WorldWideScience

Sample records for imatinib mesylate implication

  1. LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate (LAMP-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0132 TITLE: LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate (LAMP-1) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Charlie Strange, MD...regarding imatinib mesylate (imatinib) in the treatment of Lymphangioleiomyomatosis ( LAM ) sufficient to power and design a phase 3 imatinib vs. placebo...clinical trial. The hypothesis is that imatinib will be equivalent to rapamycin in short term efficacy and safety. Currently, most LAM patients are

  2. Imatinib mesylate--gold standards and silver linings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peggs, K

    2004-09-01

    Imatinib mesylate represents the first of a new generation of molecularly targeted therapies engineered to disrupt signal transduction pathways. It is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with relatively selective activity against the Abelson (ABL) proto-oncogene, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-KIT receptor. Deregulated tyrosine kinase activity has been implicated as a central pathogenic event in a number of human malignancies, most notably chronic myeloid leukemia. In this myeloproliferative disorder the t(9;22) reciprocal translocation results in the generation of a novel fusion oncoprotein, BCR-ABL, with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Imatinib inhibits this activity, inducing remarkable rates of hematological and cytogenetic remission in excess of those seen with alternative medical therapies. Following a large phase III study comparing its efficacy with the combination of interferon alpha and low-dose cytarabine, it has emerged as the current gold standard therapy for patients with chronic-phase disease without a potential bone marrow donor and those considered unsuitable for bone marrow transplantation. Its integration into the management of those patients who might be considered for transplantation, which has historically been considered the only potentially curative approach, remains a major challenge. The increasing recognition and subsequent molecular characterization of resistance mechanisms has reinforced the need to exercise caution against deferring a proven curative therapy in favor of a treatment approach that is still investigational, with the spectre of increased numbers of patients progressing to sudden-onset blast crisis remaining the potential dark cloud in the silver lining for imatinib.

  3. Successful Treatment For Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia (CEL With Imatinib Mesylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayane da Silva Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a patient with Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia (CEL with mutation in alfa PDGFR gene exhibiting a satisfactory response to treatment with imatinib mesylate. A 25-year-old man presented in a hematology service with a persistent cough and hemogram alterations. His blood count showed a hemoglobin level of 12.5 g/dL and a white blood cell count of 94,030/mm3, eosinophils were 68% of all cells. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy showed hypercellularity with marked eosinophilia (77% and erythroid differentiation series was hypocellular with normoblast maturation. The immunohistochemically of the bone biopsy was positive for myeloperoxidase and negative for CD34/CD99, consistent with CEL. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for the beta-fraction of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGFRβ and Philadelphia chromosome (Ph 1 were negative and the alfa PDGFR (Platelet-Derived Growth Factor was positive and showed heterozygosis in c.2531T>C on 18 Exon and homozygous in C.2562+1G>A at the region of the splicing site at the 18 intron. Treatment was initiated and maintained by administering 400mg/day imatinib mesylate. Laboratory findings returned to normal ranges, with clinical improvement and a hematological response observed after the second month of therapy. Currently, the patient’s blood count shows the white blood cell count (5,400 total leukocytes, eosinophils (8.6/mm3, hemoglobin (15.5 g/dl, hematocrit (45.4% and platelets (298,000/mm3 within normal ranges. The mutation search was negative in in peripheral blood one year after the initial treatment. Our work corroborates other studies on the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in the treatment of patients with CSF PDGFR alpha positive. We emphasize the importance of molecular studies, considering its relevance for the correct staging of the disease. Since CEL is a rare disease, it is important to define its etiology and anticipate its treatment, thus minimizing the damage induced by

  4. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, David A; Egorin, Merrill J; Quinn, Jennifer A; Rich, Jeremy N; Rich, Jeremy N; Gururangan, Sridharan; Gururangan, Idharan; Vredenburgh, James J; Desjardins, Annick; Sathornsumetee, Sith; Provenzale, James M; Herndon, James E; Dowell, Jeannette M; Badruddoja, Michael A; McLendon, Roger E; Lagattuta, Theodore F; Kicielinski, Kimberly P; Dresemann, Gregor; Sampson, John H; Friedman, Allan H; Salvado, August J; Friedman, Henry S

    2005-12-20

    We performed a phase II study to evaluate the combination of imatinib mesylate, an adenosine triphosphate mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patients with GBM at any recurrence received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Assessments were performed every 28 days. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Thirty-three patients enrolled with progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 58 weeks, 27% of patients were progression-free at 6 months, and the median PFS was 14.4 weeks. Three patients (9%) achieved radiographic response, and 14 (42%) achieved stable disease. Cox regression analysis identified concurrent EIAED use and no more than one prior progression as independent positive prognostic factors of PFS. The most common toxicities included grade 3 neutropenia (16%), thrombocytopenia (6%), and edema (6%). There were no grade 4 or 5 events. Concurrent EIAED use lowered imatinib mesylate exposure. Imatinib mesylate clearance was decreased at day 28 compared with day 1 in all patients, suggesting an effect of hydroxyurea. Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea is well tolerated and associated with durable antitumor activity in some patients with recurrent GBM.

  5. In vitro effects of imatinib mesylate on radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, Marion T; Maass, Nicolai; Mundhenke, Christoph; Dahmke, Linda; Schem, Christian; Bauerschlag, Dirk O; Weber, Katrin; Niehoff, Peter; Bauer, Maret; Strauss, Alexander; Jonat, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer treatment is based on a combination of adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy effecting intracellular signal transduction. With the tyrosine kinase inhibitors new targeted drugs are available. Imatinib mesylate is a selective inhibitor of bcr-abl, PRGFR alpha, beta and c-kit. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Imatinib has an influence on the effectiveness of radiotherapy in breast cancer cell lines and if a combination of imatinib with standard chemotherapy could lead to increased cytoreduction. Colony-forming tests of MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 were used to study differences in cell proliferation under incubation with imatinib and radiation. Changes in expression and phosphorylation of target receptors were detected using western blot. Cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis assays were performed combining imatinib with doxorubicin. The combination of imatinib and radiotherapy showed a significantly stronger inhibition of cell proliferation compared to single radiotherapy. Differences in PDGFR expression could not be detected, but receptor phosphorylation was significantly inhibited when treated with imatinib. Combination of imatinib with standard chemotherapy lead to an additive effect on cell growth inhibition compared to single treatment. Imatinib treatment combined with radiotherapy leads in breast cancer cell lines to a significant benefit which might be influenced through inhibition of PDGFR phosphorylation. Combining imatinib with chemotherapy enhances cytoreductive effects. Further in vivo studies are needed to evaluate the benefit of Imatinib in combination with radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the treatment of breast cancer

  6. Imatinib mesylate exerts anti-proliferative effects on osteosarcoma cells and inhibits the tumour growth in immunocompetent murine models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérengère Gobin

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumour characterized by osteoid production and/or osteolytic lesions of bone. A lack of response to chemotherapeutic treatments shows the importance of exploring new therapeutic methods. Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Novartis Pharma, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was originally developed for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Several studies revealed that imatinib mesylate inhibits osteoclast differentiation through the M-CSFR pathway and activates osteoblast differentiation through PDGFR pathway, two key cells involved in the vicious cycle controlling the tumour development. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of imatinib mesylate on the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and migration ability of five osteosarcoma cell lines (human: MG-63, HOS; rat: OSRGA; mice: MOS-J, POS-1. Imatinib mesylate was also assessed as a curative and preventive treatment in two syngenic osteosarcoma models: MOS-J (mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic osteosarcoma and POS-1 (undifferentiated osteosarcoma. Imatinib mesylate exhibited a dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect in all cell lines studied. The drug induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in most cell lines, except for POS-1 and HOS cells that were blocked in the S phase. In addition, imatinib mesylate induced cell death and strongly inhibited osteosarcoma cell migration. In the MOS-J osteosarcoma model, oral administration of imatinib mesylate significantly inhibited the tumour development in both preventive and curative approaches. A phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase array kit revealed that PDGFRα, among 7 other receptors (PDFGFRβ, Axl, RYK, EGFR, EphA2 and 10, IGF1R, appears as one of the main molecular targets for imatinib mesylate. In the light of the present study and the literature, it would be particularly interesting to revisit therapeutic evaluation of imatinib mesylate in osteosarcoma according to the tyrosine-kinase receptor

  7. Imatinib mesylate induces responses in patients with liver metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumor failing intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorentini Giammaria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imatinib mesylate represents a real major paradigm shift in cancer therapy, targeting the specific molecular abnormalities, crucial in the etiology of tumor. Intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy (IAHC followed by embolization, has been considered an interesting palliative option for patients with liver metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST, due to the typically hypervascular pattern of the tumor. Aims: We report our experience with IAHC followed by Imatinib mesylate, in order to show the superiority of the specific molecular approach in liver metastases from GIST. Materials and Methods: Three patients (pts with pretreated massive liver metastases from GIST, received IAHC with Epirubicin 50 mg/mq, every 3 weeks for 6 cycles. At the evidence of progression, they received Imatinib mesylate. Results: We observed progressive diseases in all cases. In 1998, one patient underwent Thalidomide at 150 mg orally, every day for 4 months, with evidence of stable disease and clinical improvement. In 2001, two patients received Imatinib mesylate at 400 mg orally, every day, with evidence of partial response lasting 18+ months and 16 months. One of them had grade 3 neutropenia, with suspension of therapy for 3 weeks. Conclusion: No patient treated with IAHC, reported objective responses, but two of them obtained partial response after the assumption of Imatinib mesylate and one showed temporary stabilization with thalidomide. Imatinib mesylate represents a new opportunity in GIST therapy, targeting the specific molecular alteration. It seems to be superior to conventional intra arterial hepatic chemotherapy.

  8. Management of CML in the Pediatric Age Group: Imatinib Mesylate or SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alfy, Mohsen S; Al-Haddad, Alaa M; Hamed, Ahmed A

    2010-12-01

    Management of CML has changed markedly since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However stem cell transplantation (SCT) remains a valid therapeutic modality especially in developing countries due to its relatively lower cost. We aim to compare between imatinib mesylate and SCT as regard outcome in CML in the pediatric age group. Forty-eight patients with newly diagnosed CML in the chronic phase, aged 3 to 18 years were enrolled in this prospective study. Patients without a matched donor (Group I; N=30) were assigned to receive imatinib mesylate at a dose of 340mg÷m2÷day, while patients with a fully matched related donor (Group II; N=18), were offered SCT. Response (hematologic, cytogenetic and molecular), side effects and survival were analyzed. Complete hematologic response was obtained in 97% of the patients in group I and 94% in group II. Major cytogenetic response (CyR) was obtained in 80% of patients in group I and 100% in group II. Complete CyR was 57% in group I and 64% in group II. Major molecular response (MMR) was 36% in group I and 50% in group II with no significant difference between both groups. Six years overall survival (OS) was 87% in the 1st group and 61% in the 2nd group (pSCT group (55% had GVHD and 78% had infection). Imatinib mesylate has a superior OS and EFS than SCT in children. It is generally safe and well tolerated. Imatinib mesylate should be the 1st line treatment of pediatric patients with CML in the chronic phase. CML- Imatinib- SCT- Pediatrics.

  9. Imatinib mesylate in chronic myeloid leukemia: frontline treatment and long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagno, Fabio; Stella, Stefania; Spitaleri, Antonio; Pennisi, Maria Stella; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Vigneri, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib Mesylate has dramatically improved the clinical outcome of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in the chronic phase of the disease, generating unprecedented rates of complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses and sustained reductions in BCR-ABL transcripts. Here, we present an overview on the efficacy and safety of Imatinib and describe the most important clinical studies employing this drug for the frontline treatment of chronic phase CML. We also discuss recent reports describing the long-term outcome of patients receiving Imatinib for their disease. The imminent availability of generic forms of Imatinib coupled with the approval of expensive second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors underlines an unmet need for early molecular parameters that may distinguish CML patients likely to benefit from the drug from those that should receive alternative forms of treatment.

  10. Platelet Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Does Imatinib Mesylate Improve It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Meltem Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of imatinib mesylate on platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP release in chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Materials and Methods: Platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by 5.0 mM adenosine diphosphate, 0.5 mM arachidonic acid, 1.0 mg/ mL ristocetin, and 2 µg/mL collagen were studied by whole blood platelet lumi-aggregometer in 20 newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients before and after imatinib mesylate treatment. Results: At the time of diagnosis, 17/20 patients had abnormal platelet aggregation results; 8 (40% had hypoactivity, 6 (30% had hyperactivity, and 3 (15% had mixed hypo- and hyperactivity. Repeat platelet aggregation studies were performed after a mean of 19 months (min: 5 months-max: 35 months in all patients who received imatinib mesylate during this period. After therapy, 18/20 (90% patients had abnormal laboratory results; 12 (60% had hypoactive platelets, 4 (20% had mixed hypo- and hyperactive platelets, and 2 (10% had hyperactive platelets. Three of the 8 patients with initial hypoactivity remained hypoactive, while 2 developed a mixed picture, 2 became hyperactive, and 1 normalized. Of the 6 patients with initial hyperactivity, 4 became hypoactive and 2 developed a mixed pattern. All of the 3 patients with initial hypo- and hyperactivity became hypoactive. Finally, 2 of the 3 patients with initial normal platelets became hypoactive while 1 remained normal. There was a significant decrease in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation after therapy (p0.05. Conclusion: These findings indicate that a significant proportion of chronic myeloid leukemia patients have different patterns of platelet function abnormalities and imatinib mesylate has no effect on these abnormalities, with a significant impairment in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

  11. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate and hydroxyurea for recurrent grade III malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Annick; Quinn, Jennifer A; Vredenburgh, James J; Sathornsumetee, Sith; Friedman, Allan H; Herndon, James E; McLendon, Roger E; Provenzale, James M; Rich, Jeremy N; Sampson, John H; Gururangan, Sridharan; Dowell, Jeannette M; Salvado, August; Friedman, Henry S; Reardon, David A

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports demonstrate the activity of imatinib mesylate, an ATP-mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. We performed the current phase 2 study to evaluate this regimen among patients with recurrent WHO grade III malignant glioma (MG). Patients with grade III MG at any recurrence, received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Clinical assessments were performed monthly and radiographic assessments were obtained at least every 2 months. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. All patients had progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. The median number of episodes of prior progression was 2 (range, 1-7) and the median number of prior treatment regimens was 3 (range, 1-8). With a median follow-up of 82.9 weeks, 24% of patients were progression-free at 6 months. The radiographic response rate was 10%, while 33% achieved stable disease. Among patients who achieved at least stable disease at first evaluation, the 6-month and 12-month PFS rates were 53% and 29%, respectively. The most common grade 3 or greater toxicities were hematologic and complicated less than 4% of administered courses. Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea, is well tolerated and associated with anti-tumor activity in some patients with recurrent grade 3 MG.

  12. Concurrent Male Gynecomastia and Testicular Hydrocele after Imatinib Mesylate Treatment of a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hawk; Chang, Heung-Moon; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Tae-Won; Sohn, Hee-Jung; Kim, So-Eun; Kang, Hye-Jin; Park, Sarah; Lee, Jung-Shin

    2005-01-01

    We report a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patient with male gynecomastia and testicular hydrocele after treatment with imatinib mesylate. A 42 yr-old male patient presented for management of hepatic masses. Two years earlier, he had undergone a small bowel resection to remove an intraabdominal mass later shown to be a GIST, followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. At presentation, CT scan revealed multiple hepatic masses, which were compatible with metastatic GIST, and he was prescribed imatinib 400 mg/day. During treatment, he experienced painful enlargement of the left breast and scrotal swelling. Three months after cessation of imatinib treatment, the tumors recurred, and, upon recommencing imatinib, he experienced painful enlargement of the right breast and scrotal swelling. He was diagnosed with male gynecomastia caused by decreased testosterone and non-communicative testicular hydrocele. He was given androgen support and a hydrocelectomy, which improved his gynecomastia. The mechanism by which imatinib induces gynecomastia and hydrocele is thought to be associated with an inhibition of c-KIT and platelet-derive growth factor. This is the first report, to our knowledge, describing concurrent male gynecomastia and testicular hydrocele after imatinib treatment of a patient with GIST. PMID:15953881

  13. Imatinib mesylate in chronic myelogenous leukemia: a Congolese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major cytogenetic response was noticed in 87.18%. After a median follow up of 12 months, chronic myeloid leukemia had not progressed to the accelerated or blastic phase in an estimated 91.8% of patients and 86.6% were alive. Conclusion: Imatinib is effective in newly chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patient ...

  14. The long-term clinical implications of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Choi, Soo Young; Bang, Ju-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jang, Eun-Jung; Byeun, Ji-Young; Park, Jin Eok; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Oh, Yun Jeong; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical significance of an additional chromosomal abnormality (ACA), variant Philadelphia chromosome (vPh) at diagnosis, and newly developed other chromosomal abnormalities (OCA) in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on imatinib (IM) therapy. Sequential cytogenetic data from 281 consecutive new chronic phase CML patients were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 78.6 months, the 22 patients with vPh (P = 0.034) or ACA (P = 0.034) at diagnosis had more events of IM failure than did the patients with a standard Ph. The 5-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and failure-free survival (FFS) rates for patients with vPh at diagnosis were 77.8%, 75.0%, and 53.3%, respectively; for patients with ACA at diagnosis, 100%, 66.3%, and 52.1%, respectively; and for patients with a standard Ph, 96.0%, 91.3%, and 83.7%, respectively. During IM therapy, eight patients developed an OCA, which had no impact on outcomes as a time-dependent covariate in our Cox proportional hazards regression models. This study showed that vPh was associated with poor OS and FFS and that ACA had adverse effects on EFS and FFS. In addition, no OCA, except monosomy 7, had any prognostic impact, suggesting that the development of OCA may not require a change in treatment strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Formulation and In Vitro, In Vivo Evaluation of Effervescent Floating Sustained-Release Imatinib Mesylate Tablet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Ali; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Davoudi, Ehsan Taghizadeh; Zaharuddin, Nurul Dhania; Sabeti, Bahareh; Chung, Lip Yong; Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Imatinib mesylate is an antineoplastic agent which has high absorption in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Conventional imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) tablets produce rapid and relatively high peak blood levels and requires frequent administration to keep the plasma drug level at an effective range. This might cause side effects, reduced effectiveness and poor therapeutic management. Therefore, floating sustained-release Imatinib tablets were developed to allow the tablets to be released in the upper part of the GIT and overcome the inadequacy of conventional tablets. Methodology Floating sustained-release Imatinib mesylate tablets were prepared using the wet granulation method. Tablets were formulated using Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC K4M), with Sodium alginate (SA) and Carbomer 934P (CP) as release-retarding polymers, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) as the effervescent agent and lactose as a filler. Floating behavior, in vitro drug release, and swelling index studies were conducted. Initial and total drug release duration was compared with a commercial tablet (Gleevec) in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2) at 37 ± 0.5°C for 24 hours. Tablets were then evaluated for various physical parameters, including weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, and drug content. Consequently, 6 months of physical stability studies and in vitro gastro-retentive studies were conducted. Results and Discussion Statistical data analysis revealed that tablets containing a composition of 14.67% w/w HPMC K4M, 10.67%, w/w Na alginate, 1.33%, w/w Carbomer 934P and 9.33%, w/w NaHCO3 produced the most favorable formulation to develop 24-hour sustained-release tablets with optimum floating behavior and satisfactory physicochemical characteristics. Furthermore, in vitro release study revealed that the formulated SR tablet had significantly lower Cmax and higher Tmax compared to the conventional tablet (Gleevec). Thus, formulated SR tablets preserved persistent

  16. Formulation and in vitro, in vivo evaluation of effervescent floating sustained-release imatinib mesylate tablet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kadivar

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate is an antineoplastic agent which has high absorption in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Conventional imatinib mesylate (Gleevec tablets produce rapid and relatively high peak blood levels and requires frequent administration to keep the plasma drug level at an effective range. This might cause side effects, reduced effectiveness and poor therapeutic management. Therefore, floating sustained-release Imatinib tablets were developed to allow the tablets to be released in the upper part of the GIT and overcome the inadequacy of conventional tablets.Floating sustained-release Imatinib mesylate tablets were prepared using the wet granulation method. Tablets were formulated using Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC K4M, with Sodium alginate (SA and Carbomer 934P (CP as release-retarding polymers, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 as the effervescent agent and lactose as a filler. Floating behavior, in vitro drug release, and swelling index studies were conducted. Initial and total drug release duration was compared with a commercial tablet (Gleevec in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2 at 37 ± 0.5°C for 24 hours. Tablets were then evaluated for various physical parameters, including weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, and drug content. Consequently, 6 months of physical stability studies and in vitro gastro-retentive studies were conducted.Statistical data analysis revealed that tablets containing a composition of 14.67% w/w HPMC K4M, 10.67%, w/w Na alginate, 1.33%, w/w Carbomer 934P and 9.33%, w/w NaHCO3 produced the most favorable formulation to develop 24-hour sustained-release tablets with optimum floating behavior and satisfactory physicochemical characteristics. Furthermore, in vitro release study revealed that the formulated SR tablet had significantly lower Cmax and higher Tmax compared to the conventional tablet (Gleevec. Thus, formulated SR tablets preserved persistent concentration of plasma up to 24 hours

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate and its metabolite in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon-Andersen, Divya; Mondick, John T; Jayaraman, Bhuvana; Thompson, Patrick A; Blaney, Susan M; Bernstein, Mark; Bond, Mason; Champagne, Martin; Fossler, Michael J; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) is a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for use in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia in adults and children and in gastrointestinal stromal tumors in adults. Population pharmacokinetic (PPK) studies evaluating the effect of population covariates on the pharmacokinetics of imatinib and its active metabolite have been developed in adults with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). However, this still remains to be described in children. The objectives of the analysis were to develop a PPK model of imatinib and its active metabolite, CGP74588, to describe exposure in children and young adults and to identify covariates that are predictors of variability in disposition. Plasma concentrations from 26 subjects with Philadelphia (Ph+) leukemia (Phase I study) and 15 subjects with refractory solid tumors (Phase II study), who received oral imatinib at doses ranging from 260 to 570 mg/m(2), were available for the PPK analysis in NONMEM. Blood samples were drawn prior to dosing and over 24-48 h on days 1 and 8 of the studies. Covariates studied included weight, age, albumin, alanine aminotransferase and the study population. The pharmacokinetics of imatinib and CGP 74588 were well described by one and two compartment models, respectively. Total body weight was the only covariate found to significantly affect Cl/F and V/F. The final imatinib-CGP 74588 model is summarized as follows: CL/F (imatinib) (L/h) = 10.8 x (WT/70)(0.75), V/F (imatinib) (L) = 284 x (WT/70) and D1(duration of zero order absorption,imatinib) (h) = 1.67 and CL/F (CGP 74588) (L/h) = 9.65 x (WT/70)(0.75), V1/F (CGP 74588) (L) = 11.6 x (WT/70), Q (CGP 74588) (L/h) = 2.9 x (WT/70)(0.75) and V2/F (CGP 74588) (L) = 256*(WT/70). Model evaluation indicated that the final model was robust and satisfactory. Current imatinib dosing guidelines in pediatrics is based on the achievement of exposures consistent with doses known to be

  18. Gynecomastia during imatinib mesylate treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a rare adverse event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan ZhongShu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imatinib mesylate has been the standard therapeutic treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia, advanced and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST. It is well tolerated with mild adverse effects. Gynecomastia development during the course of treatment has been rarely reported. Methods Ninety-eight patients with advanced or recurrent GIST were treated with imatinib mesylate. Among the fifty-seven male patients six developed gynecomastia during the treatment. The lesions were confirmed by sonography. Sex hormone levels were determined in six patients with and without the presence of gynecomastia respectively. The patients with gynecomatia were treated with tamoxifene and the sex hormones were assayed before and after tamoxifene treatment. Results In patients with gynecomastia the lump underneath the bilateral nipples was 2.5 to 5 centimeters in diameter. Their serum free testosterone levels ranged between 356.61 and 574.60 ng/dl with a mean ± SD of 408.64 ± 82.06 ng/dl (95% CI 343.03~474.25 ng/dl, which is within the normal range. The level of serum estradiol was 42.89 ± 16.54 pg/ml (95% CI 29.66~56.12 pg/ml. Three patients had higher levels (43.79~71.21 pg/ml and the others' were within normal range of 27.00~34.91 pg/ml. Six patients without the development of gynecomastia had normal free testosterone. One patient died because of large tumor burden. The sex hormones had no significant changes before and after tamoxifene treatment.(P > 0.05 Conclusions Testosterone levels were not decreased in the six GIST patients with gynecomastia. Three patients had increased serum estradiol level which suggests that imbalance of sex hormones may be the cause of gynecomastia during treatment with imatinib mesylate.

  19. Imatinib mesylate inhibits Leydig cell tumor growth: evidence for in vitro and in vivo activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basciani, Sabrina; Brama, Marina; Mariani, Stefania; De Luca, Gabriele; Arizzi, Mario; Vesci, Loredana; Pisano, Claudio; Dolci, Susanna; Spera, Giovanni; Gnessi, Lucio

    2005-03-01

    Leydig cell tumors are usually benign tumors of the male gonad. However, if the tumor is malignant, no effective treatments are currently available. Leydig cell tumors express platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), kit ligand and their respective receptors, PDGFR and c-kit. We therefore evaluated the effects of imatinib mesylate (imatinib), a selective inhibitor of the c-kit and PDGFR tyrosine kinases, on the growth of rodent Leydig tumor cell lines in vivo and in vitro, and examined, in human Leydig cell tumor samples, the expression of activated PDGFR and c-kit and the mutations in exons of the c-kit gene commonly associated with solid tumors. Imatinib caused concentration-dependent decreases in the viability of Leydig tumor cell lines, which coincided with apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation and ligand-stimulated phosphorylation of c-kit and PDGFRs. Mice bearing s.c. allografts of a Leydig tumor cell line treated with imatinib p.o., had an almost complete inhibition of tumor growth, less tumor cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a lesser amount of tumor-associated mean vessel density compared with controls. No drug-resistant tumors appeared during imatinib treatment but tumors regrew after drug withdrawal. Human Leydig cell tumors showed an intense expression of the phosphorylated form of c-kit and a less intense expression of phosphorylated PDGFRs. No activating mutations in common regions of mutation of the c-kit gene were found. Our studies suggest that Leydig cell tumors might be a potential target for imatinib therapy.

  20. Cerebral relapse of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor during treatment with imatinib mesylate: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waring Paul

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs has previously been difficult as they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The development of imatinib mesylate has made a major impact on the management of advanced GISTs. It is apparent that there are sanctuary sites such as the central nervous system where imatinib does not achieve adequate concentrations. We describe the case of a man with metastatic GIST who experienced multiple cerebral relapses of disease while systemic disease progression appeared to be controlled by imatinib. Case presentation A 47-year-old man presented in July 1999 with a jejunal GIST with multiple hepatic metastases. The jejunal primary was resected and after unsuccessful cytoreductive chemotherapy, the liver metastases were also resected in December 1999. The patient subsequently relapsed in August 2001 with symptomatic hepatic, subcutaneous gluteal, left choroidal and right ocular metastases all confirmed on CT and PET scanning. Biopsy confirmed recurrent GIST. MRI and lumbar puncture excluded central nervous system involvement. The patient was commenced on imatinib 400 mg bd in September 2001 through a clinical trial. The symptoms improved with objective PET and CT scan response until December 2002 when the patient developed a right-sided foot drop. MRI scan showed a left parasagittal tumor which was resected and confirmed histologically to be metastatic GIST. Imatinib was ceased pre-operatively due to the trial protocol but recommenced in February 2003 on a compassionate use program. The left parasagittal metastasis recurred and required subsequent re-excision in September 2003 and January 2004. Control of the systemic GIST was temporarily lost on reduction of the dose of imatinib (due to limited drug supply but on increasing the dose back to 800 mg per day, systemic disease was stabilized for a period of time before generalised progression

  1. Cerebral relapse of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor during treatment with imatinib mesylate: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Brett; Yip, Desmond; Goldstein, David; Waring, Paul; Beshay, Victoria; Chong, Guan

    2004-01-01

    The management of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has previously been difficult as they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The development of imatinib mesylate has made a major impact on the management of advanced GISTs. It is apparent that there are sanctuary sites such as the central nervous system where imatinib does not achieve adequate concentrations. We describe the case of a man with metastatic GIST who experienced multiple cerebral relapses of disease while systemic disease progression appeared to be controlled by imatinib. A 47-year-old man presented in July 1999 with a jejunal GIST with multiple hepatic metastases. The jejunal primary was resected and after unsuccessful cytoreductive chemotherapy, the liver metastases were also resected in December 1999. The patient subsequently relapsed in August 2001 with symptomatic hepatic, subcutaneous gluteal, left choroidal and right ocular metastases all confirmed on CT and PET scanning. Biopsy confirmed recurrent GIST. MRI and lumbar puncture excluded central nervous system involvement. The patient was commenced on imatinib 400 mg bd in September 2001 through a clinical trial. The symptoms improved with objective PET and CT scan response until December 2002 when the patient developed a right-sided foot drop. MRI scan showed a left parasagittal tumor which was resected and confirmed histologically to be metastatic GIST. Imatinib was ceased pre-operatively due to the trial protocol but recommenced in February 2003 on a compassionate use program. The left parasagittal metastasis recurred and required subsequent re-excision in September 2003 and January 2004. Control of the systemic GIST was temporarily lost on reduction of the dose of imatinib (due to limited drug supply) but on increasing the dose back to 800 mg per day, systemic disease was stabilized for a period of time before generalised progression occurred. This case illustrates that the brain can be a

  2. Long-term remission in BCR/ABL-positive AML-M6 patient treated with Imatinib Mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompetti, Franca; Spadano, Antonio; Sau, Antonella; Mennucci, Antonio; Russo, Rosa; Catinella, Virginia; Franchi, Paolo Guanciali; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Palka, Giandomenico; Fioritoni, Giuseppe; Iacone, Antonio

    2007-04-01

    BCR/ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare disease, characterized by a poor prognosis, with resistance to induction chemotherapy and frequent relapses in responsive patients. Here we report a case of BCR/ABL-positive AML-M6 who, after relapse, was treated with Imatinib Mesylate (600 mg/die) and within 4 months achieved a cytogenetic and molecular complete response. After more than 4 years of continuous Imatinib therapy, nested RT-PCR for BCR/ABL is persistently negative. The case reported shows that the response obtained with Imatinib Mesylate in BCR/ABL-positive AML may be long lasting, offering a chance of successful treatment for this poor prognosis group of patients.

  3. Falla cardiaca asociada con el uso de imatinib mesilato: Reporte de un caso Heart failure associated to imatinib mesylate use: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Saldarriaga

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La cardiotoxicidad por medicamentos es un evento cada vez más frecuente en la práctica clínica diaria. Inhibidores de la proteína de fusión Brc/Abl como el imatinib mesilato, son una nueva herramienta para el tratamiento de algunas neoplasias hematológicas, en especial de la leucemia mieloide crónica. Sin embargo, en la literatura se reporta desarrollo de cardiotoxicidad a causa de este medicamento. Se presenta el caso de una mujer joven con corazón de estructura sana quien desarrolla cardiotoxicidad por imatinib pocas semanas después de iniciarlo.Cardiotoxicity due to drugs has become a frequent event in the daily clinical practice. Fusion protein Brc/Abl inhibitors such as imatinib mesylate constitute a new tool for the treatment of some hematogical neoplasias, especially chronic myeloid leukemia. Nevertheless, there have been reports in the literature regarding imatinib mesylate toxicity. We present the case of a young woman with a structurally healthy heart who developed cardiotoxicity with imatinib few weeks after its initiation.

  4. Cytoprotective effect of imatinib mesylate in non-BCR-ABL-expressing cells along with autophagosome formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtomo, Tadashi; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Naito, Munekazu; Moriya, Shota; Kuroda, Masahiko; Itoh, Masahiro; Tomoda, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with imatinib mesylate (IM) results in an increased viable cell number of non-BCR-ABL-expressing cell lines by inhibiting spontaneous apoptosis. Electron microscopy revealed an increase of autophagosomes in response to IM. IM attenuated the cytotoxic effect of cytosine arabinoside, as well as inhibiting cell death with serum-deprived culture. Cytoprotection with autophagosome formation by IM was observed in various leukemia and cancer cell lines as well as normal murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Complete inhibition of autophagy by knockdown of atg5 in the Tet-off atg5 -/- MEF system attenuated the cytoprotective effect of IM, indicating that the effect is partially dependent on autophagy. However, cytoprotection by IM was not mediated through suppression of ROS production via mitophagy, ER stress via ribophagy, or proapoptotic function of ABL kinase. Although the target tyrosine kinase(s) of IM remains unclear, our data provide novel therapeutic possibilities of using IM for cytoprotection.

  5. O tratamento da Leucemia Mielóide Crônica com mesilato de imatinibe Therapy of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia with imatinib mesylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaneuza M. Funke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O mesilato de imatinibe é atualmente o tratamento de escolha para pacientes com Leucemia mielóide Crônica (LMC recém-diagnosticados. Desde os primeiros estudos clínicos em 1998 até o estudo IRIS, que comparou o uso em primeira linha de imatinibe com interferon + ara-C, esta droga vem se consolidando em segurança e eficácia. Ainda há, entretanto questionamentos sobre a melhor dose inicial, a identificação dos pacientes que mais se beneficiariam e a melhor abordagem frente a respostas sub-ótimas e resistência. Os principais estudos clínicos publicados com mesilato de imatinibe são revisados no presente artigo, e discutidos sob a perspectiva da realidade brasileira.Imatinib mesylate is currently the gold-standard therapy for patients with newly diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia. From the clinical trials in 1998 to the IRIS study, which compared first line imatinib treatment with interferon and low dose ara-C, this drug has been consolidated in regards to its safety and efficacy. There are still some questions to answer. Which would be the best initial dose? Are there any patients who benefit more than others? What is the best approach to suboptimal response and resistance? The most important published clinical studies are reviewed in the current article and discussed from a Brazilian perspective.

  6. Up regulation of K A I 1 gene expression and apoptosis effect of imatinib mesylate in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    eyed Ataollah Sadat Shandiz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of imatinib mesylate on KAI1 gene expression and apoptosis properties in human gastric carcinoma AGS cell line. Methods: Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay and quantitative real time PCR method was applied for investigation of Bax, Bcl-2, and KAI1 gene expression in AGS cells. The quantity of KAI1, Bax, and Bcl-2 compared to GAPDH gene expressions were examined using the formula 2-∆∆Ct. Furthermore, cell apoptosis/necrosis was carried out by annexin V/PI staining and quantified with flow cytometry after treatment with imatinib. Results: Imatinib mesylate was showed to have a dose-dependent toxicity effect against AGS cells. KAI1/GAPDH gene expression ratios were 1.07 ± 0.02 (P > 0.05, 1.68 ± 0.19 (P > 0.05, 3.60 ± 0.55 (P < 0.05, 6.54 ± 0.27 (P < 0.001 for 20, 50, 80 and 100 μmol/L of imatinib concentrations. The mRNA levels of Bax detected by real-time PCR after treatment with imatinib mesylate were significantly increased. Also, the number of apoptotic cells was increased from 3.72% (statistically significant; P < 0.05 in untreated AGS cells to 21.72%, 83.04% and 85.80%, respectively, following treatment with 20, 40, and 60 μmol/L imatinib mesylate. Conclusions: The results suggest that imatinib mesylate can induce apoptosis pathway in a dose-dependent mode and might modulate metastasis by up regulating KAI1 gene expression in human gastric carcinoma AGS cell line.

  7. "Antifibrotic effect after low-dose imatinib mesylate treatment in patients with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: An open-label non-randomized, uncontrolled clinical trial"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Tina Rask; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2011-01-01

    Background Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a disease affecting the connective tissue of the skin and internal organs in patients with renal failure. No effective treatments are available. Objectives To investigate if the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate was effective in patients...... Imatinib mesylate may be an effective drug in the treatment of skin fibrosis in moderate to severe NSF cases, even at reduced doses. We found a positive clinical effect on the skin, but no convincing improvement of the joint mobility. Only few patients could be recruited limiting the interpretation...

  8. In vitro inhibitory effects of imatinib mesylate on stromal cells and hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Soares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate (IM is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML because it selectively inhibits tyrosine kinase, which is a hallmark of CML oncogenesis. Recent studies have shown that IM inhibits the growth of several non-malignant hematopoietic and fibroblast cells from bone marrow (BM. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IM on stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cells, specifically in the colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM, using BM cultures from 108 1.5- to 2-month-old healthy Swiss mice. The results showed that low concentrations of IM (1.25 µM reduced the growth of CFU-GM in clonogenic assays. In culture assays with stromal cells, fibroblast proliferation and α-SMA expression by immunocytochemistry analysis were also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner, with a survival rate of approximately 50% with a dose of 2.5 µM. Cell viability and morphology were analyzed using MTT and staining with acrydine orange/ethidium bromide. Most cells were found to be viable after treatment with 5 µM IM, although there was gradual growth inhibition of fibroblastic cells while the number of round cells (macrophage-like cells increased. At higher concentrations (15 µM, the majority of cells were apoptotic and cell growth ceased completely. Oil red staining revealed the presence of adipocytes only in untreated cells (control. Cell cycle analysis of stromal cells by flow cytometry showed a blockade at the G0/G1 phases in groups treated with 5-15 µM. These results suggest that IM differentially inhibits the survival of different types of BM cells since toxic effects were achieved.

  9. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate suppresses uric acid crystal-induced acute gouty arthritis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent L Reber

    Full Text Available Gouty arthritis is caused by the deposition of monosodium urate (MSU crystals in joints. Despite many treatment options for gout, there is a substantial need for alternative treatments for patients unresponsive to current therapies. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have demonstrated therapeutic benefit in experimental models of antibody-dependent arthritis and in rheumatoid arthritis in humans, but to date, the potential effects of such inhibitors on gouty arthritis has not been evaluated. Here we demonstrate that treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (imatinib can suppress inflammation induced by injection of MSU crystals into subcutaneous air pouches or into the ankle joint of wild type mice. Moreover, imatinib treatment also largely abolished the lower levels of inflammation which developed in IL-1R1-/- or KitW-sh/W-sh mice, indicating that this drug can inhibit IL-1-independent pathways, as well as mast cell-independent pathways, contributing to pathology in this model. Imatinib treatment not only prevented ankle swelling and synovial inflammation when administered before MSU crystals but also diminished these features when administrated after the injection of MSU crystals, a therapeutic protocol more closely mimicking the clinical situation in which treatment occurs after the development of an acute gout flare. Finally, we also assessed the efficiency of local intra-articular injections of imatinib-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles in this model of acute gout. Treatment with low doses of this long-acting imatinib:PLGA formulation was able to reduce ankle swelling in a therapeutic protocol. Altogether, these results raise the possibility that tyrosine kinase inhibitors might have utility in the treatment of acute gout in humans.

  10. Imatinib mesylate is effective in children with chronic myelogenous leukemia in late chronic and advanced phase and in relapse after stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millot, F; Guilhot, J; Nelken, B; Leblanc, T; De Bont, ES; Bekassy, AN; Gadner, H; Sufliarska, S; Stary, J; Gschaidmeier, H; Guilhot, F; Suttorp, M

    A multicentric phase 2 study was conducted to determine the efficiency and the tolerance of imatinib mesylate in children with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in advanced phase of the disease, in relapse after stem cell transplantation, or in case of failure to an interferon a-based regimen. In

  11. [Disappearance of a Philadelphia chromosome-positive clone and appearance of a -negative clone following treatment with imatinib mesylate in acute myelomonocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Wataru; Arai, Yukihiro; Tadokoro, Jiro; Takeuchi, Kengo; Yamagata, Tetsuya; Mitani, Kinuko

    2006-02-01

    A 63-year-old female was diagnosed as having Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myelomonocytic leukemia in June 2002. The patient received monotherapy with imatinib mesylate or combination therapy with DCM and idarubicin/cytarabine, both of which failed in attaining disease remission. However, the second imatinib administration plus CAG therapy resulted in disappearance of the Philadelphia chromosome-positive clone and increase of Philadelphia chromosome-negative cells. During a therapy-withholding period due to fungal infection, the Philadelphia chromosome-positive clone expanded and the patient died of cerebral hemorrhage in February 2003. The transient suppression of the Philadelphia chromosome-positive clone may have brought about amplification of the Philadelphia chromosome-negative cells after the secondary imatinib treatment.

  12. The Effects of Imatinib Mesylate on Cellular Viability, Platelet Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor in Mouse Testicular Normal Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Nasim; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Growth factors play an essential role in the development of tumor and normal cells like testicular leydig cells. Treatment of cancer with anti-cancer agents like imatinib mesylate may interfere with normal leydig cell activity, growth and fertility through failure in growth factors' production or their signaling pathways. The purpose of the study was to determine cellular viability and the levels of, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) in normal mouse leydig cells exposed to imatinib, and addressing the effect of imatinib on fertility potential. The mouse TM3 leydig cells were treated with 0 (control), 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM imatinib for 2, 4 and 6 days. Each experiment was repeated three times (15 experiments in each day).The cellular viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA with Tukey's post hoc and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. With increasing drug concentration, cellular viability decreased significantly (pcellular viability, PDGF and SCF levels. Imatinib may reduce fertility potential especially at higher concentrations in patients treated with this drug by decreasing cellular viability. The effect of imatinib on leydig cells is associated with PDGF stimulation. Of course future studies can be helpful in exploring the long term effects of this drug.

  13. Myeloid neoplasm with prominent eosinophilia and PDGFRA rearrangement treated with imatinib mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Møller, Michael Boe

    2010-01-01

    of FIP1L1-PDGFRA positive disease has been reported. We report a 2-year-old female with a myeloid neoplasm associated with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA. Treatment with imatinib resulted in complete and durable clinical, hematological, and molecular remission within 3 months after starting...

  14. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia with Variant Chromosomal Translocations: Results of Treatment with Imatinib Mesylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Bhise

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia patients with variant translocations. Methods: Forty eight chronic myeloid leukemia patients carrying variant translocations and treated with imatinib at our institute were considered for the study. Survival and response rates were evaluated. Results: The median follow up was 48 months(m. Forty three (89.58% patients achieved complete hematologic response. Thirty one (64.58% patients achieved complete cytogenetic response and 19(39.58% achieved major molecular response anytime during their follow up period. Only 18.75% of the patients achieved complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response within the stipulated time frames.The estimated overall survival at 48 m median follow up was 81.2%.The progression free survival was also 81.2% and the event free survival was 79.1%.There was no significant survival difference between low vs intermediate and high risk sokal group. Conclusion: We report suboptimal responses to imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia with variant translocations. Further studies with imatinib and the newer more active drugs dasatinib and nilotinib are justified.

  15. Evaluation of the Safety of Imatinib Mesylate in 200 Iraqi Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the Chronic Phase: Single-Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam Francis Matti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is presently the drug of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. During therapy, a few patients may develop hematological and non-hematological adverse effects. METHODS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of imatinib therapy in patients with CML. Between December 2007 and October 2009 two hundred patients with CML in chronic phase were included in the study. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients prior to the start of the study. Imatinib was started at 400 mg orally daily. Patients were monitored carefully for any adverse effects. Complete blood count, liver, and renal function tests were done once in 2 weeks during the first month and on a monthly basis during follow-up. Toxicities that encountered were graded as per the National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria version 2. Both hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were managed with short interruptions of treatment and supportive measures, but the daily dose of imatinib was not reduced below 300 mg/day. RESULTS: Two hundred CML patients in chronic phase were included in this study; the male: female ratio was 0.7: 1 with mean age 39.06±13.21 years (ranged from 15-81 years. The study showed that the commonest hematological side effects were grade 2 anemia (12.5% followed by leukopenia (8% and thrombocytopenia (4%, while the most common non-hematological adverse effects were superficial edema and weight gain (51.5%, followed by musculoskeletal pain (35.5%, then gastro-intestinal symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea (19%. Fluid retention was the commonest side effect, which responded to low-dose diuretics. The drug was safe and well tolerated. There were no deaths due to toxicity. CONCLUSION: Imatinib mesylate a well-tolerated drug, and all undesirable effects could be ameliorated easily. The most common hematological and non-hematological side effects were anemia and fluid retention, respectively.

  16. Chronic myeloid leukemia: an overview of the determinants of effectiveness and therapeutic response in the first decade of treatment with imatinib mesylate in a Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Maria Camelo Cid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last decade, there has been a revolution in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment with the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors with imatinib mesylate becoming the frontline therapy. Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of imatinib mesylate in treating chronic myeloid leukemia patients and to identify factors related to therapeutic efficacy. Methods: This retrospective study was based on information obtained from patients'records in the Hematology Service of Hospital Universitário Walter Cantídio of the Universidade Federal do Ceará (HUWC / UFC. All patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia that took imatinib mesylate for a minimum of 12 months in the period from January 2001 to January 2011 were included. From a population of 160 patients, 100 were eligible for analysis. Results: The study population consisted of 100 patients who were mostly male (51% with ages rangingbetween 21 and 40 years (42%, from the countryside (59%, in the chronic phase (95%, with high-riskprognostic factors (40%; the prognosis of high risk was not associated with complete hematologic responseor complete cytogenetic response, but correlated to complete molecular response or major molecularresponse. Reticulin condensation was associated with complete hematologic response and completecytogenetic response. It was found that 53% of patients had greater than 90% adherence to treatment. Thehigh adherence was correlated to attaining complete cytogenetic response in less than 12 months. Moreover,20% of patients had good response. Conclusion: Significant changes are indispensable in the monitoring of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Thus, the multidisciplinary team is important as it provides access to the full treatment and not just to medications.

  17. Prolonged treatment with imatinib mesylate in patients with advanced chronic myeloid leukemia causes a reduction of bcr/abl mRNA levels independent of cytogenetic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariani, E; Capucci, M; Micheletti, M; Spalenza, F; Zanella, I; Albertini, A; Rossi, G

    2003-06-01

    Bcr/abl mRNA levels were monitored in 13 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia receiving imatinib mesylate over a period of 78 weeks. During treatment median bcr/abl mRNA levels progressively declined from 77.2 normalized dose (nD) at baseline to 11.28 nD after 13 weeks ( P<0.05) and to 1.28 nD after 78 weeks ( P<0.05). After 13 weeks, bcr/abl mRNA levels were significantly lower in cytogenetic responders compared to nonresponders ( P<0.05), but subsequent decrease in the transcript levels caused the loss of any correlation to the cytogenetic status. These results suggest that bcr/abl mRNA levels may reflect cytogenetic response only during the early phases of imatinib therapy.

  18. Maximizing the Therapeutic Efficacy of Imatinib Mesylate-Loaded Niosomes on Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Using Box-Behnken Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Mohammed A; El-Sawy, Hossam S; Abd-Allah, Fathy I; Abdelghany, Tamer M; El-Say, Khalid M

    2017-01-01

    This research purposed to formulate an optimized imatinib mesylate (IM)-loaded niosomes to improve its chemotherapeutic efficacy. The influence of 3 formulation factors on niosomal vesicular size (Y 1 ), zeta potential (Y 2 ), entrapment capacity percentage (Y 3 ), the percentage of initial drug release after 2 h (Y 4 ), and the percentage of cumulative drug release after 24 h (Y 5 ) were studied and optimized using Box-Behnken design. Optimum desirability was specified and the optimized formula was prepared, stability tested, morphologically examined, checked for vesicular bilayer formation and evaluated for its in vitro cytotoxicity on 3 different cancer cell lines namely MCF-7, HCT-116, and HepG-2 in addition to 1 normal cell line to ensure its selectivity against cancer cells. The actual responses of the optimized IM formulation were 425.36 nm, -62.4 mV, 82.96%, 18.93%, and 89.45% for Y 1 , Y 2 , Y 3 , Y 4 , and Y 5 , respectively. The optimized IM-loaded niosomes confirmed the spherical vesicular shape imaged by both light and electron microscopes and further proven by differential scanning calorimetry. Moreover, the optimized formula exhibited improved stability on storage at 4 ± 2°C and superior efficacy on MCF7, HCT-116, and HepG2 as IC 50 values were 6.7, 16.4, and 7.3 folds less than those of free drug, respectively. Interestingly, IC 50 of the optimized formula against normal cell line was ranged from 3 to 11 folds higher than in different cancer cells indicating a higher selectivity of the optimized formula to cancer cells. In conclusion, the incorporation of IM in niosomes enhanced its efficacy and selectivity toward cancer cells, presenting a promising tool to fight cancer using this approach. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous regression of Philadelphia chromosome and multiple nonrecurrent clonal chromosomal abnormalities with imatinib mesylate in a patient autografted 22 years before for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Akker, J; Coppo, P; Portnoï, M F; Barbu, V; Bories, D; Gorin, N C

    2007-09-01

    A 31-year-old patient developed chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in November, 1983. In November 1984, following a diagnosis of acceleration, he received an autologous hemopoietic transplant after conditioning with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation. The autologous marrow was purged with mafosfamide. Over 20 years, the patient remained in chronic phase of CML. Multiple nonrecurrent clonal chromosomal abnormalities appeared leading to a very complex karyotype, including among others involvement of chromosomes 1, 7, 9, 13, 19, and X. Fluorescent in situ hybridization showed that the two chromosomes 9 were involved. Acute myeloid crisis was diagnosed in February, 2004. Treatment with imatinib mesylate resulted within 6 months in a total disappearance of all chromosomal abnormalities with a complete cytogenetic and molecular response, which persists 3 years later. We question whether the ex vivo purging procedure with mafosfamide has favored the occurrence of these particular cytogenetic abnormalities (with no independent oncogenic potential) within the original leukemic stem cell pool. It remains unclear whether the autologous transplantation has indeed resulted into some prolongation of the duration of the chronic phase, which lasted for 20 years. At time of acute crisis, the dramatic response to imatinib mesylate leading to a complete cytogenetic and molecular response is noteworthy.

  20. Effects of imatinib mesylate on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in Korean patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Tan, Eugene Y; Jin, Yu; Park, Sahee; Hayes, Michael; Demirhan, Eren; Schran, Horst; Wang, Yanfeng

    2011-02-01

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of imatinib on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML). Patients (n = 12) received a single oral dose of acetaminophen 1000 mg on day 1 (control). On days 2-8, imatinib 400 mg was administered daily. On day 8 (treatment), another 1000 mg dose of paracetamol was administered 1 h after the morning dose of imatinib 400 mg. Blood and urine samples were collected for bioanalytical analyses. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) for paracetamol, paracetamol glucuronide and paracetamol sulphate under control conditions was similar to that after treatment with imatinib; the 90% confidence interval of the log AUC ratio was within 0.8 to 1.25. Urinary excretion of paracetamol, paracetamol glucuronide and paracetamol sulphate was also unaffected by imatinib. The pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and imatinib in Korean patients with CML were similar to previous pharmacokinetic results in white patients with CML. Co-administration of a single dose of paracetamol and multiple doses of imatinib was well tolerated and safety profiles were similar to those of either drug alone. The pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and its major metabolites in the presence of imatinib were similar to those of the control conditions and the combination was well tolerated. These findings suggest that imatinib can be safely administered with paracetamol without dose adjustment of either drug. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Marrow signal changes observed in follow-up whole-body MRI studies in children and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 treated with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) for plexiform neurofibromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmazyn, Boaz; Cohen, Mervyn D. [Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University Health, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Jennings, Samuel Gregory [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Robertson, Kent A. [Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We observed bone marrow signal changes (BMSC) in patients with plexiform neurofibromas after treatment with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). To evaluate the pattern and natural history of BMSC. The data were obtained from a pilot study of imatinib mesylate in patients with plexiform neurofibromas. All patients underwent baseline and sequential whole-body STIR 1.5-T MRI after treatment. The bone marrow signal on MRI was evaluated for abnormalities, location and pattern, and any change on follow-up studies. The study group included 16 patients (8 males) with a median age of 14 years (range 4 to 25 years). The mean whole-body MRI follow-up duration was 1.9 years. Of the 16 patients, 14 (88%) developed BMSC. The signal change was asymmetrical in 9 of the 14 patients (64%). The appendicular skeleton was involved in all 14 patients and the axial skeleton in 3 patients (21%). BMSC was followed in 13 patients and decreased signal was seen in 9 patients (69%) after a mean duration of 1.3 years of treatment (range 0.6 to 2.9 years); no complications were observed. BMSC appeared in most patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 following treatment with imatinib mesylate. BMSC was unusually asymmetrical and involved the lower extremities. On follow-up, BMSC often showed a decrease without complications. (orig.)

  2. Penetrable silica microspheres for immobilization of bovine serum albumin and their application to the study of the interaction between imatinib mesylate and protein by frontal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liyun; Li, Jing; Zhao, Juan; Liao, Han; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-guo

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, novel featured silica, named penetrable silica, simultaneously containing macropores and mesopores, was immobilized with bovine serum albumin (BSA) via Schiff base method. The obtained BSA-SiO2 was employed as the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) stationary phase. Firstly, D- and L-tryptophan were used as probes to investigate the chiral separation ability of the BSA-SiO2 stationary phase. An excellent enantioseparation factor was obtained up to 4.3 with acceptable stability within at least 1 month. Next, the BSA-SiO2 stationary phase was applied to study the interaction between imatinib mesylate (IM) and BSA by frontal affinity chromatography. A single type of binding site was found for IM with the immobilized BSA, and the hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals interactions were expected to be contributing interactions based on the thermodynamic studies, and this was a spontaneous process. Compared to the traditional silica for HPLC stationary phase, the proposed penetrable silica microsphere possessed a larger capacity to bond more BSA, minimizing column overloading effects and enhancing enantioseparation ability. In addition, the lower running column back pressure and fast mass transfer were meaningful for the column stability and lifetime. It was a good substrate to immobilize biomolecules for fast chiral resolution and screening drug-protein interactions.

  3. Administration of imatinib mesylate in rats impairs the neonatal development of intramuscular interstitial cells in bladder and results in altered contractile properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Thomas; Hutchings, Graham; Everaerts, Wouter; Prenen, Hans; Roskams, Tania; Nilius, Bernd; De Ridder, Dirk

    2014-04-01

    The KIT receptor is considered as a reliable marker for a subpopulation of interstitial cells (IC), and by persistent neonatal inhibition of KIT we have investigated the role of this receptor in the development of IC-networks in bladder and we have observed the functional consequences of this inhibition. Newborn rat pups were treated daily with the KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate (IM). After 7 days animals were sacrificed and bladder samples were dissected for morphological and functional studies. Morphological research consisted of immunohistochemistry with IC specific antigens (KIT and vimentin) and electron microscopy. The functional studies were based on isolated bladder strips in organ baths, in which spontaneous bladder contractility and the response to a non-subtype selective muscarinic agonist was evaluated. Suburothelial and intramuscular IC were found and characterized in neonatal rat bladder. IM-treatment induced a significant decrease in numbers of IC based on specific immunohistochemical markers, and electron microscopy revealed evidence of IC cell injury. These morphological alterations were observed on intramuscular IC only and not on IC in the suburothelium. Isolated muscle strips from IM-treated animals had a lower contractile frequency and an altered response to muscarinic agonists. The present study shows the presence of regional subpopulations of IC in neonatal rat bladder, provides evidence for a dependence on KIT of the development of intramuscular IC and supports the hypothesis that a poor development of networks of intramuscular IC might have repercussions on spontaneous and muscarinic-induced bladder contractility. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition boosts the antitumor effects of Imatinib mesylate via potentiating the antiangiogenic and antimetastatic machineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd-El Fattah, Amal A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11562 (Egypt); Darwish, Hebatallah A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11562 (Egypt); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmaceutical Industries, Future University, Cairo (Egypt); Fathy, Nevine, E-mail: nevine.abdallah@pharma.cu.edu.eg [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11562 (Egypt); Shouman, Samia A. [Department of Cancer Biology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo 11796 (Egypt)

    2017-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors have emerged in the past few years as an interesting candidate for the development of novel unconventional strategies. Despite their effect in tumor regression via inhibition of tumor acidification, their potential role is not yet fully elucidated. Herein, we investigated whether acetazolamide (AZ) could modulate imatinib (IM) anticancer activity, both in breast cancer cells (T47D) and in isolated tumor specimens of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC). The impact of this combination on angiogenesis was evidenced by decreasing PDGF-A expression and enhancing that of TSP-1. In the meantime, AZ significantly suppressed IM-induced attenuation of VEGF secretion in T47D cells, most probably due to NO inhibition. The combination also dramatically decreased the metastatic activity of T47D cells by mitigating the protein levels of MMP-2 and -9 and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, while increasing the expression of TIMP-1 and -2. In addition, a strong proapoptotic effect was observed in T47D cells after combining AZ and IM in terms of increased caspase-9 and -3 activities. Interestingly, these results were confirmed by the reduction in the isolated tumor volume, MVD, Ki-67 and VEGF expression. Eventually, the study provides a new therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. - Highlights: • A novel combination of imatinib and a carbonic anhydrase was studied. • The impact was evaluated in T47D cells and EAC-bearing mice. • The interaction suppressed PDGF-A and VEGF while enhanced TSP-1. • MMPs and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were suppressed while TIMPs were enhanced. • The interaction triggered caspase-9 and -3 activation.

  5. Efficacy of the dual PI3K and mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in combination with imatinib mesylate against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin P

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pengliang Xin, Chuntuan Li, Yan Zheng, Qunyi Peng, Huifang Xiao, Yuanling Huang, Xiongpeng Zhu Department of Haematology, First Hospital of Quanzhou Affiliated to Fujian Medical University, Licheng, Quanzhou, Fujian Province, China Background: Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is a therapy target of cancer. We aimed to confirm the effect of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 on proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells and sensitivity of tyrosine kinase inhibitor in vitro.Methods: Two human CML cell lines, K562 and KBM7R (T315I mutant strain, were used. The proliferation of CML cells was detected by MTS (Owen’s reagent assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis assay were examined by flow cytometric analysis. The phosphorylation levels and the expression levels were both evaluated by Western blot analysis. NVP-BEZ235 in combination with imatinib was also used to reveal the effect on proliferation and apoptosis.Results: NVP-BEZ235 significantly inhibited the proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of NVP-BEZ235 inhibiting the proliferation of K562 and KBM7R were 0.37±0.21 and 0.43±0.27 µmol/L, respectively, after 48 h. Cell apoptosis assay showed that NVP-BEZ235 significantly increased the late apoptotic cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that the cells were mostly arrested in G1/G0 phase after treatment by NVP-BEZ235. In addition, results also found that, after treatment by NVP-BEZ235, phosphorylation levels of Akt kinase and S6K kinase significantly reduced, and the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 significantly increased; meanwhile, the expression levels of caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma-2, cyclin D1, and cyclin D2 significantly decreased, and the ratio of LC3II/LC3I was significantly increased with increased LC3II expression level. Moreover, imatinib in combination with NVP-BEZ235

  6. Celecoxib sensitizes imatinib-resistant K562 cells to imatinib by inhibiting MRP1-5, ABCA2 and ABCG2 transporters via Wnt and Ras signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmapuri, Gangappa; Doneti, Ravinder; Philip, Gundala Harold; Kalle, Arunasree M

    2015-07-01

    Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is very effective in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, development of resistance to imatinib therapy is also a very common mechanism observed with long-term administration of the drug. Our previous studies have highlighted the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in regulating the expression of multidrug resistant protein-1 (MDR1), P-gp, in imatinib-resistant K562 cells (IR-K562) via PGE2-cAMP-PKC-NF-κB pathway and inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib, a COX-2 specific inhibitor, inhibits this pathway and reverses the drug resistance. Studies have identified that not only MDR1 but other ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) are involved in the development of imatinib resistance. Here, we tried to study the role of COX-2 in the regulation of other ABC transporters such as MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, ABCA2 and ABCG2 that have been already implicated in imatinib resistance development. The results of the study clearly indicated that overexpression of COX-2 lead to upregulation of MRP family proteins in IR-K562 cells and celecoxib down-regulated the ABC transporters through Wnt and MEK signaling pathways. The study signifies that celecoxib in combination with the imatinib can be a good alternate treatment strategy for the reversal of imatinib resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tratamento da recidiva da leucemia mielóide crônica após transplante de medula óssea alogênico utilizando mesilato de imatinibe: relato de três casos Treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with imatinib mesylate: report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Pallotta

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O mesilato de imatinibe (MI, inibidor seletivo da tirosinoquinase envolvido na patogênese da leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC, tem se constituído como terapia farmacológica de primeira linha para o tratamento desta doença. A infusão de linfócitos do doador (DLI tem sido considerada como tratamento padrão para recidiva da LMC após transplante de medula óssea (TMO alogênico, apesar de estar freqüentemente associado à ocorrência de doença do enxerto contra hospedeiro e mielossupressão. Por apresentar resultados satisfatórios e boa tolerabilidade no tratamento da LMC, os autores empregaram o mesilato de imatinib como terapêutica alternativa à DLI em pacientes que sofreram recidiva após o TMO. Obtiveram sucesso em dois casos, sendo que em um houve retorno comprovado do quimerismo do doador. No terceiro caso houve progressão da doença e o paciente foi encaminhado para segundo TMO. Desta forma, devido ao caráter recente do tema, este estudo descritivo sugere que esta opção terapêutica possa ser estudada como alternativa na recaída pós-TMO.Imatinib mesylate (MI, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor involved in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, has become the first-line treatment for this disease. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI has been considered as the standard treatment for relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT, even though it is frequently associated with graft versus host disease and myelosuppression. Because of the satisfactory results and tolerance of the treatment of CML, the authors used MI as an alternative therapy for DLI in patients that relapsed after BMT. They obtained cytogenetic remission in two cases, with, in one case, proven conversion to the donor chimera. The third case evolved with progression of the disease and a second BMT was required. Since this is a new alternative, this descriptive study suggests it should be considered as an alternative therapy for relapse

  8. Results of plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin monitoring in GIST patients do not support the existence of imatinib-induced cardiotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perik, P. J.; Rikhof, B.; de Jong, F. A.; Verweij, J.; Gietema, J. A.; van der Graaf, W. T. A.

    Background: Recently, case reports of patients treated with imatinib (imatinib mesylate; Gleevec (R); Glvec (R)) indicated that this tyrosine kinase inhibitor may induce cardiomyopathy. Consequently, careful cardiac monitoring was advocated for clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to

  9. Acompanhamento farmacoterapêutico dos pacientes com leucemia mieloide crônica em uso de mesilato de imatinibe na Universidade Federal do Ceará The pharmacotherapeutic follow- up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML on imatinib mesylate therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterfen S. Aquino

    2009-01-01

    unregulated growth of myeloid precursor cells in the bone marrow. CML is associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation known as the Philadelphia chromosome. This is a descriptive observational study of CML patients in the Walter Cantídio University Hospital, Federal University of Ceará, Brazil. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy and common side effects of imatinib mesylate therapy. Twenty- six patients were included in the study: 9 in the chronic phase (34.61%, 6 in the accelerated phase (23.08% and 11 in blast crises (42.31 %. The cases in the chronic phase had previous intolerance to interferon alpha (IFN- α. Complete hematological responses were observed in 7 patients: 5 in the chronic phase, 1 in the accelerated phase and 1 in blast crisis. During the first year of treatment, 4 patients in the chronic phase presented complete cytogenetic responses. One of these patients subsequently lost response. No patient in the accelerated phase or blast crisis showed complete cytogenetic response. Complete molecular response was confirmed in 1 patient in the chronic phase. Among the 18 patients who were alive at the end of the study, only 4 patients (22.22% had no complaint. The most commonly reported adverse events were: edema (50%, adynamia (33.33%, bone and / or joint pain (33.33%, headaches (27.78%, cramps (16,67%, diarrhea (16.67%, insomnia (16.67%, itching (16.67%, ecchymosis (11.11%, nauseas (11.11%, epigastric pain (5.55%, erythema (5.55%, shedding of tears (5.55%, dehydration of the skin and lips (5.55%, rush (5.55%, and sweating (5.55%. A minority of patients evolved with imatinib resistance. Newer drugs and trials are being developed to overcome resistance and to increase responsiveness to tyrosine- kinase inhibitors.

  10. Fluid retention associated with imatinib treatment in patients with gastroenterol stromal: Quantitative radiologic assessment and implications for management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Shinagare, Atul B.; Krajewski, Katherine M.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikihil H. [Dept. of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Pyo, Jun Hee [The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We aimed to describe radiologic signs and time-course of imatinib-associated fluid retention (FR) in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and its implications for management. In this Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective study of 403 patients with GIST treated with imatinib, 15 patients with imaging findings of FR were identified by screening radiology reports, followed by manual confirmation. Subcutaneous edema, ascites, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion were graded on a four-point scale on CT scans; total score was the sum of these four scores. The most common radiologic sign of FR was subcutaneous edema (15/15, 100%), followed by ascites (12/15, 80%), pleural effusion (11/15, 73%), and pericardial effusion (6/15, 40%) at the time of maximum FR. Two distinct types of FR were observed: 1) acute/progressive FR, characterized by acute aggravation of FR and rapid improvement after management, 2) intermittent/steady FR, characterized by occasional or persistent mild FR. Acute/progressive FR always occurred early after drug initiation/dose escalation (median 1.9 month, range 0.3-4.0 months), while intermittent/steady FR occurred at any time. Compared to intermittent/steady FR, acute/progressive FR was severe (median score, 5 vs. 2.5, p = 0.002), and often required drug-cessation/dose-reduction. Two distinct types (acute/progressive and intermittent/steady FR) of imatinib-associated FR are observed and each type requires different management.

  11. Imatinib-induced postoperative periorbital purpura: GASP (Gleevec-Associated Surgical Purpura) in a woman with imatinib-treated chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle; Cortes, Jorge E

    2014-01-15

    Imatinib mesylate is a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Ocular side effects of imatinib include periorbital edema, which may become so severe as to obstruct the visual field. The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical characteristics of imatinib- induced postoperative periorbital purpura. We retrospectively reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms edema, Gleevec, imatinib, periorbital, postoperative and purpura. Patient reports and previous reviews of the subject were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Three patients have undergone surgery to reduce the imatinib-induced periorbital edema; two of these individuals have developed imatinib-induced postoperative periorbital purpura. We recommend discontinuing imatinib usage one week prior to periorbital surgery and not resuming therapy until the eighth postoperative day.

  12. Bioequivalence of two film-coated tablets of imatinib mesylate 400 mg: a randomized, open-label, single-dose, fasting, two-period, two-sequence crossover comparison in healthy male South American volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrillo-Campiglia, Susana; Ercoli, Mónica Cedres; Umpierrez, Ofelia; Rodríguez, Patricia; Márquez, Sara; Guarneri, Carolina; Estevez-Parrillo, Francisco T; Laurenz, Marilena; Estevez-Carrizo, Francisco E

    2009-10-01

    Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been established as a highly effective therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. A new generic, once-daily 400-mg tablet of imatinib has been developed by a pharmaceutical company in Argentina, where the regulatory standard for marketing authorization of an imatinib generic is in vitro dissolution testing. The aim of this study was to assess the bioequivalence of a new generic film-coated test tablet formulation versus a film-coated reference tablet formulation of imatinib 400 mg. The local manufacturer seeks to validate the in vitro performance of this new formulation with a bioequivalence study. A randomized, open-label, single-dose, fasting, 2-period, 2-sequence crossover design with a 2-week washout period was used in this study. The study population consisted of healthy male South American (Uruguayan) volunteers, who were assigned in a 1:1 ratio to a randomized sequence (test-reference or reference-test). In each period, the test or reference formulation was administered after an overnight fast. During the 72-hour follow-up period, participants were monitored for vital signs and symptoms. Blood samples were collected at 15 time points, including baseline, until 72 hours. Physical examination and laboratory tests (blood, urine) were repeated 1 week after study completion. A noncompartmental model was used to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of imatinib. The 90% CIs of the test/reference ratios for AUC(0-infinity) and C(max) were determined; the test and reference formulations were considered bioequivalent if the 90% CIs were between 0.80 and 1.25. Adverse events were assessed by a nurse who administered a questionnaire while the healthy volunteers were admitted in the unit. The bioequivalence study was conducted in 30 Uruguayan male volunteers. Demographic characteristics (mean [SD]) included age, 27.8 (6.5) years; weight, 71.2 (9.8) kg; height, 1.71 (0.09) m; and body

  13. Downregulation of miR-451 in Tunisian chronic myeloid leukemia patients: potential implication in imatinib resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ismael; Douzi, Kais; Gharbi, Hanen; Benhassine, Islem; Teber, Mouheb; Amouri, Hassiba; Ben Hadj Othman, Hind; Farrah, Ahlem; Ben Lakhel, Raihane; Abbes, Salem; Menif, Samia

    2017-05-01

    Resistance to imatinib has been recognized as a major challenge for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Aberrant expression of miR-451 has been reported to participate in anticancer drug resistance. However, the role of miR-451 in imatinib resistance has not been investigated. The present study was undertaken to determine the expression of miR-451 in order to find a possible association between the expression of this miRNA and imatinib resistance in Tunisian CML patients. First, real-time RT-PCR was performed to identify the expression of miR-451 in peripheral leukocytes of 59 CML patients treated with imatinib. Then, bioinformatics analysis was carried out to understand the regulatory roles of miR-451 in imatinib-resistant process. Downregulated miR-451 was observed in imatinib-resistant CML cases. In silico analysis identified MYC as a potential target of miR-451. We further revealed the existence of an MYC-binding site in MiR-451 promoter region. On the other hand, increased level of MYC was detected in imatinib-resistant CML cases which may explain the causative role of MYC in CML cases and the downregulation of miR-451. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-451 and MYC form together a regulatory loop which may act as a potential therapeutic target, and disruption of suggested regulatory loop could help to improve CML therapy.

  14. Multicentre phase II studies evaluating imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Reardon; G. Dresemann; S. Taillibert; M. Campone (Mario); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); P.M.J. Clement (Paul); E. Blomquist; L. Gordower; H. Schultz; J. Raizer; P. Hau (Peter); J. Easaw; M. Gil (Miguel); J. Tonn; A. Gijtenbeek; U. Schlegel; P. Bergström (Per); S. Green; A.E. Weir (Angela); Z. Nikolova

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in addition to hydroxyurea in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who were either on or not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs). Methods: A total of 231 patients with GBM at first recurrence from 21

  15. Multicentre phase II studies evaluating imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive glioblastoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reardon, D.A.; Dresemann, G.; Taillibert, S.; Campone, M.; Bent, M. van den; Clement, P.; Blomquist, E.; Gordower, L.; Schultz, H.; Raizer, J.; Hau, P.; Easaw, J.; Gil, M.; Tonn, J.; Gijtenbeek, A.; Schlegel, U.; Bergstrom, P.; Green, S.; Weir, A.; Nikolova, Z.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in addition to hydroxyurea in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who were either on or not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs). METHODS: A total of 231 patients with GBM at first recurrence from 21 institutions in 10

  16. Determination of trace level of palladium and platinum content in anticancer drug Imatinib base by ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Ravi; Salunke-Gawali, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Metal impurities in Pharmaceutical drug substance is of great concern not only because of the intrinsic toxicity of certain contaminants but also due to the opposite effect that the contaminants which may have on drug stability and shelf life. Therefore it is necessary to monitor the organic as well as inorganic impurities throughout the process of manufacturing process at every stage from raw material, intermediate and finished products. An Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for Palladium and Platinum content in the anticancer drug, Imatinib mesylate. Rhodium (Rh) was used as internal standard for determination of Palladium and Platinum content on in Imatinib mesylate. (author)

  17. Epigenetic Silencing and Resistance to Imatinib Mesylate in CML

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    ...). In this project, we are exploring the hypothesis that epigenetic silencing associated with promoter DNA methylation mediates resistance in selected cases, and that reversal of silencing by decitabine...

  18. Epigenetic Silencing and Resistance to Imatinib Mesylate in CML

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    ...). In this project, we are exploring the hypothesis that epigenetic silencing associated with promoter DNA methylation mediates resistance in selected cases, and that reversal of silencing by decitabine...

  19. Epigenetic Silencing and Resistance to Imatinib Mesylate in CML

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    ...). In this project we are exploring the hypothesis that epigenetic silencing associated with promoter DNA methylation mediates resistance in selected cases and that reversal of silencing by decitabine...

  20. LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate (LAMP 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    purchase generic drug from Canada; however, all drug purchases inside the Medical University of South Carolina must occur through the MUSC pharmacy who...decline to purchase international drug. We do have an accepted IND plan to overencapsulate Gleevec and manufacture placebo at MUSC that was approved by... Journal publications. List peer-reviewed articles or papers appearing in scientific, technical, or professional journals . Identify for each publication

  1. Sensitive detection of pre-existing BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells of newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients is associated with imatinib resistance: implications in the post-imatinib era.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Iqbal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations are infrequently detected in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. Recent studies indicate the presence of pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations in a higher percentage of CML patients when CD34+ stem/progenitor cells are investigated using sensitive techniques, and these mutations are associated with imatinib resistance and disease progression. However, such studies were limited to smaller number of patients. METHODS: We investigated BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells from 100 chronic-phase CML patients by multiplex allele-specific PCR and sequencing at diagnosis. Mutations were re-investigated upon manifestation of imatinib resistance using allele-specific PCR and direct sequencing of BCR-ABL kinase domain. RESULTS: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations were detected in 32/100 patients and included F311L, M351T, and T315I. After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 8-48, all patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations exhibited imatinib resistance. Of the 68 patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, 24 developed imatinib resistance; allele-specific PCR and BCR-ABL kinase domain sequencing detected mutations in 22 of these patients. All 32 patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations had the same mutations after manifestation of imatinib-resistance. In imatinib-resistant patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, we detected F311L, M351T, Y253F, and T315I mutations. All imatinib-resistant patients except T315I and Y253F mutations responded to imatinib dose escalation. CONCLUSION: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations can be detected in a substantial number of chronic-phase CML patients by sensitive allele-specific PCR technique using CD34+ cells. These mutations are associated with imatinib resistance if affecting drug binding directly or indirectly. After the recent approval of nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib and ponatinib for treatment of chronic myeloid

  2. Multicentre phase II studies evaluating imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Reardon, D A; Dresemann, G; Taillibert, S; Campone, M; van den Bent, M; Clement, P; Blomquist, E; Gordower, L; Schultz, H; Raizer, J; Hau, P; Easaw, J; Gil, M; Tonn, J; Gijtenbeek, A

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in addition to hydroxyurea in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who were either on or not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs). Methods: A total of 231 patients with GBM at first recurrence from 21 institutions in 10 countries were enrolled. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 600 mg per day for patients not on EIAEDs and at 500 mg twice a day if on EIA...

  3. Imatinib induced severe skin reactions and neutropenia in a patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jun-Eul; Yoon, Ju-Young; Bae, Woo-Kyun; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Sang-Hee; Chung, Ik-Joo

    2010-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate has been used for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The current recommended dose of imatinib is 400 mg/day that is increased to 800 mg/day in cases with disease progression. However, imatinib can be associated with diverse adverse events, which has limited its use. We report a case of severe adverse skin reactions with neutropenic fever during imatinib treatment in a patient with GIST. A 71-year-old man was admitted with a one month history of epigastric pain and a palpable mass in the right upper quadrant. An abdominal CT scan revealed a 20 × 19 cm intraabdominal mass with tumor invasion into the peritoneum. Needle biopsy was performed and the results showed spindle shaped tumor cells that were positive for c-KIT. The patient was diagnosed with unresectable GIST. Imatinib 400 mg/day was started. The patient tolerated the first eight weeks of treatment. However, about three months later, the patient developed a grade 4 febrile neutropenia and a grade 3 exfoliative skin rash. The patient recovered from this serious adverse events after discontinuation of imatinib with supportive care. However, the skin lesions recurred whenever the patient received imatinib over 100 mg/day. Therefore, imatinib 100 mg/day was maintained. Despite the low dose imatinib, follow up CT showed a marked partial response without grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The recommended dose of imatinib for the treatment of GIST is 400 mg/day but patients at risk for adverse drug reaction may benefit from lower doses. Individualized treatment is needed for such patients, and we may also try sunitinib as a alternative drug

  4. Bioinspired co-crystals of Imatinib providing enhanced kinetic solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggane, Maude; Wiest, Johannes; Saedtler, Marco; Harlacher, Cornelius; Gutmann, Marcus; Zottnick, Sven H; Piechon, Philippe; Dix, Ina; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Meinel, Lorenz; Galli, Bruno

    2018-05-04

    Realizing the full potential of co-crystals enhanced kinetic solubility demands a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of dissolution, phase conversion, nucleation and crystal growth, and of the complex interplay between the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the coformer and co-existing forms in aqueous media. One blueprint provided by nature to keep poorly water-soluble bases in solution is the complexation with phenolic acids. Consequently, we followed a bioinspired strategy for the engineering of co-crystals of a poorly water-soluble molecule - Imatinib - with a phenolic acid, syringic acid (SYA). The dynamics of dissolution and solution-mediated phase transformations were monitored by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, providing mechanistic insights into the 60 fold-increased long lasting concentrations achieved by the syringate co-crystals as compared to Imatinib base and Imatinib mesylate. This lasting effect was linked to SYA's ability to delay the formation and nucleation of Imatinib hydrate - the thermodynamically stable form in aqueous media - through a metastable association of SYA with Imatinib in solution. Results from permeability studies evidenced that SYA did not impact Imatinib's permeability across membranes while suggesting improved bioavailability through higher kinetic solubility at the biological barriers. These results reflect that some degree of hydrophobicity of the coformer might be key to extend the kinetic solubility of co-crystals with hydrophobic APIs. Understanding how kinetic supersaturation can be shaped by the selection of an interactive coformer may help achieving the needed performance of new forms of poorly water-soluble, slowly dissolving APIs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. [Watermelon stomach: Chronic renal failure and/or imatinib?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnac, Richard; Blaison, Dominique; Brahimi, Saïd; Schendel, Adeline; Levasseur, Thomas; Takin, Romulus

    2015-11-01

    Watermelon stomach or gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) syndrome is an uncommon cause of sometimes severe upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Essentially based on a pathognomonic endoscopic appearance, its diagnosis may be unrecognised because mistaken with portal hypertensive gastropathy, while treatment of these two entities is different. Its etiopathogeny remains still unclear, even if it is frequently associated with different systemic illnesses as hepatic cirrhosis, autoimmune disorders and chronic renal failure. The mechanism inducing these vascular ectasia may be linked with mechanical stress on submucosal vessels due to antropyloric peristaltic motility dysfunction modulated by neurohormonal vasoactive alterations. Because medical therapies are not very satisfactory, among the endoscopic modalities, argon plasma coagulation seems to be actually the first-line treatment because the most effective and safe. However, surgical antrectomy may be sometimes necessary. Recently GAVE syndrome appeared as a new adverse reaction of imatinib mesylate, one of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors used in chronic myeloid leukemia, and we report here the observation of such a pathology in one patient treated at the same time by haemodialysis and by imatinib mesylate for chronic myeloid leukemia. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Positron emission tomography in patients with aggressive fibromatosis/desmoid tumours undergoing therapy with imatinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, Bernd; Hohenberger, Peter [University of Heidelberg, Sarcoma Unit, ITM - Interdisciplinary Tumor Center Mannheim, Mannheim University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Strauss, Ludwig G. [German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    We used {sup 18}F-FDG PET to evaluate the FDG uptake in patients with aggressive fibromatosis (AF, also known as desmoid tumours) undergoing therapy with imatinib (imatinib mesylate, Glivec). The pilot study included nine patients with progressive AF receiving oral treatment with imatinib at a daily dose of 800 mg. Patients were examined using PET prior to the start of therapy and during imatinib treatment. Restaging according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) was performed in parallel using CT and/or MRI and served as reference. The clinical outcomes in nine evaluable patients were as follows: seven patients with stable disease, and two patients with progressive disease. A 27% decrease in the median average standardized uptake value (SUV) of the sequential PET examinations was demonstrated in all evaluable patients with three patients (33%) showing a decrease in SUV of more than 40% (48%, 52% and 54%, respectively); no patient showed a substantial increase in SUV. To our knowledge, this is the first series of AF patients undergoing treatment with imatinib and monitored using sequential PET imaging, that allows detection of SUV changes after imatinib induction, thus helping to decide whether treatment should be continued or not. (orig.)

  7. Synthesis and positron emission tomography studies of carbon-11-labeled imatinib (Gleevec)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Kun-Eek [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Ding Yushin [Department of Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8048 (United States); Lin Kuoshyan [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Alexoff, David [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Kim, Sung Won [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Shea, Colleen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Xu Youwen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Muench, Lisa [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)]. E-mail: fowler@bnl.gov

    2007-02-15

    Introduction: Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) is a well known drug for treating chronic myeloid leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Its active ingredient, imatinib ([4-[(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)methyl]-N-[4-methyl-3-[[4-(3-pyridyl) -2-pyrimidinyl]amino]phenyl]benzamide), blocks the activity of several tyrosine kinases. Here we labeled imatinib with carbon-11 as a tool for determining the drug distribution and pharmacokinetics of imatinib, and we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) studies in baboons. Methods: [N-{sup 11}C-methyl]imatinib was synthesized from [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide and norimatinib was synthesized by the demethylation of imatinib (isolated from Gleevec tablets) according to a patent procedure [Collins JM, Klecker RW Jr, Anderson LW. Imaging of drug accumulation as a guide to antitumor therapy. US Patent 20030198594A1, 2003]. Norimatinib was also synthesized from the corresponding amine and acid. PET studies were carried out in three baboons to measure pharmacokinetics in the brain and peripheral organs and to determine the effect of a therapeutic dose of imatinib. Log D and plasma protein binding were also measured. Results: [N-{sup 11}C-methyl]imatinib uptake in the brain is negligible (consistent with P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux); it peaks and clears rapidly from the heart, lungs and spleen. Peak uptake and clearance occur more slowly in the liver and kidneys, followed by accumulation in the gallbladder and urinary bladder. Pretreatment with imatinib did not change uptake in the heart, lungs, kidneys and spleen, and increased uptake in the liver and gallbladder. Conclusions: [N-{sup 11}C-methyl]imatinib has potential for assessing the regional distribution and kinetics of imatinib in the human body to determine whether the drug targets tumors and to identify other organs to which the drug or its labeled metabolites distribute. Paired with tracers such as 2'deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) and 3&apos

  8. Comparison of imatinib 400 mg and 800 mg daily in the front-line treatment of high-risk, Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia: a European LeukemiaNet Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baccarani, Michele; Rosti, Gianantonio; Castagnetti, Fausto

    2009-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM), 400 mg daily, is the standard treatment of Philadelphia-positive (Ph(+)) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Preclinical data and results of single-arm studies raised the suggestion that better results could be achieved with a higher dose. To investigate whether the systematic...

  9. Adherence to treatment with imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia: a study of the first decade of responses obtained at a Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Roosevelt Campos dos Reis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: The aim of this study was to identify the reasons for failure in adherence to imatinib mesylate treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 100 non-electronic records of patients with Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia treated with imatinib mesylate. The study period was from January 2001 to January2011. Data were analyzed by Chi-Square and Correspondence analysis using the Statistical Analysis System software package. Results: At the beginning of treatment 41% of patients were in advanced stages of the disease. The unavailability of the drug (44.8% and myelotoxicity (25.7% were the most frequent reasons for interruption. The adherence rate was 95% induced complete cytogenetic response, major cytogenetic response and major molecular response. Conclusion: The population of this study obtained lower-than-expected therapeutic responses compared to other studies.

  10. Quantification of imatinib in human serum: validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic assays

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende, Vinicius Marcondes; Rivellis, Ariane; Novaes, Mafalda Megumi Yoshinaga; de Alencar Fisher Chamone, Dalton; Bendit, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Vinicius Marcondes Rezende,1 Ariane Rivellis,1 Mafalda Megumi Yoshinaga Novaes,1 Dalton de Alencar Fisher Chamone,2 Israel Bendit1,21Laboratory of Tumor Biology, 2Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Imatinib mesylate has been a breakthrough treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. It has become the ideal tyrosine kinase inhibitor and the standard treatment for chronic-phase leukemia. Striking results have rec...

  11. Effect of Imatinib on the Oogenesis and Pituitary -Ovary Hormonal Axis in Female Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehreh Yaghmaei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imatinib mesylate, a small-molecular analog of adenosine triphosphate (ATPthat potently inhibits tyrosine kinase activities of Bcr–Abl, PDGFR-β, PDGFR-α, c-Fms, Argand c-kit, is one of the novel molecularly targeted drugs being introduced into cancer therapy.We tested the effect of imatinib on the ovarian histological structure and the concentration ofestrogen and progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSHin the serum of female Wistar rats.Materials and Methods: Two groups of rats (180 ± 15 grams were gavaged with doses of 50and 100 mg/kg body weight imatinib dissolved in distilled water for 14 days. The control groupreceived sterile water. On day 7, after termination of the treatment, blood serum concentrationwas measured with the radioimmunoassay (RIA method. Also, sections (5 μm thick of ovariesstained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E were investigated histologically.Results: Progesterone concentration in the experimental groups was increased (p<0.001,estrogen and FSH concentrations were decreased (p<0.01, and the LH concentration decreasedbut was not statistically different in comparison with the control group. The weight of ovaries andnumber of atretic follicles in the experimental groups was increased compared with the controlgroup (p<0.05. The diameter of corpus lutea were increased but the number of corpus luteadecreased in both experimental groups (p<0.01.Conclusion: These findings suggest that administration of imatinib may have profound effects onfemale fertility.

  12. Therapeutic options for chronic myeloid leukemia: focus on imatinib (Glivec®, Gleevec™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Henkes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available 1Martin Henkes, 2Heiko van der Kuip, 1Walter E Aulitzky12nd Department of Internal Medicine, Oncology and Hematology, Robert Bosch Hospital, Auerbachstr. 110, Stuttgart, Germany; 2Dr Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Auerbachstr. 112, Stuttgart, and University of Tuebingen, GermanyAbstract: Treatment options for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML have changed dramatically during the last decades. Interferon-α treatment and stem cell transplantation (SCT clearly improved survival over conventional chemotherapy and offered the possibility of complete and durable responses. With the advent of the small molecule inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Glivec®, GleevecTM targeting the causative Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, the era of molecular cancer therapy began with remarkable success especially in chronic phase patients. Today, imatinib is the first-line treatment for CML. However, imatinib does not appear to be capable to eliminate all leukemia cells in the patients and pre-existing as well as acquired resistance to the drug has been increasingly recognized. To overcome these problems, several strategies involving dose escalation, combinations with other agents, and novel Bcr-Abl inhibitors have been developed.Keywords: CML therapy, imatinib, SCT, novel kinase inhibitors

  13. Multicentre phase II studies evaluating imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, D A; Dresemann, G; Taillibert, S; Campone, M; van den Bent, M; Clement, P; Blomquist, E; Gordower, L; Schultz, H; Raizer, J; Hau, P; Easaw, J; Gil, M; Tonn, J; Gijtenbeek, A; Schlegel, U; Bergstrom, P; Green, S; Weir, A; Nikolova, Z

    2009-12-15

    We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in addition to hydroxyurea in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) who were either on or not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs). A total of 231 patients with GBM at first recurrence from 21 institutions in 10 countries were enrolled. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 600 mg per day for patients not on EIAEDs and at 500 mg twice a day if on EIAEDs. The primary end point was radiographic response rate and secondary end points were safety, progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6), and overall survival (OS). The radiographic response rate after centralised review was 3.4%. Progression-free survival at 6 months and median OS were 10.6% and 26.0 weeks, respectively. Outcome did not appear to differ based on EIAED status. The most common grade 3 or greater adverse events were fatigue (7%), neutropaenia (7%), and thrombocytopaenia (7%). Imatinib in addition to hydroxyurea was well tolerated among patients with recurrent GBM but did not show clinically meaningful anti-tumour activity.

  14. 75 FR 76017 - Determination That GLEEVEC (Imatinib Mesylate) Capsules, 50 Milligrams and 100 Milligrams, Were...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... initially approved on May 10, 2001. GLEEVEC is a protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of a variety of malignancies, including Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative diseases, aggressive systemic mastocytosis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, chronic...

  15. Imatinib-induced fulminant liver failure in chronic myeloid leukemia: role of liver transplant and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacif, Lucas Souto; Waisberg, Daniel R; Pinheiro, Rafael Soares; Lima, Fabiana Roberto; Rocha-Santos, Vinicius; Andraus, Wellington; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Carneiro

    2018-03-10

    There is a worldwide problem of acute liver failure and mortality associated with remaining on the waiting for a liver transplant. In this study, we highlight results published in recent years by leading transplant centers in evaluating imatinib-induced acute liver failure in chronic myeloid leukemia and follow-up in liver transplantation. A 36-year-old brown-skinned woman (mixed Brazilian race) diagnosed 1 year earlier with chronic myeloid leukemia was started after delivery of a baby and continued for 6 months with imatinib mesylate (selective inhibitor of Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase), which induced liver failure. We conducted a literature review using the PubMed database for articles published through September 2017, and we demonstrate a role of liver transplant in this situation for imatinib-induced liver failure. We report previously published results and a successful liver transplant after acute liver failure due to imatinib-induced in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. We report a case of a successful liver transplant after acute liver failure resulting from imatinib-induced chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. The literature reveals the importance of prompt acute liver failure diagnosis and treatment with liver transplant in selected cases.

  16. Bioequivalence of a single 400-mg dose of imatinib 100-mg oral tablets and a 400-mg tablet in healthy adult Korean volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Won; Seong, Sook Jin; Park, Sung Min; Lee, Joomi; Gwon, Mi-Ri; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Lim, Sung Mook; Lim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Woomi; Yang, Dong Heon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2015-06-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. A new once-daily 400-mg film-coated tablet of imatinib has been developed by a pharmaceutical company in Korea. The present study was designed to assess and compare the PK parameters, bioavailability, and bioequivalence of the new imatinib 400-mg formulation (test) versus the conventional 100-mg formulation (reference) administered as a single 400-mg dose in healthy adult male volunteers. This randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way crossover study was conducted in healthy Korean male volunteers. Eligible subjects were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 ratio to receive 400 mg of the test (one 400-mg tablet) or reference (four 100-mg tablets) formulation, followed by a 2-week washout period and administration of the alternate formulation. Serial blood samples were collected at 0 (predose), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. Plasma imatinib concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The formulations were to be considered bioequivalent if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the adjusted geometric mean ratios for Cmax, AUC(0-t), and AUC(0-∞)ž were within the predetermined range of 0.80 - 1.25. In total, 35 subjects completed the study. No serious adverse event was reported during the study. The 90% CIs of the adjusted geometric mean ratios of the test formulation to the reference formulation for C(max), AUC(0-t) and AUC(0-∞)ž of imatinib were all within the bioequivalence criteria range of 0.8 - 1.25. The test formulation of imatinib met the Korean regulatory requirements for bioequivalence. Both imatinib formulations were well-tolerated in all subjects.

  17. Imatinib treatment induces CD5+ B lymphocytes and IgM natural antibodies with anti-leukemic reactivity in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Catellani

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate is a first line treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and of a rare form of gastrointestinal stromal cancer, where the response to the drug is also linked to the immune system activation with production of antineoplastic cytokines. In this study, forty patients in the chronic phase of disease, treated with imatinib mesylate, were analyzed. Bone marrow aspirates were drawn at diagnosis, after 3, 6, 12, 18 months for haematological, cytofluorimetric, cytogenetic, biomolecular evaluation and cytokine measurement. Responder and non responder patients were defined according to the European LeukemiaNet recommendations. In responder patients (n = 32, the percentage of bone marrow CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ lymphocytes, and the plasma levels of IgM, were significantly higher, at 3 months and up to 9 months, than in non responders. These IgM reacted with O-linked sugars expressed by leukemic cells and could induce tumor cell apoptosis. In responder patients the stromal-derived factor-1 and the B-lymphocyte-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family significantly raised in the bone marrow after imatinib administration, together with the bone morphogenetic proteins-2 and -7. All patients with high number of CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ cells and high stromal-derived factor-1 and B lymphocyte activating factor levels, underwent complete cytogenetic and/or molecular remission by 12 months. We propose that CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ lymphocytes producing anti-carbohydrate antibodies with anti-tumor activity, might contribute to the response to imatinib treatment. As in multivariate analysis bone marrow CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ cells and stromal-derived factor-1 and B-lymphocyte-activating factor levels were significantly related to cytogenetical and molecular changes, they might contribute to the definition of the pharmacological response.

  18. Quantification of imatinib in human serum: validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Vinicius Marcondes; Rivellis, Ariane; Novaes, Mafalda Megumi Yoshinaga; de Alencar Fisher Chamone, Dalton; Bendit, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate has been a breakthrough treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. It has become the ideal tyrosine kinase inhibitor and the standard treatment for chronic-phase leukemia. Striking results have recently been reported, but intolerance to imatinib and noncompliance with treatment remain to be solved. Molecular monitoring by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is the gold standard for monitoring patients, and imatinib blood levels have also become an important tool for monitoring. A fast and cheap method was developed and validated using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for quantification of imatinib in human serum and tamsulosin as the internal standard. Remarkable advantages of the method includes use of serum instead of plasma, less time spent on processing and analysis, simpler procedures, and requiring reduced amounts of biological material, solvents, and reagents. Stability of the analyte was also studied. This research also intended to drive the validation scheme in clinical centers. The method was validated according to the requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration and Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency within the range of 0.500-10.0 μg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.155 μg/mL. Stability data for the analyte are also presented. Given that the validated method has proved to be linear, accurate, precise, and robust, it is suitable for pharmacokinetic assays, such as bioavailability and bioequivalence, and is being successfully applied in routine therapeutic drug monitoring in the hospital service.

  19. Cisplatin and doxorubicin induce distinct mechanisms of ovarian follicle loss; imatinib provides selective protection only against cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Morgan

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy treatment in premenopausal women has been linked to ovarian follicle loss and premature ovarian failure; the exact mechanism by which this occurs is uncertain. Here, two commonly used chemotherapeutic agents (cisplatin and doxorubicin were added to a mouse ovary culture system, to compare the sequence of events that leads to germ cell loss. The ability of imatinib mesylate to protect the ovary against cisplatin or doxorubicin-induced ovarian damage was also examined.Newborn mouse ovaries were cultured for a total of six days, exposed to a chemotherapeutic agent on the second day: this allowed for the examination of the earliest stages of follicle development. Cleaved PARP and TUNEL were used to assess apoptosis following drug treatment. Imatinib was added to cultures with cisplatin and doxorubicin to determine any protective effect.Histological analysis of ovaries treated with cisplatin showed oocyte-specific damage; in comparison doxorubicin preferentially caused damage to the granulosa cells. Cleaved PARP expression significantly increased for cisplatin (16 fold, p<0.001 and doxorubicin (3 fold, p<0.01. TUNEL staining gave little evidence of primordial follicle damage with either drug. Imatinib had a significant protective effect against cisplatin-induced follicle damage (p<0.01 but not against doxorubicin treatment.Cisplatin and doxorubicin both induced ovarian damage, but in a markedly different pattern, with imatinib protecting the ovary against damage by cisplatin but not doxorubicin. Any treatment designed to block the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the ovary may need to be specific to the drug(s the patient is exposed to.

  20. Distinct Dasatinib-Induced Mechanisms of Apoptotic Response and Exosome Release in Imatinib-Resistant Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although dasatinib is effective in most imatinib mesylate (IMT-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients, the underlying mechanism of its effectiveness in eliminating imatinib-resistant cells is only partially understood. This study investigated the effects of dasatinib on signaling mechanisms driving-resistance in imatinib-resistant CML cell line K562 (K562RIMT. Compared with K562 control cells, exsomal release, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling and autophagic activity were increased significantly in K562RIMT cells and mTOR-independent beclin-1/Vps34 signaling was shown to be involved in exosomal release in these cells. We found that Notch1 activation-mediated reduction of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN was responsible for the increased Akt/mTOR activities in K562RIMT cells and treatment with Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor prevented activation of Akt/mTOR. In addition, suppression of mTOR activity by rapamycin decreased the level of activity of p70S6K, induced upregulation of p53 and caspase 3, and led to increase of apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. Inhibition of autophagy by spautin-1 or beclin-1 knockdown decreased exosomal release, but did not affect apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. In summary, in K562RIMT cells dasatinib promoted apoptosis through downregulation of Akt/mTOR activities, while preventing exosomal release and inhibiting autophagy by downregulating expression of beclin-1 and Vps34. Our findings reveal distinct dasatinib-induced mechanisms of apoptotic response and exosomal release in imatinib-resistant CML cells.

  1. Imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of leukemia (cancer that begins in the white blood cells) and other cancers and disorders of ... In case of overdose, call the poison control helpline at 1-800-222-1222. Information is also available online at https://www.poisonhelp.org/help. If the victim has ...

  2. Quantification of imatinib in human serum: validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezende VM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vinicius Marcondes Rezende,1 Ariane Rivellis,1 Mafalda Megumi Yoshinaga Novaes,1 Dalton de Alencar Fisher Chamone,2 Israel Bendit1,21Laboratory of Tumor Biology, 2Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Imatinib mesylate has been a breakthrough treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. It has become the ideal tyrosine kinase inhibitor and the standard treatment for chronic-phase leukemia. Striking results have recently been reported, but intolerance to imatinib and noncompliance with treatment remain to be solved. Molecular monitoring by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is the gold standard for monitoring patients, and imatinib blood levels have also become an important tool for monitoring.Methods: A fast and cheap method was developed and validated using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for quantification of imatinib in human serum and tamsulosin as the internal standard. Remarkable advantages of the method includes use of serum instead of plasma, less time spent on processing and analysis, simpler procedures, and requiring reduced amounts of biological material, solvents, and reagents. Stability of the analyte was also studied. This research also intended to drive the validation scheme in clinical centers. The method was validated according to the requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration and Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency within the range of 0.500–10.0 µg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.155 µg/mL. Stability data for the analyte are also presented.Conclusion: Given that the validated method has proved to be linear, accurate, precise, and robust, it is suitable for pharmacokinetic assays, such as bioavailability and bioequivalence, and is being successfully applied in routine therapeutic drug monitoring in the hospital service.Keywords: imatinib, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, therapeutic

  3. Low educational level but not low income impairs the achievement of cytogenetic remission in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Napoleão Fortes Rego

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In Brazil, imatinib mesylate is supplied as the first-line therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase through the public universal healthcare program, Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS. We studied the socio-demographic factors that influenced therapy success in a population in the northeast region of Brazil. METHODS: Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia from the state of Piauí were treated in only one reference center. Diagnosis was based on WHO 2008 criteria. Risk was assessed by Sokal, Hasford and EUTOS scores. Patients received 400 mg imatinib daily. We studied the influence of the following factors on the achievement of complete cytogenetic response within one year of treatment: age, clinical risk category, time interval between diagnosis and the start of imatinib treatment, geographic distance from the patient's home to the hospital, years of formal education and monthly income. RESULTS: Among 103 patients studied, the median age was 42 years; 65% of the patients had 2-9 years of formal education, and the median monthly income was approximately 100 US$. Imatinib was started in the first year after diagnosis (early chronic phase in 69 patients. After 12 months of treatment, 68 patients had a complete cytogenetic response. The Hasford score, delay to start imatinib and years of formal education influenced the attainment of a complete cytogenetic response, whereas income and the distance from the home to the healthcare facility did not. CONCLUSION: Patients require additional healthcare information to better understand the importance of long-term oral anticancer treatment and to improve their compliance with the treatment.

  4. Compound list: imatinib, methanesulfonate salt [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available imatinib, methanesulfonate salt IMA 00186 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-t...ggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/imatinib%2C_methanesulfonate_salt.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  5. Evaluation of different substrates for inkjet printing of rasagiline mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Janßen, Eva Maria; Breitenbach, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to evaluate applicability of the different model substrates, namely orodispersible films (ODFs), porous copy paper sheets, and water impermeable transparency films (TFs) in preparation of the inkjet-printed drug-delivery systems. Rasagiline mesylate (RM...

  6. Profile of imatinib in pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael J BurkeDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplantation, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Using targeted therapy for treatment of cancer has become the paradigm to which clinical trials aspire. Imatinib, the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, was the first of its kind to specifically target and inhibit the underlying Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+ oncogene found to be driving chronic myeloid leukemia in adults, and has since become standard of care for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in children. Imatinib, with its ability to target Ph+ leukemia, has been successfully incorporated into the treatment of not only pediatric chronic myeloid leukemia but also Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. With the incorporation of imatinib into combination chemotherapy for pediatric Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia, current survival rates are far higher than at any other time for this once dreadful disease. With more children today receiving treatment with imatinib for either chronic myeloid leukemia or Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia, knowledge is accumulating surrounding the short-term and long-term toxicities observed in children, adolescents, and young adults treated with this TKI. In summary, the TKI imatinib has made a historic impact in the treatment of pediatric Ph+ leukemias, transforming what were once very high-risk diseases with considerable morbidity and mortality into ones that are now very treatable but with a new awareness surrounding the long-term toxicities that may come with this price for cure.Keywords: imatinib, leukemia, lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, pediatric

  7. Safety pharmacology of sibutramine mesylate, an anti-obesity drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Joo; Park, Eun-Kyung; Suh, Kwee-Hyun

    2005-03-01

    Sibutramine mesylate is a new anti-obesity drug. It is a crystalline salt of sibutramine developed to improve the solubility of sibutramine hydrochloride. Methanesulfonic acid was used as a salt-forming acid instead of hydrochloric acid, resulting in a greatly improved solubility of 1000 mg/mL in water. Sibutramine mesylate was administered orally to ICR mice, Sprague-Dawley rats, and beagle dogs at dose levels of 1.15, 3.45, and 11.50 mg/kg to measure its effects on the central nervous system (CNS), general behaviour, cardiovascular-respiratory system and the other organ systems. Following administration of sibutramine mesylate, spontaneous locomotor activity was significantly increased from 120 min to 24 hours at 3.45 mg/kg and from 30 min to 24 hours at 11.50 mg/kg. Furthermore, there were a decrease in hexobarbital-induced sleep time, an increase in respiratory rate at 120 min, increases in intestinal transport capacity and gastric pH at 11.50 mg/kg, and decreases in gastric volume and total acidity at 3.45 and 11.50 mg/kg. However sibutramine mesylate caused no effects on general behaviour, motor coordination, body temperature, analgesia, convulsion, blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiogram, cardiac functions of the isolated rat heart, isolated smooth muscles and renal function. Based on the above results, it was concluded that sibutramine mesylate caused effects on the spontaneous locomotor activity, hexobarbital-induced sleep time, respiration, gastrointestinal transport, and gastric secretion at a dose level of 3.45 mg/kg or greater but caused no effects on other general pharmacological reactions.

  8. Nilotinib: optimal therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and resistance or intolerance to imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Ronan; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Padmanabhan, Swaminathan; Carew, Jennifer; Giles, Francis

    2009-09-21

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is the consequence of a single balanced translocation that produces the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene which is detectable in over 90% of patients at presentation. The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib mesylate (IM) has improved survival in all phases of CML and is the standard of care for newly diagnosed patients in chronic phase. Despite the very significant therapeutic benefits of IM, a small minority of patients with early stage disease do not benefit optimally while IM therapy in patients with advanced disease is of modest benefit in many. Diverse mechanisms may be responsible for IM failures, with point mutations within the Bcr-Abl kinase domain being amongst the most common resistance mechanisms described in patients with advanced CML. The development of novel agents designed to overcome IM resistance, while still primarily targeted on BCR-ABL, led to the creation of the high affinity aminopyrimidine inhibitor, nilotinib. Nilotinib is much more potent as a BCR-ABL inhibitor than IM and inhibits both wild type and IM-resistant BCR-ABL with significant clinical activity across the entire spectrum of BCR-ABL mutants with the exception of T315I. The selection of a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor to rescue patients with imatinib failure will be based on several factors including age, co-morbid medical problems and ABL kinase mutational profile. It should be noted that while the use of targeted BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors in CML represents a paradigm shift in CML management these agents are not likely to have activity against the quiescent CML stem cell pool. The purpose of this review is to summarize the pre-clinical and clinical data on nilotinib in patients with CML who have failed prior therapy with IM or dasatinib.

  9. Behandling af ideopatisk hypereosinofilt syndrom med imatinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Louise; Larsen, Herdis

    2008-01-01

    We here report a case of idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome with prompt response to treatment with imatinib. The patient presented with chest pain, myalgias, fatigue and weakness. Blood tests and bone marrow examination revealed striking eosinophilia. Clonal or reactive disorders were excluded...

  10. Nilotinib: optimal therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and resistance or intolerance to imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Swords

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ronan Swords, Devalingam Mahalingam, Swaminathan Padmanabhan, Jennifer Carew, Francis GilesInstitute for Drug Development, Cancer Therapy and Research Centre, University of Texas Health Science Centre at San Antonio, USAAbstract: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is the consequence of a single balanced translocation that produces the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene which is detectable in over 90% of patients at presentation. The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib mesylate (IM has improved survival in all phases of CML and is the standard of care for newly diagnosed patients in chronic phase. Despite the very significant therapeutic benefits of IM, a small minority of patients with early stage disease do not benefit optimally while IM therapy in patients with advanced disease is of modest benefit in many. Diverse mechanisms may be responsible for IM failures, with point mutations within the Bcr-Abl kinase domain being amongst the most common resistance mechanisms described in patients with advanced CML. The development of novel agents designed to overcome IM resistance, while still primarily targeted on BCR-ABL, led to the creation of the high affinity aminopyrimidine inhibitor, nilotinib. Nilotinib is much more potent as a BCR-ABL inhibitor than IM and inhibits both wild type and IM-resistant BCR-ABL with significant clinical activity across the entire spectrum of BCR-ABL mutants with the exception of T315I. The selection of a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor to rescue patients with imatinib failure will be based on several factors including age, co-morbid medical problems and ABL kinase mutational profile. It should be noted that while the use of targeted BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors in CML represents a paradigm shift in CML management these agents are not likely to have activity against the quiescent CML stem cell pool. The purpose of this review is to summarize the pre-clinical and clinical data on nilotinib in patients with CML who have failed prior

  11. Effect of STI-571 (imatinib mesylate) in combination with retinoic acid and γ-irradiation on viability of neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, Jochen; Zambrzycka, Izabella; Lagodny, Jeanette; Kontny, Udo; Niemeyer, Charlotte Marie

    2006-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) expresses the tyrosine kinase receptors c-Kit, PDGFR-α and -β-targets for STI-571.We investigated a possible combination therapy of STI-571 with retinoic acid (RA) and γ-irradiation on NB cell viability in vitro. Expression of tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands was examined in 6 NB cell lines by RT-PCR and FACS. The effect on cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Cell viability of all 6 NB cell lines was significantly inhibited after treatment with 20 μM STI-571 for 72 h, two cell lines responding already to 10 μM. Cell lines responded irrespective of their mRNA status or cell surface expression of c-Kit, PDGFR-α and -β. Co-incubation with 9-cis RA sensitized cells to the inhibitory effects of STI-571. However, pre-treatment with 9-cis RA resulted in resistance of NB cell lines to STI-571 and γ-irradiation. Treatment of NB with STI-571 in combination with 9-cis RA might be a therapeutic strategy for patients in consolidation therapy who have completed γ-irradiation therapy

  12. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Progressive, Refractory, or Recurrent Stage II or Stage III Testicular or Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Seminoma

  13. Nilotinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saglio, Giuseppe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2010-01-01

    Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase.......Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase....

  14. Pd-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions of Amides and Aryl Mesylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooleweerdt, Karin; Fors, Brett P.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    A catalyst, based on a biarylphosphine ligand, for the Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of amides and aryl mesylates is described. This system allows an array of aryl and heteroaryl mesylates to be transformed into the corresponding N-arylamides in moderate to excellent yields. PMID:20420379

  15. Tirilazad mesylate protects stored erythrocytes against osmotic fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, D E; Knechtel, T J; Bacznskyj, O; Decker, D; Guido, D M; Buxser, S E; Mathews, W R; Buffenbarger, S L; Lutzke, B S; McCall, J M

    1994-12-01

    The hypoosmotic lysis curve of freshly collected human erythrocytes is consistent with a single Gaussian error function with a mean of 46.5 +/- 0.25 mM NaCl and a standard deviation of 5.0 +/- 0.4 mM NaCl. After extended storage of RBCs under standard blood bank conditions the lysis curve conforms to the sum of two error functions instead of a possible shift in the mean and a broadening of a single error function. Thus, two distinct sub-populations with different fragilities are present instead of a single, broadly distributed population. One population is identical to the freshly collected erythrocytes, whereas the other population consists of osmotically fragile cells. The rate of generation of the new, osmotically fragile, population of cells was used to probe the hypothesis that lipid peroxidation is responsible for the induction of membrane fragility. If it is so, then the antioxidant, tirilazad mesylate (U-74,006f), should protect against this degradation of stored erythrocytes. We found that tirilazad mesylate, at 17 microM (1.5 mol% with respect to membrane lecithin), retards significantly the formation of the osmotically fragile RBCs. Concomitantly, the concentration of free hemoglobin which accumulates during storage is markedly reduced by the drug. Since the presence of the drug also decreases the amount of F2-isoprostanes formed during the storage period, an antioxidant mechanism must be operative. These results demonstrate that tirilazad mesylate significantly decreases the number of fragile erythrocytes formed during storage in the blood bank.

  16. Dasatinib in the treatment of imatinib refractory chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Ramchandren

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Radhakrishnan Ramchandren, Charles A SchifferDivision of Hematology/Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: The development of imatinib for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has proven to be an example of medical success in the era of targeted therapy. However, imatinib resistance or intolerance occurs in a substantial number of patients. Additionally, patients who have progressed beyond the chronic phase of CML do relatively poorly with imatinib therapy. Mechanisms of imatinib resistance include BCR-ABL point mutations resulting in decreased imatinib binding, as well as mutation-independent causes of resistance such as SRC family kinase dysregulation, BCR-ABL gene amplification, drug influx/efflux mechanisms and other poorly understood processes. The options for therapy in these patients include stem cell transplantation, imatinib dose escalation as well as the use of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Dasatinib is a second-generation multi-kinase inhibitor with several theoretical and mechanistic advantages over imatinib. Moreover, several studies have evaluated dasatinib in patients who have progressed on imatinib therapy with encouraging results. Other novel agents such as mTOR inhibitors, bosutinib and INNO 406 have also shown promise in this setting. Although treatment options have increased, the choice of second-line therapy in patients with CML is influenced by concerns surrounding the duration of response as well as toxicity. Consequently, there is no agreed upon optimal second-line agent. This paper reviews the current data and attempts to address these issues. Keywords: chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, dasatinib, imatinib, resistance (imatinib resistance, nilotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  17. Imatinib-induced pleural effusion: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Banka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has rarely been reported to cause pleural effusion. We report the case of an 88-year-old male, known case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor on treatment with imatinib, who presented with a 2-week history of cough and dyspnea. He was diagnosed to have a right-sided pleural effusion and thoracentesis of the fluid revealed an exudate with low adenosine deaminase and negative cytology. Withdrawal of the drug lead to resolution of symptoms. We report this case to highlight the side effect profile of imatinib and warn physicians regarding this potential adverse effect which may be mistaken for metastasis or infection.

  18. Imatinib-loaded polyelectrolyte microcapsules for sustained targeting of BCR-ABL+ leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamà, Ilaria E; Leporatti, Stefano; de Luca, Emanuela; Di Renzo, Nicola; Maffia, Michele; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Rinaldi, Ross; Gigli, Giuseppe; Cingolani, Roberto; Coluccia, Addolorata M L

    2010-04-01

    The lack of sensitivity of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) stem cells to imatinib mesylate (IM) commonly leads to drug dose escalation or early disease relapses when therapy is stopped. Here, we report that packaging of IM into a biodegradable carrier based on polyelectrolyte microcapsules increases drug retention and antitumor activity in CML stem cells, also improving the ex vivo purging of malignant progenitors from patient autografts. Microparticles/capsules were obtained by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte multilayers on removable calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) templates and loaded with or without IM. A leukemic cell line (KU812) and CD34(+) cells freshly isolated from healthy donors or CML patients were tested. Polyelectrolyte microcapsules (PMCs) with an average diameter of 3 microm, fluorescently labelled multilayers sensitive to the action of intracellular proteases and 95-99% encapsulation efficiency of IM, were prepared. Cell uptake efficiency of such biodegradable carriers was quantified in KU812, leukemic and normal CD34(+) stem cells (range: 70-85%), and empty PMCs did not impact cell viability. IM-loaded PMCs selectively targeted CML cells, by promoting apoptosis at doses that exert only cytostatic effects by IM alone. More importantly, residual CML cells from patient leukapheresis products were reduced or eliminated more efficiently by using IM-loaded PMCs compared with freely soluble IM, with a purging efficiency of several logs. No adverse effects on normal CD34(+) stem-cell survival and their clonogenic potential was noticed in long-term cultures of hematopoietic progenitors in vitro. This pilot study provides the proof-of-principle for the clinical application of biodegradable IM-loaded PMC as feasible, safe and effective ex vivo purging agents to target CML stem cells, in order to improve transplant outcome of resistant/relapsed patients or reduce IM dose escalation.

  19. Imatinib en leucemia mieloide crónica Imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valia Pavón Morán

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available La leucemia mieloide crónica (LMC fue la primera neoplasia en la que se pudo presentar un modelo de genotipo que sirviera de blanco a una terapia de acción molecular. La activación de múltiples vías de señales de transducción en las células con el gen BCR- ABL favorece el incremento de la proliferación celular, interfiere en la apoptosis y perturba la interacción con la matriz extracelular y el estroma. La introducción del Imatinib en el tratamiento de la LMC ha modificado la evolución y pronóstico de la enfermedad. Cuando se compara con los regímenes basados en interferón e hidroxiurea, el imatinib ha demostrado un alto nivel de eficacia asociado con un número menor de reacciones adversasChronic myeloid leukemia (CML was the first neoplasia in which it was possible to present a model of genotype that served as a target for a molecular action therapy. The activation of multiple ways of transduction signals in the cells with the BCR-ABL gene favors the increase of the cellular proliferation, interferes the apoptosis, and perturbs the interaction with the extracellular matrix and the stroma. The introduction of Imatinib in the treatment of CML has modified the evolution and prognosis of this disease. Imatinib has proved to have a high level of efficiency associated with a smaller number of adverse reactions on being compared with the regimens based on interferon and hydroxyurea

  20. Phentolamine mesylate: It′s role as a reversal agent for unwarranted prolonged local analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Administration of local anesthesia is an integral procedure prior to dental treatments to minimize the associated pain. It is learned that its effect stays more than the time required for the dental procedure to be completed. This prolonged soft tissue anesthesia (STA can be detrimental, inconvenient, and unnecessary. Phentolamine mesylate, a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug essentially serves the purpose of faster recovery from numbness at the site of local anesthesia. This article reviews the development of the drug phentolamine mesylate and its indication as a local anesthetic reversal agent. A literature search for phentolamine mesylate as a STA reversal agent was conducted in PubMed using the terms "dental local anesthesia reversal, phentolamine mesylate" up to March 2014. The search was limited to articles published in English. The search revealed 13 PubMed indexed articles stating the development and application of phentolamine mesylate. Phentolamine mesylate is an important step in the progress of developing patient care as well as an aid to the dental clinician.

  1. Hepatic stellate cell-targeted imatinib nanomedicine versus conventional imatinib: A novel strategy with potent efficacy in experimental liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mezayen, Nesrine S; El-Hadidy, Wessam F; El-Refaie, Wessam M; Shalaby, Th I; Khattab, Mahmoud M; El-Khatib, Aiman S

    2017-11-28

    Liver fibrosis is a global health problem without approved treatment. Imatinib inhibits two key profibrotic pathways; platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and thus can be used to treat liver fibrosis. However, conventional imatinib therapy is hampered by low concentration at target tissue and increased toxicity to other tissues especially heart, lung and liver. Since hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main contributors to liver fibrosis pathogenesis and sole hepatic vitamin A (V A ) storage cells, they can be actively targeted by coupling liposomes to V A . In this study, novel V A -coupled imatinib-loaded liposomes (ILC) were prepared and optimized regarding V A -coupling efficiency, imatinib entrapment efficiency, and particle size. Preferential accumulation of the selected formula in liver was proved by tracing intraperitoneally (i.p.)-injected V A -coupled liposomes loaded with Nile Red (LCNR) to rats with CCl 4 -induced liver fibrosis using live animal imaging. Co-localization of LCNR with immunofluorescently-labeled PDGFR-β in frozen liver tissue sections confirmed HSCs targeting. ILC bio-distribution, following single i.p. injection, revealed 13.5 folds higher hepatic accumulation than conventional imatinib in addition to limited bio-distribution to other organs including heart and lung reflecting diminished adverse effects. ILC therapy resulted in a potent inhibition of phosphorylated PDGFR-β expression when compared to conventional imatinib. Subsequently, there was a statistically significant improvement in liver function tests and reversal of hepatotoxicity along with liver fibrosis. Anti-fibrotic effect was evident from histopathologic Ishak score reduction as well as normalization of the level of profibrotic mediators (hydroxyproline, TGF-B and matrix metalloproteinase-2). Thus, HSC-targeted imatinib therapy shows outstanding anti-fibrotic effects with reduced cytotoxicity compared to conventional

  2. Sequential Use of Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Treatment and Intensive Chemotherapy Induced Long-Term Complete Molecular Response in Imatinib-Resistant CML Patient Presenting as a Myeloid Blast Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Tsuji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML-MBC is rarely seen at presentation and has a poor prognosis. There is no standard therapy for CML-MBC. It is often difficult to distinguish CML-MBC from acute myeloid leukemia expressing the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+ AML. We present a case in which CML-MBC was seen at the initial presentation in a 75-year-old male. He was treated with conventional AML-directed chemotherapy followed by imatinib mesylate monotherapy, which failed to induce response. However, he achieved long-term complete molecular response after combination therapy involving dasatinib, a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and conventional chemotherapy.

  3. Effect of imatinib on growth of experimental endometriosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Caglar; Kacan, Turgut; Akkar, Ozlem Bozoklu; Karakus, Savas; Seker, Metin; Kacan, Selen Baloglu; Ozer, Hatice; Cetin, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Currently, medical and surgical treatment options for endometriosis are limited due to suboptimal efficacy, and also safety and tolerance issues. Long-term use of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogs, androgenes, and the danazol, which are widely used drugs for endometriosis, is usually not possible due to their suboptimal safety and tolerance profile. The lack of an effective, tolerable and safe treatment option for endometriosis makes animal models of experimental endometriosis necessary to study candidate drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of imatinib on the experimental endometriosis in a rat model. Endometriosis was induced by autotransplantation of uterine tissue into the peritoneal cavity. Twenty-four rats, which had visually confirmed endometriotic implants on subsequent laparotomy, were randomized into three groups to receive imatinib (25mg/kg/day, p.o.), anastrozole (0.004 mg/day, p.o.), or normal saline (0.1 mL, i.p.) for 14 days. After removal of endometriotic tissue and H & E staining, endometriosis score was determined according to a semiquantitative histological classification. Also, immunostaining with primary antibodies including VEGF, CD117, and Bax were used for immunohistochemical (IHC) examination. Both anastrozole and imatinib suppressed the growth of endometriotic tissue and reduced the number of ovarian follicles. Although the difference was not statistically significant, imatinib was less effective than anastrozole for treatment of endometriosis. Imatinib effectively treats experimental endometriosis by its inhibitor effects on angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. New use of an old drug: inhibition of breast cancer stem cells by benztropine mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jihong; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Lina; Chen, Yong; Proulx, Steven T; Reker, Daniel; Schneider, Gisbert; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-03

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play major roles in cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence and therapeutic resistance. Targeting CSCs represents a promising strategy for cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify selective inhibitors of breast CSCs (BCSCs). We carried out a cell-based phenotypic screening with cell viability as a primary endpoint, using a collection of 2,546 FDA-approved drugs and drug-like molecules in spheres formed by malignant human breast gland-derived cells (HMLER-shEcad cells, representing BCSCs) and control immortalized non-tumorigenic human mammary cells (HMLE cells, representing normal stem cells). 19 compounds were identified from screening. The chemically related molecules benztropine mesylate and deptropine citrate were selected for further validation and both potently inhibited sphere formation and self-renewal of BCSCs in vitro. Benztropine mesylate treatment decreased cell subpopulations with high ALDH activity and with a CD44+/CD24- phenotype. In vivo, benztropine mesylate inhibited tumor-initiating potential in a 4T1 mouse model. Functional studies indicated that benztropine mesylate inhibits functions of CSCs via the acetylcholine receptors, dopamine transporters/receptors, and/or histamine receptors. In summary, our findings identify benztropine mesylate as an inhibitor of BCSCs in vitro and in vivo. This study also provides a screening platform for identification of additional anti-CSC agents.

  5. Downregulated microRNA-148b in circulating PBMCs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients with undetectable minimal residual disease: a possible biomarker to discontinue imatinib safely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohyashiki JH

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Junko H Ohyashiki,1 Kazushige Ohtsuki,1 Izuru Mizoguchi,2 Takayuki Yoshimoto,2 Seiichiro Katagiri,3 Tomohiro Umezu,1,4 Kazuma Ohyashiki3,4 1Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, 2Department of Immunoregulation, Institute of Medical Science, 3Department of Hematology, 4Department of Molecular Science, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Background: A subset of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML can sustain a complete molecular response after discontinuing imatinib mesylate (IM. We focused on microRNAs (miRNAs, with the aim of finding a molecular biomarker to discriminate which patients can safely and successfully discontinue IM use. Methods: To identify miRNAs that showed altered expression in patients who had discontinued IM (STOP-IM group, we first screened miRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by using a TaqMan miRNA array on samples from five unselected patients from the STOP-IM group, seven CML patients receiving IM (IM group, and five healthy volunteers. We then performed miRNA quantification in 49 CML patients with deep molecular response. Mann–Whitney U and chi-square tests were used to determine statistical significance for comparisons between the control (healthy volunteers and test groups (STOP-IM and IM groups. Multiple groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance. Results: Downregulation of miR-148b was noted in patients in the STOP-IM group and in a subset of the IM group. We then subdivided the IM patients into two groups: one with downregulated miR-148b expression (IM-1; less than the cut-off value and the other without downregulated miR-148b expression (IM-2; greater than the cut-off value. The number of patients who had a sustained stable molecular response was significantly lower in IM-2 group. This group also had a significantly lower percentage of natural killer cells. Conclusion: Downregulated miR-148 may contribute to immune surveillance in STOP-IM patients

  6. A novel dic (17;18 (p13.1;q11.2 with loss of TP53 and BCR/ABL rearrangement in an Imatinib resistant chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-achkar Walid

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The so-called Philadelphia (Ph chromosome is present in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cases. It results in juxtaposition of the 5′ part of the BCR gene on chromosome 22 to the 3′ part of the ABL gene on chromosome 9. Since the majority of CML cases are currently treated with Imatinib, variant rearrangements in general have no specific prognostic significance, although the mechanisms involved in resistance to therapy have yet to be investigated. The T315I mutation within the abl-gene is the most frequent one associated with resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Results This study evaluated a Ph chromosome positive CML case resistant to imatinib mesylate. A dic(17;18, loss of TP53 gene, co-expression of b2a2 and b3a2 fusions transcript and a T315I mutation were found. Conclusions We reported here a novel case of a Ph chromosome positive CML with a secondary abnormality [dic(17;18], resulting to Glivec resistance but good response to nilotinib. The dic(17;18 might be a marker for poor prognosis in CML. Our finding indicated for an aggressive progression of the disease. The patient died under the treatment due to unknown reasons.

  7. Solution-mediated phase transformation of haloperidol mesylate in the presence of sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Kristyn; Bogner, Robin

    2011-09-01

    Forming a salt is a common way to increase the solubility of a poorly soluble compound. However, the solubility enhancement gained by salt formation may be lost due to solution-mediated phase transformation (SMPT) during dissolution. The SMPT of a salt can occur due to a supersaturated solution near the dissolving surface caused by pH or other solution conditions. In addition to changes in pH, surfactants are also known to affect SMPT. In this study, SMPT of a highly soluble salt, haloperidol mesylate, at pH 7 in the presence of a commonly used surfactant, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), was investigated. Dissolution experiments were performed using a flow-through dissolution apparatus with solutions containing various concentrations of SLS. Compacts of haloperidol mesylate were observed during dissolution in the flow-through apparatus using a stereomicroscope. Raman microscopy was used to characterize solids. The dissolution of haloperidol mesylate was significantly influenced by the addition of sodium lauryl sulfate. In conditions where SMPT was expected, the addition of SLS at low concentrations (0.1-0.2 mM) reduced the dissolution of haloperidol mesylate. In solutions containing concentrations of SLS above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) (10-15 mM), the dissolution of haloperidol mesylate increased compared to below the CMC. The solids recovered from solubility experiments of haloperidol mesylate indicated that haloperidol free base precipitated at all concentrations of SLS. Above 5 mM of SLS, Raman microscopy suggested a new form, perhaps the estolate salt. The addition of surfactant in solids that undergo solution-mediated phase transformation can add complexity to the dissolution profiles and conversion.

  8. Exploiting mitochondrial dysfunction for effective elimination of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérome Kluza

    Full Text Available Challenges today concern chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients resistant to imatinib. There is growing evidence that imatinib-resistant leukemic cells present abnormal glucose metabolism but the impact on mitochondria has been neglected. Our work aimed to better understand and exploit the metabolic alterations of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells. Imatinib-resistant cells presented high glycolysis as compared to sensitive cells. Consistently, expression of key glycolytic enzymes, at least partly mediated by HIF-1α, was modified in imatinib-resistant cells suggesting that imatinib-resistant cells uncouple glycolytic flux from pyruvate oxidation. Interestingly, mitochondria of imatinib-resistant cells exhibited accumulation of TCA cycle intermediates, increased NADH and low oxygen consumption. These mitochondrial alterations due to the partial failure of ETC were further confirmed in leukemic cells isolated from some imatinib-resistant CML patients. As a consequence, mitochondria generated more ROS than those of imatinib-sensitive cells. This, in turn, resulted in increased death of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells following in vitro or in vivo treatment with the pro-oxidants, PEITC and Trisenox, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model. Conversely, inhibition of glycolysis caused derepression of respiration leading to lower cellular ROS. In conclusion, these findings indicate that imatinib-resistant leukemic cells have an unexpected mitochondrial dysfunction that could be exploited for selective therapeutic intervention.

  9. Validated UV-Spectrophotometric Methods for Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate in Pharmaceutical Tablet Dosage Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rote Ambadas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, economic and accurate UV spectrophotometric methods have been developed for determination of gemifloxacin mesylate in pharmaceutical tablet formulation. The first UV-spectrophotometric method depends upon the measurement of absorption at the wavelength 263.8 nm. In second area under curve method the wavelength range for detection was selected from 268.5-258.5 nm. Beer’s law was obeyed in the range of 2 to 12 μgmL-1 for both the methods. The proposed methods was validated statistically and applied successfully to determination of gemifloxacin mesylate in pharmaceutical formulation.

  10. SLC22A1-ABCB1 haplotype profiles predict imatinib pharmacokinetics in Asian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Singh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the influence of SLC22A1, PXR, ABCG2, ABCB1 and CYP3A5 3 genetic polymorphisms on imatinib mesylate (IM pharmacokinetics in Asian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Healthy subjects belonging to three Asian populations (Chinese, Malay, Indian; n = 70 each and CML patients (n = 38 were enrolled in a prospective pharmacogenetics study. Imatinib trough (C(0h and clearance (CL were determined in the patients at steady state. Haplowalk method was applied to infer the haplotypes and generalized linear model (GLM to estimate haplotypic effects on IM pharmacokinetics. Association of haplotype copy numbers with IM pharmacokinetics was defined by Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: Global haplotype score statistics revealed a SLC22A1 sub-haplotypic region encompassing three polymorphisms (rs3798168, rs628031 and IVS7+850C>T, to be significantly associated with IM clearance (p = 0.013. Haplotype-specific GLM estimated that the haplotypes AGT and CGC were both associated with 22% decrease in clearance compared to CAC [CL (10(-2 L/hr/mg: CAC vs AGT: 4.03 vs 3.16, p = 0.017; CAC vs CGC: 4.03 vs 3.15, p = 0.017]. Patients harboring 2 copies of AGT or CGC haplotypes had 33.4% lower clearance and 50% higher C(0h than patients carrying 0 or 1 copy [CL (10(-2 L/hr/mg: 2.19 vs 3.29, p = 0.026; C(0h (10(-6 1/ml: 4.76 vs 3.17, p = 0.013, respectively]. Further subgroup analysis revealed SLC22A1 and ABCB1 haplotypic combinations to be significantly associated with clearance and C(0h (p = 0.002 and 0.009, respectively. CONCLUSION: This exploratory study suggests that SLC22A1-ABCB1 haplotypes may influence IM pharmacokinetics in Asian CML patients.

  11. Comparison of imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and INNO-406 in imatinib-resistant cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Shinya; Ashihara, Eishi; Niwa, Tomoko; Hodohara, Keiko; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Maekawa, Taira

    2008-06-01

    We compared the growth-inhibitory effects and inhibition profile of the SRC family kinases (SFKs) of imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and INNO-406. Dasatinib exhibited the strongest potency against BCR-ABL with little selectivity over SFKs. Nilotinib exhibited a weaker affinity than the other inhibitors, but was highly specific for ABL and may be useful for the treatment of P-glycoprotein overexpressing leukemic cells. INNO-406 had an intermediate affinity for BCR-ABL between that of dasatinib and nilotinib, and inhibited only SFKs LCK and LYN among SFKs. Both nilotinib and INNO-406 were potent inhibitors of the dasatinib-resistant T315A, F317L and F317V BCR-ABL mutations.

  12. Women Administered Standard Dose Imatinib for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Have Higher Dose-Adjusted Plasma Imatinib and Norimatinib Concentrations Than Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsey, Sarah L; Ireland, Robin; Lang, Kathryn; Kizilors, Aytug; Ho, Aloysius; Mufti, Ghulam J; Bisquera, Alessandra; De Lavallade, Hugues; Flanagan, Robert J

    2017-10-01

    The standard dose of imatinib for the treatment of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is 400 mg·d. A predose plasma imatinib concentration of >1 mg·L is associated with improved clinical response. This study aimed to assess the plasma imatinib and norimatinib concentrations attained in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia administered standard doses of imatinib adjusted for dose, age, sex, body weight, and response. We evaluated data from a cohort of patients treated between 2008 and 2014 with respect to dose, age, sex, body weight, and response. The study comprised 438 samples from 93 patients (54 male, 39 female). The median imatinib dose was 400 mg·d in men and in women. The plasma imatinib concentration ranged 0.1-5.0 mg·L and was below 1 mg·L in 20% and 16% of samples from men and women, respectively. The mean dose normalized plasma imatinib and norimatinib concentrations were significantly higher in women in comparison with men. This was partially related to body weight. Mixed effects ordinal logistic regression showed no evidence of an association between sex and plasma imatinib (P = 0.13). However, there was evidence of an association between sex and plasma norimatinib, with higher norimatinib concentrations more likely in women than in men (P = 0.02). Imatinib therapeutic drug monitoring only provides information on dosage adequacy and on short-term adherence; longer-term adherence cannot be assessed. However, this analysis revealed that approximately 1 in 5 samples had a plasma imatinib concentration <1 mg·L, which was suggestive of inadequate dosage and/or poor adherence and posed a risk of treatment failure. Higher imatinib exposure in women may be a factor in the increased rate of long-term, stable, deep molecular response (undetectable breakpoint cluster-Abelson (BCR-ABL) transcript levels with a PCR sensitivity of 4.5 log, MR4.5) reported in women.

  13. Physico-chemical stability of eribulin mesylate containing concentrate and ready-to-administer solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindeldreier, Kirsten; Thiesen, Judith; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Krämer, Irene

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the stability of commercially available eribulin mesylate containing injection solution as well as diluted ready-to-administer solutions stored under refrigeration or at room temperature. Stability was studied by a novel developed stability-indicating reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay with ultraviolet detection (detection wavelength 200 nm). Triplicate test solutions of eribulin mesylate containing injection concentrate (0.5 mg/mL) and with 0.9% sodium chloride solution diluted ready-to-administer preparations (0.205 mg/mL eribulin mesylate in polypropylene (PP) syringes, 0.020 mg/mL eribulin mesylate in polypropylene/polyethylene (PE) bags) were stored protected from light either at room temperature (25) or under refrigeration (2-8). Samples were withdrawn on day 0 (initial), 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 28 of storage and assayed. Physical stability was determined by measuring the pH value once a week and checking for visible precipitations or colour changes. The stability tests revealed that concentrations of eribulin mesylate remained unchanged over a period of 28 days irrespective of concentration, container material or storage temperature. Neither colour changes nor visible particles have been observed. The pH value varied slightly over time but remained in the stability favourable range of 5-9. Eribulin mesylate injection (0.5 mg/mL) is physico-chemically stable over a period of 28 days after first puncture of the vial. After dilution with 0.9% NaCl vehicle solution, ready-to-administer eribulin mesylate injection solutions (0.205 mg/mL in PP syringe) and infusion solutions (0.02 mg/mL in prefilled PP/PE bags) are physico-chemically stable for a period of at least four weeks either refrigerated or stored at room temperature. For microbiological reasons storage under refrigeration is recommended.

  14. The Culture Repopulation Ability (CRA) Assay and Incubation in Low Oxygen to Test Antileukemic Drugs on Imatinib-Resistant CML Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheloni, Giulia; Tanturli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a stem cell-driven disorder caused by the BCR/Abl oncoprotein, a constitutively active tyrosine kinase (TK). Chronic-phase CML patients are treated with impressive efficacy with TK inhibitors (TKi) such as imatinib mesylate (IM). However, rather than definitively curing CML, TKi induces a state of minimal residual disease, due to the persistence of leukemia stem cells (LSC) which are insensitive to this class of drugs. LSC persistence may be due to different reasons, including the suppression of BCR/Abl oncoprotein. It has been shown that this suppression follows incubation in low oxygen under appropriate culture conditions and incubation times.Here we describe the culture repopulation ability (CRA) assay, a non-clonogenic assay capable - together with incubation in low oxygen - to reveal in vitro stem cells endowed with marrow repopulation ability (MRA) in vivo. The CRA assay can be used, before moving to animal tests, as a simple and reliable method for the prescreening of drugs potentially active on CML and other leukemias with respect to their activity on the more immature leukemia cell subsets.

  15. Impact of CYP2C8*3 polymorphism on in vitro metabolism of imatinib to N-desmethyl imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Suleman; Barratt, Daniel T; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    1. Imatinib is metabolized to N-desmethyl imatinib by CYPs 3A4 and 2C8. The effect of CYP2C8*3 genotype on N-desmethyl imatinib formation was unknown. 2. We examined imatinib N-demethylation in human liver microsomes (HLMs) genotyped for CYP2C8*3, in CYP2C8*3/*3 pooled HLMs and in recombinant CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 enzymes. Effects of CYP-selective inhibitors on N-demethylation were also determined. 3. A single-enzyme Michaelis-Menten model with autoinhibition best fitted CYP2C8*1/*1 HLM (n = 5) and recombinant CYP2C8 kinetic data (median ± SD Ki = 139 ± 61 µM and 149 µM, respectively). Recombinant CYP3A4 showed two-site enzyme kinetics with no autoinhibition. Three of four CYP2C8*1/*3 HLMs showed single-enzyme kinetics with no autoinhibition. Binding affinity was higher in CYP2C8*1/*3 than CYP2C8*1/*1 HLM (median ± SD Km = 6 ± 2 versus 11 ± 2 µM, P=0.04). CYP2C8*3/*3 (pooled HLM) also showed high binding affinity (Km = 4 µM) and single-enzyme weak autoinhibition (Ki = 449 µM) kinetics. CYP2C8 inhibitors reduced HLM N-demethylation by 47-75%, compared to 0-30% for CYP3A4 inhibitors. 4. In conclusion, CYP2C8*3 is a gain-of-function polymorphism for imatinib N-demethylation, which appears to be mainly mediated by CYP2C8 and not CYP3A4 in vitro in HLM.

  16. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a chronic myelocytic leukemia patient treated with imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydaş

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib is an important example of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs used in clinical practice. Imatinib blocks the ATP binding site of the Bcr-Abl fusion protein and selectively inhibits Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase (TK activity. Treatment of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML with imatinib is encouraging and it has an acceptable toxicity profile, and as such has changed the management of CML during the last decade. As with all drugs used in clinical practice, side effects of imatinib have been reported in studies with extended follow-up periods. In addition, some neoplastic disorders have been reported to occur during imatinib therapy. Herein we present a CML case that developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL while receiving imatinib treatment.

  17. Combinations of Novel Histone Deacetylase and Bcr-Abl Inhibitors in the Therapy of Imatinib Mesylate-Sensitive and -Refractory Bcr-Abl Expressing Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Balasis,1Purva Bali,1Veronica Estrella ,1Sandhya Kumaraswamy,1 Rekha Rao,1Kathy Rocha,1Bryan Herger,1Francis Lee,2 Victoria Richon,3 and Kapil Bhalla1...Balasis M, Bali P, Estrella V, Kumaraswamy S, et al. Histone deacetylase inhibitors deplete EZH2 and associated Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 proteins

  18. Improved oral absorption of cilostazol via sulfonate salt formation with mesylate and besylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo JH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jae Hong Seo, Jung Bae Park, Woong-Kee Choi, Sunhwa Park, Yun Jin Sung, Euichaul Oh, Soo Kyung Bae College of Pharmacy and Integrated Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, South Korea Objective: Cilostazol is a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II drug with low solubility and high permeability, so its oral absorption is variable and incomplete. The aim of this study was to prepare two sulfonate salts of cilostazol to increase the dissolution and hence the oral bioavailability of cilostazol.Methods: Cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate were synthesized from cilostazol by acid addition reaction with methane sulfonic acid and benzene sulfonic acid, respectively. The salt preparations were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The water contents, hygroscopicity, stress stability, and photostability of the two cilostazol salts were also determined. The dissolution profiles in various pH conditions and pharmacokinetic studies in rats were compared with those of cilostazol-free base.Results: The two cilostazol salts exhibited good physicochemical properties, such as nonhygroscopicity, stress stability, and photostability, which make it suitable for the preparation of pharmaceutical formulations. Both cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate showed significantly improved dissolution rate and extent of drug release in the pH range 1.2–6.8 compared to the cilostazol-free base. In addition, after oral administration to rats, cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate showed increases in Cmax and AUCt of approximately 3.65- and 2.87-fold and 3.88- and 2.94-fold, respectively, compared to cilostazol-free base.Conclusion: This study showed that two novel salts of cilostazol, such as cilostazol mesylate and cilostazol besylate, could be used to enhance its oral absorption. The findings warrant further preclinical and clinical studies on cilostazol mesylate and

  19. Response of Complex Undefined Hypereosinophilic Syndrome to Treatment with Imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, İnsu; Kaynar, Leylagül; Tutar, Nuri; Pala, Çiğdem; Canöz, Özlem; Yıldırım, Afra; Büyükoğlan, Hakan; Gülmez, İnci

    2016-07-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndomes (HESs) include potentially lethal multisystem disorders characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of a variable spectrum of target organs, predominantly the skin, heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system. Based on recent advances in molecular and genetic diagnostic techniques and increasing experience with differences in clinical features and prognosis, subtypes have been defined, including "myeloproliferative-HES ", "lymphocytic-HES", "familial eosinophilia", "overlap HES", "undefined HES" ("complex undefined HES", "simple undefined HES", "episodic undefined HES") and "eosinophil associated diseases" (such as Churg-Strauss syndrome). HES should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of eosinophilic lung diseases especially in patients with peripheral eosinophilia and pulmonary infiltrates. Corticosteroids represent an effective firstline approach to decreasing eosinophil counts in the majority of cases. Imatinib might be used for corticosteroid nonresponders. We herein report a patient with "complex undefined HES" who had disease resistant to corticosteroids, but who had a significant response after treatment with imatinib.

  20. Homologous recombination induced by doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto in the Drosophila wing-spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Katiane Cella; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Lehmann, Mauricio; Reguly, Maria Luiza; Richter, Marc François; Andrade, Heloisa Helena Rodrigues de

    2013-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common tumor in men over 40 years of age. Acute urinary retention (AUR) is regarded as the most serious hazard of untreated BPH. α-Blockers, such as doxazosin mesylate, and 5-α reductase inhibitors, such as finasteride, are frequently used because they decrease both AUR and the need for BPH-related surgery. An extract of the fruit from American saw palmetto plant has also been used as an alternative treatment for BPH. The paucity of information available concerning the genotoxic action of these compounds led us to assess their activity as inducers of different types of DNA lesions using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster. Finasteride did not induce gene mutation, chromosomal mutation or mitotic recombination, which means it was nongenotoxic in our experimental conditions. On the other hand, doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto induced significant increases in spot frequencies in trans-heterozygous flies. In order to establish the actual role played by mitotic recombination and by mutation in the genotoxicity observed, the balancer-heterozygous flies were also analyzed, showing no increment in the total spot frequencies in relation to the negative control, for both drugs. Doxazosin mesylate and saw palmetto were classified as specific inducers of homologous recombination in Drosophila proliferative cells, an event linked to the loss of heterozygosity. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Imatinib prevents beta cell death in vitro but does not improve islet transplantation outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Aileen J F; Griffiths, Lisa A; Persaud, Shanta J; Jones, Peter M; Howell, Simon L; Welsh, Nils

    2016-05-01

    Introduction Improving islet transplantation outcome could not only bring benefits to individual patients but also widen the patient pool to which this life-changing treatment is available. Imatinib has previously been shown to protect beta cells from apoptosis in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. The aim of this study was to investigate whether imatinib could be used to improve islet transplantation outcome. Methods Islets were isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and pre-cultured with imatinib prior to exposure to streptozotocin and cytokines in vitro. Cell viability and glucose-induced insulin secretion were measured. For transplantation experiments, islets were pre-cultured with imatinib for either 72 h or 24 h prior to transplantation into streptozotocin-diabetic C57Bl/6 mice. In one experimental series mice were also administered imatinib after islet transplantation. Results Imatinib partially protected islets from beta cell death in vitro. However, pre-culturing islets in imatinib or administering the drug to the mice in the days following islet transplantation did not improve blood glucose concentrations more than control-cultured islets. Conclusion Although imatinib protected against beta cell death from cytokines and streptozotocin in vitro, it did not significantly improve syngeneic islet transplantation outcome.

  2. Chronic myeloid leukemia patients sensitive and resistant to imatinib treatment show different metabolic responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiye A

    Full Text Available The BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib is highly effective for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, some patients gradually develop resistance to imatinib, resulting in therapeutic failure. Metabonomic and genomic profiling of patients' responses to drug interventions can provide novel information about the in vivo metabolism of low-molecular-weight compounds and extend our insight into the mechanism of drug resistance. Based on a multi-platform of high-throughput metabonomics, SNP array analysis, karyotype and mutation, the metabolic phenotypes and genomic polymorphisms of CML patients and their diverse responses to imatinib were characterized. The untreated CML patients (UCML showed different metabolic patterns from those of healthy controls, and the discriminatory metabolites suggested the perturbed metabolism of the urea cycle, tricarboxylic acid cycle, lipid metabolism, and amino acid turnover in UCML. After imatinib treatment, patients sensitive to imatinib (SCML and patients resistant to imatinib (RCML had similar metabolic phenotypes to those of healthy controls and UCML, respectively. SCML showed a significant metabolic response to imatinib, with marked restoration of the perturbed metabolism. Most of the metabolites characterizing CML were adjusted to normal levels, including the intermediates of the urea cycle and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA. In contrast, neither cytogenetic nor metabonomic analysis indicated any positive response to imatinib in RCML. We report for the first time the associated genetic and metabonomic responses of CML patients to imatinib and show that the perturbed in vivo metabolism of UCML is independent of imatinib treatment in resistant patients. Thus, metabonomics can potentially characterize patients' sensitivity or resistance to drug intervention.

  3. An economic analysis of high-dose imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib for imatinib-resistant chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia in China: A CHEERS-compliant article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Liu, Maobai; Li, Te; Lin, Houwen; Zhong, Hua

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to test the cost-effectiveness of dasatinib compared to high-dose imatinib and nilotinib in Chinese patients who were diagnosed with imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase (CML-CP). A Markov model combined with clinical effectiveness, utility, and cost data was used. The sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the robustness of the model outcomes. The impact of patient assistance programs (PAPs) was assessed. Treatment with dasatinib is expected to produce 3.65, 0.59, and 0.15 more quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) in comparison with high-dose imatinib (600 and 800 mg) and nilotinib, respectively. When a PAP was available, dasatinib yielded an incremental cost of $16,417 per QALY compared to imatinib (600 mg) and was cost-saving compared to imatinib (800 mg) and nilotinib. When PAP is available in the Chinese setting, dasatinib is likely to be a cost-effective strategy for patients with CML-CP standard-dose imatinib resistance. The results should be carefully explained due to the assumptions and limitations used in the study.

  4. Gemfibrozil impairs imatinib absorption and inhibits the CYP2C8-mediated formation of its main metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filppula, A M; Tornio, A; Niemi, M; Neuvonen, P J; Backman, J T

    2013-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 is considered the most important enzyme in imatinib biotransformation. In a randomized, crossover study, 10 healthy subjects were administered gemfibrozil 600 mg or placebo twice daily for 6 days, and imatinib 200 mg on day 3, to study the significance of CYP2C8 in imatinib pharmacokinetics. Unexpectedly, gemfibrozil reduced the peak plasma concentration (Cmax) of imatinib by 35% (P Gemfibrozil also reduced the Cmax and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) of N-desmethylimatinib by 56 and 48% (P gemfibrozil reduced the Cmax/plasma concentration at 24 h (C24 h) ratios of imatinib and N-desmethylimatinib by 44 and 17% (P gemfibrozil. Our findings indicate significant participation of CYP2C8 in the metabolism of imatinib in humans, and support involvement of an intestinal influx transporter in imatinib absorption.

  5. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. The synthesis of [[sup 2]H],[[sup 3]H], and [[sup 14]C]-labeled 8[beta]-[(methylthio)methyl]-6-propylergoline mesylate (pergolide mesylate), a potent, long-acting dopamine agonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, W.J.; Kau, D.L.K.; Bach, N.J. (Lilly (Eli) and Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States). Lilly Research Labs.)

    1990-03-01

    The [[sup 3]H]- and two[[sup 14]C]-isopomers of 8[beta]-[(methylthio)methyl]-6-propylergoline mesylate (pergolide mesylate) have been synthesized. The [[sup 3]H]-derivative was synthesized by the palladium catalyzed tritiation of the corresponding 6-allyl derivative. Reaction of 8[beta]-[(methylthio)methyl]-ergoline with 1-[[sup 14]C]-1-propyl bromide yielded pergolide labeled in the 6-propyl group. Alternatively, reaction of 8[beta]-mesyloxy-6-propylergoline with [[sup 14]C]-sodium cyanide, followed by base hydrolysis, yielded 8 [beta]-carboxy-6-propylergoline-[[sup 14]C], which was subsequently converted to pergolide mesylate radiolabeled in the 17-position via a four step sequence. (Author).

  7. OUTCOME OF FRONTLINE TREATMENT WITH “GENERIC” IMATINIB IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA IN ALGERIAN POPULATION: A MULTICENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Amine BEKADJA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In a developing country like Algeria, such expensive therapy is not available. Alternative approaches are needed to help these adult. In Algeria ‘imatib’ (CIPLA-India was introduced in 2006; but no study has been published yet in the North Africa region regarding response and outcome of this copy in CML patients. The goal of this multicenter study is to characterize newly adult CML in the western region of Algeria and to assess the effectiveness and safety of imatib (IM, copy as frontline therapy for patients with CML. Patients and Methods: The study was carried out in 7 hematology centers in the western Algeria. Patients, who were diagnosed to be suffering from CML between January 1st, 2007 and  December 31st, 2014 were selected for data analysis. All patients received a copy preparation, consisting of the alpha crystal form of imatinib, (IM, copy at a oral dose of 400 mg daily and monitored for tolerance and side effects while on therapy. Results: Between January 2007 and December 2014, 355 patients with CML were treated with imatib (Copy. The median follow- up of the study was 46 months (range: 13–107 months. Complete hematological response (CHR was seen in 83% of patients within 3 months. According to the Sokal score, 72% patients with low, 78% with intermediate and 69% with high risk disease achieved a CHR in 3 months (p=0.26 and according to the EUTOS score, 81% of patients with low and 70% with high risk disease achieved a CHR in 3 months (p=0.08. The major molecular response (MMR at six months (M6, M9, M12, M18 and M24 was 21%, 38%, 35%, 51% and 67% respectively and 34% of patients achieved a complete molecular response (CMR. The projected 5-year overall survival (OS rate was 83%. Side effects of imatib (copy in this study were similar to those reported previously for the entire imatinib mesylate treatment study and only 8% of patients were intolerant to imatib (copy and treated with a second generation of BCR

  8. CYP2C8 Genotype Significantly Alters Imatinib Metabolism in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Daniel T; Cox, Hannah K; Menelaou, Andrew; Yeung, David T; White, Deborah L; Hughes, Timothy P; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effects of the CYP2C8*3 and *4 polymorphisms on imatinib metabolism and plasma imatinib concentrations in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients. We genotyped 210 CML patients from the TIDELII trial receiving imatinib 400-800 mg/day for CYP2C8*3 (rs11572080, rs10509681) and *4 (rs1058930). Steady-state trough total plasma N-desmethyl imatinib (major metabolite):imatinib concentration ratios (metabolic ratios) and trough total plasma imatinib concentrations were compared between genotypes (one-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc). CYP2C8*3 (n = 34) and *4 (n = 15) carriers had significantly higher (P  50% higher for CYP2C8*1/*4 than for CYP2C8*1/*1 and CYP2C8*3 carriers (2.18 ± 0.66 vs. 1.45 ± 0.74 [P < 0.05] and 1.36 ± 0.98 μg/mL [P < 0.05], respectively). CYP2C8 genotype significantly alters imatinib metabolism in patients through gain- and loss-of-function mechanisms.

  9. Effects of Tyrosine Kinase inhibitor Imatinib (Glivec) on PDGFR-positive primary and metastatic melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straface, E.; Gambardella, L.; Vona, R.

    2009-01-01

    In summary these preliminary results indicate that Imatinib is able to induce apoptosis in metastatic cells and to sensitize these cells to pro-apoptotic agents commonly used in melanoma therapy, e.g. radiation or Cisplatin. Conversely, primary melanoma cells seem to be intrinsically resistant either to Imatinib given alone or in combination with Cisplatin or radiation. By contrast, these cells underwent autophagy and replicative senescence boostering their survival. Interestingly, the use of Imatinib in combination with anti-CD95/Fas antibodies sensitizes primary melanoma cells to apoptosis

  10. The clinical effect of deferoxamine mesylate on edema after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Chunpeng; Kong, Zhiping; Xu, Yan; Liu, Guangzhi; Gao, Xuguang

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that 3 days of 62 mg/kg/day deferoxamine infusion (maximum dose not to exceed 6000 mg/day) is safe and tolerated by intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of deferoxamine mesylate for edema resolution and hematoma absorption after ICH. From February 2013 to May 2014, spontaneous ICH patients diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) within 18 hours of onset were evaluated. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental group and a control group. The treatment of the two groups was similar except that the experimental group received deferoxamine mesylate. Patients were evaluated by CT and neurology scale at the time of admission, and on the fourth, eighth, and fifteenth day (or at discharge) after admission. Patients were followed up for the first 30 days and clinical data of the two groups were compared. Forty-two patients completed 30 days of follow-up by May 2014; 21 cases in the experimental group and 21 cases in the control group. The control group's relative edema volume on the fifteenth day (or discharge) was 10.26 ± 17.54, which was higher than the experimental group (1.91 ± 1.94; P edema volume on the fourth, eighth, and fifteenth day (or discharge) was higher than the experimental group (P edema after ICH, although further investigation is required to form definitive conclusions. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-14004979.

  11. Activation of PDGFr-β Signaling Pathway after Imatinib and Radioimmunotherapy Treatment in Experimental Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Michio [Minamata City Hospital and Medical Center, Minamata City, Kumamoto 867 (Japan); Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P.; Enke, Charles A.; Mack, Elizabeth; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina, E-mail: jbaranow@unmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, J. Bruce Henriksen Cancer Research Laboratories, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2011-05-25

    Pancreatic cancer does not respond to a single-agent imatinib therapy. Consequently, multimodality treatments are contemplated. Published data indicate that in colorectal cancer, imatinib and radioimmunotherapy synergize to delay tumor growth. In pancreatic cancer, the tumor response is additive. This disparity of outcomes merited further studies because interactions between these modalities depend on the imatinib-induced reduction of the tumor interstitial fluid pressure. The examination of human and murine PDGFr-β/PDGF-B pathways in SW1990 pancreatic cancer xenografts revealed that the human branch is practically dormant in untreated tumors but the insult on the stromal component produces massive responses of human cancer cells. Inhibition of the stromal PDGFr-β with imatinib activates human PDGFr-β/PDGF-B signaling loop, silent in untreated xenografts, via an apparent paracrine rescue pathway. Responses are treatment-and time-dependent. Soon after treatment, levels of human PDGFr-β, compared to untreated tumors, are 3.4×, 12.4×, and 5.7× higher in imatinib-, radioimmunotherapy + imatinib-, and radioimmunotherapy-treated tumors, respectively. A continuous 14-day irradiation of imatinib-treated xenografts reduces levels of PDGFr-β and phosphorylated PDGFr-β by 5.3× and 4×, compared to earlier times. Human PDGF-B is upregulated suggesting that the survival signaling via the autocrine pathway is also triggered after stromal injury. These findings indicate that therapies targeting pancreatic cancer stromal components may have unintended mitogenic effects and that these effects can be reversed when imatinib is used in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy.

  12. Activation of PDGFr-β Signaling Pathway after Imatinib and Radioimmunotherapy Treatment in Experimental Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Michio; Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P.; Enke, Charles A.; Mack, Elizabeth; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer does not respond to a single-agent imatinib therapy. Consequently, multimodality treatments are contemplated. Published data indicate that in colorectal cancer, imatinib and radioimmunotherapy synergize to delay tumor growth. In pancreatic cancer, the tumor response is additive. This disparity of outcomes merited further studies because interactions between these modalities depend on the imatinib-induced reduction of the tumor interstitial fluid pressure. The examination of human and murine PDGFr-β/PDGF-B pathways in SW1990 pancreatic cancer xenografts revealed that the human branch is practically dormant in untreated tumors but the insult on the stromal component produces massive responses of human cancer cells. Inhibition of the stromal PDGFr-β with imatinib activates human PDGFr-β/PDGF-B signaling loop, silent in untreated xenografts, via an apparent paracrine rescue pathway. Responses are treatment-and time-dependent. Soon after treatment, levels of human PDGFr-β, compared to untreated tumors, are 3.4×, 12.4×, and 5.7× higher in imatinib-, radioimmunotherapy + imatinib-, and radioimmunotherapy-treated tumors, respectively. A continuous 14-day irradiation of imatinib-treated xenografts reduces levels of PDGFr-β and phosphorylated PDGFr-β by 5.3× and 4×, compared to earlier times. Human PDGF-B is upregulated suggesting that the survival signaling via the autocrine pathway is also triggered after stromal injury. These findings indicate that therapies targeting pancreatic cancer stromal components may have unintended mitogenic effects and that these effects can be reversed when imatinib is used in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy

  13. Effects of co-dergocrine mesylate (Hydergine) in multi-infarct dementia as evaluated by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Haruo; Kogure, Kyuya; Kawashima, Koichiro; Ido, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Hatazawa, Jun.

    1990-01-01

    Three female patients aged from 74 to 79 with multi-infarct dementia were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the effect of co-dergocrine mesylate (Hydergine) on cerebral glucose metabolism. The cerebral glucose utilization (CMRGlc) of each patient was evaluated by PET scan using 2-deoxy-[ 18 F]-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG). Following the first PET study, 0.04 mg/kg of co-dergocrine mesylate was injected intravenously with 250 ml saline solution, and then the second PET study was performed. The CMRGlc was determined from the images of the PET scan and the radioactivity of 18 F in the plasma. After the administration of co-dergocrine mesylate, the value of CMRGlc increased significantly in the cerebral cortex (p<0.01 and p<0.05) and basal ganglia (p<0.05) compared with values before the administration, but no significant increase was found in the centrum semiovale. These results suggest that co-dergocrine mesylate stimulates glucose metabolism of neurons in the human brain. (author)

  14. A radioprotective effect of imatinib (Gleevec registered) in human squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartkowiak, D.; Hipp, P.R.; Roettinger, E.M.; Mendonca, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To study the radiation response-modifying effect of imatinib (Gleevec registered ) in a squamous cell carcinoma line, PECA. Patients and Methods: Cytotoxicity was determined by colony forming and multiplying capacity. Drug stability was shown by HPLC. Multidrug resistance phenotype was studied by rhodamine-123 efflux. Cell-cycle responses were measured by flow cytometry. Homologous recombination repair was determined by Rad51 immunohistochemistry. Results: Inactivating 50% of the PECA cells required approximately 7 μM imatinib. The drug did not decay nor was it degraded during test periods. Drug efflux occurred only to a minor extent. Multiplying capacity but not survival fractions revealed a radioprotective effect of imatinib. There were only minor cell-cycle alterations in the presence of imatinib but the rate of Rad51-positive repair foci was significantly increased. Conclusion: PECA cells apparently lack a highly specific target for imatinib. In cells surviving at high drug concentrations, imatinib may exert a radioprotective effect on multiplying capacity by inducing DNA repair. Under prolonged exposure, drug-resistant cells may show an accelerated recovery from acute or delayed radiation damage. (orig.)

  15. Could imatinib replace surgery in esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salam, Suhail N.; El-Teraifi, Hassan A.; Taha, Mazen S.

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are cellular spindle, or epithelioid tumors that occur in the stomach, intestine and rarely in the esophagus. A 61-years-old man was complaining of resistant dry cough with dysphagia for one month duration. Upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopic examination showed a polypoid mass 30 cm from the incisors obstructing 50% of the lumen, where multiple biopsies were taken. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a mass in the wall of the esophagus extending into the thoracic cavity. Histologically, the stained sections with routine hematoxylin and eosin as well as the immunohistochemical stainsfor CD117, CD34, S100, vimentin and smooth muscle actin confirmed the diagnosis of esophageal GIST. The patient was treated with imatinib 400mg/day. There was a dramatic reduction in the size of the tumor with successful improvement of his symptoms after 2 months of treatment, which was confirmed by reapeated upper GIT endoscopy, and MRI. (author)

  16. Leucemia Mielóide Crônica: causas de falha do tratamento com mesilato de imatinibe Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: causes of treatment failure with imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia B. B. Pagnano

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O mesilato de imatinibe (MI é atualmente o tratamento de escolha da Leucemoa Mielóide Crônica (LMC, mas, apesar dos excelentes resultados, não é capaz de erradicar completamente a doença, podendo ocorrer resistência ao tratamento. O mecanismo mais conhecido de resistência é o desenvolvimento de mutações do BCR-ABL, que impedem a ação ligação adequada do imatinibe à quinase, além de amplificação gênica e evolução clonal. No entanto, há uma série de outros mecanismos envolvidos e ainda pouco estudados, como alterações na absorção, efluxo e influxo de droga para o interior das células. Devem-se também considerar outros fatores, como aderência ao tratamento e uso de medicamentos concomitantes que podem interferir com imatinibe, diminuindo sua ação. O entendimento desses mecanismos poderá contribuir no desenvolvimento de novas estratégias para o tratamento dos casos resistentes.Imatinib is currently the treatment of choice of CML, but despite of the excellent results, it is not able to completely eradicate the disease and resistance may occur. The most studied mechanism is the presence of ABL kinase mutations that interfere with imatinib binding and action, gene amplification and clonal evolution. However, there are other mechanisms involved and less studied such as drug absorption and influx and efflux of imatinib. Besides the true causes of resistance, compliance is always a concern and also drug interaction should be checked. An understanding of these mechanisms will certainly contribute to develop new strategies for the treatment of resistant cases.

  17. Molecular response to imatinib & its correlation with mRNA expression levels of imatinib influx & efflux transporters in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia in chronic phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Malhotra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Imatinib is the standard first-line treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients. About 20 to 30 per cent patients develop resistance to imatinib and fail imatinib treatment. One of the mechanisms proposed is varying expression levels of the drug transporters. This study was aimed to determine the expression levels of imatinib transporter genes (OCT1, ABCB1, ABCG2 in CML patients and to correlate these levels with molecular response. Methods: Sixty three CML chronic phase patients who were on 400 mg/day imatinib for more than two years were considered for gene expression analysis study for OCT1, ABCB1 and ABCG2 genes. These were divided into responders and non-responders. The relative transcript expression levels of the three genes were compared between these two categories. The association between the expression values of these three genes was also determined. Results: No significant difference in the expression levels of OCT1, ABCB1 and ABCG2 was found between the two categories. The median transcript expression levels of OCT1, ABCB1 and ABCG2 genes in responders were 26.54, 10.78 and 0.64 versus 33.48, 7.09 and 0.53 in non-responders, respectively. A positive association was observed between the expression of the ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporter genes (r=0.407, P<0.05 while no association was observed between the expression of either of the ABC transporter genes with the OCT1 gene. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of imatinib transporter genes were not correlated with molecular response in CML patients. Further studies need to be done on a large sample of CML patients to confirm these findings.

  18. Lack of inhibitory effects of the anti-fibrotic drug imatinib on endothelial cell functions in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venalis, Paulius; Maurer, Britta; Akhmetshina, Alfiya; Busch, Nicole; Dees, Clara; Stürzl, Michael; Zwerina, Jochen; Jüngel, Astrid; Gay, Steffen; Schett, Georg; Distler, Oliver; Distler, Jörg H W

    2009-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a systemic autoimmune disease that is characterized by microangiopathy with progressive loss of capillaries and tissue fibrosis. Imatinib exerts potent anti-fibrotic effects and is currently evaluated in clinical trials. The aim of the present study was to exclude that the anti-fibrotic effects of imatinib are complicated by inhibitory effects on endothelial cell functions, which might augment vascular disease in SSc. Endothelial cells and mice were treated with pharmacologically relevant concentrations of imatinib. The expression of markers of vascular activation was assessed with real-time PCR. Proliferation was analysed with the cell counting experiments and the MTT assay. Apoptosis was quantified with caspase 3 assays, annexin V in vitro and with TUNEL staining in vivo. Migration was studied with scratch and transwell assays. Tube forming was investigated with the matrigel assay. Imatinib did not alter the expression of markers of vascular activation. Imatinib did not increase the percentage of annexin V positive cells or the activity of caspase 3. No reduction in proliferation or metabolic activity of endothelial cells was observed. Imatinib did not affect migration of endothelial cells and did not reduce the formation of capillary tubes. Consistent with the in vitro data, no difference in the number of apoptotic endothelial cells was observed in vivo in mice treated with imatinib. Imatinib does not inhibit activation, viability, proliferation, migration or tube forming of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, treatment with imatinib might not augment further endothelial cell damage in SSc.

  19. PDGFRα promoter polymorphisms and expression patterns influence risk of development of imatinib-induced thrombocytopenia in chronic myeloid leukemia: A study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru, Sameer Ahmad; Mir, Rashid; Bhat, Musadiq; Najar, Imtiyaz; Zuberi, Mariyam; Sumi, Mamta; Masroor, Mirza; Gupta, Naresh; Saxena, Alpana

    2017-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor has been implicated in many malignant and non-malignant diseases. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α is a tyrosine kinase and a side target for imatinib, a revolutionary drug for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia that has dramatically improved the survival of chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Given the importance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor in platelet development and its inhibition by imatinib, it was intriguing to analyze the role of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α in relation to imatinib treatment in the development of imatinib-induced thrombocytopenia in chronic myeloid leukemia patients. We hypothesized that two known functional polymorphisms, +68GA insertion/deletion and -909C/A, in the promoter region of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α gene may affect the susceptibility of chronic myeloid leukemia patients receiving imatinib treatment to the development of thrombocytopenia. A case-control study was conducted among a cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia patients admitted to the Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi, India. A set of 100 patients of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase and 100 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. After initiation of imatinib treatment, the hematological response of chronic myeloid leukemia patients was monitored regularly for 2 years, in which the development of thrombocytopenia was the primary end point. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α promoter polymorphisms +68GA ins/del and -909C/A were studied by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α messenger RNA expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The messenger RNA expression results were expressed as 2 -Δct ± standard deviation. The distribution of +68GA ins/del promoter polymorphism genotypes differed significantly between the thrombocytopenic and non-thrombocytopenic chronic

  20. Identification of cysteine-644 as the covalent site of attachment of dexamethasone 21-mesylate to murine glucocorticoid receptors in WEHI-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.I.; Bodwell, J.E.; Mendel, D.B.; Ciardelli, T.; North, W.G.; Munck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Dexamethasone 21-mesylate is a highly specific synthetic glucocorticoid derivative that binds covalently to glucocorticoid receptors via sulfhydryl groups. The authors have identified the amino acid that reacts with the dexamethasone 21-mesylate by using enzymatic digestion and microsequencing for radiolabel. Nonactivated glucocorticoid receptors obtained from labeling intact WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells with [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate were immunopurified and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Trypsin digestion followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (reversed-phase HPLC) produced a single [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled peptide. Automated Edman degradation of this peptide revealed that the [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate was located at position 5 from the amino terminus. Dual-isotope labeling studies with [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate and [ 35 S]methionine demonstrated that this peptide contained methionine. Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion of [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled steroid-binding subunits generated a different radiolabeled peptide containing label at position 7 from the amino terminus. On the basis of the published amino acid sequence of the murine glucocorticoid receptor, their data clearly identify cysteine-644 as the single residue in the steroid-binding domain that covalently binds dexamethasone 21-mesylate. They have confirmed this finding by demonstrating that a synthetic peptide representing the amino acid sequence 640-650 of the murine glucocorticoid receptor behaves in an identical manner on reversed-phase HPLC as the trypsin-generated peptide from intact cells

  1. Synthesis of chitosan-PEO hydrogels via mesylation and regioselective Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirino, Pasquale; Laurino, Rosaria; Maglio, Giovanni; Malinconico, Mario; d'Ayala, Giovanna Gomez; Laurienzo, Paola

    2014-11-04

    In this work, a well-defined hydrogel was developed by coupling chitosan with PEO through "click chemistry". Azide functionalities were introduced onto chitosan, through mesylation of C-6 hydroxyl groups, and reacted with a di-alkyne PEO by a regioselective Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition. This synthetic approach allowed us to obtain a hydrogel with a controlled crosslinking degree. In fact, the extent of coupling is strictly dependent on the amount of azido groups on chitosan, which in turn can be easily modulated. The obtained hydrogel, with a crosslinking degree of around 90%, showed interesting swelling properties. With respect to chitosan hydrogels reported in literature, a considerably higher equilibrium uptake was reached (940%). The possibility to control the crosslinking degree of hydrogel and its capability to rapidly absorb high amounts of water make this material suitable for several applications, such as controlled drug release and wound healing. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. → PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. → PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. → PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. → PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  3. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung [Department of Food Science and Nutrition and RIC Center, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Cheon [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hyun Sook, E-mail: wazzup@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  4. Dasatinib, high-dose imatinib and nilotinib for the treatment of imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveman, E; Cooper, K; Bryant, J; Colquitt, J L; Frampton, G K; Clegg, A

    2012-01-01

    The present report was commissioned as a supplement to an existing technology assessment report produced by the Peninsula Technology Assessment Group (PenTAG), which evaluated the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dasatinib and nilotinib in patients who are either resistant or intolerant to standard-dose imatinib. This report evaluates the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dasatinib, nilotinib and high-dose imatinib within their licensed indications for the treatment of people with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) who are resistant to standard-dose imatinib. Bibliographic databases were searched from inception to January 2011, including The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations. Bibliographies of related papers were screened, key conferences were searched, and experts were contacted to identify additional published and unpublished references. This report includes systematic reviews of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness studies, an independent appraisal of information submitted by drug manufacturers to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), an independent appraisal of the PenTAG economic evaluation, and new economic analyses adapting the PenTAG economic model. Standard systematic procedures involving two reviewers to maintain impartiality and transparency, and to minimise bias, were conducted. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Four of these studies included new data published since the PenTAG report; all of these were in chronic-phase CML. No relevant studies on the clinical effectiveness of nilotinib were found. The clinical effectiveness studies on dasatinib [one arm of a randomised controlled trial (RCT)] and high-dose imatinib (one arm of a RCT and three single-arm cohort studies) had major methodological limitations. These limitations precluded a comparison of the different arms within the RCT. Data from the studies are

  5. Protonation effects on the UV/Vis absorption spectra of imatinib: a theoretical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grante, Ilze; Actins, Andris; Orola, Liana

    2014-08-14

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of protonation effects on the UV/Vis absorption spectra of imatinib showed systematic changes of absorption depending on the pH, and a new absorption band appeared below pH 2. These changes in the UV/Vis absorption spectra were interpreted using quantum chemical calculations. The geometry of various imatinib cations in the gas phase and in ethanol solution was optimized with the DFT/B3LYP method. The resultant geometries were compared to the experimentally determined crystal structures of imatinib salts. The semi-empirical ZINDO-CI method was employed to calculate the absorption lines and electronic transitions. Our study suggests that the formation of the extra near-UV absorption band resulted from an increase of imatinib trication concentration in the solution, while the rapid increase of the first absorption maximum could be attributed to both the formation of imatinib trication and tetracation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Imatinib Intolerance Is Associated With Blastic Phase Development in Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles-Velázquez, Jorge Luis; Hurtado-Monroy, Rafael; Vargas-Viveros, Pablo; Carrillo-Muñoz, Silvia; Candelaria-Hernández, Myrna

    2016-08-01

    Over the past years, the survival of patients with Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML Ph(+)) has increased as a result of therapy with tyrosin kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Intolerance to TKIs has been described in approximately 20% of patients receiving treatment. We studied the incidence of imatinib intolerance in patients with CML Ph(+) and their outcome in our CML reference site, as there is no information about the evolution of patients intolerant to TKIs. A group of 86 patients with CML Ph(+) receiving imatinib monotherapy who abandoned treatment were the basis for this study. We present the trends of their disease evolution. The median of age at diagnosis was 42 years. Within a year, 19 (22%) of 86 patients developed imatinib intolerance, all of them with grade III or IV disease that required imatinib dose reduction or discontinuation. Of these patients, 16 (84%) of 19 developed transformation to blastic phase. The cumulative incidences of blastic phase development were 47% in the nonintolerant group and 84% in the intolerant group. There was a relative risk for those with imatinib intolerance to develop blastic phase of 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.28 to 2.42) (P treatment is available. Future research should to determine whether the origin of this evolution is really due to the intolerance itself or whether it is due to a more aggressive form of the disease, perhaps related to genetic transformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Imatinib Increases Serum Creatinine by Inhibiting Its Tubular Secretion in a Reversible Fashion in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Rea, Delphine; Serrano, Fidéline; Stehlé, Thomas; Gardin, Claude; Rousselot, Philippe; Peraldi, Marie-Noëlle; Flamant, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring renal function is important in imatinib-treated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia because serum creatinine may increase during the course of therapy. The mechanism of this increase and its reversibility on treatment cessation have never been investigated. We retrospectively analyzed data from imatinib-treated patients explored in our renal physiology unit with measurement of glomerular filtration rate (urinary clearance of (51)CrEDTA) and of urinary clearance and tubular secretion of creatinine. Results were compared with those of controls matched for measured glomerular filtration rate, age, gender, and ethnicity. We also analyzed variations of serum creatinine before and during imatinib cessation and after imatinib resumption in patients enrolled in imatinib discontinuation studies. In 4 imatinib-treated patients who underwent thorough renal exploration, the part of creatinine clearance due to tubular secretion was negligible (2.4, 3.1, -1.3, and 2.8 mL/min) and significantly lower than that measured in their respective controls (17.7 ± 5.6, 43.0 ± 18.0, 23.1 ± 6.7, and 18.6 ± 5.6 mL/min, P creatinine tubular secretion (20.3 vs. 17.9 ± 5.2 mL/min in the control population, P = .2). In 15 patients of imatinib discontinuation studies, a median decrease in serum creatinine of 17.9% was observed after imatinib cessation. Resumption of treatment in 6 patients led to a median increase in serum creatinine of 18.8%. Imatinib completely blunts tubular secretion of creatinine, a previously unreported pharmacologic property. This inhibition increases serum creatinine independently of any glomerular dysfunction and is fully reversible on imatinib cessation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Randomized assessment of imatinib in patients with acute ischaemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, N; Thorén, M; Höjeberg, B; Käll, T-B; Laska, A-C; Sjöstrand, C; Höijer, J; Almqvist, H; Holmin, S; Lilja, A; Fredriksson, L; Lawrence, D; Eriksson, U; Ahmed, N

    2017-03-01

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to restore blood-brain barrier integrity and reduce infarct size, haemorrhagic transformation and cerebral oedema in stroke models treated with tissue plasminogen activator. We evaluated the safety of imatinib, based on clinical and neuroradiological data, and its potential influence on neurological and functional outcomes. A phase II randomized trial was performed in patients with acute ischaemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. A total of 60 patients were randomly assigned to four groups [3 (active): 1 (control)]; the active treatment groups received oral imatinib for 6 days at three dose levels (400, 600 and 800 mg). Primary outcome was any adverse event; secondary outcomes were haemorrhagic transformation, cerebral oedema, neurological severity on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at 7 days and at 3 months and functional outcomes on the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Four serious adverse events were reported, which resulted in three deaths (one in the control group and two in the 400-mg dose group; one patient in the latter group did not receive active treatment and the other received two doses). Nonserious adverse events were mostly mild, resulting in full recovery. Imatinib ameliorated neurological outcomes with an improvement of 0.6 NIHSS points per 100 mg imatinib (P = 0.02). For the 800-mg group, the mean unadjusted and adjusted NIHSS improvements were 4 (P = 0.037) and 5 points (P = 0.012), respectively, versus controls. Functional independence (mRS 0-2) increased by 18% versus controls (61 vs. 79; P = 0.296). This phase II study showed that imatinib is safe and tolerable and may reduce neurological disability in patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis after ischaemic stroke. A confirmatory randomized trial is currently underway. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The

  9. The treatment of pediatric chronic myelogenous leukemia in the imatinib era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Wook Lee

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Childhood chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a rare hematologic disease, with limited literature on the methods of treatment. Previously, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT was considered the only curative treatment for this disease. Treatment with imatinib, a selective inhibitor of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TKI, has resulted in prolonged molecular response with limited drug toxicity. Imatinib is now implemented in the primary treatment regimen for children, but the paucity of evidence on its ability to result in permanent cure and the potential complications that may arise from long-term treatment with TKIs have prevented imatinib from superseding HSCT as the primary means of curative treatment in children. The results of allogeneic HSCT in children with CML are similar to those observed in adults; HSCT-related complications such as transplant-related mortality and graft-versus-host disease remain significant challenges. An overall consensus has been formed with regards to the need for HSCT in patients with imatinib resistance or those with advanced-phase disease. However, issues such as when to undertake HSCT in chronic-phase CML patients or how best to treat patients who have relapsed after HSCT are still controversial. The imatinib era calls for a reevaluation of the role of HSCT in the treatment of CML. Specific guidelines for the treatment of pediatric CML have not yet been formulated, underscoring the importance of prospective studies on issues such as duration of imatinib treatment, optimal timing of HSCT and the type of conditioning utilized, possible treatment preand post-HSCT, and the role of second-generation TKIs.

  10. Combination of pegylated IFN-α2b with imatinib increases molecular response rates in patients with low- or intermediate-risk chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Markevärn, Berit

    2011-01-01

    Biologic and clinical observations suggest that combining imatinib with IFN-a may improve treatment outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We randomized newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML patients with a low or intermediate Sokal risk score and in imatinib-induced complete hematologic remission......%) discontinued imatinib treatment (1 because of blastic transformation in imatinib arm). In addition, in the combination arm, 34 patients (61%) discontinued Peg-IFN-a2b, most because of toxicity. The MMR rate at 12 months was significantly higher in the imatinib plus Peg-IFN-a2b arm (82%) compared...... with the imatinib monotherapy arm (54%; intention-to-treat, P = .002). The MMR rate increased with the duration of Peg-IFN-a2b treatment ( 12-week MMR rate 91%). Thus, the addition of even relatively short periods of Peg-IFN-a2b to imatinib markedly increased the MMR rate at 12 months...

  11. Phase I study of imatinib, cisplatin and 5-fluoruracil or capecitabine in advanced esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, Martina; Becker, Karen; Schulte, Nadine; Belle, Sebastian; Hofheinz, Ralf; Krause, Annekatrin; Schmid, Roland M; Röcken, Christoph; Ebert, Matthias P

    2012-01-01

    Despite all benefit provided by established therapies prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor. Targeted inhibition of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) by imatinib may influence tumor growth and amplify chemotherapeutic effects. This phase I study evaluated dose limiting toxicity (DLT) of imatinib combinated with chemotherapy according to a 3-patient cohort dose-escalating design. Thirty-five patients received cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 d1 q 3w)/ capecitabine (1250 mg/m 2 bid d1-14 q 21) or cisplatin (50 mg/m 2 d1 q 2w)/ 5-fluoruracil (2 g/m 2 d1, q 1w). Imatinib was started d - 4 with dose escalation from 300 to 700 mg QD in 100 mg steps. At imatinib dose level 1 (300mg) one DLT was observed, three more patients were enrolled without further DLT. At dose level 5 (700 mg) two gastric perforations occurred, so 600 mg imatinib emerged as the maximum tolerated dose. Major grade 3/4 toxicities were nausea (6%), anemia (6%) and fatigue (3%). Response evaluation revealed partial response in 27% and stable disease in 43% of the assessable patients. Combination of imatinib and chemotherapy is well tolerated. Response rates were not superior to those of standard therapy. Further investigations of a larger group of patients are required to confirm the amplification of chemotherapy effects by imatinib. European Clinical Trials Database: Eudra-CT2006-005792-17 and Clinical Trials Database: NCT00601510

  12. Imatinib and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST: a selective targeted therapy Imatinib y tumor del estroma gastrointestinal (GIST: un tratamiento selectivo frente a una diana molecular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fernández

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. They originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal and are characterized by an anomalous receptor for a growth factor with tyrosine-kinase activity (c-kit. This anomaly causes a permanent activation of the receptor and uncontrolled cell growth. These tumors show a poor response to traditional chemotherapy drugs, and are thus associated with low survival in cases of advanced disease. Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is an example of selective targeted oncologic therapy that induces improved survival in these patients. We discuss two cases of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors with a good response to imatinib, and also review the pathophysiology and treatment-related outcome of this type of tumors. We include results from clinical phase-III studies.Los tumores del estroma gastrointestinal son los tumores mesenquimales más frecuentes del tracto digestivo y se originan de las células intersticiales de Cajal. Se caracterizan por presentar un receptor para el factor de crecimiento con actividad tirosin kinasa (c-kit anómalo que condiciona su activación permanente y un crecimiento celular incontrolado. Tienen una baja supervivencia en casos de enfermedad avanzada, con escasa respuesta a los agentes quimioterápicos tradicionales. El imatinib es un fármaco inhibidor de la tirosín kinasa y un ejemplo de terapia oncológica selectiva que condiciona un importante aumento en la supervivencia de estos pacientes. Se presentan 2 casos de enfermedad metastásica con buena respuesta a imatinib, así como una revisión sobre la fisiopatología y evolución en el tratamiento de este tipo de tumores, incluyendo resultados de estudios en fase III.

  13. Efficacy and safety of casopitant mesylate, a neurokinin 1 (NK1)-receptor antagonist, in prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients receiving cisplatin-based highly emetogenic chemotherapy: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunberg, Steven M; Rolski, Janusz; Strausz, Janos

    2009-01-01

    in the control group. The most common serious adverse events were neutropenia (n=5 [3%] in the control group, n=3 [1%] in the single-dose oral casopitant mesylate group, and n=11 [4%] in the 3-day intravenous plus oral casopitant mesylate group), febrile neutropenia (n=1 [

  14. An expeditious synthesis of imatinib and analogues utilising flow chemistry methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkin, Mark D; Baxendale, Ian R; Ley, Steven V

    2013-03-21

    A flow-based route to imatinib, the API of Gleevec, was developed and the general procedure then used to generate a number of analogues which were screened for biological activity against Abl1. The flow synthesis required minimal manual intervention and was achieved despite the poor solubility of many of the reaction components.

  15. Efficacy of escalated imatinib combined with cytarabine in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, Wendy; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.; van der Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Smit, Willem M.; Kersten, Marie José; Daenen, Simon M. G. J.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Ferrant, Augustin; Schattenberg, Anton V. M. B.; Sonneveld, Pieter; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Wittebol, Shulamit; Willemze, Roelof; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Beverloo, H. Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve the molecular response rate and prevent resistance to treatment, combination therapy with different dosages of imatinib and cytarabine was studied in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the HOVON-51 study. Having reported feasibility previously, we hereby

  16. Efficacy of escalated imatinib combined with cytarabine in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, W.; Janssen, J.J.W.M.; van der Holt, B.; Verhoef, G.E.G.; Smit, W.M.; Kersten, M.J.; Daenen, S.M.G.J.; Verdouck, L.F.; Ferrant, A.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Sonneveld, P.; Kooy, M.V.M.; Wittebol, S.; Willemze, R.; Wijermans, P.W.; Beverloo, H.B.; Lowenberg, B.; Valk, P.J.M.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Cornelissen, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to improve the molecular response rate and prevent resistance to treatment, combination therapy with different dosages of imatinib and cytarabine was studied in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the HOVON-51 study. Design and Methods Having reported

  17. Efficacy of escalated imatinib combined with cytarabine in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, Wendy; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.; van der Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Smit, Willem M.; Kersten, Marie Jose; Daenen, Simon M. G. J.; Verdouck, Leo F.; Ferrant, Augustin; Schattenberg, Anton V. M. B.; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kooy, Marinus van Marwijk; Wittebol, Shulamit; Willemze, Roelof; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Beverloo, H. Berna; Lowenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    Background In order to improve the molecular response rate and prevent resistance to treatment, combination therapy with different dosages of imatinib and cytarabine was studied in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the HOVON-51 study. Design and Methods Having reported

  18. Spectrophotometric Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate in Pharmaceutical Formulations Through Ion-Pair Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marothu Vamsi Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Four simple and sensitive ion-pairing spectrophotometric methods have been described for the assay of gemifloxacin mesylate (GFX either in pure form or in pharmaceutical formulations. The developed methods involve formation of colored chloroform extractable ion-pair complexes of the drug with safranin O (SFN O and methylene blue (MB in basic medium; Napthol blue 12BR (NB 12BR and azocaramine G (AG in acidic medium. The extracted complexes showed absorbance maxima at 525, 650, 620 and 540 nm for SFN O, MB, NB 12BR and AG, respectively.Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration ranges 3-15, 4-20, 2-10 and 2-10 μg/mL with molar absorptivity of 2.81 × 104, 2.20 x 104, 4.02 × 104 and 4.15 × 104 L mole−1 cm−1 and relative standard deviation of 0.077, 0.104, 0.080 and 0.103% for SFN O, MB, NB 12BR and AG, respectively. These methods have been successfully applied for the assay of drug in pharmaceutical formulations. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. Results of analysis were validated statistically and through recovery studies.

  19. Spectrophotometric Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate, Moxifloxacin Hydrochloride, and Enrofloxacin in Pharmaceutical Formulations Using Acid Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A. Gouda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple, rapid, and extractive spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of some fluoroquinolones antibiotics: gemifloxacin mesylate (GMF, moxifloxacin hydrochloride (MXF, and enrofloxacin (ENF in pure forms and pharmaceutical formulations. These methods are based on the formation of ion-pair complexes between the basic drugs and acid dyes, namely, bromocresol green (BCG, bromocresol purple (BCP, bromophenol blue (BPB, bromothymol blue (BTB, and methyl orange (MO in acidic buffer solutions. The formed complexes were extracted with chloroform and measured at 420, 408, 416, 415, and 422 nm for BCG, BCP, BPB, BTB, and MO, respectively, for GMF; at 410, 415, 416, and 420 nm for BCP, BTB, BPB, and MO, respectively, for MXF; and at 419 and 414 nm for BCG and BTB, respectively, in case of ENF. The analytical parameters and their effects are investigated. Beer’s law was obeyed in the ranges 1.0–30, 1.0–20, and 2.0–24 μg mL−1 for GMF, MXF, and ENF, respectively. The proposed methods have been applied successfully for the analysis of the studied drugs in pure forms and pharmaceutical formulations. Statistical comparison of the results with the reference methods showed excellent agreement and indicated no significant difference in accuracy and precision.

  20. Effect of gamma-irradiation on biodegradable microspheres loaded with rasagiline mesylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Marcos; Barcia, Emilia; Negro, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the influence of gamma-irradiation was evaluated on the physicochemical characteristics and in vitro release of rasagiline mesylate (RM), a selective MAO-B inhibitor used in Parkinson's disease, from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Microspheres were prepared using PLGA 50:50 by the solvent evaporation technique (O/W emulsion). Microspheres were sterilized by gamma-irradiation and their influence was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser light diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro drug release. Gamma-irradiation of RM-loaded microspheres did not affect EE, DSC and XRD patterns. After gamma-irradiation, changes on the surface were observed by SEM, but no significant difference in mean particle size was observed. GPC measurements showed a decrease in molecular weight of the polymer after five days of in vitro release. The similarity factor value between irradiated and non-irradiates microspheres was <50, indicating the non-similarity of the release profiles. The sterilization technique had an effect on the integrity of polymeric system, significantly affecting in vitro release of RM from PLGA microspheres. Therefore, from our results we conclude that gamma-irradiation is not a suitable sterilization procedure for this formulation

  1. Quantitative determination of pefloxacin mesylate by residual-base neutralisation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HULIKALCHANDRA SHEKAR PRAMEELA

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This work describes two procedures based on residual base determination for the quantification of pefloxacin mesylate (PFM in bulk drug and in pharmaceutical products. In the first method involving titrimetry, the drug solution is treated with a measured excess of sodium hydroxide followed by back titration of the residual base with hydrochloric acid using a phenol red-bromothymol blue mixed indicator. The second spectrophotometrie method involves treatment of a fixed amount of sodium hydroxide – phenol red mixture with varying amounts of the drug, and measuring the decrease in the absorbance of the dye at 560 nm. In the titrimetric method, a reaction stoichiometry of 1:1 was found in the quantification range of 4–20 mg of drug. The spectrophotometric method allows the determination of PFM in the 5–40 mg ml-1 range. The molar absorptivity is 5.91¤103 l mol-1 cm-1 and the Sandell sensitivity is 56.37 ng cm-2. The methods were applied successfully to the determination of PFM in pharmaceutical preparations.

  2. Enhanced Silver Nanoparticle Chemiluminescence Method for the Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate using Sequential Injection Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarfaj, N.A.; Aly, F.A.; Tamimi, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    A sequential injection analysis (SIA) with chemiluminescence detection has been proposed for the determination of the antibiotic gemifloxacin mesylate (GFX). The developed method is based on the enhancement effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the chemiluminescence (CL) signal of luminol-potassium ferricyanide reaction in alkaline medium. The introduction of gemifloxacin in this system produced a significant decrease in the CL intensity in presence of (Ag NPs). The optimum conditions for CL emission were investigated. Linear relationship between the decrease in CL intensity and concentration was obtained in the range 0.01-1000 ng mL-1, (r = 0.9997) with detection limit of 2.0 pg mL-1 and quantification limit of 0.01 pg mL-1. The relative standard deviation was 1.3 %. The proposed method was employed for the determination of gemifloxacin in bulk drug, in its pharmaceutical dosage forms and biological fluids such as human serum and urine. The interference of some common additive compounds such as glucose, lactose, starch, talc and magnesium stearate was investigated, and no interference was found from these excipients. The obtained SIA results were statistically compared with those obtained from a reported method and did not show any significant difference at confidence level 95%. (author)

  3. Minimal cross-intolerance with nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic or accelerated phase who are intolerant to imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhaus, Andreas; le Coutre, Philipp D.; Rosti, Gianantonio; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Jabbour, Elias; Gillis, Kathryn; Woodman, Richard C.; Blakesley, Rick E.; Giles, Francis J.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Baccarani, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Nilotinib has significant efficacy in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) and in patients with CML-CP or CML in accelerated phase (CML-AP) after imatinib failure. We investigated the occurrence of cross-intolerance to nilotinib in imatinib-intolerant patients with CML. Only 1/75 (1%) patients with nonhematologic imatinib intolerance experienced a similar grade 3/4 adverse event (AE), and 3/75 (4%) experienced a similar persistent grade 2 nonhematologic AE on nilotinib. Only 7/40 (18%) patients with hematologic imatinib intolerance discontinued nilotinib, all because of grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia. Ninety percent of imatinib-intolerant patients with CML-CP who did not have complete hematologic response (CHR) at baseline (n = 52) achieved CHR on nilotinib. Nilotinib induced a major cytogenetic response in 66% and 41% of patients with imatinib-intolerant CML-CP and CML-AP (complete cytogenetic response in 51% and 30%), respectively. Minimal cross-intolerance was confirmed in patients with imatinib-intolerant CML. The favorable tolerability of nilotinib in patients with imatinib intolerance leads to alleviation of AE-related symptoms and significant and durable responses. In addition to its established clinical benefit in patients with newly diagnosed CML and those resistant to imatinib, nilotinib is effective and well-tolerated for long-term use in patients with imatinib intolerance. This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00471497 PMID:21467546

  4. ON012380: A Non-ATP Competitive Inhibitor of BCR-ABL for the Therapy of Imatinib-Resistant CMLs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reddy, E. P

    2007-01-01

    Because it is now apparent that a significant proportion of patients chronically treated with imatinib develop resistance due to the acquisition of mutations in the kinase domain of BCR-ABL our aim...

  5. WT1 expression in peripheral leukocytes of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia serves for the prediction of Imatinib resistance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otahalová, E.; Ullmannová-Benson, Veronika; Klamová, H.; Haškovec, C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2009), s. 393-397 ISSN 0028-2685 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Imatinib * drug resistance * cml Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2009

  6. Bosutinib, dasatinib, imatinib, nilotinib, and ponatinib differentially affect the vascular molecular pathways and functionality of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover-Proaktor, Ayala; Granot, Galit; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Pasvolsky, Oren; Shapira, Saar; Raz, Oshrat; Raanani, Pia; Leader, Avi

    2018-05-09

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), nilotinib, ponatinib, and dasatinib (but not bosutinib or imatinib), are associated with vascular adverse events (VAEs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Though the mechanism is inadequately understood, an effect on vascular cells has been suggested. We investigated the effect of imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, and ponatinib on tube formation, cell viability, and gene expression of human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found a distinct genetic profile in HUVECs treated with dasatinib, ponatinib, and nilotinib compared to bosutinib and imatinib, who resembled untreated samples. However, unique gene expression and molecular pathway alterations were detected between dasatinib, ponatinib, and nilotinib. Angiogenesis/blood vessel-related pathways and HUVEC function (tube formation/viability) were adversely affected by dasatinib, ponatinib, and nilotinib but not by imatinib or bosutinib. These results correspond to the differences in VAE profiles of these TKIs, support a direct effect on vascular cells, and provide direction for future research.

  7. Ponatinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukaemia: an international, randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Jeffrey H; Chuah, Charles; Guerci-Bresler, Agnès; Rosti, Gianantonio; Simpson, David; Assouline, Sarit; Etienne, Gabriel; Nicolini, Franck E; le Coutre, Philipp; Clark, Richard E; Stenke, Leif; Andorsky, David; Oehler, Vivian; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Rivera, Victor M; Clackson, Timothy; Haluska, Frank G; Baccarani, Michele; Cortes, Jorge E; Guilhot, François; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hughes, Timothy; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Shah, Neil P; Talpaz, Moshe; Deininger, Michael W

    2016-05-01

    Ponatinib has shown potent activity against chronic myeloid leukaemia that is resistant to available treatment, although it is associated with arterial occlusion. We investigated whether this activity and safety profile would result in superior outcomes compared with imatinib in previously untreated patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. The Evaluation of Ponatinib versus Imatinib in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (EPIC) study was a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial designed to assess the efficacy and safety of ponatinib, compared with imatinib, in newly diagnosed patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia. Patients from 106 centres in 21 countries were randomly assigned (1:1, with stratification by Sokal score at diagnosis) using an interactive voice and web response system to receive oral ponatinib (45 mg) or imatinib (400 mg) once daily until progression, unacceptable toxicity, or other criteria for withdrawal were met. Eligible patients were at least 18 years of age, within 6 months of diagnosis, and Philadelphia chromosome-positive by cytogenetic assessment, with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-2, and had not previously been treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The primary endpoint was major molecular response at 12 months. Patients who remained on study and had molecular assessments at specified timepoints were studied at those timepoints. Safety analyses included all treated patients, as per study protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01650805. Between Aug 14, 2012, and Oct 9, 2013, 307 patients were randomly assigned to receive ponatinib (n=155) or imatinib (n=152). The trial was terminated early, on Oct 17, 2013, following concerns about vascular adverse events observed in patients given ponatinib in other trials. Trial termination limited assessment of the primary endpoint of major molecular response at 12 months, as only 13 patients in the imatinib group and ten patients in the

  8. Successful combination treatment of a patient with progressive juvenile localized scleroderma (morphea) using imatinib, corticosteroids, and methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamo, Yasuji; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of progressive juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS or morphea) treated with a combination of imatinib, corticosteroids, and methotrexate. This therapy halted the progressive skin thickening and the hand and finger joint deformity in the early stages of the disease. We conclude that imatinib used in addition to standard treatment with systemic corticosteroids and methotrexate may be of therapeutic benefit for individuals with JLS. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Reversal of soft-tissue local anesthesia with phentolamine mesylate in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Elliot V; Moore, Paul A; Papas, Athena S; Goodson, J Max; Navalta, Laura A; Rogy, Siegfried; Rutherford, Bruce; Yagiela, John A

    2008-08-01

    The authors conducted two multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, controlled Phase III clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of phentolamine mesylate (PM) in shortening the duration and burden of soft-tissue anesthesia. The study involved 484 subjects who received one of four commercially available local anesthetic solutions containing vasoconstrictors for restorative or scaling procedures. On completion of the dental procedure, subjects randomly received a PM or a sham injection (an injection in which a needle does not penetrate the soft tissue) in the same site as the local anesthetic injection. The investigators measured the duration of soft-tissue anesthesia by using standardized lip- and tongue-tapping procedures every five minutes for five hours. They also evaluated functional measures and subject-perceived altered function, sensation, appearance and safety. Median recovery times in the lower lip and tongue for subjects in the PM group were 70 minutes and 60 minutes, respectively. Median recovery times in the lower lip and tongue for subjects in the sham group were 155 minutes and 125 minutes, respectively. Upper lip median recovery times were 50 minutes for subjects in the PM group and 133 minutes for subjects in the sham group. These differences were significant (P < .0001). Recovery from actual functional deficits and subject-perceived altered function, sensation and appearance also showed significant differences between the PM and the sham groups. PM was efficacious and safe in reducing the duration of local anesthetic- induced soft-tissue numbness and its associated functional deficits. Clinicians can use PM to accelerate reversal of soft-tissue anesthesia and the associated functional deficits.

  10. Dihydroergotamine mesylate-loaded dissolving microneedle patch made of polyvinylpyrrolidone for management of acute migraine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Cetin; Joyce, Jessica C; Nguyen, Hiep X; Eangoor, Padmanabhan; Knaack, Jennifer S; Banga, Ajay K; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2017-12-28

    Migraine is a widespread neurological disease with negative effects on quality of life and productivity. Moderate to severe acute migraine attacks can be treated with dihydroergotamine mesylate (DHE), an ergot derivative that is especially effective in non-responders to triptan derivatives. To overcome limitations of current DHE formulations in subcutaneous injection and nasal spray such as pain, adverse side effects and poor bioavailability, a new approach is needed for DHE delivery enabling painless self-administration, quick onset of action, and high bioavailability. In this study, we developed a dissolving microneedle patch (MNP) made of polyvinylpyrrolidone, due to its high aqueous solubility and solubility enhancement properties, using a MNP design previously shown to be painless and simple to administer. DHE-loaded MNPs were shown to have a content uniformity of 108±9% with sufficient mechanical strength for insertion to pig skin ex vivo and dissolution within 2min. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies were carried out on hairless rats, and DHE plasma levels were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The area under curve (AUC) value after DHE delivery by MNP (1259±917ng/mL min) was not significantly different (p>0.05) as compared to subcutaneous injection, with a relative bioavailability of 97%. Also, appreciable plasma levels of DHE were seen within 5min for both delivery methods and t max value of MNPs (38±23min) showed no significant difference (p>0.05) compared to subcutaneous injection (24±13min). These results suggest that DHE-loaded MNPs have promise as an alternative DHE delivery method that can be painlessly self-administered with rapid onset and high bioavailability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgery and imatinib therapy for liver oligometastasis of GIST: a study of Japanese Study Group on GIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Masuzawa, Toru; Hirai, Toshihiro; Ikawa, Osamu; Takagane, Akinori; Hata, Yasuhiro; Ojima, Hitoshi; Sodeyama, Harutsugu; Mochizuki, Izumi; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Nishida, Toshirou

    2017-04-01

    We conducted a multicenter prospective study to clarify the efficacy and safety of surgery and imatinib for liver oligometastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Eligible gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients were enrolled in the surgery trial or the imatinib trial. Primary endpoints were recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival, respectively. The trials were prematurely terminated due to amendment of guidelines for adjuvant imatinib therapy and low patient accrual. In the surgery trial, all the six patients showed hepatic recurrence: median recurrence-free survival was 145 days (range: 62-1366 days). Of the five patients receiving salvage imatinib therapy, two showed progressive disease although no death was observed. Of the five patients enrolled in the imatinib trial, one died of pneumonia after progressive disease, and four had not shown progressive disease as of last visit. The results suggest that liver oligometastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor may not be controllable by surgery alone and require concomitant imatinib therapy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Induction of autophagy by Imatinib sequesters Bcr-Abl in autophagosomes and down-regulates Bcr-Abl protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elzinga, Baukje M

    2013-06-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a disease of hematopoietic stem cells which harbor the chimeric gene Bcr-Abl. Expression levels of this constitutively active tyrosine kinase are critical for response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment and also disease progression, yet the regulation of protein stability is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that imatinib can induce autophagy in Bcr-Abl expressing cells. Autophagy has been associated with the clearance of large macromolecular signaling complexes and abnormal proteins, however, the contribution of autophagy to the turnover of Bcr-Abl protein in imatinib treated cells is unknown. In this study, we show that following imatinib treatment, Bcr-Abl is sequestered into vesicular structures that co-localize with the autophagy marker LC3 or GABARAP. This association is inhibited by siRNA mediated knockdown of autophagy regulators (Beclin 1\\/ATG7). Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also reduced Bcr-Abl\\/LC3 co-localization in both K562 and CML patient cells. Bcr-Abl protein expression was reduced with imatinib treatment. Inhibition of both autophagy and proteasome activity in imatinib treated cells was required to restore Bcr-Abl protein levels to those of untreated cells. This ability to down-regulate Bcr-Abl protein levels through the induction of autophagy may be an additional and important feature of the activity of imatinib.

  13. Cumulative clinical experience from a decade of use: imatinib as first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Y

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Yusuf Baran,1 Guray Saydam21Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Izmir Institute of Technology, Izmir, Turkey; 2Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Ege University, Izmir, TurkeyAbstract: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant disease that originates in the bone marrow and is designated by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph+ chromosome, a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. Targeted therapy against CML commenced with the development of small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs exerting their effect against the oncogenic breakpoint cluster region (BCR-ABL fusion protein. Imatinib emerged as the first successful example of a TKI used for the treatment of chronic-phase CML patients and resulted in significant improvements in response rate and overall survival compared with previous treatments. However, a significant portion of patients failed to respond to the therapy and developed resistance against imatinib. Second-generation TKIs nilotinib and dasatinib were to have higher efficiency in clinical trials in imatinib- resistant or intolerant CML patients compared with imatinib. Identification of novel strategies such as dose escalation, drug combination therapy, and use of novel BCR-ABL inhibitors may eventually overcome resistance against BCR-ABL TKIs. This article reviews the history of CML, including the treatment strategies used prediscovery of TKIs and the preclinical and clinical data obtained after the use of imatinib, and the second-generation TKIs developed for the treatment of CML.Keywords: drug resistance, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, chronic myeloid leukemia, imatinib, BCR/ABL

  14. Imatinib treatment causes substantial transcriptional changes in adult Schistosoma mansoni in vitro exhibiting pleiotropic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Buro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosome parasites cause schistosomiasis, one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. For decades Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug widely used for controlling schistosomiasis. The absence of a vaccine and fear of PZQ resistance have motivated the search for alternatives. Studies on protein kinases (PKs demonstrated their importance for diverse physiological processes in schistosomes. Among others two Abl tyrosine kinases, SmAbl1 and SmAbl2, were identified in Schistosoma mansoni and shown to be transcribed in the gonads and the gastrodermis. SmAbl1 activity was blocked by Imatinib, a known Abl-TK inhibitor used in human cancer therapy (Gleevec/Glivec. Imatinib exhibited dramatic effects on the morphology and physiology of adult schistosomes in vitro causing the death of the parasites.Here we show modeling data supporting the targeting of SmAbl1/2 by Imatinib. A biochemical assay confirmed that SmAbl2 activity is also inhibited by Imatinib. Microarray analyses and qRT-PCR experiments were done to unravel transcriptional processes influenced by Imatinib in adult schistosomes in vitro demonstrating a wide influence on worm physiology. Surface-, muscle-, gut and gonad-associated processes were affected as evidenced by the differential transcription of e.g. the gynecophoral canal protein gene GCP, paramyosin, titin, hemoglobinase, and cathepsins. Furthermore, transcript levels of VAL-7 and egg formation-associated genes such as tyrosinase 1, p14, and fs800-like were affected as well as those of signaling genes including a ribosomal protein S6 kinase and a glutamate receptor. Finally, a comparative in silico analysis of the obtained microarray data sets and previous data analyzing the effect of a TGFβR1 inhibitor on transcription provided first evidence for an association of TGFβ and Abl kinase signaling. Among others GCP and egg formation-associated genes were identified as common targets.The data affirm broad negative effects of

  15. Imatinib preserves blood-brain barrier integrity following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yan; Krafft, Paul R; Lekic, Tim; Ma, Qingyi; Souvenir, Rhonda; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and consequent edema formation contribute to the development of early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Various cerebrovascular insults result in increased platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α stimulation, which has been linked to BBB breakdown and edema formation. This study examines whether imatinib, a PDGFR inhibitor, can preserve BBB integrity in a rat endovascular perforation SAH model. Imatinib (40 or 120 mg/kg) or a vehicle was administered intraperitoneally at 1 hr after SAH induction. BBB leakage, brain edema, and neurological deficits were evaluated. Total and phosphorylated protein expressions of PDGFR-α, c-Src, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and c-Jun were measured, and enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were determined in the injured brain. Imatinib treatment significantly ameliorated BBB leakage and edema formation 24 hr after SAH, which was paralleled by improved neurological functions. Decreased brain expressions of phosphorylated PDGFR-α, c-Src, JNK, and c-Jun as well as reduced MMP-9 activities were found in treated animals. PDGFR-α inhibition preserved BBB integrity following experimental SAH; however, the protective mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Targeting PDGFR-α signaling might be advantageous to ameliorate early brain injury following SAH. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Phase I study of imatinib, cisplatin and 5-fluoruracil or capecitabine in advanced esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayr Martina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite all benefit provided by established therapies prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor. Targeted inhibition of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR by imatinib may influence tumor growth and amplify chemotherapeutic effects. Methods This phase I study evaluated dose limiting toxicity (DLT of imatinib combinated with chemotherapy according to a 3-patient cohort dose-escalating design. Thirty-five patients received cisplatin (60 mg/m2 d1 q 3w/ capecitabine (1250 mg/m2 bid d1-14 q 21 or cisplatin (50 mg/m2 d1 q 2w/ 5-fluoruracil (2 g/m2 d1, q 1w. Imatinib was started d - 4 with dose escalation from 300 to 700 mg QD in 100 mg steps. Results At imatinib dose level 1 (300mg one DLT was observed, three more patients were enrolled without further DLT. At dose level 5 (700 mg two gastric perforations occurred, so 600 mg imatinib emerged as the maximum tolerated dose. Major grade 3/4 toxicities were nausea (6%, anemia (6% and fatigue (3%. Response evaluation revealed partial response in 27% and stable disease in 43% of the assessable patients. Conclusions Combination of imatinib and chemotherapy is well tolerated. Response rates were not superior to those of standard therapy. Further investigations of a larger group of patients are required to confirm the amplification of chemotherapy effects by imatinib. Trial registration European Clinical Trials Database: Eudra-CT2006-005792-17 and Clinical Trials Database: NCT00601510

  17. Increased financial burden among patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia receiving imatinib in Japan: a retrospective survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodama Yuko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The financial burden of medical expenses has been increasing for cancer patients. We investigated the relationship between household income and financial burden among patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML who have been treated with imatinib. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to 1200 patients between May and August 2009. We retrospectively surveyed their household incomes, out-of-pocket medical expenses, final co-payments after refunds, and the perceived financial burden of their medical expenses in 2000, 2005 and 2008. Results A total of 577 patients completed the questionnaire. Their median age was 61 years (range, 15–94. A financial burden was felt by 41.2 % (28 of 68 of the patients treated with imatinib in 2000, 70.8 % (201 of 284 in 2005, and 75.8 % (400 of 528 in 2008. Overall, 182 patients (31.7 % considered its discontinuation because of the financial burden and 15 (2.6 % temporarily stopped their imatinib prescription. In 2000, 2005 and 2008, the patients’ median annual household incomes were 49,615 US Dollars (USD, 38,510 USD and 36,731 USD, respectively, with an average currency exchange rate of 104 Yen/USD in 2008. Their median annual out-of-pocket expenses were 11,548, 12,067 and 11,538 USD and their median final annual co-payments were 4,375, 4,327 and 3,558 USD, respectively. Older patients (OR = 0.96, 95 % CI: 0.95–0.98, p ≪ 0.0001 for 1-year increments, and patients with higher household incomes (OR = 0.92, 95 % CI: 0.85–0.99, p = 0.03 for 10,000 USD-increments were less likely to have considered discontinuing their imatinib treatment. Conversely, patients with higher annual final co-payments (OR = 2.21, 95 % CI: 1.28–4.28, p = 0.004 for 10,000 USD-increments were more likely to have considered discontinuing their imatinib treatment. Conclusions The proportion of CML patients who sensed a financial burden increased between 2000 and 2008

  18. Activity and side effects of imatinib in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors: data from a german multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlemmer M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are mesenchymal tumors that in the past were classified as leiomyosarcomas or leiomyomas not responding to standard sarcoma chemotherapy. In several phase I and II trials the efficacy and safety of imatinib was shown before the largest trial ever performed in a single sarcoma entity revealed response rates (CR/PR of 52%. This multicenter phase II trial presented here was performed to open access to imatinib for patients with unresectable or metastastatic GIST when the EORTC 62005 trial had been closed before imatinib was approved in Germany. It was designed to follow the best clinical response and to assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of imatinib 400 mg/d in patients with unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor. 95 patients were treated in this trial with Imatinib 400 mg/d. Four patients (4.6% attained a complete response and 26 patients (29.9% a partial response to imatinib treatment. Forty-one patients (47.1% revealed a stable disease and 16 patients (18.4% had a progressive disease. Of the progressive patients 22% showed a partial response and 67% showed stable disease after escalating the dose to 800 mg. According to SWOG tumor response classification, 66 patients (70% were free of progression within the first year of treatment. Seventy-one patients (74.7% experienced adverse events or severe adverse events with a suspected relationship to the study drug. Among these, the most common were nausea (n = 27 patients, 28.4%, eyelid edema and peripheral edema in 23 patients each (24.2%, diarrhea in 20 patients (21.1%, muscle cramps in 15 patients (15.8% and fatigue in 13 patients (13.7%. Imatinib 400 mg/d led to disease stabilisation in 81,6% of patients with unresectable or metastatic malignant GIST. Thirty-four percent of patients attained a tumor remission (partial or complete response. The safety profile of imatinib based on adverse event assessment is favorable

  19. Phase I Pharmacokinetic Study of the VEGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Vatalanib (PTK787) plus Imatinib and Hydroxyurea for Malignant Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, David A.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Desjardins, Annick; Vredenburgh, James J.; Beumer, Jan H.; Lagattuta, Theodore F.; Gururangan, Sridharan; Herndon, James E.; Salvado, August J.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2009-01-01

    Background We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) of the oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor, vatalanib, when administered with imatinib and hydroxyurea on a continuous daily schedule among recurrent malignant glioma patients. Methods All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice daily. Imatinib was dosed at 400 mg per day for patients not taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs; stratum A) and at 500 mg twice-a-day for patients taking EIAEDs (stratum B). Vatalanib was escalated from 500 mg to 1250 mg twice daily in successive cohorts, independently for each stratum. Pharmacokinetics of each drug were assessed. Results Thirty-seven recurrent patients, including 34 (92%) with glioblastoma and 3 (8%) with grade 3 malignant glioma, were enrolled. Nineteen patients (51%) were taking EIAEDs. The MTD of vatalanib for all patients was 1000 mg twice-a-day. DLTs were hematologic, gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic. No patients developed intracranial hemorrhage. Concurrent administration of imatinib and hydroxyurea did not affect vatalanib exposure, but EIAEDs decreased vatalanib and imatinib plasma exposures. Conclusion Vatalanib doses up to 1000 mg twice-a-day combined with imatinib and hydroxyurea are well tolerated. Strategies to target tumor blood vessel endothelial cells and pericytes by inhibiting VEGFR and PDGFR, respectively, are safe among recurrent malignant glioma patients and may enhance anti-angiogenesis activity. PMID:19248046

  20. The use of imatinib in the treatment of inoperable dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans in the area of the shoulder joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Huszno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP is a rare sarcoma of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. The most common clinical problem is its local recurrence. The therapeutic procedure of choice is radical surgery. In the case of inoperable disease, targeted therapy with imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, may cause significant reduction of tumor volume and even enable radical surgery. Objective. We present the effectiveness of imatinib for the treatment of unresectable DFSP localized in the area of the shoulder joint of a 62-year-old woman. Case report. The patient met the criteria for inclusion in treatment with imatinib. After 3 cycles of treatment, partial regression of the lesions (above 50% was observed. Therapy was complicated by hepatological side effects during the sixth cycle. Treatment was continued with a reduced dose when transaminase levels normalized. In a physical examination and imaging studies, further regression was observed. The patient has regained considerable mobility of the shoulder joint. A decision to continue the treatment has been made. Conclusions. The use of imatinib allowed a clinical benefit to be gained in the form of significant regression of lesions. A very good treatment response and significant improvement in quality of life of the patient were achieved. The patient has been treated with imatinib for 30 months.

  1. Impact of imatinib interruption and duration of prior hydroxyurea on the treatment outcome in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: Single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edesa, Wael Abdelgawad; Abdel-malek, Raafat Ragaey

    2015-06-01

    Optimal response requires that patients should be maintained on the drug continuously. To evaluate the influence of imatinib interruption and prior hydroxyurea use on the outcome of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Between January 2010 and November 2013, patients with chronic phase who received imatinib at the Kasr Al-ainy Center of Clinical Oncology were included. Sixty patients were included in this study, thirty three patients (55%) received imatinib upfront, while 27 (45%) received imatinib post hydroxyurea. Imatinib was not given regularly in 50% of patients. In terms of response, only major molecular response and complete molecular response were statistically significant in favor of patients who were receiving imatinib regularly compared to those who had interruption (phydroxyurea. The median progression free survival was 30.3 months (95% CI 24.3-36.3). Among the group of patients who received imatinib regularly, progression free survival was longer (p=0.049), there was no difference between those who received prior hydroxyurea versus those who did not (p=0.67). Duration of prior hydroxyurea had no impact on response or progression free survival, while patients regular on imatinib had statistically significant difference with respect to major molecular response, complete molecular response and progression free survival compared to those who had periods of drug interruption, thus we need more governmental support to supply the drug without interruption to improve the outcome of therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Combination of pegylated IFN-α2b with imatinib increases molecular response rates in patients with low- or intermediate-risk chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Markevärn, Berit

    2011-01-01

    Biologic and clinical observations suggest that combining imatinib with IFN-α may improve treatment outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We randomized newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML patients with a low or intermediate Sokal risk score and in imatinib-induced complete hematologic remissio...

  3. Combined derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection for simultaneous analysis of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in human pancreatic juice samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Federico; Sulpizio, Sara; Bassi, Claudio; Carlucci, Maura; Cotellese, Roberto; Ferrone, Vincenzo; Innocenti, Paolo; Locatelli, Marcello

    2015-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method based on the combination of derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and fluorimetric detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in human pancreatic juice samples. Parameters of the derivatization procedure affecting extraction efficiency were optimized. The developed method was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The calibration curves were linear over a range of 0.1-15 µg/mL for octreotide and 0.20-15 µg/mL for gabexate mesylate metabolite. Derivatized products of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite were separated on a Luna C18 column (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 µm particle size) using a gradient with a run time of 36 min, without further purification. The limits of detection were 0.025 and 0.05, respectively, for octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite. This paper reports the validation of a quantitative high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-fluorescence (HPLC-PDA-FL) method for the simultaneous analysis of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in pancreatic juice by protein precipitation using zinc sulfate-methanol-acetonitrile containing the derivatizing reagent, 4-fluoro-7-nitro-[2,1,3]-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F). Derivatized products of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite were separated on a Luna C18 column (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 µm particle size) using a gradient with a run time of 36 min, without further purification. The method was validated over the concentration ranges 0.1-15 and 0.2-15 µg/mL for octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite, respectively, in human pancreatic juice. Biphalin and methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate were used as the internal standards. This method was successfully utilized to support clinical studies in humans. The results from assay validations show that the method is selective, sensitive and robust. The limit

  4. p53 Gene (NY-CO-13 Levels in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: The Role of Imatinib and Nilotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder M. Al-kuraishy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene is also known as tumor suppressor p53. The main functions of the p53 gene are an anticancer effect and cellular genomic stability via various pathways including activation of DNA repair, induction of apoptosis, and arresting of cell growth at the G1/S phase. Normally, the p53 gene is inactivated by mouse double minute 2 proteins (mdm2, but it is activated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective chemotherapeutic agents in the management of CML. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the differential effect of imatinib and nilotinib on p53 gene serum levels in patients with CML. A total number of 60 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia with ages ranging from 47 to 59 years were recruited from the Iraqi Hematology Center. They started with tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line chemotherapy. They were divided into two groups—Group A, 29 patients treated with imatinib and Group B, 31 patients treated with nilotinib—and compared with 28 healthy subjects for evaluation p53 serum levels regarding the selective effect of either imatinib or nilotinib. There were significantly (p < 0.01 high p53 gene serum levels in patients with CML (2.135 ± 1.44 ng/mL compared to the control (0.142 ± 0.11 ng/mL. Patients with CML that were treated with either imatinib or nilotinib showed insignificant differences in most of the hematological profile (p > 0.05 whereas, p53 serum levels were high (3.22 ± 1.99 ng/mL in nilotinib-treated patients and relatively low (1.18 ± 0.19 ng/mL in imatinib-treated patients (p = 0.0001. Conclusions: Nilotinib is more effective than imatinib in raising p53 serum levels in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

  5. GSTT1 copy number gain and ZNF overexpression are predictors of poor response to imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Jin Lee

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs predict prognosis and therapeutic responses to imatinib. In wild-type GISTs, the tumor-initiating events are still unknown, and wild-type GISTs are resistant to imatinib therapy. We performed an association study between copy number alterations (CNAs identified from array CGH and gene expression analyses results for four wild-type GISTs and an imatinib-resistant PDGFRA D842V mutant GIST, and compared the results to those obtained from 27 GISTs with KIT mutations. All wild-type GISTs had multiple CNAs, and CNAs in 1p and 22q that harbor the SDHB and GSTT1 genes, respectively, correlated well with expression levels of these genes. mRNA expression levels of all SDH gene subunits were significantly lower (P≤0.041, whereas mRNA expression levels of VEGF (P=0.025, IGF1R (P=0.026, and ZNFs (P<0.05 were significantly higher in GISTs with wild-type/PDGFRA D842V mutations than GISTs with KIT mutations. qRT-PCR validation of the GSTT1 results in this cohort and 11 additional malignant GISTs showed a significant increase in the frequency of GSTT1 CN gain and increased mRNA expression of GSTT1 in wild-type/PDGFRA D842V GISTs than KIT-mutant GISTs (P=0.033. Surprisingly, all four malignant GISTs with KIT exon 11 deletion mutations with primary resistance to imatinib had an increased GSTT1 CN and mRNA expression level of GSTT1. Increased mRNA expression of GSTT1 and ZNF could be predictors of a poor response to imatinib. Our integrative approach reveals that for patients with wild-type (or imatinib-resistant GISTs, attempts to target VEGFRs and IGF1R may be reasonable options.

  6. A decrease in ubiquitination and resulting prolonged life-span of KIT underlies the KIT overexpression-mediated imatinib resistance of KIT mutation-driven canine mast cell tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masato; Kuroki, Shiori; Kurita, Sena; Miyamoto, Ryo; Tani, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Kyoichi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2017-10-01

    Overexpression of KIT is one of the mechanisms that contributes to imatinib resistance in KIT mutation-driven tumors. Here, the mechanism underlying this overexpression of KIT was investigated using an imatinib-sensitive canine mast cell tumor (MCT) line CoMS, which has an activating mutation in KIT exon 11. A KIT-overexpressing imatinib-resistant subline, rCoMS1, was generated from CoMS cells by their continuous exposure to increasing concentrations of imatinib. Neither a secondary mutation nor upregulated transcription of KIT was detected in rCoMS1 cells. A decrease in KIT ubiquitination, a prolonged KIT life-span, and KIT overexpression were found in rCoMS1 cells. These events were suppressed by withdrawal of imatinib and were re-induced by re‑treatment with imatinib. These findings suggest that imatinib elicited overexpression of KIT via suppression of its ubiquitination. These results also indicated that imatinib-induced overexpression of KIT in rCoMS1 cells was not a permanently acquired feature but was a reversible response of the cells. Moreover, the pan deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor PR619 prevented imatinib induction of KIT overexpression, suggesting that the imatinib-induced decrease in KIT ubiquitination could be mediated by upregulation and/or activation of deubiquitinating enzyme(s). It may be possible that a similar mechanism of KIT overexpression underlies the acquisition of imatinib resistance in some human tumors that are driven by KIT mutation.

  7. ON012380: A Non-ATP Competitive Inhibitor of BCR-ABL for the Therapy of Imatinib-Resistant CMLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    imatinib resistance with a novel ABL kinase inhibitor. Science. 2004; 305(5682):399-401 3. Weisberg E, Manley PW, Breitenstein W, Bruggen J, Cowan-Jacob... Manley PW, Cowan-Jacob SW, Hochhaus A, Griffin JD. Second generation inhibitors of BCR-ABL for the treatment of imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid...araldehyde (5) (10 mmol), glacial acetic acid (5 mL), and a catalytic amount (100 lL ) of benzyl amine was re- fluxed for 5–8 h. After completion of

  8. Comparison of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin in the treatment of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic oxidative stress, injury and fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shaker, Mohamed E.; Zalata, Khaled R.; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Shiha, Gamal E.; Ibrahim, Tarek M.

    2011-01-01

    Effective and well-tolerated anti-fibrotic drugs are currently lacking. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the potential anti-fibrotic effects of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin on established hepatic fibrosis in the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) rat model. Male Wistar rats received intraperitoneal injections of CCl4 twice weekly for 8 weeks, as well as daily intraperitoneal treatments of imatinib (10 and 20 mg/kg), nilotinib (10 and 20 mg/kg) and silymarin (100 mg/kg) durin...

  9. Intravitreal Bevacizumab and Triamcinolone for Treatment of Cystoid Macular Oedema Associated with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia and Imatinib Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K. Newcott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal bevacizumab and triamcinolone in the treatment of cystoid macular oedema in a case with chronic myeloid leukaemia on imatinib treatment. Methods. We treated a 78-year-old man with bilateral cystoid macular oedema with intravitreal triamcinolone and subsequent bevacizumab in one eye and intravitreal bevacizumab, alone, in the fellow eye. Results. Serial intravitreal bevacizumab with and without triamcinolone treated cystoid macular oedema in both eyes and improved the vision. Conclusion. Intravitreal bevacizumab and triamcinolone could be viable options to treat cystoid macular oedema due to chronic myeloid leukaemia and imatinib therapy.

  10. Imatinib and Nilotinib Off-Target Effects on Human NK Cells, Monocytes, and M2 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellora, Francesca; Dondero, Alessandra; Corrias, Maria Valeria; Casu, Beatrice; Regis, Stefano; Caliendo, Fabio; Moretta, Alessandro; Cazzola, Mario; Elena, Chiara; Vinti, Luciana; Locatelli, Franco; Bottino, Cristina; Castriconi, Roberta

    2017-08-15

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used in the clinical management of hematological neoplasms. Moreover, in solid tumors such as stage 4 neuroblastomas (NB), imatinib showed benefits that might depend on both on-target and immunological off-target effects. We investigated the effects of imatinib and nilotinib on human NK cells, monocytes, and macrophages. High numbers of monocytes died upon exposure to TKI concentrations similar to those achieved in patients. Conversely, NK cells were highly resistant to the TKI cytotoxic effect, were properly activated by immunostimulatory cytokines, and degranulated in the presence of NB cells. In NB, neither drug reduced the expression of ligands for activating NK receptors or upregulated that of HLA class I, B7-H3, PD-L1, and PD-L2, molecules that might limit NK cell function. Interestingly, TKIs modulated the chemokine receptor repertoire of immune cells. Acting at the transcriptional level, they increased the surface expression of CXCR4, an effect observed also in NK cells and monocytes of patients receiving imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia. Moreover, TKIs reduced the expression of CXCR3 (in NK cells) and CCR1 (in monocytes). Monocytes also decreased the expression of M-CSFR, and low numbers of cells underwent differentiation toward macrophages. M0 and M2 macrophages were highly resistant to TKIs and maintained their phenotypic and functional characteristics. Importantly, also in the presence of TKIs, the M2 immunosuppressive polarization was reverted by TLR engagement, and M1-oriented macrophages fully activated autologous NK cells. Our results contribute to better interpreting the off-target efficacy of TKIs in tumors and to envisaging strategies aimed at facilitating antitumor immune responses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Identifying and validating a combined mRNA and microRNA signature in response to imatinib treatment in a chronic myeloid leukemia cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Bhutra

    Full Text Available Imatinib, a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the gold standard for managing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Despite its wide application, imatinib resistance occurs in 20-30% of individuals with CML. Multiple potential biomarkers have been identified to predict imatinib response; however, the majority of them remain externally uncorroborated. In this study, we set out to systematically identify gene/microRNA (miRNA whose expression changes are related to imatinib response. Through a Gene Expression Omnibus search, we identified two genome-wide expression datasets that contain expression changes in response to imatinib treatment in a CML cell line (K562: one for mRNA and the other for miRNA. Significantly differentially expressed transcripts/miRNAs post imatinib treatment were identified from both datasets. Three additional filtering criteria were applied 1 miRbase/miRanda predictive algorithm; 2 opposite direction of imatinib effect for genes and miRNAs; and 3 literature support. These criteria narrowed our candidate gene-miRNA to a single pair: IL8 and miR-493-5p. Using PCR we confirmed the significant up-regulation and down-regulation of miR-493-5p and IL8 by imatinib treatment, respectively in K562 cells. In addition, IL8 expression was significantly down-regulated in K562 cells 24 hours after miR-493-5p mimic transfection (p = 0.002. Furthermore, we demonstrated significant cellular growth inhibition after IL8 inhibition through either gene silencing or by over-expression of miR-493-5p (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.001 respectively. The IL8 inhibition also further sensitized K562 cells to imatinib cytotoxicity (p < 0.0001. Our study combined expression changes in transcriptome and miRNA after imatinib exposure to identify a potential gene-miRNA pair that is a critical target in imatinib response. Experimental validation supports the relationships between IL8 and miR-493-5p and between this gene-miRNA pair and imatinib sensitivity in a CML cell

  12. BCR-ABL V280G Mutation, Potential Role in Imatinib Resistance: First Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Ana P; Reichert, Alice; Afonso, Celina; Alberca, Maria D; Tavares, Purifica??o; Lima, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Export Date: 28 December 2017 Correspondence Address: Azevedo, A.P.; Department of Clinical Pathology, Hospital São Francisco Xavier, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Ocidental, Estrada do Forte do Alto do Duque, Portugal; email: Chemicals/CAS: glycine, 56-40-6, 6000-43-7, 6000-44-8; hydroxyurea, 127-07-1; imatinib, 152459-95-5, 220127-57-1; nilotinib, 641571-10-0; valine, 7004-03-7, 72-18-4 References: Radich, J.P., Shah, N.P., Mauro, M.J., Integrating current treatment options ...

  13. Effects of imatinib and nilotinib on the whole transcriptome of cultured murine osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Gyöngyi; Balla, Bernadett; Horváth, Péter; Kövesdi, Andrea; Lakatos, Gergely; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Tóbiás, Bálint; Árvai, Kristóf; Kósa, János Pál; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Numerous clinical observations have confirmed that breakpoint cluster region-abelson fusion oncoprotein tyrosine kinase inhibitors used in leukemia treatment alter bone physiology in a complex manner. The aim of the present study was to analyze the whole transcriptome of cultured murine osteoblasts and determine the changes following treatment with imatinib and nilotinib using Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection next generation RNA sequencing. This study also aimed to identify candidate signaling pathways and network regulators by multivariate Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Based on the right-tailed Fisher's exact test, significantly altered pathways including upstream regulators were defined for each drug. The correlation between these pathways and bone metabolism was also examined. The preliminary results suggest the two drugs have different mechanisms of action on osteoblasts, and imatinib was shown to have a greater effect on gene expression. Data also indicated the potential role of a number of genes and signaling cascades that may contribute to identifying novel targets for the treatment of metabolic bone diseases.

  14. Imatinib for the treatment of patients with unresectable and/or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumours: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J; Connock, M; Song, F; Yao, G; Fry-Smith, A; Raftery, J; Peake, D

    2005-07-01

    To assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of imatinib in the treatment of unresectable and/or metastatic, KIT-positive, gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), relative to current standard treatments. Electronic databases. As there were no randomised trials that have directly compared imatinib with the current standard treatment in patients with advanced GIST, this review included non-randomised controlled studies, cohort studies, and case series that reported effectiveness results of treatment with imatinib and/or other interventions in patients with advanced GIST. The effectiveness assessment was based on the comparison of results from imatinib trials and results from studies of historical control patients. Economic evaluation was mainly based on an assessment and modification (when judged necessary) of a model submitted by Novartis. Evidence from published uncontrolled trials involving 187 patients, and from abstracts reporting similar uncontrolled trials involving 1700 patients, indicates that approximately 50% of imatinib-treated individuals with advanced GIST experience a dramatic clinical response in terms of at least a 50% reduction in tumour mass. At present, although useful data are accumulating, it is not possible to predict which patients may respond in this way. Fifteen studies where possible GIST patients had been treated with therapies other than imatinib or best supportive care were also identified. All imatinib-treated patients experienced adverse effects, although they were relatively mild. Overall, imatinib was reported to be well tolerated. The most common serious events included unspecified haemorrhage and neutropenia. Skin rash, oedema and periorbital oedema were the common adverse events observed. Patients on the highest dose regimen (1000 mg per day in one trial) may experience dose-limiting drug toxicity. A structured assessment was carried out of the Novartis economic evaluation of imatinib for unresectable and/or metastatic GIST

  15. Lack of Association of Multidrug Resistance Gene-1 Polymorphisms with Treatment Outcome in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with Imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaya Kassogue

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the impressive results obtained with imatinib, inadequate response or resistance are observed in certain patients. It is known that imatinib is a substrate of a multidrug resistance gene (MDR1. Thus, interindividual genetic differences linked to single nucleotide polymorphisms in MDR1 may influence the metabolism of imatinib. The present study has aimed to examine the impact of MDR1 polymorphisms on the hematologic and cytogenetic responses in 70 chronic myeloid leukemia patients who received imatinib. Methods: We used a polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism to identify different profiles of 1236C>T, 2677G>T and 3435C>T in MDR1. Results: The distribution of the three SNPs in responders and poor responders did not show any particular trend (P>0.05. The T allele was slightly higher in responders, but not significantly regardless of the type of SNP (40.3% vs. 33.8% for 1236C>T; 25% vs. 14.7% for 2677G>T and 33.3% vs. 22% for 3435C>T. The dominant model showed a similar trend (P>0.05. Diplotypes composed by the T allele in different exons were frequent in responders. Haplotype analysis showed that 1236C-2677G-3435C was slightly higher in poor responders (60.02% compared to responders (50.42%. However, 1236T-2677T-3435T was frequent in responders (16.98% compared to poor responders (13.1%. Overall, none of the haplotypes were associated with IM response in our cohort (global haplotype association test, P=0.39. Conclusion: The identification of 1236C>T, 2677G>T and 3435C>T polymorphisms may not be advantageous to predict imatinib response for our chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

  16. PTCH1 is a reliable marker for predicting imatinib response in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in chronic phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Alonso-Dominguez

    Full Text Available Patched homolog 1 gene (PTCH1 expression and the ratio of PTCH1 to Smoothened (SMO expression have been proposed as prognostic markers of the response of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients to imatinib. We compared these measurements in a realistic cohort of 101 patients with CML in chronic phase (CP using a simplified qPCR method, and confirmed the prognostic power of each in a competing risk analysis. Gene expression levels were measured in peripheral blood samples at diagnosis. The PTCH1/SMO ratio did not improve PTCH1 prognostic power (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.71 vs. 0.72. In order to reduce the number of genes to be analyzed, PTCH1 was the selected measurement. High and low PTCH1 expression groups had significantly different cumulative incidences of imatinib failure (IF, which was defined as discontinuation of imatinib due to lack of efficacy (5% vs. 25% at 4 years, P = 0.013, probabilities of achieving a major molecular response (81% vs. 53% at first year, P = 0.02, and proportions of early molecular failure (14% vs. 43%, P = 0.015. Every progression to an advanced phase (n = 3 and CML-related death (n = 2 occurred in the low PTCH1 group (P<0.001 for both comparisons. PTCH1 was an independent prognostic factor for the prediction of IF. We also validated previously published thresholds for PTCH1 expression. Therefore, we confirmed that PTCH1 expression can predict the imatinib response in CML patients in CP by applying a more rigorous statistical analysis. Thus, PTCH1 expression is a promising molecular marker for predicting the imatinib response in CML patients in CP.

  17. Evaluating complications of local anesthesia administration and reversal with phentolamine mesylate in a portable pediatric dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynes, Sean G; Riley, Amah E; Milbee, Sarah; Bastin, Meghan R; Price, Maylyn E; Ladson, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to identify and quantify complications with local anesthetic administration and reversal on consecutive patients seen for comprehensive dental care in a school-based, portable dental clinic, and includes data on the patients seen by the participating portable dental providers. In 923 dental visits where local anesthetic was administered, a standardized form was used to gain further information and identify any complications; this was accompanied by a questionnaire for the student's teacher, in order to quantify the student's distraction and disruption ratings following the dental visit. After statistical analysis of the 923 consecutive cases, the overall complication rate was 5.3%. All of the complications were considered to be mild or moderate, and there were no severe event reports. The complications encountered most frequently (n = 49) were associated with self-inflicted soft tissue injury. The results of this study indicate that comprehensive care with local anesthesia delivered by a school-based portable dental clinic has a low risk of complications. Whereas safe administration of dental care is achievable with or without phentolamine mesylate as a local anesthetic reversal agent, its use was determined to improve safety outcomes. Three factors appeared to directly increase the incidence of complications: the administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block, attention deficit disorder, and obesity. Teacher evaluations demonstrated that children receiving care by a portable dental team were able to reorient back to classwork and were not disruptive to classmates.

  18. Thermodynamic solution properties of pefloxacin mesylate and its interactions with organized assemblies of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Rashid, Muhammad Abid; Mansha, Asim; Siddiq, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Free energy of adsorption is more negative than free energy of micellization. • Micellization becomes more spontaneous at high temperature. • There is strong interaction between PFM and SDS. - Abstract: This manuscript reports the physicochemical behavior of antibiotic amphiphilic drug pefloxacin mesylate (PFM) and its interaction with anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The data of surface tension and electrical conductivity are helpful to detect the CMC as well as to calculate surface parameters, i.e. surface pressure, π, surface excess concentration, Γ, area per molecule of drug and standard Gibbs free energy of adsorption, ΔG ads and thermodynamic parameters like standard free energy of micellization, ΔG m , standard enthalpy of micellization, ΔH m and standard entropy of micellization, ΔS m . The interaction of this drug with anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by electrical conductivity and UV/visible spectroscopy. This enabled us to compute the values of partition coefficient (K x ), free energy of partition, ΔG p , binding constant, K b , free energy of binding, ΔG b , number of drug molecules per micelle, n, and thermodynamic parameters of drug–surfactant interaction

  19. Measurement and prediction of dabigatran etexilate mesylate Form II solubility in mono-solvents and mixed solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Yan; Wang, Jingkang; Wang, Ting; Ouyang, Jinbo; Huang, Xin; Hao, Hongxun; Bao, Ying; Fang, Wen; Yin, Qiuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of DEM Form II in mono-solvents and binary solvent mixtures was measured. • Regressed UNIFAC model was used to predict the solubility in solvent mixtures. • The experimental solubility data were correlated by different models. - Abstract: UV spectrometer method was used to measure the solubility data of dabigatran etexilate mesylate (DEM) Form II in five mono-solvents (methanol, ethanol, ethane-1,2-diol, DMF, DMAC) and binary solvent mixtures of methanol and ethanol in the temperature range from 287.37 K to 323.39 K. The experimental solubility data in mono-solvents were correlated with modified Apelblat equation, van’t Hoff equation and λh equation. GSM model and Modified Jouyban-Acree model were employed to correlate the solubility data in mixed solvent systems. And Regressed UNIFAC model was used to predict the solubility of DEM Form II in the binary solvent mixtures. Results showed that the predicted data were consistent with the experimental data.

  20. Spectrofluorimetric determination of gemifloxacin mesylate and linezolid in pharmaceutical formulations: Application of quinone-based fluorophores and enhanced native fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Bahia Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinone-based fluorophores and enhanced native fluorescence techniques were applied for a fast quantitative analysis of gemifloxacin mesylate (GEM and linezolid (LIN in pharmaceutical formulations. For this purpose, three sensitive, accurate and precise spectrofluorimetric methods were developed. GEM, as an n-electron donor, reacts with 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (method A and 2,5-dichloro-3,6-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone (method B as п-electron acceptors, forming charge transfer complexes that exhibit high fluorescence intensity at 441 and 390 nm upon excitation at 260 and 339 nm, respectively. Method C depends on measurement of enhanced native fluorescence of LIN in phosphate buffer (pH 5 at 380 nm upon excitation at 260 nm. Experimental factors affecting fluorescence intensity were optimized. Linearity was obtained over concentration ranges 50-500, 10-60 and 20-400 ng mL-1 for methods A, B and C, respectively. The developed methods were validated and successfully applied for determination of the cited drugs in tablets.

  1. Electroanalytical Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate in Bulk, Tablets and Human Urine Using Gold Nanoparticles Modified Carbon Paste Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Attia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple, precise, inexpensive and sensitive voltammetric method has been developed for the determination of gemifloxacin mesylate (GEM in the presence of tween 80 in the bulk, farmaceutical dosage forms and human urine at gold nanoparticles modified carbon paste electrode (GNCPE. The electrochemical behavior of GEM has been investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV techniques. The electrochemical oxidation of GEM was an irreversible process which exhibited adsorption-diffusion controlled process behavior in Britton-Robinson (BR buffer over the entire pH range of values from 2 to 9. The adsorptive stripping response was evaluated as a function of some variables such as pH, type of surfactant, scan rate and accumulation time. The anodic peak current varied linearly over the range from 8.0 × 10-7 to 2.8 × 10-5 M. The limits of detection and quantification were 7.32 × 10-8 M and 2.44 × 10-7 M, respectively. The relative standard deviations and the percentage recoveries were found in the following ranges: 0.58-1.35% and 99.37-101.76%, respectively.

  2. Slow desensitization of imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions and dynamic changes of drug-specific CD4+CD25+CD134+ lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Thantiworasit, Pattarawat; Sodsai, Pimpayao; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Mongkolpathumrat, Pungjai

    2016-11-01

    Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and certain neoplastic diseases; however, nonimmediate adverse reactions are common. To describe the process of imatinib slow desensitization in patients who experienced nonimmediate reactions to imatinib and the dynamic change in drug-specific CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T-lymphocyte percentages. Five patients diagnosed as having GISTs and with a recent history of imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions (maculopapular exanthema with eosinophilia, exfoliative dermatitis, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) were desensitized using a slow desensitization protocol. The reintroduced imatinib dosage was stepped up every week starting from 10 mg/d and increasing to 25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200, and 300 mg/d until the target dose of 400 mg/d was achieved. Prednisolone of up to 30 mg/d was allowed if allergic reactions recurred. The percentages of CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells present after incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with imatinib, at baseline and after successful desensitization, were analyzed using flow cytometric analysis. By using a slow desensitization technique, all patients were able to receive 400 mg/d of imatinib, and prednisolone was gradually tapered off. The percentages of imatinib-induced CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells decreased from a mean (SD) of 11.3% (6.5%) and 13.4% (7.3%) at baseline to 3.2% (0.7%) and 3.0% (1.1%) after successful desensitization, when stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with 1 and 2 μM of imatinib, respectively. Slow desensitization is a helpful procedure in treating patients with imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions other than simple maculopapular exanthema. The reduced percentages of imatinib-induced CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells in these patients may be associated with immune tolerance. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  3. Impact of imatinib interruption and duration of prior hydroxyurea on the treatment outcome in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: Single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edesa, W.A.; Abdel-malek, R.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Optimal response requires that patients should be maintained on the drug continuously. Objectives: To evaluate the influence of imatinib interruption and prior hydroxyurea use on the outcome of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Materials and methods: Between January 2010 and November 2013, patients with chronic phase who received imatinib at the Kasr Al-ainy Center of Clinical Oncology were included. Results: Sixty patients were included in this study, thirty three patients (55%) received imatinib upfront, while 27 (45%) received imatinib post hydroxyurea. Imatinib was not given regularly in 50% of patients. In terms of response, only major molecular response and complete molecular response were statistically significant in favor of patients who were receiving imatinib regularly compared to those who had interruption (ρ < 0.001, ρ < 0.001, respectively) , while there was no difference in patients stratified according to prior hydroxyurea. The median progression free survival was 30.3 months (95% CI 24.3–36.3). Among the group of patients who received imatinib regularly, progression free survival was longer (ρ = 0.049), there was no difference between those who received prior hydroxyurea versus those who did not (ρ = 0.67). Conclusion: Duration of prior hydroxyurea had no impact on response or progression free survival, while patients regular on imatinib had statistically significant difference with respect to major molecular response, complete molecular response and progression free survival compared to those who had periods of drug interruption, thus we need more governmental support to supply the drug without interruption to improve the outcome of therapy

  4. Cost-effectiveness of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Treatment Strategies for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase After Generic Entry of Imatinib in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Larson, Richard A; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Apperley, Jane F; Hehlmann, Rudiger; Baccarani, Michele; Eigendorff, Ekkehard; Guilhot, Joelle; Guilhot, Francois; Hehlmann, Rudiger; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mayer, Jiri; Müller, Martin C; Niederwieser, Dietger; Saussele, Susanne; Schiffer, Charles A; Silver, Richard T; Simonsson, Bengt; Conti, Rena M

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the cost-effectiveness of treating incident chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) with generic imatinib when it becomes available in United States in 2016. In the year following generic entry, imatinib's price is expected to drop 70% to 90%. We hypothesized that initiating treatment with generic imatinib in these patients and then switching to the other tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs), dasatinib or nilotinib, because of intolerance or lack of effectiveness ("imatinib-first") would be cost-effective compared with the current standard of care: "physicians' choice" of initiating treatment with any one of the three TKIs. We constructed Markov models to compare the five-year cost-effectiveness of imatinib-first vs physician's choice from a US commercial payer perspective, assuming 3% annual discounting ($US 2013). The models' clinical endpoint was five-year overall survival taken from a systematic review of clinical trial results. Per-person spending on incident CML-CP treatment overall care components was estimated using Truven's MarketScan claims data. The main outcome of the models was cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). We interpreted outcomes based on a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100 000/QALY. A panel of European LeukemiaNet experts oversaw the study's conduct. Both strategies met the threshold. Imatinib-first ($277 401, 3.87 QALYs) offered patients a 0.10 decrement in QALYs at a savings of $88 343 over five years to payers compared with physician's choice ($365 744, 3.97 QALYs). The imatinib-first incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was approximately $883 730/QALY. The results were robust to multiple sensitivity analyses. When imatinib loses patent protection and its price declines, its use will be the cost-effective initial treatment strategy for CML-CP. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Imatinib as the first and only treatment in Europe for adult patients at significant risk of relapse following gastrointestinal stromal tumor removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffaud, F; Salas, S; Huyn, T; Deville, JL

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KIT gene are the molecular hallmark of most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). GIST has become a model for targeted treatment of solid tumors, imatinib becoming the standard first-line treatment of these tumors in the advanced/metastatic phase. Because of the efficacy of imatinib treatment in the advanced setting, its role following resection of a primary non-metastatic GIST was investigated. The recently published phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter ACOSOG Z9001 study showed that adjuvant therapy is safe, and significantly improves recurrence-free survival compared to placebo when given after resection. To what extent imatinib will improve overall survival has yet to be answered. What is clear is that high-risk GIST patients definitely need adjuvant therapy, and that 1 year of imatinib is not enough for the patients who do need it. The questions of optimal duration of imatinib treatment in the adjuvant setting, adequate selection of risk patients and effect of imatinib on overall survival are currently being studied. PMID:21694845

  6. BCR-ABL1 mutation development during first-line treatment with dasatinib or imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T P; Saglio, G; Quintás-Cardama, A; Mauro, M J; Kim, D-W; Lipton, J H; Bradley-Garelik, M B; Ukropec, J; Hochhaus, A

    2015-09-01

    BCR-ABL1 mutations are a common, well-characterized mechanism of resistance to imatinib as first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Less is known about mutation development during first-line treatment with dasatinib and nilotinib, despite increased use because of higher response rates compared with imatinib. Retrospective analyses were conducted to characterize mutation development in patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP treated with dasatinib (n=259) or imatinib (n=260) in DASISION (Dasatinib versus Imatinib Study in Treatment-Naive CML-CP), with 3-year minimum follow-up. Mutation screening, including patients who discontinued treatment and patients who had a clinically relevant on-treatment event (no confirmed complete cytogenetic response (cCCyR) and no major molecular response (MMR) within 12 months; fivefold increase in BCR-ABL1 with loss of MMR; loss of CCyR), yielded a small number of patients with mutations (dasatinib, n=17; imatinib, n=18). Dasatinib patients had a narrower spectrum of mutations (4 vs 12 sites for dasatinib vs imatinib), fewer phosphate-binding loop mutations (1 vs 9 mutations), fewer multiple mutations (1 vs 6 patients) and greater occurrence of T315I (11 vs 0 patients). This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00481247.

  7. Reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with imatinib has comparable event-free survival and overall survival to long-term imatinib treatment in young patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanmin; Wang, Jiasheng; Luo, Yi; Shi, Jimin; Zheng, Weiyan; Tan, Yamin; Cai, Zhen; Huang, He

    2017-08-01

    The relative merits of reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (RIST) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the first chronic phase (CP) in imatinib era have not been evaluated. The study was designed to compare the outcomes of combination therapy of RIST plus imatinib (RIST + IM) vs. imatinib (IM) alone for young patients with early CP (ECP) and late CP (LCP). Of the patients, 130 were non-randomly assigned to treatment with IM alone (n = 88) or RIST + IM (n = 42). The 10-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were comparable between RIST + IM and IM groups. LCP, high Sokal score, and no complete cytogenetic response at 3 months were adverse prognostic factors for survival, but only the time from diagnosis to IM was an independent predictor after multivariate analysis. For ECP, IM was similar to RIST + IM, with 10-year EFS rates of 77.2 vs. 81.6% (p = 0.876) and OS rates of 93.8 vs. 87.9% (p = 0.102), respectively. For LCP, both treatments resulted in similar survival, but more patients in the imatinib group experienced events (10-year EFS 40.8 vs. 66.7%, p = 0.047). The patients with higher EBMT risk scores had an inferior survival than those with lower scores (69.2 vs. 92.9%, p = 0.04). We concluded that RIST + IM was comparable to IM in terms of OS and EFS. However, RIST + IM was more affordable than IM alone in a 10-year scale. Thus, RIST + IM could be considered as an alternative treatment option, especially when the patients have low EBMT risk scores and demand a definite cure for CML.

  8. Expression of c-kit receptor in human cholangiocarcinoma and in vivo treatment with imatinib mesilate in chimeric mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenz, Thomas; Caca, Karel; Blüthner, Thilo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Mössner, Joachim; Wiedmann, Marcus

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the c-kit expression in biliary tract cancer cell lines and histological sections from patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and to evaluate the efficacy of in vitro and in vitro treatment with imatinib mesilate. METHODS: The protein expression of c-kit in the human biliary tract cancer cell lines Mz-ChA-2 and EGI-1 and histological sections from 19 patients with extrahepatic CC was assessed by immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry. The anti-proliferative effect of imatinib mesilate on biliary tract cancer cell lines Mz-ChA-2 and EGI-1 was studied in vitro by automated cell counting. In addition, immunodeficient NMRI mice (TaconicTM) were subcutaneously injected with 5 x 106 cells of cell lines MzChA-2 and EGI-1. After having reached a tumour volume of 200 mm3, daily treatment was started intraperitoneally with imatinib mesilate at a dose of 50 mg/kg or normal saline (NS). Tumor volume was calculated with a Vernier caliper. After 14 d, mice were sacrificed with tumors excised and tumor mass determined. RESULTS: Immunoblotting revealed presence of c-kit in Mz-ChA-2 and absence in EGI-1 cells. Immunocytochemistry with c-kit antibodies displayed a cytoplasmatic and membraneous localization of receptor protein in Mz-ChA-2 cells and absence of c-kit in EGI-1 cells. c-kit was expressed in 7 of 19 (37%) extrahepatic human CC tissue samples, 2 showed a moderate and 5 a rather weak immunostaining. Imatinib mesilate at a low concentration of 5 µmol/L caused a significant growth inhibition in the c-kit positive cell line Mz-ChA-2 (31%), but not in the c-kit negative cell line EGI-1 (0%) (P < 0.05). Imatinib mesilate at an intermediate concentration of 10 µmol/L inhibited cellular growth of both cell lines (51% vs 57%). Imatinib mesilate at a higher concentration of 20 µmol/L seemed to have a general toxic effect on both cell lines. The IC50 values were 9.7 µmol/L and 11 µmol/L, respectively. After 14 d of in vitro

  9. Preparation of 14C-labeled 8,9-didehydro-6,8-dimethyl-2-methylthioergoline mesylate, a dopamine antagonist potentially useful in the treatment of schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    We have prepared 14 C-labeled 8,9-didehydro-6,8-dimethyl-2-methyl-thioergoline mesylate (LY 170542), a dopamine antagonist potentially useful as an anti-psychotic. The 14 C-label was introduced via a novel application of the Wittig reaction on 1-(4'-toluene-sulfonyl)-8,9-didehydro-6-methyl-ergolin-8-one and subsequent reduction of 1-(4'-toluenesulfonyl)-17-[ 14 C]-lysergene by lithium/ammonia at -33 0 C. The 17-[ 14 C]-agroclavine thus prepared was converted into 17-[ 14 C]-LY 170542 by reaction with methanesulfenyl chloride/methanesulfonic acid. (author)

  10. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, Paula; Howley, Rachel; Doolan, Padraig; Clarke, Colin; Madden, Stephen F.; Clynes, Martin; Farrell, Michael; Amberger-Murphy, Verena

    2012-01-01

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ). Response for each culture was compared with the EGFR/PDGFR immunocytochemical pathway profile using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Erlotinib response was not strongly associated with high expression of the growth factor pathway components. PTEN expression did not correlate with response to any of the three TKIs. Increased EGFR expression was associated with gefitinib response; increased PDGFR-α expression was associated with imatinib response. The results of this in vitro study suggest gefitinib and imatinib may have therapeutic potential in HGG tumours with a corresponding growth factor receptor expression profile. -- Highlights: ► Non-responders had low EGFR expression, high PDGFR-β, and a low proliferation rate. ► PTEN is not indicative of response to a TKI. ► Erlotinib response was not associated with expression of the proteins examined. ► Imatinib-response correlated with expression of PDGFR-α. ► Gefitinib response correlated with increased expression of EGFR.

  11. Comparison of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin in the treatment of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic oxidative stress, injury and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Mohamed E; Zalata, Khaled R; Mehal, Wajahat Z; Shiha, Gamal E; Ibrahim, Tarek M

    2011-04-15

    Effective and well-tolerated anti-fibrotic drugs are currently lacking. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the potential anti-fibrotic effects of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin on established hepatic fibrosis in the carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) rat model. Male Wistar rats received intraperitoneal injections of CCl(4) twice weekly for 8weeks, as well as daily intraperitoneal treatments of imatinib (10 and 20mg/kg), nilotinib (10 and 20mg/kg) and silymarin (100mg/kg) during the last 4weeks of CCl(4)-intoxication. At the end of the study, hepatic damage was evaluated by analysis of liver function tests and hepatic oxidative stress parameters. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology and morphometry, as well as collagen and 4-hydroxyproline contents. Nilotinib (20mg/kg) was the most effective treatment to counteract CCl(4)-induced hepatic injury as indicated by liver function tests and histopathology. Nilotinib (10mg/kg), nilotinib (20mg/kg) and silymarin (100mg/kg) treatments reduced the mean score of hepatic fibrosis by 31%, 68% and 47%, respectively, and hepatic collagen content by 47%, 49% and 18%, respectively in CCl(4)-treated rats. Hepatic morphometric evaluation and 4-hydroxyproline content revealed that CCl(4)-induced fibrosis was ameliorated significantly by nilotinib (20mg/kg) and imatinib (20mg/kg). Unlike nilotinib, imatinib (20mg/kg) showed some sort of hepatic injury evidenced by elevation of serum aminotransferases and total bilirubin levels, and hepatic total nitrate/nitrite content, as well as characteristic anisonucleosis visualized with the hematoxylin-eosin staining. In conclusion, this study provides the evidence that nilotinib exerts anti-fibrotic activity and suggests that it may be valuable in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Subcellular distribution of [3H]-dexamethasone mesylate binding sites in Leydig cells using electron microscope radioautography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T.

    1991-01-01

    The present view is that glucocorticoid hormones bind to their cytoplasmic receptors before reaching their nuclear target sites, which include specific DNA sequences. Although it is believed that cytoplasmic sequestration of steroid receptors and other transcription factors (such as NFKB) may regulate the overall activity of these factors, there is little information on the exact subcellular sites of steroid receptors or even of any other transcription factors. Tritiated (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) is an affinity label that binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thereby allowing morphological localization of the receptor at the light and electron microscope levels as well as for quantitative radioautographic (RAG) analysis. After injection of 3H-DM into the testis, a specific radioautographic signal was observed in Leydig cells, which correlated with a high level of immunocytochemically demonstrable GR in these cells at the light-microscope level. To localize the 3H-DM binding sites at the electron microscope (EM) level, the testes of 5 experimental and 3 control adrenalectomized rats were injected directly with 20 microCi 3H-DM; control rats received simultaneously a 25-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone; 15 min later, rats were fixed with glutaraldehyde and the tissue was processed for EM RAG analysis combined with quantitative morphometry. The radioautographs showed that the cytosol, nucleus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and mitochondria were labeled. Since the cytosol was always adjacent to tubules of the sER, the term sER-rich cytosol was used to represent label over sER networks, which may also represent cytosol labeling due to the limited resolution of the radioautographic technique. Labeling was highest in sER-rich cytosol and mitochondria, at 53% and 31% of the total, respectively

  13. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Paula

    2012-03-10

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)). Response for each culture was compared with the EGFR\\/PDGFR immunocytochemical pathway profile using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Erlotinib response was not strongly associated with high expression of the growth factor pathway components. PTEN expression did not correlate with response to any of the three TKIs. Increased EGFR expression was associated with gefitinib response; increased PDGFR-α expression was associated with imatinib response. The results of this in vitro study suggest gefitinib and imatinib may have therapeutic potential in HGG tumours with a corresponding growth factor receptor expression profile.

  14. 'Real-life' study of imatinib therapy in chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia: A novel retrospective observational longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merante, Serena; Ferretti, Virginia; Elena, Chiara; Calvello, Celeste; Rocca, Barbara; Zappatore, Rita; Cavigliano, Paola; Orlandi, Ester

    2017-01-01

    Imatinib is a cornerstone of treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. It remains unclear whether transient treatment discontinuation or dose changes affect outcome and this approach has not yet been approved for use outside clinical trials. We conducted a retrospective single-institution observational study to evaluate factors affecting response in 'real-life' clinical practice in 138 chronic myeloid leukemia patients in chronic phase treated with imatinib. We used a novel longitudinal data analytical model, with a generalized estimating equation model, to study BCR-ABL variation according to continuous standard dose, change in dose or discontinuation; BCR-ABL transcript levels were recorded. Treatment history was subdivided into time periods for which treatment was given at constant dosage (total 483 time periods). Molecular and cytogenetic complete response was observed after 154 (32%) and 358 (74%) time periods, respectively. After adjusting for length of time period, no association between dose and cytogenetic complete response rate was observed. There was a significantly lower molecular complete response rate after time periods at a high imatinib dosage. This statistical approach can identify individual patient variation in longitudinal data collected over time and suggests that changes in dose or discontinuation of therapy could be considered in patients with appropriate biological characteristics.

  15. Hematologic Relapse after 2 Years on a Non-Authorized Copy Version of Imatinib in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoubir Chouffai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib (Gleevec®/Glivec® has demonstrated high and durable hematologic and cytogenetic response rates, favorable safety and toxicity profiles, and prolonged survival when used for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Imatinib copy drugs are currently available in some countries; however, the safety and efficacy of these compounds have not been widely assessed. We present a patient who received the copy drug imatinib-COPER, lost hematologic response while on therapy, and was subsequently treated with branded Glivec. This report, and other published cases, suggests that imatinib copy drugs may not be equivalent to branded Glivec in pharmacology, safety, and efficacy. The case was a 42-year-old Moroccan male with CML. Initial therapy with hydroxyurea alone followed by hydroxyurea in combination with interferon-α resulted in durable complete hematologic remission (CHR. Due to adverse effects, the patient was switched to imatinib-COPER at 400 mg/day. Despite compliance with therapy, he lost his CHR after 2 years and presented with aplasia requiring a blood transfusion. Administration of Glivec in combination with hydroxyurea resulted in re-achievement of complete hematologic remission that was stable at last follow-up. Data from large-scale trials demonstrating high and durable responses and favorable safety have resulted in Glivec being considered as standard frontline therapy for patients with CML. Such trials have not been conducted for imatinib copy drugs. In the absence of clinical trial data, information from individual cases is critical to assessing the utility of copy drugs. This report suggests that initial treatment with an imatinib copy drug may compromise efficacy.

  16. Three Paths to Better Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Behind the Blood-Brain Barrier in Treating Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Glioblastoma with Imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Richard E; Focosi, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) can be controlled for years with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib but because imatinib poorly penetrates the blood-brain barrier (BBB), on occasion, the CML clone will thrive and evolve to an accelerated phase in the resulting imatinib sanctuary within the central nervous system. In this, CML resembles glioblastoma in that imatinib, which otherwise may be effective, cannot get to the tumor. Although a common street drug of abuse, methamphetamine is Food and Drug Administration-approved and marketed as a pharmaceutical drug to treat attention-deficit disorders. It has shown the ability to open the BBB in rodents. We have some clinical hints that it may do so in humans as well. This short note presents three new points potentially leading to better tyrosine kinase inhibition behind the BBB: 1) Pharmaceutical methamphetamine may have a useful role in treating both CML and glioblastoma by allowing higher imatinib concentrations behind the BBB. 2) The old antidepressant and monoamine oxidase inhibitor selegiline, used to treat Parkinson disease, is catabolized to methamphetamine. Selegiline, as a nonscheduled drug,may therefore be an easier way to open the BBB, allowing more effective chemotherapy with tyrosine kinases. 3) Dasatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with a spectrum of inhibition only partially overlapping that of imatinib and a mechanism of tyrosine kinase inhibition that is different from that of imatinib. The two should be additive. In addition, dasatinib crosses the BBB poorly, and it can therefore be expected to benefit from methamphetamine-assisted entry. PMID:20165690

  17. Analysis of Survival of Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treated with Imatinib in the Last 15 Years in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, Marcel; Sakr, Riwa; Kerbage, Fouad; Makdissi, Joseph; Hawi, Jenny; Rached, Layale; Nasr, Fady; Chahine, Georges

    2017-07-01

    In the 2000s, the introduction of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), imatinib, improved the survival outcomes of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In Lebanon, we rapidly adopted this treatment strategy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the survival rates of Lebanese CML patients. We examined the rates of major molecular response (MMR) and complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and analyzed the overall survival, progression-free survival, and event-free survival of CML patients treated with front-line imatinib in 3 university hospitals in Lebanon. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 46 patients diagnosed with CML and treated with front-line imatinib 400 mg/day from 2000 and followed up to 2015. In all patients, initially, 2 diagnostic tests were performed: cytogenetic analysis and qualitative molecular testing of the BCR-ABL transcript. The male-to-female sex ratio was 3:1. The median age at diagnosis was 49 years, and the mean age was 44.52 years. At diagnosis, 46 patients were in the chronic phase. All patients started imatinib 400 mg/day. Of the 46 patients, 35 had a typical karyotype, 8 an atypical karyotype, and 3 hypoploidism. The MMR rate at 18 months was 58.69%. The cumulative CCyR rate at 18 months of therapy with imatinib at the standard dose was 67.39%. The event-free survival rate was 75.86% and 74.14% at 5 and 8 years, respectively. The progression-free survival rate was 77.59% and 75.86% at 5 and 8 years, respectively. The overall survival rate was 98.27% and 98.27% at 5 and 8 years, respectively. Of the 46 patients, 12 developed disease progression and were salvaged by second-generation TKIs. These 12 patients were still alive with a MMR. In our study population, the achievement of a MMR and CCyR and overall survival, progression-free survival, and event-free survival were similar to previous published data. Reaching high survival rates with a first-generation TKI in a country with limited

  18. Comparison of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin in the treatment of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic oxidative stress, injury and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaker, Mohamed E.; Zalata, Khaled R.; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Shiha, Gamal E.; Ibrahim, Tarek M.

    2011-01-01

    Effective and well-tolerated anti-fibrotic drugs are currently lacking. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the potential anti-fibrotic effects of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin on established hepatic fibrosis in the carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) rat model. Male Wistar rats received intraperitoneal injections of CCl 4 twice weekly for 8 weeks, as well as daily intraperitoneal treatments of imatinib (10 and 20 mg/kg), nilotinib (10 and 20 mg/kg) and silymarin (100 mg/kg) during the last 4 weeks of CCl 4 -intoxication. At the end of the study, hepatic damage was evaluated by analysis of liver function tests and hepatic oxidative stress parameters. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology and morphometry, as well as collagen and 4-hydroxyproline contents. Nilotinib (20 mg/kg) was the most effective treatment to counteract CCl 4 -induced hepatic injury as indicated by liver function tests and histopathology. Nilotinib (10 mg/kg), nilotinib (20 mg/kg) and silymarin (100 mg/kg) treatments reduced the mean score of hepatic fibrosis by 31%, 68% and 47%, respectively, and hepatic collagen content by 47%, 49% and 18%, respectively in CCl 4 -treated rats. Hepatic morphometric evaluation and 4-hydroxyproline content revealed that CCl 4 -induced fibrosis was ameliorated significantly by nilotinib (20 mg/kg) and imatinib (20 mg/kg). Unlike nilotinib, imatinib (20 mg/kg) showed some sort of hepatic injury evidenced by elevation of serum aminotransferases and total bilirubin levels, and hepatic total nitrate/nitrite content, as well as characteristic anisonucleosis visualized with the hematoxylin-eosin staining. In conclusion, this study provides the evidence that nilotinib exerts anti-fibrotic activity and suggests that it may be valuable in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis in humans. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: → The anti-fibrotic effects of imatinib, nilotinib and silymarin were compared. → These effects were

  19. Regulation of HtrA2 on WT1 gene expression under imatinib stimulation and its effects on the cell biology of K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixia; Li, Yan; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Qing; Qiu, Shaowei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Min; Xing, Haiyan; Rao, Qing; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wang, Jianxiang; Mi, Yingchang

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) by serine protease high-temperature requirement protein A2 (HtrA2), a member of the Htr family, in K562 cells. In addition, the study aimed to observe the effect of this regulation on cell biological functions and its associated mechanisms. Expression of WT1 and HtrA2 mRNA, and proteins following imatinib and the HtrA2 inhibitor 5-[5-(2-nitrophenyl) furfuryl iodine]-1, 3-diphenyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (UCF-101) treatment was detected with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Subsequent to treatment with drugs and UCF-101, the proliferative function of K562 cells was detected using MTT assays, and the rate of apoptosis was detected using Annexin V with propidium iodide flow cytometry in K562 cells. The protein levels in the signaling pathway were analyzed using western blotting following treatment with imatinib and UCF-101. In K562 cells, imatinib treatment activated HtrA2 gene at a transcription level, while the WT1 gene was simultaneously downregulated. Following HtrA2 inhibitor (UCF-101) treatment, the downregulation of WT1 increased gradually. At the protein level, imatinib induced the increase in HtrA2 protein level and concomitantly downregulated WT1 protein level. Subsequent to HtrA2 inhibition by UCF-101, the WT1 protein level decreased temporarily, but eventually increased. Imatinib induced apoptosis in K562 cells, but this effect was attenuated by the HtrA2 inhibitor UCF-101, resulting in the upregulation of the WT1 protein level. However; UCF-101 did not markedly change the proliferation inhibition caused by imatinib. Imatinib activated the p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway in K562 cells, and UCF-101 affected the activation of imatinib in the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Imatinib inhibited the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) pathway markedly and persistently, but UCF-101

  20. Clinical efficacy of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in imatinib-resistant gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a meta-analysis of recent clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lile Wu, Zhongqiang Zhang, Hongliang Yao, Kuijie Liu, Yu Wen, Li Xiong Department of General Surgery, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China Background: Primary and secondary resistance to imatinib, a selective receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, is a serious clinical problem in the control of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST. Here we report on a meta-analysis we performed to evaluate the efficacy of second-generation TKIs in the treatment of patients with imatinib-resistant GIST.Methods: Randomized controlled trials evaluating the clinical efficacy of second-generation TKIs were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE from 2000 to February 2014. Outcomes subjected to analysis were progression-free survival and overall survival. Statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager version 5.1.0 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Weighted hazard ratios (HR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated for the outcomes. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were used, depending on the degree of heterogeneity across the selected studies.Results: Three randomized controlled trials were selected for meta-analysis. Among imatinib-resistant or imatinib-intolerant patients, 541 received second-generation TKIs (sunitinib, nilotinib, or regorafenib and 267 controls received placebo or best supportive care. Progression-free survival was significantly improved in the TKI-treated group (HR 0.38; 95% CI 0.24–0.59; P<0.0001. No statistically significant difference was detected in overall survival between the treatment group and the control group (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.71–1.03; P=0.09. In the subgroup of patients who were resistant or intolerant to both imatinib and sunitinib, TKI therapy (nilotinib or regorafenib improved progression-free survival (HR 0.40; 95% CI 0.19–0.84; P=0.02 but not overall survival (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.63–1.08; P=0.17. Regorafenib was shown to be

  1. Final 5-Year Study Results of DASISION: The Dasatinib Versus Imatinib Study in Treatment-Naïve Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Jorge E; Saglio, Giuseppe; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Baccarani, Michele; Mayer, Jiří; Boqué, Concepción; Shah, Neil P; Chuah, Charles; Casanova, Luis; Bradley-Garelik, Brigid; Manos, George; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2016-07-10

    We report the 5-year analysis from the phase III Dasatinib Versus Imatinib Study in Treatment-Naïve Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients (DASISION) trial, evaluating long-term efficacy and safety outcomes of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP) treated with dasatinib or imatinib. Patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP were randomly assigned to receive dasatinib 100 mg once daily (n = 259) or imatinib 400 mg once daily (n = 260). At the time of study closure, 61% and 63% of dasatinib- and imatinib-treated patients remained on initial therapy, respectively. Cumulative rates of major molecular response and molecular responses with a 4.0- or 4.5-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 transcripts from baseline by 5 years remained statistically significantly higher for dasatinib compared with imatinib. Rates for progression-free and overall survival at 5 years remained high and similar across treatment arms. In patients who achieved BCR-ABL1 ≤ 10% at 3 months (dasatinib, 84%; imatinib, 64%), improvements in progression-free and overall survival and lower rates of transformation to accelerated/blast phase were reported compared with patients with BCR-ABL1 greater than 10% at 3 months. Transformation to accelerated/blast phase occurred in 5% and 7% of patients in the dasatinib and imatinib arms, respectively. Fifteen dasatinib-treated and 19 imatinib-treated patients had BCR-ABL1 mutations identified at discontinuation. There were no new or unexpected adverse events identified in either treatment arm, and pleural effusion was the only drug-related, nonhematologic adverse event reported more frequently with dasatinib (28% v 0.8% with imatinib). First occurrences of pleural effusion were reported with dasatinib, with the highest incidence in year 1. Arterial ischemic events were uncommon in both treatment arms. These final results from the DASISION trial continue to support dasatinib 100 mg once daily as a safe and effective first-line therapy for the long

  2. The mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001), overcomes resistance to imatinib in quiescent Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwatsuka, Y; Minami, M; Minami, Y; Sugimoto, K; Hayakawa, F; Miyata, Y; Abe, A; Goff, D J; Kiyoi, H; Naoe, T

    2011-01-01

    In Ph-positive (Ph + ) leukemia, the quiescent cell state is one of the reasons for resistance to the BCR-ABL-kinase inhibitor, imatinib. In order to examine the mechanisms of resistance due to quiescence and the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, everolimus, for such a resistant population, we used Ph + acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient cells serially xenotransplanted into NOD/SCID/IL2rγ null (NOG) mice. Spleen cells from leukemic mice showed a higher percentage of slow-cycling G 0 cells in the CD34 + CD38 − population compared with the CD34 + CD38 + and CD34 − populations. After ex vivo imatinib treatment, more residual cells were observed in the CD34 + CD38 − population than in the other populations. Although slow-cycling G 0 cells were insensitive to imatinib in spite of BCR-ABL and CrkL dephosphorylation, combination treatment with everolimus induced substantial cell death, including that of the CD34 + CD38 − population, with p70-S6 K dephosphorylation and decrease of MCL-1 expression. The leukemic non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse system with the in vivo combination treatment with imatinib and everolimus showed a decrease of tumor burden including CD34 + cells. These results imply that treatment with everolimus can overcome resistance to imatinib in Ph + leukemia due to quiescence

  3. FIP1L1-PDGFRA-Positive Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia: A Low-Burden Disease with Dramatic Response to Imatinib - A Report of 5 Cases from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anıl Kumar N.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Eosinophilia associated with FIP1L1-PDGFRA rearrangement represents a subset of chronic eosinophilic leukemia and affected patients are sensitive to imatinib treatment. This study was undertaken to learn the prevalence and associated clinicopathologic and genetic features of FIP1L1-PDGFRA rearrangement in a cohort of 26 adult patients presenting with profound eosinophilia (>1.5x109/L. METHODS: Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and gel electrophoresis were used for the detection of FIP1L1-PDGFRA rearrangement. RESULTS: Five male patients with splenomegaly carried the FIP1L1-PDGFRA gene rearrangement. All patients achieved complete hematological response within 4 weeks of starting imatinib. One patient had previous deep vein thrombosis and 1 patient had cardiomyopathy, which improved with steroids and imatinib. Conventional cytogenetics was normal in all these patients. No primary resistance to imatinib was noted. CONCLUSION: This study indicates the need to do the FIP1L1-PDGFRA assay in patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome. Prompt treatment of this condition with imatinib can lead to complete hematological response and resolution of the organ damage that can be seen in this setting.

  4. Proliferation of Interstitial Cells in the Cyclophosphamide-Induced Cystitis and the Preventive Effect of Imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sancho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophosphamide- (CYP- induced cystitis in the rat is a well-known model of bladder inflammation that leads to an overactive bladder, a process that appears to involve enhanced nitric oxide (NO production. We investigated the changes in the number and distribution of interstitial cells (ICs and in the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS in the bladder and urethra of rats subjected to either intermediate or chronic CYP treatment. Pronounced hyperplasia and hypertrophy of ICs were evident within the lamina propria and in the muscle layer. IC immunolabeling with CD34, PDGFRα, and vimentin was enhanced, as reflected by higher colocalization indexes of the distinct pairs of markers. Moreover, de novo expression of eNOS was evident in vimentin and CD34 positive ICs. Pretreatment with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib prevented eNOS expression and ICs proliferation, as well as the increased voiding frequency and urinary tract weight provoked by CYP. As similar results were obtained in the urethra, urethritis may contribute to the uropathology of CYP-induced cystitis.

  5. Survival of gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients in the imatinib era: life raft group observational registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jerry; Walentas, Christopher D; Eickhoff, Jens C; Scherzer, Norman

    2012-03-19

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, prior to routine immunohistochemical staining and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, were often mistaken for neoplasms of smooth muscle origin such as leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas or leiomyoblastomas. Since the advent of imatinib, GIST has been further delineated into adult- (KIT or PDGFRα mutations) and pediatric- (typified by wild-type GIST/succinate dehydrogenase deficiencies) types. Using varying gender ratios at age of diagnosis we sought to elucidate prognostic factors for each sub-type and their impact on overall survival. This is a long-term retrospective analysis of a large observational study of an international open cohort of patients from a GIST research and patient advocacy's lifetime registry. Demographic and disease-specific data were voluntarily supplied by its members from May 2000-October 2010; the primary outcome was overall survival. Associations between survival and prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses, with backward selection at P diligence be taken with "young adults" (aged 18-35 at diagnosis) as pediatric-type GIST may present well beyond adolescence, particularly as these distinct sub-types have different causes, and consequently respond differently to treatments.

  6. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Link between Imatinib Resistance and Kinase Conformational Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lovera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to its inhibition of the Abl kinase domain in the BCR-ABL fusion protein, imatinib is strikingly effective in the initial stage of chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 90% of the patients showing complete remission. However, as in the case of most targeted anti-cancer therapies, the emergence of drug resistance is a serious concern. Several drug-resistant mutations affecting the catalytic domain of Abl and other tyrosine kinases are now known. But, despite their importance and the adverse effect that they have on the prognosis of the cancer patients harboring them, the molecular mechanism of these mutations is still debated. Here by using long molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale free energy calculations complemented by in vitro mutagenesis and microcalorimetry experiments, we model the effect of several widespread drug-resistant mutations of Abl. By comparing the conformational free energy landscape of the mutants with those of the wild-type tyrosine kinases we clarify their mode of action. It involves significant and complex changes in the inactive-to-active dynamics and entropy/enthalpy balance of two functional elements: the activation-loop and the conserved DFG motif. What is more the T315I gatekeeper mutant has a significant impact on the binding mechanism itself and on the binding kinetics.

  7. Is imatinib still the best choice as first-line oral TKI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy is the buzz word these days. A decade back the emergence of tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib on the horizon, as the targeted therapy, had captured the imagination of everyone in the field of cancer. It is encouraging to see a large number of patients getting relief from deadly CML disease and leading a good quality of life with the help of this drug. However, sky is not the limit and now we have second and third generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. I still remember the sagacious smile on the face of late Dr. John Goldman, when I asked him about his preferred choice and he replied and I quote "this is going to be the debate of the decade." Here I take the opportunity to contribute to this debate. I have scrutinized various aspects of the three TKIs, now recommended, for the treatment of CML. I`m still convinced it is too early to shift our practice completely towards 2G TKI as more time is required to make a clear recommendation.

  8. The novel oral imatinib microemulsions: physical properties, cytotoxicity activities and improved Caco-2 cell permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Evren; Karasulu, Hatice Yesim; Koksal, Cinel; Karasulu, Ercüment

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate imatinib (IM) loaded to water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions as an alternative formulation for cancer therapy and to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of microemulsions Caco-2 and MCF-7. Moreover, permeability studies were also performed with Caco-2 cells. W/o microemulsion systems were developed by using pseudo-ternary phase diagram. According to cytotoxicity studies, all formulations did not exert a cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, all formulations had a significant cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cells and the cytotoxic effect of M3IM was significantly more than that of other microemulsions and IM solution (p < 0.05). The permeability studies of IM across Caco-2 cells showed that permeability value from apical to basolateral was higher than permeability value of other formulations. In conclusion, the microemulsion formulations as a drug carrier, especially M3IM formulation, may be used as an effective alternative breast cancer therapy for oral delivery of IM.

  9. Treatment interruptions and non-adherence with imatinib and associated healthcare costs: a retrospective analysis among managed care patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkow, Theodore; Henk, Henry J; Thomas, Simu K; Feng, Weiwei; Baladi, Jean-Francois; Goldberg, George A; Hatfield, Alan; Cortes, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Identify treatment interruptions and non-adherence with imatinib; examine the clinical and patient characteristics related to treatment interruptions and non-adherence; and estimate the association between treatment interruptions and non-adherence with imatinib and healthcare costs for US managed care patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). This retrospective analysis utilised electronic healthcare claims data from a US managed care provider. Adult patients with CML (as determined by International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] diagnosis code) were identified who began treatment with imatinib from 1 June 2001 through 31 March 2004. Treatment interruptions (i.e. failure to refill imatinib within 30 days from the run-out date of the prior prescription) were identified during the 12-month follow-up period. Medication possession ratio (MPR), calculated as total days' supply of imatinib divided by 365, was also examined. Healthcare costs (i.e. paid amounts for all prescription medications and medical services received, including health plan and patient liability) were examined in three ways: (i) total healthcare costs; (ii) total healthcare costs exclusive of imatinib costs; and (iii) total medical costs. All costs were converted to US dollars (2004 values) using the medical component of the Consumer Price Index. MPR was modelled using ordinary least squares regression. Presence of treatment interruptions was modelled using logistic regression. The association between MPR and healthcare costs was estimated using a generalised linear model specified with a gamma error distribution and a log link. All models included adjustment for age, gender, number of concomitant medications, starting dose of imatinib and cancer complexity. A total of 267 patients were identified. Average age was approximately 50 years, and 43% were women. Mean MPR was 77.7%, with 31% of patients having a treatment interruption. However, all of these

  10. Cost-utility analysis of dasatinib and nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia refractory to first-line treatment with imatinib in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpeng, Wantanee; Sompitak, Sumalai; Jootar, Saengsuree; Chansung, Kanchana; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2014-04-01

    Recently, the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors dasatinib and nilotinib have emerged as alternative treatments in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who are resistant to or intolerant of imatinib. This article aimed to assess the cost utility and budget impact of using dasatinib or nilotinib, rather than high-dose (800-mg/d) imatinib, in patients with chronic phase (CP) CML who are resistant to standard-dose (400-mg/d) imatinib in Thailand. A Markov simulation model was developed and used to estimate the lifetime costs and outcomes of treating patients aged ≥38 years with CP-CML. The efficacy parameters were synthesized from a systematic review. Utilities using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions tool and costs were obtained from the Thai CML population. Costs and outcomes were compared and presented as the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in 2011 Thai baht (THB) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate parameter uncertainty. From a societal perspective, treatment with dasatinib was found to yield more QALYs (2.13) at a lower cost (THB 1,631,331) per person than high-dose imatinib. Nilotinib treatment was also found to be more cost-effective than high-dose imatinib, producing an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of THB 83,328 per QALY gained. This treatment option also resulted in the highest number of QALYs gained of all of the treatment options. The costs of providing dasatinib, nilotinib, and high-dose imatinib were estimated at THB 5 billion, THB 6 billion, and THB 7 billion, respectively. Treatment with dasatinib or nilotinib is likely to be more cost-effective than treatment with high-dose imatinib in CP-CML patients who do not respond positively to standard-dose imatinib in the Thai context. Dasatinib was found to be more cost-effective than nilotinib. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A combination of low-dose bevacizumab and imatinib enhances vascular normalisation without inducing extracellular matrix deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, L M; Brunold, M; Liwschitz, M; Goede, V; Loges, S; Wroblewski, M; Quaas, A; Alakus, H; Stippel, D; Bruns, C J; Hallek, M; Kashkar, H; Hacker, U T; Coutelle, O

    2017-02-28

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeting drugs normalise the tumour vasculature and improve access for chemotherapy. However, excessive VEGF inhibition fails to improve clinical outcome, and successive treatment cycles lead to incremental extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, which limits perfusion and drug delivery. We show here, that low-dose VEGF inhibition augmented with PDGF-R inhibition leads to superior vascular normalisation without incremental ECM deposition thus maintaining access for therapy. Collagen IV expression was analysed in response to VEGF inhibition in liver metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, in syngeneic (Panc02) and xenograft tumours of human colorectal cancer cells (LS174T). The xenograft tumours were treated with low (0.5 mg kg -1 body weight) or high (5 mg kg -1 body weight) doses of the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab with or without the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. Changes in tumour growth, and vascular parameters, including microvessel density, pericyte coverage, leakiness, hypoxia, perfusion, fraction of vessels with an open lumen, and type IV collagen deposition were compared. ECM deposition was increased after standard VEGF inhibition in patients and tumour models. In contrast, treatment with low-dose bevacizumab and imatinib produced similar growth inhibition without inducing detrimental collagen IV deposition, leading to superior vascular normalisation, reduced leakiness, improved oxygenation, more open vessels that permit perfusion and access for therapy. Low-dose bevacizumab augmented by imatinib selects a mature, highly normalised and well perfused tumour vasculature without inducing incremental ECM deposition that normally limits the effectiveness of VEGF targeting drugs.

  12. Time-series analysis in imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia K562-cells under different drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Xue-Fang; Zhao, Yan-Qiu; Bai, Fan; Qin, Fan; Sun, Jing; Dong, Ying

    2017-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by the accumulation of active BCR-ABL protein. Imatinib is the first-line treatment of CML; however, many patients are resistant to this drug. In this study, we aimed to compare the differences in expression patterns and functions of time-series genes in imatinib-resistant CML cells under different drug treatments. GSE24946 was downloaded from the GEO database, which included 17 samples of K562-r cells with (n=12) or without drug administration (n=5). Three drug treatment groups were considered for this study: arsenic trioxide (ATO), AMN107, and ATO+AMN107. Each group had one sample at each time point (3, 12, 24, and 48 h). Time-series genes with a ratio of standard deviation/average (coefficient of variation) >0.15 were screened, and their expression patterns were revealed based on Short Time-series Expression Miner (STEM). Then, the functional enrichment analysis of time-series genes in each group was performed using DAVID, and the genes enriched in the top ten functional categories were extracted to detect their expression patterns. Different time-series genes were identified in the three groups, and most of them were enriched in the ribosome and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Time-series genes in the three treatment groups had different expression patterns and functions. Time-series genes in the ATO group (e.g. CCNA2 and DAB2) were significantly associated with cell adhesion, those in the AMN107 group were related to cellular carbohydrate metabolic process, while those in the ATO+AMN107 group (e.g. AP2M1) were significantly related to cell proliferation and antigen processing. In imatinib-resistant CML cells, ATO could influence genes related to cell adhesion, AMN107 might affect genes involved in cellular carbohydrate metabolism, and the combination therapy might regulate genes involved in cell proliferation.

  13. Persistence of chromosomal abnormalities additional to the Philadelphia chromosome after Philadelphia chromosome disappearance during imatinib therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, Alfonso; Valenti, Anna Maria; Donti, Emilio; Gozzetti, Alessandro; Ronconi, Sonia; Spedicato, Francesco

    2007-04-01

    Five Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with additional chromosome abnormalities at diagnosis have been followed during Imatinib therapy. In all, the Ph chromosome disappeared, while the 5 cases, additional abnormalities [dup(1); del(5), +8 (2 patients) and +14] persisted in the subsequent studies, performed over a period of 11 to 49 months, either alone or together with a karyotypically normal cell population. This finding is consistent with a secondary origin of the Ph chromosome in these patients. It is still to early to evaluate the possible prognostic value of these additional abnormalities.

  14. Chronic myeloid leukemia patients in Tunisia: epidemiology and outcome in the imatinib era (a multicentric experience).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Lakhal, Raihane; Ghedira, Hela; Bellaaj, Hatem; Ben Youssef, Yosra; Menif, Samia; Manai, Zeineb; Bedoui, Manel; Lakhal, Amel; M'Sadek, Fehmi; Elloumi, Moez; Khélif, Abderrahmane; Ben Romdhane, Neila; Laatiri, Mohamed Adnène; Ben Othmen, Tarek; Meddeb, Balkis

    2018-04-01

    Data are limited in developing countries regarding the clinicopathologic features and response to therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the era of imatinib (IM). The objective of this study is to report on the clinicoepidemiologic features of CML in Tunisia, to evaluate the long-term outcome of patients in chronic (CP) or accelerated phase (AP) treated with IM 400 mg daily as frontline therapy, and to determine imatinib's efficacy and safety. From October 2002 to December 2014, 410 CML patients were treated with IM in six Tunisian departments of hematology. Response (hematologic, cytogenetic, and molecular responses) and outcome-overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and progression-free survival (PFS)-were evaluated. The following prognostic factors were analyzed for their impact on the European leukemia net (ELN) response, OS, EFS, and PFS at 5 years: age, sex, leukocyte count, Sokal score, European Treatment and Outcome Study (EUTOS) score, CML phase, time to starting IM, and impact of adverse events. The median age was 45 years (3-85 years). Two hundred ten (51.2%) patients were male. Splenomegaly was present in 322 of the 410 (79%). Additional cytogenetic abnormalities were encountered in 25 (6.3%) patients. At diagnosis, 379 (92.4%) patients were in CP, 31 (7.6%) were in AP. The Sokal risk was low in 87 (22.5%), intermediate in 138 (35.7%), and high in 164 patients (41.9%). The EUTOS risk was low in 217 (74%), and high in 77 (26%) patients. The rates of cumulative complete cytogenetic response (CCyR), major molecular response (MMR), and molecular response 4/5 log (MR4.5) in CP/AP-CML patients were 72, 68.4, and 46.4%, respectively. The median time to reach CCyR, MMR, and MR4.5 was 6 months (3-51), 18 months (3-72), and 24 months (3-100), respectively. According to the ELN criteria, optimal, suboptimal response, and failure were noted in 206 (51.8%), 61 (15.3%), and 125 (31.4%) patients, respectively. Five-year event-free survival (EFS

  15. Survival of gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients in the imatinib era: life raft group observational registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Call Jerry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, prior to routine immunohistochemical staining and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, were often mistaken for neoplasms of smooth muscle origin such as leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas or leiomyoblastomas. Since the advent of imatinib, GIST has been further delineated into adult- (KIT or PDGFRα mutations and pediatric- (typified by wild-type GIST/succinate dehydrogenase deficiencies types. Using varying gender ratios at age of diagnosis we sought to elucidate prognostic factors for each sub-type and their impact on overall survival. Methods This is a long-term retrospective analysis of a large observational study of an international open cohort of patients from a GIST research and patient advocacy's lifetime registry. Demographic and disease-specific data were voluntarily supplied by its members from May 2000-October 2010; the primary outcome was overall survival. Associations between survival and prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses, with backward selection at P Results Inflections in gender ratios by age at diagnosis in years delineated two distinct groups: above and below age 35 at diagnosis. Closer analysis confirmed the above 35 age group as previously reported for adult-type GIST, typified by mixed primary tumor sites and gender, KIT or PDGFRα mutations, and shorter survival times. The pediatric group ( Conclusions Pediatric- and adult-type GIST have been previously characterized in clinical settings and these observations confirm significant prognostic factors for each from a diverse real-world cohort. Additionally, these findings suggest that extra diligence be taken with "young adults" (aged 18-35 at diagnosis as pediatric-type GIST may present well beyond adolescence, particularly as these distinct sub-types have different causes, and consequently

  16. SPARC expression in CML is associated to imatinib treatment and to inhibition of leukemia cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Palumbo, Giuseppe A; Di Raimondo, Francesco; La Cava, Piera; Tibullo, Daniele; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Parrinello, Nunziatina; Cupri, Alessandra; Stagno, Fabio; Consoli, Carla; Chiarenza, Annalisa

    2013-01-01

    SPARC is a matricellular glycoprotein with growth-inhibitory and antiangiogenic activity in some cell types. The study of this protein in hematopoietic malignancies led to conflicting reports about its role as a tumor suppressor or promoter, depending on its different functions in the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated the variations in SPARC production by peripheral blood cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients at diagnosis and after treatment and we identified the subpopulation of cells that are the prevalent source of SPARC. We evaluated SPARC expression using real-time PCR and western blotting. SPARC serum levels were detected by ELISA assay. Finally we analyzed the interaction between exogenous SPARC and imatinib (IM), in vitro, using ATP-lite and cell cycle analysis. Our study shows that the CML cells of patients at diagnosis have a low mRNA and protein expression of SPARC. Low serum levels of this protein are also recorded in CML patients at diagnosis. However, after IM treatment we observed an increase of SPARC mRNA, protein, and serum level in the peripheral blood of these patients that had already started at 3 months and was maintained for at least the 18 months of observation. This SPARC increase was predominantly due to monocyte production. In addition, exogenous SPARC protein reduced the growth of K562 cell line and synergized in vitro with IM by inhibiting cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. Our results suggest that low endogenous SPARC expression is a constant feature of BCR/ABL positive cells and that IM treatment induces SPARC overproduction by normal cells. This exogenous SPARC may inhibit CML cell proliferation and may synergize with IM activity against CML

  17. SPARC expression in CML is associated to imatinib treatment and to inhibition of leukemia cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giallongo Cesarina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SPARC is a matricellular glycoprotein with growth-inhibitory and antiangiogenic activity in some cell types. The study of this protein in hematopoietic malignancies led to conflicting reports about its role as a tumor suppressor or promoter, depending on its different functions in the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated the variations in SPARC production by peripheral blood cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis and after treatment and we identified the subpopulation of cells that are the prevalent source of SPARC. Methods We evaluated SPARC expression using real-time PCR and western blotting. SPARC serum levels were detected by ELISA assay. Finally we analyzed the interaction between exogenous SPARC and imatinib (IM, in vitro, using ATP-lite and cell cycle analysis. Results Our study shows that the CML cells of patients at diagnosis have a low mRNA and protein expression of SPARC. Low serum levels of this protein are also recorded in CML patients at diagnosis. However, after IM treatment we observed an increase of SPARC mRNA, protein, and serum level in the peripheral blood of these patients that had already started at 3 months and was maintained for at least the 18 months of observation. This SPARC increase was predominantly due to monocyte production. In addition, exogenous SPARC protein reduced the growth of K562 cell line and synergized in vitro with IM by inhibiting cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. Conclusion Our results suggest that low endogenous SPARC expression is a constant feature of BCR/ABL positive cells and that IM treatment induces SPARC overproduction by normal cells. This exogenous SPARC may inhibit CML cell proliferation and may synergize with IM activity against CML.

  18. Rapid Determination of Imatinib in Human Plasma by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jeong Soo; Cho, Eun Gi; Huh, Wooseong; Ko, Jaewook; Jung, Jin Ah; Lee, Sooyoun [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    A simple, fast and robust analytical method was developed to determine imatinib in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode. Imatinib and labeled internal standard were extracted from plasma with a simple protein precipitation. The chromatographic separation was performed using an isocratic elution of mobile phase involving 5.0 mM ammonium formate in water -5.0 mM ammonium formate in methanol (30:70, v/v) over 3.0 min on reversed-stationary phase. The detection was performed using a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The developed method was validated with lower limit of quantification of 10 ng/mL. The calibration curve was linear over 10-2000 ng/mL (R{sup 2} > 0.99). The method validation parameters met the acceptance criteria. The spiked samples and standard solutions were stable under conditions for storage and handling. The reliable method was successfully applied to real sample analyses and thus a pharmacokinetic study in 27 healthy Korean male volunteers.

  19. The impact assessment of anticancer drug imatinib on the feeding behavior of rotifers with an integrated perspective: Exposure, post-exposure and re-exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhengyu; Yan, Kun; He, Xingliang; Liu, Yanhua; Zhang, Jie; Lopez Torres, Oscar; Guo, Ruixin; Chen, Jianqiu

    2017-10-01

    The anticancer drugs are getting increasing attention as an emerging contaminant in the aquatic environments. In the present study, feeding behavior of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus under the impact of anticancer drug imatinib was evaluated. Traditional toxicological studies usually focus on dose-effect relationship at a given exposure time, while ignore the possible impact after the exposure. Thus, how the impact varied in the post-exposure and re-exposure was also considered in the present study. The feeding depression of the rotifers was attributed to the increased concentration of imatinib. Although the filtration and ingestion rate of the rotifers recovered to a certain extent after the exposure, the significant feeding inhibition still persisted even if the exposure was ended. In the re-exposure period, the feeding behavior was less depressed than those of the exposure period, which implied that rotifers might develop a tolerance to the same toxics. The activities of acetylcholine esterase (AchE) and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rotifers were also detected. Imatinib inhibited the activities of AchE in the exposure and re-exposure while ROS levels increased significantly in the re-exposure period. Our present study provided an integrated assessment the potential environmental risks of imatinib at a new perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Imatinib in combination with hydroxyurea versus hydroxyurea alone as oral therapy in patients with progressive pretreated glioblastoma resistant to standard dose temozolomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dresemann, G.; Weller, M.; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann Maria

    2010-01-01

    A randomized, multicenter, open-label, phase 3 study of patients with progressive, recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) for whom front-line therapy had failed was conducted. This study was designed to determine whether combination therapy with imatinib and hydroxyurea (HU) has superior antitumor...

  1. Impact of imatinib interruption and duration of prior hydroxyurea on the treatment outcome in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: Single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Abdelgawad Edesa

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Duration of prior hydroxyurea had no impact on response or progression free survival, while patients regular on imatinib had statistically significant difference with respect to major molecular response, complete molecular response and progression free survival compared to those who had periods of drug interruption, thus we need more governmental support to supply the drug without interruption to improve the outcome of therapy.

  2. A non-radioactive assay for precise determination of intracellular levels of imatinib and its main metabolite in Bcr-Abl positive cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlejnek, P.; Novák, Ondřej; Doležel, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 5 (2011), s. 1466-1471 ISSN 0039-9140 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : K562 cells * P-glycoprotein * Multidrug resistance * N-desmethyl imatinib * CGP 74588 Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2011

  3. Follow-up of hepatic and peritoneal metastases of gastrointestinal tumors (GIST) under Imatinib therapy requires different criteria of radiological evaluation (size is not everything!!!)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabille, Mylene; Vanel, Daniel; Albiter, Marcela; Le Cesne, Axel; Bonvalot, Sylvie; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Terrier, Philippe; Shapeero, Lorraine G.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To define computed tomography (CT) criteria for evaluating the response of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) who are receiving Imatinib (tyrosine-kinase inhibitor therapy). Materials and methods: This prospective CT study evaluated 107 consecutive patients with advanced metastatic GIST treated with Imatinib. Results: Seventy patients had total or partial cystic-like transformation of hepatic and/or peritoneal metastases. These pseudocysts remained unchanged in size or stable in size on successive CT examinations (stable disease according to RECIST criteria). Forty-six patients developed metastases, 17 patients showed increasing parietal thickness and 29 patients with peripheral enhancing nodules. These CT changes represented local recurrence consistent with GIST resistance to Imatinib treatment. WHO or RECIST criteria did not provide a reliable evaluation of disease evolution or recurrence. Development of new enhancement of lesions (parietal thickness or nodule) was the only reliable criterion. Conclusion: The development of peripheral thickening or enhancing nodules within cystic-like metastatic lesions, even without any change in size, represented progressive GIST under Imatinib, growing in a short time and should alert the clinician for the possible need for a change in therapy

  4. B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with 11q22.3 Rearrangement in Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treated with Imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lewandowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of two diseases chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL is a rare phenomenon. Both neoplastic disorders have several common epidemiological denominators (they occur more often in men over 50 years of age but different origin and long term prognosis. In this paper we described the clinical and pathological findings in patient with CML in major molecular response who developed B-CLL with 11q22.3 rearrangement and Coombs positive hemolytic anemia during the imatinib treatment. Due to the presence of the symptoms of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and optimal CML response to the imatinib treatment, the decision about combined therapy with prednisone and imatinib was made. During the follow-up, the normalization of complete blood count and resolution of peripheral lymphadenopathy were noted. The hematologic response of B-CLL was diagnosed. The repeated FISH analysis of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes showed 2% of cells carrying 11q22.3 rearrangement. At the same time, molecular monitoring confirmed the deep molecular response of CML. The effectiveness of such combination in the described case raises the question about the best therapeutic option in such situation, especially in patients with good imatinib tolerance and optimal response.

  5. Changes in Cell Adhesivity and Cytoskeleton-Related Proteins During Imatinib-Induced Apoptosis of Leukemic JURL-MK1 Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuželová, K.; Pluskalová, M.; Grebeňová, D.; Pavlásková, Kateřina; Halada, Petr; Hrkal, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 6 (2010), s. 1413-1425 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA MZd NR9243 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : imatinib * adhesion * cytoskeleton Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.122, year: 2010

  6. Dasatinib or imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia : 2-year follow-up from a randomized phase 3 trial (DASISION)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Shah, Neil P.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Baccarani, Michele; Agarwal, Mohan B.; Soledad Undurraga, Maria; Wang, Jianxiang; Kassack Ipina, Juan Julio; Kim, Dong-Wook; Ogura, Michinori; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Junghanss, Christian; Milone, Jorge H.; Nicolini, Franck E.; Robak, Tadeusz; Van Droogenbroeck, Jan; Vellenga, Edo; Bradley-Garelik, M. Brigid; Zhu, Chao; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Dasatinib is a highly potent BCR-ABL inhibitor with established efficacy and safety in imatinib-resistant/-intolerant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In the phase 3 DASISION trial, patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase (CP) CML were randomized to receive dasatinib 100 mg (n =

  7. Pristimerin induces apoptosis in imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia cells harboring T315I mutation by blocking NF-κB signaling and depleting Bcr-Abl

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the chimeric tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the notorious point mutation that causes resistance to imatinib and the second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, leading to poor prognosis. CML blasts have constitutive p65 (RelA NF-κB) transcriptional activity, and NF-κB may be a potential target for molecular therapies in CML that may also be effective against CML cells with Bcr-Abl-T315I. Results In this report, we discovered that pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells, including the cells harboring Bcr-Abl-T315I mutation. Additionally, pristimerin inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Pristimerin blocked the TNFα-induced IκBα phosphorylation, translocation of p65, and expression of NF-κB-regulated genes. Pristimerin inhibited two steps in NF-κB signaling: TAK1→IKK and IKK→IκBα. Pristimerin potently inhibited two pairs of CML cell lines (KBM5 versus KBM5-T315I, 32D-Bcr-Abl versus 32D-Bcr-Abl-T315I) and primary cells from a CML patient with acquired resistance to imatinib. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl in imatinib-sensitive (KBM5) or imatinib-resistant (KBM5-T315I) CML cells were reduced after pristimerin treatment. Further, inactivation of Bcr-Abl by imatinib pretreatment did not abrogate the TNFα-induced NF-κB activation while silencing p65 by siRNA did not affect the levels of Bcr-Abl, both results together indicating that NF-κB inactivation and Bcr-Abl inhibition may be parallel independent pathways. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that pristimerin is effective in vitro and in vivo against CML cells, including those with the T315I mutation. The mechanisms may involve inhibition of NF-κB and Bcr-Abl. We concluded that pristimerin could be a lead compound for further drug development to

  8. Hydroxyurea with or without imatinib in the treatment of recurrent or progressive meningiomas: a randomized phase II trial by Gruppo Italiano Cooperativo di Neuro-Oncologia (GICNO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Elena; Brandes, Alba; Zanon, Silvia; Eoli, Marika; Lombardi, Giuseppe; Faedi, Marina; Franceschi, Enrico; Reni, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyurea (HU) is among the most widely used salvage therapies in progressive meningiomas. Platelet-derived growth factor receptors are expressed in virtually all meningiomas. Imatinib sensitizes transformed cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents that interfere with DNA metabolism. The combination of HU with imatinib yielded intriguing results in recurrent malignant glioma. The current trial addressed the activity of this association against meningioma. Patients with recurrent or progressive WHO grade I-III meningioma, without therapeutic indication for surgery, radiotherapy, or stereotactic radiosurgery, aged 18-75 years, ECOG performance status 0-2, and not on enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs were randomized to receive HU 500 mg BID ± imatinib 400 mg QD until progression, unacceptable toxicity, or patient's refusal. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival rate at 9 months (PFS-9). Between September 2009 and February 2012, 15 patients were randomized to receive HU + imatinib (N = 7; Arm A) or HU alone (N = 8; Arm B). Afterward the trial was prematurely closed due to slow enrollment rate. PFS-9 (A/B) was 0/75%, and median PFS was 4/19.5 months. Median and 2-year overall survival (A/B) rates were: 6/27.5 months; 28.5/75%, respectively. Main G3-4 toxicities were: G3 neutropenia in 1/0, G4 headache in 1/1, and G3 vomiting in 1/0. The conduction of a study in recurrent or progressive meningioma remains a challenge. Given the limited number of patients enrolled, no firm conclusions can be drawn about the combination of imatinib and HU. The optimal systemic therapy for meningioma failing surgery and radiation has yet to be identified.

  9. The mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001), overcomes resistance to imatinib in quiescent Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwatsuka, Y; Minami, M; Minami, Y; Sugimoto, K; Hayakawa, F; Miyata, Y; Abe, A [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Goff, D J [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA (United States); Kiyoi, H [Department of Infectious Diseases, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Naoe, T [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-05-01

    In Ph-positive (Ph{sup +}) leukemia, the quiescent cell state is one of the reasons for resistance to the BCR-ABL-kinase inhibitor, imatinib. In order to examine the mechanisms of resistance due to quiescence and the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, everolimus, for such a resistant population, we used Ph{sup +} acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient cells serially xenotransplanted into NOD/SCID/IL2rγ{sup null} (NOG) mice. Spleen cells from leukemic mice showed a higher percentage of slow-cycling G{sub 0} cells in the CD34{sup +}CD38{sup −} population compared with the CD34{sup +}CD38{sup +} and CD34{sup −} populations. After ex vivo imatinib treatment, more residual cells were observed in the CD34{sup +}CD38{sup −} population than in the other populations. Although slow-cycling G{sub 0} cells were insensitive to imatinib in spite of BCR-ABL and CrkL dephosphorylation, combination treatment with everolimus induced substantial cell death, including that of the CD34{sup +}CD38{sup −} population, with p70-S6 K dephosphorylation and decrease of MCL-1 expression. The leukemic non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse system with the in vivo combination treatment with imatinib and everolimus showed a decrease of tumor burden including CD34{sup +} cells. These results imply that treatment with everolimus can overcome resistance to imatinib in Ph{sup +} leukemia due to quiescence.

  10. Activities of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate in combination with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors against acute HIV-1 infection in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Patick, A K; Boritzki, T J; Bloom, L A

    1997-01-01

    Nelfinavir mesylate (formerly AG1343) is a potent and selective, nonpeptidic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease that was discovered by protein structure-based design methodologies. We evaluated the antiviral and cytotoxic effects of two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the clinically approved antiretroviral therapeutics zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (3TC), dideoxycytidine (ddC; zalcitabine), stavudine (d4T), didanosine (ddI), indinavir, saquinavir, and ritona...

  11. Survival of gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients in the imatinib era: life raft group observational registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Call, Jerry; Walentas, Christopher D; Eickhoff, Jens C; Scherzer, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, prior to routine immunohistochemical staining and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, were often mistaken for neoplasms of smooth muscle origin such as leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas or leiomyoblastomas. Since the advent of imatinib, GIST has been further delineated into adult- (KIT or PDGFRα mutations) and pediatric- (typified by wild-type GIST/succinate dehydrogenase deficiencies) types. Using varying gender ratios at age of diagnosis we sought to elucidate prognostic factors for each sub-type and their impact on overall survival. This is a long-term retrospective analysis of a large observational study of an international open cohort of patients from a GIST research and patient advocacy's lifetime registry. Demographic and disease-specific data were voluntarily supplied by its members from May 2000-October 2010; the primary outcome was overall survival. Associations between survival and prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses, with backward selection at P < 0.05 used to identify independent factors. Inflections in gender ratios by age at diagnosis in years delineated two distinct groups: above and below age 35 at diagnosis. Closer analysis confirmed the above 35 age group as previously reported for adult-type GIST, typified by mixed primary tumor sites and gender, KIT or PDGFRα mutations, and shorter survival times. The pediatric group (< age 18 at diagnosis) was also as previously reported with predominantly stomach tumors, females, wild-type GIST or SDH mutations, and extended survival. 'Young adults' however formed a third group aged 18-35 at diagnosis, and were a clear mix of these two previously reported distinct sub-types. Pediatric- and adult-type GIST have been previously characterized in clinical settings and these observations confirm significant prognostic factors for each

  12. Efeitos adversos e resposta citogenética em pacientes com leucemia mieloide crônica tratados com imatinibe Adverse events and cytogenetc response in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia treated with imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana F. Alvarenga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia mieloide crônica (LMC é uma doença mieloproliferativa clonal caracterizada citogeneticamente pelo cromossomo Philadelphia. Dentre as opções terapêuticas estão a hidroxiureia, o interferon-a, o transplante alogeneico de células-tronco hematopoéticas e o imatinibe. Esta última terapia tem demonstrado eficácia, principalmente na fase crônica da doença. Entretanto, alguns estudos têm demonstrado que alterações cromossômicas adicionais levam resistência à terapia, enquanto outros relatam aparecimento de manifestações clínicas indesejáveis, como cefaleia, náuseas e vômitos. Devido à importância desta terapia alvo-molecular, torna-se necessário analisar a resposta deste tratamento considerando a qualidade de vida dos pacientes. O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar as manifestações clínicas indesejáveis e a resposta citogenética durante o tratamento com imatinibe em pacientes com LMC após uso prévio de interferon-a. O estudo clínico foi feito através de prontuários de 51 pacientes. A análise citogenética foi feita em células de medula óssea através da técnica de bandeamento GTG. As manifestações clínicas mais frequentes foram: cefaleia (37%, náusea (37%, vômito (33% e edema periférico (33%. Esses sintomas foram considerados leves a moderados. Os pacientes que alcançaram resposta citogenética completa tiveram uma sobrevida significativamente maior que os pacientes que não apresentaram resposta citogenética ao tratamento (p=0.007. Oito pacientes sem resposta citogenética faleceram. Nossos resultados mostraram a importância do acompanhamento clínico (analisando o grau de tolerância medicamentosa e citogenético, onde a presença de alterações cromossômicas adicionais mostrou um comportamento biológico distinto que não pode ser avaliado pelas técnicas moleculares. Desta forma, a análise citogenética representa uma importante ferramenta para o diagnóstico e monitoramento destes

  13. Studies on the toxic effects of periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate on early embryonic development of SD rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-mou DONG

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the toxic effects of periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate on early embryonic development of SD rats.Methods A total of 100female SD rats were randomly divided into negative control,low-,medium-,high-dose group and intervention group(20each.Rats in low-,medium-and high-dose group were fed daily with the sustained release drug at 1,4,and 8g/kg respectively;those in negative control group were fed daily with distilled water from the 14th day before mating to the 7th day of pregnancy continuously,and those in intervention group received cyclophosphamide(40mg/kgby intraperitoneal injection for 5successive days.During this period,the general status,mating,pregnancy,coefficient of ovary and uterus,the numbers of corpus luteum,nidation,live births,stillbirths,absorbed embryo,prenidatory and postnidatory mortality,serum testosterone(Tand estradiol(E2were determined respectively.Histopathologic examination of the ovary and uterus,immunohistochemical observation of ovaries for proliferating cell nuclear antigen(PCNAand Bcl-2associated X protein(Baxwere also performed respectively.Results The general status of those rats was good except one in the low-dose group and one in the intervention group died on the 14th day of administration,and one in negative control and one in high dose group died on the 5th day of pregnancy,respectively.The body weight of animals decreased significantly(P 0.05.The serum T level in medium-and high-dose group and the E2level in high-dose group declined compared to that in negative control group(P < 0.05.Conclusions Although the periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate shows no toxicity to the early embryonic development of SD rats,the high dose drug has certain toxicity to ovary.Declined serum concentrations of T and E2,reduced expression of PCNA,and increased Bax may be the causes of the toxicity.

  14. CM363, a novel naphthoquinone derivative which acts as multikinase modulator and overcomes imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos; McNaughton-Smith, Grant; Jiménez-Alonso, Sandra; Hueso-Falcón, Idaira; Montero, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Raquel; León, Javier; Rodríguez-González, Germán; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Pandiella, Atanasio; Díaz-Chico, Bonifacio Nicolás; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Human Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) is a hematological stem cell disorder which is associated with activation of Bcr-Abl-Stat5 oncogenic pathway. Direct Bcr-Abl inhibitors are initially successful for the treatment of CML but over time many patients develop drug resistance. In the present study, the effects of CM363, a novel naphthoquinone (NPQ) derivative, were evaluated on human CML-derived K562 cells. CM363 revealed an effective cell growth inhibition (IC50 = 0.7 ± 0.5 μM) by inducing cancer cells to undergo cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. CM363 caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction of cells in G0/G1 and G2/M phases. This cell cycle arrest was associated with increased levels of cyclin E, pChk1 and pChk2 whereas CM363 downregulated cyclin B, cyclin D3, p27, pRB, Wee1, and BUBR1. CM363 increased the double-strand DNA break marker γH2AX. CM363 caused a time-dependent increase of annexin V-positive cells, DNA fragmentation and increased number of apoptotic nuclei. CM363 triggered the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as reflected by a release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and induction of the cleavage of caspase-3 and -9, and PARP. CM363 showed multikinase modulatory effects through an early increased JNK phosphorylation followed by inhibition of pY-Bcrl-Abl and pY-Stat5. CM363 worked synergistically with imatinib to inhibit cell viability and maintained its activity in imatinib-resistant cells. Finally, CM363 (10 mg/Kg) suppressed the growth of K562 xenograft tumors in athymic mice. In summary, CM363 is a novel multikinase modulator that offers advantages to circumvent imanitib resistance and might be therapeutically effective in Bcrl-Abl-Stat5 related malignancies. PMID:27557509

  15. Incidence of second primary malignancies and related mortality in patients with imatinib-treated chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliotta, Gabriele; Castagnetti, Fausto; Breccia, Massimo; Albano, Francesco; Iurlo, Alessandra; Intermesoli, Tamara; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Levato, Luciano; D'Adda, Mariella; Pregno, Patrizia; Cavazzini, Francesco; Stagno, Fabio; Martino, Bruno; La Barba, Gaetano; Sorà, Federica; Tiribelli, Mario; Bigazzi, Catia; Binotto, Gianni; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Caracciolo, Clementina; Soverini, Simona; Foà, Robin; Cavo, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni; Pane, Fabrizio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Baccarani, Michele; Rosti, Gianantonio

    2017-09-01

    The majority of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia are successfully managed with life-long treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In patients in chronic phase, other malignancies are among the most common causes of death, raising concerns on the relationship between these deaths and the off-target effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We analyzed the incidence of second primary malignancies, and related mortality, in 514 chronic myeloid leukemia patients enrolled in clinical trials in which imatinib was given as first-line treatment. We then compared the observed incidence and mortality with those expected in the age- and sex-matched Italian general population, calculating standardized incidence and standardized mortality ratios. After a median follow-up of 74 months, 5.8% patients developed second primary malignancies. The median time from chronic myeloid leukemia to diagnosis of the second primary malignancies was 34 months. We did not find a higher incidence of second primary malignancies compared to that in the age- and sex-matched Italian general population, with standardized incidence ratios of 1.06 (95% CI: 0.57-1.54) and 1.61 (95% CI: 0.92-2.31) in males and females, respectively. Overall, 3.1% patients died of second primary malignancies. The death rate in patients with second primary malignancies was 53% (median overall survival: 18 months). Among females, the observed cancer-related mortality was superior to that expected in the age- and sex-matched Italian population, with a standardized mortality ratio of 2.41 (95% CI: 1.26 - 3.56). In conclusion, our analysis of patients with imatinib-treated chronic myeloid leukemia did not reveal a higher incidence of second primary malignancies; however, the outcome of second primary malignancies in such patients was worse than expected. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00514488, NCT00510926. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  16. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TNF blocker Ibritumomab tiuxetan Zevalin CD20 with radioisotope Ibrutinib Imbruvica Tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib mesylate Gleevec, STI ... of Health, and HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2014 ...

  17. Multi criteria decision making to select the best method for the preparation of solid lipid nanoparticles of rasagiline mesylate using analytic hierarchy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveksarathi Kunasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to select best method for the development of rasagiline mesylate (RM loaded nanoscale solid lipid particles using analytic hierarchy process (AHP. Improper method selection may lead to waste of time, loss of material and financial resources. One of the possibilities to overcome these difficulties, AHP was employed to find the suitable method. In the AHP, a decision of hierarchy was constructed with a goal, criteria, sub-criteria, and alternatives. After constructing the AHP, the expert choice software was used to compute the overall priority of criteria, sub-criteria and alternatives. The best alternative selected was based on the highest priority. Nanoscale solid lipid particles of RM was formulated by the selected microemulsion method (M4 and it shows the particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential were within acceptable limits. Drug content and entrapment efficiency of the RM-solid lipid nanoparticles were 97.26% and 86.57%, respectively. This study concludes that the AHP was viable and effective tool for selecting a most suitable method for the fabrication of RM loaded nanoscale solid lipid particles.

  18. Quality-by-design based development of a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system to reduce the effect of food on Nelfinavir mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Sunil; Rana, Vikas

    2016-03-30

    Poor aqueous solubility and moderate permeability of Nelfinavir mesylate (NFM) leads to high variability in absorption after oral administration. To improve the solubility and bioavailability of NFM, the self microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) was developed. For this purpose, Quality by design (QbD) approach employing D-optimal mixture design was used to prepare SMEDDS of NFM. Further, the software generated numerically optimized SMEDDS were developed by utilizing desirability function. Maisine 35-1, Tween 80, and Transcutol HP were identified as oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant that had best solubility for NFM. Ternary phase diagrams were plotted to identify the self-emulsification region. Dissolution of putative NFM in simulated fasted or fed small intestinal conditions, respectively, predicted that there is a positive food effect. However, NFM loaded SMEDDS showed absence of food effect with no significant difference in dissolution performance either in Fasted or fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF or FeSSIF) biorelevent dissolution media. The prepared SMEDDS were thermodynamically stable with droplet size (121 nm), poly dispersity index (PDI) (0.198) and emulsification time (food effect on pure NFM suspension. However, absence of food effect and 3.5-3.6 fold enhancement in the oral bioavailability was observed when NFM was formulated into SMEDDS. Thus, it could be envisaged that development of SMEDDS formulation of NFM could be one of the best alternative to enhance oral bioavailability of NFM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor after failure with imatinib and sunitinib treatment: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenan; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Wensheng; Piao, Daxun

    2017-12-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of regorafenib as a treatment for patients with advanced (metastatic and/or unresectable) gastrointestinal stromal tumor (AGIST) after developing resistance to imatinib and sunitinib. A literature search of databases such as PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library was conducted up to February 2017. The pooled percentages and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Stata 11.0 software. Four studies involving 243 patients with AGIST were included. Results revealed that approximately 49% (95% CI 30-67), 14% (95% CI 5-23), and 41% (95% CI 21-61) of patients with AGIST showed clinical benefit (including complete response), partial response, and stable disease, respectively, after regorafenib treatment, which was given after failure with imatinib and sunitinib treatments. No complete response was found in the included studies. Pooled progression-free survival was 6.58 months (95% CI 4.62-8.54). Hypertension (20%; 95% CI 7-33), hand-foot skin reaction (22%; 95% CI 17-27), and hypophosphatemia (18%; 95% CI 5-41) were common grade ≥3 regorafenib-related adverse events in patients treated with regorafenib after failure with imatinib and sunitinib treatments. Forty-nine per cent of patients with AGIST benefited after regorafenib treatment after the development of resistance to imatinib and sunitinib. More studies should be performed to improve the clinical survival of patients with AGIST. Close monitoring and appropriate management of grade ≥3 regorafenib-related adverse events should be considered during treatment.

  20. Comparison of early treatment with low doses of nilotinib, imatinib and a clinically relevant dose of silymarin in thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Mohamed E; Shiha, Gamal E; Ibrahim, Tarek M

    2011-11-30

    Our previous study has already confirmed a promising anti-fibrotic activity especially for nilotinib; when given at a daily dose of 10 mg/kg during the last 4 weeks of thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis for 12 weeks in rats. Therefore, this study was carried out to compare the prophylactic potential of low dose of nilotinib to that of its predecessor, imatinib, and a clinically relevant dose of the standard hepatoprotective treatment, silymarin, in TAA-intoxication. Male Wistar rats received intraperitoneal injections of TAA (150 mg/kg, twice weekly) for 8 weeks, as well as oral treatments with imatinib (5 mg/kg/day), nilotinib (5 mg/kg/day) and silymarin (50 mg/kg/day) from the first day of TAA-intoxication. At the end of the study, chronic hepatic injury was evaluated by analysis of liver function tests in serum. Hepatic oxidative stress was assessed by measuring malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, total nitrate/nitrite and reduced glutathione contents, as well as myeloperoxidase and superoxide dismutase activities. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology and collagen content. Our results suggest that the prophylactic potential of nilotinib (5 mg/kg/day), imatinib (5mg/kg/day) and silymarin (50 mg/kg/day) in TAA-intoxication for 8 weeks is lower than the late treatments of nilotinib (10 mg/kg/day), imatinib (10mg/kg/day) and silymarin (100 mg/kg/day) during the last 4 weeks of TAA-intoxication for 12 weeks in rats. Taken together, this study suggests that nilotinib may have higher anti-fibrotic activity when administered at a significant stage of fibrosis as a result of impairment of its metabolism in the fibrotic livers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: A Genetic Mechanism of Imatinib Resistance in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor-Where Are We a Decade Later?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonescu, Cristina R; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2015-08-01

    In the June 1, 2005, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, Antonescu and colleagues defined second-site KIT mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) as the leading mechanism of acquired resistance to imatinib. Secondary mutations were detectable mainly in KIT exon 11 mutant GISTs after prolonged initial clinical responses. These findings played a critical role in designing the next generation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Long-term safety and efficacy of dasatinib in the treatment of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant or intolerant to imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoumariyeh K

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Khalid Shoumariyeh, Nikolas von BubnoffDepartment of Hematology, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has undergone dramatic changes in the last decade. Dissecting the molecular pathways that lead to the development of this disease resulted in the development of targeted therapy against the molecular driver of CML, namely the aberrantly activated tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL1. By introducing the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib to the treatment repertoire, the natural course of the disease has been dramatically altered and overall survival of patients with CML prolonged substantially. Nevertheless, a significant number of patients are primarily resistant, acquire resistance during the course of their disease, or do not tolerate the intake of imatinib due to adverse effects. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors were developed in an attempt to overcome these problems. Dasatinib is a potent oral kinase inhibitor that was originally developed as an Src-kinase inhibitor but exhibited promising potency against BCR-ABL1 as well. Phase I and II trials demonstrated efficacy in patients failing imatinib, and thus dasatanib was approved in 2006 for the treatment of imatinib-resistant or -intolerant patients with chronic-phase CML harboring the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. It has since shown promising efficacy and good overall tolerability in subsequent clinical trials, including the Phase III first-line DASISION trial that led to the extension of its approval for first-line treatment of chronic-phase CML. The following review summarizes the available data on the long-term efficacy and safety of dasatinib as a second-line therapy in chronic-phase CML. Keywords: BCR-ABL1, TKI, CML-CP, second-line treatment

  3. Updated estimates of survival and cost effectiveness for imatinib versus interferon-alpha plus low-dose cytarabine for newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shelby D; Anstrom, Kevin J; Li, Yanhong; Schulman, Kevin A

    2008-01-01

    For trials in which participants are followed beyond the main study period to assess long-term outcomes, economic evaluations conducted using short-term data should be systematically updated to reflect new information. We used 60-month survival data from the IRIS (International Randomized study of Interferon vs STI571) trial to update previously published cost-effectiveness estimates, based on 19 months of follow-up, of imatinib versus interferon (IFN)-alpha plus low-dose cytarabine in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia. For patients treated with imatinib, we used the 60-month data to calibrate the survival curves generated from the original cost-effectiveness model. We used historical data to model survival for patients randomized to IFNalpha. We updated costs for medical resources using 2006 Medicare reimbursement rates and applied average wholesale prices (AWPs) and wholesale acquisition costs (WACs) to study medications. Five-year survival for patients randomized to imatinib was better than predicted in the original model (89.4% vs 83.2%). We estimated remaining life expectancy with first-line imatinib to be 19.1 life-years (3.8 life-years over the original model) and 15.2 QALYs (3.1 QALYs over the original estimate). Estimates for IFNalpha remained at 9.1 life-years and 6.3 QALYs. When we applied AWPs to study medications, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were $US 51,800-57,500 per QALY. When we applied WACs, ICERs were $US 42,000-46,200 per QALY. Although the analysis revealed that the original survival estimates were conservative, the updated cost-effectiveness ratios were consistent with, or slightly higher than, the original estimates, depending on the method for assigning costs to study medications.

  4. Do polymorphisms in MDR1 and CYP3A5 genes influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harivenkatesh, Natarajan; Kumar, Lalit; Bakhshi, Sameer; Sharma, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Gogia, Ajay; Shastri, Shivaram S; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Influence of polymorphisms in the genes coding for imatinib transporters and metabolizing enzymes on cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is not known. One hundred and four patients (52 cases with cytogenetic relapse and 52 controls without relapse) with chronic-phase CML on imatinib therapy and have completed 5 years of follow-up were enrolled. The following single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped; C1236T, C3435T, G2677T/A in MDR1 gene and A6986G in CYP3A5 gene, using PCR-RFLP method and validated by direct gene sequencing. Imatinib trough levels were measured using LC-MS/MS. Patients with CC genotype for MDR1-C1236T polymorphism were at significantly higher risk for cytogenetic relapse [OR =4.382, 95% CI (1.145, 16.774), p = .022], while those with TT genotype for MDR1-C3435T polymorphism had significantly lower risk of relapse [OR =0.309, 95% CI (0.134, 0.708), p = .005]. Imatinib trough levels were lower in patients with relapse compared to those without relapse (1551.4 ± 1324.1 vs. 2154.2 ± 1358.3 ng/mL; p = .041). MDR1-C3435T genotype [adjusted-OR: 0.266; 95% CI (0.111, 0.636); p = .003] and trough levels (p = .014) were independent predictors of relapse in multivariate analysis. To conclude, C1236T and C3435T polymorphisms in MDR1 gene and trough levels significantly influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse. MDR1-C3435T genotype might emerge as a potential biomarker to predict the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with CML.

  5. Early Evaluation of Response Using 18F-FDG PET Influences Management in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Sheima; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de; van der Graaf, Winette T; van Coevorden, Frits; Grunhagen, Dirk; Reyners, Anna K L; Boonstra, Pieter A; Desar, Ingrid; Gelderblom, Hans; Steeghs, Neeltje

    2018-02-01

    18 F-FDG PET has previously been proven effective as an early way to evaluate the response of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) to imatinib treatment. However, it is unclear whether early evaluation of response affects treatment decisions in GIST patients treated with neoadjuvant intent. Methods: We retrospectively scored changes in management based on early evaluation of response by 18 F-FDG PET in patients in the Dutch GIST registry treated with neoadjuvant imatinib. Results: Seventy 18 F-FDG PET scans were obtained for 63 GIST patients to evaluate for an early response to neoadjuvant imatinib. The scans led to a change in management in 27.1% of the patients. Change in management correlated strongly with lack of metabolic response ( P PET for early evaluation of response often results in a change of management in GIST patients harboring the non- KIT exon 11 mutation and should be considered the standard of care in GIST patients treated with neoadjuvant intent. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  6. Time-specific blockade of PDGFR with Imatinib (Glivec®) causes cataract and disruption of lens fiber cells in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yin-Pin; He, Yang-Tao; Chen, Cheng-Li; Ji, Jun; Niu, Jian-Qin; Wang, Han-Zhi; Li, Shi-Feng; Huang, Lan; Mei, Feng

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed at investigating the response of lens epithelial cells in postnatal mice to Imatinib (Glivec®, a potent inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)) treatment. Mouse eyes were sampled 10 days after administration of Imatinib (0.5 mg·g(-1)·day(-1)) for 3 days, at either 7, 14, or 21 days postpartum. Structural changes of lens were revealed by routine H.E. staining. Levels of proliferation and apoptosis were revealed by BrdU incorporation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively, and immunofluorescent staining with anti-PDGFRα antibody was carried out on the sections of eyeball. PDGFRα and p-PDGFRαprotein levels were evaluated by Western blot. Our results indicated that administration of Imatinib led to blockade of PDGFR signaling. Formation of cataracts was found only in those mice where treatment started from 7 days postpartum (P7), but was not observed in those samples from P14 nor P21. Fiber cells were disorganized in cataract lens core as observed histologically, and migration of epithelial cells was also inhibited. No apoptosis was detected with the TUNEL method. Our results indicated blockade of PDGFR at the neonatal stage (P7) would lead to cataracts and lens fiber cells disorganization, suggesting that PDGFR signaling plays a time-specific and crucial role in the postnatal development of lens in the mouse, and also may provide a new approach to produce a congenital cataract animal model.

  7. A single nucleotide polymorphism in cBIM is associated with a slower achievement of major molecular response in chronic myeloid leukaemia treated with imatinib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Augis

    Full Text Available BIM is essential for the response to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients. Recently, a deletion polymorphism in intron 2 of the BIM gene was demonstrated to confer an intrinsic TKI resistance in Asian patients. The present study aimed at identifying mutations in the BIM sequence that could lead to imatinib resistance independently of BCR-ABL mutations.BIM coding sequence analysis was performed in 72 imatinib-treated CML patients from a French population of our centre and in 29 healthy controls (reference population as a case-control study. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT qPCR was performed to assess Bim expression in our reference population.No mutation with amino-acid change was found in the BIM coding sequence. However, we observed a silent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP c465C>T (rs724710. A strong statistical link was found between the presence of the T allele and the high Sokal risk group (p = 0.0065. T allele frequency was higher in non responsive patients than in the reference population (p = 0.0049. Similarly, this T allele was associated with the mutation frequency on the tyrosine kinase domain of BCR-ABL (pT SNP of BIM could be useful for predicting the outcome of imatinib-treated CML patients.

  8. [Literature review and presentation of our own research results regarding the effects on bone of tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib and nilotinib used in the treatment of oncohematological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Gyöngyi; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János; Horváth, Péter; Kövesdi, Andrea; Lakatos, Gergely; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Tóbiás, Bálint; Árvai, Kristóf; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are widely used for treatment of certain oncohematological diseases. Several clinical studies have confirmed that specific BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors alter the physiological process of bone tissue in a complex and unclearly identified manner. Since these treatments are being given to more and more patients, and the therapy takes decades or lasts even lifelong, it is justifiable to obtain more detailed knowledge of the molecular background of these mechanisms. In this article the authors summarize preliminary research results and human clinical observations on imatinib and nilotinib which are related to bone metabolism, and present the results of their own experiments in in vitro osteoblast cultures. Based on the presented results, the effects of imatinib and nilotinib on bone cells depend on the concentration of imatinib and nilotinib, the maturation stage of the cells and the distribution ratio of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. In this study the authors firstly prepared a stop-gap, comprehensive review in the Hungarian literature, regarding the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on bone metabolism. In addition they firstly performed whole transcriptome analysis on osteoblasts in order to obtain a better understanding of the cellular molecular mechanisms. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(36), 1429-1437.

  9. Dasatinib rapidly induces deep molecular response in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients who achieved major molecular response with detectable levels of BCR-ABL1 transcripts by imatinib therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiseki, Masayuki; Yoshida, Chikashi; Takezako, Naoki; Ohwada, Akira; Kumagai, Takashi; Nishiwaki, Kaichi; Horikoshi, Akira; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Takano, Hina; Kouzai, Yasuji; Tanaka, Junji; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2017-10-01

    With the introduction of imatinib, a first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to inhibit BCR-ABL1 kinase, the outcome of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) has improved dramatically. However, only a small proportion of CP-CML patients subsequently achieve a deep molecular response (DMR) with imatinib. Dasatinib, a second-generation TKI, is more potent than imatinib in the inhibition of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase in vitro and more effective in CP-CML patients who do not achieve an optimal response with imatinib treatment. In the present study, we attempted to investigate whether switching the treatment from imatinib to dasatinib can induce DMR in 16 CP-CML patients treated with imatinib for at least two years who achieved a major molecular response (MMR) with detectable levels of BCR-ABL1 transcripts. The rates of achievement of DMR at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after switching to dasatinib treatment in the 16 patients were 44% (7/16), 56% (9/16), 63% (10/16) and 75% (12/16), respectively. The cumulative rate of achieving DMR at 12 months from initiation of dasatinib therapy was 93.8% (15/16). The proportion of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells in peripheral lymphocytes increased after switching to dasatinib. In contrast, the proportion of regulatory T cells decreased during treatment. The safety profile of dasatinib was consistent with previous studies. Switching to dasatinib would be a therapeutic option for CP-CML patients who achieved MMR but not DMR by imatinib, especially for patients who wish to discontinue TKI therapy.

  10. Imatinib use immediately before stem cell transplantation in children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Results from Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG) Study Ph(+) ALL04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Itaru; Kodama, Yuichi; Sato, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kato, Keisuke; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kudo, Kazuko; Kato, Motohiro; Saito, Tomohiro; Saito, Akiko M; Tsurusawa, Masahito; Horibe, Keizo

    2015-05-01

    Incorporation of imatinib into chemotherapeutic regimens has improved the prognosis of children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+) ALL). We investigated a role of imatinib immediately before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Children with Ph(+) ALL were enrolled on JPLSG Ph(+) ALL 04 Study within 1 week of initiation of treatment for ALL. Treatment regimen consisted of Induction phase, Consolidation phase, Reinduction phase, 2 weeks of imatinib monotherapy phase, and HSCT phase (Etoposide+CY+TBI conditioning). Minimal residual disease (MRD), the amount of BCR-ABL transcripts, was measured with the real-time PCR method. The study was registered in UMIN-CTR: UMIN ID C000000290. Forty-two patients were registered and 36 patients (86%) achieved complete remission (CR). Eight of 17 patients (47%) who had detectable MRD at the beginning of imatinib monotherapy phase showed disappearance or decrease in MRD after imatinib treatment. Consequently, 26 patients received HSCT in the first CR and all the patients had engraftment and no patients died because of complications of HSCT. The 4-year event-free survival rates and overall survival rates among all the 42 patients were 54.1 ± 7.8% and 78.1 ± 6.5%, respectively. Four of six patients who did achieve CR and three of six who relapsed before HSCT were salvaged with imatinib-containing chemotherapy and subsequently treated with HSCT. The survival rate was excellent in this study although all patients received HSCT. A longer use of imatinib concurrently with chemotherapy should eliminate HSCT in a subset of patients with a rapid clearance of the disease. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 mesylate on the anticonvulsant action of lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and topiramate against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Wlaz, Aleksandra; Karwan, Slawomir; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of WIN 55,212-2 mesylate (WIN - a non-selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist) on the protective action of four second-generation antiepileptic drugs (lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and topiramate) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model. Tonic hind limb extension (seizure activity) was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 500 V, 50 Hz, 0.2s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Drug-related adverse effects were ascertained by use of the chimney test (evaluating motor performance), the step-through passive avoidance task (assessing long-term memory) and the grip-strength test (evaluating skeletal muscular strength). Total brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography to ascertain any pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed antiseizure effect. Results indicate that WIN (5mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant action of lamotrigine (Poxcarbazepine in the maximal electroshock-induced tonic seizure test in mice. Furthermore, none of the investigated combinations of WIN with antiepileptic drugs were associated with any concurrent adverse effects with regards to motor performance, long-term memory or muscular strength. Pharmacokinetic characterization revealed that WIN had no impact on total brain concentrations of lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and topiramate in mice. These preclinical data would suggest that WIN in combination with lamotrigine, pregabalin and topiramate is associated with beneficial anticonvulsant pharmacodynamic interactions in the maximal electroshock-induced tonic seizure test. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Aplasia irreversible por el tratamiento con mesilato de Imatinib en una leucemia mieloide crónica: Presentación de un caso Irreversible aplasia due to the treatment with imatinib mesilate in a chronic myeloid leukemia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Agramonte Llanes

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una paciente de 45 años de edad diagnosticada en marzo de 1984 como una leucemia mieloide crónica Ph + , BCR/ABL positivo, que llevó tratamiento con busulfán, hidroxiurea, interferón y arabinósido de citosina durante 15 años. En marzo del 2003 se diagnosticó fase de transformación y en abril se comenzó la administración de Imatinib en dosis de 600mg diarios. Evolutivamente presentó dolores óseos ligeros, edema palpebral y en el día 35 pancitopenia severa, que provocó la suspensión del tratamiento. Se tomaron muestras para medulograma y biopsia de médula ósea y se diagnosticó una aplasia medular severa. Se administró tratamiento con antibioticoterapia de amplio espectro, hemoderivados y factor estimulador de colonias granulocíticas. A pesar de estas medidas terapéuticas, la paciente falleció a los 46 días de suspendido el tratamiento con Imatinib, con un cuadro clínico de aplasia medular irreversible y distrés respiratorio, complicaciones atribuibles al ImatinibA 45-year-old female patient who was diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia Ph+ in March 1984, and had treatment with busulfan, hydroxyurea, interferon and cytosine arabinoside during 15 years is presented. In March 2003, the transformation stage was diagnosed and, in April, she began to receive imatinib at daily doses of 600 mg. Evolutively, she had mild bone pain, palpebral edema and, on the 35th day, severe pancytopenia that caused the suspension of the treatment. Bone marrow samples were taken by aspiration and biopsy, and a severe medular aplasia was diagnosed. Treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotic therapy, hemoderivates, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was applied. In spite of these therapeutic measures, the patient died 46 days after interrupting the treatment with imatinib, with a clinical picture of irreversible medular aplasia and respiratory distress, complications attributable to Imatinib

  13. The conformational control inhibitor of tyrosine kinases DCC-2036 is effective for imatinib-resistant cells expressing T674I FIP1L1-PDGFRα.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Shen

    Full Text Available The cells expressing the T674I point mutant of FIP1-like-1-platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (FIP1L1-PDGFRα in hypereosinophilics syndrome (HES are resistant to imatinib and some second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. There is a desperate need to develop therapy to combat this acquired drug resistance. DCC-2036 has been synthesized as a third-generation TKI to combat especially the Bcr-Abl T315I mutant in chronic myeloid leukemia. This study evaluated the effect of DCC-2036 on FIP1L1-PDGFRα-positive cells, including the wild type (WT and the T674I mutant. The in vitro effects of DCC-2036 on the PDGFRα signal pathways, proliferation, cell cycling and apoptosis of FIP1L1-PDGFRα-positive cells were investigated, and a nude mouse xenograft model was employed to assess the in vivo antitumor activity. We found that DCC-2036 decreased the phosphorylated levels of PDGFRα and its downstream targets without apparent effects on total protein levels. DCC-2036 inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis with MEK-dependent up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim in FIP1L1-PDGFRα-positive cells. DCC-2036 also exhibited in vivo antineoplastic activity against cells with T674I FIP1L1-PDGFRα. In summary, FIP1L1-PDGFRα-positive cells are sensitive to DCC-2036 regardless of their sensitivity to imatinib. DCC-2036 may be a potential compound to treat imatinib-resistant HES.

  14. The predictive value of early molecular response in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients treated with imatinib in a single real-world medical centre in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Ping Chong; Sekaran, Veera; Ng, Richard Rui Jie; Kweh, Ting Yi; Gan, Gin Gin

    2017-03-01

    The prognosis of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) has improved since the introduction of imatinib. However, patients who do not achieve complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and major molecular response (MMR) have poorer prognosis. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that early and deeper cytogenetic and molecular responses predict a better long-term outcome. This study aimed to analyse the relationship between early molecular response and clinical outcome in a real-life setting. This retrospective study included all patients with CML, in chronic or accelerated phase, who were treated with imatinib at University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. A total of 70 patients were analysed. The median follow-up duration was 74 months, and the cumulative percentages of patients with CCyR and MMR were 80.0% and 65.7%, respectively. Overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) at ten years were 94.3% and 92.9%, respectively. Patients who achieved CCyR and MMR had significantly better OS and EFS than those who did not. At six months, patients who had a BCR-ABL level ≤ 10% had significantly better OS and EFS than those who had a BCR-ABL level > 10%. The target milestone of CCyR at 12 months and MMR at 18 months showed no survival advantage in our patients. Our data showed that imatinib is still useful as first-line therapy. However, vigilant monitoring of patients who have a BCR-ABL level > 10% at six months of treatment should be implemented so that prompt action can be taken to provide the best outcome for these patients. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  15. Achieving deeper molecular response is associated with a better clinical outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia patients on imatinib front-line therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Morisset, Stéphane; Fort, Marie-Pierre; Schmitt, Anna; Etienne, Madeleine; Hayette, Sandrine; Lippert, Eric; Bureau, Caroline; Tigaud, Isabelle; Adiko, Didier; Marit, Gérald; Reiffers, Josy; Mahon, François-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Sustained imatinib treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia patients can result in complete molecular response allowing discontinuation without relapse. We set out to evaluate the frequency of complete molecular response in imatinib de novo chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients, to identify base-line and under-treatment predictive factors of complete molecular response in patients achieving complete cytogenetic response, and to assess if complete molecular response is associated with a better outcome. A random selection of patients on front-line imatinib therapy (n=266) were considered for inclusion. Complete molecular response was confirmed and defined as MR 4.5 with undetectable BCR-ABL transcript levels. Median follow up was 4.43 years (range 0.79–10.8 years). Sixty-five patients (24%) achieved complete molecular response within a median time of 32.7 months. Absence of spleen enlargement at diagnosis, achieving complete cytogenetic response before 12 months of therapy, and major molecular response during the year following complete cytogenetic response was predictive of achieving further complete molecular response. Patients who achieved complete molecular response had better event-free and failure-free survivals than those with complete cytogenetic response irrespective of major molecular response status (95.2% vs. 64.7% vs. 27.7%, P=0.00124; 98.4% vs. 82.3% vs. 56%, P=0.0335), respectively. Overall survival was identical in the 3 groups. In addition to complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response, further deeper molecular response is associated with better event-free and failure-free survivals, and complete molecular response confers the best outcome. PMID:24362549

  16. Imatinib in combination with hydroxyurea versus hydroxyurea alone as oral therapy in patients with progressive pretreated glioblastoma resistant to standard dose temozolomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dresemann, G.; Weller, M.; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann Maria

    2010-01-01

    A randomized, multicenter, open-label, phase 3 study of patients with progressive, recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) for whom front-line therapy had failed was conducted. This study was designed to determine whether combination therapy with imatinib and hydroxyurea (HU) has superior antitumor...... activity compared with HU monotherapy in the treatment of recurrent GBM. The target population consisted of patients with confirmed recurrent GBM and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-2 who had completed previous treatment comprising surgical resection, irradiation therapy...

  17. Bromocriptine Mesylate Attenuates Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Phase 2a, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Research in Japanese Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichiro Nagata

    Full Text Available Bromocriptine mesylate (BRC, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist has been shown to confer neuroprotection, sustained motor function and slowed disease progression in mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS Here we report a first in human trial in ALS.A multicenter, Riluzole add-on, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled 102-week extension BRC clinical trial.The trial was conducted between January 2009 and March 2012 on 36 Japanese ALS patients. A 12-week treatment with Riluzole observational period was followed by combined treatment (Riluzole + BRC; n = 29 or Riluzole + placebo; n = 7. The dosing commenced at 1.25 mg/day increasing in steps at two weeks intervals to a maximum of 15 mg/day. The efficacy of BRC was evaluated by comparing BRC and placebo groups upon completion of stepwise dosing at 14 weeks 2 points (1st endpoint and upon completion or discontinuation of the study (2nd endpoint of the dosing.Statistics analyses revealed a marginal BRC treatment efficacy with P≦20%to placebo by 1st and 2nd endpoint analysis. In the 1st endpoint analysis, BRC group was significantly effective on the scores of ALSAQ40-communicaton (P = 1.2%, eating and drinking (P = 2.2%, ALSFRS-R total (P = 17.6%, grip strength (P = 19.8% compared to the placebo group. In the 2nd endpoint analysis, differences between the scores of Limb Norris Scale (P = 18.3%, ALSAQ40-communication (P = 11.9%, eating and drinking (P = 13.6%, and neck forward-bent test (P = 15.4% of BRC group were detected between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the treatment groups for adverse events or serious drug reactions incidence.BRC sustains motoneuronal function at least in part through BRC treatment. Further analysis involving a Phase 2b or 3 clinical trial is required but BRC currently shows promise for ALS treatment.UMIN Clinical Trials UMIN000008527.

  18. Development of imatinib and dasatinib resistance: dynamics of expression of drug transporters ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCG2, MVP, and SLC22A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromicho, Marta; Dinis, Joana; Magalhães, Marta; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Tavares, Purificação; Laires, António; Rueff, José; Rodrigues, António Sebastião

    2011-10-01

    About 20% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) do not respond to treatment with imatinib either initially or because of acquired resistance. To study the development of CML drug resistance, an in vitro experimental system comprising cell lines with different resistance levels was established by exposing K562 cells to increasing concentrations of imatinib and dasatinib anticancer agents. The mRNA levels of BCR- ABL1 and of genes involved in drug transport or redistribution (ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCC3, ABCG2, MVP, and SLC22A1) were measured and the ABL1 kinase domain sequenced. Results excluded BCR- ABL1 overexpression and mutations as relevant resistance mechanisms. Most studied transporters were overexpressed in the majority of resistant cell lines. Their expression pattern was dynamic: varying with resistance level and chronic drug exposure. Studied efflux transporters may have an important role at the initial stages of resistance, but after prolonged exposure and for higher doses of drugs other mechanisms might take place.

  19. MPT0B169, a New Antitubulin Agent, Inhibits Bcr-Abl Expression and Induces Mitochondrion-Mediated Apoptosis in Nonresistant and Imatinib-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuit-Mun Wong

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells that is caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. Clinical resistance to the Bcr-Abl inhibitor imatinib is a critical problem in treating CML. This study investigated the antitumor effect and mechanism of MPT0B169, a new antitubulin agent, in K562 CML cells and their derived imatinib-resistant cells, IMR2 and IMR3. IMR2 and IMR3 cells showed complete resistance to imatinib-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Resistance involved ERK1/2 overactivation and MDR1 overexpression. MPT0B169 inhibited the growth of K562, IMR2, and IMR3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MPT0B169 substantially inhibited the mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl, followed by its downstream pathways including Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in these cells. MPT0B169 treatment resulted in a decrease in the polymer form of tubulin according to Western blot analysis. It triggered cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase before apoptosis, which was related to the upregulation of the mitotic marker MPM2 and the cyclin B1 level, and a change in the phosphorylation of Cdk1. MPT0B169 induced apoptosis in nonresistant and imatinib-resistant cells via a mitochondrion-mediated caspase pathway. Further study showed that the agent led to a decrease in the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 and an increase in the apoptotic protein Bax. Taken together, our results suggest that MPT0B169 might be a promising agent for overcoming imatinib resistance in CML cells.

  20. The outcome and predictive factors of sunitinib therapy in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) after imatinib failure - one institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Osuch, Czesław; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Wasielewski, Kacper; Woźniak, Agnieszka; Grzesiakowska, Urszula; Nowecki, Zbigniew I; Siedlecki, Janusz A; Limon, Janusz; Bylina, Elżbieta; Klimczak, Anna; Świtaj, Tomasz; Falkowski, Sławomir; Kroc, Jacek; Ługowska, Iwona; Brzeskwiniewicz, Magdalena; Melerowicz, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) mutational status is recognized factor related to the results of tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy such as imatinib (IM) or sunitinib (SU). Arterial hypertension (AH) is common adverse event related to SU, reported as predictive factor in renal cell carcinoma. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcomes and factors predicting results of SU therapy in inoperable/metastatic CD117(+) GIST patients after IM failure. We identified 137 consecutive patients with advanced inoperable/metastatic GIST treated in one center with SU (2 nd line treatment). Median follow-up time was 23 months. Additionally, in 39 patients there were analyzed selected constitutive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VEGFA and VEGFR2 genes. One year progression-free survival (PFS; calculated from the start of SU) rate was 42% and median PFS was 43 weeks. The estimated overall survival (OS, calculated both from start of SU or IM) was 74 weeks and 51 months, respectively. One-year PFS was 65% (median 74 weeks) in 55 patients with AH vs. 22% (median 17 weeks) in patients without AH. Patients with primary tumors carrying mutations in KIT exon 9 or wild-type had substantially better 1-year PFS (68% and 57%; median 65.5 and 50.5 weeks, respectively) than patients having tumors with KIT exon 11 or PDGFRA mutations (34% and 15%; median 36.8 and 9 weeks, respectively). We identified two independent factors with significant impact on PFS and OS in univariate and multivariate analysis: primary tumor genotype and presence of AH. The most common adverse events during therapy were: fatigue, AH, hypothyroidism, hand and foot syndrome, mucositis, skin reactions, dyspepsia, and diarrhea. Two deaths were assessed as related to tumor rupture caused by reaction to SU therapy. The presence of C-allele in rs833061 and the T-allele in rs3025039 polymorphism of VEGFA were associated with significantly higher risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 10.0 p = 0.041 and OR: 10.5; p = 0

  1. The outcome and predictive factors of sunitinib therapy in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST after imatinib failure - one institution study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutkowski Piotr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST mutational status is recognized factor related to the results of tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy such as imatinib (IM or sunitinib (SU. Arterial hypertension (AH is common adverse event related to SU, reported as predictive factor in renal cell carcinoma. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcomes and factors predicting results of SU therapy in inoperable/metastatic CD117(+ GIST patients after IM failure. Methods We identified 137 consecutive patients with advanced inoperable/metastatic GIST treated in one center with SU (2nd line treatment. Median follow-up time was 23 months. Additionally, in 39 patients there were analyzed selected constitutive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of VEGFA and VEGFR2 genes. Results One year progression-free survival (PFS; calculated from the start of SU rate was 42% and median PFS was 43 weeks. The estimated overall survival (OS, calculated both from start of SU or IM was 74 weeks and 51 months, respectively. One-year PFS was 65% (median 74 weeks in 55 patients with AH vs. 22% (median 17 weeks in patients without AH. Patients with primary tumors carrying mutations in KIT exon 9 or wild-type had substantially better 1-year PFS (68% and 57%; median 65.5 and 50.5 weeks, respectively than patients having tumors with KIT exon 11 or PDGFRA mutations (34% and 15%; median 36.8 and 9 weeks, respectively. We identified two independent factors with significant impact on PFS and OS in univariate and multivariate analysis: primary tumor genotype and presence of AH. The most common adverse events during therapy were: fatigue, AH, hypothyroidism, hand and foot syndrome, mucositis, skin reactions, dyspepsia, and diarrhea. Two deaths were assessed as related to tumor rupture caused by reaction to SU therapy. The presence of C-allele in rs833061 and the T-allele in rs3025039 polymorphism of VEGFA were associated with significantly higher risk of hypothyroidism

  2. Efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours after failure of imatinib and sunitinib: an international, multicentre, prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial (GRID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetri, George D; Reichardt, Peter; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rutkowski, Piotr; Gelderblom, Hans; Hohenberger, Peter; Leahy, Michael; von Mehren, Margaret; Joensuu, Heikki; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Blackstein, Martin; Cesne, Axel Le; Schöffski, Patrick; Maki, Robert G; Bauer, Sebastian; Nguyen, Binh Bui; Xu, Jianming; Nishida, Toshirou; Chung, John; Kappeler, Christian; Kuss, Iris; Laurent, Dirk; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background To date, only two agents, imatinib and sunitinib, have shown clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), but almost all metastatic GISTs eventually develop resistance to these agents, resulting in fatal disease progression. This phase 3 trial assessed efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with metastatic and/or unresectable GIST progressing after failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib. Methods Patients were randomised 2:1 to receive either regorafenib 160 mg orally daily or placebo, plus best supportive care in both arms, for the first 3 weeks of each 4-week cycle. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Upon disease progression, patients on placebo could cross over to regorafenib. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), objective response rate, disease control rate (DCR: rate of durable stable disease lasting for ≥12 weeks plus complete or partial responses), and safety. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01271712). Results From January to August 2011, 240 patients were screened at 57 centres in 17 countries, and 199 patients were randomised to receive regorafenib (n=133) or matching placebo (n=66). Median PFS per independent blinded central review was 4·8 months and 0·9 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR] 0·27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0·19–0·39; pregorafenib, resulting in no significant difference in OS between study arms (HR 0·77, 95% CI 0·42–1·41; p=0·199). A best response of partial response or stable disease was observed in 101/133 patients (75·9%) on regorafenib and 23/66 patients (34·8%) on placebo. DCR was 52·6% (70/133 patients) and 9·1% (6/66 patients), respectively. Drug-related adverse events were reported in 130 (98·5%) of 132 regorafenib patients and 45 (68·2%) of 66 placebo patients. The most common grade ≥3 regorafenib-related adverse events were hypertension (31/132, 23·5%), hand–foot skin reaction (26

  3. [New orientations in the management of advanced, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST): combination of surgery and systemic therapy with imatinib in a case of primary gastric location].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; De Milito, Ritanna; Simi, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are rare neoplasms originating from connective tissue in the digestive tract with an incidence of less than 1% and account for most non-epithelial primitive digestive tumours. Metastasis diagnosed at the time of disease discovery confirms GIST malignancy. Kit protein, a trans-membrane tyrosine kinase receptor of staminal cells, is characteristically expressed by GIST. Most GIST have a mutation in the kit proto-oncogene. Resistance to conventional chemotherapy is commonly shown by malignant GIST. Most patients with advanced malignant GIST achieve clinical benefit with imatinib mesilate, an orally administered selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase receptor. We treated a 43-year-old male patient suffering from a gastric GIST diagnosed during a surgical emergency operation for peritonitis caused by gastric perforation. At the time of the first operation the patient had lost 10 kg body weight over the previous months and was seriously cachectic. During the emergency operation the perforation was sutured. The biopsy results showed the presence of CD1 17 (c-kit) and CD34 markers. A total body CT scan documented the substantial size of the gastric wall lesion, an increased volume of abdominal lymph nodes and compression of the splenic vein with alternative collateral circulation. The liver presented no less than 5 large metastases distributed in both the left and right lobes. There was also a pulmonary metastasis. Because of frequent spontaneous bleeding and starvation the patient was seriously anaemic. Considering the action mechanism of imatinib and the extent of the lesion we decided to perform a total gastrectomy procedure. At the time of the operation the stomach seemed to have a modified volume and shape: it appeared to be divided into two sacs, the larger and deeper of which was the original gastric cavity, while the superficial, smaller one seemed to be a protrusion of the organ. The stomach was indistinguishable from

  4. Bcr-Abl-independent mechanism of resistance to imatinib in K562 cells: Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by histone deacetylases (HDACs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Arunasree M; Sachchidanand, Sachchidanand; Pallu, Reddanna

    2010-09-01

    Our previous studies have shown that overexpression of MDR1 and cyclooygenase-2 (COX-2) resulted in resistance development to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562 (IR-K562) cells. In the present study, the regulatory mechanism of MDR1 induction by COX-2 was investigated. A gradual overexpression of MDR1 and COX-2 during the process of development was observed. Furthermore, down regulation of MDR1 upon COX-2 knockdown by siRNA showed a decrease in the PKC levels and activation of PKC by addition of PGE(2) to K562 cells, suggesting a role for PKC in the COX-2 mediated induction of MDR1. The present study demonstrates COX-2 induction by HDACs and MDR1 induction by COX-2 via PGE(2)-cAMP-PKC-mediated pathway. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [ABIN1 is not involved in imatinib upregulating A20 to inhibit the activation of NF-κB pathway in Jurkat T cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Wang, Senlin; Lin, Chen; Chen, Shaohua; Zhao, Xiaoling; Li, Yangqiu

    2017-05-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of imatinib (IM) on the expressions of A20-binding inhibitor of NF-κB1 (ABIN1) and A20 in Jurkat T cells. Methods Jurkat T cells were treated with 25, 50 and 100 nmol/L IM for 24 hours. The mRNA and protein levels of ABIN1, A20 and NF-κB were detected by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. Results IM significantly inhibited both mRNA and protein levels of ABIN1 and NF-κB, but raised the mRNA and protein levels of A20; while phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin increased the expression levels of ABIN1 and A20 mRNA and protein. Conclusion IM could upregulate A20 protein to inhibit the activation of NF-κB pathway in Jurkat T cells, which was independent of the ABIN1 protein.

  6. Phase I Study of INNO-406, a Dual Abl/Lyn Kinase Inhibitor, in Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Leukemias Post-Imatinib Resistance or Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarjian, H.; le Coutre, P.; Cortes, J.; Pinilla-Ibarz, J.; Nagler, A.; Hochhaus, A.; Kimura, S.; Ottmann, O.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND INNO-406, an oral dual Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), demonstrates specific Lyn kinase activity with no or limited activity against other Src-family member kinases. Several Bcr-Abl kinase domain mutations are sensitive to INNO-406 in vitro, including the F317L and F317V mutations. In this study, we evaluated INNO-406 in Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome–positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) post-imatinib resistance or intolerance. METHODS A dose escalation study was conducted with a starting dose of 30mg administered orally once daily. Cohorts of at least 3 patients were treated at each dose level until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was reached. Twice-daily (BID) dosing was also evaluated. Therapy was allowed for a maximum of 24 months. RESULTS INNO-406 was administered to 56 patients with imatinib resistance (n=40) or intolerance (n=16). Other previous treatments included nilotinib (n=20), dasatinib (n=26), and dasatinib/nilotinib (n=9). Common mutations upon study entry included Y253H (n=6), G250E (n=4), T315I (n=4) and F317L (n=3). Among 31 patients with CML in chronic phase treated with INNO-406, the major cytogenetic response rate was 19%. In this study, no responses were seen in patients with CML-AP, CML-BP, or Ph-positive ALL. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) at INNO-406 480mg BID were liver function abnormalities and thrombocytopenia. CONCLUSIONS INNO-406 showed anti-CML efficacy in this heavily pretreated study population. Based on the classical determinations of both DLT and MTD, the recommended phase 2 dose of INNO-406 is 240mg orally BID. Lower doses of INNO-406 may be equally effective and should be explored. PMID:20310049

  7. Comparison of performance of various tumour response criteria in assessment of regorafenib activity in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours after failure of imatinib and sunitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagare, Atul B; Jagannathan, Jyothi P; Kurra, Vikram; Urban, Trinity; Manola, Judith; Choy, Edwin; Demetri, George D; George, Suzanne; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2014-03-01

    To compare performance of various tumour response criteria (TRCs) in assessment of regorafenib activity in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) with prior failure of imatinib and sunitinib. Twenty participants in a phase II trial received oral regorafenib (median duration 47 weeks; interquartile range (IQR) 24-88) with computed tomography (CT) imaging at baseline and every two months thereafter. Tumour response was prospectively determined on using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) 1.1, and retrospectively reassessed for comparison per RECIST 1.0, World Health Organization (WHO) and Choi criteria, using the same target lesions. Clinical benefit rate [CBR; complete or partial response (CR or PR) or stable disease (SD)≥16 weeks] and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared between various TRCs using kappa statistics. Performance of TRCs in predicting overall survival (OS) was compared by comparing OS in groups with progression-free intervals less than or greater than 20 weeks by each TRC using c-statistics. PR was more frequent by Choi (90%) than RECIST 1.1, RECIST 1.0 and WHO (20% each), however, CBR was similar between various TRCs (overall CBR 85-90%, 95-100% agreement between all TRC pairs). PFS per RECIST 1.0 was similar to RECIST 1.1 (median 44 weeks versus 58 weeks), and shorter for WHO (median 34 weeks) and Choi (median 24 weeks). With RECIST 1.1, RECIST 1.0 and WHO, there was moderate concordance between PFS and OS (c-statistics 0.596-0.679). Choi criteria had less favourable concordance (c-statistic 0.506). RECIST 1.1 and WHO performed somewhat better than Choi criteria as TRC for response evaluation in patients with advanced GIST after prior failure on imatinib and sunitinib. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. INNO-406, a novel BCR-ABL/Lyn dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suppresses the growth of Ph+ leukemia cells in the central nervous system, and cyclosporine A augments its in vivo activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Asumi; Kimura, Shinya; Masuda, Satohiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Kuroda, Junya; Sato, Kiyoshi; Kamitsuji, Yuri; Kawata, Eri; Deguchi, Yasuyuki; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Terui, Yasuhito; Ruthardt, Martin; Ueda, Takanori; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Inui, Ken-ichi; Maekawa, Taira

    2007-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse accompanying the prolonged administration of imatinib mesylate has recently become apparent as an impediment to the therapy of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemia. CNS relapse may be explained by limited penetration of imatinib mesylate into the cerebrospinal fluid because of the presence of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier. To overcome imatinib mesylate-resistance mechanisms such as bcr-abl amplification, mutations within the ABL kinase domain, and activation of Lyn, we developed a dual BCR-ABL/Lyn inhibitor, INNO-406 (formerly NS-187), which is 25 to 55 times more potent than imatinib mesylate in vitro and at least 10 times more potent in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of INNO-406 in treating CNS Ph+ leukemia. We found that INNO-406, like imatinib mesylate, is a substrate for P-glycoprotein. The concentrations of INNO-406 in the CNS were about 10% of those in the plasma. However, this residual concentration was enough to inhibit the growth of Ph+ leukemic cells which expressed not only wild-type but also mutated BCR-ABL in the murine CNS. Furthermore, cyclosporine A, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, augmented the in vivo activity of INNO-406 against CNS Ph+ leukemia. These findings indicate that INNO-406 is a promising agent for the treatment of CNS Ph+ leukemia.

  9. Clinical effects of prior trastuzumab on combination eribulin mesylate plus trastuzumab as first-line treatment for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from a Phase II, single-arm, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhalla S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shannon Puhalla,1 Sharon Wilks,2 Adam M Brufsky,1 Joyce O’Shaughnessy,3 Lee S Schwartzberg,4 Erhan Berrak,5 James Song,5 Linda Vahdat6 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, 2Department of Hematology Oncology, US Oncology-Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX, 3Department of Medical Oncology, Texas Oncology-Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center US Oncology, Dallas, TX, 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, West Cancer Center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, 5Department of Medical Affairs, Formerly of Eisai Inc., Woodcliff Lake, NJ, 6Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Eribulin mesylate, a novel nontaxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor in the halichondrin class of antineoplastic drugs, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who previously received ≥2 chemotherapy regimens in the metastatic setting. Primary data from a Phase II trial for the first-line combination of ­eribulin plus trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients showed a 71% objective response rate and tolerability consistent with the known profile of these agents. Here, we present prespecified analyses of efficacy of this combination based on prior trastuzumab use. Patients received eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 (equivalent to 1.23 mg/m2 eribulin [expressed as free base] intravenously on days 1 and 8 plus trastuzumab (8 mg/kg intravenously/cycle 1, then 6 mg/kg on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. Objective response rates, progression-free survival, and tolerability were assessed in patients who had and had not received prior adjuvant or neoadjuvant (neo/adjuvant trastuzumab treatment. Fifty-two patients (median age: 59.5 years received eribulin/trastuzumab for a median treatment duration of ~31 weeks; 40.4% (n=21 had been previously treated with neo/adjuvant trastuzumab prior to

  10. Desarrollo tecnológico de una formulación de dihidroergotoxina mesilato 0,3 mg/mL inyectable Technological development of an injectable formulation of dihydroergotoxine mesylate 0.3 mg/mL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Karelia Collado Coello

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Los vasodilatadores cerebrales y periféricos son un conjunto de medicamentos muy heterogéneo, que tienen en común la capacidad de producir vasodilatación cerebral o periférica por mecanismos muy diferentes.Dentro de ese grupo se encuentra el fármaco que le da razón a este artículo, la dihidroergotoxina mesilato el cual estimula el ritmo del electroencefalograma e incrementa la utilización de glucosa en el cerebro. Se desarrolló una formulación inyectable estéril compuesta por dihidroergotoxina mesilato polvo, y cantidad suficiente del vehículo acuoso envasada en ampolletas de 1 mL de capacidad. Se desarrolló y validó una técnica analítica por cromatografía líquida de alta resolución para estudiar la estabilidad de la formulación y determinar la fecha de vencimiento de esta. Se comprobó la calidad microbiológica de la preparación, y se logró un producto que cumple satisfactoriamente con todas las especificaciones establecidas para preparaciones estériles. La tecnología obtenida fue fácilmente escalable.Cerebral and peripheral vasodilators are a group of very heterogeneous drugs that have in common the capacity to produce cerebral or peripheral vasodilatation by different mechanisms. The drug that gave rise to this paper, dihydroergotoxine mesylate, is within this group. It stimulates the rhythm of the electroencephalogram and increases the utilization of glucose in the brain. A sterile injectable formulation composed of dihydroergotoxine mesylate powder and enough amount of aqueous vehicle was developed and bottled in ampoules of 1 mL. An analytical technique was developed and validated by high resolution liquid chromatography to study the stability of the formulation and to determine its expiration date. The quality of the microbiological preparation was proved, and a product that satisfactorily meets all the specifications established for sterile preparations was obtained. The technology obtained was easily scalable

  11. Myeloid Neoplasms with t(5;12 and ETV6-ACSL6 Gene Fusion, Potential Mimickers of Myeloid Neoplasm with PDGFRB Rearrangement: Case Report with Imatinib Therapy and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier De Luca-Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the second case of ETV6-ACSL6 associated myeloproliferative neoplasm that has received a full course of imatinib therapy. The patient was a 51-year-old previously healthy man who presented with three months of worsening dyspnea and was found to have a white count of 216,000/cmm, of which 84% were eosinophil lineage. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a t(5;12(q31~33;p13. FISH was negative for PDGFRB rearrangement but additional FISH testing demonstrated an ACSL6 rearrangement. ETV6-ACSL6 gene fusion is a rare abnormality that most often presents as a myeloproliferative-type disorder with prominent eosinophilia or basophilia. Review of the literature yielded a total of 11 previous cases. This gene fusion results in a t(5;12(q31~33;p13 that mimics the t(5;12 found in ETV6-PDGFRB neoplasms. Identification of the fusion genes involved in t(5;12 in eosinophilia-associated myeloproliferative disorders is crucial to direct an effective treatment plan. In particular, while tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy is effective in patients with PDGFRB rearrangement, there is little information on imatinib efficacy in patients with ETV6-ACSL6 gene fusion. Our patient was found to be nonresponsive to imatinib therapy.

  12. Phase 1 study of INNO-406, a dual Abl/Lyn kinase inhibitor, in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias after imatinib resistance or intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarjian, Hagop; le Coutre, Phillipp; Cortes, Jorge; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Nagler, Arnon; Hochhaus, Andreas; Kimura, Shinya; Ottmann, Oliver

    2010-06-01

    : INNO-406, a dual v-abl Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog (Abl)/v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral-related oncogene homolog (Lyn) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), has demonstrated specific Lyn kinase inhibitory activity with no or limited activity against other sarcoma (Src) family member kinases. Several breakpoint cluster region (Bcr)-Abl kinase domain mutations are sensitive to INNO-406 in vitro, including mutations that involve a phenylalanine-to-leucine or phenylalanine-to-valine substitution at codon 317 (F317L and F317V, respectively). In the current study, the authors evaluated the use of INNO-406 in patients with Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) after imatinib resistance or intolerance. : A dose-escalation study was conducted at a starting dose of oral INNO-406 30 mg once daily. Cohorts of at least 3 patients were treated at each dose level until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was reached. Twice-daily dosing also was evaluated. Therapy was allowed to continue for a maximum of 24 months. : INNO-406 was administered to 56 patients with imatinib resistance (n = 40) or intolerance (n = 16). Other previous treatments included nilotinib (n = 20 patients), dasatinib (n = 26 patients), and dasatinib/nilotinib (n = 9 patients). Common mutations at the time of study entry included a tyrosine-to-histidine substitution at codon 253 (Y253H) (n = 6 patients), a glycine-to-glutamic acid substitution at codon 250 (G250E) (n = 4 patients), a threonine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 315 (T315I) (n = 4 patients), and F317L (n = 3 patients). Of 31 patients with CML in chronic phase who received INNO-406, the major cytogenetic response rate was 19%. No responses were observed in patients who had CML in accelerated phase, CML in blastic phase, or Ph-positive ALL. The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) at an INNO-406 dose of 480 mg twice daily were liver function abnormalities and

  13. Análisis de costo-efectividad de nilotinib, dasatinib e imatinib como terapia de primera línea en leucemia mieloide crónica en Colombia, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Romero

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Los nuevos inhibidores de la tirosina cinasa para tratar la leucemia mieloide crónica basados en nilotinib, dasatinib e imatinib, mejoraron la calidad de vida de los pacientes y la tornaron en enfermedad crónica. Objetivo. Evaluar el costo-efectividad de nilotinib, 600 mg, y dasatinib, 100 mg, comparados con imatinib, 400 mg, como terapia de primera línea en leucemia mieloide crónica desde la perspectiva del tercero pagador en Colombia. Materiales y métodos. Se analizó el costo-efectividad mediante un modelo de Markov con ciclos trimestrales, que evaluó una cohorte hipotética de 100 pacientes de 55 años recién diagnosticados con leucemia mieloide crónica en fase crónica en un horizonte temporal hasta el final de la vida. El desenlace primario fueron los años de vida ganados libres de progresión. Se analizaron las probabilidades de transición para respuesta molecular mayor, progresión de la enfermedad y muerte relacionada con la leucemia mieloide crónica en el modelo para cada grupo. Se aplicó una tasa de descuento de 3 % a los costos y resultados de los pacientes. La solidez del modelo se evaluó por medio de un análisis de sensibilidad de tipo Montecarlo. Resultados. Nilotinib fue mayor en años de vida ganados libres de progresión esperados (15,21 Vs. 12,64 para imatinib, seguido por dasatinib (14,91 Vs. 14,54 para imatinib. El grupo tratado con imatinib fue la opción menos costosa y menos efectiva. La relación costo-efectividad ‘incremental’ (sic. fue de US$ 33.120 en el grupo de nilotinib y de US$ 514.939,08 en el grupo de dasatinib por año de vida ganado libre de progresión comparados con imatinib. Al comparar indirectamente nilotinib con dasatinib, nilotinib fue dominante debido a su mayor eficacia (2,25 años de vida ganados libres de progresión y menor costo (US$ 44.674. El costo promedio estimado para manejar la progresión de la enfermedad por año fue US$ 101.978,78 considerado como umbral

  14. Implicative Algebras

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tadesse

    In this paper we introduce the concept of implicative algebras which is an equivalent definition of lattice implication algebra of Xu (1993) and further we prove that it is a regular Autometrized. Algebra. Further we remark that the binary operation → on lattice implicative algebra can never be associative. Key words: Implicative ...

  15. Regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors following imatinib and sunitinib treatment: a subgroup analysis evaluating Japanese patients in the phase III GRID trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Yoshito; Doi, Toshihiko; Sawaki, Akira; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yamada, Yasuhide; Kuss, Iris; Demetri, George D; Nishida, Toshirou

    2015-10-01

    The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled GRID trial tested the oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib in 199 patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) following failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib, and showed a significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo [hazard ratio (HR) 0.27; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.19-0.39; p regorafenib 160 mg once daily with matching placebo, in combination with best supportive care. The primary study endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS); safety was evaluated through the incidence of adverse events (AEs). Seventeen Japanese patients were randomized to regorafenib (n = 12) or placebo (n = 5). Patient demographics were consistent with those of the overall study population. PFS was significantly longer with regorafenib than placebo (HR 0.08; 95 % CI 0.02-0.45; p = 0.000164). Centrally assessed disease control rates were 58 % and 20 % in the regorafenib and placebo groups, respectively (p = 0.080796). Treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were reported in all regorafenib-treated patients and 60 % of placebo recipients; the most frequent AE was hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) (92 % versus 20 %, respectively). Regorafenib showed efficacy and a manageable safety profile in Japanese patients with advanced GIST, consistent with the overall GRID study population. AEs, such as HFSR and maculopapular rash, were observed more frequently in Japanese patients. Although dose modification was frequently reported, only one patient with hepatic failure discontinued regorafenib because of AEs.

  16. Activities of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate in combination with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors against acute HIV-1 infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patick, A K; Boritzki, T J; Bloom, L A

    1997-10-01

    Nelfinavir mesylate (formerly AG1343) is a potent and selective, nonpeptidic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease that was discovered by protein structure-based design methodologies. We evaluated the antiviral and cytotoxic effects of two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the clinically approved antiretroviral therapeutics zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (3TC), dideoxycytidine (ddC; zalcitabine), stavudine (d4T), didanosine (ddI), indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir and a three-drug combination of nelfinavir with ZDV and 3TC against an acute HIV-1 strain RF infection of CEM-SS cells in vitro. Quantitative assessment of drug interaction was evaluated by a universal response surface approach (W. R. Greco, G. Bravo, and J. C. Parsons, Pharm. Rev. 47:331-385, 1995) and by the method of M. N. Prichard and C. Shipman (Antiviral Res. 14:181-206, 1990). Both analytical methods yielded similar results and showed that the two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the reverse transcriptase inhibitors ZDV, 3TC, ddI, d4T, and ddC and the three-drug combination with ZDV and 3TC resulted in additive to statistically significant synergistic interactions. In a similar manner, the combination of nelfinavir with the three protease inhibitors resulted in additive (ritonavir and saquinavir) to slightly antagonistic (indinavir) interactions. In all combinations, minimal cellular cytotoxicity was observed with any drug alone and in combination. These results suggest that administration of combinations of the appropriate doses of nelfinavir with other currently approved antiretroviral therapeutic agents in vivo may result in enhanced antiviral activity with no associated increase in cellular cytotoxicity.

  17. The chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box inhibits the growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML by targeting the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Liu, Xiping; Zhang, Mei; Zhong, Daixing; Ye, Mingxiang; Li, Yuanchun; Han, Hua; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2016-06-22

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by constitutively active fusion protein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) against BCR-ABL, imatinib, is the first-line therapy for CML, acquired resistance almost inevitably emerges. The underlying mechanism are point mutations within the BCR-ABL gene, among which T315I is notorious because it resists to almost all currently available inhibitors. Here we took use of a previously generated chimeric ubiquitin ligase, SH2-U-box, in which SH2 from the adaptor protein Grb2 acts as a binding domain for activated BCR-ABL, while U-box from CHIP functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, so as to target the ubiquitination and degradation of both native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL. As such, SH2-U-box significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in CML cells harboring either the wild-type or T315I-mutant BCR-ABL (K562 or K562R), with BCR-ABL-dependent signaling pathways being repressed. Moreover, SH2-U-box worked in concert with imatinib in K562 cells. Importantly, SH2-U-box-carrying lentivirus could markedly suppress the growth of K562-xenografts in nude mice or K562R-xenografts in SCID mice, as well as that of primary CML cells. Collectively, by degrading the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL, the chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box may serve as a potential therapy for both imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML.

  18. [Effect of Recombinant Adenovirus AdE-SH2-Caspase 8 on the Apoptosis of Imatinib-resistant K562/G01 Cell Line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Fei, Chang; Huang, Zheng-Lan; Li, Hui; Liu, Zhang-Lin; Feng, Wen-Li

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of SH2-Caspase 8 fusion protein expressed by recombinant adenovirus AdE-SH2-Caspase8-HA-GFP (SC) on the apoptosis of K562/G01 cell line, which is a BCR/ABL positive chronic myeloid leukemia cell line and resistant to imatinib. The K562/G01 cell line was infected with AdE-SH2-Caspase 8-HA-GFP adenovirus (SC), then the cells were divided into 3 groups: AdE-SH2m-Caspase 8-HA-GFP (SmC) group, AdE-GFP (CMV) group and PBS group as control. The infection efficiency was observed under fluorescent microscopy and by flow cytometry. The expression of fusion protein SH2-Caspase 8-HA was measured by Western blot. The morphology of the cells detected by Wright's staining. The apoptosis of the cells were detected by flow cytometry and DNA ladder. The expression of Caspase 3 and PARP were detected by Western blot. The infection efficiency of SC on K562/G01 cells was high which was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy and FCM. SH2-Caspase 8-HA fusion protein were expressed correctly in K562/G01 cells. After treatment with SC the apoptosis of K562/G01 cells could be observed by microscopy. The result of FCM showed that early apoptosis of K562/G01 cells increased significantly as compared with control groups (P SH2-Caspase 8 fusion protein can induces the apoptosis of K562/G01 cells.

  19. New spectrophotometric/chemometric assisted methods for the simultaneous determination of imatinib, gemifloxacin, nalbuphine and naproxen in pharmaceutical formulations and human urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belal, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Sheribah, Z. A.; Alaa, H.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, novel univariate and multivariate regression methods along with model-updating technique were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of quaternary mixture of imatinib (IMB), gemifloxacin (GMI), nalbuphine (NLP) and naproxen (NAP). The univariate method is extended derivative ratio (EDR) which depends on measuring every drug in the quaternary mixture by using a ternary mixture of the other three drugs as divisor. Peak amplitudes were measured at 294 nm, 250 nm, 283 nm and 239 nm within linear concentration ranges of 4.0-17.0, 3.0-15.0, 4.0-80.0 and 1.0-6.0 μg mL-1 for IMB, GMI, NLP and NAB, respectively. Multivariate methods adopted are partial least squares (PLS) in original and derivative mode. These models were constructed for simultaneous determination of the studied drugs in the ranges of 4.0-8.0, 3.0-11.0, 10.0-18.0 and 1.0-3.0 μg mL-1 for IMB, GMI, NLP and NAB, respectively, by using eighteen mixtures as a calibration set and seven mixtures as a validation set. The root mean square error of predication (RMSEP) were 0.09 and 0.06 for IMB, 0.14 and 0.13 for GMI, 0.07 and 0.02 for NLP and 0.64 and 0.27 for NAP by PLS in original and derivative mode, respectively. Both models were successfully applied for analysis of IMB, GMI, NLP and NAP in their dosage forms. Updated PLS in derivative mode and EDR were applied for determination of the studied drugs in spiked human urine. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained by the reported methods giving a conclusion that there is no significant difference regarding accuracy and precision.

  20. Identification of chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib who are potentially eligible for treatment discontinuation by assessing real-life molecular responses on the international scale in a EUTOS-certified lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Amélie; Dessars, Barbara; El Housni, Hakim; Pluymers, Wim; Peeters, Karen; Benghiat, Fleur S; Heimann, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    A retrospective study was performed to describe molecular responses (MR) on the international scale (IS) in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treated with imatinib in routine clinical practice in Belgium and to identify patients potentially eligible for treatment discontinuation. The analysis included 116 patients with CML in chronic phase at treatment centers sending blood samples for molecular follow-up to a single EUTOS-certified laboratory. IS MR from the last patient visit between October 2014 and April 2015 were retrospectively collected. Most patients (93.1%) had an IS MR corresponding to an optimal response per European LeukemiaNet 2013 guidelines; 53.4% (62/116) of patients were in deep molecular responses ≥MR 4.5 at their last visit (mean treatment duration: 91.0 months) among whom 36.2% (42/116) had been receiving imatinib for >5.8 years and 26.7% (31/116) for >8 years (margins of error: 8.74% and 8.05%, respectively). These patients would likely have the highest chance of staying in treatment-free remission (TFR) upon discontinuation, based on published TFR trial data. Although our study only provides a snapshot in time of a patient's last MR reported, without precise information regarding MR duration, the study settings could nevertheless support the feasibility of attempting TFR outside clinical trials in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Eco-friendly synthesis, in vitro anti-proliferative evaluation, and 3D-QSAR analysis of a novel series of monocationic 2-aryl/heteroaryl-substituted 6-(2-imidazolinyl)benzothiazole mesylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racané, Livio; Ptiček, Lucija; Sedić, Mirela; Grbčić, Petra; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Bertoša, Branimir; Sović, Irena; Karminski-Zamola, Grace

    2018-04-17

    Herein, we describe the synthesis of twenty-one novel water-soluble monocationic 2-aryl/heteroaryl-substituted 6-(2-imidazolinyl)benzothiazole mesylates 3a-3u and present the results of their anti-proliferative assays. Efficient syntheses were achieved by three complementary simple two-step synthetic protocols based on the condensation reaction of aryl/heteroaryl carbaldehydes or carboxylic acid. We developed an eco-friendly synthetic protocol using glycerol as green solvent, particularly appropriate for the condensation of thermally and acid-sensitive heterocycles such as furan, benzofuran, pyrrole, and indole. Screening of anti-proliferative activity was performed on four human tumour cell lines in vitro including pancreatic cancer (CFPAC-1), metastatic colon cancer (SW620), hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), and cervical cancer (HeLa), as well as in normal human fibroblast cell lines. All tested compounds showed strong to moderate anti-proliferative activity on tested cell lines depending on the structure containing aryl/heteroaryl moiety coupled to 6-(2-imidazolinyl)benzothiazole moiety. The most potent cytostatic effects on all tested cell lines with [Formula: see text] values ranging from 0.1 to 3.70 [Formula: see text] were observed for benzothiazoles substituted with naphthalene-2-yl 3c, benzofuran-2-yl 3e, indole-3-yl 3j, indole-2-yl 3k, quinoline-2-yl 3s, and quinoline-3-yl 3t and derivatives substituted with phenyl 3a, naphthalene-1-yl 3b, benzothiazole-2-yl 3g, benzothiazole-6-yl 3h, N-methylindole-3-yl 3l, benzimidazole-2-yl 3n, benzimidazole-5(6)-yl 3o, and quinolone-4-yl 3u with [Formula: see text] values ranging from 1.1 to 29.1 [Formula: see text]. Based on obtained anti-proliferative activities, 3D-QSAR models for five cell lines were derived. Molecular volume, molecular surface, the sum of hydrophobic surface areas, molecular mass, and possibility of making dispersion forces were identified by QSAR analyses as molecular properties that are

  2. Castration Induced Neuroendocrine Mediated Progression of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    independent prostate cancer. J Clin Oncol 22, 3323–3329. [115] Tiffany NM, Wersinger EM, Garzotto M, and Beer TM (2004). Imatinib mesylate and zoledronic...Inhibition of Akt pathways EC Nelson et al 335 Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases addition, some Asian forms of fermented soy, such as miso, nattou and

  3. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 4. Association of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphisms with clinical response to imatinib mesylate treatment among Malaysian chronic myeloid leukaemia patients. SITI MAZIRAS MAKHTAR AZLAN HUSIN ABDUL AZIZ BABA RAVINDRAN ANKATHIL.

  4. The BCR-ABLT315I mutation compromises survival in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, in a matched pair analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck E; Ibrahim, Amr R; Soverini, Simona

    2013-01-01

    The BCR-ABL T315I mutation confers resistance to currently licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, the impact of this mutation on survival in early stages of disease, in chronic phase, has never been detailed. Using matched pair analysis, a cohort of 64...... patients with chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia harboring a T315I mutation and resistant to imatinib mesylate was compared to a similar cohort of 53 chronic phase patients resistant to imatinib, but with no detectable T315I mutation, in the pre-ponatinib era. These patients were matched according...... to age at diagnosis, interval between disease diagnosis and start of imatinib treatment, and duration of imatinib therapy. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses demonstrated the significant negative impact of the presence of the T315I mutation on overall survival (since imatinib-resistance: 48.4 months for T315...

  5. Multiple roles and therapeutic implications of Akt signaling in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Calvo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Emiliano Calvo1, Victoria Bolós2, Enrique Grande21Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal (CiOCC, Madrid. Spain; 2Pfizer Oncology, Alcobendas-Madrid, SpainAbstract: The prominence of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in several tumors indicates a relationship with tumor grade and proliferation. Critical cellular processes are driven through this pathway. More detailed knowledge of the pathogenesis of tumors would enable us to design targeted drugs to block both membrane tyrosine kinase receptors and the intracellular kinases involved in the transmission of the signal. The newly approved molecular inhibitors sunitinib (an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and other tyrosine kinase receptors, sorafenib (a serine–threonine kinase inhibitor that acts against B-Raf and temsirolimus (an mTOR inhibitor shown clinical activity in advanced kidney cancer. Chronic myeloid leukemia has changed its natural history thanks to imatinib and dasatinib, both of which inhibit the intracellular bcr/abl protein derived from the alteration in the Philadelphia chromosome. Intracellular pathways are still important in cancer development and their blockade directly affects outcome. Cross-talk has been observed but is not well understood. Vertical and horizontal pathway blockade are promising anticancer strategies. Indeed, preclinical and early clinical data suggest that combining superficial and intracellular blocking agents can synergize and leverage single-agent activity. The implication of the Akt signaling pathway in cancer is well established and has led to the development of new anticancer agents that block its activation.Keywords: Akt, cancer, therapeutic target, Akt inhibitors

  6. Hydroxychavicol, a Piper betle leaf component, induces apoptosis of CML cells through mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-dependent JNK and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and overrides imatinib resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Jayashree B; Mahato, Sanjit K; Joshi, Kalpana; Shinde, Vaibhav; Rakshit, Srabanti; Biswas, Nabendu; Choudhury Mukherjee, Indrani; Mandal, Labanya; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Chowdhury, Avik A; Chaudhuri, Jaydeep; Paul, Kausik; Pal, Bikas C; Vinayagam, Jayaraman; Pal, Churala; Manna, Anirban; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Chaudhuri, Utpal; Konar, Aditya; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Santu

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic extract of Piper betle (Piper betle L.) leaves was recently found to induce apoptosis of CML cells expressing wild type and mutated Bcr-Abl with imatinib resistance phenotype. Hydroxy-chavicol (HCH), a constituent of the alcoholic extract of Piper betle leaves, was evaluated for anti-CML activity. Here, we report that HCH and its analogues induce killing of primary cells in CML patients and leukemic cell lines expressing wild type and mutated Bcr-Abl, including the T315I mutation, with minimal toxicity to normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. HCH causes early but transient increase of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species-dependent persistent activation of JNK leads to an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide generation. This causes loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, cleavage of caspase 9, 3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase leading to apoptosis. One HCH analogue was also effective in vivo in SCID mice against grafts expressing the T315I mutation, although to a lesser extent than grafts expressing wild type Bcr-Abl, without showing significant bodyweight loss. Our data describe the role of JNK-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide for anti-CML activity of HCH and this molecule merits further testing in pre-clinical and clinical settings. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Indução de endividamento hospitalar na compra de medicamento em situação de monopólio: o caso do mesilato de imatinibe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolinne Thays Scopel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Os gastos com medicamentos correspondem a uma grande parcela do orçamento em saúde. Sendo assim, a produção de conhecimento sobre o uso desses recursos é essencial na tomada de decisão em saúde pública e melhoria da assistência farmacêutica. Este estudo teve como objetivo analisar o processo de endividamento em um hospital universitário de alta complexidade devido ao gasto crescente com a aquisição de mesilato de imatinibe. Por meio de análise documental e registros no Sistema de Informações Hospitalares (SIH entre 2002 e 2010, realizou-se um estudo descritivo. A partir do caminho da incorporação do medicamento, foram mapeadas as estratégias da indústria farmacêutica e do governo, assim como as respostas governamentais de redução do preço. A sistematização e publicação de informações guardadas em arquivos e na memória podem contribuir para o acompanhamento dos resultados dos programas mantidos pelo Ministério da Saúde.

  8. Assessment of imatinib as first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: 10-year survival results of the randomized CML study IV and impact of non-CML determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehlmann, R; Lauseker, M; Saußele, S; Pfirrmann, M; Krause, S; Kolb, H J; Neubauer, A; Hossfeld, D K; Nerl, C; Gratwohl, A; Baerlocher, G M; Heim, D; Brümmendorf, T H; Fabarius, A; Haferlach, C; Schlegelberger, B; Müller, M C; Jeromin, S; Proetel, U; Kohlbrenner, K; Voskanyan, A; Rinaldetti, S; Seifarth, W; Spieß, B; Balleisen, L; Goebeler, M C; Hänel, M; Ho, A; Dengler, J; Falge, C; Kanz, L; Kremers, S; Burchert, A; Kneba, M; Stegelmann, F; Köhne, C A; Lindemann, H W; Waller, C F; Pfreundschuh, M; Spiekermann, K; Berdel, W E; Müller, L; Edinger, M; Mayer, J; Beelen, D W; Bentz, M; Link, H; Hertenstein, B; Fuchs, R; Wernli, M; Schlegel, F; Schlag, R; de Wit, M; Trümper, L; Hebart, H; Hahn, M; Thomalla, J; Scheid, C; Schafhausen, P; Verbeek, W; Eckart, M J; Gassmann, W; Pezzutto, A; Schenk, M; Brossart, P; Geer, T; Bildat, S; Schäfer, E; Hochhaus, A; Hasford, J

    2017-11-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-study IV was designed to explore whether treatment with imatinib (IM) at 400 mg/day (n=400) could be optimized by doubling the dose (n=420), adding interferon (IFN) (n=430) or cytarabine (n=158) or using IM after IFN-failure (n=128). From July 2002 to March 2012, 1551 newly diagnosed patients in chronic phase were randomized into a 5-arm study. The study was powered to detect a survival difference of 5% at 5 years. After a median observation time of 9.5 years, 10-year overall survival was 82%, 10-year progression-free survival was 80% and 10-year relative survival was 92%. Survival between IM400 mg and any experimental arm was not different. In a multivariate analysis, risk group, major-route chromosomal aberrations, comorbidities, smoking and treatment center (academic vs other) influenced survival significantly, but not any form of treatment optimization. Patients reaching the molecular response milestones at 3, 6 and 12 months had a significant survival advantage. For responders, monotherapy with IM400 mg provides a close to normal life expectancy independent of the time to response. Survival is more determined by patients' and disease factors than by initial treatment selection. Although improvements are also needed for refractory disease, more life-time can currently be gained by carefully addressing non-CML determinants of survival.

  9. Overcoming imatinib resistance using Src inhibitor CGP76030, Abl inhibitor nilotinib and Abl/Lyn inhibitor INNO-406 in newly established K562 variants with BCR-ABL gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Koji; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Kimura, Shinya; Maekawa, Taira; Ueda, Takanori

    2008-06-01

    Because imatinib (IM) resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia is primarily caused by the re-establishment of Abl kinase, new inhibitors may be efficacious. We evaluated 3 new agents against 2 new K562 variants, IM-R1 and IM-R2 cells, which were developed having 7- and 27-fold greater IM resistance, respectively, than the parental K562 cells. Both variants possessed BCR-ABL gene amplification along with elevated levels of its transcript and protein. Greater BCR-ABL gene amplification was observed in IM-R2 cells than in IM-R1 cells, which was consistent with the higher mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl, and ultimately correlated with the greater IM resistance in IM-R2 cells. No mutation in the Abl kinase domain was detected in either variant. Despite the absence of Lyn overexpression, the Src kinase inhibitor CGP76030 showed positive cooperability with IM in inhibiting cell growth of not only K562 cells but also these 2 variants. This might be because of the augmented inhibition of Erk1/2 phosphorylation. The new Abl kinase inhibitor nilotinib was 10-fold more potent than IM in inhibiting the growth of K562 cells. Nilotinib inhibited the growth of IM-R1 and IM-R2 cells as potently as K562 cells. The combination of nilotinib with CGP76030 showed little additivity, because the potency of nilotinib masked the efficacy of CGP76030. The new dual Abl/Lyn inhibitor INNO-406 (formerly NS-187) was slightly more potent than nilotinib in inhibiting the growth of all 3 cell lines. Because BCR-ABL gene amplification occurs in blast crisis, these inhibitors might overcome IM resistance in such patients' leukemia. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Simultaneous occurrence of t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) and t(16;16)(p13;q22) in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia in blastic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámecníkova, Adriana; Al Bahar, Soad; Ramesh, Pandita

    2008-06-01

    Coexistence of two specific chromosomal translocations in the same clone is an infrequent phenomenon and has only rarely been reported in hematological malignancies. We report a combination of t(16;16)(p13;q22), the Philadelphia translocation t(9;22)(q34;q11.2), and deletion of the long arm of chromosome 7 in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia in blast phase. Monotherapy treatment with imatinib mesylate resulted in the disappearance of the Ph-positive clone, but with persistence of t(16;16) and del(7) in all of the metaphases examined. The case illustrates that, although imatinib mesylate can be an effective treatment in eradication of the BCR-ABL fusion gene cells, the occurrence of additional specific abnormalities in Philadelphia-positive leukemias may pose a significant therapeutic challenge. (c) 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Initial presentation of a giant gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach with recurrent spontaneous intra-peritoneal haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Vinagreiro

    2015-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: GISTs are uncommon and rarely present with spontaneous intra-peritoneal haemorrhage, which may be life threatening. In our understanding, this is the first reported case of the reviewed literature presenting with a chronic hemoperitoneum, due to recurrent brisk episodes of tumour haemorrhage. Tumour rupture and large tumour size are two poor independent prognostic tumour factors for recurrence. Despite this, the patient remains free of disease after surgery and instituted adjuvant imatinib mesylate.

  12. 18FDG-PET at 1-Month Intervals Is a Better Predictive Marker for GISTs That Are Difficult to Be Diagnosed Histopathologically: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Otsuka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of c-KIT and PDGFRA. Imatinib mesylate is an effective drug that can be used as a first-choice agent for treatment of GISTs. Prior to treatment, molecular diagnosis of c-KIT or PDGFRA is necessary; however, in some types of GISTs, it is impossible to obtain a sufficient amount of specimen for diagnosis. An inoperable or marginally resectable GIST in a 79-year-old female was difficult to be diagnosed at a molecular pathological level, and hence, exploratory treatment was initiated using imatinib combined with 18FDG-PET evaluation at 1-month intervals. PET imaging indicated a positive response, and so we continued imatinib treatment in an NAC setting for 4 months. As a result, curative resection of the entire tumor was successfully performed with organ preservation and minimally invasive surgery. 18FDG-PET evaluation at 1-month intervals is beneficial for GISTs that are difficult to be diagnosed histopathologically.

  13. Psychosocial implications of Thalassemia Major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinok, Yesim; Erermis, Serpil; Bukusoglu, Nagihan; Yilmaz, Deniz; Solak, Ufuk

    2005-02-01

    Many causes including the chronicity of disease, burden of treatment modalities, morbidities, and the expectation of early death resulting from the disease complications, may lead to psychosocial burden in Thalassemia Major (TM) patients. A total of 38 patients with TM and their mothers were recruited to evaluate the psychosocial burden as well as to disclose whether the psychological status of the patients contribute to the compliance with the therapy or to the contrary. Demographic and disease variables were obtained. Child Behavior Check-list (CBCL) was completed by the mothers of the patients. A detailed psychiatric interview based on the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual diagnostic criteria was performed for each patient. Symptom Distress Checklist 90 (SCL-90) scale was given to all mothers for evaluating their psychopathology. Although CBCL scores remained between the normal ranges, desferrioxamine mesylate (DFO)-compliant patients and the patients with lower ferritin values had significantly higher scores. A total of 24% of the patients had a psychiatric diagnosis including major depression, anxiety disorder, tic disorder, and enuresis nocturnal. The psychiatric diagnosis was significantly higher in the patients who were compliant with desferrioxamine compared with the non-compliant group (P = 0.007). The SCL-90 scores indicated that the mothers who had a child with good adherence to DFO had higher scale scores than the mothers with a poor adherent child. The increase risk of psychosocial and behavioral problems in thalassemics and their parents indicated the importance of a lifelong psychosocial support for the prevention of mental health issues. The patients and their parents, who were more conscious of the illness, were more worried but more compliant with the therapy and need stronger psychiatric support.

  14. Concurrent inhibition of kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling: coordinated suppression of mast cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Beaven, Michael A; Iwaki, Shoko

    2008-01-01

    Although primarily required for the growth, differentiation, and survival of mast cells, Kit ligand (stem cell factor) is also required for optimal antigen-mediated mast cell activation. Therefore, concurrent inhibition of Kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling would be an attractive approach...... characterized Kit inhibitor imatinib mesylate (imatinib). In contrast to imatinib, however, hypothemycin also effectively inhibited FcepsilonRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production in addition to the potentiation of these responses via Kit. The effect of hypothemycin on Kit-mediated responses could...... be explained by its inhibition of Kit kinase activity, whereas the inhibitory effects on FcepsilonRI-dependent signaling were at the level of Btk activation. Because hypothemycin also significantly reduced the mouse passive cutaneous anaphylaxis response in vivo, these data provide proof of principle...

  15. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  16. Eribulin Mesylate: A New Therapeutic Option for Metastatic Breast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asthenia, fatigue, neutropenia, alopecia, nausea, anorexia, and neuropathy are the most frequent adverse effects associated with this drug. The aim of this review was to highlight the importance of this drug in the management of breast cancer. Medline, Excerpta Medica database, cochrane database, medscape, Elsevier ...

  17. Psoriasis : implications of biologics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecluse, L.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the end of 2004 several specific immunomodulating therapies: ‘biologic response modifiers’ or ‘biologics’ have been registered for moderate to severe psoriasis in Europe. This thesis is considering the implications of the introduction of the biologics for psoriasis patients, focusing on safety

  18. Implications of social structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Josefine Bohr

    Social systems in nature are characterised by heterogeneous social structures. The pattern of social interactions or associations between individuals within populations (i.e. their social network) is typically non-random. Such structuring may have important implications for the expression...... and evolution of behaviour, and for individual fitness. In this thesis I investigated implications of social structure for fitness and behaviour, with focus on three main areas: social structure & fitness, social structure & communication, and social structure & cooperation. These areas were investigated......, we investigate empirically the role of the social environment of individuals for their communication patterns. Our study species is a song bird, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus). The results suggest that individual communication in this species is influenced by features of the local...

  19. Epigenetics: ambiguities and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Karola; Griffiths, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Everyone has heard of 'epigenetics', but the term means different things to different researchers. Four important contemporary meanings are outlined in this paper. Epigenetics in its various senses has implications for development, heredity, and evolution, and also for medicine. Concerning development, it cements the vision of a reactive genome strongly coupled to its environment. Concerning heredity, both narrowly epigenetic and broader 'exogenetic' systems of inheritance play important roles in the construction of phenotypes. A thoroughly epigenetic model of development and evolution was Waddington's aim when he introduced the term 'epigenetics' in the 1940s, but it has taken the modern development of molecular epigenetics to realize this aim. In the final sections of the paper we briefly outline some further implications of epigenetics for medicine and for the nature/nurture debate.

  20. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition causes simultaneous bone loss and excess bone formation within growing bone in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurmio, Mirja; Joki, Henna; Kallio, Jenny; Maeaettae, Jorma A.; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo; Toppari, Jorma; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina

    2011-01-01

    During postnatal skeletal growth, adaptation to mechanical loading leads to cellular activities at the growth plate. It has recently become evident that bone forming and bone resorbing cells are affected by the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI571, Gleevec (registered) ). Imatinib targets PDGF, ABL-related gene, c-Abl, c-Kit and c-Fms receptors, many of which have multiple functions in the bone microenvironment. We therefore studied the effects of imatinib in growing bone. Young rats were exposed to imatinib (150 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-7, or 100 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-13), and the effects of RTK inhibition on bone physiology were studied after 8 and 70 days (3-day treatment), or after 14 days (9-day treatment). X-ray imaging, computer tomography, histomorphometry, RNA analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate bone modeling and remodeling in vivo. Imatinib treatment eliminated osteoclasts from the metaphyseal osteochondral junction at 8 and 14 days. This led to a resorption arrest at the growth plate, but also increased bone apposition by osteoblasts, thus resulting in local osteopetrosis at the osteochondral junction. The impaired bone remodelation observed on day 8 remained significant until adulthood. Within the same bone, increased osteoclast activity, leading to bone loss, was observed at distal bone trabeculae on days 8 and 14. Peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT) and micro-CT analysis confirmed that, at the osteochondral junction, imatinib shifted the balance from bone resorption towards bone formation, thereby altering bone modeling. At distal trabecular bone, in turn, the balance was turned towards bone resorption, leading to bone loss. - Research highlights: → 3-Day imatinib treatment. → Causes growth plate anomalies in young rats. → Causes biomechanical changes and significant bone loss at distal trabecular bone. → Results in loss of osteoclasts at osteochondral junction.

  1. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed

  2. Effects of chemotherapeutics on organotypic corticostriatal slice cultures identified by a panel of fluorescent and immunohistochemical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Annette; Jensen, Stine Skov; Kolenda, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    no toxicity was observed. Corresponding immunostaining showed loss of MAP2 and increased expression of GFAP and p25α for cultures exposed to 1,000 nM VCR. Cultures exposed to high concentrations of ACNU and IM disintegrated, leaving no tissue for histology. In conclusion, corticostriatal slice cultures...... specific neuronal and glial degeneration induced by chemotherapeutics in organotypic rat corticostriatal slice cultures. The slice cultures were exposed to the alkylating agents temozolomide (TMZ) and nimustine (ACNU), the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (IM) and the microtubule...

  3. An activating mutation of GNB1 is associated with resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in ETV6-ABL1-positive leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zimmermannova, O.; Doktorova, E.; Stuchlý, J.; Kanderová, V.; Kuzilkova, D.; Strnad, Hynek; Starková, J.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Trka, J.; Petrák, J.; Zuna, J.; Žaliová, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 43 (2017), s. 5985-5994 ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : acute lymphoblastic-leukemia * chronic myeloid-leukemia * bcr-abl * tel-abl * cytogenetic characterization * imatinib-mesylate * fusion proteins * blast crisis * rearrangement * patient Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 7.519, year: 2016

  4. A rare case of primary mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumor with metastasis to the cervix uteri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nupur; Mittal, Suneeta; Lal, Neena; Misra, Renu; Kumar, Lalit; Bhalla, Sunita

    2007-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are CD117 (C Kit) positive mesenchymal neoplasms, that may arise anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Their current therapy is imatinib mesylate before or after surgery. Case presentation We describe a case of 17-year-old female with metastasis to the cervix uteri of a primary mesenteric gastrointestinal tumor. Conclusion Surgery remains the mainstay of known curative treatment. The manifestations of GIST are not restricted to the typical locations within the bowel; may have very unusual metastatic sites or infiltrations per continuitatem. PMID:18045506

  5. Bilateral Proliferative Retinopathy as the Initial Presentation of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Mafalda S. F.; Figueiredo, Ana R. M.; Ferreira, Natália N.; Barbosa, Irene M. A.; Furtado, Maria João F. B. S.; Correia, Nuno F. C. B. A.; Gomes, Miguel P.; Lume, Miguel R. B.; Menéres, Maria João S.; Santos, Marinho M. N.; Meireles S., M. Angelina C.

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of a 48-year-old male with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who initially presented with a bilateral proliferative retinopathy. The patient complained of recent visual loss and floaters in both eyes (BE). Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/50 in the right eye and 20/200 in the left eye (LE). Fundoscopy showed the presence of bilateral peripheral capillary dropout with multiple retinal sea fan neovascularisations, which were confirmed on fluorescein angiography. Full blood count revealed hyperleukocytosis, thrombocytosis, anemia, and hyperuricemia. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy showed the reciprocal chromosomal translocation t (9;22), diagnostic of CML. The patient was started on hydroxyurea, allopurinol and imatinib mesylate. He received bilateral panretinal laser photocoagulation and a vitrectomy was performed in the LE. The patient has been in complete hematologic, cytogenetic, and major molecular remission while on imatinib and his BCVA is 20/25 in BE. PMID:24339689

  6. Implications of antisocial parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Zachary D; Billick, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Antisocial behavior is a socially maladaptive and harmful trait to possess. This can be especially injurious for a child who is raised by a parent with this personality structure. The pathology of antisocial behavior implies traits such as deceitfulness, irresponsibility, unreliability, and an incapability to feel guilt, remorse, or even love. This is damaging to a child's emotional, cognitive, and social development. Parents with this personality makeup can leave a child traumatized, empty, and incapable of forming meaningful personal relationships. Both genetic and environmental factors influence the development of antisocial behavior. Moreover, the child with a genetic predisposition to antisocial behavior who is raised with a parental style that triggers the genetic liability is at high risk for developing the same personality structure. Antisocial individuals are impulsive, irritable, and often have no concerns over their purported responsibilities. As a parent, this can lead to erratic discipline, neglectful parenting, and can undermine effective care giving. This paper will focus on the implications of parents with antisocial behavior and the impact that this behavior has on attachment as well as on the development of antisocial traits in children.

  7. Structuralism and Its Heuristic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Ruth M.

    1984-01-01

    The author defines structuralism (a method for modeling and analyzing event systems in a space-time framework), traces its origins to the work of J. Piaget and M. Fourcault, and discusses its implications for learning. (CL)

  8. Strategic Implications of Global Health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monaghan, Karen

    2008-01-01

    "Strategic Implications of Global Health" responds to a request from the Undersecretary of State for Democratization and Global Affairs for an intelligence assessment on the connections between health and U.S. national interests...

  9. The privacy implications of Bluetooth

    OpenAIRE

    Kostakos, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    A substantial amount of research, as well as media hype, has surrounded RFID technology and its privacy implications. Currently, researchers and the media focus on the privacy threats posed by RFID, while consumer groups choose to boycott products bearing RFID tags. At the same, however, a very similar technology has quietly become part of our everyday lives: Bluetooth. In this paper we highlight the fact that Bluetooth is a widespread technology that has real privacy implications. Furthermor...

  10. Maritime Violence : Implications to Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Zubir, Nurulizwan Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Maritime Piracy has been a serious threat to the international community especially in the SoutheastAsia region. This threat has caused tremendous implications towards the world economy, environment,political stability of the nations involved because 45% of the shipping company passes through theSoutheast Asia. The worrying fact is that these attacks were committed by terrorists as well as traditionalmaritime pirates. This paper examines on the implications of maritime crime in M...

  11. Predictive value of minimal residual disease in Philadelphia-chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with imatinib in the European intergroup study of post-induction treatment of Philadelphia-chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, based on immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor and BCR/ABL1 methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; De Lorenzo, Paola; Alten, Julia; Röttgers, Silja; Hancock, Jeremy; Saha, Vaskar; Castor, Anders; Madsen, Hans O.; Gandemer, Virginie; Cavé, Hélène; Leoni, Veronica; Köhler, Rolf; Ferrari, Giulia M.; Bleckmann, Kirsten; Pieters, Rob; van der Velden, Vincent; Stary, Jan; Zuna, Jan; Escherich, Gabriele; zur Stadt, Udo; Aricò, Maurizio; Conter, Valentino; Schrappe, Martin; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Biondi, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    The prognostic value of minimal residual disease (MRD) in Philadelphia-chromosome-positive (Ph+) childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is not fully established. We detected MRD by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) of rearranged immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor genes (IG/TR) and/or BCR/ABL1 fusion transcript to investigate its predictive value in patients receiving Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) high-risk (HR) therapy and post-induction intermittent imatinib (the European intergroup study of post-induction treatment of Philadelphia-chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (EsPhALL) study). MRD was monitored after induction (time point (TP)1), consolidation Phase IB (TP2), HR Blocks, reinductions, and at the end of therapy. MRD negativity progressively increased over time, both by IG/TR and BCR/ABL1. Of 90 patients with IG/TR MRD at TP1, nine were negative and none relapsed, while 11 with MRD<5×10−4 and 70 with MRD≥5×10−4 had a comparable 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 36.4 (15.4) and 35.2 (5.9), respectively. Patients who achieved MRD negativity at TP2 had a low relapse risk (5-yr cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR)=14.3[9.8]), whereas those who attained MRD negativity at a later date showed higher CIR, comparable to patients with positive MRD at any level. BCR/ABL1 MRD negative patients at TP1 had a relapse risk similar to those who were IG/TR MRD negative (1/8 relapses). The overall concordance between the two methods is 69%, with significantly higher positivity by BCR/ABL1. In conclusion, MRD monitoring by both methods may be functional not only for measuring response but also for guiding biological studies aimed at investigating causes for discrepancies, although from our data IG/TR MRD monitoring appears to be more reliable. Early MRD negativity is highly predictive of favorable outcome. The earlier MRD negativity is achieved, the better the prognosis. PMID

  12. Transport mechanisms and their pathology-induced regulation govern tyrosine kinase inhibitor delivery in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schmidt-Lauber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs are effective in treating malignant disorders and were lately suggested to have an impact on non-malignant diseases. However, in some inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis (RA the in vivo effect seemed to be moderate. As most TKIs are taken up actively into cells by cell membrane transporters, this study aimed to evaluate the role of such transporters for the accumulation of the TKI Imatinib mesylates in RA synovial fibroblasts as well as their regulation under inflammatory conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transport and accumulation of Imatinib was investigated in transporter-transfected HEK293 cells and human RA synovial fibroblasts (hRASF. Transporter expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. In transfection experiments, hMATE1 showed the highest apparent affinity for Imatinib among all known Imatinib transporters. Experiments quantifying the Imatinib uptake in the presence of specific transporter inhibitors and after siRNA knockdown of hMATE1 indeed identified hMATE1 to mediate Imatinib transport in hRASF. The anti-proliferative effect of Imatinib on PDGF stimulated hRASF was quantified by cell counting and directly correlated with the uptake activity of hMATE1. Expression of hMATE1 was investigated by Western blot and immuno-fluorescence. Imatinib transport under disease-relevant conditions, such as an altered pH and following stimulation with different cytokines, was also investigated by HPLC. The uptake was significantly reduced by an acidic extracellular pH as well as by the cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6, which all decreased the expression of hMATE1-mRNA and protein. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The regulation of Imatinib uptake via hMATE1 in hRASF and resulting effects on their proliferation may explain moderate in vivo effects on RA. Moreover, our results suggest that investigating transporter mediated drug processing under normal and pathological conditions is important

  13. Quantum histories and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, A.

    2000-01-01

    Classical mechanics and standard Copenhagen quantum mechanics respect subspace implications. For example, if a particle is confined in a particular region R of space, then in these theories we can deduce that it is confined in regions containing R. However, subspace implications are generally violated by versions of quantum theory that assign probabilities to histories, such as the consistent histories approach. I define here a new criterion, ordered consistency, which refines the criterion of consistency and has the property that inferences made by ordered consistent sets do not violate subspace relations. This raises the question: do the operators defining our observations form an ordered consistent history? If so, ordered consistency defines a version of quantum theory with greater predictive power than the consistent histories formalism. If not, and our observations are defined by a non-ordered consistent quantum history, then subspace implications are not generally valid. (orig.)

  14. THE ACTUAL IMPLICATIONS OF INFLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murăriţa Ilie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors have started from the idea that inflationary phenomenon is a companion, the cause and the effect of the globalization of poverty in the broader context of world economy globalization. Therefore, starting from a common definition of inflation, the first objective was to identify causal relationships that singularize contemporary inflationary process. After that, attention was focused on the implications of inflation in the current stage, bearing in mind that monetary financial theory and practice are operating with perfectly anticipated inflation or imperfectly anticipated inflation. Inflation has great implications on the long-term contracts and wage contracts.

  15. OSHA: Implications for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    Presented in this document are several articles concerning recommendations about the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHA) and its implications for higher education. It is time for an educated look at facilities and programs and the beginning of plans which, in the long run, will bring colleges and universities into compliance with…

  16. Implications of SNOMED CT versioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Dennis; Cornet, Ronald; Lau, Francis

    2011-01-01

    To determine the changes each Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) release undergoes and the implications of those changes. (1) We reviewed the SNOMED CT Component History documentation and analyzed the Component History table in detail. (2) We outlined a list of semantic

  17. Military Implications of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-20

    U.S. environmental issues also have important global implications. This paper analyzes current U.S. Policy as it pertains to global warming and climate...for military involvement to reduce global warming . Global warming and other environmental issues are important to the U.S. military. As the United

  18. Chromosome abnormalities additional to the Philadelphia chromosome at the diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia: pathogenetic and prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, Alfonso; Testoni, Nicoletta; Valenti, Anna Maria; Luatti, Simona; Tonelli, Michela; Marzocchi, Giulia; Cipriani, Raffaella; Baldazzi, Carmen; Giannini, Barbara; Stacchini, Monica; Gamberini, Carla; Castagnetti, Fausto; Rosti, Gianantonio; Azzena, Annalisa; Cavazzini, Francesco; Cianciulli, Anna Maria; Dalsass, Alessia; Donti, Emilio; Giugliano, Emilia; Gozzetti, Alessandro; Grimoldi, Maria Grazia; Ronconi, Sonia; Santoro, Alessandra; Spedicato, Francesco; Zanatta, Lucia; Baccarani, Michele

    2010-06-01

    Additional chromosome abnormalities (ACAs) occur in less than 10% of cases at diagnosis of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In some cases, on the basis of the persistence of the ACAs in Ph-negative cells after response to imatinib, a secondary origin of the Ph chromosome has been demonstrated. In this study, the possible prognostic value of this phenomenon was evaluated. Thirty-six Ph-positive CML patients were included in the study. In six patients, ACAs persisted after the disappearance of the Ph. A complete cytogenetic response (CCR) was obtained in five of these six patients, and five of six also had a high Sokal score. In all the other cases, ACAs disappeared together (in cases of response to therapy with imatinib) or persisted with the Ph (in cases of no response to imatinib). In the former cases, the primary origin of the Ph was demonstrated. CCR was obtained in 22 cases (17 with low to intermediate Sokal scores), while no response was observed in 8 patients (5 with a high Sokal score). Sokal score seems to maintain its prognostic value for patients in whom the Ph occurs as a primary event, but not in those in whom it occurs as a secondary one. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Safety implications of control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, O.L.

    1983-01-01

    The Safety Implications of Control Systems Program has three major activities in support of USI-A47. The first task is a failure mode and effects analysis of all plant systems which may potentially induce control system disturbance that have safety implications. This task has made a preliminary study of overfill events and recommended cases for further analysis on the hybrid simulator. Work continues on overcooling and undercooling. A detailed investigation of electric power network is in progress. LERs are providing guidance on important failure modes that will provide initial conditions for further simulator studies. The simulator taks is generating a detailed model of the control system supported by appropriate neutronics, hydraulics, and thermodynamics submodels of all other principal plant components. The simulator is in the last stages of development. Checkout calculations are in progress to establish model stability, robustness, and qualitative credibility. Verification against benchmark codes and plant data will follow

  20. Cosmological implications of Heisenberg's principle

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalo, Julio A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this book is to analyze the all important implications of Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle for a finite universe with very large mass-energy content such as ours. The earlier and main contributors to the formulation of Quantum Mechanics are briefly reviewed regarding the formulation of Heisenberg's Principle. After discussing “indeterminacy” versus ”uncertainty”, the universal constants of physics are reviewed and Planck's units are given. Next, a novel set of units, Heisenberg–Lemaitre units, are defined in terms of the large finite mass of the universe. With the help of Heisenberg's principle, the time evolution of the finite zero-point energy for the universe is investigated quantitatively. Next, taking advantage of the rigorous solutions of Einstein's cosmological equation for a flat, open and mixed universe of finite mass, the most recent and accurate data on the “age” (to) and the expansion rate (Ho) of the universe and their implications are reconsidered.

  1. MARITIME VIOLENCE : IMPLICATIONS TO MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurulizwan Ahmad Zubir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maritime Piracy has been a serious threat to the international community especially in the SoutheastAsia region. This threat has caused tremendous implications towards the world economy, environment,political stability of the nations involved because 45% of the shipping company passes through theSoutheast Asia. The worrying fact is that these attacks were committed by terrorists as well as traditionalmaritime pirates. This paper examines on the implications of maritime crime in Malaysia and discusseswhether the definition of piracy under the International Law could be applied to these attacks. Thispaper concludes that cooperation between the region’s states and the enhancement of a good securitysystem of one state are needed to combat maritime violence. Thus it is imperative that the internationallaw need to be changed in order to enhance the meaning of piracy and also to include sea terrorism. Key words: piracy, maritime, terrorist

  2. Implications of alternative fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The United States is re-examining alternative fuel cycles and nuclear power strategies, and doubtful attempts are being made to justify the economics of the 'throw-away' fuel cycle. At an international forum on 'An acceptable nuclear energy future for the world' at Fort Lauderdale, Karl Cohen of General Electric and a leading authority on this topic put the implications into perspective. Extracts from his address are presented

  3. MECHANISTIC STUDIES ON THE PHOTOTOXICITY OF ROSUVASTATIN, ITRACONAZOLE AND IMATINIB

    OpenAIRE

    Nardi, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Photosensitizing effects of xenobiotics are of increasing concern in public health since modern lifestyle often associates sunlight exposure with the presence of chemical substances in the skin. An important number of chemicals like perfumes, sunscreen components, or therapeutic agents have been reported as photosensitizers. In this context, a considerable effort has been made to design a model system for photosafety assessment. Indeed, screening for phototoxicity is necessary ...

  4. Pharmacogenomics and migraine: possible implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Brosen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the science about how inherited factors influence the effects of drugs. Drug response is always a result of mutually interacting genes with important modifications from environmental and constitutional factors. Based on the genetic variability of pharmacokinetic and in some...... cases pharmacodynamic variability we mention possible implications for the acute and preventive treatment of migraine. Pharmacogenomics will most likely in the future be one part of our therapeutic armamentarium and will provide a stronger scientific basis for optimizing drug therapy on the basis...

  5. Networking activism: implications for Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Vatikiotis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of December 2008 against police brutality through a wave of demonstrations and street protests in Athens, which was strongly advocated by protest activities and practices across the world, addresses several issues in relation to the transformative potentials of mediated collective action. The paper critically evaluates different accounts of December events, probing then into thevery networking of that movement. From this perspective, it points out another aspect of the local-global interplay in protest culture along new mediating practices (beyond the creation of transnational publics, that of the implications of transnational networking for local social activism and identification, addressing relevant questions in the Greek context.

  6. Practical implications of 'postmodern philosophy'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Mile V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the implications of the discourse about postmodernity. Postmodernity is analyzed as a complex discursive figure. Within the discourse about postmodernity three levels are distinguished: the postmodern condition, postmodernism, and reflection of the postmodern condition. Special attention is paid to globalization and the problem of the enforcement of modern projects in East-European societies, particularly Serbia. These societies are termed object-societies, while their modification of modernity is called eastmodernity. The author's answer to the complexity of the postmodern condition is a conception of the politics of subsistence.

  7. Inflationary implications of supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Andrea; Roest, Diederik; Zavala, Ivonne [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-23

    We discuss a general bound on the possibility to realise inflation in any minimal supergravity with F-terms. The derivation crucially depends on the sGoldstini, the scalar field directions that are singled out by spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. The resulting bound involves both slow-roll parameters and the geometry of the Kähler manifold of the chiral scalars. We analyse the inflationary implications of this bound, and in particular discuss to what extent the requirements of single field and slow-roll can both be met in F-term inflation.

  8. CREAM: Results, Implications and Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) balloon-borne experiment has accumulated ∼161 days of exposure during six successful flights over Antarctica. Energy measurements are made with a transition radiation detector and an ionization calorimeter. Charge measurements are made with timing scintillators, pixelated Si, and Cherenkov detectors to minimize the effect of backscattered particles. High energy cosmicray data were collected over a wide energy range from ∼ 1010 to ∼ 1015 eV at an average altitude of ∼ 38.5 km, with ∼ 3.9 g/cm2 atmospheric overburden. All cosmic-ray elements from protons (Z = 1) to iron nuclei (Z = 26) are separated with excellent charge resolution. Recent results from the ongoing analysis including the discrepant hardening of elemental spectra at ∼ 200 GeV/n are presented and their implications on cosmic-ray origin, acceleration and propagation are discussed. The project status and plans are also presented.

  9. MARKETING IMPLICATION IN WINE ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan MATEI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The wine, a very complex product in viticulture, has proved its tremendous importance not only to the individual but rational nutrition and increasing national income of a country cultivators (evidenced by the upward trend of the share of crop production horticulture and viticulture in the global economy agricultural. More interesting is, given the continued growth in the number of scientific publications and their quality (at least since the 1980s - where "wine" is the centerpiece of these studies - we can not but be witnessing a growing interest more to this "potion" and found that the growing popularity of wine in the science reveals the emergence of a new academic field, ie "wine economy" (or wine-economy. This study aims to make a foray into "wine economy" and to outline some of the implications of marketing in this area.

  10. Conflict management: importance and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, Laurie

    2017-01-26

    Conflict is a consistent and unavoidable issue within healthcare teams. Despite training of nurse leaders and managers around areas of conflict resolution, the problem of staff relations, stress, sickness and retention remain. Conflict arises from issues with interpersonal relationships, change and poor leadership. New members of staff entering an already established healthcare team should be supported and integrated, to encourage mutual role respect between all team members and establish positive working relationships, in order to maximise patient care. This paper explores the concept of conflict, the importance of addressing causes of conflict, effective management, and the relevance of positive approaches to conflict resolution. Good leadership, nurturing positive team dynamics and communication, encourages shared problem solving and acceptance of change. Furthermore mutual respect fosters a more positive working environment for those in healthcare teams. As conflict has direct implications for patients, positive resolution is essential, to promote safe and effective delivery of care, whilst encouraging therapeutic relationships between colleagues and managers.

  11. Indirect comparisons of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in CML: case study using baseline population characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimbach Tran Carpiuc

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Kimbach Tran Carpiuc1, Gianantonio Rosti2, Fausto Castagnetti2, Maarten Treur3, Jennifer Stephens11Pharmerit North America LLC, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Hematology and Oncology, S Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy; 3Pharmerit Europe, Rotterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: The use of indirect comparisons to evaluate the relative effectiveness between two or more treatments is widespread in the literature and continues to grow each year. Appropriate methodologies will be essential for integrating data from various published clinical trials into a systematic framework as part of the increasing emphasis on comparative effectiveness research. This article provides a case study example for clinicians using the baseline study population characteristics and response rates of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors in imatinib-resistant or imatinib-intolerant chronic myelogenous leukemia followed by a discussion of indirect comparison methods that are being increasingly implemented to address challenges with these types of comparisons.Keywords: comparative effectiveness research, meta-analysis, BCR–ABL-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, dasatinib 

  12. Treating the chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patient: which TKI, when to switch and when to stop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ami B; Wilds, Brandon W; Deininger, Michael W

    2017-07-01

    With the discovery of imatinib mesylate nearly 20 years ago, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were found to be effective in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). TKI therapy has since revolutionized the treatment of CML and has served as a paradigm of success for targeted drug therapy in cancer. Several new TKIs for CML have been approved over the last two decades that exhibit improved potency over imatinib and have different off-target profiles, providing options for individualized therapy selection. Areas covered: Current management of chronic phase CML, including guidance on the sequential use of imatinib and newer-generation TKIs and evolving treatment strategies such as TKI discontinuation. Relevant literature was identified by searching biomedical databases (i.e. PubMed) for primary research material. Expert commentary: Although survival outcomes have drastically improved for CML patients, treatment for CML has grown more complex with the introduction of next-generation TKIs and the advent of treatment-free remissions (TFR). Goals of therapy have shifted accordingly, with increased focus on improving quality of life, managing patient expectations and optimizing patient adherence.

  13. Ophthalmic implications of seasonal affective disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramore, J.E.; King, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    A review of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is presented with a discussion of its standard treatment of phototherapy. A number of ophthalmic implications related to SAD are proposed. These implications relate to both the condition and the phototherapy used in its treatment, especially the use of full spectrum light which contains ultraviolet and near ultraviolet radiation. 12 references

  14. Implications of deforestation and desertification on sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the implications of deforestation and desertification in sustainable agriculture. The problems of deforestation and desertification were examined as they affect land and agricultural productivity. The socio-economic implications of deforestation and desertification in sustainable agriculture were equally ...

  15. Mining TCGA data using Boolean implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subarna Sinha

    Full Text Available Boolean implications (if-then rules provide a conceptually simple, uniform and highly scalable way to find associations between pairs of random variables. In this paper, we propose to use Boolean implications to find relationships between variables of different data types (mutation, copy number alteration, DNA methylation and gene expression from the glioblastoma (GBM and ovarian serous cystadenoma (OV data sets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. We find hundreds of thousands of Boolean implications from these data sets. A direct comparison of the relationships found by Boolean implications and those found by commonly used methods for mining associations show that existing methods would miss relationships found by Boolean implications. Furthermore, many relationships exposed by Boolean implications reflect important aspects of cancer biology. Examples of our findings include cis relationships between copy number alteration, DNA methylation and expression of genes, a new hierarchy of mutations and recurrent copy number alterations, loss-of-heterozygosity of well-known tumor suppressors, and the hypermethylation phenotype associated with IDH1 mutations in GBM. The Boolean implication results used in the paper can be accessed at http://crookneck.stanford.edu/microarray/TCGANetworks/.

  16. Green buildings: Implications for acousticians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    This presentation will deal with the practical implications of green design protocols of the US Green Building Council on interior acoustics of buildings. Three areas of particular consequence to acousticians will be discussed. Ventilation Systems: reduced energy consumption goals dictate reliance on natural cooling and ventilation using ambient air when possible. The consequent large openings in the building envelope to bring fresh air into rooms, and similar sized openings to transfer the mixed air out, can severely compromise the noise isolation of the rooms concerned. Radiant Cooling: the heavy concrete floors of buildings can be used as a thermal flywheel to lessen the cooling load, which forces the concrete ceilings to be exposed to the occupied rooms for heat transfer, and strictly limits the application of acoustical absorption on the ceilings. This challenges the room acoustics design. Green Materials: the LEED protocols require the elimination of potentially harmful finishes, including fibrous materials which may impact air quality or contribute to health problems. Since the backbone of sound absorption is glass and mineral fibres, this further challenges provision of superior room acoustics. Examples and commentary will be provided based on current and recent projects.

  17. Implications of increased ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The implications of increased ethanol production in Canada, assuming a 10% market penetration of a 10% ethanol/gasoline blend, are evaluated. Issues considered in the analysis include the provision of new markets for agricultural products, environmental sustainability, energy security, contribution to global warming, potential government cost (subsidies), alternative options to ethanol, energy efficiency, impacts on soil and water of ethanol crop production, and acceptance by fuel marketers. An economic analysis confirms that ethanol production from a stand-alone plant is not economic at current energy values. However, integration of ethanol production with a feedlot lowers the break-even price of ethanol by about 35 cents/l, and even further reductions could be achieved as technology to utilize lignocellulosic feedstock is commercialized. Ethanol production could have a positive impact on farm income, increasing cash receipts to grain farmers up to $53 million. The environmental impact of ethanol production from grain would be similar to that from crop production in general. Some concerns about ethanol/gasoline blends from the fuel industry have been reduced as those blends are now becoming recommended in some automotive warranties. However, the concerns of the larger fuel distributors are a serious constraint on an expansion of ethanol use. The economics of ethanol use could be improved by extending the federal excise tax exemption now available for pure alcohol fuels to the alcohol portion of alcohol/gasoline blends. 9 refs., 10 tabs

  18. Health implications of hydropower development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    Hydropower development had been neglected in many countries during the past few decades, but the situation dramatically changed during the 1970s owing to the constantly increasing costs of electricity generation by fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. Currently, hydroelectric generation accounts for approximately 23% of total global electricity supply. Much of the hydropower potential in developing countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America still remains to be exploited. Like any other source of energy, hydropower development has several health impacts. Conceptually, health implications of hydropower development can be divided into two broad categories: short-term and long-term problems. Short-term health impacts occur during the planning, construction and immediate post-construction phases, whereas long-term impacts stem from the presence of large man-made lakes, development of extensive canal systems, alteration of the ecosystem of the area, and changing socio-economic conditions. Longer-term impacts are further classified into two categories: introduction of new diseases and/or intensification of existing ones due to the improvements of the habitats of disease-carrying vectors, and health problems arising from resettlement of the people whose homes and land-holdings are inundated by the reservoirs. All these impacts are discussed in detail. Health impacts of hydropower developments have not yet been studied extensively. It is often implicitly assumed that health impacts of major dams are minor compared with other social and environmental impacts. Future studies could possibly reverse this assumption. (author)

  19. Geometric Implications of Maxwell's Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Felix T.

    2015-03-01

    Maxwell's synthesis of the varied results of the accumulated knowledge of electricity and magnetism, based largely on the searching insights of Faraday, still provide new issues to explore. A case in point is a well recognized anomaly in the Maxwell equations: The laws of electricity and magnetism require two 3-vector and two scalar equations, but only six dependent variables are available to be their solutions, the 3-vectors E and B. This leaves an apparent redundancy of two degrees of freedom (J. Rosen, AJP 48, 1071 (1980); Jiang, Wu, Povinelli, J. Comp. Phys. 125, 104 (1996)). The observed self-consistency of the eight equations suggests that they contain additional information. This can be sought as a previously unnoticed constraint connecting the space and time variables, r and t. This constraint can be identified. It distorts the otherwise Euclidean 3-space of r with the extremely slight, time dependent curvature k (t) =Rcurv-2 (t) of the 3-space of a hypersphere whose radius has the time dependence dRcurv / dt = +/- c nonrelativistically, or dRcurvLor / dt = +/- ic relativistically. The time dependence is exactly that of the Hubble expansion. Implications of this identification will be explored.

  20. Implications of human tissue studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1986-10-01

    Through radiochemical analysis of voluntary tissue donations, the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries are gaining improved understanding of the distribution and biokinetics of actinide elements in occupationally exposed persons. Evaluation of the first two whole body contributions to the Transuranium Registry revealed an inverse proportionality between actinide concentration and bone ash fraction. The analysis of a whole body with a documented 241 Am deposition indicated a significantly shorter half-time in liver and a greater fraction resident in the skeleton than predicted by existing models. Other studies of the Registries are designed to evaluate in vivo estimates of actinide deposition with those derived from postmortem tissue analysis, compare results of animal experiments with human data, and reviw histopathologic slides for tissue toxicity that might be attributable to exposure to uranium and the transuranic elements. The implications of these recent findings and other work of the Registries are discussed from the standpoint of their potential impact on biokinetic modeling, internal dose assessment, safety standards, and operational health physics practices

  1. On the implications of confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors consider some implications of confinement starting from the basic observation that cross-sections for the production of colored asymptotic states, such as free quarks and gluons, from color singlet initial states must be zero if QCD is to be confining. The authors discuss two pictures of confinement: the failure of the cluster decomposition property and the absence of a pole at timelike momenta in the propagator of a confined particle. The authors use QCD-based models as a framework to relate the failure of the cluster decomposition property to other ideas, such as the role of a nonzero gluon condensate. The authors' primary interest is to address the question of the absence of a mass pole through a study of model Schwinger-Dyson equations. These equations contain some of the dynamical information that is present in the study of the cluster decomposition property. The authors discuss the problems within this idea and its study using the Schwinger-Dyson equations

  2. National and international social implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zablocki, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    Every new technology since slash-and-burn has required new social institutions to go along with it, and nuclear technology is no exception. There is, therefore, a need to go beyond decisionmaking among alternative peaceful proliferation schemes. There is a need also to look at the needs for new national and/or transnational institutions that will have to accompany any proliferations in area. There are five social implications that bear on the need to develop new social institutions. First is the issue of Great Power relations, in an era of nuclear proliferation. Second is the conflict between nationalism and internationalism. The third is the issue of the military and diplomatic strategies of small nations, particularly small nations on the threshold of nuclear capacity, and the question of military versus civilian rule in those nations. Fourth, and possibly the most important is the role of multinational corporations in nuclear regulation, and fifth, the question of secrecy and how that bears on power values of primacy in democratic states

  3. Energy implications of bottled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleick, P H; Cooley, H S

    2009-01-01

    As bottled water use continues to expand around the world, there is growing interest in the environmental, economical, and social implications of that use, including concerns about waste generation, proper use of groundwater, hydrologic effects on local surface and groundwater, economic costs, and more. A key concern is how much energy is required to produce and use bottled water. This paper estimates the energy footprint required for various phases of bottled water production, transportation, and use. We do not develop a single comprehensive life-cycle energy estimate because of differences among water sources, bottling processes, transportation costs, and other factors, but we quantify key energy inputs necessary for site-specific assessments. We also apply these inputs to three site-specific examples of the energy required from production to the point of use: local bottled water produced and used in Los Angeles, water bottled in the South Pacific and shipped by cargo ship to Los Angeles, and water bottled in France and shipped in various ways to Los Angeles. For water transported short distances, the energy requirements of bottled water are dominated by the energy used to produce the plastic bottles. Long-distance transport, however, can lead to energy costs comparable to, or even larger than, those of producing the bottle. All other energy costs-for processing, bottling, sealing, labeling, and refrigeration-are far smaller than those for the production of the bottle and transportation. These data can be used to generate specific estimates for different sources, treatments, and delivery options.

  4. Implications of Donald Macdonald's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolick, M.; Carr, J.; Hall, D.; Murphy, J.; Jennings, T.; Shepherd, J.

    1997-01-01

    The chairman of the session debating the implications of the Macdonald report identified three important aspects of utility restructuring: equity, efficiency and sustainability. Dr. Jan Carr, a member of the Macdonald Committee, predicted that the continental energy market will likely demand a much larger number of smaller energy transactions, and the value in having inherently low-cost generation located close to load centres, and/or close to the US border. Douglas Hall, Vice President of RBC Dominion Securities criticized the Macdonald Committee for leaving 70 per cent of Hydro's generating capacity in public hands. He favored transferring all assets to the private sector, and questioned the Committee's assumption that the utility could be broken down into four components that would share overhead and still compete against each other. John Murphy, President of the Power Workers Union stated that the Union was not ideologically opposed to competition in the electricity industry, but he questioned the Committee's assumption that competition would promote efficient supply of power at the least cost to the economy. Tony Jennings, Chief Executive of the Municipal Electric Association tackled a series of myths about municipal electric utilities, and IPPSO Counsel Jay Sheppard emphasized the need for making sure that the entity buying the power in the short term is truly independent and is not doing incestuous deals with its friends at Ontario Hydro Generation (one of the four components of the proposed, restructured Corporation) , because otherwise competition will not work

  5. New use of an old drug: Inhibition of breast cancer stem cells by benztropine mesylate

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Jihong; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Lina; Chen, Yong; Proulx, Steven T.; Reker, Daniel; Schneider, Gisbert; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play major roles in cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence and therapeutic resistance. Targeting CSCs represents a promising strategy for cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify selective inhibitors of breast CSCs (BCSCs). We carried out a cell-based phenotypic screening with cell viability as a primary endpoint, using a collection of 2,546 FDA-approved drugs and drug-like molecules in spheres formed by malignant human breast gland-derived cells...

  6. Postgraduate diploma collaborative assignment: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postgraduate diploma collaborative assignment: Implications for ESL students ... and collaborative teaching/learning model involving the major course convenors. ... The quality of the work and mood of all concerned improved tremendously.

  7. Surveillance theory and its implications for law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timan, Tjerk; Galic, Masa; Koops, Bert-Jaap; Brownsword, Roger; Scotford, Eloise; Yeung, Karen

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of key surveillance theories and their implications for law and regulation. It presents three stages of theories that characterise changes in thinking about surveillance in society and the disciplining, controlling, and entertaining functions of surveillance.

  8. Implications of Risk Management Practices on Financial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implications of Risk Management Practices on Financial Performance of Sugar ... The respondents were functional heads of the companies under the survey. ... of downside losses in order to minimize the negative impact of risk on returns.

  9. Epistemological and Treatment Implications of Nonlinear Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, A. H.

    The treatment implications of understanding mind as solely epiphenomenal to nonlinearly founded neurobiology are discussed. G. Klimovsky's epistemological understanding of psychoanalysis as a science is rejected and treatment approaches integrating W. R. Bion's and D. W. Winnicott's work are supported.

  10. Gender equality mainstreaming: Implications for poverty reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender equality mainstreaming: Implications for poverty reduction and sustainable development in Abia State of Nigeria. ... Empowerment of women when pursued beyond mere rhetoric and instrumentation, it will improve their wellbeing, self esteem, resource allocation, political voice and increased productivity generally.

  11. The pedagogical implications of information and communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pedagogical implications of information and communication technology on adult education: a case study of the osun state colleges of ... Finally, the department should give individual students access to the use of 1C1 equipment.

  12. Implications for Forest Resource Degradation and Deforestation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Socio-Economic Status and Food Consumption Pattern on Household Energy uses: Implications for Forest Resource Degradation and Deforestation around Wondo Genet Catchments, South-Central Ethiopia.

  13. Personal Narratives: Cultural Differences and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Lynn S.; McCabe, Allyssa

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the misdiagnosis of cultural difference deficits and how mistaking deficits in narrative production for cultural differences can be avoided. Findings reveal the implications for intervention.

  14. Corporal punishment contestations, paradoxes and implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporal punishment contestations, paradoxes and implications for school leadership: A case study of two South African high schools. ... South African Journal of Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current ...

  15. Climate Change Communication Research: Trends and Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Climate Change Communication Research: Trends and Implications. ... African Journal of Sustainable Development ... with a specific focus on the themes that have dominated current studies, major research methods in use, major theories that ...

  16. Business ethics: implications for managed care contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, D A

    1997-01-01

    Business ethics is a specialized study that emphasizes how moral standards apply to organizations, policies, procedures and behavior. Moral standards must be considered to understand the implications of business ethics in subacute care.

  17. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasen, M.H.; Charnsangavej, C.

    1998-01-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax ( Fig. 1 ). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations). (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  18. Neurosurgical implications of Carney complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J C; Stratakis, C A; Bryant-Greenwood, P K; Koch, C A; Kirschner, L S; Nguyen, T; Carney, J A; Oldfield, E H

    2000-03-01

    The authors present their neurosurgical experience with Carney complex. Carney complex, characterized by spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac myxomas, primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, pituitary tumors, and nerve sheath tumors (NSTs), is a recently described, rare, autosomal-dominant familial syndrome that is relatively unknown to neurosurgeons. Neurosurgery is required to treat pituitary adenomas and a rare NST, the psammomatous melanotic schwannoma (PMS), in patients with Carney complex. Cushing's syndrome, a common component of the complex, is caused by primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease and is not secondary to an adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma. The authors reviewed 14 cases of Carney complex, five from the literature and nine from their own experience. Of the 14 pituitary adenomas recognized in association with Carney complex, 12 developed growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion (producing gigantism in two patients and acromegaly in 10), and results of immunohistochemical studies in one of the other two were positive for GH. The association of PMSs with Carney complex was established in 1990. Of the reported tumors, 28% were associated with spinal nerve sheaths. The spinal tumors occurred in adults (mean age 32 years, range 18-49 years) who presented with pain and radiculopathy. These NSTs may be malignant (10%) and, as with the cardiac myxomas, are associated with significant rates of morbidity and mortality. Because of the surgical comorbidity associated with cardiac myxoma and/or Cushing's syndrome, recognition of Carney complex has important implications for perisurgical patient management and family screening. Study of the genetics of Carney complex and of the biological abnormalities associated with the tumors may provide insight into the general pathobiological abnormalities associated with the tumors may provide insight into the general pathobiological features of pituitary adenomas and NSTs.

  19. Implications of U.S. electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    This article is a concise summary of the potential impacts of electric utility deregulation, including the resolution of stranded costs, impact on electricity rates, reformation of utilities, and reshuffling of the nation's fuel portfolio. The national and state implications of the deregulation of the electricity industry are monumental and overwhelming. The implications occur on many fronts, including monetary, quality, reliability, and environmental issues. Many significant changes will occur as a result--some will be positive and others may be more disturbing

  20. Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-03-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

  1. Prime implicants in dynamic reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrväinen, Tero

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops an improved definition of a prime implicant for the needs of dynamic reliability analysis. Reliability analyses often aim to identify minimal cut sets or prime implicants, which are minimal conditions that cause an undesired top event, such as a system's failure. Dynamic reliability analysis methods take the time-dependent behaviour of a system into account. This means that the state of a component can change in the analysed time frame and prime implicants can include the failure of a component at different time points. There can also be dynamic constraints on a component's behaviour. For example, a component can be non-repairable in the given time frame. If a non-repairable component needs to be failed at a certain time point to cause the top event, we consider that the condition that it is failed at the latest possible time point is minimal, and the condition in which it fails earlier non-minimal. The traditional definition of a prime implicant does not account for this type of time-related minimality. In this paper, a new definition is introduced and illustrated using a dynamic flowgraph methodology model. - Highlights: • A new definition of a prime implicant is developed for dynamic reliability analysis. • The new definition takes time-related minimality into account. • The new definition is needed in dynamic flowgraph methodology. • Results can be represented by a smaller number of prime implicants.

  2. Implicative Algebras | Kolluru | Momona Ethiopian Journal of Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we introduce the concept of implicative algebras which is an equivalent definition of lattice implication algebra of Xu (1993) and further we prove that it is a regular Autometrized Algebra. Further we remark that the binary operation → on lattice implicative algebra can never be associative. Keywords: Implicative ...

  3. Long-term failure of alveologenesis after an early short-term exposure to a PDGF-receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Mandy; Masood, Azhar; Yi, Man; Belcastro, Rosetta; Li, Jun; Tanswell, A Keith

    2011-04-01

    Survivors of moderate-to-severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia have impaired alveologenesis lasting at least into early adult life. The mechanisms underlying this long-term effect are unknown. We hypothesized that short-term inhibition of growth factor-mediated early alveolar formation would result in a long-term impairment of subsequent alveologenesis. Neonatal rats were injected daily with the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor antagonist, imatinib mesylate, from day 1-7 of life, to inhibit the early alveolar formation occurring by in-growth of secondary crests into precursor saccules. The pups were then allowed to recover for 7, 14, 21, or 58 days. In imatinib-treated pups, DNA synthesis in total lung cells, and specifically in cells of secondary crests, was reduced at day 8 of life, had rebounded on day 14 of life but was then again reduced by day 28 of life. At day 8 of life, imatinib-treated pups had impaired alveologenesis as reflected by a decrease in secondary crests, an increase in alveolar size, and an overall decrease in both estimated alveolar number and generations compared with age-matched controls. No meaningful recovery was observed, even after a 21- or 58-day recovery period. The lungs of imatinib-treated pups had increased fibulin-5 content and an abnormal deposition of elastin. We conclude that reduced signaling through the PDGF pathways, at an early stage of alveologenesis, can result in long-lasting changes in lung architecture. A likely mechanism is through impaired formation of the elastin scaffold required for alveolarization.

  4. Uranium ore deposits: geology and processing implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyk, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    There are fifteen accepted types of uranium ore deposits and at least forty subtypes readily identified around the world. Each deposit type has a unique set of geological characteristics which may also result in unique processing implications. Primary uranium production in the past decade has predominantly come from only a few of these deposit types including: unconformity, sandstone, calcrete, intrusive, breccia complex and volcanic ones. Processing implications can vary widely between and within the different geological models. Some key characteristics of uranium deposits that may have processing implications include: ore grade, uranium and gangue mineralogy, ore hardness, porosity, uranium mineral morphology and carbon content. Processing difficulties may occur as a result of one or more of these characteristics. In order to meet future uranium demand, it is imperative that innovative processing approaches and new technological advances be developed in order that many of the marginally economic traditional and uneconomic non-traditional uranium ore deposits can be exploited. (author)

  5. Risk Implications of Energy Policy Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitzing, Lena

    papers and a working paper), based on a combination of micro-economic and policy analysis. Financial theory is used for the quantitative analysis of investment problems under uncertainty, including mean-variance portfolio theory, real option analysis, Monte Carlo simulations and time series analysis...... show, both qualitatively and quantitatively, that policy makers cannot neglect risk implications when designing RES support instruments without compromising either on effectiveness or cost-efficiency of energy policy. The central research questions are: how can risk implications of RES policy...... instruments be integrated into policy design, so that the policies provide adequate investment incentives? And can the consideration of such risk implications in policy design make overall energy policy more successful? These questions are answered in seven research papers (four journal papers, two conference...

  6. The economic implications of carbon cycle uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Edmonds, James A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the implications of uncertainty in the carbon cycle for the cost of stabilizing carbon dioxide concentrations. Using a state of the art integrated assessment model, we find that uncertainty in our understanding of the carbon cycle has significant implications for the costs of a climate stabilization policy, with cost differences denominated in trillions of dollars. Uncertainty in the carbon cycle is equivalent to a change in concentration target of up to 100 ppmv. The impact of carbon cycle uncertainties are smaller than those for climate sensitivity, and broadly comparable to the effect of uncertainty in technology availability

  7. Therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tothova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Although chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was probably first described in the early nineteenth century, there was little progress in understanding its biology until the discovery of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome in 1960. Subsequent important landmarks were the recognition that the Ph chromosome results from a t(9;22) translocation and subsequently of BCR-ABL fusion gene. Between 1980 and 2000, allo grafting, despite the risks of morbidity and mortality, was the recommended initial treatment for younger patients with HLA-matched donors. Therapy has now been „revolutionized“ by the introduction on imatinib mesylate (IM), the original Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) which was used first in the clinic in 1998. This paper will attempt to define approaches to management of the newly diagnosed patient with CML in chronic phase that are favored in 2012, but it is most probable these recommendations will need to be updated as further experience in gained with the use of TKI. (author)

  8. Mainstreaming academic literacy teaching: Implications for how ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article draws on research into the role of academic literacies within a range of disciplines and its implications for academic literacy teaching in Higher Education. The study explored ways of transforming current academic literacy teaching practices with a view to developing better synergy between the academic ...

  9. Cassava production and consumption: Health implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr A. O. Akinpelu

    HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF CASSAVA PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION. AKINPELU, A.O. ... huge potential for the export market (Egesi et al., 2007). In urban areas ... farmer's/ household income and economic growth. Stakeholders in ..... dissertation submitted to the school of graduate studies in partial fulfilment of the.

  10. First Planck results and cosmological implications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The Planck satellite has measured CMB anisotropies over the full sky with unprecedented sensitivity. The collaboration has released its first CMB temperature maps and cosmological analysis on the 21st of March. I will present a summary of these new CMB results, focusing mainly on their implications for our understanding of the Universe.

  11. Corporal Punishment: Legalities, Realities, and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchey, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a quiz that will help readers determine the reliability of their own perceptions relating to corporal punishment in schools. Discusses U.S. Courts and corporal punishment, worldwide and nationwide legality, and the realities of corporal punishment in the United States. Discusses implications for what teachers can do to address corporal…

  12. The CHARGE Association: Implications for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Dunne, Michele T.

    1988-01-01

    CHARGE association is described as a diagnostic label for a group of congenital malformations, including coloboma, heart defects, atresia choanae, retarded postnatal growth/central nervous system defects, genital hypoplasia, and ear deformities. Etiology and characteristics of the CHARGE association are discussed, along with implications for…

  13. Ambiguity and Volatility : Asset Pricing Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pataracchia, B.

    2011-01-01

    Using a simple dynamic consumption-based asset pricing model, this paper explores the implications of a representative investor with smooth ambiguity averse preferences [Klibano¤, Marinacci and Mukerji, Econometrica (2005)] and provides a comparative analysis of risk aversion and ambiguity aversion.

  14. Insecurity and national economic development implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insecurity and national economic development implications for Nigeria's vision 20: 2020. ... International Journal of Development and Management Review ... These social menace trigger off a worrisome sense of insecurity that challenge Nigeria's efforts towards national economic development and consequently its vision ...

  15. Cultural Implications of Human Resource Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranpruk, Chaiskran

    A discussion of the cultural effects of economic and, by extension, human resource development in Southeast Asia looks at short- and long-term implications. It is suggested that in the short term, increased competition will affect distribution of wealth, which can promote materialism and corruption. The introduction of labor-saving technology may…

  16. Proof complexity of intuitionistic implicational formulas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Emil

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 1 (2017), s. 150-190 ISSN 0168-0072 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : proof complexity * intuitionistic logic * implicational fragment Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.647, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168007216301154

  17. Investigating Teachers' Personal Visions and Beliefs: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigating Teachers' Personal Visions and Beliefs: Implications for Quality in Language Teacher Education. ... attitude, focus and performance. The growing influence of constructivism in teacher education and the increase in the amount of research into teacher cognition has put the notion of beliefs and vision into central ...

  18. Understanding predation: implications toward forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey R. Smith

    1991-01-01

    It is generally accepted that when gypsy moths rest in the litter survival is low due to predation by ground-foraging generalist predators and that predation can maintain these populations indefinitely. Forest Service research on predators of gypsy moth continues to focus on population dynamics, the mechanisms of predation and forest management implications.

  19. Origin of comets - implications for planetary formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, P.R.; Arizona Univ., Tucson)

    1985-01-01

    Primordial and episodic theories for the origin of comets are discussed. The implications of the former type for the origin of the solar system are considered. Candidate sites for the formation of comets are compared. The possible existence of a massive inner Oort cloud is discussed

  20. African Regional Integration: Implications for Food Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van M.

    2011-01-01

    This report looks at the African regional trade, regional integration agreements (RIAs) and the implications for food security. An overview is presented on the present state of African regional integration and the determinants of regional trade in agriculture and food commodities. In particular the

  1. Environmental conflicts: Key issues and management implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental crises and problems throughout the world are widespread and increasing rapidly. In relation to these concerns, the article discusses the following aspects: people and the environment, environmental conflicts, climate change and environmental conflicts, and management implications. The section on people ...

  2. Social Constructionism and Ethics: Implications for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Jeffrey T.; Rudes, James

    2008-01-01

    Social constructionism is set forth as an epistemological framework from which to establish an ethical base for the field of counseling. The development of the social constructionist movement in counseling is described. Implications of a social constructionist position are considered in relation to ethics. A case example is provided to illustrate…

  3. Implicational Schemata and the Attribution of Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Glenn D.; Spores, John M.

    Attribution of a disposition or trait to a person asserts information about the pattern of that person's behavior. Past research has suggested that a moral disposition implies only moral behavior, while an immoral disposition implies both moral and immoral behavior. The effect of these implicational schemata on attributions of morality was…

  4. Climate Change: Generic Implications for Agriculture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Climate Change: Generic Implications for Agriculture. Increasing carbon dioxide: Good for most crops. Increase in mean temperature: orter ... Increasing rainfall intensity and dry days- more floods and droughts: Higher production variability. Himalayan glaciers to recede: irrigation in IGP gradually becomes less dependable ...

  5. Current Trends In Educational Technology: Implication On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the current trends in educational technology and the implication on educational managers in Nigeria. The current trends in the field of educational technology are centred on the influence of information and communication technology on the development of educational management. Various challenges ...

  6. Assisted Reproductive Technologies : Implications for Women's ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Assisted Reproductive Technologies : Implications for Women's Reproductive Rights and Social Citizenship. There is a general perception that assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) affect only a small number of affluent women in India. However, the ART industry - tied as it is to the vigorously pushed medical tourism ...

  7. Ethical Implications of Digital Imaging in Photojournalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Danal; Lasorsa, Dominic L.

    Arguing that the news media are about to adopt digital imaging systems that will have far-reaching implications for the practice of journalism, this paper discusses how the news media is expected to adopt the new technology and explains why the marriage of journalism and digital imaging will create ethical issues with respect to photo manipulation…

  8. The implications of the German Risk Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.; Koeberlein, K.

    1980-01-01

    The methods and results of the German Risk Study published in 1979 are summarized and its implications for reactor safety are discussed. It has led to suggestions that risk analysis should be more widely used for nuclear and other technological systems. It has also identified the need for specific system modifications and confirmed trends in safety research. (author)

  9. Alternative Families and Children: Implications for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jannette; Eiduson, Bernice T.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1973, the UCLA Family Styles Project has studied a sample of nontraditional Caucasian families (single mothers, social contract families, communal families) plus a comparison group of conventional nuclear families. Findings are reported on parents' personal/social values and changes in childrearing practices. Implications for education are…

  10. Managerialism and higher education governance: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article identifies some of the implications of corporate forms of higher education governance for the management of South African universities. It explores corporate higher educational governance with reference to institutional autonomy incorporating academic freedom. It is the contention of this article that the primary ...

  11. Some Implications of Human-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    On structures, humans may be active which may cause structural vibrations as human activity can excite structural vibration modes. However, humans may also be passive (sitting or standing on the structure). The paper addresses this subject and explores the implications of having passive humans...

  12. Feminist Developmental Theory: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastell, Colin A.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the importance of counseling guided by a life-span development model. Emphasizes that one popular theory should be modified by taking into account a broader understanding of life-span development in terms of commonalities and differences in male and female development. Examines implications with borderline personality disorder and…

  13. Implications of Telecommuting in a Library Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meglio, Delores

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of telecommuting possibilities focuses on a program at Information Access Company that allows indexers and abstractors to work at home. Employer and employee expectations are discussed, equipment provisions are described, employee benefits are examined, and implications for the library environment are suggested. (LRW)

  14. Globalisation; Its Implications and Consequences for Developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper attempts to look at the concept of globalisations and analyse its implications and consequences for developing nations in Africa. It is premised on the general perception that globalisations is a positive and powerful force for the improved material well-being of humankind, that would aid the developing countries ...

  15. Mycobacterial Species Identification and Public Health Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycobacterial Species Identification and Public Health Implications of Tuberculosis Among Nomadic Pastoralists in Three Local Governments of Plateau State, North ... Bovine and human tuberculosis is endemic in Nigeria, and apart from meat inspection at the abattoir, which is not very effective, no control measures are ...

  16. Implications of the behavioral approach to hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starker, S

    1975-07-01

    The findings of behaviorally oriented research regarding the importance of cognitive-motivational variables in hypnosis are examined and some clinical and theoretical implications are explored. Hypnosis seems usefully conceptualized as a complex configuration or gestalt of interacting variables on several different levels, for example, cognitive, motivational, social, physiologic.

  17. Changing business environment: implications for farming

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolm, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The natural, technological, economic, political and social environment in which farmers farm constantly changes. History has lessons about change in agriculture and about farmers coping with change, though the future is unknowable and thus always surprising. The implication for farm operation is to prepare, do not predict.

  18. Tour Guiding Research Insights, Issues and Implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meged, Jane Widtfeldt

    2017-01-01

    The book Tour guiding research – insights, issues and implications by Betty Weiler and Rosemary Black is a most welcome contribution to the specific research field of guided tours within tourism studies. It sets forth to “give an authoritative state-of-art review of the scholarly literature on tour...

  19. Energy from forests: environmental and wildlife implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel, D [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY; Chick, S; Vergara, W

    1981-09-01

    This report analyzes the feasibility of utilizing forests in North America as an energy source. The analysis focuses on three major aspects: (1) the technology of converting wood biomass to energy; (2) the potential of wood as a source of energy; and (3) the environmental implications of using forest products for energy. 49 references, 6 tables.

  20. Total Quality Management: Implications for Educational Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Stuart C.

    1992-01-01

    Deming's "System of Profound Knowledge" is even more fundamental than his 14-principle system transformation guide and is based on 4 elements: systems theory, statistical variation, a theory of knowledge, and psychology. Management should revamp total system processes so that quality of product is continually improved. Implications for…

  1. The nuclear and its psychological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, D.

    2001-01-01

    From the 13. to 15. january 1977, the S.F.R.P. has organised at Paris, with the patronage of The National Institute of Health and Medical Research, the French Society of Radiology, a colloquium devoted to the nuclear and its psycho-implications sociological. It is a second edition, realised at the demand of the Antoine Beclere Center. (N.C.)

  2. Environmental conflicts: Key issues and management implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    main manifestations and implications of these conflicts are examined in the next section ... with invasive or alien species. This special ... the majority of potential pest species. ... Production of goods: food, durable materials and industrial products, ... well as a remarkably stable life support system that has allowed human.

  3. Clinical Implications Of Childhood Bilingualism | Southwood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 32 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Clinical Implications Of Childhood Bilingualism.

  4. Federal Tax Implications of Charitable Gift Annuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitell, Conrad

    1975-01-01

    Surveys the federal tax implications of "immediate" charitable gift annuities (annuity payments beginning within one year of transfer) and "deferred payment" charitable gift annuities (beginning at a specified date), both of which enable individuals to make a charitable gift, retain a form of life income, and achieve federal…

  5. Transnational Education: Current Developments and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    Ever since the transnational education trend took off since the 1980s, transnational education has come to bearing political, economic and cultural implications. Different approaches have been formulated to achieve specific policy objectives by both importing and exporting countries. Such approaches demonstrate a four dimensional composition,…

  6. Knowledge and Awareness Implication on E-Waste Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and Awareness Implication on E-Waste Management among ... and Awareness Implication on E-Waste Management among Nigerian Collegiate ... with e-waste may pose potential threat to human health and the environment.

  7. Chinese Cultural Implications for ERP Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Srivastava

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP system in a global environment can be fragmented due to the internal enterprise culture, which is representative of societal culture. In China, this is especially true due to the nationalistic culture of business. The way ERP systems are perceived, treated, and integrated within the business plays a critical role in the success or failure of the implementation. When a Western developed ERP system is implemented in a country where the culture differs greatly from that of the developer, implementation may require localization in order to be successful. In doing so, strategic benefits of ERP systems may be diminished. This research paper looks into the characteristics of Chinese localization by Western vendors and the implications to the Chinese enterprise. Keywords: ERP, Chinese Cultural Implications, Societal Culture, Strategy

  8. Teacher's experiences in PBL: implications for practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Anabela C.; Sousa, Rui M.; Fernandes, Sandra; Cardoso, Elisabete; Carvalho, Maria Alice; Figueiredo, Jorge; Pereira, Rui M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Project-Based Learning (PBL) has been implemented in the first year of the Industrial Engineering and Management programme at the University of Minho, Portugal, since 2004/2005. The purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss teachers' experiences in PBL in this programme and to explore its implications for student learning and for teaching practices in higher education. For data collection, the research method used was written narratives to these teachers, at the end of the PBL semester. Findings suggest that teachers express a positive view of PBL as a learning approach. They identify student motivation and engagement, along with a better understanding of the application of concepts in real-life situations, as important outcomes of the project for students. Besides this, teachers also highlight the importance of the development of transversal skills by students throughout the project. Recommendations for future work and implications for practice will also be discussed.

  9. Clinical implications of contemporary gender theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulish, Nancy

    2010-04-01

    The current intellectual scene in psychoanalysis is marked by vigorous theoretical controversies about gender. The ideas being debated have important implications for clinical work, which have not been thoroughly explicated or integrated into common practice. These implications include the following: gender can accrue idiosyncratic meanings; gender identity is considered fluid and rigidity of gender identity deemed problematic; gender-related conflicts are typically described as divergent; analysis of superego conflicts related to gender becomes particularly important; and, finally, gender-related biases are seen as inevitable and must be taken into account in the clinical situation. A detailed clinical example illustrates the application of these ideas. While the more dramatic cases related to gender have been more frequent subjects of study, conflicts about gender are everyday occurrences for our patients and deserve further attention.

  10. Cosmological implications of grand unified theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanopoulos, D.V.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures, mainly devoted to the cosmological implications of GUTs, also include the essential ingredients of GUTs and some of their important applications to particle physics. Section 1 contains some basic points concerning the structure of the standard strong and electroweak interactions prior to grand unification. A detailed expose of GUTs is attempted in sect. 2, including their basci principles and their consequences for particle physics. The minimal, simplest GUT, SU 5 is analysed in some detail and it will be used throughout these lectures as the GUT prototype. Finally, sect. 3 contains the most important cosmological implications of GUTs, including baryon number generation in the early Universe (in rather lengthy detail), dissipative processes in the very early Universe, grand unified monopoles, etc. (orig./HSI)

  11. Climate Change and Interacting Stressors: Implications for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final document, Climate Change and Interacting Stressors: Implications for Coral Reef Management in American Samoa. This report provides a synthesis of information on the interactive effects of climate change and other stressors on the reefs of American Samoa as well as an assessment of potential management responses. This report provides the coral reef managers of American Samoa, as well as other coral reef managers in the Pacific region, with some management options to help enhance the capacity of local coral reefs to resist the negative effects of climate change. This report was designed to take advantage of diverse research and monitoring efforts that are ongoing in American Samoa to: analyze and compile the results of multiple research projects that focus on understanding climate-related stressors and their effects on coral reef ecosystem degradation and recovery; and assess implications for coral reef managment of the combined information, including possible response options.

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-05-01

    (-)-Gossypol; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, ACAM-1000, ACE-011, Agomelatine, AGS-004, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, AMG-317, Amlodipine, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Azacitidine; Becatecarin, Belinostat, Bevacizumab, BMS-387032, BMS-690514, Bortezomib; Casopitant mesylate, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, CK-1827452, Clofarabine, Conivaptan hydrochloride; Dabigatran etexilate, DADMe-Immucillin-H, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, DC-WT1, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Denosumab, Dienogest, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Eculizumab, Edoxaban tosilate, Elacytarabine, Elesclomol, Eltrombopag olamine, Enfuvirtide, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine; Flibanserin, Fludarabine, Fondaparinux sodium, Fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, Genistein; I-131-L19-SIP, Idrabiotaparinux sodium, Imatinib mesylate, IMGN-901, Ipilimumab; Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal cisplatin, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir; Maraviroc, MDV-3100, Mecasermin rinfabate, MP-470, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxcinod, NB-002, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NK-012; Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pitavastatin calcium, PL-3994, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Plitidepsin, PM-10450; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, ReoT3D, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rivaroxaban, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rozrolimupab; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, Salinosporamide A, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Smallpox (Vaccinia) Vaccine, Live, Sorafenib; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Teriparatide, Tipifarnib, Tipranavir, Trabectedin, Trifluridine/TPI; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Vinflunine, Volociximab, Vorinostat; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, Zoledronic acid monohydrate

  13. Automotive fuels - environmental and health implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This document covers papers presented to the Institute of Petroleum's conference ''Automotive Fuels: Environmental and Health Implications'' held on the 9th October 1991. This wide ranging title meant that topics covered included the biochemistry, pathology and epidemiology of automotive fuel use, combustion science, environmental chemistry and atmospheric modelling. Also discussed are the technology of fuel and engine manufacture, limiting and containing emissions and social and political aspects relating to the use of automotive fuels. (UK)

  14. Civil implications of commercial nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, P.; Gallie, N.

    1985-01-01

    The following aspects are discussed; spent fuel transport by rail, routes and possible accidents; reactors, possible accidents and effects of radioactive releases to the environment; possible effects of sabotage and terrorist attacks; possible hazards from fuel reprocessing plants; radioactive wastes, inventories and possible effects of escape to environment; biological radiation effects; civil war effects and democratic freedoms; the miners' strike and its implications. (U.K.)

  15. Inferring Genetic Ancestry: Opportunities, Challenges, and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Royal, Charmaine D.; Novembre, John; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Goldstein, David B.; Long, Jeffrey C.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing public interest in direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic ancestry testing has been accompanied by growing concern about issues ranging from the personal and societal implications of the testing to the scientific validity of ancestry inference. The very concept of “ancestry” is subject to misunderstanding in both the general and scientific communities. What do we mean by ancestry? How exactly is ancestry measured? How far back can such ancestry be defined and by which genetic tools? How ...

  16. ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF INSUFFICIENT HEALTH LITERACY

    OpenAIRE

    Dukić, Nikolina; Arbula Blecich, Andrea; Cerović, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to elaborate the importance of health literacy in cost-effective utilization of health care services which influence the efficiency of the entire health care sector. In order to complement the theoretical framework of the economic implications and the circular influence of health literacy on the economy, an empirical analysis was carried out using S–TOFHLA. The results suggest that the patients’ personal characteristics and the accessibil...

  17. Physician-Rating Web Sites: Ethical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samora, Julie Balch; Lifchez, Scott D; Blazar, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    To understand the ethical and professional implications of physician behavior changes secondary to online physician-rating Web sites (PRWs). The American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) Ethics and Professionalism Committee surveyed the ASSH membership regarding PRWs. We sent a 14-item questionnaire to 2,664 active ASSH members who practice in both private and academic settings in the United States. We received 312 responses, a 12% response incidence. More than 65% of the respondents had a slightly or highly unfavorable impression of these Web sites. Only 34% of respondents had ever updated or created a profile for PRWs, although 62% had observed inaccuracies in their profile. Almost 90% of respondents had not made any changes in their practice owing to comments or reviews. One-third of respondents had solicited favorable reviews from patients, and 3% of respondents have paid to improve their ratings. PRWs are going to become more prevalent, and more research is needed to fully understand the implications. There are several ethical implications that PRWs pose to practicing physicians. We contend that it is morally unsound to pay for good reviews. The recourse for physicians when an inaccurate and potentially libelous review has been written is unclear. Some physicians have required patients to sign a waiver preventing them from posting negative comments online. We propose the development of a task force to assess the professional, ethical, and legal implications of PRWs, including working with companies to improve accuracy of information, oversight, and feedback opportunities. It is expected that PRWs will play an increasing role in the future; it is unclear whether there will be a uniform reporting system, or whether these online ratings will influence referral patterns and/or quality improvement. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  19. 2014 and beyond: implications for displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan O’Leary

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 2014 marks a watershed for Afghanistan, with the withdrawal of the International Security Assistance Force after twelve years, and the very real risks this withdrawal poses to the capacity of the Afghan state to meet the many internal and external challenges faced by the country. These challenges have significant implications for displaced and returning Afghans and for the potential for displacement in the future.

  20. Competitive implications of cross-border banking

    OpenAIRE

    Claessens, Stijn

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent literature on cross-border banking, with a focus on policy implications. Cross-border banking has increased sharply in recent decades, particularly in the form of entry, and has affected the development of financial systems, access to financial services, and stability. Reviewing the empirical literature, the author finds much, although not uniform, evidence that cross-border banking supports the development of an efficient and stable financial system that offers ...

  1. Market-Driven Management: the Policy Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    The first policy implication of the diffusion of a Market-Driven Management approach is the same as the spreading of globalization, i.e. the obsolescence of industrial policies as traditionally designed and managed by Nation-States with the established toolbox of protectionism and subsidies, picking 'national champions', etc. The growing asymmetry between the physical jurisdiction of political bodies and the global operation space of modern corporations feeds the apparent trend toward company...

  2. Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit B (SDHB Is Expressed in Neurofibromatosis 1-Associated Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (Gists: Implications for the SDHB Expression Based Classification of Gists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny H. Wang, Jerzy Lasota, Markku Miettinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the digestive tract. GISTs develop with relatively high incidence in patients with Neurofibromatosis-1 syndrome (NF1. Mutational activation of KIT or PDGFRA is believed to be a driving force in the pathogenesis of familial and sporadic GISTs. Unlike those tumors, NF1-associated GISTs do not have KIT or PGDFRA mutations. Similarly, no mutational activation of KIT or PDGFRA has been identified in pediatric GISTs and in GISTs associated with Carney Triad and Carney-Stratakis Syndrome. KIT and PDGFRA-wild type tumors are expected to have lesser response to imatinib treatment. Recently, Carney Triad and Carney-Stratakis Syndrome -associated GISTs and pediatric GISTs have been shown to have a loss of expression of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB, a Krebs cycle/electron transport chain interface protein. It was proposed that GISTs can be divided into SDHB- positive (type 1, and SDHB-negative (type 2 tumors because of similarities in clinical features and response to imatinib treatment. In this study, SDHB expression was examined immunohistochemically in 22 well-characterized NF1-associated GISTs. All analyzed tumors expressed SDHB. Based on SDHB-expression status, NF1-associated GISTs belong to type 1 category; however, similarly to SDHB type 2 tumors, they do not respond well to imatinib treatment. Therefore, a simple categorization of GISTs into SDHB-positive and-negative seems to be incomplete. A classification based on both SDHB expression status and KIT and PDGFRA mutation status characterize GISTs more accurately and allow subdivision of SDHB-positive tumors into different clinico-genetic categories.

  3. Investigating Variations in Gameplay: Cognitive Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Sedig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in creating computer games for learning, problem solving, and other high-level cognitive activities. When investigating whether gameplay is conducive to such activities, gameplay is often studied as a whole. As a result, cognitive implications can be linked to the game but not to its structural elements. Given that gameplay arises from interaction between the player and the game, it is the structural components of interaction that should be investigated to better understand the design of gameplay. Furthermore, minor variations in the components of interaction can have significant cognitive implications. However, such variation has not been studied yet. Thus, to gain a better understanding of how we can study the effect of interaction on the cognitive aspect of gameplay, we conducted an exploratory investigation of two computer games. These games were isomorphic at a deep level and only had one minor difference in the structure of their interaction. Volunteers played these games and discussed the cognitive processes that emerged. In one game, they primarily engaged in planning, but in the other game they primarily engaged in visualizing. This paper discusses the results of our investigation as well as its implications for the design of computer games.

  4. Energy Drinks: Implications for the Breastfeeding Mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlton, Janet; Ahmed, Azza; Colby, David A

    2016-01-01

    Breastfeeding women may experience disrupted sleep schedules and be tempted to turn to popular energy drinks to reduce fatigue and enhance alertness, prompting the question: What are the maternal and child health implications for breastfeeding mothers consuming energy drinks? Caffeine and vitamin-rich energy drinks contain a variety of herbal ingredients and vitamins; however, ingredient amounts may not be clearly disclosed on product labels. Interactions between herbal ingredients and caffeine are understudied and not well defined in the literature. Some infants can be sensitive to caffeine and display increased irritability and sleep disturbances when exposed to caffeine from breastmilk. Breastfeeding women who consume energy drinks may be ingesting herbal ingredients that have not undergone scientific evaluation, and if taking prenatal vitamins, may unknowingly exceed the recommended daily intake. Caffeinated products are marketed in newer ways, fueling concerns about health consequences of caffeine exposure. We present implications associated with consumption of caffeine and vitamin-rich energy drinks among breastfeeding women. Product safety, labeling, common ingredients, potential interactions, and clinical implications are discussed. Healthcare providers should encourage breastfeeding women to read product labels for ingredients, carbohydrate content, serving size, and to discourage consumption of energy drinks when breastfeeding and/or taking prenatal vitamins, to avoid potential vitamin toxicity.

  5. Myasthenia Gravis and Its Aeromedical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagathesan, Tania; O'Brien, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune condition where antibodies form against the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction, eventually causing damage to the motor end plate. The clinical features include muscle fatigability as well as ocular, bulbar, and limb weakness, which can have implications on the role of a pilot or air traffic controller. This retrospective study reviewed the United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority (UK CAA) experience of myasthenia gravis. A search of the United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority medical records database from 1990 to 2016 identified 11 individuals with a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. Data were extracted for the class of medical certificate, age at diagnosis, symptoms, acetylcholine receptor antibody status, treatment, the time from diagnosis to loss of medical certification, and the reasons for loss of certification. There were two Class 1 certificate holders (for professional flying) and six Class 2 certificate holders (for private pilot flying) and three air traffic controllers. The mean and median ages at diagnosis were 53 and 57 yr, respectively, with a range of 28-67 yr. The mean and median intervals from diagnosis to loss of certification were 22 and 11 mo, respectively, with a range of 0 to 108 mo. The aeromedical implications of myasthenia gravis, including complications, types of treatment, and functional impact, are considered. A policy for medical certification following a diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is proposed.Jagathesan T, O'Brien MD. Myasthenia gravis and its aeromedical implications. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(1):30-33.

  6. [Gut microbiota: Description, role and pathophysiologic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, C; Quévrain, E

    2016-06-01

    The human gut contains 10(14) bacteria and many other micro-organisms such as Archaea, viruses and fungi. Studying the gut microbiota showed how this entity participates to gut physiology and beyond this to human health, as a real "hidden organ". In this review, we aimed to bring information about gut microbiota, its structure, its roles and its implication in human pathology. After bacterial colonization in infant, intestinal microbial composition is unique for each individual although more than 95% can be assigned to four major phyla. The use of culture independent methods and more recently the development of high throughput sequencing allowed to depict precisely gut microbiota structure and diversity as well as its alteration in diseases. Gut microbiota is implicated in the maturation of the host immune system and in many fundamental metabolic pathways including sugars and proteins fermentation and metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. Imbalance of gut microbial populations or dysbiosis has important functional consequences and is implicated in many digestive diseases (inflammatory bowel diseases, colorectal cancer, etc.) but also in obesity and autism. These observations have led to a surge of studies exploring therapeutics which aims to restore gut microbiota equilibrium such as probiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation. But recent research also investigates biological activity of microbial products which could lead to interesting therapeutics leads. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Bioenergy and its implication for yoga therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chathapuram Rajan Narayanan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Electro photonic imaging (EPI is being researched relative to its application for yoga therapy. Three parameters of interest in EPI measurements are as follows: Communication energy (C, integral or normalized area (IA, and Entropy (E. It is important to note that C indicates the total energy of communication for the organ system; IA is an indication of total amount of energy that is available for the organ system while entropy is an indication of the amount of coherence of the energy. Coherence and entropy are inversely related; this means less the entropy, more the coherence and vice versa. Illustrative cases of successful therapy with yoga practices in a wide variety of abnormal conditions are examined, and in every case, entropy is shown to decrease for the affected organ system while communication energy stays within stable range. Relative to the electromagnetic (Rubik and living matrix (Oschman models, it is suggested that the regulation of energy, its coherence in the biological system and interaction with life processes provide the basis for model building and design of health-promoting procedures. Further, this approach is examined relative to yoga theory, traditional medicine systems, and scientific developments in the field of gene expression and neuroplasticity and a generalized model that we call Unified System of Medicine is proposed. This model has direct implications on methods used to control the environmental factors to get robust results from EPI application for therapeutic purposes. Implications for furthering research in yoga therapy using EPI and implications of EPI as a translational technology between traditional medicine systems and modern medicine is discussed.

  8. Reliability implications for commercial Plowshare applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumleve, T D [Plowshare Systems Research Division, Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Based on the premise that there will always be a finite chance of a Plowshare project failure, the implications of such a failure are examined. It is suggested that the optimum reliability level will not necessarily be the highest attainable, but rather that which results in minimum average project cost. The type of performance guarantee that the U. S. should provide for nuclear explosive services, the determination of nuclear yield, courses of action to take in the event of failure, and methods to offset remedial costs are discussed. (author)

  9. Stopping Power Measurements: Implications in Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmen Angulo; Thierry Delbar; Jean-Sebastien Graulich; Pierre Leleux

    1999-01-01

    The stopping powers of C, CH 2 , Al, Ni, and polyvinylchloride (PVC) for several light ions ( 9 Be, 11 B, 12 C, 14 N, 16 O, 19 F, 20 Ne) with an incident energy of 1 MeV/amu have been measured at the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility. Stopping powers are given relative to the one for 5.5 MeV 4 He ions with an uncertainty of less than 1%. We compare our results with two widely used semiempirical models and we discuss some implications in nuclear astrophysics studies

  10. Corporate Language and Implications for Organizational Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores empirically implications of language use for MNCs’ learning from subsidiaries. Drawing on sociolinguistic literature, the article argues that while employing a single corporate language facilitates quick and direct communication of explicit knowledge, such a language design...... is insufficient to leverage contextually specific and culturally embedded knowledge. This indicates the need for disentangling language and culture. The paper further argues for the need to go beyond national language to consider how prevailing kinds of corporate talk may curb headquarters potential for learning...

  11. Conflicting belief systems: some implications for education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.J. van Niekerk

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article the conceptions of knowledge and time within Christianity, secular humanism and traditional African religion are juxtaposed. In order to emphasise the vital role o f belief systems in the field of education, some educational implications are inferred from these different conceptions of knowledge and time. The need to create enough space within the South African education system so that parents will be able to send their children to schools where education is conducted according to their particular belief systems is also foregrounded.

  12. Literature and the Sarau: Political Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Pivetta de Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the phenomenon of the cultural gatherings that currently take place in the urban peripheries of Brazil’s larger cities, such as, for example, Sarau da Cooperifa, organized by Sérgio Vaz, and Sarau Suburbano, managed by Alessandro Buzo, both in São Paulo. We attempt to understand how they are organized and the cultural functions they perform in the context of a debate on literature as a cultural practice (Williams 1977; 2015 with aesthetic and political implications (Rancière 1996; 2009.

  13. Machine implications for detectors and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauchi, Toshiaki

    2001-01-01

    Future linear colliders are very different at many aspects because of low repetition rate (5∼200 Hz) and high accelerating gradient (22∼150 MeV/m). For high luminosity, the beam sizes must be squeezed in extremely small region at interaction point (IP). We briefly describe new phenomena at the IP, i.e. beamstrahlung process, creations of e + e - pairs and minijets. We also report machine implications related to the energy spread, beamstrahlung, bunch-train structure, beam polarizations and backgrounds for detectors and physics

  14. Implicational (semilinear) logics III: completeness properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Noguera, Carles

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 57, 3-4 (2018), s. 391-420 ISSN 0933-5846 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14654S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 689176 - SYSMICS Institutional support: RVO:67985807 ; RVO:67985556 Keywords : abstract algebraic logic * protoalgebraic logics * implicational logics * disjunctional logics * semilinear logics * non-classical logics * completeness theorems * rational completeness Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics; BA - General Mathematics (UTIA-B) OBOR OECD: Computer science s, information science , bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.394, year: 2016

  15. Child sexual abuse: consequences and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornor, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Sexual abuse is a problem of epidemic proportions in the United States. Given the sheer numbers of sexually abused children, it is vital for pediatric nurse practitioners to understand both short-term and long-term consequences of sexual abuse. Understanding consequences of sexual abuse can assist the pediatric nurse practitioner in anticipating the physical and mental health needs of patients and also may assist in the identification of sexual abuse victims. Sexual abuse typically does not occur in isolation. Implications for practice will be discussed. Copyright © 2010 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cosmological implications of Higgs near-criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, J R

    2018-03-06

    The Standard Model electroweak (EW) vacuum, in the absence of new physics below the Planck scale, lies very close to the boundary between stability and metastability, with the last option being the most probable. Several cosmological implications of this so-called 'near-criticality' are discussed. In the metastable vacuum case, the main challenges that the survival of the EW vacuum faces during the evolution of the Universe are analysed. In the stable vacuum case, the possibility of implementing Higgs inflation is critically examined.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Higgs cosmology'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  17. Reliability implications for commercial Plowshare applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumleve, T.D.

    1970-01-01

    Based on the premise that there will always be a finite chance of a Plowshare project failure, the implications of such a failure are examined. It is suggested that the optimum reliability level will not necessarily be the highest attainable, but rather that which results in minimum average project cost. The type of performance guarantee that the U. S. should provide for nuclear explosive services, the determination of nuclear yield, courses of action to take in the event of failure, and methods to offset remedial costs are discussed. (author)

  18. Implications of organizational ethics to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ells, Carolyn; MacDonald, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Organizational ethics is an emerging field concerned with the study and practice of the ethical behaviour of organizations. For effective application to healthcare settings, we argue that organizational ethics requires attention to organizations' special characteristics combined with tools borrowed from the fields of business ethics and bioethics. We identify and discuss several implications of this burgeoning field to healthcare organizations, showing how organizational ethics can facilitate policy making, accountability, self-evaluation, and patient and business perspectives. In our conclusion, we suggest an action plan for healthcare organizations to help them respond appropriately to their ethical responsibilities.

  19. Dust and radon: the legal implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sittert, J.M.O.

    1990-01-01

    It is known that radon gas is not generally considered to be a major problem when encountered in the working environment. However, in its process of decay, a series of four short lived daughter products are formed. In a dust-laden atmosphere these daughter products, which are ionized readily, attach to the particulate material and when inhaled are deposited in the alveoli of the lungs. Therefore, if respirable dust is controlled, the effects of radon daughters will also be minimized. The legal requirements for dust control in South Africa and their implications are discussed. 1 ill

  20. TECHNICAL AND PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS OF SHORT SELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BORES

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at providing insight into some of the implication of short selling for markets, investors as well as regulators. Findings show that capital flows are adversely affected by strict regulation and bans of short sales, while market liquidity, and bid-ask spread can be improved by allowing short selling. Additionally portfolios that incorporate short selling strategies can have lower volatility in returns. The informational content of short sales can provide important feedback for informed investors and lead to better price discovery.

  1. Global Climate Change: National Security Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    it cost to treat asthma in children and other health problems caused by the dirt we were putting out of the smokestacks. It was passed by the...in Latin America for a number of years. General Clark used to say, “In SOUTHCOM, take no credit and expect none.” And I think that was a good rule...damage the health of our children .35 People also need to better understand the implications of globalization. Not all currently appreciate how our

  2. Implicational (semilinear) logics III: completeness properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Noguera, Carles

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 57, 3-4 (2018), s. 391-420 ISSN 0933-5846 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14654S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 689176 - SYSMICS Institutional support: RVO:67985807 ; RVO:67985556 Keywords : abstract algebraic logic * protoalgebraic logics * implicational logics * disjunctional logics * semilinear logics * non-classical logics * completeness theorems * rational completeness Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics; BA - General Mathematics (UTIA-B) OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.394, year: 2016

  3. Imaging in early phase childhood cancer trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Advances made in the treatment of childhood malignancies during the last four decades have resulted in overall cure rates of approximately 80%, but progress has slowed significantly during the last 10 years, underscoring the need for more effective and less toxic agents. Current research is focused on development of molecularly targeted agents, an era ushered in with the discovery of imatinib mesylate for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Since imatinib's introduction into the clinic, an increasing number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed and entered into clinical trials and practice. Parallel to the initial advances made in molecularly targeted agents has been the development of a spectrum of novel imaging modalities. Future goals for imaging in childhood cancer research thus include (1) patient identification based on target identification or other biologic characteristics of the tumor, (2) assessing pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) effects, and (3) predictive value with an early indication of patient benefit. Development and application of novel imaging modalities for children with cancer can serve to streamline development of molecularly targeted agents. (orig.)

  4. Radiotherapy in the treament of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C. Heintzelman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are uncommon mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Up to one-third of GISTs are malignant with a high rate of metastasis. Surgical resection is the mainstay of care for patients with resectable disease. Imatinib mesylate, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the current standard of care for GISTs that cannot be completely resected or in cases of metastatic GIST. Although often overlooked, radiation therapy is a viable option for select patients with GIST. We report the case of a patient with unresectable GIST who was treated with local radiotherapy and achieved longterm response. We also present a review of the literature regarding the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of GIST. GIST has been shown to be a radiosensitive tumor. Radiotherapy can offer long-term local control and should be considered in the adjuvant or palliative setting. The role of radiotherapy delivered concurrently with imatinib in the treatment of GIST may warrant further investigation.

  5. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors with Unusual Localization: Report of Three Cases with a Brief Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Sunar, Haldun; Hut, Adnan; Kocakusak, Ahmet; Pergel, Ahmet; Barut, Gul; Dikici, Suleyman

    2010-07-26

    The most common tumors derived from the mesenchyme of the gastrointestinal system are stromal tumors. These tumors are typically seen in the stomach and small intestine and less frequently in the colon, rectum and esophagus and are very rarely located outside the gastrointestinal system. Cure is provided with complete surgical resection with resection borders free of tumor. Tumor size, mitotic index, localization, CD117 and CD34 negativity in immunohistochemical studies, mucosal ulceration and presence of necrosis help to predict recurrence of the illness and patient survival. In high-risk gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) there is an increased rate of recurrence and shortened survival despite complete surgical resection. Thus patients with a high-risk GIST should be given adjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate. Sunitinib maleate is another FDA-approved agent only for cases who cannot tolerate imatinib or who are resistant to it. Herein we present three cases with GISTs in different locations of the gastrointestinal system with a review of the relevant literature.

  6. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors with Unusual Localization: Report of Three Cases with a Brief Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Fikret Yucel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The most common tumors derived from the mesenchyme of the gastrointestinal system are stromal tumors. These tumors are typically seen in the stomach and small intestine and less frequently in the colon, rectum and esophagus and are very rarely located outside the gastrointestinal system. Cure is provided with complete surgical resection with resection borders free of tumor. Tumor size, mitotic index, localization, CD117 and CD34 negativity in immunohistochemical studies, mucosal ulceration and presence of necrosis help to predict recurrence of the illness and patient survival. In high-risk gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs there is an increased rate of recurrence and shortened survival despite complete surgical resection. Thus patients with a high-risk GIST should be given adjuvant therapy with imatinib mesylate. Sunitinib maleate is another FDA-approved agent only for cases who cannot tolerate imatinib or who are resistant to it. Herein we present three cases with GISTs in different locations of the gastrointestinal system with a review of the relevant literature.

  7. Gradient dissimilation in Mongolian: Implications for diachrony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jatteau, Adèle; Hejná, Michaela

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of ‘gradient dissimilation’ (Jatteau & Hejná 2016) for the diachronic implementation of dissimilation. Since this sound change is usually considered as typically sporadic, lexically regular cases should result from lexical diffusion. In contrast with this ass......This paper explores the implications of ‘gradient dissimilation’ (Jatteau & Hejná 2016) for the diachronic implementation of dissimilation. Since this sound change is usually considered as typically sporadic, lexically regular cases should result from lexical diffusion. In contrast...... with this assumption, we explore the hypothesis that gradient dissimilation may represent the phonetic precursor of completed, regular dissimilatory processes. Such cases of dissimilation might then be reanalysed as Neogrammarian types of change. To assess this question, we gather and analyse new data from Halh...... Mongolian, a language reported to show gradient dissimilation (Svantesson et al. 2005), and compare it to two completed patterns of dissimilation reconstructed within the Mongolic family: Mongolian Chahar and Monguor. The results suggest that the gradient dissimilation in Halh may represent the phonetic...

  8. Forensic implications: adolescent sexting and cyberbullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenis, Panagiota; Billick, Stephen Bates

    2014-03-01

    Adolescence is marked by establishing a sense of identity, core values, a sense of one's relationship to the outside world and heightened peer relationships. In addition, there is also risk taking, impulsivity, self exploration and dramatic increase in sexuality. The dramatic increase in the use of cell phones and the Internet has additional social implications of sexting and cyberbullying. Sexting refers to the practice of sending sexually explicit material including language or images to another person's cell phone. Cyberbullying refers to the use of this technology to socially exclude, threaten, insult or shame another person. Studies of cell phone use in the 21st century report well over 50% of adolescents use them and that text messaging is the communication mode of choice. Studies also show a significant percentage of adolescents send and receive sex messaging, both text and images. This paper will review this expanding literature. Various motivations for sexting will also be reviewed. This new technology presents many dangers for adolescents. The legal implications are extensive and psychiatrists may play an important role in evaluation of some of these adolescents in the legal context. This paper will also make suggestions on future remedies and preventative actions.

  9. Global implications of China's healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Tang, Shenglan; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing healthcare reform in China has a powerful spillover effect beyond the health sector and the borders of China. A successful completion of the Chinese reform will offer a new model for social justice development, shift the global economy toward sustainability and create a new hub for science and technology in medical and health science. However, reforming the healthcare system in the most populated country is a daunting task. China will not live up to its promise, and all the potentials may end with hype not hope if coherent national strategies are not constructed and state-of-the-art navigation is not achieved with staggering domestic and global challenges. The cost of failure will be immensely high, socioeconomic costs for Chinese and an opportunity cost for the world as a whole. A full appreciation of the global implications of China's healthcare reform is crucial in keeping China receptive toward good practices evidence-approved elsewhere and open minded to fulfill its international obligations. More critically, the appreciation yields constructive engagements from global community toward a joint development and global prosperity. The current report provides a multiple disciplinary assessment on the global implications of the healthcare reform in China. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Generic implications of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sege, G.

    1989-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff's assessment of the generic implications of the Chernobyl accident led to the conclusion that no immediate changes in the NRC's regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors are needed. However, further consideration of certain issues was recommended. This paper discusses those issues and the studies being addressed to them. Although 24 tasks relating to light water reactor issues are identified in the Chernobyl follow-up research program, only four are new initiatives originating from Chernobyl implications. The remainder are limited modifications of ongoing programs designed to ensure that those programs duly reflect any lessons that may be drawn from the Chernobyl experience. The four new study tasks discussed include a study of reactivity transients, to reconfirm or bring into question the adequacy of potential reactivity accident sequences hitherto selected as a basis for design approvals; analysis of risk at low power and shutdown; a study of procedure violations; and a review of current NRC testing requirements for balance of benefits and risks. Also discussed, briefly, are adjustments to ongoing studies in the areas of operational controls, design, containment, emergency planning, and severe accident phenomena

  11. Transformation of University Organizations:Leadership and Managerial Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemil ULUKAN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of University Organizations:Leadership and Managerial Implications Cemil ULUKAN, Ph.D Anadolu UniversityOpen Education Faculty Eskisehir-TURKEYABSTRACT Technology and globalization are forcing higher education institutions to transform themselves. This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding the leadership and managerial implications of recent developments for higher education. Reviewing unique characteristics and the fundamental changes shaping higher education, the paper examines the need for organizational transformation and the major managerial implications.

  12. Public health implications of emerging zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, F X; Stöhr, K; Heymann, D

    2000-04-01

    Many new, emerging and re-emerging diseases of humans are caused by pathogens which originate from animals or products of animal origin. A wide variety of animal species, both domestic and wild, act as reservoirs for these pathogens, which may be viruses, bacteria or parasites. Given the extensive distribution of the animal species affected, the effective surveillance, prevention and control of zoonotic diseases pose a significant challenge. The authors describe the direct and indirect implications for public health of emerging zoonoses. Direct implications are defined as the consequences for human health in terms of morbidity and mortality. Indirect implications are defined as the effect of the influence of emerging zoonotic disease on two groups of people, namely: health professionals and the general public. Professional assessment of the importance of these diseases influences public health practices and structures, the identification of themes for research and allocation of resources at both national and international levels. The perception of the general public regarding the risks involved considerably influences policy-making in the health field. Extensive outbreaks of zoonotic disease are not uncommon, especially as the disease is often not recognised as zoonotic at the outset and may spread undetected for some time. However, in many instances, the direct impact on health of these new, emerging or re-emerging zoonoses has been small compared to that of other infectious diseases affecting humans. To illustrate the tremendous indirect impact of emerging zoonotic diseases on public health policy and structures and on public perception of health risks, the authors provide a number of examples, including that of the Ebola virus, avian influenza, monkeypox and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Recent epidemics of these diseases have served as a reminder of the existence of infectious diseases and of the capacity of these diseases to occur unexpectedly in new

  13. Epigenetics: relevance and implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozek, Laura S; Dolinoy, Dana C; Sartor, Maureen A; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of the multilayer regulation of the human genome has led to a greater appreciation of environmental, nutritional, and epigenetic risk factors for human disease. Chromatin remodeling, histone tail modifications, and DNA methylation are dynamic epigenetic changes responsive to external stimuli. Careful interpretation can provide insights for actionable public health through collaboration between population and basic scientists and through integration of multiple data sources. We review key findings in environmental epigenetics both in human population studies and in animal models, and discuss the implications of these results for risk assessment and public health protection. To ultimately succeed in identifying epigenetic mechanisms leading to complex phenotypes and disease, researchers must integrate the various animal models, human clinical approaches, and human population approaches while paying attention to life-stage sensitivity, to generate effective prescriptions for human health evaluation and disease prevention.

  14. Income inequality: Implications and relevant economic policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arestis Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this contribution is to discuss closely the implications of income inequality and the economic policies to tackle it, especially so in view of inequality being one of the main causes of the 2007/2008 international financial crisis and the “great recession” that subsequently emerged. Wealth inequality is also important in this respect, but the focus is on income inequality. Ever since the financial crisis and the subsequent “great recession”, inequality of income, and wealth, has increased and the demand for economic policy initiatives to produce a more equal distribution of income and wealth has become more urgent. Such reduction would help to increase the level of economic activity as has been demonstrated again more recently. A number of economic policy initiatives for this purpose will be the focus of this contribution.

  15. Implications of global warming on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Syam, P.V.S.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the build up of green house gases in atmosphere, less heat escapes through the atmosphere promoting global warming. This may result in world wide droughts, sea-level rise inundating islands and coastal countries, cataclysmic hurricanes etc. Human health as a result of these changes, will be affected both physiologically and psychologically. Physiological effects may be more pronounced in cases occurring due to changes in rainfall and temperature patterns, food production amounts, water availability, etc. Psychological impact may be more in cases of catastrophes like floods, hurricanes or famine. In this paper, an attempt has been made to highlight the implications of global warming on human health due to temperature change. Food production changes and ultra-violet radiation effects and cataclysmic disaster effects. (author)

  16. Gestalt theory: implications for radiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Nicholas A; Gunderman, Richard B

    2008-05-01

    The Gestalt theory of modern psychology is grounded in the ideas that holistic rather than atomistic approaches are necessary to understand the mind, and that the mental whole is greater than the sum of its component parts. Although the Gestalt school fell out of favor due to its descriptive rather than explanatory nature, it permanently changed our understanding of perception. For the radiologist, such fundamental Gestalt concepts as figure-ground relationships and a variety of "grouping principles" (the laws of closure, proximity, similarity, common region, continuity, and symmetry) are ubiquitous in daily work, not to mention in art and personal life. By considering the applications of these principles and the stereotypical ways in which humans perceive visual stimuli, a radiology learner may incur fewer errors of diagnosis. This article serves to introduce several important principles of Gestalt theory, identify examples of these principles in widely recognizable fine art, and highlight their implications for radiology education.

  17. Environmental implications of China's WTO accession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vennemo, Haakon; Aunan, Kristin; He, Jianwu; Hu, Tao; Li, Shantong; Rypdal, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    China's accession to the WTO in 2001 completed the country's entry into the global economy. We investigate environmental implications of WTO-accession. There are several hypotheses in this area: The scale hypothesis says that production is scaled up and in turn, pollution increases. The composition hypothesis says that composition of industries changes and pollution reflects the new composition. The technique hypothesis says that production methods become cleaner and pollution decreases. We analyze the relative strength of the hypotheses by means of an environmental CGE-model, and in the case of air pollution find support for a composition effect in favor of clean industries. Thanks to the composition effect, emissions to air of greenhouse gases fall. Emissions of particles and SO2 also fall, but emissions of NOx and VOC rise. Since particle and SO2-emissions fall we estimate that public health improves (author)

  18. Policy Implications of Air Quality Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinbaum, C.

    2004-12-01

    While an integrated assessment approach will be required to achieve and sustain improvements in the air quality of Mexico City Metropolitan Area's (MCMA), policy strategies must be based on a solid understanding of the pollutant emissions and atmospheric processes that lead to unacceptable levels of air pollution. The required level of understanding can only be achieved by comprehensive atmospheric measurements followed by a coordinated atmospheric modeling program. The innovative, two-phase atmospheric measurement program, which was a collaborative effort between Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Mexican Metropolitan Environmental Commission, with exploratory measurements in February 2002 and extensive measurements from late March through early May of 2003, was an important step towards meeting these requirements. Although the extensive data sets from the two measurement programs are still being analyzed by the investigators, their preliminary analysis efforts have yielded important insights into the nature and extent of air pollution problem in the MCMA, which in turn will have important policy implications.

  19. Tumor dedifferentiation: diagnostic and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu Jha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Some of the neoplasm especially malignant tumors are notorious in masquerading their cell of origin because of additional mutations which drives them to differentiate into unusual phenotype. This is implicated to a phenomenon of tumor dedifferentiation which can mislead into inappropriate categorization and therapy. Dedifferentiation is well recognized in sarcomas such as liposarcoma, chondrosarcoma and MPNST. However, it can also develop in carcinomas, melanomas and lymphomas at initial diagnosis, following therapy or at recurrence.  The phenomenon has been reported in both primary tumors as well as at metastatic foci. A correct and early pathological identification of this phenomenon might profoundly help in guiding appropriate therapy. Clinical and radiological findings, immunohistochemistry and genetic analysis are often required for correct lineage identification of these tumors.

  20. Hyperspectral forest monitoring and imaging implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, David G.; Bannon, David

    2014-05-01

    The forest biome is vital to the health of the earth. Canada and the United States have a combined forest area of 4.68 Mkm2. The monitoring of these forest resources has become increasingly complex. Hyperspectral remote sensing can provide a wealth of improved information products to land managers to make more informed decisions. Research in this area has demonstrated that hyperspectral remote sensing can be used to create more accurate products for forest inventory (major forest species), forest health, foliar biochemistry, biomass, and aboveground carbon. Operationally there is a requirement for a mix of airborne and satellite approaches. This paper surveys some methods and results in hyperspectral sensing of forests and discusses the implications for space initiatives with hyperspectral sensing

  1. IPAD products and implications for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The betterment of productivity through the improvement of product quality and the reduction of cost is addressed. Productivity improvement is sought through (1) reduction of required resources, (2) improved ask results through the management of such saved resources, (3) reduced downstream costs through manufacturing-oriented engineering, and (4) lowered risks in the making of product design decisions. The IPAD products are both hardware architecture and software distributed over a number of heterogeneous computers in this architecture. These IPAD products are described in terms of capability and engineering usefulness. The future implications of state-of-the-art IPAD hardware and software architectures are discussed in terms of their impact on the functions and on structures of organizations concerned with creating products.

  2. [Mental Imagery: Neurophysiology and Implications in Psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Nathalie Tamayo

    2014-03-01

    To provide an explanation about what mental imagery is and some implications in psychiatry. This article is a narrative literature review. There are many terms in which imagery representations are described in different fields of research. They are defined as perceptions in the absence of an external stimulus, and can be created in any sensory modality. Their neurophysiological substrate is almost the same as the one activated during sensory perception. There is no unified theory about its function, but it is possibly the way that our brain uses and manipulates the information to respond to the environment. Mental imagery is an everyday phenomenon, and when it occurs in specific patterns it can be a sign of mental disorders. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Cognitive implications of facilitating echoic persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Carryl L

    2007-06-01

    Seventeen participants performed a tone-pattern-matching task at different presentation levels while concurrently engaged in a simulated-driving task. Presentation levels of 60, 65, and 70 dBC (SPL) were combined factorially with tone-matching delays of 2, 3, and 4 sec. Intensity had no effect on performance in single-task conditions and short-delay conditions. However, when the participants were engaged concurrently in the driving task, a significant interaction between presentation level and delay was observed. In the longest delay condition, the participants performed the tone-pattern-matching task more efficiently (more quickly and without additional errors) as presentation intensity increased. These findings demonstrate the interaction between sensory and cognitive processes and point to a direct-intensity relationship where intensity affects the persistence of echoic memory. Implications for facilitating auditory processing and improving auditory interfaces in complex systems (i.e., transportation environments), particularly for older and hearing-impaired listeners, are discussed.

  4. Regulated necrosis and its implications in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-07-03

    Recent research developments have revealed that caspase-dependent apoptosis is not the sole form of regulated cell death. Caspase-independent, but genetically regulated, forms of cell death include pyroptosis, necroptosis, parthanatos, and the recently discovered ferroptosis and autosis. Importantly, regulated necrosis can be modulated by small molecule inhibitors/activators, confirming the cell autonomous mechanism of these forms of cell death. The success of small molecule-mediated manipulation of regulated necrosis has produced great changes in the field of cell death research, and has also brought about significant changes in the fields of pharmacology as well as toxicology. In this review, we intend to summarize the modes of regulated cell death other than apoptosis, and discuss their implications in toxicology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Implications of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitcher, P.

    1998-11-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), launched in 1991, aims to map and sequence the human genome by 2006. During the fifteen-year life of the project, it is projected that $3 billion in federal funds will be allocated to it. The ultimate aims of spending this money are to analyze the structure of human DNA, to identify all human genes, to recognize the functions of those genes, and to prepare for the biology and medicine of the twenty-first century. The following summary examines some of the implications of the program, concentrating on its scientific import and on the ethical and social problems that it raises. Its aim is to expose principles that might be used in applying the information which the HGP will generate. There is no attempt here to translate the principles into detailed proposals for legislation. Arguments and discussion can be found in the full report, but, like this summary, that report does not contain any legislative proposals.

  6. Projections of energy requirements and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogroian, P.

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled as shown. Numerical data are indicated in parenthesis. The record of nuclear power forecasting (estimates of the growth of world nuclear power, penetration of the electric power market by nuclear power); brief review of energy forecasting techniques and problems; some views of future world energy demand (estimates of world primary energy requirements); possible allocations of energy resources to needs (allocation of resources (oil, oil from tar sands, shale, natural gas, coal, coal to gasification, hydroelectricity, renewable resources, nuclear) to the world's primary energy needs in the year 2000); observations on the adequacy of energy resources; implications for nuclear energy (postulated growth of world nuclear power, annual fuel cycle requirements of the world, annual uranium requirements of the world). (U.K.)

  7. Glutamate in schizophrenia: clinical and research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, D C; Wine, L

    1997-10-30

    The excitatory amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, are of interest to schizophrenia research because of their roles in neurodevelopment, neurotoxicity and neurotransmission. Recent evidence suggests that densities of glutamatergic receptors and the ratios of subunits composing these receptors may be altered in schizophrenia, although it is unclear whether these changes are primary or compensatory. Agents acting at the phencyclidine binding site of the NMDA receptor produce symptoms of schizophrenia in normal subjects, and precipitate relapse in patients with schizophrenia. The improvement of negative symptoms with agents acting at the glycine modulatory site of the NMDA receptor, as well as preliminary evidence that clozapine may differ from conventional neuroleptic agents in its effects on glutamatergic systems, suggest that clinical implications may follow from this model. While geriatric patients may be at increased risk for glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity, very little is known about the specific relevance of this model to geriatric patients with schizophrenia.

  8. Life Sciences Implications of Lunar Surface Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Abercromby, Andrew F.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document preliminary, predicted, life sciences implications of expected operational concepts for lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). Algorithms developed through simulation and testing in lunar analog environments were used to predict crew metabolic rates and ground reaction forces experienced during lunar EVA. Subsequently, the total metabolic energy consumption, the daily bone load stimulus, total oxygen needed, and other variables were calculated and provided to Human Research Program and Exploration Systems Mission Directorate stakeholders. To provide context to the modeling, the report includes an overview of some scenarios that have been considered. Concise descriptions of the analog testing and development of the algorithms are also provided. This document may be updated to remain current with evolving lunar or other planetary surface operations, assumptions and concepts, and to provide additional data and analyses collected during the ongoing analog research program.

  9. The antecedents and implications of interracial anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, E Ashby; Devine, Patricia G

    2003-06-01

    Drawing on previous theorizing from both the prejudice and social anxiety literatures, a model of the antecedents and implications of intergroup anxiety is offered. It is argued that a lack of positive previous experiences with outgroup members creates negative expectancies about interracial interactions, which result in intergroup anxiety. This anxiety is posited to result in heightened hostility toward outgroup members and a desire to avoid interacting with outgroup members. Study 1 examined White participants' responses to interacting with Black people using a range of self-report measures; the associations between these responses supported the relationships outlined in the model. Study 2 explored White participants' responses to an anticipated interaction with a Black person or a White person. The findings revealed that high levels of anxiety about an interaction with a Black person, but not a White person, were associated with a lower likelihood of returning for the interaction.

  10. Waste management implications of concentrating slimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-02-01

    The anticipated increase in demand for sand-size tailings from the uranium industry suggests that the fine-grained or 'slime' fraction will require special attention for disposal. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) required information on the behaviour and environmental significance of the fine-grained tailings fraction in disposal facilities. Beak Consultants and Golder Associates were contracted to review the significant characteristics of slimes disposal and prepare a report on the physical and chemical characteristics of fine-grained tailings (Phase 1). This report (Phase 2) presents a summary of disposal and management practices for slimes and outlines potential concerns related to these practices. The report also presents an approach to disposal planning and the implications of available and potential management techniques. Experience with the disposal of uranium slimes is scarce and, therefore, relevant information was borrowed from the other mining sectors to predict the consequences of various disposal scenarios

  11. Nursing implications for Hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellender, R.

    1999-01-01

    Nurses working in Nuclear Medicine assist in Hepatic Artery Catheter (HAC) perfusion studies. This scan is not widely performed in Australia, the St George hospital for example performs approximately five per year. The purpose of this article is firstly to review the indications and rationale of HAC patency studies. Secondly, this article will stress the clinical implications for the Nuclear Medicine Nurse during this study. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of patient education during the procedure. A brief overview of hepatic anatomy and the radiopharmaceuticals administered during the scan is discussed. Finally, a step by step protocol is presented to show how the perfusion/ shunt study is performed. Copyright (1999) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  12. Destination image: Origins, Developments and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Dominique Ferreira Lopes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, tourism has become one of the main sectors of the global economy, not only because of its contribution to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP of different countries, but also because of the employment it generates. Since 2009, however, the results of tourism have been severely affected by the economic and financial crisis and it is now essential to analyze the key elements of tourist consumer behavior. In this context, the image that a destination transmits to the market becomes one of the elements which influence tourists the most when choosing a tourist destination. The authors therefore aim to identify the main elements that characterize the image of a tourist destination, as well as their implications for the management of tourist destinations.

  13. Prescription drug abuse: problem, policies, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Janice

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview on prescription drug abuse and highlights a number of related legislative bills introduced during the 112th Congress in response to this growing epidemic. Prescription drug abuse has emerged as the nation's fastest growing drug problem. Although prescription drugs have been used effectively and appropriately for decades, deaths from prescription pain medicine in particular have reached epidemic proportions. Bills related to prescription drug abuse introduced during the 112th Congress focus on strengthening provider and consumer education, tracking and monitoring prescription drug abuse, improving data collection on drug overdose fatalities, combating fraud and abuse in Medicare and Medicaid programs, reclassifying drugs to make them more difficult to prescribe and obtain, and enforcing stricter penalties for individuals who operate scam pain clinics and sell pain pills illegitimately. This article underscores the importance of a multifaceted approach to combating prescription drug abuse and concludes with implications for nursing. Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  14. Exploring Forensic Implications of the Fusion Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Gupta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the forensic implications of Apple's Fusion Drive. The Fusion Drive is an example of auto-tiered storage. It uses a combination of a flash drive and a magnetic drive. Data is moved between the drives automatically to maximize system performance. This is different from traditional caches because data is moved and not simply copied. The research included understanding the drive structure, populating the drive, and then accessing data in a controlled setting to observe data migration strategies. It was observed that all the data is first written to the flash drive with 4 GB of free space always maintained. If data on the magnetic drive is frequently accessed, it is promoted to the flash drive while demoting other information. Data is moved at a block-level and not a file-level. The Fusion Drive didn't alter the timestamps of files with data migration.

  15. Rumen bypass nutrients: Manipulation and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng, R.A.; Nolan, J.V.; Preston, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    The feeds available for ruminants in developing countries are either agro-industrial by-products or specially grown forage crops. Many of these feeds are low in protein and require supplementation with non-protein N (NPN) to maintain efficient rumen function and digestibility. The principles for utilizing high energy, low protein feeds by ruminants are discussed in relation to the supply of NPN, the establishment of efficient rumen function, maximizing feed intake by means of supplements, and increasing total energy and protein intake by using supplements which bypass the rumen. To illustrate it the application of these principles to feeding systems based on molasses, chopped whole sugar cane and derinded sugar cane is discussed. The implications of the principles in increasing the feeding value of straw are also discussed. (author)

  16. Low energy implications of minimal superstring unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, S.; Vissani, F.; Masiero, A.

    1995-11-01

    We study the phenomenological implications of effective supergravities based on string vacua with spontaneously broken N =1 supersymmetry by dilation and moduli F-terms. We further require Minimal String Unification, namely that large string threshold corrections ensure the correct unification of the gauge couplings at the grand unification scale. The whole supersymmetric mass spectrum turns out to be determined in terms of only two independent parameters, the dilaton-moduli mixing angle and the gravitino mass. In particular we discuss the region of the parameter space where at least one superpartner is ''visible'' at LEPII. We find that the most likely candidates are the scalar partner of the right-handed electron and the lightest chargino, with interesting correlations between their masses and with the mass of the lightest higgs. We show how discovering SUSY particles at LEPII might rather sharply discriminate between scenarios with pure dilaton SUSY breaking and mixed dilaton-moduli breaking. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs

  17. Pharmacologic Implications of Marijuana Use During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    Marijuana is the most commonly used recreational drug in the United States, including among women of childbearing age and women who are pregnant. Changing legal statutes that allow for the use of medical marijuana and the decriminalization of marijuana for personal use reflect more permissive societal views on the use of this drug. Active compounds in marijuana cross the placenta rapidly and are excreted in breast milk. Results of studies of the effects of marijuana on a developing fetus and neonate are conflicting, but researchers have identified chronic marijuana exposure as a risk factor for preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age infants. This article reviews the pharmacology of marijuana and discusses implications for nurses who work with women of childbearing age. © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  18. Implications of inherent safe nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yo-Taik

    1987-01-01

    The safety of present day nuclear power reactors and research reactors depends on a combination of design features of passive and active systems, and the alert judgement of their operators. A few inherently safe designs of nuclear reactors for power plants are currently under development. In these designs, the passive systems are emphasized, and the active systems are minimized. Also efforts are made to eliminate the potential for human failures that initiate the series of accidents. If a major system fails in these designs, the core is flooded automatically with coolants that flow by gravity, not by mechanical pumps or electromagnetic actuators. Depending on the choice of the coolants--water, liquid metal and helium gas--there are three principal types of inherently safe reactors. In this paper, these inherently safe reactor designs are reviewed and their implications are discussed. Further, future perspectives of their acceptance by nuclear industries are discussed. (author)

  19. Implications of LHCb measurements and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Anelli, M; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Band, H; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Beigbeder-Beau, C; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernard, F; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; van Beveren, V; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bochin, B; Boer Rookhuizen, H; Bogdanova, G; Bonaccorsi, E; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Brarda, L; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cacérès, T; Cachemiche, J -P; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casajus Ramo, A; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Ceelie, L; Chadaj, B; Chanal, H; Charles, M; Charlet, D; Charpentier, Ph; Chebbi, M; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciambrone, P; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corajod, B; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; D'Antone, I; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, Michel; De Groen, P; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Decreuse, G; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Domke, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Drancourt, C; Duarte, O; Dumps, R; Dupertuis, F; Duval, P -Y; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Evangelisti, F; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Faulkner, P J W; Fave, V; Felici, G; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Föhr, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Fournier, C; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frei, R; Frosini, M; Fuchs, H; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Gets, S; Ghez, Ph; Giachero, A; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golovtsov, V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gong, G; Gong, H; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gromov, V; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Guzik, Z; Gys, T; Hachon, F; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; van der Heijden, B; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hofmann, W; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jamet, O; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jansen, L; Jansweijer, P; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karavichev, O; Karbach, T M; Kashchuk, A; Kechadi, T; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kihm, T; Kluit, R; Kochebina, O; Komarov, V; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kos, J; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Kristic, R; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudenko, Y; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Landi, L; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Laptev, S; Latham, T; Lax, I; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Likhoded, A; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maino, M; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mauricio, J; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meissner, M; Mejia, H; Mendez-Munoz, V; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Mul, F; Müller, K; Munneke, B; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nawrot, A; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nikolaiko, Y; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Ostankov, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; van Overbeek, M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; van Petten, O; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Piedigrossi, D; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, M; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Rethore, F; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roeland, E; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; de Roo, K; Rouvinet, J; Roy, L; Rudloff, K; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Saornil Gamarra, S; Sapunov, M; Saputi, A; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savidge, T; Savrie, M; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schimmel, A; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schneider, T; Schopper, A; Schuijlenburg, H; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shao, B; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Sigurdsson, S; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Slater, M W; Sluijk, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Squerzanti, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; Tikhonov, A; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tocut, V; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ullaland, O; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vink, W; Volkov, S; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Vouters, G; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Warda, K; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Wenerke, P; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xue, T; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zappon, F; Zavertyaev, M; Zeng, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A; Zwart, A; Bharucha, A; Bigi, I.I.; Bobeth, C; Bobrowski, M; Brod, Joachim; Buras, A J; Davies, C T H; Datta, A.; Delaunay, C; Descotes-Genon, S; Ellis, J; Feldmann, T; Fleischer, R; Gedalia, O; Girrbach, J; Guadagnoli, D; Hiller, G; Hochberg, Y; Hurth, T; Isidori, G; Jager, S; Jung, M; Kagan, A; Kamenik, J F; Lenz, A; Ligeti, Z; London, D; Mahmoudi, F; Matias, J; Nandi, S; Nir, Y; Paradisi, P; Perez, G; Petrov, A A; Rattazzi, R; Sharpe, S R; Silvestrini, L; Soni, A; Straub, D M; van Dyk, D; Virto, J; Wang, Y M; Weiler, A; Zupan, J

    2013-01-01

    During 2011 the LHCb experiment at CERN collected $1.0 {\\mbox{fb}^{-1}}$ of $\\sqrt{s} = 7 {\\mathrm{\\,Te\\kern -0.1em V}}$ $pp$ collisions. Due to the large heavy quark production cross-sections, these data provide unprecedented samples of heavy flavoured hadrons. The first results from LHCb have made a significant impact on the flavour physics landscape and have definitively proved the concept of a dedicated experiment in the forward region at a hadron collider. This document discusses the implications of these first measurements on classes of extensions to the Standard Model, bearing in mind the interplay with the results of searches for on-shell production of new particles at ATLAS and CMS. The physics potential of an upgrade to the LHCb detector, which would allow an order of magnitude more data to be collected, is emphasised.

  20. Promoting biofuels: Implications for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Joerg; Thielmann, Sascha

    2008-01-01

    Interest in biofuels is growing worldwide as concerns about the security of energy supply and climate change are moving into the focus of policy makers. With the exception of bioethanol from Brazil, however, production costs of biofuels are typically much higher than those of fossil fuels. As a result, promotion measures such as tax exemptions or blending quotas are indispensable for ascertaining substantial biofuel demand. With particular focus on developing countries, this paper discusses the economic justification of biofuel promotion instruments and investigates their implications. Based on data from India and Tanzania, we find that substantial biofuel usage induces significant financial costs. Furthermore, acreage availability is a binding natural limitation that could also lead to conflicts with food production. Yet, if carefully implemented under the appropriate conditions, biofuel programs might present opportunities for certain developing countries