WorldWideScience

Sample records for immersive virtual-reality environment

  1. A Comparative Study of Sense of Presence of Virtual Reality and Immersive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max M. North

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of sense of presence experienced in virtual reality environments has become an important area of research. The continued advancement of immersive technology offers more opportunities to examine how a subject becomes immersed in and interacts with a variety of virtual environments. The primary purpose of this research is to study the sense of presence while interacting with a traditional Virtual Reality Environment (Helmet-based system with a Head-tracking device and compare it with a virtual reality environment using an Immersive Environment (Spherical-based Visualization environment. Two empirical experiments were investigated in this study, each consisting of thirty-five subjects. A virtual airplane scenario was created and simulated for the participants of both environments. Participants were given several questionnaires after completing the simulation. This study mainly focused on question 9 and 10 of that survey, which dealt with how much the participant felt present in the virtual environment, and if the presence of the real world could still be experienced while in the virtual environment. We found that the subjects felt more involved with the virtual environment while using the Immersive Environment simulation versus using the traditional helmet-based Virtual Reality Environment. There was a statistically significant difference in questions 9 and 10 between the Immersive Environment and traditional Virtual Reality Environment when those questions are considered in isolation. However there was not a significant difference in the total sense of presence between the two environments after analyzing the questions together. The primary differences between the questions were analyzed using the overall mean and the standard deviation. The Immersive Environment has a smaller deviation than the traditional Virtual Reality Environment, implying that the sense of presence response is more concentrated. However, the overall results

  2. Immersive Environments and Virtual Reality: Systematic Review and Advances in Communication, Interaction and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Rubio-Tamayo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, virtual reality and immersive environments are lines of research which can be applied to numerous scientific and educational domains. Immersive digital media needs new approaches regarding its interactive and immersive features, which means the design of new narratives and relationships with users. Additionally, ICT (information and communication theory evolves through more immersive and interactive scenarios, it being necessary to design and conceive new forms of representing information and improving users’ interaction with immersive environments. Virtual reality and technologies associated with the virtuality continuum, such as immersive and digital environments, are emerging media. As a medium, this approach may help to build and represent ideas and concepts, as well as developing new languages. This review analyses the cutting-edge expressive, interactive and representative potential of immersive digital technologies. It also considers future possibilities regarding the evolution of these immersive technologies, such as virtual reality, in coming years, in order to apply them to diverse scientific, artistic or informational and educational domains. We conclude that virtual reality is an ensemble of technological innovations, but also a concept, and propose models to link it with the latest in other domains such as UX (user experience, interaction design. This concept can help researchers and developers to design new experiences and conceive new expressive models that can be applied to a wide range of scientific lines of research and educational dynamics.

  3. Feasibility of Using an Augmented Immersive Virtual Reality Learning Environment to Enhance Music Conducting Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Evelyn K.; Price, Harry E.; Russell, Christine R.

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring nonverbal skills necessary to appropriately communicate and educate members of performing ensembles is essential for wind band conductors. Virtual reality learning environments (VRLEs) provide a unique setting for developing these proficiencies. For this feasibility study, we used an augmented immersive VRLE to enhance eye contact, torso…

  4. Immersive virtual reality simulations in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmon, Carol A; Brown, Leonard; Ghosh, Sumit; Mikitiuk, Artur

    2010-01-01

    This article explores immersive virtual reality as a potential educational strategy for nursing education and describes an immersive learning experience now being developed for nurses. This pioneering project is a virtual reality application targeting speed and accuracy of nurse response in emergency situations requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Other potential uses and implications for the development of virtual reality learning programs are discussed.

  5. Applications and a Three-dimensional Desktop Environment for an Immersive Virtual Reality System

    CERN Document Server

    Kageyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    We developed an application launcher called Multiverse for scientific visualizations in a CAVE-type virtual reality (VR) system. Multiverse can be regarded as a type of three-dimensional (3D) desktop environment. In Multiverse, a user in a CAVE room can browse multiple visualization applications with 3D icons and explore movies that float in the air. Touching one of the movies causes "teleportation" into the application's VR space. After analyzing the simulation data using the application, the user can jump back into Multiverse's VR desktop environment in the CAVE.

  6. Manifold compositions, music visualization, and scientific sonification in an immersive virtual-reality environment.

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    Kaper, H. G.

    1998-01-05

    An interdisciplinary project encompassing sound synthesis, music composition, sonification, and visualization of music is facilitated by the high-performance computing capabilities and the virtual-reality environments available at Argonne National Laboratory. The paper describes the main features of the project's centerpiece, DIASS (Digital Instrument for Additive Sound Synthesis); ''A.N.L.-folds'', an equivalence class of compositions produced with DIASS; and application of DIASS in two experiments in the sonification of complex scientific data. Some of the larger issues connected with this project, such as the changing ways in which both scientists and composers perform their tasks, are briefly discussed.

  7. From toy to tool: the development of immersive virtual reality environments for psychotherapy of specific phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinger, A H; Roessler, A; Mueller-Spahn, F

    1998-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) entered the mental health field some years ago. While the technology itself has been available for more than ten years now, there is still a certain amount of uncertainty among researchers and users as to whether VR will one day fulfill all it's promises. In this chapter we are giving an overview of the implementation of the technology in our mental health research facility in Basel, Switzerland. The development of two applications for use with claustrophobic and acrophobic patients perspectively serves just as an example within this context. Some may say, the chapter is too much based on technical considerations. Strictly speaking, VR is pure technology, even knowing that this special form of technology has sensory, psychological and even philosophical implications not known from other human computer interfaces so far. As far as we are concerned, the development of the technology for use within the mental health sector has merely just begun. As today's mostly used immersive output devices (Head-mounted Displays, shutter glasses) do not have a satisfactory resolution, do restrict movements and prevent multi-user-capabilities, there will be a soar of mental health applications the day some or at least the most important of these obstacles have been overcome.

  8. Deep immersion with Kasina: an exploration of meditation and concentration within virtual reality environments

    OpenAIRE

    Moseley, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    The matching of established meditation techniques and new technologies offer intriguing possibilities for exploring how particular states of mind can be enhanced and become an inducible target. The Kasina method of developing meditation skills can be utilized for exploring and enhancing such states within VR. A comparison of various techniques is involved, together with virtual immersion, entrainment and biofeedback through EEG, also known here as Deep Immersion.

  9. Data Visualization Using Immersive Virtual Reality Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioc, Alexandru; Djorgovski, S. G.; Donalek, C.; Lawler, E.; Sauer, F.; Longo, G.

    2013-01-01

    The growing complexity of scientific data poses serious challenges for an effective visualization. Data sets, e.g., catalogs of objects detected in sky surveys, can have a very high dimensionality, ~ 100 - 1000. Visualizing such hyper-dimensional data parameter spaces is essentially impossible, but there are ways of visualizing up to ~ 10 dimensions in a pseudo-3D display. We have been experimenting with the emerging technologies of immersive virtual reality (VR) as a platform for a scientific, interactive, collaborative data visualization. Our initial experiments used the virtual world of Second Life, and more recently VR worlds based on its open source code, OpenSimulator. There we can visualize up to ~ 100,000 data points in ~ 7 - 8 dimensions (3 spatial and others encoded as shapes, colors, sizes, etc.), in an immersive virtual space where scientists can interact with their data and with each other. We are now developing a more scalable visualization environment using the popular (practically an emerging standard) Unity 3D Game Engine, coded using C#, JavaScript, and the Unity Scripting Language. This visualization tool can be used through a standard web browser, or a standalone browser of its own. Rather than merely plotting data points, the application creates interactive three-dimensional objects of various shapes, colors, and sizes, and of course the XYZ positions, encoding various dimensions of the parameter space, that can be associated interactively. Multiple users can navigate through this data space simultaneously, either with their own, independent vantage points, or with a shared view. At this stage ~ 100,000 data points can be easily visualized within seconds on a simple laptop. The displayed data points can contain linked information; e.g., upon a clicking on a data point, a webpage with additional information can be rendered within the 3D world. A range of functionalities has been already deployed, and more are being added. We expect to make this

  10. A Study on Immersion of Hand Interaction for Mobile Platform Virtual Reality Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghun Han

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes gaze-based hand interaction, which is helpful for improving the user’s immersion in the production process of virtual reality content for the mobile platform, and analyzes efficiency through an experiment using a questionnaire. First, three-dimensional interactive content is produced for use in the proposed interaction experiment while presenting an experiential environment that gives users a high sense of immersion in the mobile virtual reality environment. This is designed to induce the tension and concentration of users in line with the immersive virtual reality environment. Additionally, a hand interaction method based on gaze—which is mainly used for the entry of mobile virtual reality content—is proposed as a design method for immersive mobile virtual reality environment. The user satisfaction level of the immersive environment provided by the proposed gaze-based hand interaction is analyzed through experiments in comparison with the general method that uses gaze only. Furthermore, detailed analysis is conducted by dividing the effects of the proposed interaction method on user’s psychology into positive factors such as immersion and interest and negative factors such as virtual reality (VR sickness and dizziness. In this process, a new direction is proposed for improving the immersion of users in the production of mobile platform virtual reality content.

  11. Immersive Virtual Reality for Pediatric Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Andrea Stevenson; Bailey, Jakki; Bailenson, Jeremy; Tataru, Christine; Yoon, Isabel A; Golianu, Brenda

    2017-06-23

    Children must often endure painful procedures as part of their treatment for various medical conditions. Those with chronic pain endure frequent or constant discomfort in their daily lives, sometimes severely limiting their physical capacities. With the advent of affordable consumer-grade equipment, clinicians have access to a promising and engaging intervention for pediatric pain, both acute and chronic. In addition to providing relief from acute and procedural pain, virtual reality (VR) may also help to provide a corrective psychological and physiological environment to facilitate rehabilitation for pediatric patients suffering from chronic pain. The special qualities of VR such as presence, interactivity, customization, social interaction, and embodiment allow it to be accepted by children and adolescents and incorporated successfully into their existing medical therapies. However, the powerful and transformative nature of many VR experiences may also pose some risks and should be utilized with caution. In this paper, we review recent literature in pediatric virtual reality for procedural pain and anxiety, acute and chronic pain, and some rehabilitation applications. We also discuss the practical considerations of using VR in pediatric care, and offer specific suggestions and information for clinicians wishing to adopt these engaging therapies into their daily clinical practice.

  12. Immersive Virtual Reality for Pediatric Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Andrea Stevenson; Bailey, Jakki; Bailenson, Jeremy; Tataru, Christine; Yoon, Isabel A.; Golianu, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Children must often endure painful procedures as part of their treatment for various medical conditions. Those with chronic pain endure frequent or constant discomfort in their daily lives, sometimes severely limiting their physical capacities. With the advent of affordable consumer-grade equipment, clinicians have access to a promising and engaging intervention for pediatric pain, both acute and chronic. In addition to providing relief from acute and procedural pain, virtual reality (VR) may also help to provide a corrective psychological and physiological environment to facilitate rehabilitation for pediatric patients suffering from chronic pain. The special qualities of VR such as presence, interactivity, customization, social interaction, and embodiment allow it to be accepted by children and adolescents and incorporated successfully into their existing medical therapies. However, the powerful and transformative nature of many VR experiences may also pose some risks and should be utilized with caution. In this paper, we review recent literature in pediatric virtual reality for procedural pain and anxiety, acute and chronic pain, and some rehabilitation applications. We also discuss the practical considerations of using VR in pediatric care, and offer specific suggestions and information for clinicians wishing to adopt these engaging therapies into their daily clinical practice. PMID:28644422

  13. Influence of Landmarks on Wayfinding and Brain Connectivity in Immersive Virtual Reality Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Greeshma; Kaushal, Yash; Chandra, Sushil; Singh, Vijander; Mittal, Alok P; Dutt, Varun

    2017-01-01

    Spatial navigation is influenced by landmarks, which are prominent visual features in the environment. Although previous research has focused on finding advantages of landmarks on wayfinding via experimentation; however, less attention has been given to identifying the key attributes of landmarks that facilitate wayfinding, including the study of neural correlates (involving electroencephalogram, EEG analyses). In this paper, we combine behavioral measures, virtual environment, and EEG signal-processing to provide a holistic investigation about the influence of landmarks on performance during navigation in a maze-like environment. In an experiment, participants were randomly divided into two conditions, Landmark-enriched (LM+; N = 17) and Landmark-devoid (LM-; N = 18), and asked to navigate from an initial location to a goal location in a maze. In the LM+ condition, there were landmarks placed at certain locations, which participants could use for wayfinding in the maze. However, in the LM- condition, such landmarks were not present. Beyond behavioral analyses of data, analyses were carried out of the EEG data collected using a 64-channel device. Results revealed that participants took less time and committed fewer errors in navigating the maze in the LM+ condition compared to the LM- condition. EEG analyses of the data revealed that the left-hemispheric activation was more prominent in the LM+ condition compared to the LM- condition. The event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) of the theta frequency band, revealed activation in the left posterior inferior and superior regions in the LM+ condition compared to the LM- condition, suggesting an occurrence of an object-location binding in the LM+ condition along with spatial transformation between representations. Moreover, directed transfer function method, which measures information flow between two regions, showed a higher number of active channels in the LM- condition compared to the LM+ condition

  14. A Study on Immersion of Hand Interaction for Mobile Platform Virtual Reality Contents

    OpenAIRE

    Seunghun Han; Jinmo Kim

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes gaze-based hand interaction, which is helpful for improving the user’s immersion in the production process of virtual reality content for the mobile platform, and analyzes efficiency through an experiment using a questionnaire. First, three-dimensional interactive content is produced for use in the proposed interaction experiment while presenting an experiential environment that gives users a high sense of immersion in the mobile virtual reality environment. This is design...

  15. Virtual Reality: immersed in the structural world

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, Aimee; McPolin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality is a rapidly emerging technology, driven by the computer gaming industry. The maturity of the concept, combined with modern hardware, is delivering an experience which offers a useful commercial tool for industry and educators. This article discusses the uses of virtual reality within structural engineering and provides an understanding of how it can be incorporated easily and efficiently for design purposes and beyond.

  16. Upper limb rehabilitation after spinal cord injury: a treatment based on a data glove and an immersive virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimbwadyo-Terrer, Iris; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Aznar, Miguel A; Alcubilla, Cesar; Pérez-Nombela, Soraya; Del Ama-Espinosa, Antonio; Polonio-López, Begoña; Gil-Agudo, Ángel

    2016-08-01

    Purpose state: The aim of this preliminary study was to test a data glove, CyberTouch™, combined with a virtual reality (VR) environment, for using in therapeutic training of reaching movements after spinal cord injury (SCI). Nine patients with thoracic SCI were selected to perform a pilot study by comparing two treatments: patients in the intervention group (IG) conducted a VR training based on the use of a data glove, CyberTouch™ for 2 weeks, while patients in the control group (CG) only underwent the traditional rehabilitation. Furthermore, two functional parameters were implemented in order to assess patient's performance of the sessions: normalized trajectory lengths and repeatability. Although no statistical significance was found, the data glove group seemed to obtain clinical changes in the muscle balance (MB) and functional parameters, and in the dexterity, coordination and fine grip tests. Moreover, every patient showed variations in at least one of the functional parameters, either along Y-axis trajectory or Z-axis trajectory. This study might be a step forward for the investigation of new uses of motion capture systems in neurorehabilitation, making it possible to train activities of daily living (ADLs) in motivational environments while measuring objectively the patient's functional evolution. Implications for Rehabilitation Key findings: A motion capture application based on a data glove is presented, for being used as a virtual reality tool for rehabilitation. This application has provided objective data about patient's functional performance. What the study has added: (1) This study allows to open new areas of research based on the use of different motion capture systems as rehabilitation tools, making it possible to train Activities of Daily Living in motivational environments. (2) Furthermore, this study could be a contribution for the development of clinical protocols to identify which types of patients will benefit most from the VR

  17. Integration of immersive virtual reality in Communication Degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ubaldo Cuesta Cambra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area promotes the integration of new technologies in didactic innovation and it aims to improve skills. It has been requested by students at the Complutense University of Madrid, who have a digital native profile or millennial. This article is a study about implementation of immersive virtual reality in the practical part of the subjects related to business communication. Specifically, it applied in the subject Crisis Communication. The methodology is a survey and three focus groups for professors and students. The conclusions say that the implementation of immersive virtual reality improves the expectations and interest of students. It also improves the skills acquired and the practical part of the subjects of communication improve employment of students of the Degree, which is one of their main causes of dissatisfaction. The full implementation of mobile telephony suggests using virtual reality devices adapted to them rather than “caves” (C.A.V.E. or consoles.

  18. Context conditioning in humans using commercially available immersive Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Marijn C W; Dunsmoor, Joseph E; Mackey, Wayne E; McClay, Mason; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2017-08-17

    Despite a wealth of knowledge on how humans and nonhuman animals learn to associate meaningful events with cues in the environment, far less is known about how humans learn to associate these events with the environment itself. Progress on understanding spatiotemporal contextual processes in humans has been slow in large measure by the methodological constraint of generating and manipulating immersive spatial environments in well-controlled laboratory settings. Fortunately, immersive Virtual Reality (iVR) technology has improved appreciably and affords a relatively straightforward methodology to investigate the role of context on learning, memory, and emotion while maintaining experimental control. Here, we review context conditioning literature in humans and describe challenges to study contextual learning in humans. We then provide details for a novel context threat (fear) conditioning paradigm in humans using a commercially available VR headset and a cross-platform game engine. This paradigm resulted in the acquisition of subjective threat, threat-conditioned defensive responses, and explicit threat memory. We make the paradigm publicly available and describe obstacles and solutions to optimize future studies of context conditioning using iVR. As computer technology advances to replicate the sensation of realistic environments, there are increasing opportunities to bridge the translational gap between rodent and human research on how context modulates cognition, which may ultimately lead to more optimal treatment strategies for anxiety- and stress-related disorders.

  19. Relaxation with Immersive Natural Scenes Presented Using Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Allison P; Mayer, Michael D; Fellows, Abigail M; Cowan, Devin R; Hegel, Mark T; Buckey, Jay C

    2017-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR) can provide exposure to nature for those living in isolated confined environments. We evaluated VR-presented natural settings for reducing stress and improving mood. There were 18 participants (9 men, 9 women), ages 32 ± 12 yr, who viewed three 15-min 360° scenes (an indoor control, rural Ireland, and remote beaches). Subjects were mentally stressed with arithmetic before scenes. Electrodermal activity (EDA) and heart rate variability measured psycho-physiological arousal. The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and the 15-question Modified Reality Judgment and Presence Questionnaire (MRJPQ) measured mood and scene quality. Reductions in EDA from baseline were greater at the end of the natural scenes compared to the control scene (-0.59, -0.52, and 0.32 μS, respectively). The natural scenes reduced negative affect from baseline ( 1.2 and 1.1 points), but the control scene did not ( 0.4 points). MRJPQ scores for the control scene were lower than both natural scenes (4.9, 6.7, and 6.5 points, respectively). Within the two natural scenes, the preferred scene reduced negative affect ( 2.4 points) more than the second choice scene ( 1.8 points) and scored higher on the MRJPQ (6.8 vs. 6.4 points). Natural scene VR provided relaxation both objectively and subjectively, and scene preference had a significant effect on mood and perception of scene quality. VR may enable relaxation for people living in isolated confined environments, particularly when matched to personal preferences.Anderson AP, Mayer MD, Fellows AM, Cowan DR, Hegel MT, Buckey JC. Relaxation with immersive natural scenes presented using virtual reality. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):520526.

  20. The Immersive Virtual Reality Experience: A Typology of Users Revealed Through Multiple Correspondence Analysis Combined with Cluster Analysis Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Pedro J; Morais, Diogo; Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Saraiva, Tomaz

    2016-03-01

    Immersive virtual reality is thought to be advantageous by leading to higher levels of presence. However, and despite users getting actively involved in immersive three-dimensional virtual environments that incorporate sound and motion, there are individual factors, such as age, video game knowledge, and the predisposition to immersion, that may be associated with the quality of virtual reality experience. Moreover, one particular concern for users engaged in immersive virtual reality environments (VREs) is the possibility of side effects, such as cybersickness. The literature suggests that at least 60% of virtual reality users report having felt symptoms of cybersickness, which reduces the quality of the virtual reality experience. The aim of this study was thus to profile the right user to be involved in a VRE through head-mounted display. To examine which user characteristics are associated with the most effective virtual reality experience (lower cybersickness), a multiple correspondence analysis combined with cluster analysis technique was performed. Results revealed three distinct profiles, showing that the PC gamer profile is more associated with higher levels of virtual reality effectiveness, that is, higher predisposition to be immersed and reduced cybersickness symptoms in the VRE than console gamer and nongamer. These findings can be a useful orientation in clinical practice and future research as they help identify which users are more predisposed to benefit from immersive VREs.

  1. A Framework for Aligning Instructional Design Strategies with Affordances of CAVE Immersive Virtual Reality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Leah T.; Buss, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing availability of immersive virtual reality (IVR) systems, such as the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) and head-mounted displays, for use in education contexts is providing new opportunities and challenges for instructional designers. By highlighting the affordances of IVR specific to the CAVE, the authors emphasize the…

  2. Using Immersive Virtual Reality for Electrical Substation Training

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    Tanaka, Eduardo H.; Paludo, Juliana A.; Cordeiro, Carlúcio S.; Domingues, Leonardo R.; Gadbem, Edgar V.; Euflausino, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Usually, distribution electricians are called upon to solve technical problems found in electrical substations. In this project, we apply problem-based learning to a training program for electricians, with the help of a virtual reality environment that simulates a real substation. Using this virtual substation, users may safely practice maneuvers…

  3. Towards photorealistic and immersive virtual-reality environments for simulated prosthetic vision: integrating recent breakthroughs in consumer hardware and software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Marc P; Matteucci, Paul B; Lovell, Nigel H; Zheng, Steven; Suaning, Gregg J

    2014-01-01

    Simulated prosthetic vision (SPV) in normally sighted subjects is an established way of investigating the prospective efficacy of visual prosthesis designs in visually guided tasks such as mobility. To perform meaningful SPV mobility studies in computer-based environments, a credible representation of both the virtual scene to navigate and the experienced artificial vision has to be established. It is therefore prudent to make optimal use of existing hardware and software solutions when establishing a testing framework. The authors aimed at improving the realism and immersion of SPV by integrating state-of-the-art yet low-cost consumer technology. The feasibility of body motion tracking to control movement in photo-realistic virtual environments was evaluated in a pilot study. Five subjects were recruited and performed an obstacle avoidance and wayfinding task using either keyboard and mouse, gamepad or Kinect motion tracking. Walking speed and collisions were analyzed as basic measures for task performance. Kinect motion tracking resulted in lower performance as compared to classical input methods, yet results were more uniform across vision conditions. The chosen framework was successfully applied in a basic virtual task and is suited to realistically simulate real-world scenes under SPV in mobility research. Classical input peripherals remain a feasible and effective way of controlling the virtual movement. Motion tracking, despite its limitations and early state of implementation, is intuitive and can eliminate between-subject differences due to familiarity to established input methods.

  4. Enhancing User Immersion and Virtual Presence in Interactive Multiuser Virtual Environments through the Development and Integration of a Gesture-Centric Natural User Interface Developed from Existing Virtual Reality Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Emma-Ogbangwo, C; Cope, N; Behringer, R.; Fabri, M

    2014-01-01

    Immersion, referring to the level of physical or psychological submergence of a user within a virtual space relative to that user's consciousness of the real-world environment, has predominantly been established as an indispensable part of interactive media designs. This is most prevalent in Virtual Reality (VR) platforms, as their applications are typically reliant on user believability. With a wide variation of possible methodologies for the enhancement of this feature, the collectively rec...

  5. A Study on Immersion and Presence of a Portable Hand Haptic System for Immersive Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mingyu; Jeon, Changyu; Kim, Jinmo

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a portable hand haptic system using Leap Motion as a haptic interface that can be used in various virtual reality (VR) applications. The proposed hand haptic system was designed as an Arduino-based sensor architecture to enable a variety of tactile senses at low cost, and is also equipped with a portable wristband. As a haptic system designed for tactile feedback, the proposed system first identifies the left and right hands and then sends tactile senses (vibration and heat) to each fingertip (thumb and index finger). It is incorporated into a wearable band-type system, making its use easy and convenient. Next, hand motion is accurately captured using the sensor of the hand tracking system and is used for virtual object control, thus achieving interaction that enhances immersion. A VR application was designed with the purpose of testing the immersion and presence aspects of the proposed system. Lastly, technical and statistical tests were carried out to assess whether the proposed haptic system can provide a new immersive presence to users. According to the results of the presence questionnaire and the simulator sickness questionnaire, we confirmed that the proposed hand haptic system, in comparison to the existing interaction that uses only the hand tracking system, provided greater presence and a more immersive environment in the virtual reality. PMID:28513545

  6. A Study on Immersion and Presence of a Portable Hand Haptic System for Immersive Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mingyu; Jeon, Changyu; Kim, Jinmo

    2017-05-17

    This paper proposes a portable hand haptic system using Leap Motion as a haptic interface that can be used in various virtual reality (VR) applications. The proposed hand haptic system was designed as an Arduino-based sensor architecture to enable a variety of tactile senses at low cost, and is also equipped with a portable wristband. As a haptic system designed for tactile feedback, the proposed system first identifies the left and right hands and then sends tactile senses (vibration and heat) to each fingertip (thumb and index finger). It is incorporated into a wearable band-type system, making its use easy and convenient. Next, hand motion is accurately captured using the sensor of the hand tracking system and is used for virtual object control, thus achieving interaction that enhances immersion. A VR application was designed with the purpose of testing the immersion and presence aspects of the proposed system. Lastly, technical and statistical tests were carried out to assess whether the proposed haptic system can provide a new immersive presence to users. According to the results of the presence questionnaire and the simulator sickness questionnaire, we confirmed that the proposed hand haptic system, in comparison to the existing interaction that uses only the hand tracking system, provided greater presence and a more immersive environment in the virtual reality.

  7. A Virtual Environment Using Virtual Reality and Artificial Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Rahaman Wahab Sait; Mohammad Nazim Raza

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a model, which gives a virtual environment to a group of people who uses it. The model is integrated with an Immersible Virtual Reality (IVR) design with an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) interface which runs on internet. A user who wants to participate in the virtual environment should have the hybrid IVR and ANN model with internet connection. IVR is the advanced technology used in the model to give an experience to the people to feel a virtual environment as a re...

  8. Self-Characterstics and Sound in Immersive Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikström, Erik; Götzen, Amalia De; Serafin, Stefania

    This experiment aimed to investigate whether a user controlling a full body avatar via real time motion tracking in an immersive virtual reality setup, would estimate the weight of the virtual avatar differently if the footstep sounds are manipulated using three different audio filter settings....... The visual appearance of the avatar was available in two sizes. The subjects performed six walks with each audio configuration active once over two ground types. After completing each walk, the participants were asked to estimate the weight of the virtual avatar and the suitability of the audio feedback...

  9. Self-Characterstics and Sound in Immersive Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikström, Erik; Götzen, Amalia De; Serafin, Stefania

    This experiment aimed to investigate whether a user controlling a full body avatar via real time motion tracking in an immersive virtual reality setup, would estimate the weight of the virtual avatar differently if the footstep sounds are manipulated using three different audio filter settings....... The visual appearance of the avatar was available in two sizes. The subjects performed six walks with each audio configuration active once over two ground types. After completing each walk, the participants were asked to estimate the weight of the virtual avatar and the suitability of the audio feedback...

  10. Quality of Grasping and the Role of Haptics in a 3-D Immersive Virtual Reality Environment in Individuals With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Mindy F; Magdalon, Eliane C; Michaelsen, Stella M; Quevedo, Antonio A F

    2015-11-01

    Reaching and grasping parameters with and without haptic feedback were characterized in people with chronic post-stroke behaviors. Twelve (67 ± 10 years) individuals with chronic stroke and arm/hand paresis (Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Arm: ≥ 46/66 pts) participated. Three dimensional (3-D) temporal and spatial kinematics of reaching and grasping movements to three objects (can: cylindrical grasp; screwdriver: power grasp; pen: precision grasp) in a physical environment (PE) with and without additional haptic feedback and a 3-D virtual environment (VE) with haptic feedback were recorded. Participants reached, grasped and transported physical and virtual objects using similar movement strategies in all conditions. Reaches made in VE were less smooth and slower compared to the PE. Arm and trunk kinematics were similar in both environments and glove conditions. For grasping, stroke subjects preserved aperture scaling to object size but used wider hand apertures with longer delays between times to maximal reaching velocity and maximal grasping aperture. Wearing the glove decreased reaching velocity. Our results in a small group of subjects suggest that providing haptic information in the VE did not affect the validity of reaching and grasping movement. Small disparities in movement parameters between environments may be due to differences in perception of object distance in VE. Reach-to-grasp kinematics to smaller objects may be improved by better 3-D rendering. Comparable kinematics between environments and conditions is encouraging for the incorporation of high quality VEs in rehabilitation programs aimed at improving upper limb recovery.

  11. Implementation of the Immersive Virtual Reality Laboratory in Nuclear Engineering Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Antonio Carlos de Abreu; Grecco, Claudio Henrique dos Santos; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R.; Oliveira, Mauro Vitor de; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti; Augusto, Silas Cordeiro; Viana Filho, Alfredo Marques [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br; grecco@ien.gov.br; paulov@ien.gov.br; mvitor@ien.gov.br; luqietti@ien.gov.br; silas@ien.gov.br; marques@ien.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    The Immersive Virtual Reality Laboratory under development in Human System Interface Laboratory constitute a powerful general-purpose facility for experimental and computational work on human perception and perceptually guided action. Virtual reality or virtual environment are computer generated environments with and within people can interact. The advantage of VR is that people can be immersed by the simulated environment, which would sometimes be unavailable due to cost, safety, or perceptual restrictions in the real environment. There are many applications of virtual reality on the nuclear area. Training is one of the most common of them. A significant advantage of a virtual training environment over a real one is it's enormous flexibility. A virtual environment can be used as the basis for training in any number of different scenarios, so that trainees can learn to cope with many different situations, some of which may be impossible to prepare for any other way. Another advantage of using virtual environments for training purposes is that trainees learn by actively performing actions. This has a significant effect on their ability to retain what they learn, and is clearly superior to passive training techniques, such as videos and books, for training where spatial understanding is important. This kind of Laboratory is the first in Brazilian nuclear area. A safe virtual environment can be used to simulate a real environment that is either too dangerous, complex, or expensive to training. Virtual environments can therefore be used to increase safety standards, improve efficiency, and reduce overall training costs. (author)

  12. Towards the Holodeck: Fully Immersive Virtual Reality Visualisation of Scientific and Engineering Data

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Stefan; Estevez, Javier E.; Connor, Andy M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development and operating principles of an immersive virtual reality (VR) visualisation environment that is designed around the use of consumer VR headsets in an existing wide area motion capture suite. We present two case studies in the application areas of visualisation of scientific and engineering data. Each of these case studies utilise a different render engine, namely a custom engine for one case and a commercial game engine for the other. The advantages ...

  13. Controlling social stress in virtual reality environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartanto, Dwi; Kampmann, Isabel L; Morina, Nexhmedin; Emmelkamp, Paul G M; Neerincx, Mark A; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive) between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual reality scenarios: a neutral virtual world, blind date scenario, and job interview scenario. Results showed a significant difference between the three virtual scenarios in the level of self-reported anxiety and heart rate. In the second study, 24 participants were exposed to a job interview scenario in a virtual environment where the ratio between negative and positive dialogue feedback responses of a virtual character was systematically varied on-the-fly. Results yielded that within a dialogue the more positive dialogue feedback resulted in less self-reported anxiety, lower heart rate, and longer answers, while more negative dialogue feedback of the virtual character resulted in the opposite. The correlations between on the one hand the dialogue stressor ratio and on the other hand the means of SUD score, heart rate and audio length in the eight dialogue conditions showed a strong relationship: r(6) = 0.91, p = 0.002; r(6) = 0.76, p = 0.028 and r(6) = -0.94, p = 0.001 respectively. Furthermore, more anticipatory anxiety reported before exposure was found to coincide with more self-reported anxiety, and shorter answers during the virtual exposure. These results demonstrate that social dialogues in a virtual environment can be effectively manipulated for therapeutic purposes.

  14. Controlling social stress in virtual reality environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Hartanto

    Full Text Available Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual reality scenarios: a neutral virtual world, blind date scenario, and job interview scenario. Results showed a significant difference between the three virtual scenarios in the level of self-reported anxiety and heart rate. In the second study, 24 participants were exposed to a job interview scenario in a virtual environment where the ratio between negative and positive dialogue feedback responses of a virtual character was systematically varied on-the-fly. Results yielded that within a dialogue the more positive dialogue feedback resulted in less self-reported anxiety, lower heart rate, and longer answers, while more negative dialogue feedback of the virtual character resulted in the opposite. The correlations between on the one hand the dialogue stressor ratio and on the other hand the means of SUD score, heart rate and audio length in the eight dialogue conditions showed a strong relationship: r(6 = 0.91, p = 0.002; r(6 = 0.76, p = 0.028 and r(6 = -0.94, p = 0.001 respectively. Furthermore, more anticipatory anxiety reported before exposure was found to coincide with more self-reported anxiety, and shorter answers during the virtual exposure. These results demonstrate that social dialogues in a virtual environment can be effectively manipulated for therapeutic purposes.

  15. Controlling Social Stress in Virtual Reality Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartanto, Dwi; Kampmann, Isabel L.; Morina, Nexhmedin; Emmelkamp, Paul G. M.; Neerincx, Mark A.; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive) between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual reality scenarios: a neutral virtual world, blind date scenario, and job interview scenario. Results showed a significant difference between the three virtual scenarios in the level of self-reported anxiety and heart rate. In the second study, 24 participants were exposed to a job interview scenario in a virtual environment where the ratio between negative and positive dialogue feedback responses of a virtual character was systematically varied on-the-fly. Results yielded that within a dialogue the more positive dialogue feedback resulted in less self-reported anxiety, lower heart rate, and longer answers, while more negative dialogue feedback of the virtual character resulted in the opposite. The correlations between on the one hand the dialogue stressor ratio and on the other hand the means of SUD score, heart rate and audio length in the eight dialogue conditions showed a strong relationship: r(6) = 0.91, p = 0.002; r(6) = 0.76, p = 0.028 and r(6) = −0.94, p = 0.001 respectively. Furthermore, more anticipatory anxiety reported before exposure was found to coincide with more self-reported anxiety, and shorter answers during the virtual exposure. These results demonstrate that social dialogues in a virtual environment can be effectively manipulated for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24671006

  16. Designing a Virtual-Reality-Based, Gamelike Math Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinhao; Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the design issues related to a virtual-reality-based, gamelike learning environment (VRGLE) developed via OpenSimulator, an open-source virtual reality server. The researchers collected qualitative data to examine the VRGLE's usability, playability, and content integration for math learning. They found it important…

  17. Virtual reality exposure therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rothbaum, BO; Hodges, L; Kooper, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been proposed that virtual reality (VR) exposure may be an alternative to standard in vivo exposure. Virtual reality integrates real-time computer graphics, body tracking devices, visual displays, and other sensory input devices to immerse a participant in a computer- generated virtual environment. Virtual reality exposure is potentially an efficient and cost-effective treatment of anxiety disorders. VR exposure therapy reduced the fear of heights in the first control...

  18. Immersive and Collaborative Data Visualization Using Virtual Reality Platforms

    CERN Document Server

    Donalek, Ciro; Davidoff, Scott; Cioc, Alex; Wang, Anwell; Longo, Giuseppe; Norris, Jeffrey S; Zhang, Jerry; Lawler, Elizabeth; Yeh, Stacy; Mahabal, Ashish; Graham, Matthew; Drake, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Effective data visualization is a key part of the discovery process in the era of big data. It is the bridge between the quantitative content of the data and human intuition, and thus an essential component of the scientific path from data into knowledge and understanding. Visualization is also essential in the data mining process, directing the choice of the applicable algorithms, and in helping to identify and remove bad data from the analysis. However, a high complexity or a high dimensionality of modern data sets represents a critical obstacle. How do we visualize interesting structures and patterns that may exist in hyper-dimensional data spaces? A better understanding of how we can perceive and interact with multi dimensional information poses some deep questions in the field of cognition technology and human computer interaction. To this effect, we are exploring the use of immersive virtual reality platforms for scientific data visualization, both as software and inexpensive commodity hardware. These p...

  19. Male sexual dysfunctions: immersive virtual reality and multimedia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optale, Gabriele; Pastore, Massimiliano; Marin, Silvia; Bordin, Diego; Nasta, Alberto; Pianon, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    The study describes a therapeutic approach using psycho-dynamic psychotherapy integrating virtual environment (VE) for resolving impotence or better erectile dysfunction (ED) of presumably psychological or mixed origin and premature ejaculation (PE). The plan for therapy consists of 12 sessions (15 if a sexual partner was involved) over a 25-week period on the ontogenetic development of male sexual identity, and the methods involved the use of a laptop PC, joystick, Virtual Reality (VR) helmet with miniature television screen showing a new specially-designed CD-ROM programs using Virtools with Windows 2000 and an audio CD. This study was composed of 30 patients, 15 (10 suffering from ED and 5 PE) plus 15 control patients (10 ED and 5 PE), that underwent the same therapeutic protocol but used an old VR helmet to interact with the old VE using a PC Pentium 133 16 Mb RAM. We also compared this study with another study we carried out on 160 men affected by sexual disorders, underwent the same therapeutic protocol, but treated using a VE created (in Superscape VRT 5.6) using always Windows 2000 with portable tools. Comparing the groups of patients affected by ED and PE, there emerged a significant positive results value without any important differences among the different VE used. However, we had a % increase of undesirable physical reactions during the more realistic 15-minute VR experience using Virtools development kit. Psychotherapy alone normally requires long periods of treatment in order to resolve sexual dysfunctions. Considering the particular way in which full-immersion VR involves the subject who experiences it (he is totally unobserved and in complete privacy), we hypothesise that this methodological approach might speed up the therapeutic psycho-dynamic process, which eludes cognitive defences and directly stimulates the subconscious, and that better results could be obtained in the treatment of these sexual disorders. This method can be used by any

  20. Immersive virtual reality improves movement patterns in patients after ACL reconstruction : implications for enhanced criteria-based return-to-sport rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Bisschop, Marsha; Myer, Gregory D.; Benjaminse, Anne; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van Keeken, Helco G.; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Otten, Egbert

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of immersion in a virtual reality environment on knee biomechanics in patients after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). It was hypothesized that virtual reality techniques aimed to change attentional focus would influence altered knee flexion angle, kn

  1. Immersive virtual reality improves movement patterns in patients after ACL reconstruction : implications for enhanced criteria-based return-to-sport rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Bisschop, Marsha; Myer, Gregory D.; Benjaminse, Anne; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van Keeken, Helco G.; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Otten, Egbert

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of immersion in a virtual reality environment on knee biomechanics in patients after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). It was hypothesized that virtual reality techniques aimed to change attentional focus would influence altered knee flexion

  2. Immersive virtual reality improves movement patterns in patients after ACL reconstruction : implications for enhanced criteria-based return-to-sport rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Bisschop, Marsha; Myer, Gregory D; Benjaminse, Anne; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van Keeken, Helco G; van Raay, Jos J A M; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Otten, Egbert

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of immersion in a virtual reality environment on knee biomechanics in patients after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). It was hypothesized that virtual reality techniques aimed to change attentional focus would influence altered knee flexion

  3. A Virtual Environment Using Virtual Reality and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahaman Wahab Sait

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a model, which gives a virtual environment to a group of people who uses it. The model is integrated with an Immersible Virtual Reality (IVR design with an Artificial Neural Network (ANN interface which runs on internet. A user who wants to participate in the virtual environment should have the hybrid IVR and ANN model with internet connection. IVR is the advanced technology used in the model to give an experience to the people to feel a virtual environment as a real one and ANN used to give a shape for the characters in the virtual environment (VE. This model actually gives an illusion to the user that as if they are in the real communication environment.

  4. Virtual reality environments for post-stroke arm rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudoin Christian

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Optimal practice and feedback elements are essential requirements for maximal motor recovery in patients with motor deficits due to central nervous system lesions. Methods A virtual environment (VE was created that incorporates practice and feedback elements necessary for maximal motor recovery. It permits varied and challenging practice in a motivating environment that provides salient feedback. Results The VE gives the user knowledge of results feedback about motor behavior and knowledge of performance feedback about the quality of pointing movements made in a virtual elevator. Movement distances are related to length of body segments. Conclusion We describe an immersive and interactive experimental protocol developed in a virtual reality environment using the CAREN system. The VE can be used as a training environment for the upper limb in patients with motor impairments.

  5. Immersion factors affecting perception and behaviour in a virtual reality power wheelchair simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaer, Abdulaziz; Regenbrecht, Holger; O'Hare, David

    2017-01-01

    Virtual Reality based driving simulators are increasingly used to train and assess users' abilities to operate vehicles in a controlled and safe way. For the development of those simulators it is important to identify and evaluate design factors affecting perception, behaviour, and driving performance. In an exemplary power wheelchair simulator setting we identified the three immersion factors display type (head-mounted display v monitor), ability to freely change the field of view (FOV), and the visualisation of the user's avatar as potentially affecting perception and behaviour. In a study with 72 participants we found all three factors affected the participants' sense of presence in the virtual environment. In particular the display type significantly affected both perceptual and behavioural measures whereas FOV only affected behavioural measures. Our findings could guide future Virtual Reality simulator designers to evoke targeted user behaviours and perceptions.

  6. A Practical Guide, with Theoretical Underpinnings, for Creating Effective Virtual Reality Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Eileen A.; Domingo, Jelia

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of open source virtual environments, the associated cost reductions, and the more flexible options, avatar-based virtual reality environments are within reach of educators. By using and repurposing readily available virtual environments, instructors can bring engaging, community-building, and immersive learning opportunities to…

  7. A Practical Guide, with Theoretical Underpinnings, for Creating Effective Virtual Reality Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Eileen A.; Domingo, Jelia

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of open source virtual environments, the associated cost reductions, and the more flexible options, avatar-based virtual reality environments are within reach of educators. By using and repurposing readily available virtual environments, instructors can bring engaging, community-building, and immersive learning opportunities to…

  8. Immersive virtual reality as a teaching tool for neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, Katelyn; Zeiger, Joshua; Hanchuk, Stephanie; Del Signore, Anthony; Shrivastava, Raj; Govindaraj, Satish; Iloreta, Alfred

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer modeling and interactive virtual reality (VR) simulation are validated teaching techniques used throughout medical disciplines. Little objective data exists supporting its use in teaching clinical anatomy. Learner motivation is thought to limit the rate of utilization of such novel technologies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness, satisfaction, and motivation associated with immersive VR simulation in teaching medical students neuroanatomy. Images of normal cerebral anatomy were reconstructed from human Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) computed tomography (CT) imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) into 3D VR formats compatible with the Oculus Rift VR System, a head-mounted display with tracking capabilities allowing for an immersive VR experience. The ventricular system and cerebral vasculature were highlighted and labeled to create a focused interactive model. We conducted a randomized controlled study with 66 medical students (33 in both the control and experimental groups). Pertinent neuroanatomical structures were studied using either online textbooks or the VR interactive model, respectively. We then evaluated the students' anatomy knowledge, educational experience, and motivation (using the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey [IMMS], a previously validated assessment). There was no significant difference in anatomy knowledge between the 2 groups on preintervention, postintervention, or retention quizzes. The VR group found the learning experience to be significantly more engaging, enjoyable, and useful (all p teaching neuroanatomy. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  9. Controlling social stress in virtual reality environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartanto, D.; Kampmann, I.L.; Morina, N.; Emmelkamp, P.G.M.; Neerincx, M.A.; Brinkman, W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: t

  10. Virtual Reality: A New Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrington, Gary; Loge, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    Discusses virtual reality (VR) technology and its possible uses in military training, medical education, industrial design and development, the media industry, and education. Three primary applications of VR in the learning process--visualization, simulation, and construction of virtual worlds--are described, and pedagogical and moral issues are…

  11. 3D Vision in a Virtual Reality Robotics Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Schütz, Christian L.; Natonek, Emerico; Baur, Charles; Hügli, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Virtual reality robotics (VRR) needs sensing feedback from the real environment. To show how advanced 3D vision provides new perspectives to fulfill these needs, this paper presents an architecture and system that integrates hybrid 3D vision and VRR and reports about experiments and results. The first section discusses the advantages of virtual reality in robotics, the potential of a 3D vision system in VRR and the contribution of a knowledge database, robust control and the combination of in...

  12. Controlling Social Stress in Virtual Reality Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hartanto, Dwi; Kampmann, Isabel L.; Morina, Nexhmedin; Paul G M Emmelkamp; Neerincx, Mark A.; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive) between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual r...

  13. Controlling social stress in virtual reality environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hartanto, D.; Kampmann, I.L.; Morina, N; Emmelkamp, P.G.M.; Neerincx, M.A.; Brinkman, W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive) between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual r...

  14. Controlling social stress in virtual reality environments

    OpenAIRE

    Dwi Hartanto; Kampmann, Isabel L.; Nexhmedin Morina; Emmelkamp, Paul G. M.; Neerincx, Mark A.; Willem-Paul Brinkman

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive) between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual r...

  15. Immersive virtual reality and environmental noise assessment: An innovative audio–visual approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruotolo, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.ruotolo@unina2.it [Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy); Maffei, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.maffei@unina2.it [Department of Architecture and Industrial Design, Second University of Naples, Abazia di S. Lorenzo, 81031, Aversa (Italy); Di Gabriele, Maria, E-mail: maria.digabriele@unina2.it [Department of Architecture and Industrial Design, Second University of Naples, Abazia di S. Lorenzo, 81031, Aversa (Italy); Iachini, Tina, E-mail: santa.iachini@unina2.it [Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy); Masullo, Massimiliano, E-mail: massimiliano.masullo@unina2.it [Department of Architecture and Industrial Design, Second University of Naples, Abazia di S. Lorenzo, 81031, Aversa (Italy); Ruggiero, Gennaro, E-mail: gennaro.ruggiero@unina2.it [Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy); Senese, Vincenzo Paolo, E-mail: vincenzopaolo.senese@unina2.it [Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy); Psychometric Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Several international studies have shown that traffic noise has a negative impact on people's health and that people's annoyance does not depend only on noise energetic levels, but rather on multi-perceptual factors. The combination of virtual reality technology and audio rendering techniques allow us to experiment a new approach for environmental noise assessment that can help to investigate in advance the potential negative effects of noise associated with a specific project and that in turn can help designers to make educated decisions. In the present study, the audio–visual impact of a new motorway project on people has been assessed by means of immersive virtual reality technology. In particular, participants were exposed to 3D reconstructions of an actual landscape without the projected motorway (ante operam condition), and of the same landscape with the projected motorway (post operam condition). Furthermore, individuals' reactions to noise were assessed by means of objective cognitive measures (short term verbal memory and executive functions) and subjective evaluations (noise and visual annoyance). Overall, the results showed that the introduction of a projected motorway in the environment can have immediate detrimental effects of people's well-being depending on the distance from the noise source. In particular, noise due to the new infrastructure seems to exert a negative influence on short term verbal memory and to increase both visual and noise annoyance. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. -- Highlights: ► Impact of traffic noise on people's well-being depends on multi-perceptual factors. ► A multisensory virtual reality technology is used to simulate a projected motorway. ► Effects on short-term memory and auditory and visual subjective annoyance were found. ► The closer the distance from the motorway the stronger was the effect. ► Multisensory virtual reality methodologies

  16. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Immersive Virtual Reality Analgesia during Physical Therapy for Pediatric Burn Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Yuko S.; Hoffman, Hunter G.; Blough, David K.; Patterson, David R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Soltani, Maryam; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Nakamura, Dana; Sharar, Sam R.

    2010-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, within-subjects (crossover design) study examined the effects of immersive virtual reality as an adjunctive analgesic technique for hospitalized pediatric burn inpatients undergoing painful physical therapy. Fifty-four subjects (6–19 years old) performed range-of-motion exercises under a therapist’s direction for one to five days. During each session, subjects spent equivalent time in both the virtual reality and the control conditions (treatment order randomized and counterbalanced). Graphic rating scale scores assessing the sensory, affective, and cognitive components of pain were obtained for each treatment condition. Secondary outcomes assessed subjects’ perception of the virtual reality experience and maximum range-of-motion. Results showed that on study day one, subjects reported significant decreases (27–44%) in pain ratings during virtual reality. They also reported improved affect (“fun”) during virtual reality. The analgesia and affect improvements were maintained with repeated virtual reality use over multiple therapy sessions. Maximum range-of-motion was not different between treatment conditions, but was significantly greater after the second treatment condition (regardless of treatment order). These results suggest that immersive virtual reality is an effective nonpharmacologic, adjunctive pain reduction technique in the pediatric burn population undergoing painful rehabilitation therapy. The magnitude of the analgesic effect is clinically meaningful and is maintained with repeated use. PMID:20692769

  17. A randomized, controlled trial of immersive virtual reality analgesia, during physical therapy for pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Yuko S; Hoffman, Hunter G; Blough, David K; Patterson, David R; Jensen, Mark P; Soltani, Maryam; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Nakamura, Dana; Sharar, Sam R

    2011-02-01

    This randomized, controlled, within-subjects (crossover design) study examined the effects of immersive virtual reality as an adjunctive analgesic technique for hospitalized pediatric burn inpatients undergoing painful physical therapy. Fifty-four subjects (6-19 years old) performed range-of-motion exercises under a therapist's direction for 1-5 days. During each session, subjects spent equivalent time in both the virtual reality and the control conditions (treatment order randomized and counterbalanced). Graphic rating scale scores assessing the sensory, affective, and cognitive components of pain were obtained for each treatment condition. Secondary outcomes assessed subjects' perception of the virtual reality experience and maximum range-of-motion. Results showed that on study day one, subjects reported significant decreases (27-44%) in pain ratings during virtual reality. They also reported improved affect ("fun") during virtual reality. The analgesia and affect improvements were maintained with repeated virtual reality use over multiple therapy sessions. Maximum range-of-motion was not different between treatment conditions, but was significantly greater after the second treatment condition (regardless of treatment order). These results suggest that immersive virtual reality is an effective nonpharmacologic, adjunctive pain reduction technique in the pediatric burn population undergoing painful rehabilitation therapy. The magnitude of the analgesic effect is clinically meaningful and is maintained with repeated use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Virtual reality exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbaum, B O; Hodges, L; Kooper, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been proposed that virtual reality (VR) exposure may be an alternative to standard in vivo exposure. Virtual reality integrates real-time computer graphics, body tracking devices, visual displays, and other sensory input devices to immerse a participant in a computer-generated virtual environment. Virtual reality exposure is potentially an efficient and cost-effective treatment of anxiety disorders. VR exposure therapy reduced the fear of heights in the first controlled study of virtual reality in treatment of a psychiatric disorder. A case study supported the efficacy of VR exposure therapy for the fear of flying. The potential for virtual reality exposure treatment for these and other disorders is explored, and therapeutic issues surrounding the delivery of VR exposure are discussed.

  19. Envisioning the future of home care: applications of immersive virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Arnott Smith, Catherine; Ponto, Kevin; Radwin, Robert; Kreutz, Kendra

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating the design of technologies to support health in the home requires 1) better understanding of how the household context shapes consumer health behaviors and (2) the opportunity to afford engineers, designers, and health professionals the chance to systematically study the home environment. We developed the Living Environments Laboratory (LEL) with a fully immersive, six-sided virtual reality CAVE to enable recreation of a broad range of household environments. We have successfully developed a virtual apartment, including a kitchen, living space, and bathroom. Over 2000 people have visited the LEL CAVE. Participants use an electronic wand to activate common household affordances such as opening a refrigerator door or lifting a cup. Challenges currently being explored include creating natural gesture to interface with virtual objects, developing robust, simple procedures to capture actual living environments and rendering them in a 3D visualization, and devising systematic stable terminologies to characterize home environments.

  20. Language Learning in Virtual Reality Environments: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsun-Ju; Lan, Yu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the research trends in language learning in a virtual reality environment by conducting a content analysis of findings published in the literature from 2004 to 2013 in four top ranked computer-assisted language learning journals: "Language Learning & Technology," "CALICO Journal," "Computer…

  1. Language Learning in Virtual Reality Environments: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsun-Ju; Lan, Yu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the research trends in language learning in a virtual reality environment by conducting a content analysis of findings published in the literature from 2004 to 2013 in four top ranked computer-assisted language learning journals: "Language Learning & Technology," "CALICO Journal," "Computer…

  2. Using Virtual Reality Environment to Improve Joint Attention Associated with Pervasive Developmental Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yufang; Huang, Ruowen

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study is using data glove to practice Joint attention skill in virtual reality environment for people with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD). The virtual reality environment provides a safe environment for PDD people. Especially, when they made errors during practice in virtual reality environment, there is no suffering or…

  3. Using Virtual Reality Environment to Improve Joint Attention Associated with Pervasive Developmental Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yufang; Huang, Ruowen

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study is using data glove to practice Joint attention skill in virtual reality environment for people with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD). The virtual reality environment provides a safe environment for PDD people. Especially, when they made errors during practice in virtual reality environment, there is no suffering or…

  4. The effect of degree of immersion upon learning performance in virtual reality simulations for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Fátima; Pierce, Jennifer; Vergara, Víctor M; Coulter, Robert; Saland, Linda; Caudell, Thomas P; Goldsmith, Timothy E; Alverson, Dale C

    2007-01-01

    Simulations are being used in education and training to enhance understanding, improve performance, and assess competence. However, it is important to measure the performance of these simulations as learning and training tools. This study examined and compared knowledge acquisition using a knowledge structure design. The subjects were first-year medical students at The University of New Mexico School of Medicine. One group used a fully immersed virtual reality (VR) environment using a head mounted display (HMD) and another group used a partially immersed (computer screen) VR environment. The study aims were to determine whether there were significant differences between the two groups as measured by changes in knowledge structure before and after the VR simulation experience. The results showed that both groups benefited from the VR simulation training as measured by the significant increased similarity to the expert knowledge network after the training experience. However, the immersed group showed a significantly higher gain than the partially immersed group. This study demonstrated a positive effect of VR simulation on learning as reflected by improvements in knowledge structure but an enhanced effect of full-immersion using a HMD vs. a screen-based VR system.

  5. History Educators and the Challenge of Immersive Pasts: A Critical Review of Virtual Reality "Tools" and History Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper will undertake a critical review of the impact of virtual reality tools on the teaching of history. Virtual reality is useful in several different ways. History educators, elementary and secondary school teachers and professors, can all profit from the digital environment. Challenges arise quickly however. Virtual reality technologies…

  6. Collaborative virtual reality environments for computational science and design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papka, M. E.

    1998-02-17

    The authors are developing a networked, multi-user, virtual-reality-based collaborative environment coupled to one or more petaFLOPs computers, enabling the interactive simulation of 10{sup 9} atom systems. The purpose of this work is to explore the requirements for this coupling. Through the design, development, and testing of such systems, they hope to gain knowledge that allows computational scientists to discover and analyze their results more quickly and in a more intuitive manner.

  7. Virtual Reality Website of Indonesia National Monument and Its Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardijono, B. A.; Hendajani, F.; Sudiro, S. A.

    2017-02-01

    National Monument (Monumen Nasional) is an Indonesia National Monument building where located in Jakarta. This monument is a symbol of Jakarta and it is a pride monument of the people in Jakarta and Indonesia country. This National Monument also has a museum about the history of the Indonesian country. To provide information to the general public, in this research we created and developed models of 3D graphics from the National Monument and the surrounding environment. Virtual Reality technology was used to display the visualization of the National Monument and the surrounding environment in 3D graphics form. Latest programming technology makes it possible to display 3D objects via the internet browser. This research used Unity3D and WebGL to make virtual reality models that can be implemented and showed on a Website. The result from this research is the development of 3-dimensional Website of the National Monument and its objects surrounding the environment that can be displayed through the Web browser. The virtual reality of whole objects was divided into a number of scenes, so that it can be displayed in real time visualization.

  8. Modeling and Optimization of a Tree Based on Virtual Reality for Immersive Virtual Landscape Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmo Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a modeling method that can effectively generate multiple diverse digital trees for creating immersive virtual landscape based on virtual reality and an optimization method for real-time rendering. The proposed method simplifies a process of procedures from growth of tree models to the generation of the three-dimensional branch geometric model. Here, the procedural branch graph (PBG algorithm is proposed, which simultaneously and effectively generates diverse trees that have a similar branch pattern. Moreover, the optimization method is designed in a polygon-based branch model which controls the resolution of tree models according to the distance from the camera to generate a tree model structure that is appropriate for an immersive system based on virtual reality. Finally, a virtual reality system is established based on the Oculus SDK (Software Development Kit and Unity3D engine. In this process, the image processing-based pixel to tree (PTT method is proposed as a technique for easily and efficiently generating a virtual landscape by allocating multiple trees on terrain. An immersive virtual landscape that has a stereoscopic perception and spatial impression is created through the proposed method and whether it can deliver experience of nature in virtual reality to the users was checked through an experiment.

  9. Utility of virtual reality environments to examine physiological reactivity and subjective distress in adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Shelley B; Brinton, James M; Hancock, Adrienne B

    2016-12-01

    Virtual reality environments (VREs) allow for immersion in speaking environments that mimic real-life interactions while maintaining researcher control. VREs have been used successfully to engender arousal in other disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of virtual reality environments to examine physiological reactivity and subjective ratings of distress in persons who stutter (PWS). Subjective and objective measures of arousal were collected from 10PWS during four-minute speeches to a virtual audience and to a virtual empty room. Stuttering frequency and physiological measures (skin conductance level and heart rate) did not differ across speaking conditions, but subjective ratings of distress were significantly higher in the virtual audience condition compared to the virtual empty room. VREs have utility in elevating subjective ratings of distress in PWS. VREs have the potential to be useful tools for practicing treatment targets in a safe, controlled, and systematic manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Virtual reality and claustrophobia: multiple components therapy involving game editor virtual environments exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbos, E; Mestre, D R; Note, I D; Gellato, C

    2008-12-01

    The effectiveness of a multiple components therapy regarding claustrophobia and involving virtual reality (VR) will be demonstrated through a trial which immersed six claustrophobic patients in multiple context-graded enclosed virtual environments (VE) using affordable VR apparatus and software. The results of the questionnaires and behavior tests exhibited a significant reduction in fear towards the enclosed space and quality of life improvement. Such gains were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Presence score indicated the patients felt immersed and present inside the game editor VE.

  11. Immersive virtual reality used as a platform for perioperative training for surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, D B; Hoskins, J D; Mastrangelo, M J; Witzke, W O; Chu, U B; Pande, S; Park, A E

    2001-01-01

    Perioperative preparations such as operating room setup, patient and equipment positioning, and operating port placement are essential to operative success in minimally invasive surgery. We developed an immersive virtual reality-based training system (REMIS) to provide residents (and other health professionals) with training and evaluation in these perioperative skills. Our program uses the qualities of immersive VR that are available today for inclusion in an ongoing training curriculum for surgical residents. The current application consists of a primary platform for patient positioning for a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Having completed this module we can create many different simulated problems for other procedures. As a part of the simulation, we have devised a computer-driven real-time data collection system to help us in evaluating trainees and providing feedback during the simulation. The REMIS program trains and evaluates surgical residents and obviates the need to use expensive operating room and surgeon time. It also allows residents to train based on their schedule and does not put patients at increased risk. The method is standardized, allows for repetition if needed, evaluates individual performance, provides the possible complications of incorrect choices, provides training in 3-D environment, and has the capability of being used for various scenarios and professions.

  12. An Exploratory fNIRS Study with Immersive Virtual Reality: A New Method for Technical Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eSeraglia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available For over two decades Virtual Reality has been used as a useful tool in several fields, from medical and psychological treatments, to industrial and military applications. Only in recent years researchers have begun to study the neural correlates that subtend virtual reality experiences. Even if the fMRI brain image technique is the most common and used technique, it suffers several limitations and problems. Here we present a methodology that involves the use of a new and growing brain imaging technique, fNIRS functional Near-infrared Spectroscopy, while participants experience immersive virtual reality. In order to allow a proper fNIRS probe application, a custom-made virtual reality helmet was created. To test the adapted helmet, a virtual version of the line bisection task was used. Participants could bisect the lines in a virtual peripersonal or extrapersonal space, through the manipulation of a Wiimote controller in order for the participants to move a virtual laser pointer. Although no neural correlates of the dissociation between peripersonal and extrapersonal space were found, a significant hemodynamic activity with respect to the baseline was present in the right parietal and occipital areas. Both advantages and disadvantages of the presented methodology are discussed.

  13. Smartphone applications for immersive virtual reality therapy for internet addiction and internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M

    2017-01-01

    There have been rapid advances in technologies over the past decade and virtual reality technology is an area which is increasingly utilized as a healthcare intervention in many disciplines including that of Medicine, Surgery and Psychiatry. In Psychiatry, most of the current interventions involving the usage of virtual reality technology is limited to its application for anxiety disorders. With the advances in technology, Internet addiction and Internet gaming disorders are increasingly prevalent. To date, these disorders are still being treated using conventional psychotherapy methods such as cognitive behavioural therapy. However, there is an increasing number of research combining various other therapies alongside with cognitive behavioural therapy, as an attempt possibly to reduce the drop-out rates and to make such interventions more relevant to the targeted group of addicts, who are mostly adolescents. To date, there has been a prior study done in Korea that has demonstrated the comparable efficacy of virtual reality therapy with that of cognitive behavioural therapy. However, the intervention requires the usage of specialized screens and devices. It is thus the objective of the current article to highlight how smartphone applications could be designed and be utilized for immersive virtual reality treatment, alongside low cost wearables.

  14. Collaborative Integration of Classic Applications in Virtual Reality Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kopecki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available When working collaboratively with others, it is often difficult to bring existing applications into the collaboration process. In this paper, an approach is shown how to enable different applications to work collaboratively. It enables a user to do three things: First, the ability to work collaboratively with the application of choice, selecting those applications that fit the need of the scenario best, and the user is comfortable to employ. Second, the user can work in the environment he chooses, even if the application is not specifically designed for this environment like Virtual Reality Environments or mobile devices. Third, the technology presented makes it possible to mesh applications to gain new functionalities not found in the original applications by connecting those applications and making them interoperable. Taking a Virtual Reality Environment and a standard office application, the use and fitness of this approach is shown. It should be specifically noted that the work underlying this paper is not specifically on multimodal usage of Virtual Environments, although it is used that way here, but rather showing a concept of meshing application capabilities to implement “Meta-Applications” that offer functionality beyond their original design.

  15. Fire training in a virtual-reality environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Jurgen; Bucken, Arno

    2005-03-01

    Although fire is very common in our daily environment - as a source of energy at home or as a tool in industry - most people cannot estimate the danger of a conflagration. Therefore it is important to train people in combating fire. Beneath training with propane simulators or real fires and real extinguishers, fire training can be performed in virtual reality, which means a pollution-free and fast way of training. In this paper we describe how to enhance a virtual-reality environment with a real-time fire simulation and visualisation in order to establish a realistic emergency-training system. The presented approach supports extinguishing of the virtual fire including recordable performance data as needed in teletraining environments. We will show how to get realistic impressions of fire using advanced particle-simulation and how to use the advantages of particles to trigger states in a modified cellular automata used for the simulation of fire-behaviour. Using particle systems that interact with cellular automata it is possible to simulate a developing, spreading fire and its reaction on different extinguishing agents like water, CO2 or oxygen. The methods proposed in this paper have been implemented and successfully tested on Cosimir, a commercial robot-and VR-simulation-system.

  16. Effect of an Immersive Preoperative Virtual Reality Experience on Patient Reported Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Calnan, Daniel; Simmons, Nathan; MacKenzie, Todd A; Kakoulides, George

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to a virtual reality (VR) environment preoperatively on patient-reported outcomes for surgical operations. There is a scarcity of well-developed quality improvement initiatives targeting patient satisfaction. We performed a randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing cranial and spinal operations in a tertiary referral center. Patients underwent a 1:1 randomization to an immersive preoperative VR experience or standard preoperative experience stratified on type of operation. The primary outcome measures were the Evaluation du Vecu de l'Anesthesie Generale (EVAN-G) score and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information (APAIS) score, as markers of the patient's experience during the surgical encounter. During the study period, a total of 127 patients (mean age 55.3 years, 41.9% females) underwent randomization. The average EVAN-G score was 84.3 (standard deviation, SD, 6.4) after VR, and 64.3 (SD, 11.7) after standard preoperative experience (difference, 20.0; 95% confidence interval, CI, 16.6-23.3). Exposure to an immersive VR experience also led to higher APAIS score (difference, 29.9; 95% CI, 24.5-35.2). In addition, VR led to lower preoperative VAS stress score (difference, -41.7; 95% CI, -33.1 to -50.2), and higher preoperative VAS preparedness (difference, 32.4; 95% CI, 24.9-39.8), and VAS satisfaction (difference, 33.2; 95% CI, 25.4-41.0) scores. No association was identified with VAS stress score (difference, -1.6; 95% CI, -13.4 to 10.2). In a randomized controlled trial, we demonstrated that patients exposed to preoperative VR had increased satisfaction during the surgical encounter. Harnessing the power of this technology, hospitals can create an immersive environment that minimizes stress, and enhances the perioperative experience.

  17. The Selimiye Mosque of Edirne, Turkey - AN Immersive and Interactive Virtual Reality Experience Using Htc Vive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, T. P.; Büyüksalih, G.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Kan, T.; Deggim, S.; Kaya, Y.; Baskaraca, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    Recent advances in contemporary Virtual Reality (VR) technologies are going to have a significant impact on veryday life. Through VR it is possible to virtually explore a computer-generated environment as a different reality, and to immerse oneself into the past or in a virtual museum without leaving the current real-life situation. For such the ultimate VR experience, the user should only see the virtual world. Currently, the user must wear a VR headset which fits around the head and over the eyes to visually separate themselves from the physical world. Via the headset images are fed to the eyes through two small lenses. Cultural heritage monuments are ideally suited both for thorough multi-dimensional geometric documentation and for realistic interactive visualisation in immersive VR applications. Additionally, the game industry offers tools for interactive visualisation of objects to motivate users to virtually visit objects and places. In this paper the generation of a virtual 3D model of the Selimiye mosque in the city of Edirne, Turkey and its processing for data integration into the game engine Unity is presented. The project has been carried out as a co-operation between BİMTAŞ, a company of the Greater Municipality of Istanbul, Turkey and the Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning Lab of the HafenCity University Hamburg, Germany to demonstrate an immersive and interactive visualisation using the new VR system HTC Vive. The workflow from data acquisition to VR visualisation, including the necessary programming for navigation, is described. Furthermore, the possible use (including simultaneous multiple users environments) of such a VR visualisation for a CH monument is discussed in this contribution.

  18. Treatment of acrophobia in virtual reality: The role of immersion and presence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Krijn; P.M.G. Emmelkamp; R. Biemond; C. de Wilde de Ligny; M.J. Schuemie; C.A. van der Mast

    2004-01-01

    In this study the effects of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) were investigated in patients with acrophobia. Feelings of presence in VRET were systematically varied by using either a head-mounted display (HMD) (low presence) or a computer automatic virtual environment (CAVE) (high presence).

  19. Height, social comparison, and paranoia: an immersive virtual reality experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Evans, Nicole; Lister, Rachel; Antley, Angus; Dunn, Graham; Slater, Mel

    2014-08-30

    Mistrust of others may build upon perceptions of the self as vulnerable, consistent with an association of paranoia with perceived lower social rank. Height is a marker of social status and authority. Therefore we tested the effect of manipulating height, as a proxy for social rank, on paranoia. Height was manipulated within an immersive virtual reality simulation. Sixty females who reported paranoia experienced a virtual reality train ride twice: at their normal and reduced height. Paranoia and social comparison were assessed. Reducing a person's height resulted in more negative views of the self in comparison with other people and increased levels of paranoia. The increase in paranoia was fully mediated by changes in social comparison. The study provides the first demonstration that reducing height in a social situation increases the occurrence of paranoia. The findings indicate that negative social comparison is a cause of mistrust.

  20. Revealing context-specific conditioned fear memories with full immersion virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eHuff

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The extinction of conditioned fear is known to be context specific, and often referred to as more robustly contextually bound than the fear memory itself (Bouton, 2004. Yet, recent findings in rodents have challenged the notion that contextual fear retention is initially generalized. The context specificity of a cued-fear memory to the learning context has not been addressed in the human literature largely due to limitations in methodology. Here we adapt a novel technology to test the context specificity of cued fear conditioning using full immersion 3-dimensional virtual reality (VR. During acquisition training, healthy participants navigated through virtual environments containing dynamic snake and spider conditioned stimuli (CSs, one of which was paired with electrical wrist stimulation. During a 24-hour delayed retention test, one group returned to the same context as acquisition training whereas another group experienced the CSs in a novel context. Unconditioned stimulus (US expectancy ratings were assayed on-line during fear acquisition as an index of contingency awareness. Skin conductance responses (SCR time-locked to CS onset were the dependent measure of cued fear, and skin conductance levels during the interstimulus interval were an index of context fear. Findings indicate that early in acquisition training, participants express contingency awareness as well as differential contextual fear, whereas differential cued fear emerged later in acquisition. During the retention test, differential cued fear retention was enhanced in the group who returned to the same context as acquisition training relative to the context shift group. The results extend recent rodent work to illustrate differences in cued and context fear acquisition and the contextual specificity of recent fear memories. Findings support the use of full immersion VR as a novel tool in cognitive neuroscience to bridge rodent models of contextual phenomena underlying human

  1. State of the art of using virtual reality technologies in built environment education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keenaghan, G.; Horvath, I.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on our major findings concerning the application of virtual reality technologies in built environment education (BEE). In addition to an analysis of the current trends and developments in current virtual reality technologies and systems, it also evaluates their educational usabili

  2. Enabling Field Experiences in Introductory Geoscience Classes through the Use of Immersive Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Smith, E.; Sellers, V.; Wyant, P.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Brame, S.

    2015-12-01

    Although field experiences are an important aspect of geoscience education, the opportunity to provide physical world experiences to large groups of introductory students is often limited by access, logistical, and financial constraints. Our project (NSF IUSE 1504619) is investigating the use of immersive virtual reality (VR) technologies as a surrogate for real field experiences in introductory geosciences classes. We are developing a toolbox that leverages innovations in the field of VR, including the Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard, to enable every student in an introductory geology classroom the opportunity to have a first-person virtual field experience in the Grand Canyon. We have opted to structure our VR experience as an interactive game where students must explore the Canyon to accomplish a series of tasks designed to emphasize key aspects of geoscience learning. So far we have produced two demo products for the virtual field trip. The first is a standalone "Rock Box" app developed for the iPhone, which allows students to select different rock samples, examine them in 3D, and obtain basic information about the properties of each sample. The app can act as a supplement to the traditional rock box used in physical geology labs. The second product is a fully functioning VR environment for the Grand Canyon developed using satellite-based topographic and imagery data to retain real geologic features within the experience. Players can freely navigate to explore anywhere they desire within the Canyon, but are guided to points of interest where they are able to complete exercises that will be aligned with specific learning goals. To this point we have integrated elements of the "Rock Box" app within the VR environment, allowing players to examine 3D details of rock samples they encounter within the Grand Canyon. We plan to provide demos of both products and obtain user feedback during our presentation.

  3. Art in virtual reality 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ben

    2010-01-01

    For decades, virtual reality artwork has existed in a small but highly influential niche in the world of electronic and new media art. Since the early 1990's, virtual reality installations have come to define an extreme boundary point of both aesthetic experience and technological sophistication. Classic virtual reality artworks have an almost mythological stature - powerful, exotic, and often rarely exhibited. Today, art in virtual environments continues to evolve and mature, encompassing everything from fully immersive CAVE experiences to performance art in Second Life to the use of augmented and mixed reality in public space. Art in Virtual Reality 2010 is a public exhibition of new artwork that showcases the diverse ways that contemporary artists use virtual environments to explore new aesthetic ground and investigate the continually evolving relationship between our selves and our virtual worlds.

  4. Feasibility of an Immersive Virtual Reality Intervention for Hospitalized Patients: An Observational Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghi, Sasan; Reid, Mark William; Martinez, Bibiana; Rosen, Bradley Todd; Spiegel, Brennan Mason Ross

    2016-06-27

    Virtual reality (VR) offers immersive, realistic, three-dimensional experiences that "transport" users to novel environments. Because VR is effective for acute pain and anxiety, it may have benefits for hospitalized patients; however, there are few reports using VR in this setting. The aim was to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of VR in a diverse cohort of hospitalized patients. We assessed the acceptability and feasibility of VR in a cohort of patients admitted to an inpatient hospitalist service over a 4-month period. We excluded patients with motion sickness, stroke, seizure, dementia, nausea, and in isolation. Eligible patients viewed VR experiences (eg, ocean exploration; Cirque du Soleil; tour of Iceland) with Samsung Gear VR goggles. We then conducted semistructured patient interview and performed statistical testing to compare patients willing versus unwilling to use VR. We evaluated 510 patients; 423 were excluded and 57 refused to participate, leaving 30 participants. Patients willing versus unwilling to use VR were younger (mean 49.1, SD 17.4 years vs mean 60.2, SD 17.7 years; P=.01); there were no differences by sex, race, or ethnicity. Among users, most reported a positive experience and indicated that VR could improve pain and anxiety, although many felt the goggles were uncomfortable. Most inpatient users of VR described the experience as pleasant and capable of reducing pain and anxiety. However, few hospitalized patients in this "real-world" series were both eligible and willing to use VR. Consistent with the "digital divide" for emerging technologies, younger patients were more willing to participate. Future research should evaluate the impact of VR on clinical and resource outcomes. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02456987; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02456987 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6iFIMRNh3).

  5. Feasibility of an Immersive Virtual Reality Intervention for Hospitalized Patients: An Observational Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Virtual reality (VR) offers immersive, realistic, three-dimensional experiences that “transport” users to novel environments. Because VR is effective for acute pain and anxiety, it may have benefits for hospitalized patients; however, there are few reports using VR in this setting. Objective The aim was to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of VR in a diverse cohort of hospitalized patients. Methods We assessed the acceptability and feasibility of VR in a cohort of patients admitted to an inpatient hospitalist service over a 4-month period. We excluded patients with motion sickness, stroke, seizure, dementia, nausea, and in isolation. Eligible patients viewed VR experiences (eg, ocean exploration; Cirque du Soleil; tour of Iceland) with Samsung Gear VR goggles. We then conducted semistructured patient interview and performed statistical testing to compare patients willing versus unwilling to use VR. Results We evaluated 510 patients; 423 were excluded and 57 refused to participate, leaving 30 participants. Patients willing versus unwilling to use VR were younger (mean 49.1, SD 17.4 years vs mean 60.2, SD 17.7 years; P=.01); there were no differences by sex, race, or ethnicity. Among users, most reported a positive experience and indicated that VR could improve pain and anxiety, although many felt the goggles were uncomfortable. Conclusions Most inpatient users of VR described the experience as pleasant and capable of reducing pain and anxiety. However, few hospitalized patients in this “real-world” series were both eligible and willing to use VR. Consistent with the “digital divide” for emerging technologies, younger patients were more willing to participate. Future research should evaluate the impact of VR on clinical and resource outcomes. ClinicalTrial Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02456987; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02456987 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6iFIMRNh3) PMID:27349654

  6. The importance of postural cues for determining eye height in immersive virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrer, Markus; Linkenauger, Sally A; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Mohler, Betty J

    2015-01-01

    In human perception, the ability to determine eye height is essential, because eye height is used to scale heights of objects, velocities, affordances and distances, all of which allow for successful environmental interaction. It is well understood that eye height is fundamental to determine many of these percepts. Yet, how eye height itself is provided is still largely unknown. While the information potentially specifying eye height in the real world is naturally coincident in an environment with a regular ground surface, these sources of information can be easily divergent in similar and common virtual reality scenarios. Thus, we conducted virtual reality experiments where we manipulated the virtual eye height in a distance perception task to investigate how eye height might be determined in such a scenario. We found that humans rely more on their postural cues for determining their eye height if there is a conflict between visual and postural information and little opportunity for perceptual-motor calibration is provided. This is demonstrated by the predictable variations in their distance estimates. Our results suggest that the eye height in such circumstances is informed by postural cues when estimating egocentric distances in virtual reality and consequently, does not depend on an internalized value for eye height.

  7. Cultivating imagination: development and pilot test of a therapeutic use of an immersive virtual reality CAVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Nicolalde, F Daniel; Ponto, Kevin; Kinneberg, Megan; Freese, Vito; Paz, Dana

    2013-01-01

    As informatics applications grow from being data collection tools to platforms for action, the boundary between what constitutes informatics applications and therapeutic interventions begins to blur. Emerging computer-driven technologies such as virtual reality (VR) and mHealth apps may serve as clinical interventions. As part of a larger project intended to provide complements to cognitive behavioral approaches to health behavior change, an interactive scenario was designed to permit unstructured play inside an immersive 6-sided VR CAVE. In this pilot study we examined the technical and functional performance of the CAVE scenario, human tolerance of immersive CAVE experiences, and explored human imagination and the manner in which activity in the CAVE scenarios varied by an individual's level of imagination. Nine adult volunteers participated in a pilot-and-feasibility study. Participants tolerated 15 minute long exposure to the scenarios, and navigated through the virtual world. Relationship between personal characteristics and behaviors are reported and explored.

  8. DESIGN COORDINATION IN DISTRIBUTED ENVIRONMENTS USING VIRTUAL REALITY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusdi HA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research project, which investigates the use of virtual reality and computer communication technology to facilitate building design coordination in distributed environments. The emphasis of the system, called VR-based DEsign COordination (VRDECO is providing a communication tool that can be used by remote designers for settling ideas before they fully engage in concurrent engineering environments. VRDECO provides the necessary design tools, library of building elements and communication procedures, for designers from remote places to perform and coordinate their initial tasks. It has been implemented using available commercial software packages, and is used in designing a simple house. VRDECO facilitates the creation a preliminary design and simple communication with the client. There are, however, some difficulties in the development of the full version of VRDECO, i.e.: creating an adequate number of building elements, building specification database with a sufficient number of choices, and establishing a systematic rule to determine the parts of a building that are updateable.

  9. A Study on Immersion and Presence of a Portable Hand Haptic System for Immersive Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mingyu; Jeon, Changyu; Kim, Jinmo

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a portable hand haptic system using Leap Motion as a haptic interface that can be used in various virtual reality (VR) applications. The proposed hand haptic system was designed as an Arduino-based sensor architecture to enable a variety of tactile senses at low cost, and is also equipped with a portable wristband. As a haptic system designed for tactile feedback, the proposed system first identifies the left and right hands and then sends tactile senses (vibration and hea...

  10. Virtual Reality: A State-of-the-Art Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-Ning Zhou; Yu-Long Deng

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a survey on virtual reality systems and provides an in-depth understanding toward the notion of immersion, according to the semantic meanings of the terms "virtual" and "reality". The paper analyses the structure and functions of a virtual reality system and takes the three dimensional display as the immersive medium to identify the key issues for construction of virtual environments. The paper also reviews the development of virtual reality technology and introduces new image processing techniques into the design of virtual reality systems and virtual environments.

  11. Perceived spatial positioning of self-footstep sounds in three surround sound speaker setups for immersive virtual reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikström, Erik; Nilsson, Niels Christian; Nordahl, Rolf;

    2013-01-01

    Are there differences in how well loudspeaker setups are able to provide a believable illusion of footstep sounds originating from the user of an immersive virtual reality? To investigate this performance in spatial positioning via loudspeakers, a comparison of the three surround sound loudspeake...

  12. Perceived spatial positioning of self-footstep sounds in three surround sound speaker setups for immersive virtual reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikström, Erik; Nilsson, Niels Christian; Nordahl, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Are there differences in how well loudspeaker setups are able to provide a believable illusion of footstep sounds originating from the user of an immersive virtual reality? To investigate this performance in spatial positioning via loudspeakers, a comparison of the three surround sound loudspeaker...

  13. Feasibility of Virtual Reality Environments for Adolescent Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Oxhandler, Holly K.; Duron, Jacuelynn F.; Swank, Paul; Bordnick, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the feasibility of virtual reality (VR) exposure as an assessment and treatment modality for youth with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Methods: Forty-one adolescents, 20 of which were identified as having SAD, were recruited from a community sample. Youth with and without SAD were exposed to two social virtual…

  14. An Immersive Virtual Reality Platform to Enhance Walking Ability of Children with Acquired Brain Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Emilia; Beretta, Elena; Cesareo, Ambra; Maghini, Cristina; Turconi, Anna C; Reni, Gianluigi; Strazzer, Sandra

    2017-03-23

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) may result in lifelong impairment of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial functions. Several rehabilitative treatments are often needed to support walking recovery, thus participants' engagement becomes a crucial aspect, especially when patients are children. In the last few years, traditional physiotherapy (PT) has been flanked by innovative technologies for rehabilitation in the fields of robotics and Virtual Reality (VR). Preliminary results have shown interesting perspectives in the use of a VR system, the GRAIL (Gait Real-time Analysis Interactive Lab), in improving walking abilities in a small group of children with ABI, although further insights are needed about its use as rehabilitative tool in the pediatric population. To evaluate the efficacy of a rehabilitation treatment on a GRAIL system for the improvement of walking abilities, in a group of children suffering from ABI. 12 children with ABI (study group - SG; mean age = 12.1 ± 3.8 years old) underwent a 10-session treatment with the GRAIL, an instrumented multi-sensor platform based on immersive VR for gait training and rehabilitation in engaging VR environments. Before (T0) and at the end of the treatment (T1), the participants were assessed by means of functional scales (Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ), 6-Minute Walk Test (6minWT) and the 3D-Gait Analysis, over ground (OGA) and on GRAIL (GGA). All the participants completed the rehabilitative treatment. The functional evaluations showed an improvement in Gross Motor abilities (GMFM-88, p = 0.008), especially in standing (GMFM-D, p = 0.007) and walking (GMFM-E, p = 0.005), an increase of the endurance (6minWT, p = 0.002), and enhanced autonomy in daily life activities (FAQ, p = 0.025). OGA identified a significant decrease of the Gillette Gait Index for the impaired side and a general increase of symmetry. GGA showed improvements in

  15. Multisensory stimulation can induce an illusion of larger belly size in immersive virtual reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Normand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Body change illusions have been of great interest in recent years for the understanding of how the brain represents the body. Appropriate multisensory stimulation can induce an illusion of ownership over a rubber or virtual arm, simple types of out-of-the-body experiences, and even ownership with respect to an alternate whole body. Here we use immersive virtual reality to investigate whether the illusion of a dramatic increase in belly size can be induced in males through (a first person perspective position (b synchronous visual-motor correlation between real and virtual arm movements, and (c self-induced synchronous visual-tactile stimulation in the stomach area. METHODOLOGY: Twenty two participants entered into a virtual reality (VR delivered through a stereo head-tracked wide field-of-view head-mounted display. They saw from a first person perspective a virtual body substituting their own that had an inflated belly. For four minutes they repeatedly prodded their real belly with a rod that had a virtual counterpart that they saw in the VR. There was a synchronous condition where their prodding movements were synchronous with what they felt and saw and an asynchronous condition where this was not the case. The experiment was repeated twice for each participant in counter-balanced order. Responses were measured by questionnaire, and also a comparison of before and after self-estimates of belly size produced by direct visual manipulation of the virtual body seen from the first person perspective. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that first person perspective of a virtual body that substitutes for the own body in virtual reality, together with synchronous multisensory stimulation can temporarily produce changes in body representation towards the larger belly size. This was demonstrated by (a questionnaire results, (b the difference between the self-estimated belly size, judged from a first person perspective, after and before the

  16. Possible Application of Virtual Reality in Geography Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Stojšić, Ivan; Ivkov Džigurski, Anđelija; Maričić, Olja; Ivanović Bibić, Ljubica; Đukičin Vučković, Smiljana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Virtual reality represents simulated three-dimensional environment created by hardware and software, which providing realistic experience and possibility of interaction to the end-user. Benefits provided by immersive virtual reality in educational setting were recognised in the past decades, however mass application was left out due to the lack of development and high price. Intensive development of new platforms and virtual reality devices in the last few years started up with Oc...

  17. Full Immersive Virtual Environment Cave[TM] in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limniou, M.; Roberts, D.; Papadopoulos, N.

    2008-01-01

    By comparing two-dimensional (2D) chemical animations designed for computer's desktop with three-dimensional (3D) chemical animations designed for the full immersive virtual reality environment CAVE[TM] we studied how virtual reality environments could raise student's interest and motivation for learning. By using the 3ds max[TM], we can visualize…

  18. Treatment of acrophobia in virtual reality: the role of immersion and presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijn, Merel; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Biemond, Roeline; de Wilde de Ligny, Claudius; Schuemie, Martijn J; van der Mast, Charles A P G

    2004-02-01

    In this study the effects of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) were investigated in patients with acrophobia. Feelings of presence in VRET were systematically varied by using either a head-mounted display (HMD) (low presence) or a computer automatic virtual environment (CAVE) (high presence). VRET in general was found to be more effective than no treatment. No differences were found in effectiveness between VRET using an HMD or CAVE. Results were maintained at 6 months follow-up. Results of VRET were comparable with those of exposure in vivo (Cyberpsychology and Behavior 4 (2001) 335). In treatment completers no relationship was found between presence and anxiety. Early drop-outs experienced less acrophobic complaints and psychopathology in general at pre-test. They also experienced less presence and anxiety in the virtual environment used in session one as compared to patients that completed VRET.

  19. ESSE: Engineering Super Simulation Emulation for Virtual Reality Systems Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeon, Choul W. [PHILOSOPHIA, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The trademark 4{sup +}D Technology{sup TM} based Engineering Super Simulation Emulation (ESSE) is introduced. ESSE resorting to three-dimensional (3D) Virtual Reality (VR) technology pledges to provide with an interactive real-time motion, sound and tactile and other forms of feedback in the man machine systems environment. In particular, the 3D Virtual Engineering Neo cybernetic Unit Soft Power (VENUS) adds a physics engine to the VR platform so as to materialize a physical atmosphere. A close cooperation system and prompt information share are crucial, thereby increasing the necessity of centralized information system and electronic cooperation system. VENUS is further deemed to contribute towards public acceptance of nuclear power in general, and safety in particular. For instance, visualization of nuclear systems can familiarize the public in answering their questions and alleviating misunderstandings on nuclear power plants answering their questions and alleviating misunderstandings on nuclear power plants (NPPs) in general, and performance, security and safety in particular. An in-house flagship project Systemic Three-dimensional Engine Platform Prototype Engineering (STEPPE) endeavors to develop the Systemic Three-dimensional Engine Platform (STEP) for a variety of VR applications. STEP is home to a level system providing the whole visible scene of virtual engineering of man machine system environment. The system is linked with video monitoring that provides a 3D Computer Graphics (CG) visualization of major events. The database linked system provides easy access to relevant blueprints. The character system enables the operators easy access to visualization of major events. The database linked system provides easy access to relevant blueprints. The character system enables the operators to access the virtual systems by using their virtual characters. Virtually Engineered NPP Informative systems by using their virtual characters. Virtually Engineered NPP

  20. Social Interaction Development through Immersive Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jason; Wendt, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if participants could improve their social interaction skills by participating in a virtual immersive environment. The participants used a developing virtual reality head-mounted display to engage themselves in a fully-immersive environment. While in the environment, participants had an opportunity…

  1. Virtual Reality environment assisting post stroke hand rehabilitation: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoupikova, Daria; Stoykov, Nikolay; Kamper, Derek; Vick, Randy

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel art-empowered Virtual Reality (VR) system designed for hand rehabilitation therapy following stroke. The system was developed by an interdisciplinary team of engineers, art therapists, occupational therapists, and VR artist to improve patient's motivation and engagement. We describe system design, development, and user testing for efficiency, subject's satisfaction and clinical feasibility. We report initial results following use of the system on the first four subjects from the ongoing clinical efficacy trials as measured by standard clinical tests for upper extremity function. These cases demonstrate that the system is operational and can facilitate therapy for post stroke patients with upper extremity impairment.

  2. Two-photon calcium imaging in mice navigating a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Marcus; Zmarz, Pawel; Buchmann, Peter; Argast, Paul; Hübener, Mark; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Keller, Georg B

    2014-02-20

    In recent years, two-photon imaging has become an invaluable tool in neuroscience, as it allows for chronic measurement of the activity of genetically identified cells during behavior(1-6). Here we describe methods to perform two-photon imaging in mouse cortex while the animal navigates a virtual reality environment. We focus on the aspects of the experimental procedures that are key to imaging in a behaving animal in a brightly lit virtual environment. The key problems that arise in this experimental setup that we here address are: minimizing brain motion related artifacts, minimizing light leak from the virtual reality projection system, and minimizing laser induced tissue damage. We also provide sample software to control the virtual reality environment and to do pupil tracking. With these procedures and resources it should be possible to convert a conventional two-photon microscope for use in behaving mice.

  3. An exploratory fNIRS study with immersive virtual reality: a new method for technical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraglia, Bruno; Gamberini, Luciano; Priftis, Konstantinos; Scatturin, Pietro; Martinelli, Massimiliano; Cutini, Simone

    2011-01-01

    For over two decades Virtual Reality (VR) has been used as a useful tool in several fields, from medical and psychological treatments, to industrial and military applications. Only in recent years researchers have begun to study the neural correlates that subtend VR experiences. Even if the functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is the most common and used technique, it suffers several limitations and problems. Here we present a methodology that involves the use of a new and growing brain imaging technique, functional Near-infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), while participants experience immersive VR. In order to allow a proper fNIRS probe application, a custom-made VR helmet was created. To test the adapted helmet, a virtual version of the line bisection task was used. Participants could bisect the lines in a virtual peripersonal or extrapersonal space, through the manipulation of a Nintendo Wiimote ® controller in order for the participants to move a virtual laser pointer. Although no neural correlates of the dissociation between peripersonal and extrapersonal space were found, a significant hemodynamic activity with respect to the baseline was present in the right parietal and occipital areas. Both advantages and disadvantages of the presented methodology are discussed.

  4. Immersive journalism: immersive virtual reality for the first-person experience of news

    OpenAIRE

    Peña, N. de la; Weil, P.; Llobera, J.; Giannopoulos, Elias; Pomes, A. S.; Spanlang, Bernhard; Friedman, D; Sánchez-Vives, María Victoria; Slater, Mel

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept, and discusses the implications of Immersive Journalism, that is the production of news in a form in which people can gain first- 2 person experiences of the events or situation described in news stories. The fundamental idea of Immersive Journalism is to allow the participant, typically represented as a digital avatar, to actually enter a virtually recreated scenario representing the news story. The sense of presence obtained through an immersive system (whe...

  5. Three-dimensional immersive virtual reality for studying cellular compartments in 3D models from EM preparations of neural tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Cali, Corrado

    2015-07-14

    Advances for application of electron microscopy to serial imaging are opening doors to new ways of analyzing cellular structure. New and improved algorithms and workflows for manual and semiautomated segmentation allow to observe the spatial arrangement of the smallest cellular features with unprecedented detail in full three-dimensions (3D). From larger samples, higher complexity models can be generated; however, they pose new challenges to data management and analysis. Here, we review some currently available solutions and present our approach in detail. We use the fully immersive virtual reality (VR) environment CAVE (cave automatic virtual environment), a room where we are able to project a cellular reconstruction and visualize in 3D, to step into a world created with Blender, a free, fully customizable 3D modeling software with NeuroMorph plug-ins for visualization and analysis of electron microscopy (EM) preparations of brain tissue. Our workflow allows for full and fast reconstructions of volumes of brain neuropil using ilastik, a software tool for semiautomated segmentation of EM stacks. With this visualization environment, we can walk into the model containing neuronal and astrocytic processes to study the spatial distribution of glycogen granules, a major energy source that is selectively stored in astrocytes. The use of CAVE was key to observe a nonrandom distribution of glycogen, and led us to develop tools to quantitatively analyze glycogen clustering and proximity to other subcellular features. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. THE SELIMIYE MOSQUE OF EDIRNE, TURKEY – AN IMMERSIVE AND INTERACTIVE VIRTUAL REALITY EXPERIENCE USING HTC VIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Kersten

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in contemporary Virtual Reality (VR technologies are going to have a significant impact on veryday life. Through VR it is possible to virtually explore a computer-generated environment as a different reality, and to immerse oneself into the past or in a virtual museum without leaving the current real-life situation. For such the ultimate VR experience, the user should only see the virtual world. Currently, the user must wear a VR headset which fits around the head and over the eyes to visually separate themselves from the physical world. Via the headset images are fed to the eyes through two small lenses. Cultural heritage monuments are ideally suited both for thorough multi-dimensional geometric documentation and for realistic interactive visualisation in immersive VR applications. Additionally, the game industry offers tools for interactive visualisation of objects to motivate users to virtually visit objects and places. In this paper the generation of a virtual 3D model of the Selimiye mosque in the city of Edirne, Turkey and its processing for data integration into the game engine Unity is presented. The project has been carried out as a co-operation between BİMTAŞ, a company of the Greater Municipality of Istanbul, Turkey and the Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning Lab of the HafenCity University Hamburg, Germany to demonstrate an immersive and interactive visualisation using the new VR system HTC Vive. The workflow from data acquisition to VR visualisation, including the necessary programming for navigation, is described. Furthermore, the possible use (including simultaneous multiple users environments of such a VR visualisation for a CH monument is discussed in this contribution.

  7. UbiWorld: An environment integrating virtual reality, supercomputing, and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disz, T.; Papka, M.E.; Stevens, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    1997-07-01

    UbiWorld is a concept being developed by the Futures Laboratory group at Argonne National Laboratory that ties together the notion of ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) with that of using virtual reality for rapid prototyping. The goal is to develop an environment where one can explore Ubicomp-type concepts without having to build real Ubicomp hardware. The basic notion is to extend object models in a virtual world by using distributed wide area heterogeneous computing technology to provide complex networking and processing capabilities to virtual reality objects.

  8. Altered Perspectives: Immersive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Immersive environments provide an exciting experiential technology to visualize the natural world. Given the increasing accessibility of 360o cameras and virtual reality headsets we are now able to visualize artistic principles and scientific concepts in a fully immersive environment. The technology has become popular for photographers as well as designers, industry, educational groups, and museums. Here we show a sci-art perspective on the use of optics and light in the capture and manipulation of 360o images and video of geologic phenomena and cultural heritage sites in Alaska, England, and France. Additionally, we will generate intentionally altered perspectives to lend a surrealistic quality to the landscapes. Locations include the Catacombs of Paris, the Palace of Versailles, and the Northern Lights over Fairbanks, Alaska. Some 360o view cameras now use small portable dual lens technology extending beyond the 180o fish eye lens previously used, providing better coverage and image quality. Virtual reality headsets range in level of sophistication and cost, with the most affordable versions using smart phones and Google Cardboard viewers. The equipment used in this presentation includes a Ricoh Theta S spherical imaging camera. Here we will demonstrate the use of 360o imaging with attendees being able to be part of the immersive environment and experience our locations as if they were visiting themselves.

  9. Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Gupta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An artificial environment created with co mputer hardware and software and presented to the user in such a way that it appears and feels like a real environment. To "enter" a virtual reality, a user does special gloves, earphones, and goggles, all of which receive their input from the computer system. In this way, at least three of the five senses are controlled by the computer. In addition to feeding sensory input to the user, the devices also monitor the user's actions

  10. Requirements Elicitation and Prototyping of a Fully Immersive Virtual Reality Gaming System for Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maram AlMousa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke rehabilitation plays an important role in recovering the lifestyle of stroke survivors. Although existing research proved the effectiveness and engagement of nonimmersive virtual reality- (VR- based rehabilitation systems, limited research is available on the applicability of fully immersive VR-based rehabilitation systems. In this paper, we present the elicited requirements of a fully immersive VR-based rehabilitation system that will be designed for domestic upper limb stroke patients; we will also provide an initial conceptual prototype of the proposed system.

  11. Multi-Sensory-Motor Research: Investigating Auditory, Visual, and Motor Interaction in Virtual Reality Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Kluss

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Perception in natural environments is inseparably linked to motor action. In fact, we consider action an essential component of perceptual representation. But these representations are inherently difficult to investigate: Traditional experimental setups are limited by the lack of flexibility in manipulating spatial features. To overcome these problems, virtual reality (VR experiments seem to be a feasible alternative, but these setups typically lack ecological realism due to the use of “unnatural” interface-devices (joystick. Thus, we propose an experimental apparatus which combines multisensory perception and action in an ecologically realistic way. The basis is a 10-foot hollow sphere (VirtuSphere placed on a platform that allows free rotation. A subject inside can walk in any direction for any distance immersed into virtual environment. Both the rotation of the sphere and movement of the subject's head are tracked to process the subject's view within the VR-environment presented on a head-mounted display. Moreover, auditory features are dynamically processed taking greatest care of exact alignment of sound-sources and visual objects using ambisonic-encoded audio processed by a HRTF-filterbank. We present empirical data that confirm ecological realism of this setup and discuss its suitability for multi-sensory-motor research.

  12. Three Primary School Students' Cognition about 3D Rotation in a Virtual Reality Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Andy

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on three primary school students' explorations of 3D rotation in a virtual reality learning environment (VRLE) named VRMath. When asked to investigate if you would face the same direction when you turn right 45 degrees first then roll up 45 degrees, or when you roll up 45 degrees first then turn right 45 degrees, the students…

  13. Students' Expectations of the Learning Process in Virtual Reality and Simulation-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskitalo, Tuulikki

    2012-01-01

    Expectations for simulations in healthcare education are high; however, little is known about healthcare students' expectations of the learning process in virtual reality (VR) and simulation-based learning environments (SBLEs). This research aims to describe first-year healthcare students' (N=97) expectations regarding teaching, studying, and…

  14. Students' Expectations of the Learning Process in Virtual Reality and Simulation-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskitalo, Tuulikki

    2012-01-01

    Expectations for simulations in healthcare education are high; however, little is known about healthcare students' expectations of the learning process in virtual reality (VR) and simulation-based learning environments (SBLEs). This research aims to describe first-year healthcare students' (N=97) expectations regarding teaching, studying, and…

  15. Immersive participation: Smartphone-Apps and Virtual Reality - tools for knowledge transfer, citizen science and interactive collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterweich, Markus

    2017-04-01

    In the last few years, the use of smartphone-apps has become a daily routine in our life. However, only a few approaches have been undertaken to use apps for transferring scientific knowledge to the public audience. The development of learning apps or serious games requires large efforts and several levels of simplification which is different to traditional text books or learning webpages. Current approaches often lack a connection to the real life and/or innovative gamification concepts. Another almost untapped potential is the use of Virtual Reality, a fast growing technology which replicates a virtual environment in order to simulate physical experiences in artificial or real worlds. Hence, smartphone-apps and VR provides new opportunities for capacity building, knowledge transfer, citizen science or interactive engagement in the realm of environmental sciences. This presentation will show some examples and discuss the advantages of these immersive approaches to improve the knowledge transfer between scientists and citizens and to stimulate actions in the real world.

  16. Eliciting Affect via Immersive Virtual Reality: A Tool for Adolescent Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Christopher D.; Barker, David H.; Garcia, Abbe Marrs; Spitalnick, Josh S.; Curtis, Virginia; Roye, Scott; Brown, Larry K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective A virtual reality environment (VRE) was designed to expose participants to substance use and sexual risk-taking cues to examine the utility of VR in eliciting adolescent physiological arousal. Methods 42 adolescents (55% male) with a mean age of 14.54 years (SD = 1.13) participated. Physiological arousal was examined through heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and self-reported somatic arousal. A within-subject design (neutral VRE, VR party, and neutral VRE) was utilized to examine changes in arousal. Results The VR party demonstrated an increase in physiological arousal relative to a neutral VRE. Examination of individual segments of the party (e.g., orientation, substance use, and sexual risk) demonstrated that HR was significantly elevated across all segments, whereas only the orientation and sexual risk segments demonstrated significant impact on RSA. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence that VREs can be used to generate physiological arousal in response to substance use and sexual risk cues. PMID:24365699

  17. [Virtual reality therapy in anxiety disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrousia, V; Giotakos, O

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade a number of studies have been conducted in order to examine if virtual reality exposure therapy can be an alternative form of therapy for the treatment of mental disorders and particularly for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Imaginal exposure therapy, which is one of the components of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, cannot be easily applied to all patients and in cases like those virtual reality can be used as an alternative or a supportive psychotherapeutic technique. Most studies using virtual reality have focused on anxiety disorders, mainly in specific phobias, but some extend to other disorders such as eating disorders, drug dependence, pain control and palliative care and rehabilitation. Main characteristics of virtual reality therapy are: "interaction", "immersion", and "presence". High levels of "immersion" and "presence" are associated with increased response to exposure therapy in virtual environments, as well as better therapeutic outcomes and sustained therapeutic gains. Typical devices that are used in order patient's immersion to be achieved are the Head-Mounted Displays (HMD), which are only for individual use, and the computer automatic virtual environment (CAVE), which is a multiuser. Virtual reality therapy's disadvantages lie in the difficulties that arise due to the demanded specialized technology skills, devices' cost and side effects. Therapists' training is necessary in order for them to be able to manipulate the software and the hardware and to adjust it to each case's needs. Devices' cost is high but as technology continuously improves it constantly decreases. Immersion during virtual reality therapy can induce mild and temporary side effects such as nausea, dizziness or headache. Until today, however, experience shows that virtual reality offers several advantages. Patient's avoidance to be exposed in phobic stimuli is reduced via the use of virtual reality since the patient is exposed to them as many times as he

  18. Immersive Virtual Reality in the Psychology Classroom: What Purpose Could it Serve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality is by no means a new technology, yet it is increasingly being used, to different degrees, in education, training, rehabilitation, therapy, and home entertainment. Although the exact reasons for this shift are not the subject of this short opinion piece, it is possible to speculate that decreased costs, and increased performance, of…

  19. Immersive Virtual Reality in the Psychology Classroom: What Purpose Could it Serve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality is by no means a new technology, yet it is increasingly being used, to different degrees, in education, training, rehabilitation, therapy, and home entertainment. Although the exact reasons for this shift are not the subject of this short opinion piece, it is possible to speculate that decreased costs, and increased performance, of…

  20. Learning Relative Motion Concepts in Immersive and Non-Immersive Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Michael; Gurlitt, Johannes; Kozhevnikov, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the current study is to understand which unique features of an immersive virtual reality environment have the potential to improve learning relative motion concepts. Thirty-seven undergraduate students learned relative motion concepts using computer simulation either in immersive virtual environment (IVE) or non-immersive desktop…

  1. Learning Relative Motion Concepts in Immersive and Non-Immersive Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Michael; Gurlitt, Johannes; Kozhevnikov, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the current study is to understand which unique features of an immersive virtual reality environment have the potential to improve learning relative motion concepts. Thirty-seven undergraduate students learned relative motion concepts using computer simulation either in immersive virtual environment (IVE) or non-immersive desktop…

  2. Virtual reality in Latin American clinical psychology and the VREPAR project. Virtual Reality Environments for Psycho-Neuro-physiological Assessment and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mauro Rubens

    2002-10-01

    Starting with the excellent collective work done by the European Community (EC)-funded Virtual Reality Environments for Psycho-Neuro-physiological Assessment and Rehabilitation (VREPAR) projects, I try to indicate some possible pathways that would allow a better integration of this advanced technology into the reality of Latin American psychology. I myself use analyses that I did in my master's degree in the PUCSP-Catholic University in São Paulo, Brazil. I also include a brief description of the CD-ROM Clinical Psychology Uses of Virtual Reality (CPUVR) that accompanies my thesis. I point out the importance of collaboration between psychology and other disciplines, including computer science. I explain the method that I used to work with digital information, important for the formation of a critical mass of people thinking in Portuguese and Spanish to accelerate a technological jump.

  3. Constructing Meaning with Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaonnou-Georgiou, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    Presents a constructivist rationale for introducing virtual reality in language learning and teaching and describes various virtual reality environments that are available. Ways of implementing constuctivist learning through virtual reality are suggested as well as basic guidelines for successful implementation in the classroom. (Author/VWL)

  4. Feasibility of using combined EMG and kinematic signals for prosthesis control: A simulation study using a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blana, Dimitra; Kyriacou, Theocharis; Lambrecht, Joris M; Chadwick, Edward K

    2016-08-01

    Transhumeral amputation has a significant effect on a person's independence and quality of life. Myoelectric prostheses have the potential to restore upper limb function, however their use is currently limited due to lack of intuitive and natural control of multiple degrees of freedom. The goal of this study was to evaluate a novel transhumeral prosthesis controller that uses a combination of kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from the person's proximal humerus. Specifically, we trained a time-delayed artificial neural network to predict elbow flexion/extension and forearm pronation/supination from six proximal EMG signals, and humeral angular velocity and linear acceleration. We evaluated this scheme with ten able-bodied subjects offline, as well as in a target-reaching task presented in an immersive virtual reality environment. The offline training had a target of 4° for flexion/extension and 8° for pronation/supination, which it easily exceeded (2.7° and 5.5° respectively). During online testing, all subjects completed the target-reaching task with path efficiency of 78% and minimal overshoot (1.5%). Thus, combining kinematic and muscle activity signals from the proximal humerus can provide adequate prosthesis control, and testing in a virtual reality environment can provide meaningful data on controller performance.

  5. Spatial working memory in immersive virtual reality foraging: path organization, traveling distance and search efficiency in humans (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lillo, Carlo; Kirby, Melissa; James, Frances C

    2014-05-01

    Search and serial recall tasks were used in the present study to characterize the factors affecting the ability of humans to keep track of a set of spatial locations while traveling in an immersive virtual reality foraging environment. The first experiment required the exhaustive exploration of a set of locations following a procedure previously used with other primate and non-primate species to assess their sensitivity to the geometric arrangement of foraging sites. The second experiment assessed the dependency of search performance on search organization by requiring the participants to recall specific trajectories throughout the foraging space. In the third experiment, the distance between the foraging sites was manipulated in order to contrast the effects of organization and traveling distance on recall accuracy. The results show that humans benefit from the use of organized search patterns when attempting to monitor their travel though either a clustered "patchy" space or a matrix of locations. Their ability to recall a series of locations is dependent on whether the order in which they are explored conformed or did not conform to specific organization principles. Moreover, the relationship between search efficiency and search organization is not confounded by effects of traveling distance. These results indicate that in humans, organizational factors may play a large role in their ability to forage efficiently. The extent to which such dependency may pertain to other primates and could be accounted for by visual organization processes is discussed on the basis of previous studies focused on perceptual grouping, search, and serial recall in non-human species.

  6. A method for generating an illusion of backwards time travel using immersive virtual reality-an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Doron; Pizarro, Rodrigo; Or-Berkers, Keren; Neyret, Solène; Pan, Xueni; Slater, Mel

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new method, based on immersive virtual reality (IVR), to give people the illusion of having traveled backwards through time to relive a sequence of events in which they can intervene and change history. The participant had played an important part in events with a tragic outcome-deaths of strangers-by having to choose between saving 5 people or 1. We consider whether the ability to go back through time, and intervene, to possibly avoid all deaths, has an impact on how the participant views such moral dilemmas, and also whether this experience leads to a re-evaluation of past unfortunate events in their own lives. We carried out an exploratory study where in the "Time Travel" condition 16 participants relived these events three times, seeing incarnations of their past selves carrying out the actions that they had previously carried out. In a "Repetition" condition another 16 participants replayed the same situation three times, without any notion of time travel. Our results suggest that those in the Time Travel condition did achieve an illusion of "time travel" provided that they also experienced an illusion of presence in the virtual environment, body ownership, and agency over the virtual body that substituted their own. Time travel produced an increase in guilt feelings about the events that had occurred, and an increase in support of utilitarian behavior as the solution to the moral dilemma. Time travel also produced an increase in implicit morality as judged by an implicit association test. The time travel illusion was associated with a reduction of regret associated with bad decisions in their own lives. The results show that when participants have a third action that they can take to solve the moral dilemma (that does not immediately involve choosing between the 1 and the 5) then they tend to take this option, even though it is useless in solving the dilemma, and actually results in the deaths of a greater number.

  7. Cultivating Imagination: Development and Pilot Test of a Therapeutic Use of an Immersive Virtual Reality CAVE

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Nicolalde, F. Daniel; Ponto, Kevin; Kinneberg, Megan; Freese, Vito; Paz, Dana

    2013-01-01

    As informatics applications grow from being data collection tools to platforms for action, the boundary between what constitutes informatics applications and therapeutic interventions begins to blur. Emerging computer-driven technologies such as virtual reality (VR) and mHealth apps may serve as clinical interventions. As part of a larger project intended to provide complements to cognitive behavioral approaches to health behavior change, an interactive scenario was designed to permit unstruc...

  8. Ambient Intelligence in Multimeda and Virtual Reality Environments for the rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko, Attila; Cecilia, Sik Lanyi

    This chapter presents a general overview about the use of multimedia and virtual reality in rehabilitation and assistive and preventive healthcare. This chapter deals with multimedia, virtual reality applications based AI intended for use by medical doctors, nurses, special teachers and further interested persons. It describes methods how multimedia and virtual reality is able to assist their work. These include the areas how multimedia and virtual reality can help the patients everyday life and their rehabilitation. In the second part of the chapter we present the Virtual Therapy Room (VTR) a realized application for aphasic patients that was created for practicing communication and expressing emotions in a group therapy setting. The VTR shows a room that contains a virtual therapist and four virtual patients (avatars). The avatars are utilizing their knowledge base in order to answer the questions of the user providing an AI environment for the rehabilitation. The user of the VTR is the aphasic patient who has to solve the exercises. The picture that is relevant for the actual task appears on the virtual blackboard. Patient answers questions of the virtual therapist. Questions are about pictures describing an activity or an object in different levels. Patient can ask an avatar for answer. If the avatar knows the answer the avatars emotion changes to happy instead of sad. The avatar expresses its emotions in different dimensions. Its behavior, face-mimic, voice-tone and response also changes. The emotion system can be described as a deterministic finite automaton where places are emotion-states and the transition function of the automaton is derived from the input-response reaction of an avatar. Natural language processing techniques were also implemented in order to establish highquality human-computer interface windows for each of the avatars. Aphasic patients are able to interact with avatars via these interfaces. At the end of the chapter we visualize the

  9. An Objective Measure for the Visual Fidelity of Virtual Reality and the Risks of Falls in a Virtual Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menzies, R.J.; Rogers, S.J.; Phillips, A. M.; Chiarovano, E.; Waele de, C.; Verstraten, F.A.J.; MacDougall, H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of development of virtual reality (VR) devices and VR’s recent renaissance, it has been difficult to measure these devices’ effectiveness in immersing the observer. Previously, VR devices have been evaluated using subjective measures of presence, but in this paper, we suggest that po

  10. An Objective Measure for the Visual Fidelity of Virtual Reality and the Risks of Falls in a Virtual Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menzies, R.J.; Rogers, S.J.; Phillips, A. M.; Chiarovano, E.; Waele de, C.; Verstraten, F.A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/107287307; MacDougall, H.

    Despite decades of development of virtual reality (VR) devices and VR’s recent renaissance, it has been difficult to measure these devices’ effectiveness in immersing the observer. Previously, VR devices have been evaluated using subjective measures of presence, but in this paper, we suggest that

  11. Virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, JM; Chan, KW; Gibson, I.

    1998-01-01

    Virtual reality is still in its infancy. However, many contemporary applications already have proven virtual reality to be indispensable to everyday life. For instance, the technology of virtual product design and manufacturing makes the new products better and cheaper. The applications of VR in medicine allow doctors to diagnose a disease more accurately. Without a doubt, it has and will foster more innovative research and applications. High-resolution, low-lag and low-price systems will be ...

  12. The Effects of Virtual Reality Learning Environment on Student Cognitive and Linguistic Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has brought about numerous alternative learning opportunities in the last decade, and with modern products such as Oculus Rift and other wearable Virtual Reality technologies being introduced...

  13. Updatable Queue Protocol Based On TCP For Virtual Reality Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Howaide, Ala'a Z; Salhieh, Ayad M

    2011-01-01

    The variance in number and types of tasks required to be implemented within Distributed Virtual Environments (DVE) highlights the needs for communication protocols can achieve consistency. In addition, these applications have to handle an increasing number of participants and deal with the difficult problem of scalability. Moreover, the real-time requirements of these applications make the scalability problem more difficult to solve. In this paper, we have implemented Updatable Queue Abstraction protocol (UQA) on TCP (TCP-UQA) and compared it with original TCP, UDP, and Updatable Queue Abstraction based on UDP (UDP-UQA) protocols. Results showed that TCP-UQA was the best in queue management.

  14. Psychological influences on distance estimation in a virtual reality environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohske eTakahashi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Researches on embodied perception have revealed that social, psychological and physiological factors influence perception of space. While many of these influences were observed with real or highly realistic stimuli, the present work showed that even the orientation of abstract geometric objects with a non-realistic virtual environment could influence distance perception. Observers wore a head mounted display and watched virtual cones moving within an invisible cube for five seconds with their head movement recorded. Subsequently, observers estimated the distance to the cones or evaluated their friendliness. The cones either faced the observer, a target behind the cones, or random orientations. Average viewing distance to the cones varied between 1.2 and 2.0 m. At a viewing distance of 1.6 m, observers perceived cones facing them as closer than cones facing an opposite target or random orientations. Furthermore, irrespective of viewing distance, observers moved their head away from the cones more strongly and evaluated the cones as less friendly when the cones were facing observers. Similar results of distance estimation were obtained with a 3D projection onto a large screen, although the effective viewing distance was farther away. These results suggest that factors other than physical distance could influence distance perception even with non-realistic geometric objects within a virtual environment. Furthermore, the modulation of distance perception was also accompanied by changes in subjective impression and avoidance movement. We propose that cones facing an observer are perceived as socially discomforting or threatening and potentially violate an observer’s personal space, which might influence the perceived distance of cones.

  15. Comparing "pick and place" task in spatial Augmented Reality versus non-immersive Virtual Reality for rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Maryam; Hondori, Hossein Mousavi; Dodakian, Lucy; Cramer, Steve; Lopes, Cristina V

    2013-01-01

    Introducing computer games to the rehabilitation market led to development of numerous Virtual Reality (VR) training applications. Although VR has provided tremendous benefit to the patients and caregivers, it has inherent limitations, some of which might be solved by replacing it with Augmented Reality (AR). The task of pick-and-place, which is part of many activities of daily living (ADL's), is one of the major affected functions stroke patients mainly expect to recover. We developed an exercise consisting of moving an object between various points, following a flash light that indicates the next target. The results show superior performance of subjects in spatial AR versus non-immersive VR setting. This could be due to the extraneous hand-eye coordination which exists in VR whereas it is eliminated in spatial AR.

  16. A method for generating an illusion of backwards time travel using immersive virtual reality - an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron eFriedman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new method, based on immersive virtual reality, to give people the illusion of having travelled backwards through time to relive a sequence of events in which they can intervene and change history. The participant had played an important part in events with a tragic outcome - deaths of strangers – by having to choose between saving 5 people or 1. We consider whether the ability to go back through time, and intervene, to possibly avoid all deaths, has an impact on how the participant views such moral dilemmas, and also whether this experience leads to a re-evaluation of past unfortunate events in their own lives. We carried out an exploratory study where in the ‘Time Travel’ condition 16 participants relived these events three times, seeing incarnations of their past selves carrying out the actions that they had previously carried out. In a ‘Repetition’ condition another 16 participants replayed the same situation three times, without any notion of time travel. Our results suggest that those in the Time Travel condition did achieve an illusion of ‘time travel’ provided that they also experienced an illusion of presence in the virtual environment, body ownership and agency over the virtual body that substituted their own. Time travel produced an increase in guilt feelings about the events that had occurred, and an increase in support of utilitarian behavior as the solution to the moral dilemma. Time travel also produced an increase in implicit morality as judged by an implicit association test. The time travel illusion was associated with a reduction of regret associated with bad decisions in their own lives. The results show that when participants have a third action that they can take to solve the moral dilemma (that does not immediately involve choosing between the 1 and the 5 then they tend to take this option, even though it is useless in solving the dilemma, and actually results in the deaths of a greater number.

  17. Virtual Reality Musical Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur; Kojs, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development and availability of low-cost technologies have created a wide interest in virtual reality. In the field of computer music, the term “virtual musical instruments” has been used for a long time to describe software simulations, extensions of existing musical instruments......, and ways to control them with new interfaces for musical expression. Virtual reality musical instruments (VRMIs) that include a simulated visual component delivered via a head-mounted display or other forms of immersive visualization have not yet received much attention. In this article, we present a field...

  18. Virtual Reality Musical Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur; Kojs, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development and availability of low-cost technologies have created a wide interest in virtual reality. In the field of computer music, the term “virtual musical instruments” has been used for a long time to describe software simulations, extensions of existing musical instruments......, and ways to control them with new interfaces for musical expression. Virtual reality musical instruments (VRMIs) that include a simulated visual component delivered via a head-mounted display or other forms of immersive visualization have not yet received much attention. In this article, we present a field...

  19. Augmented and virtual reality in surgery-the digital surgical environment: applications, limitations and legal pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Wee Sim; Baker, Benjamin; Amin, Kavit; Chan, Adrian; Patel, Ketan; Wong, Jason

    2016-12-01

    The continuing enhancement of the surgical environment in the digital age has led to a number of innovations being highlighted as potential disruptive technologies in the surgical workplace. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are rapidly becoming increasingly available, accessible and importantly affordable, hence their application into healthcare to enhance the medical use of data is certain. Whether it relates to anatomy, intraoperative surgery, or post-operative rehabilitation, applications are already being investigated for their role in the surgeons armamentarium. Here we provide an introduction to the technology and the potential areas of development in the surgical arena.

  20. Augmented and virtual reality in surgery—the digital surgical environment: applications, limitations and legal pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Benjamin; Amin, Kavit; Chan, Adrian; Patel, Ketan; Wong, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The continuing enhancement of the surgical environment in the digital age has led to a number of innovations being highlighted as potential disruptive technologies in the surgical workplace. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are rapidly becoming increasingly available, accessible and importantly affordable, hence their application into healthcare to enhance the medical use of data is certain. Whether it relates to anatomy, intraoperative surgery, or post-operative rehabilitation, applications are already being investigated for their role in the surgeons armamentarium. Here we provide an introduction to the technology and the potential areas of development in the surgical arena. PMID:28090510

  1. Validation of an immersive virtual reality system for training near and far space neglect in individuals with stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Muroi, Daisuke; Ohira, Masahiro; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2017-07-12

    Unilateral spatial neglect (USN) is defined as impaired ability to attend and see on one side, and when present, it interferes seriously with daily life. These symptoms can exist for near and far spaces combined or independently, and it is important to provide effective intervention for near and far space neglect. The purpose of this pilot study was to propose an immersive virtual reality (VR) rehabilitation program using a head-mounted display that is able to train both near and far space neglect, and to validate the immediate effect of the VR program in both near and far space neglect. Ten USN patients underwent the VR program with a pre-post design and no control. In the virtual environment, we developed visual searching and reaching tasks using an immersive VR system. Behavioral inattention test (BIT) scores obtained pre- and immediate post-VR program were compared. BIT scores obtained pre- and post-VR program revealed that far space neglect but not near space neglect improved promptly after the VR program. This effect for far space neglect was observed in the cancelation task, but not in the line bisection task. Positive effects of the immersive VR program for far space neglect are suggested by the results of the present pilot study. However, further studies with rigorous designs are needed to validate its clinical effectiveness.

  2. Quantitative orientation preference and susceptibility to space motion sickness simulated in a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Chao, Jian-Gang; Chen, Xue-Wen; Wang, Jin-Kun; Tan, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Orientation preference should appear when variable weightings of spatial orientation cues are used between individuals. It is possible that astronauts' orientation preferences could be a potential predictor for susceptibility to space motion sickness (SMS). The present study was conducted to confirm this relationship on Earth by quantifying orientation preferences and simulating SMS in a virtual reality environment. Two tests were carried out. The first was to quantitatively determine one's orientation preference. Thirty-two participants' vision and body cue preferences were determined by measuring perceptual up (PU) orientations. The ratio of vision and body vector (ROVB) was used as the indicator of one's orientation preference. The second test was to visually induce motion sickness symptoms that represent similar sensory conflicts as SMS using a virtual reality environment. Relationships between ROVB values and motion sickness scores were analyzed, which revealed cubic functions by using optimal fits. According to ROVB level, participants were divided into three groups - body group, vision group, and confusion group - and the factor of gender was further considered as a covariate in the analysis. Consistent differences in motion sickness scores were observed between the three groups. Thus, orientation preference had a significant relationship with susceptibility to simulated SMS symptoms. This knowledge could assist with astronaut selection and might be a useful countermeasure when developing new preflight trainings. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Comprehensive modelling and simulation of cylindrical nanoparticles manipulation by using a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Hoshiar, Ali Kafash; Ghofrani, Maedeh

    2017-08-01

    With the expansion of nanotechnology, robots based on atomic force microscope (AFM) have been widely used as effective tools for displacing nanoparticles and constructing nanostructures. One of the most limiting factors in AFM-based manipulation procedures is the inability of simultaneously observing the controlled pushing and displacing of nanoparticles while performing the operation. To deal with this limitation, a virtual reality environment has been used in this paper for observing the manipulation operation. In the simulations performed in this paper, first, the images acquired by the atomic force microscope have been processed and the positions and dimensions of nanoparticles have been determined. Then, by dynamically modelling the transfer of nanoparticles and simulating the critical force-time diagrams, a controlled displacement of nanoparticles has been accomplished. The simulations have been further developed for the use of rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The established virtual reality environment has made it possible to simulate the manipulation of biological particles in a liquid medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Gregory B.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the current state of the art in virtual reality (VR), its historical background, and future possibilities. Highlights include applications in medicine, art and entertainment, science, business, and telerobotics; and VR for information science, including graphical display of bibliographic data, libraries and books, and cyberspace.…

  5. The use of virtual reality exposure in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbaum, B O; Hodges, L F

    1999-10-01

    One possible alternative to standard in vivo exposure may be virtual reality exposure. Virtual reality integrates real-time computer graphics, body tracking devices, visual displays, and other sensory input devices to immerse a participant in a computer-generated virtual environment. Virtual reality exposure (VRE) is potentially an efficient and cost-effective treatment of anxiety disorders. VRE therapy has been successful in reducing the fear of heights in the first known controlled study of virtual reality in the treatment of a psychological disorder. Outcome was assessed on measures of anxiety, avoidance, attitudes, and distress. Significant group differences were found on all measures such that the VRE group was significantly improved at posttreatment but the control group was unchanged. The efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy was also supported for the fear of flying in a case study. The potential for virtual reality exposure treatment for these and other disorders is explored.

  6. Does Feedback Design Matter? A Neurofeedback Study Comparing Immersive Virtual Reality and Traditional Training Screens in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Erika Kober

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurofeedback (NF is a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI application, in which the brain activity is fed back to the user in real-time enabling voluntary brain control. In this context, the significance of the feedback design is mainly unexplored. Highly immersive feedback scenarios using virtual reality (VR technique are available. However, their effects on subjective user experience as well as on objective outcome measures remain open. In the present article, we discuss the general pros and cons of using VR as feedback modality in BCI applications. Furthermore, we report on the results of an empirical study, in which the effects of traditional two-dimensional and three-dimensional VR based feedback scenarios on NF training performance and user experience in healthy older individuals and neurologic patients were compared. In conclusion, we suggest indications and contraindications of immersive VR feedback designs in BCI applications. Our results show that findings in healthy individuals are not always transferable to patient populations having an impact on serious game and feedback design.

  7. New Desktop Virtual Reality Technology in Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausburn, Lynna J.; Ausburn, Floyd B.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) that immerses users in a 3D environment through use of headwear, body suits, and data gloves has demonstrated effectiveness in technical and professional education. Immersive VR is highly engaging and appealing to technically skilled young Net Generation learners. However, technical difficulty and very high costs have kept…

  8. Declarative Knowledge Acquisition in Immersive Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rustin

    2016-01-01

    The author investigated the interaction effect of immersive virtual reality (VR) in the classroom. The objective of the project was to develop and provide a low-cost, scalable, and portable VR system containing purposely designed and developed immersive virtual learning environments for the US Army. The purpose of the mixed design experiment was…

  9. Neurocognitive Treatment for a Patient with Alzheimer's Disease Using a Virtual Reality Navigational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J.F. White

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, a man at the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD was enrolled in a cognitive treatment program based upon spatial navigation in a virtual reality (VR environment. We trained him to navigate to targets in a symmetric, landmark-less virtual building. Our research goals were to determine whether an individual with AD could learn to navigate in a simple VR navigation (VRN environment and whether that training could also bring real-life cognitive benefits. The results show that our participant learned to perfectly navigate to desired targets in the VRN environment over the course of the training program. Furthermore, subjective feedback from his primary caregiver (his wife indicated that his skill at navigating while driving improved noticeably and that he enjoyed cognitive improvement in his daily life at home. These results suggest that VRN treatments might benefit other people with AD.

  10. Virtual Reality: The Future of Animated Virtual Instructor, the Technology and Its Emergence to a Productive E-Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiman, Juhanita

    This paper discusses the use of Virtual Reality (VR) in e-learning environments where an intelligent three-dimensional (3D) virtual person plays the role of an instructor. With the existence of this virtual instructor, it is hoped that the teaching and learning in the e-environment will be more effective and productive. This virtual 3D animated…

  11. Health Education capabilities Based on Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, Paulo Vinícius de Farias; Machado,Liliane dos Santos; Santos,Sérgio Ribeiro dos; Romero, Renata Olívia Gadelha

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of virtual reality is to create three-dimensional environments that users can explore and manipulate with the feeling of being immersed in realistic simulations. VR systems are mainly characterized by a high degree of realism in their simulation of real world experiences or even fictitious situations. Medicine and healthcare are benefiting from VR, especially the collaborative virtual environments for teaching various procedures that enable distance education as well as collabor...

  12. Usability Comparisons of Head-Mounted vs. Stereoscopic Desktop Displays in a Virtual Reality Environment with Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Gromala, Diane; Gupta, Dimple; Squire, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have shown that immersive Virtual Reality (VR) can serve as an unusually powerful pain control technique. However, research assessing the reported symptoms and negative effects of VR systems indicate that it is important to ascertain if these symptoms arise from the use of particular VR display devices, particularly for users who are deemed "at risk," such as chronic pain patients Moreover, these patients have specific and often complex needs and requirements, and because basic issues such as 'comfort' may trigger anxiety or panic attacks, it is important to examine basic questions of the feasibility of using VR displays. Therefore, this repeated-measured experiment was conducted with two VR displays: the Oculus Rift's head-mounted display (HMD) and Firsthand Technologies' immersive desktop display, DeepStream3D. The characteristics of these immersive desktop displays differ: one is worn, enabling patients to move their heads, while the other is peered into, allowing less head movement. To assess the severity of physical discomforts, 20 chronic pain patients tried both displays while watching a VR pain management demo in clinical settings. Results indicated that participants experienced higher levels of Simulator Sickness using the Oculus Rift HMD. However, results also indicated other preferences of the two VR displays among patients, including physical comfort levels and a sense of immersion. Few studies have been conducted that compare usability of specific VR devices specifically with chronic pain patients using a therapeutic virtual environment in pain clinics. Thus, the results may help clinicians and researchers to choose the most appropriate VR displays for chronic pain patients and guide VR designers to enhance the usability of VR displays for long-term pain management interventions.

  13. Exploring Learning through Audience Interaction in Virtual Reality Dome Theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolellis, Panagiotis; Daradoumis, Thanasis

    Informal learning in public spaces like museums, science centers and planetariums is increasingly popular during the last years. Recent advancements in large-scale displays allowed contemporary technology-enhanced museums to get equipped with digital domes, some with real-time capabilities like Virtual Reality systems. By conducting extensive literature review we have come to the conclusion that little to no research has been carried out on the leaning outcomes that the combination of VR and audience interaction can provide in the immersive environments of dome theaters. Thus, we propose that audience collaboration in immersive virtual reality environments presents a promising approach to support effective learning in groups of school aged children.

  14. Virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Kate E; George, Stacey; Thomas, Susie; Deutsch, Judith E; Crotty, Maria

    2015-02-12

    Virtual reality and interactive video gaming have emerged as recent treatment approaches in stroke rehabilitation. In particular, commercial gaming consoles have been rapidly adopted in clinical settings. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2011. To determine the efficacy of virtual reality compared with an alternative intervention or no intervention on upper limb function and activity. To determine the efficacy of virtual reality compared with an alternative intervention or no intervention on: gait and balance activity, global motor function, cognitive function, activity limitation, participation restriction and quality of life, voxels or regions of interest identified via imaging, and adverse events. Additionally, we aimed to comment on the feasibility of virtual reality for use with stroke patients by reporting on patient eligibility criteria and recruitment. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1950 to November 2013), EMBASE (1980 to November 2013) and seven additional databases. We also searched trials registries and reference lists. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of virtual reality ("an advanced form of human-computer interface that allows the user to 'interact' with and become 'immersed' in a computer-generated environment in a naturalistic fashion") in adults after stroke. The primary outcome of interest was upper limb function and activity. Secondary outcomes included gait and balance function and activity, and global motor function. Two review authors independently selected trials based on pre-defined inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A third review author moderated disagreements when required. The authors contacted investigators to obtain missing information. We included 37 trials that involved 1019 participants. Study sample sizes were generally small and interventions

  15. EEG-based asynchronous BCI control of a car in 3D virtual reality environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO QiBin; ZHANG LiQing; CICHOCKI Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCl) aims at creating new communication channels without depending on brain's normal output channels of peripheral nerves and muscles.However,natural and sophisticated interactions manner between brain and computer still remain challenging.In this paper,we investigate how the duration of event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) caused by motor im-agery (MI) can be modulated and used as an additional control parameter beyond simple binary deci-sions.Furthermore,using the non-time-locked properties of sustained (de)synchronization,we have developed an asynchronous BCl system for driving a car in 3D virtual reality environment (VRE) based on cumulative incremental control strategy.The extensive real time experiments confirmed that our new approach is able to drive smoothly a virtual car within challenging VRE only by the MI tasks with-out involving any muscular activities.

  16. Can simple interactions capture complex features of neural activity underlying behavior in a virtual reality environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshulam, Leenoy; Gauthier, Jeffrey; Brody, Carlos; Tank, David; Bialek, William

    The complex neural interactions which are abundant in most recordings of neural activity are relatively poorly understood. A prime example of such interactions can be found in the in vivo neural activity which underlies complex behaviors of mice, imaged in brain regions such as hippocampus and parietal cortex. Experimental techniques now allow us to accurately follow these neural interactions in the simultaneous activity of large neuronal populations of awake behaving animals. Here, we demonstrate that pairwise maximum entropy models can predict a surprising number of properties of the neural activity. The models, that are constrained with activity rates and interactions between pairs of neurons, are well fit to the activity `states' in the hippocampus and cortex of mice performing cognitive tasks while navigating in a virtual reality environment.

  17. VIRTUAL REALITY HYPNOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askay, Shelley Wiechman; Patterson, David R; Sharar, Sam R

    2009-03-01

    Scientific evidence for the viability of hypnosis as a treatment for pain has flourished over the past two decades (Rainville, Duncan, Price, Carrier and Bushnell, 1997; Montgomery, DuHamel and Redd, 2000; Lang and Rosen, 2002; Patterson and Jensen, 2003). However its widespread use has been limited by factors such as the advanced expertise, time and effort required by clinicians to provide hypnosis, and the cognitive effort required by patients to engage in hypnosis.The theory in developing virtual reality hypnosis was to apply three-dimensional, immersive, virtual reality technology to guide the patient through the same steps used when hypnosis is induced through an interpersonal process. Virtual reality replaces many of the stimuli that the patients have to struggle to imagine via verbal cueing from the therapist. The purpose of this paper is to explore how virtual reality may be useful in delivering hypnosis, and to summarize the scientific literature to date. We will also explore various theoretical and methodological issues that can guide future research.In spite of the encouraging scientific and clinical findings, hypnosis for analgesia is not universally used in medical centres. One reason for the slow acceptance is the extensive provider training required in order for hypnosis to be an effective pain management modality. Training in hypnosis is not commonly offered in medical schools or even psychology graduate curricula. Another reason is that hypnosis requires far more time and effort to administer than an analgesic pill or injection. Hypnosis requires training, skill and patience to deliver in medical centres that are often fast-paced and highly demanding of clinician time. Finally, the attention and cognitive effort required for hypnosis may be more than patients in an acute care setting, who may be under the influence of opiates and benzodiazepines, are able to impart. It is a challenge to make hypnosis a standard part of care in this environment

  18. A standardized set of 3-D objects for virtual reality research and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, David

    2017-06-23

    The use of immersive virtual reality as a research tool is rapidly increasing in numerous scientific disciplines. By combining ecological validity with strict experimental control, immersive virtual reality provides the potential to develop and test scientific theories in rich environments that closely resemble everyday settings. This article introduces the first standardized database of colored three-dimensional (3-D) objects that can be used in virtual reality and augmented reality research and applications. The 147 objects have been normed for name agreement, image agreement, familiarity, visual complexity, and corresponding lexical characteristics of the modal object names. The availability of standardized 3-D objects for virtual reality research is important, because reaching valid theoretical conclusions hinges critically on the use of well-controlled experimental stimuli. Sharing standardized 3-D objects across different virtual reality labs will allow for science to move forward more quickly.

  19. Streaming Virtual Reality Content

    OpenAIRE

    El-Ganainy, Tarek; Hefeeda, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The recent rise of interest in Virtual Reality (VR) came with the availability of commodity commercial VR prod- ucts, such as the Head Mounted Displays (HMD) created by Oculus and other vendors. To accelerate the user adoption of VR headsets, content providers should focus on producing high quality immersive content for these devices. Similarly, multimedia streaming service providers should enable the means to stream 360 VR content on their platforms. In this study, we try to cover different ...

  20. Virtual reality exposure treatment of agoraphobia: a comparison of computer automatic virtual environment and head-mounted display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerbröker, K.; Morina, N.; Kerkhof, G.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Wiederhold, B.K.; Bouchard, S.; Riva, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this study the effects of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) were investigated in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia. The level of presence in VRET was compared between using either a head-mounted display (HMD) or a computer automatic virtual environment (CAVE). Results indicate

  1. Role-Playing a Legend in Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xun; Lee, Jack; Yamashiro, Kelly A.

    2003-01-01

    Reports a case study of thirteen college students engaging in a role-play activity of a Maui legend in a virtual reality environment. Immersed in the authentic cultural environment, the students not only interacted with the environment and each other, but recreated the legend based on their interpretation of the culture. (CAK)

  2. A Review on Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Halarnkar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality is a major asset and aspect of our future. It is the key to experiencing, feeling and touching the past, present and the future. It is the medium of creating our own world, our own customized reality. It could range from creating a video game to having a virtual stroll around the universe, from walking through our own dream house to experiencing a walk on an alien planet. With virtual reality, we can experience the most intimidating and gruelling situations by playing safe and with a learning perspective. In this review paper, we present our survey about virtual reality: the levels of virtual reality, the components used, the factors affecting the virtual environment, its origin, future and the challenges to overcome in order to obtain an impeccable virtual reality experience.

  3. Virtual reality experiments linking social environment and psychosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Wim; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Dorrestijn, Emily; van der Gaag, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Initial studies with healthy subjects and individuals with high risk for psychosis have suggested that virtual reality (VR) environments may be used to investigate social and psychological mechanisms of psychosis. One small study reported that VR can safely be used in individuals with current persecutory delusions. The present pilot study investigated the feasibility and potential negative side effects of exposure to different virtual social risk environments in patients with first episode psychosis and in healthy controls. Seventeen patients with first episode psychosis (FEP) and 24 healthy control subjects (HC) participated in four virtual experiments during which they walked for 3.5-4 minutes in a virtual café, looking for avatars with digits on their clothing. The level of paranoid thoughts, as well as psychological, physiological, and behavioral correlates of paranoid thoughts, were measured in different virtual social risk environments, manipulating two factors: population density and ethnicity of avatars. FEP and HC frequently had paranoid thoughts about avatars. Paranoia in the real world correlated strongly with paranoid thoughts about avatars in virtual environments (Spearman's ρ=0.67 and 0.54 in FEP and HC respectively, pvirtual environments with avatars of other ethnicity than in the own ethnicity condition. These results suggest that VR is an acceptable and sufficiently realistic method to use in patients with first episode psychosis. VR research may help to increase our understanding of the social and psychological mechanisms of psychosis and to develop new treatment applications.

  4. A rapid evidence assessment of immersive virtual reality as an adjunct therapy in acute pain management in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bernie; Taverner, Tarnia; Masinde, Wendy; Gromala, Diane; Shaw, Chris; Negraeff, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Immersive virtual reality (IVR) therapy has been explored as an adjunct therapy for the management of acute pain among children and adults for several conditions. Therapeutic approaches have traditionally involved medication and physiotherapy but such approaches are limited over time by their cost and side effects. This review seeks to critically evaluate the evidence for and against IVR as an adjunctive therapy for acute clinical pain applications. A rapid evidence assessment (REA) strategy was used. CINAHL, Medline, Web of Science, IEEE Xplore Digital Library, and the Cochrane Library databases were screened in from December 2012 to March 2013 to identify studies exploring IVR therapies as an intervention to assist in the management of pain. Main outcome measures were for acute pain and functional impairment. Seventeen research studies were included in total including 5 RCTs, 6 randomized crossover studies, 2 case series studies, and 4 single-patient case studies. This included a total of 337 patients. Of these studies only 4 had a low risk of bias. There was strong overall evidence for immediate and short-term pain reduction, whereas moderate evidence was found for short-term effects on physical function. Little evidence exists for longer-term benefits. IVR was not associated with any serious adverse events. This review found moderate evidence for the reduction of pain and functional impairment after IVR in patients with acute pain. Further high-quality studies are required for the conclusive judgment of its effectiveness in acute pain, to establish potential benefits for chronic pain, and for safety.

  5. The use of immersive virtual reality (VR) to predict the occurrence 6 months later of paranoid thinking and posttraumatic stress symptoms assessed by self-report and interviewer methods: a study of individuals who have been physically assaulted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Antley, Angus; Ehlers, Anke; Dunn, Graham; Thompson, Claire; Vorontsova, Natasha; Garety, Philippa; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Glucksman, Edward; Slater, Mel

    2014-09-01

    Presentation of social situations via immersive virtual reality (VR) has the potential to be an ecologically valid way of assessing psychiatric symptoms. In this study we assess the occurrence of paranoid thinking and of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in response to a single neutral VR social environment as predictors of later psychiatric symptoms assessed by standard methods. One hundred six people entered an immersive VR social environment (a train ride), presented via a head-mounted display, 4 weeks after having attended hospital because of a physical assault. Paranoid thinking about the neutral computer-generated characters and the occurrence of PTSD symptoms in VR were assessed. Reactions in VR were then used to predict the occurrence 6 months later of symptoms of paranoia and PTSD, as assessed by standard interviewer and self-report methods. Responses to VR predicted the severity of paranoia and PTSD symptoms as assessed by standard measures 6 months later. The VR assessments also added predictive value to the baseline interviewer methods, especially for paranoia. Brief exposure to environments presented via virtual reality provides a symptom assessment with predictive ability over many months. VR assessment may be of particular benefit for difficult to assess problems, such as paranoia, that have no gold standard assessment method. In the future, VR environments may be used in the clinic to complement standard self-report and clinical interview methods.

  6. Psychological and physiological human responses to simulated and real environments: A comparison between Photographs, 360° Panoramas, and Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera-Trujillo, Juan Luis; López-Tarruella Maldonado, Juan; Llinares Millán, Carmen

    2017-11-01

    Psychological research into human factors frequently uses simulations to study the relationship between human behaviour and the environment. Their validity depends on their similarity with the physical environments. This paper aims to validate three environmental-simulation display formats: photographs, 360° panoramas, and virtual reality. To do this we compared the psychological and physiological responses evoked by simulated environments set-ups to those from a physical environment setup; we also assessed the users' sense of presence. Analysis show that 360° panoramas offer the closest to reality results according to the participants' psychological responses, and virtual reality according to the physiological responses. Correlations between the feeling of presence and physiological and other psychological responses were also observed. These results may be of interest to researchers using environmental-simulation technologies currently available in order to replicate the experience of physical environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. RELATIVE PANORAMIC CAMERA POSITION ESTIMATION FOR IMAGE-BASED VIRTUAL REALITY NETWORKS IN INDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nakagawa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Image-based virtual reality (VR is a virtual space generated with panoramic images projected onto a primitive model. In imagebased VR, realistic VR scenes can be generated with lower rendering cost, and network data can be described as relationships among VR scenes. The camera network data are generated manually or by an automated procedure using camera position and rotation data. When panoramic images are acquired in indoor environments, network data should be generated without Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS positioning data. Thus, we focused on image-based VR generation using a panoramic camera in indoor environments. We propose a methodology to automate network data generation using panoramic images for an image-based VR space. We verified and evaluated our methodology through five experiments in indoor environments, including a corridor, elevator hall, room, and stairs. We confirmed that our methodology can automatically reconstruct network data using panoramic images for image-based VR in indoor environments without GNSS position data.

  8. Virtual reality and the CAVE: Taxonomy, interaction challenges and research directions

    OpenAIRE

    Muhanna A. Muhanna

    2015-01-01

    One of the main goals of virtual reality is to provide immersive environments that take participants away from the real life into a virtual one. Many investigators have been interested in bringing new technologies, devices, and applications to facilitate this goal. Few, however, have focused on the specific human–computer interaction aspects of such environments. In this article we present our literature review of virtual reality and the Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE). In particula...

  9. A hardware and software architecture to deal with multimodal and collaborative interactions in multiuser virtual reality environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Tseu, A.; Férey, N.; Touraine, D.; Bourdot, P.

    2014-02-01

    Most advanced immersive devices provide collaborative environment within several users have their distinct head-tracked stereoscopic point of view. Combining with common used interactive features such as voice and gesture recognition, 3D mouse, haptic feedback, and spatialized audio rendering, these environments should faithfully reproduce a real context. However, even if many studies have been carried out on multimodal systems, we are far to definitively solve the issue of multimodal fusion, which consists in merging multimodal events coming from users and devices, into interpretable commands performed by the application. Multimodality and collaboration was often studied separately, despite of the fact that these two aspects share interesting similarities. We discuss how we address this problem, thought the design and implementation of a supervisor that is able to deal with both multimodal fusion and collaborative aspects. The aim of this supervisor is to ensure the merge of user's input from virtual reality devices in order to control immersive multi-user applications. We deal with this problem according to a practical point of view, because the main requirements of this supervisor was defined according to a industrial task proposed by our automotive partner, that as to be performed with multimodal and collaborative interactions in a co-located multi-user environment. In this task, two co-located workers of a virtual assembly chain has to cooperate to insert a seat into the bodywork of a car, using haptic devices to feel collision and to manipulate objects, combining speech recognition and two hands gesture recognition as multimodal instructions. Besides the architectural aspect of this supervisor, we described how we ensure the modularity of our solution that could apply on different virtual reality platforms, interactive contexts and virtual contents. A virtual context observer included in this supervisor in was especially designed to be independent to the

  10. A training platform for many-dimensional prosthetic devices using a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrino, David; Wong, Yan T; Weiss, Adam; Pesaran, Bijan

    2015-04-15

    Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) have the potential to assist in the rehabilitation of millions of patients worldwide. Despite recent advancements in BMI technology for the restoration of lost motor function, a training environment to restore full control of the anatomical segments of an upper limb extremity has not yet been presented. Here, we develop a virtual upper limb prosthesis with 27 independent dimensions, the anatomical dimensions of the human arm and hand, and deploy the virtual prosthesis as an avatar in a virtual reality environment (VRE) that can be controlled in real-time. The prosthesis avatar accepts kinematic control inputs that can be captured from movements of the arm and hand as well as neural control inputs derived from processed neural signals. We characterize the system performance under kinematic control using a commercially available motion capture system. We also present the performance under kinematic control achieved by two non-human primates (Macaca Mulatta) trained to use the prosthetic avatar to perform reaching and grasping tasks. This is the first virtual prosthetic device that is capable of emulating all the anatomical movements of a healthy upper limb in real-time. Since the system accepts both neural and kinematic inputs for a variety of many-dimensional skeletons, we propose it provides a customizable training platform for the acquisition of many-dimensional neural prosthetic control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recovering stereo vision by squashing virtual bugs in a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedamurthy, Indu; Knill, David C; Huang, Samuel J; Yung, Amanda; Ding, Jian; Kwon, Oh-Sang; Bavelier, Daphne; Levi, Dennis M

    2016-06-19

    Stereopsis is the rich impression of three-dimensionality, based on binocular disparity-the differences between the two retinal images of the same world. However, a substantial proportion of the population is stereo-deficient, and relies mostly on monocular cues to judge the relative depth or distance of objects in the environment. Here we trained adults who were stereo blind or stereo-deficient owing to strabismus and/or amblyopia in a natural visuomotor task-a 'bug squashing' game-in a virtual reality environment. The subjects' task was to squash a virtual dichoptic bug on a slanted surface, by hitting it with a physical cylinder they held in their hand. The perceived surface slant was determined by monocular texture and stereoscopic cues, with these cues being either consistent or in conflict, allowing us to track the relative weighting of monocular versus stereoscopic cues as training in the task progressed. Following training most participants showed greater reliance on stereoscopic cues, reduced suppression and improved stereoacuity. Importantly, the training-induced changes in relative stereo weights were significant predictors of the improvements in stereoacuity. We conclude that some adults deprived of normal binocular vision and insensitive to the disparity information can, with appropriate experience, recover access to more reliable stereoscopic information.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'.

  12. Using virtual reality environment to facilitate training with advanced upper-limb prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in upper-limb prosthetic design offer dramatically increased possibilities for powered movement. The DEKA Arm system allows users 10 powered degrees of movement. Learning to control these movements by utilizing a set of motions that, in most instances, differ from those used to obtain the desired action prior to amputation is a challenge for users. In the Department of Veterans Affairs "Study to Optimize the DEKA Arm," we attempted to facilitate motor learning by using a virtual reality environment (VRE program. This VRE program allows users to practice controlling an avatar using the controls designed to operate the DEKA Arm in the real world. In this article, we provide highlights from our experiences implementing VRE in training amputees to use the full DEKA Arm. This article discusses the use of VRE in amputee rehabilitation, describes the VRE system used with the DEKA Arm, describes VRE training, provides qualitative data from a case study of a subject, and provides recommendations for future research and implementation of VRE in amputee rehabilitation. Our experience has led us to believe that training with VRE is particularly valuable for upper-limb amputees who must master a large number of controls and for those amputees who need a structured learning environment because of cognitive deficits.

  13. A novel semi-immersive virtual reality visuo-motor task activates ventrolateral prefrontal cortex: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Moro, Sara; Carrieri, Marika; Avola, Danilo; Brigadoi, Sabrina; Lancia, Stefania; Petracca, Andrea; Spezialetti, Matteo; Ferrari, Marco; Placidi, Giuseppe; Quaresima, Valentina

    2016-06-01

    Objective. In the last few years, the interest in applying virtual reality systems for neurorehabilitation is increasing. Their compatibility with neuroimaging techniques, such as functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), allows for the investigation of brain reorganization with multimodal stimulation and real-time control of the changes occurring in brain activity. The present study was aimed at testing a novel semi-immersive visuo-motor task (VMT), which has the features of being adopted in the field of neurorehabilitation of the upper limb motor function. Approach. A virtual environment was simulated through a three-dimensional hand-sensing device (the LEAP Motion Controller), and the concomitant VMT-related prefrontal cortex (PFC) response was monitored non-invasively by fNIRS. Upon the VMT, performed at three different levels of difficulty, it was hypothesized that the PFC would be activated with an expected greater level of activation in the ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC), given its involvement in the motor action planning and in the allocation of the attentional resources to generate goals from current contexts. Twenty-one subjects were asked to move their right hand/forearm with the purpose of guiding a virtual sphere over a virtual path. A twenty-channel fNIRS system was employed for measuring changes in PFC oxygenated-deoxygenated hemoglobin (O2Hb/HHb, respectively). Main results. A VLPFC O2Hb increase and a concomitant HHb decrease were observed during the VMT performance, without any difference in relation to the task difficulty. Significance. The present study has revealed a particular involvement of the VLPFC in the execution of the novel proposed semi-immersive VMT adoptable in the neurorehabilitation field.

  14. Incorporating Kansei Engineering in instructional design: Designing virtual reality based learning environments from a novel perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Man Chuah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the application of virtual reality (VR technology in education is rapidly gaining momentum. The educational benefits offered by such technology have prompted many educators as well as instructional designers to investigate ways to create effective and engaging VR learning. Instructional designers have examined widely the capability of VR in influencing the cognitive capacity as well as motivational processes of learners. Nonetheless, one often-neglected aspect is its ability to stimulate emotions, which in turn can affect learning. With the current intense interest in designing emotionally sound instructional applications, this paper proposes a new outlook by incorporating Kansei Engineering methodology in the instructional design process. Specifically, as part of an on-going project, it describes how Kansei Engineering method can be incorporated in the design of VR based learning environments based on the model suggested by Chen, Toh and Wan (2004. The proposed method is not only able to facilitate the instructional designers in identifying desired design elements but also to refine the methods prescribed in an instructional model.

  15. Conditioned place preference and aversion for music in a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molet, Mikaël; Billiet, Gauthier; Bardo, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    The use of a virtual reality environment (VRE) enables behavioral scientists to create different spatial contexts in which human participants behave freely, while still confined to the laboratory. In this article, VRE was used to study conditioned place preference (CPP) and aversion (CPA). In Experiment 1, half of the participants were asked to visit a house for 2 min with consonant music and then they were asked to visit an alternate house with static noise for 2 min, whereas the remaining participants did the visits in reverse order. In Experiment 2, we used the same design as Experiment 1, except for replacing consonant music with dissonant music. After conditioning in both experiments, the participants were given a choice between spending time in the two houses. In Experiment 1, participants spent more time in the house associated with the consonant music, thus showing a CPP toward that house. In Experiment 2, participants spent less time in the house associated with the dissonant music, thus showing a CPA for that house. These results support VRE as a tool to extend research on CPP/CPA in humans.

  16. Stereoscopic neuroanatomy lectures using a three-dimensional virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockro, Ralf A; Amaxopoulou, Christina; Killeen, Tim; Wagner, Wolfgang; Reisch, Robert; Schwandt, Eike; Gutenberg, Angelika; Giese, Alf; Stofft, Eckart; Stadie, Axel T

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics are increasingly used to supplement the teaching of anatomy. While most systems consist of a program which produces 3D renderings on a workstation with a standard screen, the Dextrobeam virtual reality VR environment allows the presentation of spatial neuroanatomical models to larger groups of students through a stereoscopic projection system. Second-year medical students (n=169) were randomly allocated to receive a standardised pre-recorded audio lecture detailing the anatomy of the third ventricle accompanied by either a two-dimensional (2D) PowerPoint presentation (n=80) or a 3D animated tour of the third ventricle with the DextroBeam. Students completed a 10-question multiple-choice exam based on the content learned and a subjective evaluation of the teaching method immediately after the lecture. Students in the 2D group achieved a mean score of 5.19 (±2.12) compared to 5.45 (±2.16) in the 3D group, with the results in the 3D group statistically non-inferior to those of the 2D group (pteaching in four domains (spatial understanding, application in future anatomy classes, effectiveness, enjoyableness) (p<0.01). Stereoscopically enhanced 3D lectures are valid methods of imparting neuroanatomical knowledge and are well received by students. More research is required to define and develop the role of large-group VR systems in modern neuroanatomy curricula. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Heading assessment by “tunnel vision” patients and control subjects standing or walking in a virtual reality environment

    OpenAIRE

    Apfelbaum, Henry; Pelah, Adar; Peli, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Virtual reality locomotion simulators are a promising tool for evaluating the effectiveness of vision aids to mobility for people with low vision. This study examined two factors to gain insight into the verisimilitude requirements of the test environment: the effects of treadmill walking and the suitability of using controls as surrogate patients. Ten “tunnel vision” patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were tasked with identifying which side of a clearly visible obstacle their heading th...

  18. Reducing Specific Phobia/Fear in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) through a Virtual Reality Environment Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is common in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), with specific fears and phobias one of the most frequent subtypes. Specific fears and phobias can have a serious impact on young people with ASD and their families. In this study we developed and evaluated a unique treatment combining cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) with graduated exposure in a virtual reality environment (VRE). Nine verbally fluent boys with an ASD diagnosis and no reported learning disability, aged 7 to 1...

  19. Foreign language learning in immersive virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Benjamin; Sheldon, Lee; Si, Mei; Hand, Anton

    2012-03-01

    Virtual reality has long been used for training simulations in fields from medicine to welding to vehicular operation, but simulations involving more complex cognitive skills present new design challenges. Foreign language learning, for example, is increasingly vital in the global economy, but computer-assisted education is still in its early stages. Immersive virtual reality is a promising avenue for language learning as a way of dynamically creating believable scenes for conversational training and role-play simulation. Visual immersion alone, however, only provides a starting point. We suggest that the addition of social interactions and motivated engagement through narrative gameplay can lead to truly effective language learning in virtual environments. In this paper, we describe the development of a novel application for teaching Mandarin using CAVE-like VR, physical props, human actors and intelligent virtual agents, all within a semester-long multiplayer mystery game. Students travel (virtually) to China on a class field trip, which soon becomes complicated with intrigue and mystery surrounding the lost manuscript of an early Chinese literary classic. Virtual reality environments such as the Forbidden City and a Beijing teahouse provide the setting for learning language, cultural traditions, and social customs, as well as the discovery of clues through conversation in Mandarin with characters in the game.

  20. Virtual Reality with Haptic Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李益明; 吕慧强; 孔繁胜

    2004-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is the use of advanced technologies, including computers and various multimedia peripherals (such as haptic), to produce a simulated environment that users perceive as comparable to real world objects and events. With the aid of specially designed transducers and sensors, users interact with displayed images, moving and manipulating virtual objects, and performing other actions in a way that engenders a feeling of actual presence (immersion) in the simulated environment. Haptic interfaces provide carefully controlled force feedback to the fingers of the user so that they feel as though they are touching objects in the virtual landscape. This article presented an overview to the concepts of VR focusing on haptics in a variety of interfaces and applications.

  1. Event-Centered Maze Generation Method for Mobile Virtual Reality Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisung Jeong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a method of effectively creating mobile virtual reality scenes centered at events for the purpose of providing new experiences in virtual reality environment to users. For this purpose, this paper uses Prim’s maze generation algorithm to automatically create maze environments that have different patterns every time and to compute mazes with finite paths. This paper designs a scheme of creating virtual reality scenes based on event-centered mazes to maximize users’ tension and immersion. Here, event components that are appropriate for the maze environment are defined and maze patterns are created centered at the event point where events that are appropriate for the maze pattern are automatically created. Finally, the paper analyzes whether the proposed virtual reality scene based on event-centered mazes is helpful in enhancing users’ immersion and arousing their interest through diverse experiments.

  2. A novel virtual reality environment for preoperative planning and simulation of image guided intracardiac surgeries with robotic manipulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniaras, Erol; Deng, Zhigang; Syed, Mushabbar A; Davies, Mark G; Tsekos, Nikolaos V

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of image-guided and robot-assisted procedures can be beneficial to intracardiac interventions. This paper proposes a novel approach and a virtual reality system for preoperative planning and intraoperative guidance of cardiac procedures, and for investigating the kinematics and control of a virtual robotic manipulator, based on MRI CINE images. The system incorporates dedicated software modules for processing MR images, generating dynamic trajectories in the continuously changing environment of a beating heart, controlling a specific generic virtual manipulator along those trajectories, and a virtual reality interface that fuses all those information. The proposed system is applied for the simulation of accessing the aortic valve annulus via a small incision on the apex by maneuvering a robotic manipulator through an access corridor that safely transverses the left ventricle (LV) of the beating heart.

  3. Exploring Learner Acceptance of the Use of Virtual Reality in Medical Education: A Case Study of Desktop and Projection-Based Display Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiu-Mei; Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Lai, Chung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Advanced technologies have been widely applied in medical education, including human-patient simulators, immersive virtual reality Cave Automatic Virtual Environment systems, and video conferencing. Evaluating learner acceptance of such virtual reality (VR) learning environments is a critical issue for ensuring that such technologies are used to…

  4. The Impact of Virtual Reality Environments on Body Movement and Concentration Skills. A Successful Attempt at Teaching Novice Computer Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Zaretsky

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at investigating the impact of virtual reality technology on body movement and concentration skills by physical education MA students and pupils through action research. The design and manipulation of virtual reality is based on applying the virtual reality environment to the real world as much as possible by controlling space. The researcher taught the method to 55 MA students majoring in physical education. Such procedures were held among various populations. The findings showed that the connection between virtual and human movements and the application of this connection in physical education lessons became clear to the students as they practiced the simulation design and manipulation through specific simulative software. The students used their unique disciplinary programs in their teaching work and reported their pupils' improvement in physical activities and concentration skills. The students were able to integrate theory and practice in their teaching and improved their level of academic writing. The motivation of the students and their pupils to control, design and manipulate virtual environments was also enhanced.

  5. The Responses of Medical General Practitioners to Unreasonable Patient Demand for Antibiotics--A Study of Medical Ethics Using Immersive Virtual Reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueni Pan

    Full Text Available Dealing with insistent patient demand for antibiotics is an all too common part of a General Practitioner's daily routine. This study explores the extent to which portable Immersive Virtual Reality technology can help us gain an accurate understanding of the factors that influence a doctor's response to the ethical challenge underlying such tenacious requests for antibiotics (given the threat posed by growing anti-bacterial resistance worldwide. It also considers the potential of such technology to train doctors to face such dilemmas.Twelve experienced GPs and nine trainees were confronted with an increasingly angry demand by a woman to prescribe antibiotics to her mother in the face of inconclusive evidence that such antibiotic prescription is necessary. The daughter and mother were virtual characters displayed in immersive virtual reality. The specific purposes of the study were twofold: first, whether experienced GPs would be more resistant to patient demands than the trainees, and second, to investigate whether medical doctors would take the virtual situation seriously.Eight out of the 9 trainees prescribed the antibiotics, whereas 7 out of the 12 GPs did so. On the basis of a Bayesian analysis, these results yield reasonable statistical evidence in favor of the notion that experienced GPs are more likely to withstand the pressure to prescribe antibiotics than trainee doctors, thus answering our first question positively. As for the second question, a post experience questionnaire assessing the participants' level of presence (together with participants' feedback and body language suggested that overall participants did tend towards the illusion of being in the consultation room depicted in the virtual reality and that the virtual consultation taking place was really happening.

  6. Photogrammetry and remote sensing for visualization of spatial data in a virtual reality environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagawati, Dwipen

    2001-07-01

    Researchers in many disciplines have started using the tool of Virtual Reality (VR) to gain new insights into problems in their respective disciplines. Recent advances in computer graphics, software and hardware technologies have created many opportunities for VR systems, advanced scientific and engineering applications being among them. In Geometronics, generally photogrammetry and remote sensing are used for management of spatial data inventory. VR technology can be suitably used for management of spatial data inventory. This research demonstrates usefulness of VR technology for inventory management by taking the roadside features as a case study. Management of roadside feature inventory involves positioning and visualization of the features. This research has developed a methodology to demonstrate how photogrammetric principles can be used to position the features using the video-logging images and GPS camera positioning and how image analysis can help produce appropriate texture for building the VR, which then can be visualized in a Cave Augmented Virtual Environment (CAVE). VR modeling was implemented in two stages to demonstrate the different approaches for modeling the VR scene. A simulated highway scene was implemented with the brute force approach, while modeling software was used to model the real world scene using feature positions produced in this research. The first approach demonstrates an implementation of the scene by writing C++ codes to include a multi-level wand menu for interaction with the scene that enables the user to interact with the scene. The interactions include editing the features inside the CAVE display, navigating inside the scene, and performing limited geographic analysis. The second approach demonstrates creation of a VR scene for a real roadway environment using feature positions determined in this research. The scene looks realistic with textures from the real site mapped on to the geometry of the scene. Remote sensing and

  7. Controlling a stream of paranoia evoking events in a virtual reality environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isnanda, Reza Giga; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Veling, Wim; van der Gaag, Mark; Neerincx, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Although virtual reality exposure has been reported as a method to induce paranoid thought, little is known about mechanisms to control specific virtual stressors. This paper reports on a study that examines the effect of controlling the stream of potential paranoia evoking events in a virtual resta

  8. Controlling a stream of paranoia evoking events in a virtual reality environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isnanda, Reza Giga; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Veling, Wim; van der Gaag, Mark; Neerincx, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Although virtual reality exposure has been reported as a method to induce paranoid thought, little is known about mechanisms to control specific virtual stressors. This paper reports on a study that examines the effect of controlling the stream of potential paranoia evoking events in a virtual

  9. ATLASrift - a Virtual Reality application

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00225336; Moyse, Edward; Bianchi, Riccardo Maria

    2015-01-01

    We present ATLASrift - a Virtual Reality application that provides an interactive, immersive visit to ATLAS experiment. We envision it being used in two different ways: first as an educational and outreach tool - for schools, universities, museums and interested individuals, and secondly as an event viewer for ATLAS physicists - for them it will provide a much better spatial awareness of an event, track and jet directions, occupancies and interactions with detector structures. Using it, one can learn about the experiment as a whole, visit individual sub-detectors, view real interactions, or take a scripted walkthrough explaining questions physicists are trying to answer. We briefly describe our platform of choice - OculusRift VR system, the development environment - UnrealEngine, and, in detail, the numerous technically demanding requirements that had to be fulfilled in order to provide a comfortable user experience. Plans for future versions include making the experience social by adding multi-user/virtual p...

  10. ATLASrift - a Virtual Reality application

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present ATLASrift - a Virtual Reality application that provides an interactive, immersive visit to ATLAS experiment. We envision it being used in two different ways: first as an educational and outreach tool - for schools, universities, museums and interested individuals, and secondly as an event viewer for ATLAS physicists – for them it will provide a much better spatial awareness of an event, track and jet directions, occupancies and interactions with detector structures. Using it, one can learn about the experiment as a whole, visit individual sub-detectors, view real interactions, or take a scripted walkthrough explaining questions physicists are trying to answer. We briefly describe our platform of choice – OculusRift VR system, the development environment – UnrealEngine, and, in detail, the numerous technically demanding requirements that had to be fulfilled in order to provide a comfortable user experience. Plans for future versions include making the experience social by adding multi-user/vir...

  11. ATLASrift - a Virtual Reality application

    CERN Document Server

    Vukotic, Ilija; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present ATLASrift - a Virtual Reality application that provides an interactive, immersive visit to ATLAS experiment. We envision it being used in two different ways: first as an educational and outreach tool - for schools, universities, museums and interested individuals, and secondly as an event viewer for ATLAS physicists – for them it will provide a much better spatial awareness of an event, track and jet directions, occupancies and interactions with detector structures. Using it, one can learn about the experiment as a whole, visit individual sub-detectors, view real interactions, or take a scripted walkthrough explaining questions physicists are trying to answer. We briefly describe our platform of choice – OculusRift VR system, the development environment – UnrealEngine, and, in detail, the numerous technically demanding requirements that had to be fulfilled in order to provide a comfortable user experience. Plans for future versions include making the experience social by adding multi-user/vir...

  12. Self-paced brain-computer interface control of ambulation in a virtual reality environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po T.; King, Christine E.; Chui, Luis A.; Do, An H.; Nenadic, Zoran

    2012-10-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leaves affected individuals unable to ambulate. Electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled lower extremity prostheses may restore intuitive and able-body-like ambulation after SCI. To test its feasibility, the authors developed and tested a novel EEG-based, data-driven BCI system for intuitive and self-paced control of the ambulation of an avatar within a virtual reality environment (VRE). Approach. Eight able-bodied subjects and one with SCI underwent the following 10-min training session: subjects alternated between idling and walking kinaesthetic motor imageries (KMI) while their EEG were recorded and analysed to generate subject-specific decoding models. Subjects then performed a goal-oriented online task, repeated over five sessions, in which they utilized the KMI to control the linear ambulation of an avatar and make ten sequential stops at designated points within the VRE. Main results. The average offline training performance across subjects was 77.2±11.0%, ranging from 64.3% (p = 0.001 76) to 94.5% (p = 6.26×10-23), with chance performance being 50%. The average online performance was 8.5±1.1 (out of 10) successful stops and 303±53 s completion time (perfect = 211 s). All subjects achieved performances significantly different than those of random walk (p ambulation after only 10 minutes training. The ability to achieve such BCI control with minimal training indicates that the implementation of future BCI-lower extremity prosthesis systems may be feasible.

  13. Honeybees in a virtual reality environment learn unique combinations of colour and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Claire; Roth, Eatai; Vinauger, Clément; Riffell, Jeffrey A

    2017-07-27

    Honeybees are well-known models for the study of visual learning and memory. Whereas most of our knowledge of learned responses comes from experiments using free-flying bees, a tethered preparation would allow fine-scale control of the visual stimuli as well as accurate characterization of the learned responses. Unfortunately, conditioning procedures using visual stimuli in tethered bees have been limited in their efficacy. Here in this study, using a novel virtual reality environment and a differential training protocol in tethered walking bees, we show that the majority of honeybees learn visual stimuli, and need only six paired training trials to learn the stimulus. We found that bees readily learn visual stimuli that differ in both shape and colour. However, bees learn certain components over others (colour versus shape), and visual stimuli are learned in a non-additive manner with the interaction of specific colour and shape combinations being critical for learned responses. To better understand which components of the visual stimuli the bees learned, the shape-colour association of the stimuli were reversed either during or after training. Results showed that maintaining the visual stimuli in training and testing phases was necessary to elicit visual learning, suggesting that bees learn multiple components of the visual stimuli. Together, our results demonstrate a protocol for visual learning in restrained bees that provides a powerful tool for understanding how components of a visual stimulus elicits learned responses as well as elucidating how visual information is processed in the honeybee brain. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Assessing the use of immersive virtual reality, mouse and touchscreen in pointing and dragging-and-dropping tasks among young, middle-aged and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiayin; Or, Calvin

    2017-11-01

    This study assessed the use of an immersive virtual reality (VR), a mouse and a touchscreen for one-directional pointing, multi-directional pointing, and dragging-and-dropping tasks involving targets of smaller and larger widths by young (n = 18; 18-30 years), middle-aged (n = 18; 40-55 years) and older adults (n = 18; 65-75 years). A three-way, mixed-factorial design was used for data collection. The dependent variables were the movement time required and the error rate. Our main findings were that the participants took more time and made more errors in using the VR input interface than in using the mouse or the touchscreen. This pattern applied in all three age groups in all tasks, except for multi-directional pointing with a larger target width among the older group. Overall, older adults took longer to complete the tasks and made more errors than young or middle-aged adults. Larger target widths yielded shorter movement times and lower error rates in pointing tasks, but larger targets yielded higher rates of error in dragging-and-dropping tasks. Our study indicated that any other virtual environments that are similar to those we tested may be more suitable for displaying scenes than for manipulating objects that are small and require fine control. Although interacting with VR is relatively difficult, especially for older adults, there is still potential for older adults to adapt to that interface. Furthermore, adjusting the width of objects according to the type of manipulation required might be an effective way to promote performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Short-term motor learning through non-immersive virtual reality task in individuals with down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira; da Silva, Talita Dias; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fregni, Felipe; de Araujo, Luciano Vieira; Ferreira, Fernando Henrique Inocêncio Borba; Leone, Claudio

    2017-04-14

    Down syndrome (DS) has unique physical, motor and cognitive characteristics. Despite cognitive and motor difficulties, there is a possibility of intervention based on the knowledge of motor learning. However, it is important to study the motor learning process in individuals with DS during a virtual reality task to justify the use of virtual reality to organize intervention programs. The aim of this study was to analyze the motor learning process in individuals with DS during a virtual reality task. A total of 40 individuals participated in this study, 20 of whom had DS (24 males and 8 females, mean age of 19 years, ranging between 14 and 30 yrs.) and 20 typically developing individuals (TD) who were matched by age and gender to the individuals with DS. To examine this issue, we used software that uses 3D images and reproduced a coincidence-timing task. The results showed that all individuals improved performance in the virtual task, but the individuals with DS that started the task with worse performance showed higher difference from the beginning. Besides that, they were able to retain and transfer the performance with increase of speed of the task. Individuals with DS are able to learn movements from virtual tasks, even though the movement time was higher compared to the TD individuals. The results showed that individuals with DS who started with low performance improved coincidence- timing task with virtual objects, but were less accurate than typically developing individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02719600 .

  16. Automatic Detection of Nausea Using Bio-Signals During Immerging in A Virtual Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    environment for analyzing the change of bio -signals during VR immersion, where subjects were requested to find trash cans in the virtual environment...within five minutes. Each subject’s various bio -signals, which were EEGs from 5 different locations, vertical EOG, Lead I ECG, fingertip skin

  17. Simulation of Emergency Evacuation in Virtual Reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Aizhu; CHEN Chi; LUO Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A virtual reality system was developed to simulate emergency evacuations during fires.The spreading of the flame and smoke in the virtual fire was modeled based on numerical fire simulations,so that the conditions are similar to real life.A multi-grid,multi-base-state database model was used to overcome the disadvantages of traditional smoke spreading simulations.Textured images and particle systems provide visualization of the flame and smoke.The system immerses the user in a virtual environment with detailed interactions between the users and the virtual environment.The system can show which evacuation methods are effective for building safety evaluations.

  18. Physics Education in Virtual Reality: An Example

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hannes Kaufmann; Bernd Meyer

    2009-01-01

    We present an immersive virtual reality (VR) application for physics education. It utilizes a recent physics engine developed for the PC gaming market to simulate physical experiments correctly and accurately...

  19. Tele-Immersive medical educational environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhuming; Dech, Fred; Silverstein, Jonathan; Rasmussen, Mary

    2002-01-01

    By combining teleconferencing, tele-presence, and Virtual Reality, the Tele-Immersive environment enables master surgeons to teach residents in remote locations. The design and implementation of a Tele-Immersive medical educational environment, Teledu, is presented in this paper. Teledu defines a set of Tele-Immersive user interfaces for medical education. In addition, an Application Programming Interface (API) is provided so that developers can easily develop different applications with different requirements in this environment. With the help of this API, programmers only need to design a plug-in to load their application specific data set. The plug-in is an object-oriented data set loader. Methods for rendering, handling, and interacting with the data set for each application can be programmed in the plug-in. The environment has a teacher mode and a student mode. The teacher and the students can interact with the same medical models, point, gesture, converse, and see each other.

  20. Virtual Reality Educational Tool for Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Santiago González; Juanes Méndez, Juan A; Palomera, Pablo Ruisoto

    2017-05-01

    Virtual Reality is becoming widespread in our society within very different areas, from industry to entertainment. It has many advantages in education as well, since it allows visualizing almost any object or going anywhere in a unique way. We will be focusing on medical education, and more specifically anatomy, where its use is especially interesting because it allows studying any structure of the human body by placing the user inside each one. By allowing virtual immersion in a body structure such as the interior of the cranium, stereoscopic vision goggles make these innovative teaching technologies a powerful tool for training in all areas of health sciences. The aim of this study is to illustrate the teaching potential of applying Virtual Reality in the field of human anatomy, where it can be used as a tool for education in medicine. A Virtual Reality Software was developed as an educational tool. This technological procedure is based entirely on software which will run in stereoscopic goggles to give users the sensation of being in a virtual environment, clearly showing the different bones and foramina which make up the cranium, and accompanied by audio explanations. Throughout the results the structure of the cranium is described in detailed from both inside and out. Importance of an exhaustive morphological knowledge of cranial fossae is further discussed. Application for the design of microsurgery is also commented.

  1. Development of an integrity evaluation system on the basis of cooperative virtual reality environment for reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.C.; Choi, J.B.; Kim, Y.J. [SAFE Research Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Kyunggi-do (Korea); Choi, Y.H.; Park, Y.W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety, Daijon (Korea); Yoshimura, S. [Inst. of Environmental Studies, The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Since early 1950's, the fracture mechanics has brought significant impact on structural integrity assessment in a wide range of industries such as power, transportation, civil and petrochemical industries, especially in nuclear power plant industries. For the last two decades, significant efforts have been devoted in developing defect assessment procedures, and as a result, various fitness-for-purpose or fitness-for-service codes have been developed. From another aspect, recent advances in IT (information technologies) bring rapid changes in various engineering fields. IT enables people to share information through network and thus provides concurrent working environment without limitations of locations. For this reason, a network system based on internet or intranet bas been appeared in various fields of business. Evaluating the integrity of critical components is one of the most critical issues in the nuclear industry. In order to evaluate the integrity of structures, a complicated and collaborative procedure is required including periodical in-service inspection, fracture mechanics analysis, etc. And thus, experts in different fields have to cooperate to resolve the integrity problem. In this paper, an integrity evaluation system on the basis of cooperative virtual reality environment for reactor pressure vessel which adopts IT into a structural integrity evaluation procedure for reactor pressure vessel is introduced. The proposed system uses virtual reality (VR) technique, virtual network computing (VNC) and knowledge based programs. This system is able to support 3-dimensional virtual reality environment and provide experts to co-operate each other by accessing related data through internet. The proposed system is expected to provide a more efficient integrity evaluation for reactor pressure vessel. (orig.)

  2. Developing safer systems in a NPP environment using the operator`s comfort parameters and virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    The contents of this paper is based on two studies involving the design of visual displays from the operator`s point of view, and the utilization of virtual reality for operations, training and maintenance repairs. The studies involve a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in strengthening design choices from the user`s perspective model of the environment. The contents of this paper focuses on the results which may be implemented in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing systems which are less inherently error prone.

  3. Physics Education in Virtual Reality: An Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Kaufmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an immersive virtual reality (VR application for physics education. It utilizes a recent physics engine developed for the PC gaming market to simulate physical experiments correctly and accurately. Students are enabled to actively build their own experiments and study them. A variety of tools are provided to analyze forces, mass, paths and other properties of objects before, during and after experiments. Innovative teaching content is presented thatexploits the strengths of the 3D virtual environment. Physics Playground serves as an example of how current technologies can be combined to deliver a new quality in physics education.

  4. Utilization of Virtual Reality Content in Grade 6 Social Studies Using Affordable Virtual Reality Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Steven O. Zantua

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality is fast becoming a breakthrough in education technology and is headed towards a path where learning has become immersive. Virtual reality (VR offers both learners and educators a great opportunity to bridge gaps in the pedagogical sense. With the emergence of the Google Cardboard (GCB platform, a low-cost, virtual reality gadget comes a wide range of opportunities for educators and institutions to bring about an immersive type of learning environment for the 21st-century learner. Using Grade 6 Middle school students, this research explores the learning outcomes and student reactions using the GCB and Google Expeditions application. The study showed no significant difference in pre-test scores of the control and experimental group. There is however, a significant difference in the scores of the experimental group compared to the control group after post-test. Utilizing t-test in comparing the two groups, it was found that the mean of the post-test scores for Group A (experimental was significantly higher than Group B(control. The result of the independent samples t-test was significant, t(18 = 2.33, p = .032, suggesting that the mean of posttest score was significantly different between Groups A and B. This difference in score performance gives light to how VR can be used as a tool that enhances the learning experience. By using VR technology that is low cost and effective, more institutions will be able to help students learn better.

  5. Usability of a virtual reality environment simulating an automated teller machine for assessing and training persons with acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Teresa HY

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aimed to examine the usability of a newly designed virtual reality (VR environment simulating the operation of an automated teller machine (ATM for assessment and training. Design Part I involved evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of a non-immersive VR program simulating an ATM (VR-ATM. Part II consisted of a clinical trial providing baseline and post-intervention outcome assessments. Setting A rehabilitation hospital and university-based teaching facilities were used as the setting. Participants A total of 24 persons in the community with acquired brain injury (ABI - 14 in Part I and 10 in Part II - made up the participants in the study. Interventions In Part I, participants were randomized to receive instruction in either an "early" or a "late" VR-ATM program and were assessed using both the VR program and a real ATM. In Part II, participants were assigned in matched pairs to either VR training or computer-assisted instruction (CAI teaching programs for six 1-hour sessions over a three-week period. Outcome Measures Two behavioral checklists based on activity analysis of cash withdrawals and money transfers using a real ATM were used to measure average reaction time, percentage of incorrect responses, level of cues required, and time spent as generated by the VR system; also used was the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination. Results The sensitivity of the VR-ATM was 100% for cash withdrawals and 83.3% for money transfers, and the specificity was 83% and 75%, respectively. For cash withdrawals, the average reaction time of the VR group was significantly shorter than that of the CAI group (p = 0.021. We found no significant differences in average reaction time or accuracy between groups for money transfers, although we did note positive improvement for the VR-ATM group. Conclusion We found the VR-ATM to be usable as a valid assessment and training tool for relearning the use of ATMs prior to real

  6. Virtual realities and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curcio Igor D.D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to highlight the state of the art of virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality technologies and their applications in formal education. We also present a selected list of case studies that prove the utility of these technologies in the context of formal education. Furthermore, as byproduct, the mentioned case studies show also that, although the industry is able to develop very advanced virtual environment technologies, their pedagogical implications are strongly related to a well-designed theoretical framework.

  7. The effects of semi-immersive virtual reality therapy on standing balance and upright mobility function in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chang-Man; Park, Young-Hyun

    2017-09-07

    Background Individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) commonly face persistent balance or mobility impairments. Virtual reality (VR) therapy is a useful rehabilitation approach; however, little is known about its effects in individuals with chronic iSCI. Objective To investigate the effects of semi-immersive VR therapy on standing balance and upright mobility function in individuals with chronic iSCI. Methods Ten subjects with chronic iSCI underwent VR therapy 30 minutes a day, 3 days a week, for 6 weeks. Limit of stability (LOS) and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) were used to evaluate standing balance function. The Timed Up & Go (TUG) test, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABS) Scale, and Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury-II (WISCI-II) were used to measure the subject's upright mobility function. Outcomes were assessed and recorded pre- and post-intervention. Results After semi-immersive VR therapy, LOS and BBS scores were significantly increased. In addition, the TUG test results increased significantly over time, while ABC scale scores and WSCI-II levels improved significantly. Conclusion This study is the first to assess the effects of semi-immersive VR therapy for patients with chronic iSCI and limited functional abilities. These results indicated that semi-immersive VR therapy has a positive effect and is a useful intervention for standing balance and upright mobility function in patients with chronic iSCI.

  8. Heading assessment by "tunnel vision" patients and control subjects standing or walking in a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, Henry; Pelah, Adar; Peli, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Virtual reality locomotion simulators are a promising tool for evaluating the effectiveness of vision aids to mobility for people with low vision. This study examined two factors to gain insight into the verisimilitude requirements of the test environment: the effects of treadmill walking and the suitability of using controls as surrogate patients. Ten "tunnel vision" patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were tasked with identifying which side of a clearly visible obstacle their heading through the virtual environment would lead them, and were scored both on accuracy and on their distance from the obstacle when they responded. They were tested both while walking on a treadmill and while standing, as they viewed a scene representing progress through a shopping mall. Control subjects, each wearing a head-mounted field restriction to simulate the vision of a paired patient, were also tested. At wide angles of approach, controls and patients performed with a comparably high degree of accuracy, and made their choices at comparable distances from the obstacle. At narrow angles of approach, patients' accuracy increased when walking, while controls' accuracy decreased. When walking, both patients and controls delayed their decisions until closer to the obstacle. We conclude that a head-mounted field restriction is not sufficient for simulating tunnel vision, but that the improved performance observed for walking compared to standing suggests that a walking interface (such as a treadmill) may be essential for eliciting natural perceptually-guided behavior in virtual reality locomotion simulators.

  9. Transcending the Self – the Illusion of Body Ownership in Immersive Virtual Reality and its Impact on Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mel Slater

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality in various forms has been around for about 40 years. It has been considered mainly as a technology that can be used to generate the illusion of a transformation of place. However, it has recently been shown that it can successfully be used to transcend the self, through illusions of body ownership and transformation. Several papers have shown that it is possible to generate in people the illusory sense of ownership of a fake body using virtual reality techniques [1-5]. This can be achieved through synchronous multisensory stimulation with respect to the real and virtual body. For example, the participant sees his or her virtual body touched, while feeling the touch synchronously and in the same place on the real body. This can also lead to illusions of body transformation, such as a thin person having the illusion of being fat [6]. Our research suggests the prime importance of a first person perspective for the illusion of ownership, however, in [7] we also found that a representation of a person in a virtual mirror with synchronous visual-motor effects also results in a body ownership illusion. Although virtual body ownership has been established, what is also of interest are the consequences of this in terms of the attitudes and behaviour of the participant who experiences the transformed body. Our very recent work suggests that the illusion of ownership of a virtual body may also result in at least short-term transformations of behaviour and attitudes of the participant towards those that are appropriate to the virtual body. This talk will describe several experiments illustrating both the illusion of body ownership and its transformative effect on attitudes and behaviour.

  10. Development of a low-cost virtual reality workstation for training and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a set of breakthrough technologies that allow a human being to enter and fully experience a 3-dimensional, computer simulated environment. A true virtual reality experience meets three criteria: (1) it involves 3-dimensional computer graphics; (2) it includes real-time feedback and response to user actions; and (3) it must provide a sense of immersion. Good examples of a virtual reality simulator are the flight simulators used by all branches of the military to train pilots for combat in high performance jet fighters. The fidelity of such simulators is extremely high -- but so is the price tag, typically millions of dollars. Virtual reality teaching and training methods are manifestly effective, but the high cost of VR technology has limited its practical application to fields with big budgets, such as military combat simulation, commercial pilot training, and certain projects within the space program. However, in the last year there has been a revolution in the cost of VR technology. The speed of inexpensive personal computers has increased dramatically, especially with the introduction of the Pentium processor and the PCI bus for IBM-compatibles, and the cost of high-quality virtual reality peripherals has plummeted. The result is that many public schools, colleges, and universities can afford a PC-based workstation capable of running immersive virtual reality applications. My goal this summer was to assemble and evaluate such a system.

  11. Poster: Virtual reality interaction using mobile devices

    KAUST Repository

    Aseeri, Sahar A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work we aim to implement and evaluate alternative approaches for interacting with virtual environments on mobile devices for navigation, object selection and manipulation. Interaction with objects in virtual worlds using traditional input such as current state-of-the-art devices is often difficult and could diminish the immersion and sense of presence when it comes to 3D virtual environment tasks. We have developed new methods to perform different kinds of interactions using a mobile device (e.g. a smartphone) both as input device, performing selection and manipulation of objects, and as output device, utilizing the screen as an extra view (virtual camera or information display). Our hypothesis is that interaction via mobile devices facilitates simple tasks like the ones described within immersive virtual reality systems. We present here our initial implementation and result. © 2013 IEEE.

  12. Cognitive factors associated with immersion in virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psotka, Joseph; Davison, Sharon

    1993-01-01

    Immersion into the dataspace provided by a computer, and the feeling of really being there or 'presence', are commonly acknowledged as the uniquely important features of virtual reality environments. How immersed one feels appears to be determined by a complex set of physical components and affordances of the environment, and as yet poorly understood psychological processes. Pimentel and Teixeira say that the experience of being immersed in a computer-generated world involves the same mental shift of 'suspending your disbelief for a period of time' as 'when you get wrapped up in a good novel or become absorbed in playing a computer game'. That sounds as if it could be right, but it would be good to get some evidence for these important conclusions. It might be even better to try to connect these statements with theoretical positions that try to do justice to complex cognitive processes. The basic precondition for understanding Virtual Reality (VR) is understanding the spatial representation systems that localize our bodies or egocenters in space. The effort to understand these cognitive processes is being driven with new energy by the pragmatic demands of successful virtual reality environments, but the literature is largely sparse and anecdotal.

  13. Virtual Reality Training in Aid of Communication Apprehension in Classroom Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max M. North

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The major goal of this study was to observe theeffectiveness of Virtual Reality Training (VRT in assistingstudents who suffer from Communication Apprehension(CA. CA seems to be prevalent throughout a large portionof the human population. Apparently, this study has only afew precedents and can be considered a novel step intreatment of CA. Thirty undergraduate volunteer studentsenrolled at a university in Georgia participated in thisstudy. A virtual auditorium scene for CA training wascreated. Virtual Auditorium was a simulation of a 48 footwide, 100 foot long, and 55 foot high auditorium with threesections of chairs that accommodated over 100 spectators.The virtual auditorium program was designed to allow theaudience to enter the auditorium one at a time, then by fiveat a time until the whole auditorium was filled. Also,several audio clips were used to react to and create a desiredeffect upon the participant. The audio clips includedmaking comments, encouraging the participant to speaklouder, ignoring the participant, laughing, holdingconversations with others, and clapping hands at thebeginning or end of the entire session. An amplifier wasused in conjunction with the virtual reality software inorder for the participant to hear the echo of their own voice.A Subjective Units of Disturbance (SUD scale was used forall five sessions to measure the participant’s anxiety level.SUD scale ranged from 0 (no anxiety to 10 (panic-levelanxiety. Sessions lasted approximately 40 to 45 minutes.After analyzing the data, the result of this research showedVRT to be effective at reducing CA anxiety. While therewas fluctuation in the standard deviation of data, meaningparticipants responded the VRT at different rates, theaverage level of anxiety reported during the post-test wassignificantly less than that of the pre-test. The participantsreported experiencing the same symptoms during VRTsessions just as they would experience in a real situation.The symptoms were

  14. Effects of Desktop Virtual Reality Environment Training on State Anxiety and Vocational Identity Scores among Persons with Disabilities during Job Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Andre Lamont

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how desktop virtual reality environment training (DVRET) affected state anxiety and vocational identity of vocational rehabilitation services consumers during job placement/job readiness activities. It utilized a quantitative research model with a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design plus some qualitative descriptive…

  15. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Michael W.

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  16. Using Virtual Reality Simulation Environments to Assess Competence for Emergency Medicine Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Jillian L; Taekman, Jeffrey M; Dev, Parvati; Danforth, Douglas R; Mohan, Deepika; Kman, Nicholas; Crichlow, Amanda; Bond, William F

    2017-09-09

    Immersive learning environments that use virtual simulation technology are increasingly relevant as medical learners train in an environment of restricted clinical training hours and a heightened focus on patient safety. We conducted a consensus process with a breakout group of the 2017 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference "Catalyzing System Change Through Health Care Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcomes." This group examined the current uses of virtual simulation in training and assessment, including limitations and challenges in implementing virtual simulation into medical education curricula. We discuss the role of virtual environments in formative and summative assessment. Finally, we offer recommended areas of focus for future research examining virtual simulation technology for assessment, including high stakes assessment in medical education. Specifically, we discuss needs for determination of areas of focus for virtual simulation training and assessment, development and exploration of virtual platforms, automated feedback within such platforms, and evaluation of effectiveness and validity of virtual simulation education. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Virtual Reality Disruption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael B Horn

    2016-01-01

    ... speculation about virtual reality's readiness to break through to the educational mainstream. The question is whether we should believe the hype. More Broadband, More Investment First, schools are upgrading their Internet connectivity, which is setting the stage for broadband-dependent virtual-reality learning. The federal ConnectED i...

  18. Virtual Reality: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Jorge

    1994-01-01

    Highlights of this overview of virtual reality include optics; interface devices; virtual worlds; potential applications, including medicine and archaeology; problems, including costs; current research and development; future possibilities; and a listing of vendors and suppliers of virtual reality products. (Contains 11 references.) (LRW)

  19. Virtual reality musical instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur; Kojs, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development and availability of low cost technologies has created a wide interest in virtual reality (VR), but how to design and evaluate multisensory interactions in VR remains as a challenge. In this paper, we focus on virtual reality musical instruments, present an overview of our...

  20. Computer Vision Assisted Virtual Reality Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.

    1999-01-01

    A computer vision assisted semi-automatic virtual reality (VR) calibration technology has been developed that can accurately match a virtual environment of graphically simulated three-dimensional (3-D) models to the video images of the real task environment.

  1. Computer Vision Assisted Virtual Reality Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.

    1999-01-01

    A computer vision assisted semi-automatic virtual reality (VR) calibration technology has been developed that can accurately match a virtual environment of graphically simulated three-dimensional (3-D) models to the video images of the real task environment.

  2. Immersive environments and digital devices. Experimental studies and distanced approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe BONFILS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to discuss the theoretical and methodological issues applied to the study of immersive environments in information and communication sciences. Environments considered are digital devices that generate more or less strong effects of immersion (virtual reality, augmented reality, serious games, etc... The authors question the renewal of a constructivist and ethno-methodological posture that will be put into test in various experiments. The paper concludes with an illustration of a methodology currently being tested on an industrial project.

  3. Virtual reality and the CAVE: Taxonomy, interaction challenges and research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhanna A. Muhanna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main goals of virtual reality is to provide immersive environments that take participants away from the real life into a virtual one. Many investigators have been interested in bringing new technologies, devices, and applications to facilitate this goal. Few, however, have focused on the specific human–computer interaction aspects of such environments. In this article we present our literature review of virtual reality and the Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE. In particular, the article begins by providing a brief overview of the evolution of virtual reality. In addition, key elements of a virtual reality system are presented along with a proposed taxonomy that categorizes such systems from the perspective of technologies used and the mental immersion level found in these systems. Moreover, a detailed overview of the CAVE is presented in terms of its characteristics, uses, and mainly, the interaction styles inside it. Insights of the interaction challenges and research directions of investigating interaction with virtual reality systems in general and the CAVE in particular are thoroughly discussed as well.

  4. Recent Advances in Immersive Visualization of Ocean Data: Virtual Reality Through the Web on Your Laptop Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, A. J.; Moore, C.; Soreide, N. N.

    2002-12-01

    Ocean circulation is irrefutably three dimensional, and powerful new measurement technologies and numerical models promise to expand our three-dimensional knowledge of the dynamics further each year. Yet, most ocean data and model output is still viewed using two-dimensional maps. Immersive visualization techniques allow the investigator to view their data as a three dimensional world of surfaces and vectors which evolves through time. The experience is not unlike holding a part of the ocean basin in one's hand, turning and examining it from different angles. While immersive, three dimensional visualization has been possible for at least a decade, the technology was until recently inaccessible (both physically and financially) for most researchers. It is not yet fully appreciated by practicing oceanographers how new, inexpensive computing hardware and software (e.g. graphics cards and controllers designed for the huge PC gaming market) can be employed for immersive, three dimensional, color visualization of their increasingly huge datasets and model output. In fact, the latest developments allow immersive visualization through web servers, giving scientists the ability to "fly through" three-dimensional data stored half a world away. Here we explore what additional insight is gained through immersive visualization, describe how scientists of very modest means can easily avail themselves of the latest technology, and demonstrate its implementation on a web server for Pacific Ocean model output.

  5. Inclusion of Immersive Virtual Learning Environments and Visual Control Systems to Support the Learning of Students with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Gonzalo; Pomares, Jorge; Lledo, Asuncion

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the use of immersive virtual reality systems in the educational intervention with Asperger students. The starting points of this study are features of these students' cognitive style that requires an explicit teaching style supported by visual aids and highly structured environments. The proposed immersive virtual reality…

  6. Inclusion of Immersive Virtual Learning Environments and Visual Control Systems to Support the Learning of Students with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Gonzalo; Pomares, Jorge; Lledo, Asuncion

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the use of immersive virtual reality systems in the educational intervention with Asperger students. The starting points of this study are features of these students' cognitive style that requires an explicit teaching style supported by visual aids and highly structured environments. The proposed immersive virtual reality…

  7. [A new age of mass casuality education? : The InSitu project: realistic training in virtual reality environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, D; Armbruster, W; Vogelgesang, C; Hoffmann, H; Pattar, A; Schmidt, D; Volk, T; Kubulus, D

    2016-09-01

    Chief emergency physicians are regarded as an important element in the care of the injured and sick following mass casualty accidents. Their education is very theoretical; practical content in contrast often falls short. Limitations are usually the very high costs of realistic (large-scale) exercises, poor reproducibility of the scenarios, and poor corresponding results. To substantially improve the educational level because of the complexity of mass casualty accidents, modified training concepts are required that teach the not only the theoretical but above all the practical skills considerably more intensively than at present. Modern training concepts should make it possible for the learner to realistically simulate decision processes. This article examines how interactive virtual environments are applicable for the education of emergency personnel and how they could be designed. Virtual simulation and training environments offer the possibility of simulating complex situations in an adequately realistic manner. The so-called virtual reality (VR) used in this context is an interface technology that enables free interaction in addition to a stereoscopic and spatial representation of virtual large-scale emergencies in a virtual environment. Variables in scenarios such as the weather, the number wounded, and the availability of resources, can be changed at any time. The trainees are able to practice the procedures in many virtual accident scenes and act them out repeatedly, thereby testing the different variants. With the aid of the "InSitu" project, it is possible to train in a virtual reality with realistically reproduced accident situations. These integrated, interactive training environments can depict very complex situations on a scale of 1:1. Because of the highly developed interactivity, the trainees can feel as if they are a direct part of the accident scene and therefore identify much more with the virtual world than is possible with desktop systems

  8. Road-Crossing Safety in Virtual Reality: A Comparison of Adolescents With and Without ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Tamera A.; Rucklidge, Julia J.; Owen, Dean

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the potential accident-proneness of adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a hazardous road-crossing environment. An immersive virtual reality traffic gap-choice task was used to determine whether ADHD adolescents show more unsafe road-crossing behavior than controls. Participants (ages 13 to…

  9. Virtual reality training improves balance function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yurong Mao; Peiming Chen; Le Li; Dongfeng Huang

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality is a new technology that simulates a three-dimensional virtual world on a com-puter and enables the generation of visual, audio, and haptic feedback for the full immersion of users. Users can interact with and observe objects in three-dimensional visual space without limitation. At present, virtual reality training has been widely used in rehabilitation therapy for balance dysfunction. This paper summarizes related articles and other articles suggesting that virtual reality training can improve balance dysfunction in patients after neurological diseases. When patients perform virtual reality training, the prefrontal, parietal cortical areas and other motor cortical networks are activated. These activations may be involved in the reconstruction of neurons in the cerebral cortex. Growing evidence from clinical studies reveals that virtual reality training improves the neurological function of patients with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy and other neurological impairments. These ifndings suggest that virtual reality training can acti-vate the cerebral cortex and improve the spatial orientation capacity of patients, thus facilitating the cortex to control balance and increase motion function.

  10. Virtual reality training improves balance function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yurong; Chen, Peiming; Li, Le; Huang, Dongfeng

    2014-09-01

    Virtual reality is a new technology that simulates a three-dimensional virtual world on a computer and enables the generation of visual, audio, and haptic feedback for the full immersion of users. Users can interact with and observe objects in three-dimensional visual space without limitation. At present, virtual reality training has been widely used in rehabilitation therapy for balance dysfunction. This paper summarizes related articles and other articles suggesting that virtual reality training can improve balance dysfunction in patients after neurological diseases. When patients perform virtual reality training, the prefrontal, parietal cortical areas and other motor cortical networks are activated. These activations may be involved in the reconstruction of neurons in the cerebral cortex. Growing evidence from clinical studies reveals that virtual reality training improves the neurological function of patients with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy and other neurological impairments. These findings suggest that virtual reality training can activate the cerebral cortex and improve the spatial orientation capacity of patients, thus facilitating the cortex to control balance and increase motion function.

  11. Virtual Reality Simulation of the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a set of breakthrough technologies that allow a human being to enter and fully experience a 3-dimensional, computer simulated environment. A true virtual reality experience meets three criteria: (1) It involves 3-dimensional computer graphics; (2) It includes real-time feedback and response to user actions; and (3) It must provide a sense of immersion. Good examples of a virtual reality simulator are the flight simulators used by all branches of the military to train pilots for combat in high performance jet fighters. The fidelity of such simulators is extremely high -- but so is the price tag, typically millions of dollars. Virtual reality teaching and training methods are manifestly effective, and we have therefore implemented a VR trainer for the International Space Welding Experiment. My role in the development of the ISWE trainer consisted of the following: (1) created texture-mapped models of the ISWE's rotating sample drum, technology block, tool stowage assembly, sliding foot restraint, and control panel; (2) developed C code for control panel button selection and rotation of the sample drum; (3) In collaboration with Tim Clark (Antares Virtual Reality Systems), developed a serial interface box for the PC and the SGI Indigo so that external control devices, similar to ones actually used on the ISWE, could be used to control virtual objects in the ISWE simulation; (4) In collaboration with Peter Wang (SFFP) and Mark Blasingame (Boeing), established the interference characteristics of the VIM 1000 head-mounted-display and tested software filters to correct the problem; (5) In collaboration with Peter Wang and Mark Blasingame, established software and procedures for interfacing the VPL DataGlove and the Polhemus 6DOF position sensors to the SGI Indigo serial ports. The majority of the ISWE modeling effort was conducted on a PC-based VR Workstation, described below.

  12. Virtual Reality and Special Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. Jeffs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of virtual environments for special needs is as diverse as the field of Special Educationitself and the individuals it serves. Individuals with special needs often face challenges withattention, language, spatial abilities, memory, higher reasoning and knowledge acquisition.Research in the use of Virtual Learning Environments (VLE targets both cognition and behavior(Rizzo, et.al, 2001. Virtual environments encourage interactive learning and provide avariety of opportunities for the learner to have control over the learning process (Pantelidis,1993. Virtual reality technology is an exciting tool that involves a safe and supportive environmentto transfer knowledge between virtual and real worlds. Through such technology,individuals with special needs can look carefully at their own strengths, abilities, and learningpreferences in comparison to the required learning task and expected learning outcome. Thisarticle reviews relevant research that explores the use of virtual reality for individuals withspecial needs.

  13. How do people with persecutory delusions evaluate threat in a controlled social environment? A qualitative study using virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornells-Ambrojo, Miriam; Freeman, Daniel; Slater, Mel; Swapp, David; Antley, Angus; Barker, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors have been associated with psychosis but there is little qualitative research looking at how the ongoing interaction between individual and environment maintains psychotic symptoms. The current study investigates how people with persecutory delusions interpret events in a virtual neutral social environment using qualitative methodology. 20 participants with persecutory delusions and 20 controls entered a virtual underground train containing neutral characters. Under these circumstances, people with persecutory delusions reported similar levels of paranoia as non-clinical participants. The transcripts of a post-virtual reality interview of the first 10 participants in each group were analysed. Thematic analyses of interviews focusing on the decision making process associated with attributing intentions of computer-generated characters revealed 11 themes grouped in 3 main categories (evidence in favour of paranoid appraisals, evidence against paranoid appraisals, other behaviour). People with current persecutory delusions are able to use a range of similar strategies to healthy volunteers when making judgements about potential threat in a neutral environment that does not elicit anxiety, but they are less likely than controls to engage in active hypothesis-testing and instead favour experiencing "affect" as evidence of persecutory intention.

  14. Water-friendly virtual reality pain control during wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Patterson, David R; Magula, Jeff; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Zeltzer, Karen; Dagadakis, Stephen; Sharar, Sam R

    2004-02-01

    Recent research suggests that entering an immersive virtual environment can serve as a powerful nonpharmacologic analgesic for severe burn pain. The present case study describes an attempt to use water-friendly virtual reality (VR) technology with a burn patient undergoing wound care in a hydrotherapy tub. The patient was a 40-year-old male with 19% total body surface area deep flame/flash burns to his legs, neck, back, and buttocks. The virtual reality treatment decreased the patient's sensory and affective pain ratings and decreased the amount of time spent thinking about his pain during wound care. We believe that VR analgesia works by drawing attention away from the wound care, leaving less attention available to process incoming pain signals. The water-friendly VR helmet dramatically increases the number of patients with severe burns that could potentially be treated with VR (see http://www.vrpain.com).

  15. Dynamic control of a moving platform using the CAREN system to optimize walking in virtual reality environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makssoud, Hassan El; Richards, Carol L; Comeau, François

    2009-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology offers the opportunity to expose patients to complex physical environments without physical danger and thus provides a wide range of opportunities for locomotor training or the study of human postural and walking behavior. A VR-based locomotor training system has been developed for gait rehabilitation post-stroke. A clinical study has shown that persons after stroke are able to adapt and benefit from this novel system wherein they walk into virtual environments (VEs) on a self-paced treadmill mounted on a platform with 6 degrees of freedom. This platform is programmed to mimic changes in the terrain encountered in the VEs. While engaging in these VEs, excessive trunk movements and speed alterations have been observed, especially during the pitch perturbations accompanying uphill or downhill terrain changes. An in-depth study of the subject's behavior in relation to the platform movements revealed that the platform rotational axes need to be modified, as previously shown by Barton et al, and in addition did not consider the subject's position on the treadmill. The aim of this study was to determine an optimal solution to simulate walking in real life when engaging in VEs.

  16. Virtual realities as optimal learning environments in sport – A transfer study of virtual and real dart throwing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Tirp

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtual realities offer a safe and repeatable learning environment, which is optimal for skills that are difficult to replicate in real-world settings. Previous research has demonstrated transfer of motor skill between basketball and darts but not of perceptual performance (Rienhoff et al., 2013. Our study considered the transferability of a specific skill between virtual and real learning environments - in our case throwing accuracy (TA and quiet eye duration (QED in dart throwing. Participants (n = 38 were separated into three groups (virtual training, real training, & control and completed 15 throws in pre- and post-tests on a real and on a virtual (Microsoft XBox Kinect dartboard. The training groups performed three sessions of 50 throws each. QED was measured using SMI eye tracking glasses and TA was defined as radial distance from the bull’s eye. Results showed significant differences in TA for group and condition; the real training group outperformed the control group and TA was better in the virtual group. The interaction of test and group was significant. Both training groups improved between tests while the control group performed worst. Results for QED showed a significant increase between tests. Furthermore, significant differences for condition and a significant interaction of condition and test were measured. QED was longer and enhanced in the virtual group. Our results generally showed the efficiency of both training modalities and the slight difference in training effects between groups suggests transferability between tasks.

  17. INTERACTIVITY INFLUENCES THE MAGNITUDE OF VIRTUAL REALITY ANALGESIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Regina; Hoffman, Hunter G; Hunner, Harley H; Seibel, Eric J; Patterson, David R; Sharar, Sam R

    2009-01-01

    Despite medication with opioids and other powerful pharmacologic pain medications, most patients rate their pain during severe burn wound care as severe to excruciating. Excessive pain is a widespread medical problem in a wide range of patient populations. Immersive virtual reality (VR) distraction may help reduce pain associated with medical procedures. Recent research manipulating immersiveness has shown that a high tech VR helmet reduces pain more effectively than a low tech VR helmet. The present study explores the effect of interactivity on the analgesic effectiveness of virtual reality. Using a double blind design, in the present study, twenty-one volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two groups, and received a thermal pain stimulus during either interactive VR, or during non-interactive VR. Subjects in both groups individually glided through the virtual world, but one group could look around and interact with the environment using the trackball, whereas participants in the other group had no trackball. Afterwards, each participant provided subjective 0-10 ratings of cognitive, sensory and affective components of pain, and the amount of fun during the pain stimulus. Compared to the non-interactive VR group, participants in the interactive VR group showed 75% more reduction in pain unpleasantness (p virtual reality.

  18. Virtual reality exposure therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Maryrose; Cukor, Judith; Difede, Joann; Rizzo, Albert; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov

    2010-08-01

    Anxiety disorders, including phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder, are common and disabling disorders that often involve avoidance behavior. Cognitive-behavioral treatments, specifically imaginal and in vivo forms of exposure therapy, have been accepted and successful forms of treatment for these disorders. Virtual reality exposure therapy, an alternative to more traditional exposure-based therapies, involves immersion in a computer-generated virtual environment that minimizes avoidance and facilitates emotional processing. In this article, we review evidence on the application of virtual reality exposure therapy to the treatment of specific phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder and discuss its advantages and cautions.

  19. The Use of Immersive Virtual Reality in the Learning Sciences: Digital Transformations of Teachers, Students, and Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy N.; Yee, Nick; Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C.; Lundblad, Nicole; Jin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates the utility of using virtual environments to transform social interaction via behavior and context, with the goal of improving learning in digital environments. We first describe the technology and theories behind virtual environments and then report data from 4 empirical studies. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated that…

  20. The Use of Immersive Virtual Reality in the Learning Sciences: Digital Transformations of Teachers, Students, and Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy N.; Yee, Nick; Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C.; Lundblad, Nicole; Jin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates the utility of using virtual environments to transform social interaction via behavior and context, with the goal of improving learning in digital environments. We first describe the technology and theories behind virtual environments and then report data from 4 empirical studies. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated that…

  1. Reducing specific phobia/fear in young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs through a virtual reality environment intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morag Maskey

    Full Text Available Anxiety is common in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD, with specific fears and phobias one of the most frequent subtypes. Specific fears and phobias can have a serious impact on young people with ASD and their families. In this study we developed and evaluated a unique treatment combining cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT with graduated exposure in a virtual reality environment (VRE. Nine verbally fluent boys with an ASD diagnosis and no reported learning disability, aged 7 to 13 years old, were recruited. Each had anxiety around a specific situation (e.g. crowded buses or stimulus (e.g. pigeons. An individualised scene was recreated in our 'wrap-around' VRE. In the VRE participants were coached by a psychologist in cognitive and behavioural techniques (e.g. relaxation and breathing exercises while the exposure to the phobia/fear stimulus was gradually increased as the child felt ready. Each child received four 20-30 minute sessions. After participating in the study, eight of the nine children were able to tackle their phobia situation. Four of the participants completely overcame their phobia. Treatment effects were maintained at 12 months. These results provide evidence that CBT with VRE can be a highly effective treatment for specific phobia/fear for some young people with ASD.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN58483069.

  2. Body Image and Anti-Fat Attitudes: An Experimental Study Using a Haptic Virtual Reality Environment to Replicate Human Touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Line; Roy-Vaillancourt, Mélina; Chebbi, Brahim; Bouchard, Stéphane; Daoust, Michael; Dénommée, Jessica; Thorpe, Moriah

    2016-02-01

    It is well documented that anti-fat attitudes influence the interactions individuals have with overweight people. However, testing attitudes through self-report measures is challenging. In the present study, we explore the use of a haptic virtual reality environment to physically interact with overweight virtual human (VH). We verify the hypothesis that duration and strength of virtual touch vary according to the characteristics of VH in ways similar to those encountered from interaction with real people in anti-fat attitude studies. A group of 61 participants were randomly assigned to one of the experimental conditions involving giving a virtual hug to a female or a male VH of either normal or overweight. We found significant associations between body image satisfaction and anti-fat attitudes and sex differences on these measures. We also found a significant interaction effect of the sex of the participants, sex of the VH, and the body size of the VH. Female participants hugged longer the overweight female VH than overweight male VH. Male participants hugged longer the normal-weight VH than the overweight VH. We conclude that virtual touch is a promising method of measuring attitudes, emotion and social interactions.

  3. Visual appearance of a virtual upper limb modulates the temperature of the real hand: a thermal imaging study in Immersive Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieri, Gaetano; Gioia, Annamaria; Scandola, Michele; Pavone, Enea F; Aglioti, Salvatore M

    2017-05-01

    To explore the link between Sense of Embodiment (SoE) over a virtual hand and physiological regulation of skin temperature, 24 healthy participants were immersed in virtual reality through a Head Mounted Display and had their real limb temperature recorded by means of a high-sensitivity infrared camera. Participants observed a virtual right upper limb (appearing either normally, or with the hand detached from the forearm) or limb-shaped non-corporeal control objects (continuous or discontinuous wooden blocks) from a first-person perspective. Subjective ratings of SoE were collected in each observation condition, as well as temperatures of the right and left hand, wrist and forearm. The observation of these complex, body and body-related virtual scenes resulted in increased real hand temperature when compared to a baseline condition in which a 3d virtual ball was presented. Crucially, observation of non-natural appearances of the virtual limb (discontinuous limb) and limb-shaped non-corporeal objects elicited high increase in real hand temperature and low SoE. In contrast, observation of the full virtual limb caused high SoE and low temperature changes in the real hand with respect to the other conditions. Interestingly, the temperature difference across the different conditions occurred according to a topographic rule that included both hands. Our study sheds new light on the role of an external hand's visual appearance and suggests a tight link between higher-order bodily self-representations and topographic regulation of skin temperature. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Virtual reality technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mihelj, Matjaž; Beguš, Samo

    2014-01-01

    As virtual reality expands from the imaginary worlds of science fiction and pervades every corner of everyday life, it is becoming increasingly important for students and professionals alike to understand the diverse aspects of this technology. This book aims to provide a comprehensive guide to the theoretical and practical elements of virtual reality, from the mathematical and technological foundations of virtual worlds to the human factors and the applications that enrich our lives: in the fields of medicine, entertainment, education and others. After providing a brief introduction to the topic, the book describes the kinematic and dynamic mathematical models of virtual worlds. It explores the many ways a computer can track and interpret human movement, then progresses through the modalities that make up a virtual world: visual, acoustic and haptic. It explores the interaction between the actual and virtual environments, as well as design principles of the latter. The book closes with an examination of diff...

  5. Concept and design of a virtual reality work environment for industrial designers; Konzeption und Entwurf eines VR Arbeitsplatzes im Bereich des Industrial Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, T.; Bruder, R. [Universitaet Essen (Germany). Institut fuer Ergonomie und Designforschung

    2002-07-01

    This concept of a working environment for industrial designers is based on the use of Virtual Reality. The project aims at making the design process using new technologies just as intuitive as the work involving traditional tools. Basis of the development is a human centered principle, not the concentration on available technologies. The project was developed in cooperation with the Fraunhofer Gesellschaft (Institute for media communication) in Sankt Augustin, Germany. (orig.)

  6. Physics Education in Virtual Reality: An Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Hannes; Meyer, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    We present an immersive virtual reality (VR) application for physics education. It utilizes a recent physics engine developed for the PC gaming market to simulate physical experiments correctly and accurately. Students are enabled to actively build their own experiments and study them. A variety of tools are provided to analyze forces, mass, paths…

  7. Evaluation of Virtual Reality Training Using Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichon, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Training designed to support and strengthen higher-order mental abilities now often involves immersion in Virtual Reality (VR) where dangerous real world scenarios can be safely replicated. However, despite the growing popularity of VR to train cognitive skills such as decision-making and situation awareness, methods for evaluating their use rely…

  8. Evaluation of Virtual Reality Training Using Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichon, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Training designed to support and strengthen higher-order mental abilities now often involves immersion in Virtual Reality (VR) where dangerous real world scenarios can be safely replicated. However, despite the growing popularity of VR to train cognitive skills such as decision-making and situation awareness, methods for evaluating their use rely…

  9. An Onboard ISS Virtual Reality Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the retirement of the Space Shuttle, many exterior repairs on the International Space Station (ISS) were carried out by shuttle astronauts, trained on the ground and flown to the Station to perform these specific repairs. With the retirement of the shuttle, this is no longer an available option. As such, the need for ISS crew members to review scenarios while on flight, either for tasks they already trained for on the ground or for contingency operations has become a very critical issue. NASA astronauts prepare for Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) or Spacewalks through numerous training media, such as: self-study, part task training, underwater training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), hands-on hardware reviews and training at the Virtual Reality Laboratory (VRLab). In many situations, the time between the last session of a training and an EVA task might be 6 to 8 months. EVA tasks are critical for a mission and as time passes the crew members may lose proficiency on previously trained tasks and their options to refresh or learn a new skill while on flight are limited to reading training materials and watching videos. In addition, there is an increased need for unplanned contingency repairs to fix problems arising as the Station ages. In order to help the ISS crew members maintain EVA proficiency or train for contingency repairs during their mission, the Johnson Space Center's VRLab designed an immersive ISS Virtual Reality Trainer (VRT). The VRT incorporates a unique optical system that makes use of the already successful Dynamic On-board Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software to assist crew members with procedure reviews and contingency EVAs while on board the Station. The need to train and re-train crew members for EVAs and contingency scenarios is crucial and extremely demanding. ISS crew members are now asked to perform EVA tasks for which they have not been trained and potentially have never seen before. The Virtual Reality Trainer (VRT

  10. Virtual Reality in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Foreman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of using virtual environments (VEs in psychology arise from the fact that movements in virtual space, and accompanying perceptual changes, are treated by the brain in much the same way as those in equivalent real space. The research benefits of using VEs, in areas of psychology such as spatial learning and cognition, include interface flexibility, the reproducibility of virtual experience, and the opportunity for on-line monitoring of performance. Applications of VEs are many and varied, but are especially beneficial where experience can be tailored via augmentation, and where dangerous training situations can be avoided. The use of programmable agents has great future potential in relation to training and interpersonal skill development, also perhaps in clinical diagnosis and therapy. Progress in VE usage in psychological education is limited by cost and availability, though VEs are being used increasingly in classroom and laboratory teaching exercises. Virtual Reality was said to be “an answer waiting for a question”, but questions are being recognized, so that applications of VEs within the behavioural sciences are likely to multiply.

  11. Computer classes and games in virtual reality environment to reduce loneliness among students of an elderly reference center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Thaiany Pedrozo Campos; de Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Crocetta, Tania Brusque; Antão, Jennifer Yohanna Ferreira de Lima; Barbosa, Renata Thais de Almeida; Guarnieri, Regiani; Massetti, Thais; Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira de Mello; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Physical and mental changes associated with aging commonly lead to a decrease in communication capacity, reducing social interactions and increasing loneliness. Computer classes for older adults make significant contributions to social and cognitive aspects of aging. Games in a virtual reality (VR) environment stimulate the practice of communicative and cognitive skills and might also bring benefits to older adults. Furthermore, it might help to initiate their contact to the modern technology. The purpose of this study protocol is to evaluate the effects of practicing VR games during computer classes on the level of loneliness of students of an elderly reference center. Methods and Analysis: This study will be a prospective longitudinal study with a randomised cross-over design, with subjects aged 50 years and older, of both genders, spontaneously enrolled in computer classes for beginners. Data collection will be done in 3 moments: moment 0 (T0) – at baseline; moment 1 (T1) – after 8 typical computer classes; and moment 2 (T2) – after 8 computer classes which include 15 minutes for practicing games in VR environment. A characterization questionnaire, the short version of the Short Social and Emotional Loneliness Scale for Adults (SELSA-S) and 3 games with VR (Random, MoviLetrando, and Reaction Time) will be used. For the intervention phase 4 other games will be used: Coincident Timing, Motor Skill Analyser, Labyrinth, and Fitts. The statistical analysis will compare the evolution in loneliness perception, performance, and reaction time during the practice of the games between the 3 moments of data collection. Performance and reaction time during the practice of the games will also be correlated to the loneliness perception. Ethics and Dissemination: The protocol is approved by the host institution's ethics committee under the number 52305215.3.0000.0082. Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journal articles and conferences

  12. Absorption’s images: from cinema to digital immersive environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Baio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The text reviews the artistic production of virtual environments to examine the regimes established by imaging devices such as virtual reality, caves and digitals panoramas. The hypothesis guiding the analysis is that these devices establish what could be understood as absorption regimes, linking to a Platonic aesthetic heritage that was present in different ways throughout art history, spanning the Renaissance, the panoramas of the century XVIII, photography, and especially the cinema. To do so, we start from the philosophy Flusser and theorists of immersive environments and hypertextual narratives.

  13. Virtual reality for engineering

    CERN Document Server

    De Gennaro, Silvano; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality for Engineers. Virtual Reality is a very powerful visualization technique for 3D data, which can bring enormous benefits to engineering design. CAD models can be exported to a VR application and used as "Virtual Prototypes". Virtual Prototypes are an ideal replacement for wooden models as they can be generated automatically from most CAD products. They are totally reliable, they can be updated in a matter of minutes, and they allow designers to explore them from inside, on a one-to-one scale and using a 3D-stereo vision. Navigation can be performed using a number of instinctive tools, such as joysticks, spaceballs, VR helmets and 3D mice. The lectures will cover today's Virtual Reality products and methods, and describe how to transform CAD models into Virtual Prototypes. A "hands on" VR experience featuring the LHC detectors models can be organized for people interested.

  14. Virtual reality simulators and training in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia; Nikiteas, Nikolaos; Perrea, Despina; Tsigris, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality simulators provide basic skills training without supervision in a controlled environment, free of pressure of operating on patients. Skills obtained through virtual reality simulation training can be transferred on the operating room. However, relative evidence is limited with data available only for basic surgical skills and for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. No data exist on the effect of virtual reality simulation on performance on advanced surgical procedures. Evidence suggests that performance on virtual reality simulators reliably distinguishes experienced from novice surgeons Limited available data suggest that independent approach on virtual reality simulation training is not different from proctored approach. The effect of virtual reality simulators training on acquisition of basic surgical skills does not seem to be different from the effect the physical simulators. Limited data exist on the effect of virtual reality simulation training on the acquisition of visual spatial perception and stress coping skills. Undoubtedly, virtual reality simulation training provides an alternative means of improving performance in laparoscopic surgery. However, future research efforts should focus on the effect of virtual reality simulation on performance in the context of advanced surgical procedure, on standardization of training, on the possibility of synergistic effect of virtual reality simulation training combined with mental training, on personalized training. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [What do virtual reality tools bring to child and adolescent psychiatry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioulac, S; de Sevin, E; Sagaspe, P; Claret, A; Philip, P; Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Bouvard, M P

    2017-09-01

    Virtual reality is a relatively new technology that enables individuals to immerse themselves in a virtual world. It offers several advantages including a more realistic, lifelike environment that may allow subjects to "forget" they are being assessed, allow a better participation and an increased generalization of learning. Moreover, the virtual reality system can provide multimodal stimuli, such as visual and auditory stimuli, and can also be used to evaluate the patient's multimodal integration and to aid rehabilitation of cognitive abilities. The use of virtual reality to treat various psychiatric disorders in adults (phobic anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, addictions…) and its efficacy is supported by numerous studies. Similar research for children and adolescents is lagging behind. This may be particularly beneficial to children who often show great interest and considerable success on computer, console or videogame tasks. This article will expose the main studies that have used virtual reality with children and adolescents suffering from psychiatric disorders. The use of virtual reality to treat anxiety disorders in adults is gaining popularity and its efficacy is supported by various studies. Most of the studies attest to the significant efficacy of the virtual reality exposure therapy (or in virtuo exposure). In children, studies have covered arachnophobia social anxiety and school refusal phobia. Despite the limited number of studies, results are very encouraging for treatment in anxiety disorders. Several studies have reported the clinical use of virtual reality technology for children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). Extensive research has proven the efficiency of technologies as support tools for therapy. Researches are found to be focused on communication and on learning and social imitation skills. Virtual reality is also well accepted by subjects with ASD. The virtual environment offers

  16. Differential impact of partial cortical blindness on gaze strategies when sitting and walking - an immersive virtual reality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorizzo, Dana B; Riley, Meghan E; Hayhoe, Mary; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2011-05-25

    The present experiments aimed to characterize the visual performance of subjects with long-standing, unilateral cortical blindness when walking in a naturalistic, virtual environment. Under static, seated testing conditions, cortically blind subjects are known to exhibit compensatory eye movement strategies. However, they still complain of significant impairment in visual detection during navigation. To assess whether this is due to a change in compensatory eye movement strategy between sitting and walking, we measured eye and head movements in subjects asked to detect peripherally-presented, moving basketballs. When seated, cortically blind subjects detected ∼80% of balls, while controls detected almost all balls. Seated blind subjects did not make larger head movements than controls, but they consistently biased their fixation distribution towards their blind hemifield. When walking, head movements were similar in the two groups, but the fixation bias decreased to the point that fixation distribution in cortically blind subjects became similar to that in controls - with one major exception: at the time of basketball appearance, walking controls looked primarily at the far ground, in upper quadrants of the virtual field of view; cortically blind subjects looked significantly more at the near ground, in lower quadrants of the virtual field. Cortically blind subjects detected only 58% of the balls when walking while controls detected ∼90%. Thus, the adaptive gaze strategies adopted by cortically blind individuals as a compensation for their visual loss are strongest and most effective when seated and stationary. Walking significantly alters these gaze strategies in a way that seems to favor walking performance, but impairs peripheral target detection. It is possible that this impairment underlies the experienced difficulty of those with cortical blindness when navigating in real life.

  17. Pervasive Radio Mapping of Industrial Environments Using a Virtual Reality Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian-Valentin Nedelcu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless communications in industrial environments are seriously affected by reliability and performance issues, due to the multipath nature of obstacles within such environments. Special attention needs to be given to planning a wireless industrial network, so as to find the optimum spatial position for each of the nodes within the network, and especially for key nodes such as gateways or cluster heads. The aim of this paper is to present a pervasive radio mapping system which captures (senses data regarding the radio spectrum, using low-cost wireless sensor nodes. This data is the input of radio mapping algorithms that generate electromagnetic propagation profiles. Such profiles are used for identifying obstacles within the environment and optimum propagation pathways. With the purpose of further optimizing the radio planning process, the authors propose a novel human-network interaction (HNI paradigm that uses 3D virtual environments in order to display the radio maps in a natural, easy-to-perceive manner. The results of this approach illustrate its added value to the field of radio resource planning of industrial communication systems.

  18. Pervasive Radio Mapping of Industrial Environments Using a Virtual Reality Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, Adrian-Valentin; Machedon-Pisu, Mihai; Duguleana, Mihai; Talaba, Doru

    2015-01-01

    Wireless communications in industrial environments are seriously affected by reliability and performance issues, due to the multipath nature of obstacles within such environments. Special attention needs to be given to planning a wireless industrial network, so as to find the optimum spatial position for each of the nodes within the network, and especially for key nodes such as gateways or cluster heads. The aim of this paper is to present a pervasive radio mapping system which captures (senses) data regarding the radio spectrum, using low-cost wireless sensor nodes. This data is the input of radio mapping algorithms that generate electromagnetic propagation profiles. Such profiles are used for identifying obstacles within the environment and optimum propagation pathways. With the purpose of further optimizing the radio planning process, the authors propose a novel human-network interaction (HNI) paradigm that uses 3D virtual environments in order to display the radio maps in a natural, easy-to-perceive manner. The results of this approach illustrate its added value to the field of radio resource planning of industrial communication systems.

  19. Virtual Reality in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelidis, Veronica S.

    1993-01-01

    Considers the concept of virtual reality; reviews its history; describes general uses of virtual reality, including entertainment, medicine, and design applications; discusses classroom uses of virtual reality, including a software program called Virtus WalkThrough for use with a computer monitor; and suggests future possibilities. (34 references)…

  20. Virtual Facility Layout Design Using Virtual Reality Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-hua; Zhong Yi-fang

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing facility layout design has long been recognized as one of the most critical and difficult design tasks in manufacturing industries. Traditional layout methods can not fully solve this complex spatial layout problem. Virtual reality (VR) is a new form of human-computer interaction, which has the potential to support a range of engineering applications. This paper discusses the reasons why manufacturing facility layout design is considered to be an appropriate new area of VR utilization. A VR-based layout design framework is proposed. The virtual environment construction issues are discussed. An example of the immersive VR application of facility layout is examined.

  1. Virtual Facility Layout Design Using Virtual Reality Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li; Zhi-Hua; Zhong; Yi-fang

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing facility layout design has long been recognized as one of the most critical and difficult design tasks in manufacturing industries. Traditional layout methods can not fully solve this complex spatial layout problem. Virtual reality (VR) is a new form of human-computer interaction,which has the potential to support a range of engineering applications. This paper discusses the reasons why manufacturing facility layout design is considered to be an appropriate new area of VR utilization. A VR-based layout design framework is proposed. Th virtual environment construction issues are discussed. An example of the immersive VR application of facility layout is examined.

  2. Virtual Reality as Innovative Approach to the Interior Designing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleja, Pavol; Kozlovská, Mária

    2017-06-01

    We can observe significant potential of information and communication technologies (ICT) in interior designing field, by development of software and hardware virtual reality tools. Using ICT tools offer realistic perception of proposal in its initial idea (the study). A group of real-time visualization, supported by hardware tools like Oculus Rift HTC Vive, provides free walkthrough and movement in virtual interior with the possibility of virtual designing. By improving of ICT software tools for designing in virtual reality we can achieve still more realistic virtual environment. The contribution presented proposal of an innovative approach of interior designing in virtual reality, using the latest software and hardware ICT virtual reality technologies

  3. The Use of Virtual Reality for Creating Unusual Environmental Stimulation to Motivate Students to Explore Creative Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kung Wong; Lee, Pui Yuen

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the roles of simulation in creativity education and how to apply immersive virtual environments to enhance students' learning experiences in university, through the provision of interactive simulations. An empirical study of a simulated virtual reality was carried out in order to investigate the effectiveness of providing…

  4. The Use of Virtual Reality for Creating Unusual Environmental Stimulation to Motivate Students to Explore Creative Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kung Wong; Lee, Pui Yuen

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the roles of simulation in creativity education and how to apply immersive virtual environments to enhance students' learning experiences in university, through the provision of interactive simulations. An empirical study of a simulated virtual reality was carried out in order to investigate the effectiveness of providing…

  5. The Use of Virtual Reality for Creating Unusual Environmental Stimulation to Motivate Students to Explore Creative Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kung Wong; Lee, Pui Yuen

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the roles of simulation in creativity education and how to apply immersive virtual environments to enhance students' learning experiences in university, through the provision of interactive simulations. An empirical study of a simulated virtual reality was carried out in order to investigate the effectiveness of providing…

  6. IQ-Station: A Low Cost Portable Immersive Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Whiting; Patrick O' Leary; William Sherman; Eric Wernert

    2010-11-01

    The emergence of inexpensive 3D TV’s, affordable input and rendering hardware and open-source software has created a yeasty atmosphere for the development of low-cost immersive environments (IE). A low cost IE system, or IQ-station, fashioned from commercial off the shelf technology (COTS), coupled with a targeted immersive application can be a viable laboratory instrument for enhancing scientific workflow for exploration and analysis. The use of an IQ-station in a laboratory setting also has the potential of quickening the adoption of a more sophisticated immersive environment as a critical enabler in modern scientific and engineering workflows. Prior work in immersive environments generally required either a head mounted display (HMD) system or a large projector-based implementation both of which have limitations in terms of cost, usability, or space requirements. The solution presented here provides an alternative platform providing a reasonable immersive experience that addresses those limitations. Our work brings together the needed hardware and software to create a fully integrated immersive display and interface system that can be readily deployed in laboratories and common workspaces. By doing so, it is now feasible for immersive technologies to be included in researchers’ day-to-day workflows. The IQ-Station sets the stage for much wider adoption of immersive environments outside the small communities of virtual reality centers.

  7. Virtual reality and virtual bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Catherine; Korba, Larry W.; Shaw, Christopher D.; Green, Mark

    1994-04-01

    There are many ways to produce the sense of `presence' or telepresence in the user of virtual reality. For example attempting to increase the realism of the visual environment is a commonly accepted strategy. In contrast, this paper explores a way for the user to feel present in an unrealistic virtual body. It investigates an unusual approach, proprioceptive illusions. Proprioceptive or body illusions are used to generate and explore the experience of virtuality and presence outside of the normal body limits. These projects are realized in art installations.

  8. Seeing size and feeling weight: the size-weight illusion in natural and virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineken, Edgar; Schulte, Frank P

    2007-02-01

    We experimentally tested the degree that the size-weight illusion depends on perceptual conditions allowing the observer to assume that both the visual and the kinesthetic stimuli of a weight seen and lifted emanate from the same object. We expected that the degree of the illusion depended on the "realism" provided by different kinds of virtual reality (VR) used when the weights are seen in virtual reality and at the same time lifted in natural reality. Welch and Warren (1980) reported that an intermodal influence can be expected only if perceptual information of different modalities is compellingly related to only one object. Objects of different sizes and weights were presented to 50 participants in natural reality or in four virtual realities: two immersive head-mounted display VRs (with or without head tracking) and two nonimmersive desktop VRs (with or without screening from input of the natural environment using a visor). The objects' heaviness was scaled using the magnitude estimation method. Data show that the degree of the illusion is largest in immersive and lowest in nonimmersive virtual realities. The higher the degree of the illusion is, the more compelling the situation is perceived and the more the observed data are in correspondence with the data predicted for the illusion in natural reality. This shows that the kind of mediating technology used strongly influences the presence experienced. The size-weight illusion's sensitivity to conditions that affect the sense of presence makes it a promising objective presence measure.

  9. Virtual reality (HMD and Interaction from the Perspective of Narrative Construction and Communication: Taxonomic Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Rubio Tamayo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality is a term popularised by some authors since the eighties and the nineties, in order to define features for immersive environments generated artificially by digital means. Immersive processes in virtual environments have dramatically changed since early experiences in this area, such as Sensorama (1962, flight simulators (in the sixties or Aspen Movie Map Experiment (1978. Those changes offer new possibilities in communication and storytelling domains. This work does a systematic literature review about those phenomena, approaching also the emergence of interdisciplinary fields such as interaction design or user experience. The study aims also to configure a taxonomic classification of components in the domain of storytelling for the use of virtual reality technologies, trying to generate models which help to complement the current ones. This taxonomy is a qualitative milestone for studying interactive dimensions between technology, person and environment.

  10. The use of a low-cost visible light 3D scanner to create virtual reality environment models of actors and objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    A low-cost 3D scanner has been developed with a parts cost of approximately USD $5,000. This scanner uses visible light sensing to capture both structural as well as texture and color data of a subject. This paper discusses the use of this type of scanner to create 3D models for incorporation into a virtual reality environment. It describes the basic scanning process (which takes under a minute for a single scan), which can be repeated to collect multiple positions, if needed for actor model creation. The efficacy of visible light versus other scanner types is also discussed.

  11. Treatment of Complicated Grief Using Virtual Reality: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, C.; Osma, J.; Palacios, A. Garcia; Guillen, V.; Banos, R.

    2008-01-01

    This is the first work exploring the application of new technologies, concretely virtual reality, to facilitate emotional processing in the treatment of Complicated Grief. Our research team has designed a virtual reality environment (EMMA's World) to foster the expression and processing of emotions. In this study the authors present a description…

  12. Avatars, Affordances, and Interfaces: Virtual Reality Tools for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Hilary

    Virtual reality technology offers the promise of interaction with a computer-based environment that engages visual, auditory, and tactile perception. Three interrelated virtual reality design topics are particularly relevant to visual literacy. The first is the concept of avatars. Avatars are agents that appear in a virtual world representing the…

  13. Physics Education in Virtual Reality: An Example

    OpenAIRE

    Hannes Kaufmann; Bernd Meyer

    2009-01-01

    We present an immersive virtual reality (VR) application for physics education. It utilizes a recent physics engine developed for the PC gaming market to simulate physical experiments correctly and accurately. Students are enabled to actively build their own experiments and study them. A variety of tools are provided to analyze forces, mass, paths and other properties of objects before, during and after experiments. Innovative teaching content is presented thatexploits the strengths of the 3D...

  14. Virtual Reality and Haptics for Product Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptics can significantly enhance the user's sense of immersion and interactivity. An industrial application of virtual reality and haptics for product assembly is described in this paper, which provides a new and low-cost approach for product assembly design, assembly task planning and assembly operation training. A demonstration of the system with haptics device interaction was available at the session of exp.at'11.

  15. Virtual Reality as a Complementary Therapy to Sexual Addiction Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cismaru Inescu, Adina; Andrianne, Robert; Triffaux, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality has gained traction as a research, education and treatment tool. Virtual reality is a system that immerses people in virtual worlds and improves clinicians’ traditional treatments for addictive disorders, eating disorders, phobias, and stroke rehabilitation. Sex addiction is a dysregulation of sexual desire, characterized by excessive sexual behavior (between 5-15 sexual activities/day, for more than 6 months, after the age of 15). Hypersexuality highlights disturbances in hum...

  16. Computer Haptics:Haptic Modeling and Rendering in Virtual Reality Environments%计算机触觉:虚拟现实环境的力触觉建模和生成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王党校; 焦健; 张玉茹; 赵晓含

    2016-01-01

    The haptic channel is one of the five sensory channels of human. It plays an indispensable role in eve-ryday life. In the virtual reality and augmented reality systems, the haptic feedback is expected to significantly improve immersion and interactivity of human-computer interaction (HCI). This paper reviews the haptic model-ing and rendering technologies in virtual reality environments. From the perspective of the haptic and visual ren-dering differences, we summarize the history and current situation of research in the haptic field, and analyze the key technology of virtual object modeling, collision detection, collision response, force/torque computation and so on. Finally, we propose trends and future research challenges in haptic rendering.%触觉是人类5种感觉通道之一,在日常生活中发挥着不可缺少的作用。在虚拟现实和增强现实系统中,力触觉反馈的引入有望显著提高人机交互的沉浸感和交互性。文中综述了虚拟现实环境中力触觉感受的建模和生成方法,从力触觉生成与视觉生成的差异性出发,回顾了计算机触觉的发展历史和国内外研究现状,重点分析了虚拟物体建模、碰撞检测、碰撞响应、变形计算等关键技术,并提出了力触觉生成技术的未来发展趋势和技术挑战。

  17. Education about Hallucinations Using an Internet Virtual Reality System: A Qualitative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellowlees, Peter M.; Cook, James N.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluate an Internet virtual reality technology as an education tool about the hallucinations of psychosis. Method: This is a pilot project using Second Life, an Internet-based virtual reality system, in which a virtual reality environment was constructed to simulate the auditory and visual hallucinations of two patients…

  18. Introduction to Virtual Reality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Chris

    2009-01-01

    As an emerging technology for learning, virtual reality (VR) dates back four decades, to early work by Ivan Sutherland in the late 1960s. At long last, interactive media are emerging that offer the promise of VR in everyday settings. Quasi-VR already is commonplace in 2-1/2-D virtual environments like Second Life and in massively multiplayer…

  19. Exploring Moral Action Using lmmersive Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: N62909-14-l-Nl 19 Exploring Moral Actions Using lmmersive Virtual Reality event LAB Entorns virtuals en neurociencias i tecnologia...Entornos virtua/es en neurociencias y tecnologfa Experimental virtual environments for neuroscience University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

  20. Presence in Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Experiencing anxiety is essential for virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) to be effective in curing patients suffering from anxiety disorders. However, some patients drop out in VRET due to the lack of feeling anxiety. Presence - which refers to the feeling of being in the virtual environment -

  1. Wayfinding and Glaucoma: A Virtual Reality Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Fábio B; Macagno, Eduardo; Stevenson, Cory; Elhosseiny, Ahmed; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Boer, Erwin R; Schulze, Jürgen; Medeiros, Felipe A

    2017-07-01

    Wayfinding, the process of determining and following a route between an origin and a destination, is an integral part of everyday tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of glaucomatous visual field loss on wayfinding behavior using an immersive virtual reality (VR) environment. This cross-sectional study included 31 glaucomatous patients and 20 healthy subjects without evidence of overall cognitive impairment. Wayfinding experiments were modeled after the Morris water maze navigation task and conducted in an immersive VR environment. Two rooms were built varying only in the complexity of the visual scene in order to promote allocentric-based (room A, with multiple visual cues) versus egocentric-based (room B, with single visual cue) spatial representations of the environment. Wayfinding tasks in each room consisted of revisiting previously visible targets that subsequently became invisible. For room A, glaucoma patients spent on average 35.0 seconds to perform the wayfinding task, whereas healthy subjects spent an average of 24.4 seconds (P = 0.001). For room B, no statistically significant difference was seen on average time to complete the task (26.2 seconds versus 23.4 seconds, respectively; P = 0.514). For room A, each 1-dB worse binocular mean sensitivity was associated with 3.4% (P = 0.001) increase in time to complete the task. Glaucoma patients performed significantly worse on allocentric-based wayfinding tasks conducted in a VR environment, suggesting visual field loss may affect the construction of spatial cognitive maps relevant to successful wayfinding. VR environments may represent a useful approach for assessing functional vision endpoints for clinical trials of emerging therapies in ophthalmology.

  2. Virtual Reality, Combat, and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Emily Austin; Bodary, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Presents a brief examination of the evolution of virtual reality devices that illustrates how the development of this new medium is influenced by emerging technologies and by marketing pressures. Notes that understanding these influences may help prepare for the role of technical communicators in building virtual reality applications for education…

  3. Interactive Scientific Visualization in 3D Virtual Reality Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Popovski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientific visualization in technology of virtual reality is a graphical representation of virtual environment in the form of images or animation that can be displayed with various devices such as Head Mounted Display (HMD or monitors that can view threedimensional world. Research in real time is a desirable capability for scientific visualization and virtual reality in which we are immersed and make the research process easier. In this scientific paper the interaction between the user and objects in the virtual environment аrе in real time which gives a sense of reality to the user. Also, Quest3D VR software package is used and the movement of the user through the virtual environment, the impossibility to walk through solid objects, methods for grabbing objects and their displacement are programmed and all interactions between them will be possible. At the end some critical analysis were made on all of these techniques on various computer systems and excellent results were obtained.

  4. Virtual reality: using the virtual world to improve quality of life in the real world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P L; Rothbaum, B O; Hodges, L

    2001-01-01

    Mental health professionals are increasingly integrating advances in technology to improve the health of those in their care (American Psychological Association, 2000). The authors describe the immersive properties of virtual reality and its importance for clinical purposes and then review the literature describing current clinical applications of virtual reality (VR) and research documenting its efficacy. Virtual reality has been used in the treatment of specific phobias, posttraumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, and pain management.

  5. Marshall Engineers Use Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. Marshall Spce Flight Center (MSFC) is begirning to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models are used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup is to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability provides general visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC).

  6. Virtual reality in posturography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossavainen, Timo; Toppila, Esko; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Forsman, Pia M; Juhola, Martti; Starck, Jukka

    2006-04-01

    Balance dysfunctions are common, especially among elderly people. Present methods for the diagnosis and evaluation of severity of dysfuntion have limited value. We present a system that makes it easy to implement different visual and mechanical perturbations for clinical investigations of balance and visual-vestibular interaction. The system combines virtual reality visual stimulation with force platform posturography on a moving platform. We evaluate our contruction's utility in a classification task between 33 healthy controls and 77 patients with Ménière's disease, using a series of tests with different visual and mechanical stimuli. Responses of patients and controls differ significantly in parameters computed from stabilograms. We also show that the series of tests achieves a classification accuracy slightly over 80% between controls and patients.

  7. Virtual reality at work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Frederick P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of virtual reality computer graphics in telepresence applications is not hard to grasp and promises to be great. When the virtual world is entirely synthetic, as opposed to real but remote, the utility is harder to establish. Vehicle simulators for aircraft, vessels, and motor vehicles are proving their worth every day. Entertainment applications such as Disney World's StarTours are technologically elegant, good fun, and economically viable. Nevertheless, some of us have no real desire to spend our lifework serving the entertainment craze of our sick culture; we want to see this exciting technology put to work in medicine and science. The topics covered include the following: testing a force display for scientific visualization -- molecular docking; and testing a head-mounted display for scientific and medical visualization.

  8. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  9. Applied virtual reality at the Research Triangle Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, R. Jorge

    1994-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a way for humans to use computers in visualizing, manipulating and interacting with large geometric data bases. This paper describes a VR infrastructure and its application to marketing, modeling, architectural walk through, and training problems. VR integration techniques used in these applications are based on a uniform approach which promotes portability and reusability of developed modules. For each problem, a 3D object data base is created using data captured by hand or electronically. The object's realism is enhanced through either procedural or photo textures. The virtual environment is created and populated with the data base using software tools which also support interactions with and immersivity in the environment. These capabilities are augmented by other sensory channels such as voice recognition, 3D sound, and tracking. Four applications are presented: a virtual furniture showroom, virtual reality models of the North Carolina Global TransPark, a walk through the Dresden Fraunenkirche, and the maintenance training simulator for the National Guard.

  10. Mobile Virtual Reality : A Solution for Big Data Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, E.; Seichter, N. D.; D'sa, A.; Werner, L. A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Pursuits in geological sciences and other branches of quantitative sciences often require data visualization frameworks that are in continual need of improvement and new ideas. Virtual reality is a medium of visualization that has large audiences originally designed for gaming purposes; Virtual reality can be captured in Cave-like environment but they are unwieldy and expensive to maintain. Recent efforts by major companies such as Facebook have focussed more on a large market , The Oculus is the first of such kind of mobile devices The operating system Unity makes it possible for us to convert the data files into a mesh of isosurfaces and be rendered into 3D. A user is immersed inside of the virtual reality and is able to move within and around the data using arrow keys and other steering devices, similar to those employed in XBox.. With introductions of products like the Oculus Rift and Holo Lens combined with ever increasing mobile computing strength, mobile virtual reality data visualization can be implemented for better analysis of 3D geological and mineralogical data sets. As more new products like the Surface Pro 4 and other high power yet very mobile computers are introduced to the market, the RAM and graphics card capacity necessary to run these models is more available, opening doors to this new reality. The computing requirements needed to run these models are a mere 8 GB of RAM and 2 GHz of CPU speed, which many mobile computers are starting to exceed. Using Unity 3D software to create a virtual environment containing a visual representation of the data, any data set converted into FBX or OBJ format which can be traversed by wearing the Oculus Rift device. This new method for analysis in conjunction with 3D scanning has potential applications in many fields, including the analysis of precious stones or jewelry. Using hologram technology to capture in high-resolution the 3D shape, color, and imperfections of minerals and stones, detailed review and

  11. Virtual Reality and Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István TÓZSA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study serves as an introduction to how virtual reality systems could be applied in public administration and what research tasks would be necessary to accomplish a project. E-government solutions began to emerge in public administration approximately a decade ago all over the developed world. Administration service facilities via the Internet did not attract many customers, because of the digital divide. E-government solutions were extended to mobile devices as well, but the expected breakthrough of usage has not ensued. The virtual reality form of public administration services recommended in this study has the most attractive outlay and the simplest navigation tools if compared to ‘traditional’ Internet based e-government. Thus, in accordance with the worldwide amazingly quick spread of the virtual reality systems of Second Life and 3 D types of entertainment, virtual reality applications in public administration could rely on a wide range of acceptance as well.

  12. The New Dawn of Virtual Reality in Health Care: Medical Simulation and Experiential Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2015-01-01

    The 90s and 00s saw great hopes that virtual reality was poised to sweep health care and change everything. But it didn't. Though researchers could immerse themselves in more complex virtual environments, the chasm between that digital experience and the complexity of real life - using a VR system in an hospital without a dedicated technician was a real challenge - just was too great. Now the situation is changing quickly. The rise of Oculus Rift and the shift of virtual reality from PC to mobile phones thanks to both the Oculus designed Gear VR headsets for Samsung phones and the Google Cardboard project are going to transform health care tools and experiences.

  13. On the Usability and Usefulness of 3d (geo)visualizations - a Focus on Virtual Reality Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çöltekin, A.; Lokka, I.; Zahner, M.

    2016-06-01

    Whether and when should we show data in 3D is an on-going debate in communities conducting visualization research. A strong opposition exists in the information visualization (Infovis) community, and seemingly unnecessary/unwarranted use of 3D, e.g., in plots, bar or pie charts, is heavily criticized. The scientific visualization (Scivis) community, on the other hand, is more supportive of the use of 3D as it allows `seeing' invisible phenomena, or designing and printing things that are used in e.g., surgeries, educational settings etc. Geographic visualization (Geovis) stands between the Infovis and Scivis communities. In geographic information science, most visuo-spatial analyses have been sufficiently conducted in 2D or 2.5D, including analyses related to terrain and much of the urban phenomena. On the other hand, there has always been a strong interest in 3D, with similar motivations as in Scivis community. Among many types of 3D visualizations, a popular one that is exploited both for visual analysis and visualization is the highly realistic (geo)virtual environments. Such environments may be engaging and memorable for the viewers because they offer highly immersive experiences. However, it is not yet well-established if we should opt to show the data in 3D; and if yes, a) what type of 3D we should use, b) for what task types, and c) for whom. In this paper, we identify some of the central arguments for and against the use of 3D visualizations around these three considerations in a concise interdisciplinary literature review.

  14. Haptic Foot Feedback for Kicking Training in Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hank; Tan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As means to further supplement athletic performances increases, virtual reality is becoming helpful to sports in terms of cognitive training such as reaction, mentality, and game strategies. With the aid of haptic feedback, interaction with virtual objects increases by another dimension, in addition to the presence of visual and auditory feedback. This research presents an integrated system of a virtual reality environment, motion tracking system, and a haptic unit designed for the dorsal foo...

  15. Immersive virtual environments for emotional engineering: description and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Rey, Beatriz; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to identify the arousal and presence level during an emotional engineering study. During the experimental sessions, a high-immersion Virtual Reality (VR) system, a CAVE-like configuration, will be used. Thirty-six volunteers will navigate through virtual houses that can be customized and that have been designed for emotional induction. Emotional induction will be obtained by stimulating the senses of sight, hearing and smell. For this purpose, the ambient lighting, music and smell will be controlled by the researcher, who will create a comfortable environment for the subject. Several physiological variables - Electrocardiogram (ECG), Respiratory signal and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) - will be recorded during the sessions. The obtained results will help furniture companies identify the senses that have more influence on emotions and will be the basis for new studies about user needs in the sector of furniture and interior decoration.

  16. Virtual reality robotic surgery warm-up improves task performance in a dry laboratory environment: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Thomas S; Brand, Timothy C; White, Lee; Kowalewski, Timothy; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Mercer, Laina D; Khorsand, Derek; Andros, Justin; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M

    2013-06-01

    Preoperative simulation warm-up has been shown to improve performance and reduce errors in novice and experienced surgeons, yet existing studies have only investigated conventional laparoscopy. We hypothesized that a brief virtual reality (VR) robotic warm-up would enhance robotic task performance and reduce errors. In a 2-center randomized trial, 51 residents and experienced minimally invasive surgery faculty in General Surgery, Urology, and Gynecology underwent a validated robotic surgery proficiency curriculum on a VR robotic simulator and on the da Vinci surgical robot (Intuitive Surgical Inc). Once they successfully achieved performance benchmarks, surgeons were randomized to either receive a 3- to 5-minute VR simulator warm-up or read a leisure book for 10 minutes before performing similar and dissimilar (intracorporeal suturing) robotic surgery tasks. The primary outcomes compared were task time, tool path length, economy of motion, technical, and cognitive errors. Task time (-29.29 seconds, p = 0.001; 95% CI, -47.03 to -11.56), path length (-79.87 mm; p = 0.014; 95% CI, -144.48 to -15.25), and cognitive errors were reduced in the warm-up group compared with the control group for similar tasks. Global technical errors in intracorporeal suturing (0.32; p = 0.020; 95% CI, 0.06-0.59) were reduced after the dissimilar VR task. When surgeons were stratified by earlier robotic and laparoscopic clinical experience, the more experienced surgeons (n = 17) demonstrated significant improvements from warm-up in task time (-53.5 seconds; p = 0.001; 95% CI, -83.9 to -23.0) and economy of motion (0.63 mm/s; p = 0.007; 95% CI, 0.18-1.09), and improvement in these metrics was not statistically significantly appreciated in the less-experienced cohort (n = 34). We observed significant performance improvement and error reduction rates among surgeons of varying experience after VR warm-up for basic robotic surgery tasks. In addition, the VR warm-up reduced errors on

  17. Immersive Simulation Training for the Dismounted Soldier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    more descriptive definition of largely equivalent and interchangeable terms virtual reality (VR) or virtual environment (VE). "Computer-generated...surgical training, and art." (virtual reality , 2003) For purposes of this report, immersive simulations are defined to include a broad range of virtual...deliver environmental sounds and voice communications. "o Haptic Display - Uses pressure or vibration to provide cues such as physical contact with

  18. Implementing virtual reality interfaces for the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, W.; Jacobsen, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States); Austin, A.; Lederer, M. [BP Exploration, Houston, TX (United States); Little, T. [Landmark Graphics Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-06-01

    For the past few years, a multidisciplinary team of computer and earth scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been exploring the use of advanced user interfaces, commonly called {open_quotes}Virtual Reality{close_quotes} (VR), coupled with visualization and scientific computing software. Working closely with industry, these efforts have resulted in an environment in which VR technology is coupled with existing visualization and computational tools. VR technology may be thought of as a user interface. It is useful to think of a spectrum, ranging the gamut from command-line interfaces to completely immersive environments. In the former, one uses the keyboard to enter three or six-dimensional parameters. In the latter, three or six-dimensional information is provided by trackers contained either in hand-held devices or attached to the user in some fashion, e.g. attached to a head-mounted display. Rich, extensible and often complex languages are a vehicle whereby the user controls parameters to manipulate object position and location in a virtual world, but the keyboard is the obstacle in that typing is cumbersome, error-prone and typically slow. In the latter, the user can interact with these parameters by means of motor skills which are highly developed. Two specific geoscience application areas will be highlighted. In the first, we have used VR technology to manipulate three-dimensional input parameters, such as the spatial location of injection or production wells in a reservoir simulator. In the second, we demonstrate how VR technology has been used to manipulate visualization tools, such as a tool for computing streamlines via manipulation of a {open_quotes}rake.{close_quotes} The rake is presented to the user in the form of a {open_quotes}virtual well{close_quotes} icon, and provides parameters used by the streamlines algorithm.

  19. Virtual Reality Design: How Head-Mounted Displays Change Design Paradigms of Virtual Reality Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Stein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the upcoming generation of virtual reality HMDs, new virtual worlds, scenarios, and games are created especially for them. These are no longer bound to a remote screen or a relatively static user, but to an HMD as a more immersive device. This article discusses requirements for virtual scenarios implemented in new-generation HMDs to achieve a comfortable user experience. Furthermore, the effects of positional tracking are introduced and the relation between the user’s virtual and physical body is analyzed. The observations made are exemplified by existing software prototypes. They indicate how the term “virtual reality,” with all its loaded connotations, may be reconceptualized to express the peculiarities of HMDs in the context of gaming, entertainment, and virtual experiences.

  20. Simulator sickness when performing gaze shifts within a wide field of view optic flow environment: preliminary evidence for using virtual reality in vestibular rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney Susan L

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wide field of view virtual environments offer some unique features that may be beneficial for use in vestibular rehabilitation. For one, optic flow information extracted from the periphery may be critical for recalibrating the sensory processes used by people with vestibular disorders. However, wide FOV devices also have been found to result in greater simulator sickness. Before a wide FOV device can be used in a clinical setting, its safety must be demonstrated. Methods Symptoms of simulator sickness were recorded by 9 healthy adult subjects after they performed gaze shifting tasks to locate targets superimposed on an optic flow background. Subjects performed 8 trials of gaze shifting on each of the six separate visits. Results The incidence of symptoms of simulator sickness while subjects performed gaze shifts in an optic flow environment was lower than the average reported incidence for flight simulators. The incidence was greater during the first visit compared with subsequent visits. Furthermore, the incidence showed an increasing trend over the 8 trials. Conclusion The performance of head unrestrained gaze shifts in a wide FOV optic flow environment is tolerated well by healthy subjects. This finding provides rationale for testing these environments in people with vestibular disorders, and supports the concept of using wide FOV virtual reality for vestibular rehabilitation.

  1. Exploration through Virtual Reality: Encounters with the Target Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Mary Grantham; Levy, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the use of a virtual reality (VR) world in a German language classroom. After participating in a lesson on the use of commands, students experienced the language and culture through navigation in a VR world. It is argued that this new medium allows for students to be immersed in the target culture and…

  2. The Virtual Pelvic Floor, a tele-immersive educational environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, R. K.; Evenhouse, R.; Rasmussen, M.; Dech, F.; Silverstein, J. C.; Prokasy, S.; Panko, W. B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Virtual Pelvic Floor, a new method of teaching the complex anatomy of the pelvic region utilizing virtual reality and advanced networking technology. Virtual reality technology allows improved visualization of three-dimensional structures over conventional media because it supports stereo vision, viewer-centered perspective, large angles of view, and interactivity. Two or more ImmersaDesk systems, drafting table format virtual reality displays, are networked together providing an environment where teacher and students share a high quality three-dimensional anatomical model, and are able to converse, see each other, and to point in three dimensions to indicate areas of interest. This project was realized by the teamwork of surgeons, medical artists and sculptors, computer scientists, and computer visualization experts. It demonstrates the future of virtual reality for surgical education and applications for the Next Generation Internet. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10566378

  3. Molecular Rift: Virtual Reality for Drug Designers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Magnus; Grebner, Christoph; Eriksson, Joakim; Boström, Jonas

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in interaction design have created new ways to use computers. One example is the ability to create enhanced 3D environments that simulate physical presence in the real world--a virtual reality. This is relevant to drug discovery since molecular models are frequently used to obtain deeper understandings of, say, ligand-protein complexes. We have developed a tool (Molecular Rift), which creates a virtual reality environment steered with hand movements. Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display, is used to create the virtual settings. The program is controlled by gesture-recognition, using the gaming sensor MS Kinect v2, eliminating the need for standard input devices. The Open Babel toolkit was integrated to provide access to powerful cheminformatics functions. Molecular Rift was developed with a focus on usability, including iterative test-group evaluations. We conclude with reflections on virtual reality's future capabilities in chemistry and education. Molecular Rift is open source and can be downloaded from GitHub.

  4. Haptic Neurorehabilitation and Virtual Reality for Upper Limb Paralysis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggott, Leah; Wagner, Samantha; Ziat, Mounia

    2016-01-01

    Motor and sensory loss or dysfunction affects the quality of life for thousands of individuals daily. The upper limb, and especially the hand, are important for a person's ability to complete activities of daily living. Traditional therapy methods focus on motor recovery, but future methods should include sensory recovery and should promote the use of the affected limb(s) at home. In this review, we highlight the current state-of-art robotic devices for the upper limb, and we discuss benefits of including haptic feedback and virtual reality environments during neurorehabilitation. Robotic devices, such as end-effector devices, grounded and ungrounded exoskeletons, have been developed to assist with various functions including individual finger, whole hand, and shoulder movements. Many robots highlighted in this paper are inexpensive and are small enough to be in a patient's home, or allow for telerehabilitation. Virtual reality creates safe environments for patients to practice motor movements and interactive games improve enjoyment of therapy. Haptic feedback creates more immersive virtual reality, and contributes to the recovery of sensory function. Physiological studies conducted after brain trauma and with robotic devices contribute to the understanding of brain plasticity, and illustrate the efficacy of these technologies. We conclude by addressing the future direction of neurorehabilitation research.

  5. Controlled interaction: strategies for using virtual reality to study perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgin, Frank H; Li, Zhi

    2010-05-01

    Immersive virtual reality systems employing head-mounted displays offer great promise for the investigation of perception and action, but there are well-documented limitations to most virtual reality systems. In the present article, we suggest strategies for studying perception/action interactions that try to depend on both scale-invariant metrics (such as power function exponents) and careful consideration of the requirements of the interactions under investigation. New data concerning the effect of pincushion distortion on the perception of surface orientation are presented, as well as data documenting the perception of dynamic distortions associated with head movements with uncorrected optics. A review of several successful uses of virtual reality to study the interaction of perception and action emphasizes scale-free analysis strategies that can achieve theoretical goals while minimizing assumptions about the accuracy of virtual simulations.

  6. The Use of Virtual Reality in Psychology: A Case Study in Visual Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher J; Soranzo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Recent proliferation of available virtual reality (VR) tools has seen increased use in psychological research. This is due to a number of advantages afforded over traditional experimental apparatus such as tighter control of the environment and the possibility of creating more ecologically valid stimulus presentation and response protocols. At the same time, higher levels of immersion and visual fidelity afforded by VR do not necessarily evoke presence or elicit a "realistic" psychological response. The current paper reviews some current uses for VR environments in psychological research and discusses some ongoing questions for researchers. Finally, we focus on the area of visual perception, where both the advantages and challenges of VR are particularly salient.

  7. The ethnography of virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović Ljiljana 1

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses possible application of ethnographic research in the realm of virtual reality, especially in the relationship between cultures in virtual communities. This represents an entirely new area of ethnographic research and therefore many adjustments in the research design are needed for example, a development of a specific method of data gathering and tools for their verification. A virtual, cyber space is a version of social space more or less synchronous with it, but without the, "real", that is, physical presence of the people who create it. This virtual reality, defined and bounded by virtual space, is in fact real - and though we are not able to observe real, physical parameters of its existence, we can perceive its consequences. In sum, an innovative ethnographic research method is fully applicable for exploring the realm of virtual reality; in order to do so we need to expand, in addition to the new research design and methods, the field of science itself.

  8. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-04-15

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients' brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies.

  9. Introduction to the special issue from the proceedings of the 2006 International Workshop on Virtual Reality in Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshner Emily A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract New technologies are rapidly having a great impact on the development of novel rehabilitation interventions. One of the more popular of these technological advances is virtual reality. The wide range of applications of this technology, from immersive environments to tele-rehabilitation equipment and care, lends versatility to its use as a rehabilitation intervention. But increasing access to this technology requires that we further our understanding about its impact on a performer. The International Workshop on Virtual Reality in Rehabilitation (IWVR, now known as Virtual Rehabilitation 2007, is a conference that emerged from the need to discover how virtual reality could be applied to rehabilitation practice. Individuals from multiple disciplines concerned with the development, transmission, and evaluation of virtual reality as a technology applied to rehabilitation attend this meeting to share their work. In this special issue of the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation we are sharing some of the papers presented at the 2006 meeting of IWVR with the objective of offering a description of the state of the art in this research field. A perusal of these papers will provide a good cross-section of the emerging work in this area as well as inform the reader about new findings relevant to research and practice in rehabilitation.

  10. 虚拟现实环境中音乐情感模型的研究%Research of the Music Emotion Model in Virtual Reality Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章银娥; 黄贤通; 胡声洲

    2015-01-01

    Using VRML and Java tools,a model of music human body in virtual reality environmenthas been researched and de-signed. Through the various nodes of the VRML and the setting of the Java script parameters, the human body geometry model is able to dynamically perceive the emotion in the virtual environment and has achieved a variety of behavioral interactions. All of above it has arrived to implement the real human behavior of a variety of realistic results.%运用VRML和Java工具,研究并设计了一个基于虚拟现实环境中的音乐人体几何模型,通过VRML的各种节点和Java脚本参数的设置使得人体几何模型能够动态感知虚拟音乐环境中的情感,较好地实现了各种行为交互,达到实施真实人体的各种行为逼真效果.

  11. Virtual Reality: The Promise of the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Jaron

    1992-01-01

    Defines virtual reality and describes the equipment or clothing necessary to achieve the illusion of being in a virtual world. Recent developments with this technology and current virtual reality applications are discussed, including experiential prototyping, telepresence, and educational applications. (MES)

  12. Virtual Realities and the Future of Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding virtual reality and "virtual books." Suggests that those who are exploring the territory of virtual realities are already helping to expand and enrich expectations and visions for integrating technology into reading and writing. (RS)

  13. Visualizing Mars Using Virtual Reality: A State of the Art Mapping Technique Used on Mars Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, C.; Zbinden, E.; Blackmon, T.; Nguyen, L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an interactive terrain visualization system which rapidly generates and interactively displays photorealistic three-dimensional (3-D) models produced from stereo images. This product, first demonstrated in Mars Pathfinder, is interactive, 3-D, and can be viewed in an immersive display which qualifies it for the name Virtual Reality (VR). The use of this technology on Mars Pathfinder was the first use of VR for geologic analysis. A primary benefit of using VR to display geologic information is that it provides an improved perception of depth and spatial layout of the remote site. The VR aspect of the display allows an operator to move freely in the environment, unconstrained by the physical limitations of the perspective from which the data were acquired. Virtual Reality offers a way to archive and retrieve information in a way that is intuitively obvious. Combining VR models with stereo display systems can give the user a sense of presence at the remote location. The capability, to interactively perform measurements from within the VR model offers unprecedented ease in performing operations that are normally time consuming and difficult using other techniques. Thus, Virtual Reality can be a powerful a cartographic tool. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Development, demonstration and implementation of a virtual reality simulation capability for coal mining operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Fowler; Phil Stothard; Jim Galvin [University of New South Wales, NSW (Australia)

    2005-06-15

    Virtual Reality (VR) simulation refers to the generation of an immersive, interactive, computer generated, three-dimensional environment. As a result of its interactive nature, the VR program senses the user's response to a situation or event. This interaction is reciprocated by the program and feedback to one or more of the user's senses is invoked. This produces the illusion of presence within the simulated environment. VR simulation is a powerful tool for conditioning behaviour. It enables the user to experience a range of situations that might otherwise not be encountered prior to a critical event and conditions the user's response in a safe and forgiving environment. The aim of the project was to develop, demonstrate and transfer a capability in immersive, interactive, virtual reality simulation in order to improve Occupational Health and Safety management and performance in the Australian coal mining sector through the provision of more effective education, training and assessment. Immersive, interactive simulations have developed that relate to 'self escape', 'sprains and strains' and 'rib stability'. All have important Occupational Health and Safety implications that are very dependent on the actions of individuals themselves. The simulations and the technology to utilise them has been transferred to the Australian coal mining industry through the construction of a Virtual Reality Theatre at Newcastle Mines Rescue Station. Recommendations are made as to the how the VR simulation capability that has been established by the project might be further developed and enhanced.

  15. Exploring Virtual Reality for Classroom Use: The Virtual Reality and Education Lab at East Carolina University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Lawrence W. S.; Pantelidis, Veronica S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Virtual Reality and Education Lab (VREL) established at East Carolina University to study the implications of virtual reality for elementary and secondary education. Highlights include virtual reality software evaluation; hardware evaluation; computer-based curriculum objectives which could use virtual reality; and keeping current…

  16. Cognitive training on stroke patients via virtual reality-based serious games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Coelho, Carla; Morais, Diogo; Lopes, Paulo; Pacheco, José; Brito, Rodrigo; Soares, Fabio; Santos, Nuno; Barata, Ana Filipa

    2017-02-01

    Use of virtual reality environments in cognitive rehabilitation offers cost benefits and other advantages. In order to test the effectiveness of a virtual reality application for neuropsychological rehabilitation, a cognitive training program using virtual reality was applied to stroke patients. A virtual reality-based serious games application for cognitive training was developed, with attention and memory tasks consisting of daily life activities. Twenty stroke patients were randomly assigned to two conditions: exposure to the intervention, and waiting list control. The results showed significant improvements in attention and memory functions in the intervention group, but not in the controls. Overall findings provide further support for the use of VR cognitive training applications in neuropsychological rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Improvements in memory and attention functions following a virtual reality-based serious games intervention. Training of daily-life activities using a virtual reality application. Accessibility to training contents.

  17. Virtual reality applied to teletesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T.W. van den; Smeenk, R.J.M.; Mazy, A.; Jacques, P.; Argüello, L.; Mills, S.

    2003-01-01

    The activity "Virtual Reality applied to Teletesting" is related to a wider European Space Agency (ESA) initiative of cost reduction, in particular the reduction of test costs. Reduction of costs of space related projects have to be performed on test centre operating costs and customer company costs

  18. Virtual reality software and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming C; Otaduy, Miguel A; Boulic, Ronan

    2008-01-01

    This special issue contains an introductory survey on 3D user interfaces by leading VR authorities and significantly expanded versions of the four best short papers from the proceedings of the 14th ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology (VRST 07).

  19. Virtual Reality: Ready or Not!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joan E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the development and current status of virtual reality (VR) and VR research. Market potentials for VR are discussed, including the entertainment industry, health care and medical training, flight and other simulators, and educational possibilities. A glossary of VR-related terms is included. (LRW)

  20. Virtual Reality and Legal Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kiskinov, Vihar

    2014-01-01

    Report published in the Proceedings of the National Conference on "Education and Research in the Information Society", Plovdiv, May, 2014 The paper examines the impact of virtual reality on legal education. Association for the Development of the Information Society, Institute of Mathematics and Informatics Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Plovdiv University "Paisii Hilendarski"

  1. Cognitive loading affects motor awareness and movement kinematics but not locomotor trajectories during goal-directed walking in a virtual reality environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Alan Kannape

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cognitive loading on movement kinematics and trajectory formation during goal-directed walking in a virtual reality (VR environment. The secondary objective was to measure how participants corrected their trajectories for perturbed feedback and how participants' awareness of such perturbations changed under cognitive loading. We asked 14 healthy young adults to walk towards four different target locations in a VR environment while their movements were tracked and played back in real-time on a large projection screen. In 75% of all trials we introduced angular deviations of ±5° to ±30° between the veridical walking trajectory and the visual feedback. Participants performed a second experimental block under cognitive load (serial-7 subtraction, counter-balanced across participants. We measured walking kinematics (joint-angles, velocity profiles and motor performance (end-point-compensation, trajectory-deviations. Motor awareness was determined by asking participants to rate the veracity of the feedback after every trial. In-line with previous findings in natural settings, participants displayed stereotypical walking trajectories in a VR environment. Our results extend these findings as they demonstrate that taxing cognitive resources did not affect trajectory formation and deviations although it interfered with the participants' movement kinematics, in particular walking velocity. Additionally, we report that motor awareness was selectively impaired by the secondary task in trials with high perceptual uncertainty. Compared with data on eye and arm movements our findings lend support to the hypothesis that the central nervous system (CNS uses common mechanisms to govern goal-directed movements, including locomotion. We discuss our results with respect to the use of VR methods in gait control and rehabilitation.

  2. Cognitive loading affects motor awareness and movement kinematics but not locomotor trajectories during goal-directed walking in a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannape, Oliver Alan; Barré, Arnaud; Aminian, Kamiar; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cognitive loading on movement kinematics and trajectory formation during goal-directed walking in a virtual reality (VR) environment. The secondary objective was to measure how participants corrected their trajectories for perturbed feedback and how participants' awareness of such perturbations changed under cognitive loading. We asked 14 healthy young adults to walk towards four different target locations in a VR environment while their movements were tracked and played back in real-time on a large projection screen. In 75% of all trials we introduced angular deviations of ±5° to ±30° between the veridical walking trajectory and the visual feedback. Participants performed a second experimental block under cognitive load (serial-7 subtraction, counter-balanced across participants). We measured walking kinematics (joint-angles, velocity profiles) and motor performance (end-point-compensation, trajectory-deviations). Motor awareness was determined by asking participants to rate the veracity of the feedback after every trial. In-line with previous findings in natural settings, participants displayed stereotypical walking trajectories in a VR environment. Our results extend these findings as they demonstrate that taxing cognitive resources did not affect trajectory formation and deviations although it interfered with the participants' movement kinematics, in particular walking velocity. Additionally, we report that motor awareness was selectively impaired by the secondary task in trials with high perceptual uncertainty. Compared with data on eye and arm movements our findings lend support to the hypothesis that the central nervous system (CNS) uses common mechanisms to govern goal-directed movements, including locomotion. We discuss our results with respect to the use of VR methods in gait control and rehabilitation.

  3. Assessment of radiation awareness training in immersive virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisker, Vaughn E., III

    The prospect of new nuclear power plant orders in the near future and the graying of the current workforce create a need to train new personnel faster and better. Immersive virtual reality (VR) may offer a solution to the training challenge. VR technology presented in a CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) provides a high-fidelity, one-to-one scale environment where areas of the power plant can be recreated and virtual radiation environments can be simulated, making it possible to safely expose workers to virtual radiation in the context of the actual work environment. The use of virtual reality for training is supported by many educational theories; constructivism and discovery learning, in particular. Educational theory describes the importance of matching the training to the task. Plant access training and radiation worker training, common forms of training in the nuclear industry, rely on computer-based training methods in most cases, which effectively transfer declarative knowledge, but are poor at transferring skills. If an activity were to be added, the training would provide personnel with the opportunity to develop skills and apply their knowledge so they could be more effective when working in the radiation environment. An experiment was developed to test immersive virtual reality's suitability for training radiation awareness. Using a mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative measures, the subjects' performances before and after training were assessed. First, subjects completed a pre-test to measure their knowledge prior to completing any training. Next they completed unsupervised computer-based training, which consisted of a PowerPoint presentation and a PDF document. After completing a brief orientation activity in the virtual environment, one group of participants received supplemental radiation awareness training in a simulated radiation environment presented in the CAVE, while a second group, the control group, moved directly to the

  4. An Affordable Virtual Reality System for Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Bartal; Nielsen, Ronni Nedergaard; Szabo, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an affordable phantom limb pain (PLP) home treatment system using virtual reality (VR) and a motion sensor to immerse the users in a virtual environment (VE). The work is inspired by mirror therapy (MT) which is used to treat patients with PLP....... This project focuses on phantom pain in amputees. Using a motion sensor, the system tracks the movement of a user’s hand and translates it onto the virtual hand. The system consists of exercises focusing on opening and closing the hand, rotating the hand, and finer finger movements. These exercises...

  5. A Virtual Reality System for Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain using Game Training and Motion Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Bartal; Nielsen, Ronni Nedergaard; Szabo, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a phantom limb pain (PLP) home-based system using virtual reality (VR) and a motion sensor to immerse the users in a virtual environment (VE). The work is inspired by mirror therapy (MT), which has been used to relieve PLP. The target patient group focuses...... on unilateral upper-limb amputees with phantom pain. Using a motion sensor, the system tracks the movement of a user’s hand and translates it onto the virtual hand. The system consists of exercises including opening and closing the hand, rotating the hand, and finer finger movements. These exercises...

  6. What virtual reality research in addictions can tell us about the future of obesity assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordnick, Patrick S; Carter, Brian L; Traylor, Amy C

    2011-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR), a system of human-computer interaction that allows researchers and clinicians to immerse people in virtual worlds, is gaining considerable traction as a research, education, and treatment tool. Virtual reality has been used successfully to treat anxiety disorders such as fear of flying and post-traumatic stress disorder, as an aid in stroke rehabilitation, and as a behavior modification aid in the treatment of attention deficit disorder. Virtual reality has also been employed in research on addictive disorders. Given the strong evidence that drug-dependent people are highly prone to use and relapse in the presence of environmental stimuli associated with drug use, VR is an ideal platform from which to study this relationship. Research using VR has shown that drug-dependent people react with strong craving to specific cues (e.g., cigarette packs, liquor bottles) as well as environments or settings (e.g., bar, party) associated with drug use. Virtual reality has also been used to enhance learning and generalization of relapse prevention skills in smokers by reinforcing these skills in lifelike environments. Obesity researchers and treatment professionals, building on the lessons learned from VR research in substance abuse, have the opportunity to adapt these methods for investigating their own research and treatment questions. Virtual reality is ideally suited to investigate the link between food cues and environmental settings with eating behaviors and self-report of hunger. In addition, VR can be used as a treatment tool for enhancing behavior modification goals to support healthy eating habits by reinforcing these goals in life-like situations.

  7. What Virtual Reality Research in Addictions Can Tell Us about the Future of Obesity Assessment and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordnick, Patrick S; Carter, Brian L; Traylor, Amy C

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR), a system of human–computer interaction that allows researchers and clinicians to immerse people in virtual worlds, is gaining considerable traction as a research, education, and treatment tool. Virtual reality has been used successfully to treat anxiety disorders such as fear of flying and post-traumatic stress disorder, as an aid in stroke rehabilitation, and as a behavior modification aid in the treatment of attention deficit disorder. Virtual reality has also been employed in research on addictive disorders. Given the strong evidence that drug-dependent people are highly prone to use and relapse in the presence of environmental stimuli associated with drug use, VR is an ideal platform from which to study this relationship. Research using VR has shown that drug-dependent people react with strong craving to specific cues (e.g., cigarette packs, liquor bottles) as well as environments or settings (e.g., bar, party) associated with drug use. Virtual reality has also been used to enhance learning and generalization of relapse prevention skills in smokers by reinforcing these skills in lifelike environments. Obesity researchers and treatment professionals, building on the lessons learned from VR research in substance abuse, have the opportunity to adapt these methods for investigating their own research and treatment questions. Virtual reality is ideally suited to investigate the link between food cues and environmental settings with eating behaviors and self-report of hunger. In addition, VR can be used as a treatment tool for enhancing behavior modification goals to support healthy eating habits by reinforcing these goals in life–like situations. PMID:21527092

  8. Computer classes and games in virtual reality environment to reduce loneliness among students of an elderly reference center: Study protocol for a randomised cross-over design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Thaiany Pedrozo Campos; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle de; Crocetta, Tania Brusque; Antão, Jennifer Yohanna Ferreira de Lima; Barbosa, Renata Thais de Almeida; Guarnieri, Regiani; Massetti, Thais; Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira de Mello; Abreu, Luiz Carlos de

    2017-03-01

    Physical and mental changes associated with aging commonly lead to a decrease in communication capacity, reducing social interactions and increasing loneliness. Computer classes for older adults make significant contributions to social and cognitive aspects of aging. Games in a virtual reality (VR) environment stimulate the practice of communicative and cognitive skills and might also bring benefits to older adults. Furthermore, it might help to initiate their contact to the modern technology. The purpose of this study protocol is to evaluate the effects of practicing VR games during computer classes on the level of loneliness of students of an elderly reference center. This study will be a prospective longitudinal study with a randomised cross-over design, with subjects aged 50 years and older, of both genders, spontaneously enrolled in computer classes for beginners. Data collection will be done in 3 moments: moment 0 (T0) - at baseline; moment 1 (T1) - after 8 typical computer classes; and moment 2 (T2) - after 8 computer classes which include 15 minutes for practicing games in VR environment. A characterization questionnaire, the short version of the Short Social and Emotional Loneliness Scale for Adults (SELSA-S) and 3 games with VR (Random, MoviLetrando, and Reaction Time) will be used. For the intervention phase 4 other games will be used: Coincident Timing, Motor Skill Analyser, Labyrinth, and Fitts. The statistical analysis will compare the evolution in loneliness perception, performance, and reaction time during the practice of the games between the 3 moments of data collection. Performance and reaction time during the practice of the games will also be correlated to the loneliness perception. The protocol is approved by the host institution's ethics committee under the number 52305215.3.0000.0082. Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journal articles and conferences. This clinical trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT

  9. Man, mind, and machine: the past and future of virtual reality simulation in neurologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, R Aaron; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2011-11-01

    To review virtual reality in neurosurgery, including the history of simulation and virtual reality and some of the current implementations; to examine some of the technical challenges involved; and to propose a potential paradigm for the development of virtual reality in neurosurgery going forward. A search was made on PubMed using key words surgical simulation, virtual reality, haptics, collision detection, and volumetric modeling to assess the current status of virtual reality in neurosurgery. Based on previous results, investigators extrapolated the possible integration of existing efforts and potential future directions. Simulation has a rich history in surgical training, and there are numerous currently existing applications and systems that involve virtual reality. All existing applications are limited to specific task-oriented functions and typically sacrifice visual realism for real-time interactivity or vice versa, owing to numerous technical challenges in rendering a virtual space in real time, including graphic and tissue modeling, collision detection, and direction of the haptic interface. With ongoing technical advancements in computer hardware and graphic and physical rendering, incremental or modular development of a fully immersive, multipurpose virtual reality neurosurgical simulator is feasible. The use of virtual reality in neurosurgery is predicted to change the nature of neurosurgical education, and to play an increased role in surgical rehearsal and the continuing education and credentialing of surgical practitioners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Virtual reality therapy for adults post-stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis exploring virtual environments and commercial games in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Keith R; Hilderman, Courtney G E; Cheung, Katharine L; Tatla, Sandy; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to systematically review the evidence for virtual reality (VR) therapy in an adult post-stroke population in both custom built virtual environments (VE) and commercially available gaming systems (CG). MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, PSYCInfo, DARE, PEDro, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were systematically searched from the earliest available date until April 4, 2013. Controlled trials that compared VR to conventional therapy were included. Population criteria included adults (>18) post-stroke, excluding children, cerebral palsy, and other neurological disorders. Included studies were reported in English. Quality of studies was assessed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro). Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. For body function outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy compared to conventional therapy controls, G = 0.48, 95% CI = [0.27, 0.70], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.38). For activity outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy, G = 0.58, 95% CI = [0.32, 0.85], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.66). For participation outcomes, the overall effect size was G = 0.56, 95% CI = [0.02, 1.10]. All participation outcomes came from VE studies. VR rehabilitation moderately improves outcomes compared to conventional therapy in adults post-stroke. Current CG interventions have been too few and too small to assess potential benefits of CG. Future research in this area should aim to clearly define conventional therapy, report on participation measures, consider motivational components of therapy, and investigate commercially available systems in larger RCTs. Prospero CRD42013004338.

  11. Virtual reality therapy for adults post-stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis exploring virtual environments and commercial games in therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith R Lohse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this analysis was to systematically review the evidence for virtual reality (VR therapy in an adult post-stroke population in both custom built virtual environments (VE and commercially available gaming systems (CG. METHODS: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, PSYCInfo, DARE, PEDro, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were systematically searched from the earliest available date until April 4, 2013. Controlled trials that compared VR to conventional therapy were included. Population criteria included adults (>18 post-stroke, excluding children, cerebral palsy, and other neurological disorders. Included studies were reported in English. Quality of studies was assessed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro. RESULTS: Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. For body function outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy compared to conventional therapy controls, G = 0.48, 95% CI = [0.27, 0.70], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.38. For activity outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy, G = 0.58, 95% CI = [0.32, 0.85], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.66. For participation outcomes, the overall effect size was G = 0.56, 95% CI = [0.02, 1.10]. All participation outcomes came from VE studies. DISCUSSION: VR rehabilitation moderately improves outcomes compared to conventional therapy in adults post-stroke. Current CG interventions have been too few and too small to assess potential benefits of CG. Future research in this area should aim to clearly define conventional therapy, report on participation measures, consider motivational components of therapy, and investigate commercially available systems in larger RCTs. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Prospero CRD42013004338.

  12. Tecnatom virtual reality experience in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza, Guillermo; Cabrera, Esteban; Salve, Ricardo

    2004-07-01

    TECNATOM is a Spanish company focused in providing support to the energy sector. Training, operation engineering and inspection services in nuclear environments are the main business of the company. Emerging applications based on Virtual Reality (VR) are being demanded by the market as a response to the current cost reduction trend and to the new challenges arising in decommissioning of NPP's, human factors analysis and training of personnel in high risk tasks. On this respect, Tecnatom has launched several initiatives to consolidate its internal capabilities in VR and to acquire consulting skills for the Tecnatom market. The results of theses actions will be shown in this paper. (Author)

  13. Visual Hallucinations as Incidental Negative Effects of Virtual Reality on Parkinson’s Disease Patients: A Link with Neurodegeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Albani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We followed up a series of 23 Parkinson’s disease (PD patients who had performed an immersive virtual reality (VR protocol eight years before. On that occasion, six patients incidentally described visual hallucinations (VH with occurrences of images not included in the virtual environment. Curiously, in the following years, only these patients reported the appearance of VH later in their clinical history, while the rest of the group did not. Even considering the limited sample size, we may argue that VR immersive systems can induce unpleasant effects in PD patients who are predisposed to a cognitive impairment.

  14. Visual Hallucinations as Incidental Negative Effects of Virtual Reality on Parkinson's Disease Patients: A Link with Neurodegeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Giovanni; Pedroli, Elisa; Cipresso, Pietro; Bulla, Daniel; Cimolin, Veronica; Thomas, Astrid; Mauro, Alessandro; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    We followed up a series of 23 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who had performed an immersive virtual reality (VR) protocol eight years before. On that occasion, six patients incidentally described visual hallucinations (VH) with occurrences of images not included in the virtual environment. Curiously, in the following years, only these patients reported the appearance of VH later in their clinical history, while the rest of the group did not. Even considering the limited sample size, we may argue that VR immersive systems can induce unpleasant effects in PD patients who are predisposed to a cognitive impairment.

  15. Visual Hallucinations as Incidental Negative Effects of Virtual Reality on Parkinson's Disease Patients: A Link with Neurodegeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroli, Elisa; Bulla, Daniel; Cimolin, Veronica; Thomas, Astrid; Mauro, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We followed up a series of 23 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who had performed an immersive virtual reality (VR) protocol eight years before. On that occasion, six patients incidentally described visual hallucinations (VH) with occurrences of images not included in the virtual environment. Curiously, in the following years, only these patients reported the appearance of VH later in their clinical history, while the rest of the group did not. Even considering the limited sample size, we may argue that VR immersive systems can induce unpleasant effects in PD patients who are predisposed to a cognitive impairment. PMID:26064775

  16. Enhancements to VTK enabling Scientific Visualization in Immersive Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, Patrick; Jhaveri, Sankhesh; Chaudhary, Aashish; Sherman, William; Martin, Ken; Lonie, David; Whiting, Eric; Money, James

    2017-04-01

    Modern scientific, engineering and medical computational sim- ulations, as well as experimental and observational data sens- ing/measuring devices, produce enormous amounts of data. While statistical analysis provides insight into this data, scientific vi- sualization is tactically important for scientific discovery, prod- uct design and data analysis. These benefits are impeded, how- ever, when scientific visualization algorithms are implemented from scratch—a time-consuming and redundant process in im- mersive application development. This process can greatly ben- efit from leveraging the state-of-the-art open-source Visualization Toolkit (VTK) and its community. Over the past two (almost three) decades, integrating VTK with a virtual reality (VR) environment has only been attempted to varying degrees of success. In this pa- per, we demonstrate two new approaches to simplify this amalga- mation of an immersive interface with visualization rendering from VTK. In addition, we cover several enhancements to VTK that pro- vide near real-time updates and efficient interaction. Finally, we demonstrate the combination of VTK with both Vrui and OpenVR immersive environments in example applications.

  17. Virtual reality for freely moving animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, John R; Hofbauer, Maximilian; Bastien, Renaud; Griessner, Johannes; Higgins, Peter; Farooqui, Sarfarazhussain; Fischer, Ruth M; Nowikovsky, Karin; Haubensak, Wulf; Couzin, Iain D; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Straw, Andrew D

    2017-08-21

    Standard animal behavior paradigms incompletely mimic nature and thus limit our understanding of behavior and brain function. Virtual reality (VR) can help, but it poses challenges. Typical VR systems require movement restrictions but disrupt sensorimotor experience, causing neuronal and behavioral alterations. We report the development of FreemoVR, a VR system for freely moving animals. We validate immersive VR for mice, flies, and zebrafish. FreemoVR allows instant, disruption-free environmental reconfigurations and interactions between real organisms and computer-controlled agents. Using the FreemoVR platform, we established a height-aversion assay in mice and studied visuomotor effects in Drosophila and zebrafish. Furthermore, by photorealistically mimicking zebrafish we discovered that effective social influence depends on a prospective leader balancing its internally preferred directional choice with social interaction. FreemoVR technology facilitates detailed investigations into neural function and behavior through the precise manipulation of sensorimotor feedback loops in unrestrained animals.

  18. High Quality Virtual Reality for Architectural Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzberg, Anette

    2016-01-01

    This paper will summarise the findings from creating and implementing a visually high quality Virtual Reality (VR) experiment as part of an international architecture exhibition. It was the aim to represent the architectural spatial qualities as well as the atmosphere created from combining natural...... and artificial lighting in a prominent not yet built project. The outcome is twofold: Findings concerning the integration of VR in an exhibition space and findings concerning the experience of the virtual space itself. In the exhibition, an important aspect was the unmanned exhibition space, requiring the VR...... and quantitative methods at two different occasions and setups after the exhibition, both showing a high degree of immersion and experience of reality....

  19. Role of virtual reality for cerebral palsy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Tirosh, Emanuel; Fehlings, Darcy

    2014-08-01

    Virtual reality is the use of interactive simulations to present users with opportunities to perform in virtual environments that appear, sound, and less frequently, feel similar to real-world objects and events. Interactive computer play refers to the use of a game where a child interacts and plays with virtual objects in a computer-generated environment. Because of their distinctive attributes that provide ecologically realistic and motivating opportunities for active learning, these technologies have been used in pediatric rehabilitation over the past 15 years. The ability of virtual reality to create opportunities for active repetitive motor/sensory practice adds to their potential for neuroplasticity and learning in individuals with neurologic disorders. The objectives of this article is to provide an overview of how virtual reality and gaming are used clinically, to present the results of several example studies that demonstrate their use in research, and to briefly remark on future developments.

  20. Physical Models and Virtual Reality Simulators in Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javia, Luv; Sardesai, Maya G

    2017-07-14

    The increasing role of simulation in the medical education of future otolaryngologists has followed suit with other surgical disciplines. Simulators make it possible for the resident to explore and learn in a safe and less stressful environment. The various subspecialties in otolaryngology use physical simulators and virtual-reality simulators. Although physical simulators allow the operator to make direct contact with its components, virtual-reality simulators allow the operator to interact with an environment that is computer generated. This article gives an overview of the various types of physical simulators and virtual-reality simulators used in otolaryngology that have been reported in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A distributed Approach for Access and Visibility Task with a Manikin and a Robot in a Virtual Reality Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Chedmail, Patrick; Roy, Christophe Le

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new method, based on a multi-agent system and on a digital mock-up technology, to assess an efficient path planner for a manikin or a robot for access and visibility task taking into account ergonomic constraints or joint and mechanical limits. In order to solve this problem, the human operator is integrated in the process optimization to contribute to a global perception of the environment. This operator cooperates, in real-time, with several automatic local elementary agents. The result of this work validates solutions through the digital mock-up; it can be applied to simulate maintenability and mountability tasks.

  2. A distributed Approach for Access and Visibility Task under Ergonomic Constraints with a Manikin in a Virtual Reality Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Bidault, Florence; Chedmail, Patrick; Pino, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new method, based on a multi-agent system and on digital mock-up technology, to assess an efficient path planner for a manikin for access and visibility task under ergonomic constraints. In order to solve this problem, the human operator is integrated in the process optimization to contribute to a global perception of the environment. This operator cooperates, in real-time, with several automatic local elementary agents. The result of this work validates solutions brought by digital mock-up and that can be applied to simulate maintenance task.

  3. Assessing effectiveness of various auditory warning signals in maintaining drivers' attention in virtual reality-based driving environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Chiu, Tien-Ting; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chao, Chih-Feng; Liang, Wen-Chieh; Hsu, Shang-Hwa; Ko, Li-Wei

    2009-06-01

    Drivers' fatigue contributes to traffic accidents, so drivers must maintain adequate alertness. The effectiveness of audio alarms in maintaining driving performance and characteristics of alarms was studied in a virtural reality-based driving environment. Response time to the car's drifting was measured under seven conditions: with no warnings and with continuous warning tones (500 Hz, 1750 Hz, and 3000 Hz), and with tone bursts at 500 Hz, 1750 Hz, and 3000 Hz. Analyses showed the audio warning signals significantly improved driving. Further, the tones' spectral characteristics significantly influenced the effectiveness of the warning.

  4. Charlie, Development of a Light-Weight, Virtual Reality Trainer for the LSO Community: Time to Make the Leap Toward Immersive VR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    training environment to the workplace environment” (Bossard, Kermarrec, Buche, & Tisseau, 2008, p. 151). Mestre (2002) describes two types of transfer...team pitching deck not landing an A/C on a foul deck Deck movement and WX and environment Teamwork Learn how to judge the...Procedural practice How the LSODS works Interface with team on the platform line-up corrections Teamwork Watching for out of limit winds not

  5. Real behavior in virtual environments: psychology experiments in a simple virtual-reality paradigm using video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Michail D; Johansen, Mark K

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to illustrate the broad usefulness of simple video-game-based virtual environments (VEs) for psychological research on real-world behavior. To this end, this research explored several high-level social phenomena in a simple, inexpensive computer-game environment: the reduced likelihood of helping under time pressure and the bystander effect, which is reduced helping in the presence of bystanders. In the first experiment, participants had to find the exit in a virtual labyrinth under either high or low time pressure. They encountered rooms with and without virtual bystanders, and in each room, a virtual person requested assistance. Participants helped significantly less frequently under time pressure but the presence/absence of a small number of bystanders did not significantly moderate helping. The second experiment increased the number of virtual bystanders, and participants were instructed to imagine that these were real people. Participants helped significantly less in rooms with large numbers of bystanders compared to rooms with no bystanders, thus demonstrating a bystander effect. These results indicate that even sophisticated high-level social behaviors can be observed and experimentally manipulated in simple VEs, thus implying the broad usefulness of this paradigm in psychological research as a good compromise between experimental control and ecological validity.

  6. Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs basic and applied research in interactive 3D computer graphics, including visual analytics, virtual environments, and augmented reality (AR). The...

  7. The ethnography of virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses possible application of ethnographic research in the realm of virtual reality, especially in the relationship between cultures in virtual communities. This represents an entirely new area of ethnographic research and therefore many adjustments in the research design are needed for example, a development of a specific method of data gathering and tools for their verification. A virtual, cyber space is a version of social space more or less synchronous with it, but without ...

  8. Virtual Reality Enhanced Instructional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachimuthu, K.; Vijayakumari, G.

    2009-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a creation of virtual 3D world in which one can feel and sense the world as if it is real. It is allowing engineers to design machines and Educationists to design AV [audiovisual] equipment in real time but in 3-dimensional hologram as if the actual material is being made and worked upon. VR allows a least-cost (energy…

  9. Virtual Reality and Public Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Tózsa, István

    2013-01-01

    This study serves as an introduction to how virtual reality systems could be applied in public administration and what research tasks would be necessary to accomplish a project. E-government solutions began to emerge in public administration approximately a decade ago all over the developed world. Administration service facilities via the Internet did not attract many customers, because of the digital divide. E-government solutions were extended to mobile devices as well, but the expected bre...

  10. Virtual Reality in Psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nigel Foreman

    2009-01-01

    The benefits of using virtual environments (VEs) in psychology arise from the fact that movements in virtual space, and accompanying perceptual changes, are treated by the brain in much the same way as those in equivalent real space...

  11. The Impact of Virtual Reality Programs in Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catterson, Anna J.

    2013-01-01

    Instructional technology has evolved from blackboards with chalk to in some cases three-dimensional virtual reality environments in which students are interacting and engaging with other students worldwide. The use of this new instructional methodology, known as "virtual reality," has experienced substantial growth in higher education…

  12. The Impact of Virtual Reality Programs in Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catterson, Anna J.

    2013-01-01

    Instructional technology has evolved from blackboards with chalk to in some cases three-dimensional virtual reality environments in which students are interacting and engaging with other students worldwide. The use of this new instructional methodology, known as "virtual reality," has experienced substantial growth in higher education…

  13. Virtual Reality: An Emerging Tool to Treat Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    of pain the next day, leading to nocebo hyperalgesia , the functional opposite of the placebo effect (Colloca et al., 2007). 4.0 IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL...symptoms in soldiers with polytrauma: unique aspects of blast exposure. Pain Med. 2009;10:447-55. Colloca L, Benedetti F: Nocebo hyperalgesia : How... thermal pain-related brain activity with virtual reality: evidence from fMRI. Neuroreport. 2004;15:1245-1248. Hoffman HG, Richards TL, Van Oostrom T

  14. Wind and warmth in virtual reality: implementation and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Hülsmann, Felix; Fröhlich, Julia; Mattar, Nikita; Wachsmuth, Ipke

    2014-01-01

    One possibility to make virtual worlds more immersive is to address as many human senses as possible. This paper presents the development of a system for creating wind and warmth simulations in Virtual Reality (VR). Therefore, suitable hardware and an implemented software model are described. Technical evaluations of the hardware and of the software components demonstrate the usability of the system in VR Applications. Furthermore, a user study underlines users’ acceptance and indicates a pos...

  15. A dialogue agent for navigation support in virtual reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luin, van J.; Akker, op den H.J.A.; Nijholt, A.; Jacko, J.; Sears, A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe our work on designing a natural language accessible navigation agent for a virtual reality (VR) environment. The agent is part of an agent framework, which means that it can communicate with other agents. Its navigation task consists of guiding the visitors in the environment and to answ

  16. Designing a Virtual Reality Game for the CAVE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Virtual Reality has for many years been a technology which has stagnated in application and software development for games. What was possible and created ten years ago for games in VR environments is still being developed. The applications available for VR environments have increased...

  17. QuickTime Virtual Reality Technology Applies to Practical Teaching Recording System

    OpenAIRE

    Yongyong Zhu

    2013-01-01

    QTVR is virtual reality technology which is based on static images and we apply it to practical teaching section. Through the practical teaching record system, virtual reality technology is applied to the whole journey of practical teaching. Give full play to the merits of strong sense of reality of the QTVR technology, good interactive performance, impressive immersive experience, convenience of produce and transmission, make seamless integration with the various present online teaching plat...

  18. Application progress of virtual reality rehabilitation technology in upper limb dysfunction after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing-Jie; Li, Fang

    2017-01-01

     Virtual reality (VR) rehabilitation technology is a kind of integrated technology which simulates the real world via computer. It has three characteristics: immersion, interaction and imagination. It is widely used in the field of stroke rehabilitation. This review briefly describes the application of virtual reality rehabilitation technology in upper limb dysfunction after stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.04.002

  19. Application progress of virtual reality rehabilitation technology in upper limb dysfunction after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-jie LI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available  Virtual reality (VR rehabilitation technology is a kind of integrated technology which simulates the real world via computer. It has three characteristics: immersion, interaction and imagination. It is widely used in the field of stroke rehabilitation. This review briefly describes the application of virtual reality rehabilitation technology in upper limb dysfunction after stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.04.002

  20. Virtual Reality in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    The benefits of using virtual environments (VEs) in psychology arise from the fact that movements in virtual space, and accompanying perceptual changes, are treated by the brain in much the same way as those in equivalent real space. The research benefits of using VEs, in areas of psychology such as spatial learning and cognition, include…

  1. Intelligent Decision-Support in Virtual Reality Healthcare & Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis Brooks, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Intelligent Decision-Support (IDS) mechanisms to improve an ‘in-action’ facilitator intervention model and ‘on-action’ evaluation and refinement model are proposed for contemporary Virtual Reality Healthcare & Rehabilitation training. The ‘Zone of Optimized Motivation’ (ZOOM) model...... and the ‘Hermeneutic Action Research Recursive Reflection’ model have emerged from a body of virtual reality research called SoundScapes. The work targets all ages and all abilities through gesture-control of responsive multimedia within Virtual Interactive Space (VIS). VIS is an interactive information environment...

  2. An investigation of the efficacy of collaborative virtual reality systems for moderated remote usability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalil Madathil, Kapil; Greenstein, Joel S

    2017-11-01

    Collaborative virtual reality-based systems have integrated high fidelity voice-based communication, immersive audio and screen-sharing tools into virtual environments. Such three-dimensional collaborative virtual environments can mirror the collaboration among usability test participants and facilitators when they are physically collocated, potentially enabling moderated usability tests to be conducted effectively when the facilitator and participant are located in different places. We developed a virtual collaborative three-dimensional remote moderated usability testing laboratory and employed it in a controlled study to evaluate the effectiveness of moderated usability testing in a collaborative virtual reality-based environment with two other moderated usability testing methods: the traditional lab approach and Cisco WebEx, a web-based conferencing and screen sharing approach. Using a mixed methods experimental design, 36 test participants and 12 test facilitators were asked to complete representative tasks on a simulated online shopping website. The dependent variables included the time taken to complete the tasks; the usability defects identified and their severity; and the subjective ratings on the workload index, presence and satisfaction questionnaires. Remote moderated usability testing methodology using a collaborative virtual reality system performed similarly in terms of the total number of defects identified, the number of high severity defects identified and the time taken to complete the tasks with the other two methodologies. The overall workload experienced by the test participants and facilitators was the least with the traditional lab condition. No significant differences were identified for the workload experienced with the virtual reality and the WebEx conditions. However, test participants experienced greater involvement and a more immersive experience in the virtual environment than in the WebEx condition. The ratings for the virtual

  3. Ontological implications of being in immersive virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morie, Jacquelyn F.

    2008-02-01

    The idea of Virtual Reality once conjured up visions of new territories to explore, and expectations of awaiting worlds of wonder. VR has matured to become a practical tool for therapy, medicine and commercial interests, yet artists, in particular, continue to expand the possibilities for the medium. Artistic virtual environments created over the past two decades probe the phenomenological nature of these virtual environments. When we inhabit a fully immersive virtual environment, we have entered into a new form of Being. Not only does our body continue to exist in the real, physical world, we are also embodied within the virtual by means of technology that translates our bodied actions into interactions with the virtual environment. Very few states in human existence allow this bifurcation of our Being, where we can exist simultaneously in two spaces at once, with the possible exception of meta-physical states such as shamanistic trance and out-of-body experiences. This paper discusses the nature of this simultaneous Being, how we enter the virtual space, what forms of persona we can don there, what forms of spaces we can inhabit, and what type of wondrous experiences we can both hope for and expect.

  4. Application of Virtual Reality to Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamela, B.; Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M. L.; Mreino, A.; Sarti, F.

    2004-07-01

    In order to optimize the operations and procedures in several aspects of a Nuclear Power Plants, Iberdrola Ingenieria y Consultoria (Iberinco) has been developed some projects with Virtual Reality: CIPRES, ACEWO, TILOS and SICOMORO. With the experience acquired in these projects, Iberinco has checked the utility and advantageous of Virtual Reality applications that could have a direct application to Radiation Protection. With Virtual Reality it is possible to optimize the procedures involved in several critical aspects of the Plant Management. A training program bases on Virtual Reality systems could be one of the most important application. In Emergency situations the time of reaction is very important and in order to reduce it and dose, Virtual Reality is a very important tool, that could be used for training and to guide response team actions. Finally, the reduction of dose to workers, in a NPP, and patients, in hospital, is one of the most important application of Virtual Reality. (Author) 5 refs.

  5. Virtual reality simulation mechanism on WWW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Feng, Yuncheng; Wei, Youshuang

    2000-06-01

    This paper addresses a fundamental, easy but powerful mechanism of Virtual Reality Simulation system on World Wide Web. The basic idea is to use Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) to build the virtual world, and design a specific simulator to complete the common simulation work and drive the VR animation. According to the achievable mathematics and animation function, two types of this VR Simulation system are founded. The first one is to use VRMLScript or JavaScript to code the specific simulator. This mechanism really can be realized, however, the mathematical operations and the simulation model scale are limited. The other is to apply Java for coding the simulator, then use HTML to combine the VR scene and the simulator in the same WebPage, which can harmonize the VR animation running according to the simulation logic. Because Java is fully mathematics functioned and the Java code modules are entirely reusable, this VR simulation system, which is mainly recommended, can be easily realized on desktop PC and meet the basic interactive requirements of VR Technology without any extra hardware. A VR M/M/1/k Queuing simulation system is given to explain the mechanism. Finally, the overall Integrated Development Environment for this VR simulation system is also discussed.

  6. Use of Virtual Reality Tools for Vestibular Disorders Rehabilitation: A Comprehensive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Bergeron

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical peripheral vestibular disorders rehabilitation is a long and costly process. While virtual reality settings have been repeatedly suggested to represent possible tools to help the rehabilitation process, no systematic study had been conducted so far. We systematically reviewed the current literature to analyze the published protocols documenting the use of virtual reality settings for peripheral vestibular disorders rehabilitation. There is an important diversity of settings and protocols involving virtual reality settings for the treatment of this pathology. Evaluation of the symptoms is often not standardized. However, our results unveil a clear effect of virtual reality settings-based rehabilitation of the patients’ symptoms, assessed by objectives tools such as the DHI (mean decrease of 27 points, changing symptoms handicap perception from moderate to mild impact on life. Furthermore, we detected a relationship between the duration of the exposure to virtual reality environments and the magnitude of the therapeutic effects, suggesting that virtual reality treatments should last at least 150 minutes of cumulated exposure to ensure positive outcomes. Virtual reality offers a pleasant and safe environment for the patient. Future studies should standardize evaluation tools, document putative side effects further, compare virtual reality to conventional physical therapy, and evaluate economical costs/benefits of such strategies.

  7. Use of Virtual Reality Tools for Vestibular Disorders Rehabilitation: A Comprehensive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Mathieu; Lortie, Catherine L; Guitton, Matthieu J

    2015-01-01

    Classical peripheral vestibular disorders rehabilitation is a long and costly process. While virtual reality settings have been repeatedly suggested to represent possible tools to help the rehabilitation process, no systematic study had been conducted so far. We systematically reviewed the current literature to analyze the published protocols documenting the use of virtual reality settings for peripheral vestibular disorders rehabilitation. There is an important diversity of settings and protocols involving virtual reality settings for the treatment of this pathology. Evaluation of the symptoms is often not standardized. However, our results unveil a clear effect of virtual reality settings-based rehabilitation of the patients' symptoms, assessed by objectives tools such as the DHI (mean decrease of 27 points), changing symptoms handicap perception from moderate to mild impact on life. Furthermore, we detected a relationship between the duration of the exposure to virtual reality environments and the magnitude of the therapeutic effects, suggesting that virtual reality treatments should last at least 150 minutes of cumulated exposure to ensure positive outcomes. Virtual reality offers a pleasant and safe environment for the patient. Future studies should standardize evaluation tools, document putative side effects further, compare virtual reality to conventional physical therapy, and evaluate economical costs/benefits of such strategies.

  8. 3DIVE:An Immersive Environment for Interactive Volume Data Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Boyles; FANG ShiaoFen(方晓芬)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an immersive system, called 3DIVE, for interactive volume data visualization and exploration inside the CAVE virtual environment. Combining interactive volume rendering and virtual reality provides a natural immersive environment for volumetric data visualization. More advanced data exploration operations, such as object level data manipulation,simulation and analysis, are supported in 3DIVE by several new techniques. In particular, volume primitives and texture regions are used for the rendering, manipulation, and collision detection of volumetric objects; and the region-based rendering pipeline is integrated with 3D image filters to provide an image-based mechanism for interactive transfer function design. The system has been recently released as public domain software for CAVE/ImmersaDesk users, and is currently being actively used by various scientific and biomedical visualization projects.

  9. A hitchhiker's guide to virtual reality

    CERN Document Server

    McMenemy , Karen

    2007-01-01

    A Hitchhiker's Guide to Virtual Reality brings together under one cover all the aspects of graphics, video, audio, and haptics that have to work together to make virtual reality a reality. Like any good guide, it reveals the practical things you need to know, from the viewpoint of authors who have been there. This two-part guide covers the science, technology, and mathematics of virtual reality and then details its practical implementation. The first part looks at how the interface between human senses and technology works to create virtual reality, with a focus on vision, the most important s

  10. Virtual Reality for Materials Design Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to research and develop materials through applied virtual reality to enable interactive "materials-by-design." Extensive theoretical and computational...

  11. Virtual reality concepts and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    A manual for both designers and users, comprehensively presenting the current state of experts' knowledge on virtual reality (VR) in computer science, mechanics, optics, acoustics, physiology, psychology, ergonomics, ethics, and related area. Designed as a reference book and design guide to help the reader develop a VR project, it presents the reader with the importance of the user's needs and various aspects of the human computer interface (HCI). It further treats technical aspects of VR, hardware and software implementations, and details on the sensory and psycho-sensory interfaces. Providin

  12. Theoretical Bases for Using Virtual Reality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chwen Jen

    2009-01-01

    This article elaborates on how the technical capabilities of virtual reality support the constructivist learning principles. It introduces VRID, a model for instructional design and development that offers explicit guidance on how to produce an educational virtual environment. The define phase of VRID consists of three main tasks: forming a…

  13. Are Spatial Visualization Abilities Relevant to Virtual Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chwen Jen

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of virtual reality (VR)-based learning environment on learners of different spatial visualization abilities. The findings of the aptitude-by-treatment interaction study have shown that learners benefit most from the Guided VR mode, irrespective of their spatial visualization abilities. This indicates that…

  14. Reduced Mimicry to Virtual Reality Avatars in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Paul A. G.; Pan, Xueni; de C. Hamilton, Antonia F.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicry involves unconsciously copying the actions of others. Increasing evidence suggests that autistic people can copy the goal of an observed action but show differences in their mimicry. We investigated mimicry in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) within a two-dimensional virtual reality environment. Participants played an imitation game with a…

  15. Design and Application of a Novel Virtual Reality Navigational Technology (VRNChair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Byagowi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel virtual reality navigation (VRN input device, called the VRNChair, offering an intuitive and natural way to interact with virtual reality (VR environments. Traditionally, VR navigation tests are performed using stationary input devices such as keyboards or joysticks. However, in case of immersive VR environment experiments, such as our recent VRN assessment, the user may feel kinetosis (motion sickness as a result of the disagreement between vestibular response and the optical flow. In addition, experience in using a joystick or any of the existing computer input devices may cause a bias in the accuracy of participant performance in VR environment experiments. Therefore, we have designed a VR navigational environment that is operated using a wheelchair (VRNChair. The VRNChair translates the movement of a manual wheelchair to feed any VR environment. We evaluated the VRNChair by testing on 34 young individuals in two groups performing the same navigational task with either the VRNChair or a joystick; also one older individual (55 years performed the same experiment with both a joystick and the VRNChair. The results indicate that the VRNChair does not change the accuracy of the performance; thus removing the plausible bias of having experience using a joystick. More importantly, it significantly reduces the effect of kinetosis. While we developed VRNChair for our spatial cognition study, its application can be in many other studies involving neuroscience, neurorehabilitation, physiotherapy, and/or simply the gaming industry.

  16. Virtual-reality-based educational laboratories in fiber optic engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Dana; Turczynski, Craig; Rice, Jonny; Kozhevnikov, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Researchers and educators have observed great potential in virtual reality (VR) technology as an educational tool due to its ability to engage and spark interest in students, thus providing them with a deeper form of knowledge about a subject. The focus of this project is to develop an interactive VR educational module, Laser Diode Characteristics and Coupling to Fibers, to integrate into a fiber optics laboratory course. The developed module features a virtual laboratory populated with realistic models of optical devices in which students can set up and perform an optical experiment dealing with laser diode characteristics and fiber coupling. The module contains three increasingly complex levels for students to navigate through, with a short built-in quiz after each level to measure the student's understanding of the subject. Seventeen undergraduate students learned fiber coupling concepts using the designed computer simulation in a non-immersive desktop virtual environment (VE) condition. The analysis of students' responses on the updated pre- and post tests show statistically significant improvement of the scores for the post-test as compared to the pre-test. In addition, the students' survey responses suggest that they found the module very useful and engaging. The conducted study clearly demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed instructional technology for engineering education, where both the model of instruction and the enabling technology are equally important, in providing a better learning environment to improve students' conceptual understanding as compared to other instructional approaches.

  17. Sensorized Garment Augmented 3D Pervasive Virtual Reality System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulrez, Tauseef; Tognetti, Alessandro; de Rossi, Danilo

    Virtual reality (VR) technology has matured to a point where humans can navigate in virtual scenes; however, providing them with a comfortable fully immersive role in VR remains a challenge. Currently available sensing solutions do not provide ease of deployment, particularly in the seated position due to sensor placement restrictions over the body, and optic-sensing requires a restricted indoor environment to track body movements. Here we present a 52-sensor laden garment interfaced with VR, which offers both portability and unencumbered user movement in a VR environment. This chapter addresses the systems engineering aspects of our pervasive computing solution of the interactive sensorized 3D VR and presents the initial results and future research directions. Participants navigated in a virtual art gallery using natural body movements that were detected by their wearable sensor shirt and then mapped the signals to electrical control signals responsible for VR scene navigation. The initial results are positive, and offer many opportunities for use in computationally intelligentman-machine multimedia control.

  18. Language-driven anticipatory eye movements in virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichert, Nicole; Peeters, David; Hagoort, Peter

    2017-08-08

    Predictive language processing is often studied by measuring eye movements as participants look at objects on a computer screen while they listen to spoken sentences. This variant of the visual-world paradigm has revealed that information encountered by a listener at a spoken verb can give rise to anticipatory eye movements to a target object, which is taken to indicate that people predict upcoming words. The ecological validity of such findings remains questionable, however, because these computer experiments used two-dimensional stimuli that were mere abstractions of real-world objects. Here we present a visual-world paradigm study in a three-dimensional (3-D) immersive virtual reality environment. Despite significant changes in the stimulus materials and the different mode of stimulus presentation, language-mediated anticipatory eye movements were still observed. These findings thus indicate that people do predict upcoming words during language comprehension in a more naturalistic setting where natural depth cues are preserved. Moreover, the results confirm the feasibility of using eyetracking in rich and multimodal 3-D virtual environments.

  19. What Virtual Reality Research in Addictions Can Tell Us about the Future of Obesity Assessment and Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bordnick, Patrick S; Carter, Brian L; Traylor, Amy C

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR), a system of human-computer interaction that allows researchers and clinicians to immerse people in virtual worlds, is gaining considerable traction as a research, education, and treatment tool...

  20. Challenges to the development of complex virtual reality surgical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, N E; Røtnes, J S

    2006-11-01

    Virtual reality simulation in surgical training has become more widely used and intensely investigated in an effort to develop safer, more efficient, measurable training processes. The development of virtual reality simulation of surgical procedures has begun, but well-described technical obstacles must be overcome to permit varied training in a clinically realistic computer-generated environment. These challenges include development of realistic surgical interfaces and physical objects within the computer-generated environment, modeling of realistic interactions between objects, rendering of the surgical field, and development of signal processing for complex events associated with surgery. Of these, the realistic modeling of tissue objects that are fully responsive to surgical manipulations is the most challenging. Threats to early success include relatively limited resources for development and procurement, as well as smaller potential for return on investment than in other simulation industries that face similar problems. Despite these difficulties, steady progress continues to be made in these areas. If executed properly, virtual reality offers inherent advantages over other training systems in creating a realistic surgical environment and facilitating measurement of surgeon performance. Once developed, complex new virtual reality training devices must be validated for their usefulness in formative training and assessment of skill to be established.

  1. Immersive Education, an Annotated Webliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricer, Wayne F.

    2011-01-01

    In this second installment of a two-part feature on immersive education a webliography will provide resources discussing the use of various types of computer simulations including: (a) augmented reality, (b) virtual reality programs, (c) gaming resources for teaching with technology, (d) virtual reality lab resources, (e) virtual reality standards…

  2. Immersive Education, an Annotated Webliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricer, Wayne F.

    2011-01-01

    In this second installment of a two-part feature on immersive education a webliography will provide resources discussing the use of various types of computer simulations including: (a) augmented reality, (b) virtual reality programs, (c) gaming resources for teaching with technology, (d) virtual reality lab resources, (e) virtual reality standards…

  3. The Virtual Tablet: Virtual Reality as a Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronister, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In the field of human-computer interaction, Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) have been rapidly growing areas of interest and concerted development effort thanks to both private and public research. At NASA, a number of groups have explored the possibilities afforded by AR and VR technology, among which is the IT Advanced Concepts Lab (ITACL). Within ITACL, the AVR (Augmented/Virtual Reality) Lab focuses on VR technology specifically for its use in command and control. Previous work in the AVR lab includes the Natural User Interface (NUI) project and the Virtual Control Panel (VCP) project, which created virtual three-dimensional interfaces that users could interact with while wearing a VR headset thanks to body- and hand-tracking technology. The Virtual Tablet (VT) project attempts to improve on these previous efforts by incorporating a physical surrogate which is mirrored in the virtual environment, mitigating issues with difficulty of visually determining the interface location and lack of tactile feedback discovered in the development of previous efforts. The physical surrogate takes the form of a handheld sheet of acrylic glass with several infrared-range reflective markers and a sensor package attached. Using the sensor package to track orientation and a motion-capture system to track the marker positions, a model of the surrogate is placed in the virtual environment at a position which corresponds with the real-world location relative to the user's VR Head Mounted Display (HMD). A set of control mechanisms is then projected onto the surface of the surrogate such that to the user, immersed in VR, the control interface appears to be attached to the object they are holding. The VT project was taken from an early stage where the sensor package, motion-capture system, and physical surrogate had been constructed or tested individually but not yet combined or incorporated into the virtual environment. My contribution was to combine the pieces of

  4. [Memory assessment by means of virtual reality: its present and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Orueta, Unai; Climent, Gema; Cardas-Ibanez, Jaione; Alonso, Laura; Olmo-Osa, Juan; Tirapu-Ustarroz, Javier

    2016-01-16

    The human memory is a complex cognitive system whose close relationship with executive functions implies that, in many occasions, a mnemonic deficit comprises difficulties to operate with correctly stored contents. Traditional memory tests, more focused in the information storage than in its processing, may be poorly sensitive both to subjects' daily life functioning and to changes originated by rehabilitation programs. In memory assessment, there is plenty evidence with regards to the need of improving it by means of tests which offer a higher ecological validity, with information that may be presented in various sensorial modalities and produced in a simultaneous way. Virtual reality reproduces three-dimensional environments with which the patient interacts in a dynamic way, with a sense of immersion in the environment similar to the presence and exposure to a real environment, and in which presentation of such stimuli, distractors and other variables may be systematically controlled. The current review aims to go deeply into the trajectory of neuropsychological assessment of memory based in virtual reality environments, making a tour through existing tests designed for assessing learning, prospective, episodic and spatial memory, as well as the most recent attempts to perform a comprehensive evaluation of all memory components.

  5. Medical applications of virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satava, R M

    1995-06-01

    Medical applications for virtual reality (VR) are just beginning to emerge. These include VR surgical simulators, telepresence surgery, complex medical database visualization, and rehabilitation. These applications are mediated through the computer interface and as such are the embodiment of VR as an integral part of the paradigm shift in the field of medicine. The Green Telepresence Surgery System consists of two components, the surgical workstation and remote worksite. At the remote site there is a 3-D camera system and responsive manipulators with sensory input. At the workstation there is a 3-D monitor and dexterous handles with force feedback. The VR surgical simulator is a stylized recreation of the human abdomen with several essential organs. Using a helmet mounted display and DataGlove, a person can learn anatomy from a new perspective by 'flying' inside and around the organs, or can practice surgical procedures with a scalpel and clamps. Database visualization creates 3-D images of complex medical data for new perspectives in analysis. Rehabilitation medicine permits impaired individuals to explore worlds not otherwise available to them, allows accurate assessment and therapy for their disabilities, and helps architects understand their critical needs in public or personal space. And to support these advanced technologies, the operating room and hospital of the future will be first designed and tested in virtual reality, bringing together the full power of the digital physician.

  6. Virtual Reality for Training and Lifelong Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mellet-d'Huart

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers the application of virtual reality (VR to training and lifelong learning. A number of considerations concerning the design of VR applications are included. The introduction is dedicated to the more general aspects of applying VR to training. From multiple perspectives, we will provide an overview of existing applications with their main purposes and go into more depth on certain learning areas. Recent developments of virtual environments for training and lifelong learning are analyzed, followed by an analytical viewpoint on design, advocating more explicit paradigmatic considerations and development of generic design methods. These approaches and proposals are aimed at better exploiting the uniqueness of VR and designing more effective virtual environments. Finally, a number of conclusions will be drawn for future technology-enhanced training and for lifelong learning using VR.

  7. World leading virtual reality mining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-15

    The development of immensely realistic Virtual Reality (VR) underground and surface mining environments resulting from a unique inter-disciplinary collaboration at the University of New South Wales has generated multi-million dollar sales and attracted intense interest across the mining sector. The university is supplying VR technologies to Coal Services Pty Ltd. (CSPL) for safety training. Similar to a giant computer game, each interactive software module recreates mine environments for various training scenarios and is displayed in multiple theatre modes including a 360-degree AVIE version for group training and a 180-degree iDome for individual training sessions. Further information is available from www.nsinnovations.com.au/vrmining. 5 photos.

  8. Virtual reality exposure in the treatment of social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Evelyne; Légeron, Patrick; Roy, Stéphane; Chemin, Isabelle; Lauer, Françoise; Nugues, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Social phobia is one of the most frequent psychiatric disorders and is accessible to two forms of scientifically validated treatments: anti-depressant drugs and cognitive-behavioral therapies. Graded exposure to feared social situations (either in vivo or by imagining the situations) is fundamental to obtain an improvement of the anxious symptoms. Virtual reality (VR) may be an alternative to these standard exposure techniques and seems to bring significant advantages by allowing exposures to numerous and varied situations. Moreover studies have shown that human subjects are appropriately sensitive to virtual environments. This chapter reports the definition of a VR-based clinical protocol and a study to treat social phobia using virtual reality techniques. The virtual environments used in the treatment reproduce four situations that social phobics feel the most threatening: performance, intimacy, scrutiny and assertiveness. With the help of the therapist, the patient learns adapted cognitions and behaviors when coping with social situations, with the aim of reducing her or his anxiety in the corresponding real life situations. Some studies have been carried out using virtual reality in the treatment of fear of public speaking, which is only a small part of the symptomatology of most of social phobic patients. The novelty of our work is to address a larger group of situations that the phobic patients experience with high anxiety. In our protocol, the efficacy of the virtual reality treatment is compared to well established and well validated group cognitive-behavioral treatment.

  9. Virtual Reality Today on a PC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christel, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Describes a microcomputer-based digital video course that uses virtual reality to teach the code inspection (i.e., formal software technical review) process. Use of virtual reality for group process activities that involve interpersonal and group dynamic skills is discussed, and research indicating that realism improves course effectiveness is…

  10. Visualizing Compound Rotations with Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Megan; Kavanagh, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Mental rotations are among the most difficult of all spatial tasks to perform, and even those with high levels of spatial ability can struggle to visualize the result of compound rotations. This pilot study investigates the use of the virtual reality-based Rotation Tool, created using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) together with…

  11. Image Based Rendering and Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation.......The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation....

  12. The virtual reality framework for engineering objects

    OpenAIRE

    Ivankov, Petr R.; Ivankov, Nikolay P.

    2006-01-01

    A framework for virtual reality of engineering objects has been developed. This framework may simulate different equipment related to virtual reality. Framework supports 6D dynamics, ordinary differential equations, finite formulas, vector and matrix operations. The framework also supports embedding of external software.

  13. Visualizing Compound Rotations with Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Megan; Kavanagh, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Mental rotations are among the most difficult of all spatial tasks to perform, and even those with high levels of spatial ability can struggle to visualize the result of compound rotations. This pilot study investigates the use of the virtual reality-based Rotation Tool, created using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) together with…

  14. Image Based Rendering and Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation.......The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation....

  15. Community-based pedestrian safety training in virtual reality: A pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Combs, Tabitha; Rodriguez, Daniel; Severson, Joan; Sisiopiku, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Child pedestrian injuries are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity across the United States and the world. Repeated practice at the cognitive-perceptual task of crossing a street may lead to safer pedestrian behavior. Virtual reality offers a unique opportunity for repeated practice without the risk of actual injury. This study conducted a pre-post within-subjects trial of training children in pedestrian safety using a semi-mobile, semi-immersive virtual pedestrian environment placed at schools and community centers. Pedestrian safety skills among a group of 44 seven- and eight-year-old children were assessed in a laboratory, and then children completed six 15-minute training sessions in the virtual pedestrian environment at their school or community center following pragmatic trial strategies over the course of three weeks. Following training, pedestrian safety skills were re-assessed. Results indicate improvement in delay entering traffic following training. Safe crossings did not demonstrate change. Attention to traffic and time to contact with oncoming vehicles both decreased somewhat, perhaps an indication that training was incomplete and children were in the process of actively learning to be safer pedestrians. The findings suggest virtual reality environments placed in community centers hold promise for teaching children to be safer pedestrians, but future research is needed to determine the optimal training dosage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. State of virtual reality based disaster preparedness and response training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Edbert B; Li, Yang; Bayram, Jamil D; Levinson, David; Yang, Samuel; Monahan, Colleen

    2013-04-24

    The advent of technologically-based approaches to disaster response training through Virtual Reality (VR) environments appears promising in its ability to bridge the gaps of other commonly established training formats. Specifically, the immersive and participatory nature of VR training offers a unique realistic quality that is not generally present in classroom-based or web-based training, yet retains considerable cost advantages over large-scale real-life exercises and other modalities and is gaining increasing acceptance. Currently, numerous government departments and agencies including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as academic institutions are exploring the unique advantages of VR-based training for disaster preparedness and response. Growing implementation of VR-based training for disaster preparedness and response, conducted either independently or combined with other training formats, is anticipated. This paper reviews several applications of VR-based training in the United States, and reveals advantages as well as potential drawbacks and challenges associated with the implementation of such training platform.

  17. The Potential of Virtual Reality for the Investigation of Awe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Alice; Yaden, David B.; Riva, Giuseppe; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The emotion of awe is characterized by the perception of vastness and a need for accommodation, which can include a positive and/or negative valence. While a number of studies have successfully manipulated this emotion, the issue of how to elicit particularly intense awe experiences in laboratory settings remains. We suggest that virtual reality (VR) is a particularly effective mood induction tool for eliciting awe. VR provides three key assets for improving awe. First, VR provides users with immersive and ecological yet controlled environments that can elicit a sense of “presence,” the subjective experience of “being there” in a simulated reality. Further, VR can be used to generate complex, vast stimuli, which can target specific theoretical facets of awe. Finally, VR allows for convenient tracking of participants’ behavior and physiological responses, allowing for more integrated assessment of emotional experience. We discussed the potential and challenges of the proposed approach with an emphasis on VR’s capacity to raise the signal of reactions to emotions such as awe in laboratory settings. PMID:27881970

  18. The Potential of Virtual Reality for the Investigation of Awe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Chirico

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The emotion of awe is characterized by the perception of vastness and a need for accommodation, which can include a positive and/or negative valence. While a number of studies have successfully manipulated this emotion, the issue of how to elicit particularly intense awe experiences in laboratory settings remains. We suggest that virtual reality (VR is a particularly effective mood induction tool for eliciting awe. VR provides three key assets for improving awe. First, VR provides users with immersive and ecological yet controlled environments that can elicit a sense of presence, the subjective experience of being there in a simulated reality. Further, VR can be used to generate complex, vast stimuli, which can target specific theoretical facets of awe. Finally, VR allows for convenient tracking of participants’ behaviour and physiological responses, allowing for more integrated assessment of emotional experience. We discussed the potential and challenges of the proposed approach with an emphasis on VR’s capacity to raise the signal of reactions to emotions such as awe in laboratory settings.

  19. Introduction to Virtual Reality in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Dede

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As an emerging technology for learning, virtual reality (VR dates back four decades, to earlywork by Ivan Sutherland in the late 1960s. At long last, interactive media are emerging thatoffer the promise of VR in everyday settings. Quasi-VR already is commonplace in 2-1/2-Dvirtual environments like Second Life and in massively multiplayer online role-playing games(e.g., World of Warcraft. Realizing the potential of VR for education, however, is much morecomplex than simply making its interface practical and affordable. Learning applications arenot like fire, a wonderful technology that provides a benefit from merely standing in its vicinity.In education, technologies achieve their power indirectly, as catalysts for deeper content,more engaging activities, more active forms of learning and instruction, and richer types ofassessment.

  20. Selected Applications of Virtual Reality in Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak-Marcincin, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has become an important and useful tool in science and engineering. VR applications cover a wide range of industrial areas from product design to analysis, from product prototyping to manufacturing. The design and manufacturing of a product can be viewed, evaluated and improved in a virtual environment before its prototype is made, which is an enormous cost saving. Virtual Manufacturing (VM) is the use of computer models and simulations of manufacturing processes to aid in the design and production of manufactured products. VM is the use of manufacturing-based simulations to optimize the design of product and processes for a specific manufacturing goal such as: design for assembly; quality; lean operations; and/or flexibility.

  1. Stereopsis, Visuospatial Ability, and Virtual Reality in Anatomy Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Maarten Luursema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new wave of virtual reality headsets has become available. A potential benefit for the study of human anatomy is the reintroduction of stereopsis and absolute size. We report a randomized controlled trial to assess the contribution of stereopsis to anatomy learning, for students of different visuospatial ability. Sixty-three participants engaged in a one-hour session including a study phase and posttest. One group studied 3D models of the anatomy of the deep neck in full stereoptic virtual reality; one group studied those structures in virtual reality without stereoptic depth. The control group experienced an unrelated virtual reality environment. A post hoc questionnaire explored cognitive load and problem solving strategies of the participants. We found no effect of condition on learning. Visuospatial ability however did impact correct answers at F(1=5.63 and p=.02. No evidence was found for an impact of cognitive load on performance. Possibly, participants were able to solve the posttest items based on visuospatial information contained in the test items themselves. Additionally, the virtual anatomy may have been complex enough to discourage memory based strategies. It is important to control the amount of visuospatial information present in test items.

  2. Stereopsis, Visuospatial Ability, and Virtual Reality in Anatomy Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Vorstenbosch, Marc; Kooloos, Jan

    2017-01-01

    A new wave of virtual reality headsets has become available. A potential benefit for the study of human anatomy is the reintroduction of stereopsis and absolute size. We report a randomized controlled trial to assess the contribution of stereopsis to anatomy learning, for students of different visuospatial ability. Sixty-three participants engaged in a one-hour session including a study phase and posttest. One group studied 3D models of the anatomy of the deep neck in full stereoptic virtual reality; one group studied those structures in virtual reality without stereoptic depth. The control group experienced an unrelated virtual reality environment. A post hoc questionnaire explored cognitive load and problem solving strategies of the participants. We found no effect of condition on learning. Visuospatial ability however did impact correct answers at F(1) = 5.63 and p = .02. No evidence was found for an impact of cognitive load on performance. Possibly, participants were able to solve the posttest items based on visuospatial information contained in the test items themselves. Additionally, the virtual anatomy may have been complex enough to discourage memory based strategies. It is important to control the amount of visuospatial information present in test items.

  3. Augmented-Virtual Reality: How to improve education systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernandez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students’ learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students’ knowledge acquisition. Stakeholders in the educational role of technology include students, faculty members, institutions, and manufacturers. While the benefits of such technologies are still under investigation, the technology landscape offers opportunities to enhance face-to-face and online teaching, including contributions in the understanding of abstract concepts and training in real environments and situations. Barriers to technology use involve limited adoption of augmented and virtual reality technologies, and, more directly, necessary training of teachers in using such technologies within meaningful educational contexts. The author proposes a six-step methodology to aid adoption of these technologies as basic elements within the regular education: training teachers; developing conceptual prototypes; teamwork involving the teacher, a technical programmer, and an educational architect; and producing the experience, which then provides results in the subsequent two phases wherein teachers are trained to apply augmented- and virtual-reality solutions within their teaching methodology using an available subject-specific experience and then finally implementing the use of the experience in a regular subject with students. The essay concludes with discussion of the business opportunities facing virtual reality in face-to-face education as well as augmented and virtual reality in online education.

  4. Postural Hypo-Reactivity in Autism Is Contingent on Development and Visual Environment: A Fully Immersive Virtual Reality Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffou, Selma; Bertone, Armando; Hahler, Eva-Maria; Hanssens, Jean-Marie; Mottron, Laurent; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Although atypical motor behaviors have been associated with autism, investigations regarding their possible origins are scarce. This study assessed the visual and vestibular components involved in atypical postural reactivity in autism. Postural reactivity and stability were measured for younger (12-15 years) and older (16-33 years) autistic…

  5. Perception of color and space in virtual reality: a comparison between a real room and virtual reality models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billger, Monica; Heldal, Ilona; Stahre, Beata; Renstrom, Kristian

    2004-06-01

    Virtual Reality has great potential to become a usable design tool for the planning of light and colour in buildings. The technical development has provided us with better computer graphics and faster rendering techniques. However, the reliability and usability is delimited by lack of knowledge about how humans perceive spatial colour phenomena. The setting up of parameters for material properties in light calculation software is done arbitrarily. We present a comparison between a real room and a digital model evaluated on a desktop PC and in an Immersive Projection Technology (IPT) type system. Data were collected from video recorded interviews and questionnaires. The participants assessed the appearance of light, colours and space. They also evaluated their involvement in solving this task, and their presence in each environment. Our results highlight the benefits and disadvantages of the real and virtual models. The participants had difficulties in estimating the size of both the desktop room and the room in the ITP system. The comparison of real and virtual rooms revealed unsatisfying differences in shadowing and colour appearance. We defined the magnitude of perceived colour reflections in the real room, and elaborated with some of the parameters in Lightscape/3dsmax6.

  6. A survey on virtual reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO QinPing

    2009-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) Is a scientific method and technology created during the exploration of the nature by human beings to understand,simulate,and better adapt and use the nature.Based on the analysis on the whole process of VR,this paper presents different categories of VR problems and a type of theoretical expression,and abstracts three kinds of scientific and technical problems in VR field.On the basis of foresaid content,this paper also studies current major research objectives,research results and development trend of VR in the aspects of VR modeling method,VR representation technology,human-machine interaction and devices,VR development suites and supporting infrastructure,as well as VR applications.Finally,several theoretical and technical problems that need to be further studied and solved are addressed.

  7. Training in virtual reality: a comparison of technology types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebok, Angelia; Nystad, Espen

    2004-11-15

    For maintenance work in the nuclear industry, a primary goal is reducing radiation exposure. Workers need to be trained to perform their tasks quickly and efficiently to minimize their time in the radioactive area, thus limiting their exposure. This requires that workers become familiar with the area in which they will work, the radiation distribution, and the tasks they will perform. Virtual Reality technology can provide this training in a safe environment. VR systems are available in a variety of formats, ranging from desktop VR to fully immersive head-mounted displays. One question regarding the use of VR for training is 'Which technology type best supports training?' This report describes an experiment evaluating different VR display technology types in terms of their ability to support different types of learning. The VR systems include two desktop types (monoscopic and stereoscopic view), a large screen display, and a head-mounted display. Procedural, configuration, and assembly training types were evaluated. Learning was assessed in terms of objective task performance and radiation awareness. Retention and transfer of training were evaluated for procedural learning. In addition, subjective questionnaire data were also gathered. Findings were that technology type did not matter for procedural, configuration, or assembly knowledge. Objective performance, by the end of the training session, was equivalent across display technology types in all of these learning conditions. On the other hand, retention and transfer of training appeared to be better supported by stereoscopic displays, particularly the large screen stereoscopic display. Subjects rated perceived performance and simulator sickness highest in the head-mounted display condition. Sense of presence (SOP) was best in the large screen stereoscopic condition for procedural learning, but there were no differences for SOP in assembly learning. This study suggests that sense of presence and

  8. Virtual Reality Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Simulation With Real-time Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Luciano, Cristian J.; Bailey, Daniel P.; Elsenousi, Abdussalam; Roitberg, Ben Z.; Bernardo, Antonio; Banerjee, P. Pat; Charbel, Fady T.

    2014-01-01

    Background With the decrease in the number of cerebral aneurysms treated surgically and the increase of complexity of those treated surgically, there is a need for simulation-based tools to teach future neurosurgeons the operative techniques of aneurysm clipping. Objective To develop and evaluate the usefulness of a new haptic-based virtual reality (VR) simulator in the training of neurosurgical residents. Methods A real-time sensory haptic feedback virtual reality aneurysm clipping simulator was developed using the Immersive Touch platform. A prototype middle cerebral artery aneurysm simulation was created from a computed tomography angiogram. Aneurysm and vessel volume deformation and haptic feedback are provided in a 3-D immersive VR environment. Intraoperative aneurysm rupture was also simulated. Seventeen neurosurgery residents from three residency programs tested the simulator and provided feedback on its usefulness and resemblance to real aneurysm clipping surgery. Results Residents felt that the simulation would be useful in preparing for real-life surgery. About two thirds of the residents felt that the 3-D immersive anatomical details provided a very close resemblance to real operative anatomy and accurate guidance for deciding surgical approaches. They believed the simulation is useful for preoperative surgical rehearsal and neurosurgical training. One third of the residents felt that the technology in its current form provided very realistic haptic feedback for aneurysm surgery. Conclusion Neurosurgical residents felt that the novel immersive VR simulator is helpful in their training especially since they do not get a chance to perform aneurysm clippings until very late in their residency programs. PMID:25599200

  9. Can walking motions improve visually induced rotational self-motion illusions in virtual reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecke, Bernhard E; Freiberg, Jacob B; Grechkin, Timofey Y

    2015-02-04

    Illusions of self-motion (vection) can provide compelling sensations of moving through virtual environments without the need for complex motion simulators or large tracked physical walking spaces. Here we explore the interaction between biomechanical cues (stepping along a rotating circular treadmill) and visual cues (viewing simulated self-rotation) for providing stationary users a compelling sensation of rotational self-motion (circular vection). When tested individually, biomechanical and visual cues were similarly effective in eliciting self-motion illusions. However, in combination they yielded significantly more intense self-motion illusions. These findings provide the first compelling evidence that walking motions can be used to significantly enhance visually induced rotational self-motion perception in virtual environments (and vice versa) without having to provide for physical self-motion or motion platforms. This is noteworthy, as linear treadmills have been found to actually impair visually induced translational self-motion perception (Ash, Palmisano, Apthorp, & Allison, 2013). Given the predominant focus on linear walking interfaces for virtual-reality locomotion, our findings suggest that investigating circular and curvilinear walking interfaces offers a promising direction for future research and development and can help to enhance self-motion illusions, presence and immersion in virtual-reality systems.

  10. A Virtual Tomb for Kelvingrove: Virtual Reality, Archaeology and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Terras

    1999-11-01

    model can be seen here. However, because of technical problems as well as the educational issues raised, it was felt that the model was not suitable in this format for inclusion in the Kelvingrove Museum. The project has illustrated that although it is technically possible to create an archaeologically based virtual model using VRML, technical issues prevent this format from being a feasible way of displaying 3D worlds in a museum environment at present. Also, the project has shown that the creation of the virtual reality world is only the beginning of developing a virtual reality display for use in education. Both the user interface and the informative aspects of a model have to be carefully designed to ensure the resulting computer display has proven educational worth, and broad issues surrounding the nature of representation and reconstruction have to be addressed before such models will become commonplace in museums.

  11. The effect of virtual reality-enhanced driving protocol in patients following spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsu Sung

    2012-11-01

    Conclusion: This study shows the significant effect of a virtual environment on the progress of driving rehabilitation, and suggests that incorporating virtual reality into rehabilitation programs will accelerate the maximal recovery of the patient’s driving competence.

  12. The use of virtual reality in visualizing land property | Quaye-Ballard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) ... a developed application medium, as if they are inside the virtual environment presenting the application. Virtual reality as a presentational medium offers different views of reality ... Article Metrics.

  13. Virtual reality excursions with programs in C

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, Christopher D

    1994-01-01

    Virtual Reality Excursions with Programs in C provides the history, theory, principles and an account of the milestones in the development of virtual reality technology.The book is organized into five chapters. The first chapter explores the applications in the vast field of virtual reality. The second chapter presents a brief history of the field and its founders. Chapter 3 discusses human perception and how it works. Some interesting notes and much of the hot debate in the field are covered in Chapter 4. The fifth chapter describes many of the complexities involved in implementing virtual en

  14. Virtual reality representations in contemporary media

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    The idea of virtual realities has a long and complex historical trajectory, spanning from Plato's concept of the cave and the simulacrum, to artistic styles such as Trompe L'oeil, and more recently developments in 3D film, television and gaming. However, this book will pay particular attention to the time between the 1980s to the 1990s when virtual reality and cyberspace were represented, particularly in fiction, as a wondrous technology that enabled transcendence from the limitations of physical embodiment. The purpose of this critical historical analysis of representations of virtual reality

  15. An Image—Based Virtual Reality Prototype System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡勇; 王平安; 等

    1998-01-01

    The most important goal of virtual reality is to create a virtual world computers where users are allowed to view the environment and control the virtual objects interactively.Traditionally,virtual reality systems use 3D computer graphics to model and render a virtual environment in real time.However,this approach usually requires laborious modeling and expensive special-purpose rendering hardware.Image-based rendering is a new approach in composing a virtual environment in which a set of panoramic images is used to compose the virtual environment and walking in the space is accomplished by “hopping”to different panoramic points.This paper introduces an experimental image-based VR system.The techniques utilized in the system,in particular the authoring and interactive control tools of the system,are described in detail.

  16. Augmenting breath regulation using a mobile driven virtual reality therapy framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushakra, Ahmad; Faezipour, Miad

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual framework of a virtual reality therapy to assist individuals, especially lung cancer patients or those with breathing disorders to regulate their breath through real-time analysis of respiration movements using a smartphone. Virtual reality technology is an attractive means for medical simulations and treatment, particularly for patients with cancer. The theories, methodologies and approaches, and real-world dynamic contents for all the components of this virtual reality therapy (VRT) via a conceptual framework using the smartphone will be discussed. The architecture and technical aspects of the offshore platform of the virtual environment will also be presented.

  17. Virtual reality simulation: using three-dimensional technology to teach nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Carole E; Forsyth, Diane McNally

    2012-06-01

    The use of computerized technology is rapidly growing in the classroom and in healthcare. An emerging computer technology strategy for nursing education is the use of virtual reality simulation. This computer-based three-dimensional educational tool simulates real-life patient experiences in a risk-free environment, allows for repeated practice sessions, requires clinical decision making, exposes students to diverse patient conditions, provides immediate feedback, and is portable. The purpose of this article was to review the importance of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy. In addition, a project to explore readiness of nursing faculty at one major Midwestern university for the use of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy is described where faculty thought virtual reality simulation would increase students' knowledge of an intravenous line insertion procedure. Faculty who practiced intravenous catheter insertion via virtual reality simulation expressed a wide range of learning experiences from using virtual reality simulation that is congruent with the literature regarding the barriers to student learning. Innovative teaching strategies, such as virtual reality simulation, address barriers of increasing patient acuity, high student-to-faculty ratio, patient safety concerns from faculty, and student anxiety and can offer rapid feedback to students.

  18. VIRTUAL REALITY FOR MANAGEMENT OF SITUATIONAL AWARENESS DURING GLOBAL MASS GATHERINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Karsakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a training technology for staff of mass events for development of action skills in large gatherings of people, including crowd dynamic management and actions in extreme situations caused by the panic. The technology is based on the multi-agent model of crowd dynamic with dynamically re-computable navigation fields. We implemented the software system that provides a collaborative and distributed process of training activities in the virtual reality environment. The following characteristics of the developed software system available from experimental studies were analyzed: computational intensity of simulations, scalability of rendering system and reactivity of the final system when rendering computationally intensive scenes. The proposed models and infrastructure for training through collaborative immersion in the virtual reality can improve situational awareness of events staff prior to the event. The developed technology is a unique tool for improving the quality and safety of disposable and unique events involving the broad masses of people, including unfunded by retrospective experience mass gatherings. Developed technology was tested within the Kumbh Mela festival in Ujjain, India.

  19. Virtual Reality Astronomy Education Using AAS WorldWide Telescope and Oculus Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, A. David; Moraitis, Christina D.

    2017-01-01

    The Boyd E. Christenberry Planetarium at Samford University (Birmingham, AL) offers family friendly, live, and interactive planetarium presentations that educate the public on topics from astronomy basics to current cutting edge astronomical discoveries. With limited funding, it is not possible to provide state of the art planetarium hardware for these community audiences. In a society in which many people, even young children, have access to high resolution smart phones and highly realistic video games, it is important to leverage cutting-edge technology to intrigue young and old minds alike. We use an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset running AAS WorldWide Telescope software to visualize 3D data in a fully immersive environment. We create interactive experiences and videos to highlight astronomical concepts and also to communicate the beauty of our universe. The ease of portability enables us to set up at Virtual Reality (VR) experience at various events, festivals, and even in classrooms to provide a community outreach that a fixed planetarium cannot. This VR experience adds the “wow” factor that encourages children and adults to engage in our various planetarium events to learn more about astronomy and continue to explore the final frontier of space. These VR experiences encourages our college students to participate in our astronomy education resulting in increased interest in STEM fields, particularly physics and math.

  20. Emerging Utility of Virtual Reality as a Multidisciplinary Tool in Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Davis, Steven; Lee, Danny; Barber, Scott; Sikka, Neal

    2017-07-31

    Among the more recent products borne of the evolution of digital technology, virtual reality (VR) is gaining a foothold in clinical medicine as an adjunct to traditional therapies. Early studies suggest a growing role for VR applications in pain management, clinical skills training, cognitive assessment and cognitive therapy, and physical rehabilitation. To complete a review of the literature, we searched PubMed and MEDLINE databases with the following search terms: "virtual reality," "procedural medicine," "oncology," "physical therapy," and "burn." We further limited our search to publications in the English language. Boolean operators were used to combine search terms. The included search terms yielded 97 potential articles, of which 45 were identified as meeting study criteria, and are included in this review. These articles provide data, which strongly support the hypothesis that VR simulations can enhance pain management (by reducing patient perception of pain and anxiety), can augment clinical training curricula and physical rehabilitation protocols (through immersive audiovisual environments), and can improve clinical assessment of cognitive function (through improved ecological validity). Through computer-generated, life-like digital landscapes, VR stands to change the current approach to pain management, medical training, neurocognitive diagnosis, and physical rehabilitation. Additional studies are needed to help define best practices in VR utilization, and to explore new therapeutic uses for VR in clinical practice.

  1. Case study of virtual reality in CNC machine tool exhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Yung-Chou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhibition and demonstration are generally used in the promotion and sale-assistance of manufactured products. However, the transportation cost of the real goods from the vender factory to the exposition venue is generally expensive for huge and heavy commodity. With the advancement of computing, graphics, mobile apps, and mobile hardware the 3D visibility technology is getting more and more popular to be adopted in visual-assisted communication such as amusement games. Virtual reality (VR technology has therefore being paid great attention in emulating expensive small and/or huge and heavy equipment. Virtual reality can be characterized as 3D extension with Immersion, Interaction and Imagination. This paper was then be focused on the study of virtual reality in the assistance of CNC machine tool demonstration and exhibition. A commercial CNC machine tool was used in this study to illustrate the effectiveness and usability of using virtual reality for an exhibition. The adopted CNC machine tool is a large and heavy mill-turn machine with the width up to eleven meters and weighted about 35 tons. A head-mounted display (HMD was attached to the developed VR CNC machine tool for the immersion viewing. A user can see around the 3D scene of the large mill-turn machine and the operation of the virtual CNC machine can be actuated by bare hand. Coolant was added to demonstrate more realistic operation while collision detection function was also added to remind the operator. The developed VR demonstration system has been presented in the 2017 Taipei International Machine Tool Show (TIMTOS 2017. This case study has shown that young engineers and/or students are very impressed by the VR-based demonstration while elder persons could not adapt themselves easily to the VR-based scene because of eyesight issues. However, virtual reality has successfully being adopted and integrated with the CNC machine tool in an international show. Another machine tool on

  2. Disguising Rotational Gain for Redirected Walking in Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan, Anders Glud; Elbaek, Jacob; Mortensen, Mathias Helmuth

    2016-01-01

    In virtual reality environments that allow users to walk freely, the area of the virtual environment (VE) is constrained to the size of the tracking area. By using redirection techniques, this problem can be partially circumvented; one of the techniques involves rotating the user more or less...... in the virtual world than in the physical world; this technique is referred to as rotational gain. This paper seeks to further investigate this area, examining the effect of visual density in the VE....

  3. Biosimmer: A Virtual Reality Simulator for Training First Responders in a BW Scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shawver, D.M.; Sobel, A.L.; Stansfield, S.A.

    1998-11-11

    BioSimMER (Bioterrorism Simulated Medical Emergency Response) is a Virtual Reality-based mission rehearsal and training environment. BioSimMER employs contingency-oriented, multiple-path algorithms and MOESINIOPS focused on real-world operations. BioSimMER is network-based and immerses multiple trainees in a high resolution synthetic environment, including virtual casualties and instruments that they may interact with and manipulate. Trainees are represented as individuals by virtual human Avatars. The simulation consists of several components: virtual casualties dynamically manifest the symptoms of their injuries and respond to the intervention of the trainees. Agent transport analysis is used to simulate casualty exposures and to drive the responses of simulated sensors/detectors. The selected prototype scenario is representative of combined injuries anticipated in BW operations.

  4. A Virtual Reality Simulator Prototype for Learning and Assessing Phaco-sculpting Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kup-Sze

    This paper presents a virtual reality based simulator prototype for learning phacoemulsification in cataract surgery, with focus on the skills required for making a cross-shape trench in cataractous lens by an ultrasound probe during the phaco-sculpting procedure. An immersive virtual environment is created with 3D models of the lens and surgical tools. Haptic device is also used as 3D user interface. Phaco-sculpting is simulated by interactively deleting the constituting tetrahedrons of the lens model. Collisions between the virtual probe and the lens are effectively identified by partitioning the space containing the lens hierarchically with an octree. The simulator can be programmed to collect real-time quantitative user data for reviewing and assessing trainee's performance in an objective manner. A game-based learning environment can be created on top of the simulator by incorporating gaming elements based on the quantifiable performance metrics.

  5. The Use of Virtual Reality in Psychology: A Case Study in Visual Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent proliferation of available virtual reality (VR tools has seen increased use in psychological research. This is due to a number of advantages afforded over traditional experimental apparatus such as tighter control of the environment and the possibility of creating more ecologically valid stimulus presentation and response protocols. At the same time, higher levels of immersion and visual fidelity afforded by VR do not necessarily evoke presence or elicit a “realistic” psychological response. The current paper reviews some current uses for VR environments in psychological research and discusses some ongoing questions for researchers. Finally, we focus on the area of visual perception, where both the advantages and challenges of VR are particularly salient.

  6. Effect of Virtual Reality Exposure and Aural Stimuli on Eye Contact, Directional Focus, and Focus of Attention of Novice Wind Band Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Evelyn K.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of virtual reality immersion with audio on eye contact, directional focus and focus of attention for novice wind band conductors. Participants (N = 34) included a control group (n = 12) and two virtual reality groups with (n = 10) and without (n = 12) head tracking. Participants completed conducting/score study…

  7. Developing a Novel Measure of Body Satisfaction Using Virtual Reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare K Purvis

    Full Text Available Body image disturbance (BID, considered a key feature in eating disorders, is a pervasive issue among young women. Accurate assessment of BID is critical, but the field is currently limited to self-report assessment methods. In the present study, we build upon existing research, and explore the utility of virtual reality (VR to elicit and detect changes in BID across various immersive virtual environments. College-aged women with elevated weight and shape concerns (n = 38 and a non-weight and shape concerned control group (n = 40 were randomly exposed to four distinct virtual environments with high or low levels of body salience and social presence (i.e., presence of virtual others. Participants interacted with avatars of thin, normal weight, and overweight body size (BMI of approximately 18, 22, and 27 respectively in virtual social settings (i.e., beach, party. We measured state-level body satisfaction (state BD immediately after exposure to each environment. In addition, we measured participants' minimum interpersonal distance, visual attention, and approach preference toward avatars of each size. Women with higher baseline BID reported significantly higher state BD in all settings compared to controls. Both groups reported significantly higher state BD in a beach with avatars as compared to other environments. In addition, women with elevated BID approached closer to normal weight avatars and looked longer at thin avatars compared to women in the control group. Our findings indicate that VR may serve as a novel tool for measuring state-level BID, with applications for measuring treatment outcomes. Implications for future research and clinical interventions are discussed.

  8. Developing a Novel Measure of Body Satisfaction Using Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Clare K.; Jones, Megan; Bailey, Jakki O.; Bailenson, Jeremy; Taylor, C. Barr

    2015-01-01

    Body image disturbance (BID), considered a key feature in eating disorders, is a pervasive issue among young women. Accurate assessment of BID is critical, but the field is currently limited to self-report assessment methods. In the present study, we build upon existing research, and explore the utility of virtual reality (VR) to elicit and detect changes in BID across various immersive virtual environments. College-aged women with elevated weight and shape concerns (n = 38) and a non-weight and shape concerned control group (n = 40) were randomly exposed to four distinct virtual environments with high or low levels of body salience and social presence (i.e., presence of virtual others). Participants interacted with avatars of thin, normal weight, and overweight body size (BMI of approximately 18, 22, and 27 respectively) in virtual social settings (i.e., beach, party). We measured state-level body satisfaction (state BD) immediately after exposure to each environment. In addition, we measured participants’ minimum interpersonal distance, visual attention, and approach preference toward avatars of each size. Women with higher baseline BID reported significantly higher state BD in all settings compared to controls. Both groups reported significantly higher state BD in a beach with avatars as compared to other environments. In addition, women with elevated BID approached closer to normal weight avatars and looked longer at thin avatars compared to women in the control group. Our findings indicate that VR may serve as a novel tool for measuring state-level BID, with applications for measuring treatment outcomes. Implications for future research and clinical interventions are discussed. PMID:26469860

  9. Developing a Novel Measure of Body Satisfaction Using Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Clare K; Jones, Megan; Bailey, Jakki O; Bailenson, Jeremy; Taylor, C Barr

    2015-01-01

    Body image disturbance (BID), considered a key feature in eating disorders, is a pervasive issue among young women. Accurate assessment of BID is critical, but the field is currently limited to self-report assessment methods. In the present study, we build upon existing research, and explore the utility of virtual reality (VR) to elicit and detect changes in BID across various immersive virtual environments. College-aged women with elevated weight and shape concerns (n = 38) and a non-weight and shape concerned control group (n = 40) were randomly exposed to four distinct virtual environments with high or low levels of body salience and social presence (i.e., presence of virtual others). Participants interacted with avatars of thin, normal weight, and overweight body size (BMI of approximately 18, 22, and 27 respectively) in virtual social settings (i.e., beach, party). We measured state-level body satisfaction (state BD) immediately after exposure to each environment. In addition, we measured participants' minimum interpersonal distance, visual attention, and approach preference toward avatars of each size. Women with higher baseline BID reported significantly higher state BD in all settings compared to controls. Both groups reported significantly higher state BD in a beach with avatars as compared to other environments. In addition, women with elevated BID approached closer to normal weight avatars and looked longer at thin avatars compared to women in the control group. Our findings indicate that VR may serve as a novel tool for measuring state-level BID, with applications for measuring treatment outcomes. Implications for future research and clinical interventions are discussed.

  10. Virtual Reality: An Efficient Way in GIS Classroom Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfan Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although geographic information system (GIS education has been spread widely, it becomes increasingly apparent that two-dimensional maps cannot be precisely present multidimensional and dynamic spatial phenomena. It seems that merging GIS and Virtual Reality (VR is a way to deal with these issues in terms of GIS classroom teaching. Virtual learning environment is the simulation of teaching method, thinking model, cognition manner and control means in the actual learning environment. This paper introduces virtual reality technology and the necessity of applying in GIS education and instruction, which explain the basic method and achieving a way of VR technology applying in the GIS classroom teaching with the instance of VR. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the application of virtual realistic learning environment for GIS education and establish a classroom teaching model accordingly.

  11. Pedagogy: Instructivism to Socio-Constructivism through Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses O. Onyesolu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available learning theories evolved with time, beginning with instructivism, constructivism, to social constructivism. These theories no doubt were applied in education and they had their effects on learners. Technology advanced, created a paradigm shift by creating new ways of teaching and learning as found in virtual reality (VR. VR provided creative ways in which students learn, provides opportunity to achieve learning goals by presenting artificial environments. We developed and simulated a virtual reality system on a desktop by deploying Visual Basic.NET, Java and Macromedia Flash. This simulated environment enhanced students’ understanding by providing a degree of reality unattainable in a traditional two-dimensional interface, creating a sensory-rich interactive learning environment.

  12. Embodying Compassion: A Virtual Reality Paradigm for Overcoming Excessive Self-Criticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Caroline J.; Slater, Mel; Rovira, Aitor; King, John A.; Gilbert, Paul; Antley, Angus; Brewin, Chris R.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality has been successfully used to study and treat psychological disorders such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder but has rarely been applied to clinically-relevant emotions other than fear and anxiety. Self-criticism is a ubiquitous feature of psychopathology and can be treated by increasing levels of self-compassion. We exploited the known effects of identification with a virtual body to arrange for healthy female volunteers high in self-criticism to experience self-compassion from an embodied first-person perspective within immersive virtual reality. Whereas observation and practice of compassionate responses reduced self-criticism, the additional experience of embodiment also increased self-compassion and feelings of being safe. The results suggest potential new uses for immersive virtual reality in a range of clinical conditions. PMID:25389766

  13. Embodying compassion: a virtual reality paradigm for overcoming excessive self-criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Caroline J; Slater, Mel; Rovira, Aitor; King, John A; Gilbert, Paul; Antley, Angus; Brewin, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality has been successfully used to study and treat psychological disorders such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder but has rarely been applied to clinically-relevant emotions other than fear and anxiety. Self-criticism is a ubiquitous feature of psychopathology and can be treated by increasing levels of self-compassion. We exploited the known effects of identification with a virtual body to arrange for healthy female volunteers high in self-criticism to experience self-compassion from an embodied first-person perspective within immersive virtual reality. Whereas observation and practice of compassionate responses reduced self-criticism, the additional experience of embodiment also increased self-compassion and feelings of being safe. The results suggest potential new uses for immersive virtual reality in a range of clinical conditions.

  14. Embodying compassion: a virtual reality paradigm for overcoming excessive self-criticism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J Falconer

    Full Text Available Virtual reality has been successfully used to study and treat psychological disorders such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder but has rarely been applied to clinically-relevant emotions other than fear and anxiety. Self-criticism is a ubiquitous feature of psychopathology and can be treated by increasing levels of self-compassion. We exploited the known effects of identification with a virtual body to arrange for healthy female volunteers high in self-criticism to experience self-compassion from an embodied first-person perspective within immersive virtual reality. Whereas observation and practice of compassionate responses reduced self-criticism, the additional experience of embodiment also increased self-compassion and feelings of being safe. The results suggest potential new uses for immersive virtual reality in a range of clinical conditions.

  15. Virtual Reality for Pediatric Sedation: A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, Pavan P; Davis, Aisha B; O'Connell, Karen J; Willner, Emily; Aronson Schinasi, Dana A; Ottolini, Mary

    2016-02-09

    Team training for procedural sedation for pediatric residents has traditionally consisted of didactic presentations and simulated scenarios using high-fidelity mannequins. We assessed the effectiveness of a virtual reality module in teaching preparation for and management of sedation for procedures. After developing a virtual reality environment in Second Life® (Linden Lab, San Francisco, CA) where providers perform and recover patients from procedural sedation, we conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of the virtual reality module versus a traditional web-based educational module. A 20 question pre- and post-test was administered to assess knowledge change. All subjects participated in a simulated pediatric procedural sedation scenario that was video recorded for review and assessed using a 32-point checklist. A brief survey elicited feedback on the virtual reality module and the simulation scenario. The median score on the assessment checklist was 75% for the intervention group and 70% for the control group (P = 0.32). For the knowledge tests, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups (P = 0.14). Users had excellent reviews of the virtual reality module and reported that the module added to their education. Pediatric residents performed similarly in simulation and on a knowledge test after a virtual reality module compared with a traditional web-based module on procedural sedation. Although users enjoyed the virtual reality experience, these results question the value virtual reality adds in improving the performance of trainees. Further inquiry is needed into how virtual reality provides true value in simulation-based education.

  16. Handbook for evaluation studies in virtual reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore; Koeffel, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) applications are spreading and attract industries since VR technologies are becoming more affordable, powerful and robust. VR applications inherently call for human-computer interaction, which in turn calls for system and usability evaluations, typically through measurement...

  17. Recent Trends and Challenges in Virtual Reality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanjay S; Girish Rao Salanke N

    2017-01-01

    .... The first section of the paper presents a background of Virtual reality followed by the description and classification of the technology and the way the processing of those technologies takes place...

  18. Handbook for evaluation studies in virtual reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore; Koeffel, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) applications are spreading and attract industries since VR technologies are becoming more affordable, powerful and robust. VR applications inherently call for human-computer interaction, which in turn calls for system and usability evaluations, typically through measurement...

  19. Virtual reality 3D headset based on DMD light modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Evans, Allan; Tang, Edward

    2014-06-13

    We present the design of an immersion-type 3D headset suitable for virtual reality applications based upon digital micro-mirror devices (DMD). Our approach leverages silicon micro mirrors offering 720p resolution displays in a small form-factor. Supporting chip sets allow rapid integration of these devices into wearable displays with high resolution and low power consumption. Applications include night driving, piloting of UAVs, fusion of multiple sensors for pilots, training, vision diagnostics and consumer gaming. Our design is described in which light from the DMD is imaged to infinity and the user’s own eye lens forms a real image on the user’s retina.

  20. ROBOTICS AND VIRTUAL REALITY FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE DIGITIZATION AND FRUITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Calisi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our novel approach for acquiring and managing digital models of archaeological sites, and the visualization techniques used to showcase them. In particular, we will demonstrate two technologies: our robotic system for digitization of archaeological sites (DigiRo result of over three years of efforts by a group of cultural heritage experts, computer scientists and roboticists, and our cloud-based archaeological information system (ARIS. Finally we describe the viewers we developed to inspect and navigate the 3D models: a viewer for the web (ROVINA Web Viewer and an immersive viewer for Virtual Reality (ROVINA VR Viewer.

  1. Robotics and Virtual Reality for Cultural Heritage Digitization and Fruition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisi, D.; Cottefoglie, F.; D'Agostini, L.; Giannone, F.; Nenci, F.; Salonia, P.; Zaratti, M.; Ziparo, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present our novel approach for acquiring and managing digital models of archaeological sites, and the visualization techniques used to showcase them. In particular, we will demonstrate two technologies: our robotic system for digitization of archaeological sites (DigiRo) result of over three years of efforts by a group of cultural heritage experts, computer scientists and roboticists, and our cloud-based archaeological information system (ARIS). Finally we describe the viewers we developed to inspect and navigate the 3D models: a viewer for the web (ROVINA Web Viewer) and an immersive viewer for Virtual Reality (ROVINA VR Viewer).

  2. A multi-viewer tiled autostereoscopic virtual reality display

    KAUST Repository

    Kooima, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing the value of autostereoscopy for 3D displays in public contexts, we pursue the goal of large-scale, high-resolution, immersive virtual reality using lenticular displays. Our contributions include the scalable tiling of lenticular displays to large fields of view and the use of GPU image interleaving and application optimization for real-time performance. In this context, we examine several ways to improve group-viewing by combining user tracking with multi-view displays. Copyright © 2010 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.

  3. Extending Science lessons with Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Minocha, Shailey; Tudor, Ana-Despina; Tilling, Steve; Needham, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Open University, Field Studies Council and Association for Science Education are conducting research into the use of Google Expeditions and other virtual reality tools to a) augment and extend field work experiences; and b) as an additional tool in the classrooms along with resources such as videos, photographs. \\ud \\ud The following aspects were discussed in this workshop:\\ud \\ud Does the virtual reality technology improve student engagement, and what are the implications for teachers?\\u...

  4. Visualization of Vector Field by Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, A.; Tamura, Y.; Sato, T.

    A visualization software program is developed in order to analyze three dimensional vector fields by means of today's advanced virtual reality technology. This program enables simulation researchers to interactively visualize stream lines, tracer particle motions, isosurfaces, etc.~with stereo view. The program accepts any kind of vector fields on structured mesh as an input data. A virtual reality hardware system, on which the program operates, and details of the program are described.

  5. Virtual Reality in the Medical Field

    OpenAIRE

    Motomatsu, Haruka

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to analyze the use of the emerging 3D computer technology of VirtualReality in the use of relieving pain in physically impaired conditions such as burn victims,amputees, and phantom limb patients, during therapy and medical procedures. Virtualtechnology generates a three dimensional visual virtual world in which enables interaction.Comparison will be made between the emerging technology of the Virtual Reality and methodsusually used, which are the use of medicine. Medicine ha...

  6. Reasons to Use Virtual Reality in Education and Training Courses and a Model to Determine When to Use Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelidis, Veronica S.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on the use of virtual reality in education and training. This article lists examples of such research. Reasons to use virtual reality are discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of using virtual reality are presented, as well as suggestions on when to use and when not to use virtual reality. A model that can be…

  7. Application of Virtual Reality in a Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor U. Obrist

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The project is an application that allows users to interact in a virtual environment via a web interface, in which models are in three dimensions to simulate different activities. The application focuses on education with virtual reality technology, enriching the student's perception through the interaction with objects in an artificial world, facilitating their learning. A website was designed for this purpose, on which the application can be executed directly in the web browser with the help of a plugin or downloaded and run as a native application. The user navigates in the virtual environment containing a three-dimensional replica of one of the laboratories of the Polytechnic School N.U.E.. The tests consisted of running the model and laboratory simulations. The results obtained from forms show that the use of virtual reality is valid, accepted and helps understanding the context of the simulations.

  8. Virtual reality: Avatars in human spaceflight training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterlund, Jeffrey; Lawrence, Brad

    2012-02-01

    With the advancements in high spatial and temporal resolution graphics, along with advancements in 3D display capabilities to model, simulate, and analyze human-to-machine interfaces and interactions, the world of virtual environments is being used to develop everything from gaming, movie special affects and animations to the design of automobiles. The use of multiple object motion capture technology and digital human tools in aerospace has demonstrated to be a more cost effective alternative to the cost of physical prototypes, provides a more efficient, flexible and responsive environment to changes in the design and training, and provides early human factors considerations concerning the operation of a complex launch vehicle or spacecraft. United Space Alliance (USA) has deployed this technique and tool under Research and Development (R&D) activities on both spacecraft assembly and ground processing operations design and training on the Orion Crew Module. USA utilizes specialized products that were chosen based on functionality, including software and fixed based hardware (e.g., infrared and visible red cameras), along with cyber gloves to ensure fine motor dexterity of the hands. The key findings of the R&D were: mock-ups should be built to not obstruct cameras from markers being tracked; a mock-up toolkit be assembled to facilitate dynamic design changes; markers should be placed in accurate positions on humans and flight hardware to help with tracking; 3D models used in the virtual environment be striped of non-essential data; high computational capable workstations are required to handle the large model data sets; and Technology Interchange Meetings with vendors and other industries also utilizing virtual reality applications need to occur on a continual basis enabling USA to maintain its leading edge within this technology. Parameters of interest and benefit in human spaceflight simulation training that utilizes virtual reality technologies are to

  9. Pedagogy: Instructivism to Socio-Constructivism through Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    learning theories evolved with time, beginning with instructivism, constructivism, to social constructivism. These theories no doubt were applied in education and they had their effects on learners. Technology advanced, created a paradigm shift by creating new ways of teaching and learning as found in virtual reality (VR). VR provided creative ways in which students learn, provides opportunity to achieve learning goals by presenting artificial environments. We developed and simulated a virtua...

  10. Pedagogy: Instructivism to Socio-Constructivism through Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Moses O. Onyesolu; Victor C. Nwasor; Obiajulu E. Ositanwosu; Obinna N. Iwegbuna

    2013-01-01

    learning theories evolved with time, beginning with instructivism, constructivism, to social constructivism. These theories no doubt were applied in education and they had their effects on learners. Technology advanced, created a paradigm shift by creating new ways of teaching and learning as found in virtual reality (VR). VR provided creative ways in which students learn, provides opportunity to achieve learning goals by presenting artificial environments. We developed and simulated a virtua...

  11. The Simulation of Grinding Wheels and Ground Surface Roughness Based on Virtual Reality Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the feasibility and method of the application of virtual reality technology to grinding process, and introduces the modeling method of object entity in the environment of virtual reality. The simulation process of grinding wheels and ground surface roughness is discussed, and the computation program system of numerical simulation is compiled with Visual C++ programming language. At the same time, the three-dimensional simulation models of grinding wheels and ground surface roughness are ...

  12. A succinct overview of virtual reality technology use in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Betances, Rebeca I; Arredondo Waldmeyer, María Teresa; Fico, Giuseppe; Cabrera-Umpiérrez, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    We provide a brief review and appraisal of recent and current virtual reality (VR) technology for Alzheimer's disease (AD) applications. We categorize them according to their intended purpose (e.g., diagnosis, patient cognitive training, caregivers' education, etc.), focus feature (e.g., spatial impairment, memory deficit, etc.), methodology employed (e.g., tasks, games, etc.), immersion level, and passive or active interaction. Critical assessment indicates that most of them do not yet take full advantage of virtual environments with high levels of immersion and interaction. Many still rely on conventional 2D graphic displays to create non-immersive or semi-immersive VR scenarios. Important improvements are needed to make VR a better and more versatile assessment and training tool for AD. The use of the latest display technologies available, such as emerging head-mounted displays and 3D smart TV technologies, together with realistic multi-sensorial interaction devices, and neuro-physiological feedback capacity, are some of the most beneficial improvements this mini-review suggests. Additionally, it would be desirable that such VR applications for AD be easily and affordably transferable to in-home and nursing home environments.

  13. A succinct overview of virtual reality technology use in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca I. García-Betances

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We provide a brief review and appraisal of recent and current virtual reality (VR technology for Alzheimer’s disease (AD applications. We categorize them according to their intended purpose (e.g. diagnosis, patient cognitive training, caregivers’ education, etc., focus feature (e.g. spatial impairment, memory deficit, etc., methodology employed (e.g. tasks, games, etc, immersion level, and passive or active interaction. Critical assessment indicates that most of them do not yet take full advantage of virtual environments with high levels of immersion and interaction. Many still rely on conventional 2D graphic displays to create non-immersive or semi-immersive VR scenarios. Important improvements are needed to make VR a better and more versatile assessment and training tool for AD. The use of the latest display technologies available, such as emerging head-mounted displays and 3D smart TV technologies, together with realistic multi-sensorial interaction devices, and neuro-physiological feedback capacity, are some of the most beneficial improvements this mini-review suggests. Additionally, it would be desirable that such VR applications for AD be easily and affordably transferable to in-Home and nursing home environments.

  14. A Succinct Overview of Virtual Reality Technology Use in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Betances, Rebeca I.; Arredondo Waldmeyer, María Teresa; Fico, Giuseppe; Cabrera-Umpiérrez, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    We provide a brief review and appraisal of recent and current virtual reality (VR) technology for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) applications. We categorize them according to their intended purpose (e.g., diagnosis, patient cognitive training, caregivers’ education, etc.), focus feature (e.g., spatial impairment, memory deficit, etc.), methodology employed (e.g., tasks, games, etc.), immersion level, and passive or active interaction. Critical assessment indicates that most of them do not yet take full advantage of virtual environments with high levels of immersion and interaction. Many still rely on conventional 2D graphic displays to create non-immersive or semi-immersive VR scenarios. Important improvements are needed to make VR a better and more versatile assessment and training tool for AD. The use of the latest display technologies available, such as emerging head-mounted displays and 3D smart TV technologies, together with realistic multi-sensorial interaction devices, and neuro-physiological feedback capacity, are some of the most beneficial improvements this mini-review suggests. Additionally, it would be desirable that such VR applications for AD be easily and affordably transferable to in-home and nursing home environments. PMID:26029101

  15. The acceptance of virtual reality devices for cognitive rehabilitation: a report of positive results with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Rosa Maria Esteves Moreira; de Carvalho, Luís Alfredo Vidal

    2004-03-01

    This study presents a process of virtual environment development supported by a cognitive model that is specific to cognitive deficits of diverse disorders or traumatic brain injury, and evaluates the acceptance of computer devices by a group of schizophrenic patients. The subjects that participated in this experiment accepted to work with computers and immersive glasses and demonstrated a high level of interest in the proposed tasks. No problems of illness have been observed. This experiment indicated that further research projects must be carried out to verify the value of virtual reality technology for cognitive rehabilitation of psychiatric patients. The results of the current study represent a small but necessary step in the realization of that potential.

  16. Virtual Training System for Hydraulic Pump Cart Based on Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wusha Huang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper dissertates the application of Virtual Reality Technology in the training process. Virtual training system has more advantages than traditional training system. The design of virtual training system based on PTC DIVISION Mockup software, position tracker and 3-D mouse is proposed. The system is divided into two parts: directing part and operating part. Collision detection is discussed to improve the sense of reality in the virtual environment .This system is applied to the training process of hydraulic pump cart’s assembly and disassembly. More immersive training effect is obtained in this system. The goal of reducing training costs and improving the efficiency of training can be achieved in the virtual training system.  

  17. Workstations for people with disabilities: an example of a virtual reality approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budziszewski, Paweł; Grabowski, Andrzej; Milanowicz, Marcin; Jankowski, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    This article describes a method of adapting workstations for workers with motion disability using computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) techniques. A workstation for grinding spring faces was used as an example. It was adjusted for two people with a disabled right upper extremity. The study had two stages. In the first, a computer human model with a visualization of maximal arm reach and preferred workspace was used to develop a preliminary modification of a virtual workstation. In the second stage, an immersive VR environment was used to assess the virtual workstation and to add further modifications. All modifications were assessed by measuring the efficiency of work and the number of movements involved. The results of the study showed that a computer simulation could be used to determine whether a worker with a disability could access all important areas of a workstation and to propose necessary modifications.

  18. Reasons to Use Virtual Reality in Education and Training Courses and a Model to Determine When to Use Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica S. Pantelidis

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on the use of virtual reality in education and training. Thisarticle lists examples of such research. Reasons to use virtual reality are discussed.Advantages and disadvantages of using virtual reality are presented, as well as suggestions onwhen to use and when not to use virtual reality. A model that can be used to determine whento use virtual reality in an education or training course is presented.

  19. Rehabilitation after Stroke using Immersive User Interfaces in 3D Virtual and Augmented Gaming Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vogiatzaki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of most common diseases of our modern societies with high socio-economic impact. Hence, rehabilitation approach involving patients in their rehabilitation process while lowering costly involvement of specialised human personnel is needed. This article describes a novel approach, offering an integrated rehabilitation training for stroke patients using a serious gaming approach based on a Unity3D virtual reality engine combined with a range of advanced technologies and immersive user interfaces. It puts patients and caretakers in control of the rehabilitation protocols, while leading physicians are enabled to supervise the progress of the rehabilitation via Personal Health Record. Possibility to perform training in a familiar home environment directly improves the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. The work presented herein has been conducted within the "StrokeBack" project co-funded by the European Commission under the Framework 7 Program in the ICT domain.

  20. Using Virtual Reality For Outreach Purposes in Planetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civet, François; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Le Menn, Erwan; Beaunay, Stéphanie

    2016-10-01

    2016 has been a year marked by a technological breakthrough : the availability for the first time to the general public of technologically mature virtual reality devices. Virtual Reality consists in visually immerging a user in a 3D environment reproduced either from real and/or imaginary data, with the possibility to move and eventually interact with the different elements. In planetology, most of the places will remain inaccessible to the public for a while, but a fleet of dedicated spacecraft's such as orbiters, landers and rovers allow the possibility to virtually reconstruct the environments, using image processing, cartography and photogrammetry. Virtual reality can then bridge the gap to virtually "send" any user into the place and enjoy the exploration.We are investigating several type of devices to render orbital or ground based data of planetological interest, mostly from Mars. The most simple system consists of a "cardboard" headset, on which the user can simply use his cellphone as the screen. A more comfortable experience is obtained with more complex systems such as the HTC vive or Oculus Rift headsets, which include a tracking system important to minimize motion sickness. The third environment that we have developed is based on the CAVE concept, were four 3D video projectors are used to project on three 2x3m walls plus the ground. These systems can be used for scientific data analysis, but also prove to be perfectly suited for outreach and education purposes.

  1. Computer Based Training: Field Deployable Trainer and Shared Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Terence J.

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut training has traditionally been conducted at specific sites with specialized facilities. Because of its size and nature the training equipment is generally not portable. Efforts are now under way to develop training tools that can be taken to remote locations, including into orbit. Two of these efforts are the Field Deployable Trainer and Shared Virtual Reality projects. Field Deployable Trainer NASA has used the recent shuttle mission by astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian space station, Mir, as an opportunity to develop and test a prototype of an on-orbit computer training system. A laptop computer with a customized user interface, a set of specially prepared CD's, and video tapes were taken to the Mir by Ms. Lucid. Based upon the feedback following the launch of the Lucid flight, our team prepared materials for the next Mir visitor. Astronaut John Blaha will fly on NASA/MIR Long Duration Mission 3, set to launch in mid September. He will take with him a customized hard disk drive and a package of compact disks containing training videos, references and maps. The FDT team continues to explore and develop new and innovative ways to conduct offsite astronaut training using personal computers. Shared Virtual Reality Training NASA's Space Flight Training Division has been investigating the use of virtual reality environments for astronaut training. Recent efforts have focused on activities requiring interaction by two or more people, called shared VR. Dr. Bowen Loftin, from the University of Houston, directs a virtual reality laboratory that conducts much of the NASA sponsored research. I worked on a project involving the development of a virtual environment that can be used to train astronauts and others to operate a science unit called a Biological Technology Facility (BTF). Facilities like this will be used to house and control microgravity experiments on the space station. It is hoped that astronauts and instructors will ultimately be able to share

  2. Assessment method of digital Chinese dance movements based on virtual reality technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Shao, Shuyuan; Wang, Shumin

    2008-03-01

    Virtual reality has played an increasing role in such areas as medicine, architecture, aviation, engineering science and advertising. However, in the art fields, virtual reality is still in its infancy in the representation of human movements. Based on the techniques of motion capture and reuse of motion capture data in virtual reality environment, this paper presents an assessment method in order to evaluate the quantification of dancers' basic Arm Position movements in Chinese traditional dance. In this paper, the data for quantifying traits of dance motions are defined and measured on dancing which performed by an expert and two beginners, with results indicating that they are beneficial for evaluating dance skills and distinctiveness, and the assessment method of digital Chinese dance movements based on virtual reality technology is validity and feasibility.

  3. The assessment of virtual reality for human anatomy instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Karen P.

    1994-01-01

    This research project seeks to meet the objective of science training by developing, assessing, and validating virtual reality as a human anatomy training medium. In ideal situations, anatomic models, computer-based instruction, and cadaver dissection are utilized to augment the traditional methods of instruction. At many institutions, lack of financial resources limits anatomy instruction to textbooks and lectures. However, human anatomy is three dimensional, unlike the one dimensional depiction found in textbooks and the two dimensional depiction found on the computer. Virtual reality is a breakthrough technology that allows one to step through the computer screen into a three dimensional world. This technology offers many opportunities to enhance science education. Therefore, a virtual testing environment of the abdominopelvic region of a human cadaver was created to study the placement of body parts within the nine anatomical divisions of the abdominopelvic region and the four abdominal quadrants.

  4. Polymer-based actuators for virtual reality devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzmacher, Christian; Hafez, Moustapha; Benali Khoudja, Mohamed; Bernardoni, Paul; Dubowsky, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is gaining more importance in our society. For many years, VR has been limited to the entertainment applications. Today, practical applications such as training and prototyping find a promising future in VR. Therefore there is an increasing demand for low-cost, lightweight haptic devices in virtual reality (VR) environment. Electroactive polymers seem to be a potential actuation technology that could satisfy these requirements. Dielectric polymers developed the past few years have shown large displacements (more than 300%). This feature makes them quite interesting for integration in haptic devices due to their muscle-like behaviour. Polymer actuators are flexible and lightweight as compared to traditional actuators. Using stacks with several layers of elatomeric film increase the force without limiting the output displacement. The paper discusses some design methods for a linear dielectric polymer actuator for VR devices. Experimental results of the actuator performance is presented.

  5. NeuroVR: an open source virtual reality platform for clinical psychology and behavioral neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Gaggioli, Andrea; Villani, Daniela; Preziosa, Alessandra; Morganti, Francesca; Corsi, Riccardo; Faletti, Gianluca; Vezzadini, Luca

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, the use of virtual reality for clinical and research applications has become more widespread. However, the diffusion of this approach is still limited by three main issues: poor usability, lack of technical expertise among clinical professionals, and high costs. To address these challenges, we introduce NeuroVR (http://www.neurovr.org--http://www.neurotiv.org), a cost-free virtual reality platform based on open-source software, that allows non-expert users to adapt the content of a pre-designed virtual environment to meet the specific needs of the clinical or experimental setting. Using the NeuroVR Editor, the user can choose the appropriate psychological stimuli/stressors from a database of objects (both 2D and 3D) and videos, and easily place them into the virtual environment. The edited scene can then be visualized in the NeuroVR Player using either immersive or non-immersive displays. Currently, the NeuroVR library includes different virtual scenes (apartment, office, square, supermarket, park, classroom, etc.), covering two of the most studied clinical applications of VR: specific phobias and eating disorders. The NeuroVR Editor is based on Blender (http://www.blender.org), the open source, cross-platform suite of tools for 3D creation, and is available as a completely free resource. An interesting feature of the NeuroVR Editor is the possibility to add new objects to the database. This feature allows the therapist to enhance the patient's feeling of familiarity and intimacy with the virtual scene, i.e., by using photos or movies of objects/people that are part of the patient's daily life, thereby improving the efficacy of the exposure. The NeuroVR platform runs on standard personal computers with Microsoft Windows; the only requirement for the hardware is related to the graphics card, which must support OpenGL.

  6. The role of presence in virtual reality exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that virtual reality is a successful tool for exposure therapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Virtual reality (VR) researchers posit the construct of presence, defined as the interpretation of an artificial stimulus as if it were real, to be a presumed factor that enables anxiety to be felt during virtual reality exposure therapy (VRE). However, a handful of empirical studies on the relation between presence and anxiety in VRE have yielded mixed findings. The current study tested the following hypotheses about the relation between presence and anxiety in VRE with a clinical sample of fearful flyers: (1) presence is related to in-session anxiety; (2) presence mediates the extent that pre-existing (pre-treatment) anxiety is experienced during exposure with VR; (3) presence is positively related to the amount of phobic elements included within the virtual environment; (4) presence is related to treatment outcome. Results supported presence as a factor that contributes to the experience of anxiety in the virtual environment as well as a relation between presence and the phobic elements, but did not support a relation between presence and treatment outcome. The study suggests that presence may be a necessary but insufficient requirement for successful VRE.

  7. Virtual Reality and its Implementation in Transport Ergonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Jurum-Kipke

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The experience of our environment is based on the informationthat reach us by means of our sensory organs, andwhich are subsequently processed in our brains. Digital interpretationimplemented to mathematical models of the studiedsubjects brings us to the so-called virtual reality that allows us toreplace some natural human senses, in this case the visualones, by computer-generated infonnation. The procedure is expandedto three-dimensional (3D scanning i. e. searching ofthe special form of the obse1ved subject/object, then digital recordingof the space point cloud (pixels which correspond tothe item, then vectorisation of the fonn, rendering and finallyanimation. In this way, by watching the display, the impressionof the virtual environment can be generated in the human perception.Moreover, in this way the human model can be realizedin a characteristic way in such a virtual space. The implementationof this virtual reality, in accordance with the possibilitiesthat it provides, has been the subject of very intensive researchin the world, and in Croatia as well. The work presentssome possibilities of applying virtual reality in the field of ergonomicanalysis of the collision process of two vehicles.

  8. Using Solver Interfaced Virtual Reality in PEACER Design Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyong Won; Nam, Won Chang; Jeong, Seung Ho; Hwang, Il Soon; Shin, Jong Gye; Kim, Chang Hyo [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The recent research progress in the area of plant design and simulation highlighted the importance of integrating design and analysis models on a unified environment. For currently developed advanced reactors, either for power production or research, this effort has embraced impressive state-of-the-art information and automation technology. The PEACER (Proliferation-resistant, Environment friendly, Accident-tolerant, Continual and Economical Reactor) is one of the conceptual fast reactor system cooled by LBE (Lead Bismuth Eutectic) for nuclear waste transmutation. This reactor system is composed of innovative combination between design process and analysis. To establish an integrated design process by coupling design, analysis, and post-processing technology while minimizing the repetitive and costly manual interactions for design changes, a solver interfaced virtual reality simulation system (SIVR) has been developed for a nuclear transmutation energy system as PEACER. The SIVR was developed using Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) in order to interface a commercial 3D CAD tool with various engineering solvers and to implement virtual reality presentation of results in a neutral format. In this paper, we have shown the SIVR approach viable and effective in the life-cycle management of complex nuclear energy systems, including design, construction and operation. For instance, The HELIOS is a down scaled model of the PEACER prototype to demonstrate the operability and safety as well as preliminary test of PEACER PLM (Product Life-cycle Management) with SIVR (Solver Interfaced Virtual Reality) concepts. Most components are designed by CATIA, which is 3D CAD tool. During the construction, 3D drawing by CATIA was effective to handle and arrange the loop configuration, especially when we changed the design. Most of all, This system shows the transparency of design and operational status of an energy complex to operators and inspectors can help ensure accident

  9. Virtual reality in medical education and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Laurie A.; Bell, Brad; Sullivan, Tim; Voss, Mark; Payer, Andrew F.; Goza, Stewart Michael

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)/LinCom Corporation, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB), and the Galveston Independent School District (GISD) have teamed up to develop a virtual visual environment display (VIVED) that provides a unique educational experience using virtual reality (VR) technologies. The VIVED end product will be a self-contained educational experience allowing students a new method of learning as they interact with the subject matter through VR. This type of interface is intuitive and utilizes spatial and psychomotor abilities which are now constrained or reduced by the current two dimensional terminals and keyboards. The perpetual challenge to educators remains the identification and development of methodologies which conform the learners abilities and preferences. The unique aspects of VR provide an opportunity to explore a new educational experience. Endowing medical students with an understanding of the human body poses some difficulty challenges. One of the most difficult is to convey the three dimensional nature of anatomical structures. The ideal environment for addressing this problem would be one that allows students to become small enough to enter the body and travel through it - much like a person walks through a building. By using VR technology, this effect can be achieved; when VR is combined with multimedia technologies, the effect can be spectacular.

  10. QuickTime Virtual Reality Technology Applies to Practical Teaching Recording System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyong Zhu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available QTVR is virtual reality technology which is based on static images and we apply it to practical teaching section. Through the practical teaching record system, virtual reality technology is applied to the whole journey of practical teaching. Give full play to the merits of strong sense of reality of the QTVR technology, good interactive performance, impressive immersive experience, convenience of produce and transmission, make seamless integration with the various present online teaching platforms, constitute comprehensive teaching material accumulation and resource utilization, uplift the quality of practical teaching, and promote students’ practical skills.

  11. Virtual reality in the psychological treatment for mental health problems: An systematic review of recent evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmaggia, Lucia R; Latif, Leila; Kempton, Matthew J; Rus-Calafell, Maria

    2016-02-28

    The aim of this paper is to provide a review of controlled studies of the use of Virtual Reality in psychological treatment (VRT). Medline, PsychInfo, Embase and Web of Science were searched. Only studies comparing immersive virtual reality to a control condition were included. The search resulted in 1180 articles published between 2012 and 2015, of these, 24 were controlled studies. The reviewed studies confirm the effectiveness of VRT compared to treatment as usual, and show similar effectiveness when VRT is compared to conventional treatments. Current developments and future research are discussed.

  12. Using Virtual Reality and Videogames for Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation: A Structured Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Eva; Pullman, Stephen; McGuire, Annabel

    2014-08-01

    This article reviews the available literature about the use of novel methods of rehabilitation using virtual reality interventions for people living with posttraumatic brain injuries. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Library databases were searched using the terms "virtual reality" OR "video games" AND "traumatic brain injury." Included studies investigated therapeutic use of virtual reality in adults with a brain trauma resulting from acquired closed head injury, reported outcomes that included measures of motor or cognitive functionality, and were published in a peer-reviewed journal written in English. Eighteen articles fulfilled inclusion criteria. Eight were case studies, five studies had a quasi-experimental design with a pre-post comparison, and five were pilot randomized control trials or comparative studies. The virtual reality systems used were commercial or custom designed for the study and ranged from expensive, fully immersive systems to cheap online games or videogames. In before-after comparisons, improvements in balance were seen in four case studies and two small randomized control trials. Between-group comparisons in these randomized control trials showed no difference between virtual reality and traditional therapy. Post-training improvements were also seen for upper extremity functions (five small studies) and for various cognitive function measures (four case studies and one pilot randomized control trial). Attitudes of participants toward virtual reality interventions was more positive than for traditional therapy (three studies). The evidence that the use of virtual reality in rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury improves motor and cognitive functionality is currently very limited. However, this approach has the potential to provide alternative, possibly more affordable and available rehabilitation therapy for traumatic brain injury in settings where access to therapy is limited by geographical or financial constraints.

  13. The Physical World as a Virtual Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Whitworth, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the idea that the universe is a virtual reality created by information processing, and relates this strange idea to the findings of modern physics about the physical world. The virtual reality concept is familiar to us from online worlds, but our world as a virtual reality is usually a subject for science fiction rather than science. Yet logically the world could be an information simulation running on a three-dimensional space-time screen. Indeed, if the essence of the universe is information, matter, charge, energy and movement could be aspects of information, and the many conservation laws could be a single law of information conservation. If the universe were a virtual reality, its creation at the big bang would no longer be paradoxical, as every virtual system must be booted up. It is suggested that whether the world is an objective reality or a virtual reality is a matter for science to resolve. Modern information science can suggest how core physical properties like space, time, lig...

  14. Development of reactor design aid tool using virtual reality technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuguchi, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Orochi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)]. E-mail: mizu@nifs.ac.jp; Tamura, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Orochi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Imagawa, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Orochi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Sagara, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Orochi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Hayashi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Orochi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    A new type of aid system for fusion reactor design, to which the virtual reality (VR) visualization and sonification techniques are applied, is developed. This system provides us with an intuitive interaction environment in the VR space between the observer and the designed objects constructed by the conventional 3D computer-aided design (CAD) system. We have applied the design aid tool to the heliotron-type fusion reactor design activity FFHR2m [A. Sagara, S. Imagawa, O. Mitarai, T. Dolan, T. Tanaka, Y. Kubota, et al., Improved structure and long -life blanket concepts for heliotron reactors, Nucl. Fusion 45 (2005) 258-263] on the virtual reality system CompleXcope [Y. Tamura, A. Kageyama, T. Sato, S. Fujiwara, H. Nakamura, Virtual reality system to visualize and auralize numerical imulation data, Comp. Phys. Comm. 142 (2001) 227-230] of the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan, and have evaluated its performance. The tool includes the functions of transfer of the observer, translation and scaling of the objects, recording of the operations and the check of interference.

  15. Using virtual reality to assess user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Francisco; Noriega, Paulo; Duarte, Emília; Soares, Marcelo

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how user experience (UX) evaluation can benefit from the use of virtual reality (VR). UX is usually evaluated in laboratory settings. However, considering that UX occurs as a consequence of the interaction between the product, the user, and the context of use, the assessment of UX can benefit from a more ecological test setting. VR provides the means to develop realistic-looking virtual environments with the advantage of allowing greater control of the experimental conditions while granting good ecological validity. The methods used to evaluate UX, as well as their main limitations, are identified.The currentVR equipment and its potential applications (as well as its limitations and drawbacks) to overcome some of the limitations in the assessment of UX are highlighted. The relevance of VR for UX studies is discussed, and a VR-based framework for evaluating UX is presented. UX research may benefit from a VR-based methodology in the scopes of user research (e.g., assessment of users' expectations derived from their lifestyles) and human-product interaction (e.g., assessment of users' emotions since the first moment of contact with the product and then during the interaction). This article provides knowledge to researchers and professionals engaged in the design of technological interfaces about the usefulness of VR in the evaluation of UX.

  16. VIRTUAL REALITY HYPNOSIS FOR PAIN CONTROL IN A PATIENT WITH GLUTEAL HIDRADENITIS:A CASE REPORT().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Maryam; Teeley, Aubriana M; Wiechman, Shelley A; Jensen, Mark P; Sharar, Sam R; Patterson, David R

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the use of hypnotic analgesia induced through immersive three-dimensional computer-generated virtual reality, better known as virtual reality hypnosis (VRH), in the treatment of a patient with ongoing pain associated with gluteal hidradenitis, The patient participated in the study for two consecutive days white hospitalized at a regional trauma centre. At pretreatment, she reported severe pain intensity and unpleasantness as well as high levels of anxiety and nervousness. She was then administered two sessions of virtual reality hypnotic treatment for decreased pain and anxiety. The patient's ratings of 'time spent thinking about pain', pain intensity, 'unpleasantness of pain', and anxiety decreased from before to after each daily VRH session, as well as from Day One to Day Two. The findings indicate that VRH may benefit individuals with severe, ongoing pain from a chronic condition, and that a controlled clinical trial examining its efficacy is warranted.

  17. Magnetic resonance urography by virtual reality modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Navid; Sangild, Thomas; Terkildsen, Søren Vorre; Deding, Dorthe; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a 3D visualization of the urinary tract by a novel virtual reality approach, and to evaluate the usefulness of this method for papillary classification as compared with 2D urogram obtained by maximum intensity projection (MIP). In one healthy pig, magnetic resonance urography was performed using a T1-weighted 3D gradient echo pulse sequence. Post-processing was performed by means of an MIP algorithm and by using 3D virtual reality modelling, followed by manual classification of papillae as being either simple or compound. The 2D MIP urogram demonstrated 6 simple and 6 compound papillae, whereas the 3D urogram demonstrated 5 simple and 7 compound papillae. In both urograms, some papillae were unsuccessfully classified. The possibility of using virtual reality devices allowed 3D rotation and offered additional diagnostic information. However, further studies should reveal its feasibility in diseased kidneys.

  18. Narratives within immersive technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Llobera, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of this project is to research technical advances in order to enhance the possibility to develop narratives within immersive mediated environments. An important part of the research is concerned with the question of how a script can be written, annotated and realized for an immersive context. A first description of the main theoretical framework and the ongoing work and a first script example is provided. This project is part of the program for presence research, and it will exploit physiological feedback and Computational Intelligence within virtual reality.

  19. Comparing Stage Presence and Virtual Reality Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Xavier Samur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflecting on the impending release of new Head Mounted Display virtual reality (VR technologies, the article examines definitions and techniques for digital presence, and compares them with research into stage presence. It opens with an outline of definitions of digital presence, comparing them with Cormac Power’s fictional, auratic, and literal modes of presence in performance. The article then looks at techniques used in VR and on stage to achieve presence. Finally, performance examples that use virtual reality technologies are presented. The article concludes that even if the technology falls short, discourse on digital presence is useful in providing insights into presence on stage.

  20. På rejse med Virtual Reality i billedkunst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver; Lyk, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    , de skulle have. Fokus. I artiklen er der særligt fokus på hvordan læringscentrede designprocesser og Virtual Reality tilsammen kan understøtte erfaringslæring. Konklusion. Eleverne fik en større forståelse af teknologi og kreative designprocesser ved at fungere som informanter og designpartnere i...... designforløbet. Eleverne fik igennem design af de fysiske modeller og besøget i Virtual Reality formidlet to oplevelser af deres modeller, som styrkede grundlaget for erfaringsbaseret læring. Erfaringsbaseret læring kombinerer oplevelse, refleksion, abstraktion og aktiv eksperimenteren i en proces, som...

  1. Use of Virtual Reality for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harm, Deborah; Taylor, L. C.; Reschke, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual environments offer unique training opportunities, particularly for training astronauts and preadapting them to the novel sensory conditions of microgravity. Two unresolved human factors issues in virtual reality (VR) systems are: 1) potential "cybersickness", and 2) maladaptive sensorimotor performance following exposure to VR systems. Interestingly, these aftereffects are often quite similar to adaptive sensorimotor responses observed in astronauts during and/or following space flight. Active exploratory behavior in a new environment, with resulting feedback and the formation of new associations between sensory inputs and response outputs, promotes appropriate perception and motor control in the new environment. Thus, people adapt to consistent, sustained alterations of sensory input such as those produced by microgravity. Our research examining the effects of repeated exposures to a full field of view dome VR system showed that motion sickness and initial decrements in eye movement and postural control were greatly diminished following three exposures. These results suggest that repeated transitions between VR and the normal environment preflight might be a useful countermeasure for neurosensory and sensorimotor effects of space flight. The range of VR applications is enormous, extending from ground-based VR training for extravehicular activities at NASA, to medical and educational uses. It seems reasonable to suggest that other space related uses of VR should be investigated. For example, 1) use of head-mounted VR on orbit to rehearse/practice upcoming operational activities, and 2) ground-based VR training for emergency egress procedures. We propose that by combining VR designed for operational activities preflight, along with an appropriate schedule to facilitate sensorimotor adaptation and improve spatial orientation would potentially accomplish two important goals for astronauts and cosmonauts, preflight sensorimotor adaption and enhanced operational

  2. From Geocaching to Virtual Reality: Technology tools that can transform courses into interactive learning expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Lazar, K.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Sellers, V.

    2016-12-01

    Transforming classrooms into active learning environments is a key challenge in introductory-level courses. The technology explosion over the last decade, from the advent of mobile devices to virtual reality, is creating innumerable opportunities to engage students within and outside of traditional classroom settings. In particular, technology can be an effective tool for providing students with field experiences that would otherwise be logistically difficult in large, introductory earth science courses. For example, we have created an integrated platform for mobile devices using readily accessible "off the shelf" components (e.g., Google Apps, Geocaching.com, and Facebook) that allow individual students to navigate to geologically relevant sites, perform and report on activities at these locations, and share their findings through social media by posting "geoselfies". Students compete with their friends on a leaderboard, while earning incentives for completing extracurricular activities in courses. Thus in addition to exposing students to a wider range of meaningful and accessible geologic field experiences, they also build a greater sense of community and identity within the context of earth science classrooms. Rather than sending students to the field, we can also increasingly bring the field to students in classrooms using virtual reality. Ample mobile platforms are emerging that easily allow for the creation, curation, and viewing of photospheres (i.e., 360o images) with mobile phones and low-cost headsets; Google Street View, Earth, and Expeditions are leading the way in terms of ease of content creation and implementation in the classroom. While these tools are an excellent entry point to show students real-world sites, they currently lack the capacity for students to interact with the environment. We have therefore also developed an immersive virtual reality game that allows students to study the geology of the Grand Canyon using their smartphone and Google

  3. IBM bringing virtual reality to electronic tete-a-tetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wexler, Joanie

    1995-01-01

    .... to provide virtual reality conferencing services. Beginning in the 4th quarter, the companies plan to deploy in the next 2 years about 120 TeleSuites for hosting virtual reality conferences in 40 US cities...

  4. The Application of Virtual Reality on Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zehui

    The features and classifications of Virtual Reality Techniques have been summarized and recommendation of applying Virtual Reality on distance education has been made. Future research is needed on the design and implementation of virtual classroom and courseware.

  5. Education about hallucinations using an internet virtual reality system: a qualitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellowlees, Peter M; Cook, James N

    2006-01-01

    The authors evaluate an Internet virtual reality technology as an education tool about the hallucinations of psychosis. This is a pilot project using Second Life, an Internet-based virtual reality system, in which a virtual reality environment was constructed to simulate the auditory and visual hallucinations of two patients with schizophrenia. Eight hundred sixty-three self-referred users took a self-guided tour. Five hundred seventy-nine (69%) of the users who toured the environment completed a survey. Of the survey responders, 440 (76%) thought the environment improved their understanding of auditory hallucinations, 69% thought it improved their understanding of visual hallucinations, and 82% said they would recommend the environment to a friend. Computer simulations of the perceptual phenomena of psychiatric illness are feasible with existing personal computer technology. Integration of the evaluation survey into the environment itself was possible. The use of Internet-connected graphics environments holds promise for public education about mental illness.

  6. Discovering new methods of data fusion, visualization, and analysis in 3D immersive environments for hyperspectral and laser altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. A.; Gertman, V.; Olsoy, P.; Mitchell, J.; Glenn, N. F.; Joshi, A.; Norpchen, D.; Shrestha, R.; Pernice, M.; Spaete, L.; Grover, S.; Whiting, E.; Lee, R.

    2011-12-01

    Immersive virtual reality environments such as the IQ-Station or CAVE° (Cave Automated Virtual Environment) offer new and exciting ways to visualize and explore scientific data and are powerful research and educational tools. Combining remote sensing data from a range of sensor platforms in immersive 3D environments can enhance the spectral, textural, spatial, and temporal attributes of the data, which enables scientists to interact and analyze the data in ways never before possible. Visualization and analysis of large remote sensing datasets in immersive environments requires software customization for integrating LiDAR point cloud data with hyperspectral raster imagery, the generation of quantitative tools for multidimensional analysis, and the development of methods to capture 3D visualizations for stereographic playback. This study uses hyperspectral and LiDAR data acquired over the China Hat geologic study area near Soda Springs, Idaho, USA. The data are fused into a 3D image cube for interactive data exploration and several methods of recording and playback are investigated that include: 1) creating and implementing a Virtual Reality User Interface (VRUI) patch configuration file to enable recording and playback of VRUI interactive sessions within the CAVE and 2) using the LiDAR and hyperspectral remote sensing data and GIS data to create an ArcScene 3D animated flyover, where left- and right-eye visuals are captured from two independent monitors for playback in a stereoscopic player. These visualizations can be used as outreach tools to demonstrate how integrated data and geotechnology techniques can help scientists see, explore, and more adequately comprehend scientific phenomena, both real and abstract.

  7. The virtues of virtual reality in exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gega, Lina

    2017-04-01

    Virtual reality can be more effective and less burdensome than real-life exposure. Optimal virtual reality delivery should incorporate in situ direct dialogues with a therapist, discourage safety behaviours, allow for a mismatch between virtual and real exposure tasks, and encourage self-directed real-life practice between and beyond virtual reality sessions. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  8. Virtual Reality: Toward Fundamental Improvements in Simulation-Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Richard A.; Mattoon, Joseph S.

    1994-01-01

    Considers the role and effectiveness of virtual reality in simulation-based training. The theoretical and practical implications of verity, integration, and natural versus artificial interface are discussed; a three-dimensional classification scheme for virtual reality is described; and the relationship between virtual reality and other…

  9. Visualizing Cumulus Clouds in Virtual Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffith, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on interactively visualizing, and ultimately simulating, cumulus clouds both in virtual reality (VR) and with a standard desktop computer. The cumulus clouds in question are found in data sets generated by Large-Eddy Simulations (LES), which are used to simulate a small section

  10. Virtual Reality for Training and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellet-d'Huart, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This article covers the application of virtual reality (VR) to training and lifelong learning. A number of considerations concerning the design of VR applications are included. The introduction is dedicated to the more general aspects of applying VR to training. From multiple perspectives, we will provide an overview of existing applications with…

  11. Visualizing Cumulus Clouds in Virtual Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffith, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on interactively visualizing, and ultimately simulating, cumulus clouds both in virtual reality (VR) and with a standard desktop computer. The cumulus clouds in question are found in data sets generated by Large-Eddy Simulations (LES), which are used to simulate a small section o

  12. Virtual Reality: theoretical basis, practical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Barker

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality (VR is a powerful multimedia visualization technique offering a range of mechanisms by which many new experiences can be made available. This paper deals with the basic nature of VR, the technologies needed to create it, and its potential, especially for helping disabled people. It also offers an overview of some examples of existing VR systems.

  13. Interaction Methods for Virtual Reality Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    34Echtzeitfähige Kollisionserkennung für Virtual Reality Anwendungen", dissertation at Universität des Saarlandes , 1998. [4] Matthias Buck, "Simulation...interaktiv bewegter Objekte mit Hinderniskontakten", dissertation at Universität des Saarlandes , 1999. [5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line

  14. Collaborative architectural design in virtual reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubers, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    In this PhD research a method and software prototype is developed for COLlaborative Architectural Design In VIRtual reality. The method consists of developing versions of a concept for a building and the evaluation of them with criteria. Every team member makes his own versions; otherwise they wou

  15. Dynamic 3D echocardiography in virtual reality.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); J.S. McGhie (Jackie); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: This pilot study was performed to evaluate whether virtual reality is applicable for three-dimensional echocardiography and if three-dimensional echocardiographic 'holograms' have the potential to become a clinically useful tool. METHODS: Three-dimensional echocardiographic d

  16. Development of SMATER Virtual Reality Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byoung Ha; Chung, B. H.; You, H. Y.; Kim, Y. M.; Park, J. B.; Choi, I. S.; Won, T. W.; Bae, J. B.; Kang, H. K.; Jang, J. M.; Heo, J. W.; Park, M. Y.; Kyun, H. S.; Lee, C. J. [Post Media Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-11-01

    In this research task, we want to develop the most suitable design of Spent Fuel Management Facility and develop 3D simulator for our illustration by applying method as such as graphics, simulation, kinematics, dynamics, and collision detection in virtual reality. Through this, we set the capability of making verification on modifying existing conceptual design as our final objective. 6 tabs., 35 figs. (author)

  17. Surgery, Virtual Reality, and the Future*

    OpenAIRE

    Vosburgh, Kirby G.; Golby, Alexandra; Pieper, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    MMVR has provided the leading forum for the multidisciplinary interaction and development of the use of Virtual Reality (VR) techniques in medicine, particularly in surgical practice. Here we look back at the foundations of our field, focusing on the use of VR in Surgery and similar interventional procedures, sum up the current status, and describe the challenges and opportunities going forward.

  18. Virtual Reality: Visualization in Three Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Hilary

    Virtual reality is a newly emerging tool for scientific visualization that makes possible multisensory, three-dimensional modeling of scientific data. While the emphasis is on visualization, the other senses are added to enhance what the scientist can visualize. Researchers are working to extend the sensory range of what can be perceived in…

  19. Surgery, virtual reality, and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosburgh, Kirby G; Golby, Alexandra; Pieper, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    MMVR has provided the leading forum for the multidisciplinary interaction and development of the use of Virtual Reality (VR) techniques in medicine, particularly in surgical practice. Here we look back at the foundations of our field, focusing on the use of VR in Surgery and similar interventional procedures, sum up the current status, and describe the challenges and opportunities going forward.

  20. Virtual reality simulation of basic pulmonary procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Arendrup, Henrik; von Buchwald, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background: Virtual reality (VR) bronchoscopy simulators have been available for more than a decade, and have been recognized as an important aid in bronchoscopy training. The existing literature has only examined the role of VR simulators in diagnostic bronchoscopy. The aim of this study...