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Sample records for imaging photomultiplier array

  1. Silicon photomultiplier arrays for the LHCb scintillating fibre tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Girard, Olivier Goran; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Stramaglia, Maria Elena

    2017-01-01

    For the LHCb detector upgrade in 2019, a large scale scintillating fibre tracker read out with silicon photomultipliers is under construction. The harsh radiation environment (neutron and ionising radiation), the 40MHz read-out rate of the trigger less system and the large detector surface of 320m2 impose many challenges. We present the results from lab tests with 1MeV electrons and from the SPS test facility at CERN for the mulitchannel SiPM array that combines peak photo-detection efficiency of 48% and extremely low correlated noise. The measurements were performed with detectors irradiated with neutrons up to a fluence of 12*1011 neq/cm2 and single photon detection was maintained. First results of the characterization of the pre-series of 500 detectors delivered by Hamamatsu and irradiation studies on a large sample will be included.

  2. Dark noise rates in irradiated silicon photomultiplier arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Sebastian; Comerma, Albert; Gerick, David; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Kecke, Matthieu; Leverington, Blake; Mazorra de Cos, Jose; Mitzel, Dominik; Neuner, Max; Uwer, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: LHCb-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The planned downstream tracking system - the Scintillating Fibre Tracker - for the LHCb upgrade uses silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays of 128 channels to read out mats made of 250 μm diameter scintillating fibres. In the LHCb environment the neutron flux degrades the silicon detectors to the edge of an acceptable performance in terms of DCR. Studies have shown that the dark count rate (DCR) of the SiPMs increases linearly with the neutron flux. Towards the end of the designed lifetime of the experiment the DCR per SiPM channel operated at T = -40 C is expected to reach a few MHz after partial annealing. To reduce the impact of the DCR - while at the same time provide efficient hit reconstruction - a clustering algorithm is developed to separate signal from noise. A brief introduction into the custom designed read-out ASIC and the cluster algorithm are presented along with the studies of the dark count cluster rate dependency on the neutron flux, the DCR per channel and the effects of the applied signal thresholds for the clustering algorithm.

  3. Scalable gamma-ray camera for wide-area search based on silicon photomultipliers array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Manhee; Van, Benjamin; Wells, Byron T.; D'Aries, Lawrence J.; Hammig, Mark D.

    2018-03-01

    Portable coded-aperture imaging systems based on scintillators and semiconductors have found use in a variety of radiological applications. For stand-off detection of weakly emitting materials, large volume detectors can facilitate the rapid localization of emitting materials. We describe a scalable coded-aperture imaging system based on 5.02 × 5.02 cm2 CsI(Tl) scintillator modules, each partitioned into 4 × 4 × 20 mm3 pixels that are optically coupled to 12 × 12 pixel silicon photo-multiplier (SiPM) arrays. The 144 pixels per module are read-out with a resistor-based charge-division circuit that reduces the readout outputs from 144 to four signals per module, from which the interaction position and total deposited energy can be extracted. All 144 CsI(Tl) pixels are readily distinguishable with an average energy resolution, at 662 keV, of 13.7% FWHM, a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.2, and a peak-to-Compton ratio of 2.9. The detector module is composed of a SiPM array coupled with a 2 cm thick scintillator and modified uniformly redundant array mask. For the image reconstruction, cross correlation and maximum likelihood expectation maximization methods are used. The system shows a field of view of 45° and an angular resolution of 4.7° FWHM.

  4. Progress in ultrafast CsI-photocathode gaseous imaging photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagendorf, V.; Breskin, A.; Chechick, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    1991-04-01

    A large area low-pressure gas-filled UV-imaging photomultiplier with CsI photocathode is presented. The double step electron photomultiplier with a 10 torr CH 4 gas-filling enables stable high gain operation. The detection efficiency of photon in the wavelength range λ ∼ 170 nm (Xe scintilation light) is about 10% for 200 to 2000 nm thick photocathodes. We investigate the influence of various substrate materials, the thickness of the CsI-layer, the gas pressure and the gas composition on the performance of the photocathode. Furthermore we studied the stability of the photocathode under different operating conditions and its sensitivity to air. Measurements of the timing characteristic of the device yielded an ultimate time resolution of 350 ps (fwhm). (author)

  5. The LED and fiber based calibration system for the photomultiplier array of SNO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, L.; Alves, R.; Andringa, S.; Bradbury, S.; Carvalho, J.; Clark, K.; Coulter, I.; Descamps, F.; Falk, L.; Gurriana, L.; Kraus, C.; Lefeuvre, G.; Maio, A.; Maneira, J.; Mottram, M.; Peeters, S.; Rose, J.; Sinclair, J.; Skensved, P.; Waterfield, J.; White, R.; Wilson, J.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    A new external LED/fiber light injection calibration system was designed for the calibration and monitoring of the photomultiplier array of the SNO+ experiment at SNOLAB. The goal of the calibration system is to allow an accurate and regular measurement of the photomultiplier array's performance, while minimizing the risk of radioactivity ingress. The choice in SNO+ was to use a set of optical fiber cables to convey into the detector the light pulses produced by external LEDs. The quality control was carried out using a modified test bench that was used in QC of optical fibers for TileCal/ATLAS. The optical fibers were characterized for transmission, timing and angular dispersions. This article describes the setups used for the characterization and quality control of the system based on LEDs and optical fibers and their results.

  6. Performance of a C4F8O gas radiator ring imaging Cherenkov detector using multi-anode photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artuso, M.; Boulahouache, C.; Blusk, S.; Butt, J.; Dorjkhaidav, O.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Muramatsu, H.; Nandakumar, R.; Randrianarivony, K.; Sia, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J.C.; Zhang, K.

    2006-01-01

    We report on tests of a novel ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detection system consisting of a 3-m-long gaseous C 4 F 8 O radiator, a focusing mirror, and a photon detector array based on Hamamatsu multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. This system was developed to identify charged particles in the momentum range from 3 to 70GeV/c for the BTeV experiment

  7. Gain monitoring of telescope array photomultiplier cameras for the first 4 years of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, B.K., E-mail: bkshin@hanyang.ac.kr [Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tokuno, H.; Tsunesada, Y. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Abu-Zayyad, T. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Aida, R. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Allen, M.; Anderson, R. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Azuma, R. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J.W.; Bergman, D.R.; Blake, S.A.; Cady, R. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Cheon, B.G., E-mail: bgcheon@hanyang.ac.kr [Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, E.J. [Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, W.R. [Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2014-12-21

    The stability of the gain of the photomultiplier (PMT) camera for the Fluorescence Detector (FD) of the Telescope Array experiment was monitored using an {sup 241}Am loaded scintillator pulsers (YAP) and a diffused xenon flasher (TXF) for a selected set of 35 PMT-readout channels. From the monitoring of YAP pulses over four years of FD operation, we found slow monotonic drifts of PMT gains at a rate of −1.7∼+1.7%/year. An average of the PMT gains over the 35 channels stayed nearly constant with a rate of change measured at −0.01±0.31(stat)±0.21(sys)%/year. No systematic decrease of the PMT gain caused by the night sky background was observed. Monitoring by the TXF also tracked the PMT gain drift of the YAP at 0.88±0.14(stat)%/year.

  8. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm2 and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm2. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system can resolve

  9. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm 2 and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm 2 . Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system can

  10. Signal encoding method for a time-of-flight PET detector using a silicon photomultiplier array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Jae Sung

    2014-10-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a promising photosensor for magnetic resonance (MR) compatible time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. The compact size of the SiPM allows direct one-to-one coupling between the scintillation crystal and the photosensor, yielding better timing and energy resolutions than the light sharing methods that have to be used in photomultiplier tube (PMT) PET systems. However, the one-to-one coupling scheme requires a huge volume of readout and processing electronics if no electric signal multiplexing or encoding scheme is properly applied. In this paper, we develop an electric signal encoding scheme for SiPM array based TOF PET detector blocks with the aim of reducing the complexity and volume of the signal readout and processing electronics. In an M×N SiPM array, the output signal of each channel in the SiPM array is divided into two signal lines. These output lines are then tied together in row and column lines. The row and column signals are used to measure the energy and timing information (or vice versa) of each incident gamma-ray event, respectively. Each SiPM channel was directly coupled to a 3×3×20 mm3 LGSO crystal. The reference detector, which was used to measure timing, consisted of an R9800 PMT and a 4×4×10 mm3 LYSO crystal and had a single time resolution of ~200 ps (FWHM). Leading edge discriminators were used to determine coincident events. Dedicated front-end electronics were developed, and the timing and energy resolutions of SiPM arrays with different array sizes (4×4, 8×8, and 12×12) were compared. Breakdown voltage of each SiPM channel was measured using energy spectra within various bias voltages. Coincidence events were measured using a 22Na point source. The average coincidence time resolution of 4×4, 8×8, and 12×12 SiPM arrays were 316 ps, 320 ps, and 335 ps (FWHM), respectively. The energy resolution of 4×4, 8×8, and 12×12 SiPM arrays were 11.8%, 12.5%, and 12.8% (FWHM

  11. Test of digital neutron–gamma discrimination with four different photomultiplier tubes for the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, X.L., E-mail: luo.xiaoliang@physics.uu.se [Department of Instrument Science and Technology, College of Mechatronics and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Modamio, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Nyberg, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Nishada, Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Angelis, G. de [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Agramunt, J. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Egea, F.J. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, Istanbul (Turkey); Erduran, M.N.; Ertürk, S. [Nigde Universitesi, Fen-Edebiyat Falkültesi, Fizik Bölümü, Nigde (Turkey); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Gadea, A. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); González, V. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Hüyük, T. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Moszyński, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, PL 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); and others

    2014-12-11

    A comparative study of the neutron–γ discrimination performance of a liquid scintillator detector BC501A coupled to four different 5 in. photomultiplier tubes (ET9390kb, R11833-100, XP4512 and R4144) was carried out. Both the Charge Comparison method and the Integrated Rise-Time method were implemented digitally to discriminate between neutrons and γ rays emitted by a {sup 252}Cf source. In both methods, the neutron–γ discrimination capabilities of the four photomultiplier tubes were quantitatively compared by evaluating their figure-of-merit values at different energy regions between 50 keVee and 1000 keVee. Additionally, the results were further verified qualitatively using time-of-flight to distinguish γ rays and neutrons. The results consistently show that photomultiplier tubes R11833-100 and ET9390kb generally perform best regarding neutron–γ discrimination with only slight differences in figure-of-merit values. This superiority can be explained by their relatively higher photoelectron yield, which indicates that a scintillator detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube with higher photoelectron yield tends to result in better neutron–γ discrimination performance. The results of this work will provide reference for the choice of photomultiplier tubes for future neutron detector arrays like NEDA.

  12. Pulse shape discrimination using EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator coupled with a Silicon Photomultiplier array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Can; Yang, Haori

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in organic plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) have gained much interest. Novel photon detectors, such as Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs), offer numerous advantages and can be used as an alternative to conventional photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) in many applications. In this work, we evaluate the PSD performance of the EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator coupled with a SiPM array. 2D PSD plots as well as the Figure of Merit (FOM) parameters are presented to demonstrate the PSD capability of EJ-299-33 using a SiPM as the light sensor. The best FOM of 0.76 was observed with a 1.0 MeVee (MeV-electron-equivalent) energy threshold, despite the high noise level of the SiPM array. A high-speed digital oscilloscope was used to acquire data, which was then processed offline in MATLAB. A performance comparison between two different PSD algorithms was carried out. The dependence of PSD quality on the sampling rate was also evaluated, stimulated by the interest to implement this setup for handheld applications where power consumption is crucial

  13. Gain compensation technique by bias correction in arrays of Silicon Photomultipliers using fully differential fast shaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baszczyk, M., E-mail: baszczyk@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Krakow (Poland); Dorosz, P.; Glab, S.; Kucewicz, W. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Krakow (Poland); Mik, L. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Krakow (Poland); State Higher Vocational School, Tarnow (Poland); Sapor, M. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Krakow (Poland)

    2016-07-11

    Proposed algorithm compensates the gain by changing the bias voltage of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). The signal from SiPM is amplified in fully differential preamplifier then is formed in time by the fully differential fast shaper. The compensation method was tested with four channels common cathode multi-pixel photon counter from Hamamatsu. The measurement system requires only one high voltage power supply. The polarization voltage is adjusted individually in each channel indirectly by tuning the output common mode voltage (VOCM) of fully differential amplifier. The changes of VOCM affect the input voltage through the feedback network. Actual gain of the SiPM is calculated by measuring the mean amplitude of the signal resulting from detection of single photoelectron. The VOCM is adjusted by DAC so as to reach the desired value of gain by each channel individually. The advantage of the algorithm is the possibility to set the bias of each SiPM in the array independently so they all could operate in very similar conditions (have similar gain and dark count rate). The algorithm can compensate the variations of gain of SiPM by using thermally generated pulses. There is no need to use additional current to voltage conversion which could introduce extra noises.

  14. Gain compensation technique by bias correction in arrays of Silicon Photomultipliers using fully differential fast shaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszczyk, M.; Dorosz, P.; Glab, S.; Kucewicz, W.; Mik, L.; Sapor, M.

    2016-07-01

    Proposed algorithm compensates the gain by changing the bias voltage of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). The signal from SiPM is amplified in fully differential preamplifier then is formed in time by the fully differential fast shaper. The compensation method was tested with four channels common cathode multi-pixel photon counter from Hamamatsu. The measurement system requires only one high voltage power supply. The polarization voltage is adjusted individually in each channel indirectly by tuning the output common mode voltage (VOCM) of fully differential amplifier. The changes of VOCM affect the input voltage through the feedback network. Actual gain of the SiPM is calculated by measuring the mean amplitude of the signal resulting from detection of single photoelectron. The VOCM is adjusted by DAC so as to reach the desired value of gain by each channel individually. The advantage of the algorithm is the possibility to set the bias of each SiPM in the array independently so they all could operate in very similar conditions (have similar gain and dark count rate). The algorithm can compensate the variations of gain of SiPM by using thermally generated pulses. There is no need to use additional current to voltage conversion which could introduce extra noises.

  15. Gain compensation technique by bias correction in arrays of Silicon Photomultipliers using fully differential fast shaper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baszczyk, M.; Dorosz, P.; Glab, S.; Kucewicz, W.; Mik, L.; Sapor, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proposed algorithm compensates the gain by changing the bias voltage of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). The signal from SiPM is amplified in fully differential preamplifier then is formed in time by the fully differential fast shaper. The compensation method was tested with four channels common cathode multi-pixel photon counter from Hamamatsu. The measurement system requires only one high voltage power supply. The polarization voltage is adjusted individually in each channel indirectly by tuning the output common mode voltage (VOCM) of fully differential amplifier. The changes of VOCM affect the input voltage through the feedback network. Actual gain of the SiPM is calculated by measuring the mean amplitude of the signal resulting from detection of single photoelectron. The VOCM is adjusted by DAC so as to reach the desired value of gain by each channel individually. The advantage of the algorithm is the possibility to set the bias of each SiPM in the array independently so they all could operate in very similar conditions (have similar gain and dark count rate). The algorithm can compensate the variations of gain of SiPM by using thermally generated pulses. There is no need to use additional current to voltage conversion which could introduce extra noises.

  16. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, Hyun Tae [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi@sogang.ac.kr [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yeom, Jung-Yeol, E-mail: jungyeol@korea.ac.kr [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO{sub 4} reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm{sup 2} and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm{sup 3}. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400–600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  17. Performance of a monolithic LaBr{sub 3}:Ce crystal coupled to an array of silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyanov, Alexei, E-mail: alexey.uliyanov@ucd.ie [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Morris, Oran [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Department of Computer Science & Applied Physics, Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, Galway (Ireland); Hanlon, Lorraine; McBreen, Sheila; Foley, Suzanne; Roberts, Oliver J.; Tobin, Isaac; Murphy, David; Wade, Colin [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Nelms, Nick; Shortt, Brian [European Space Agency, ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Slavicek, Tomas; Granja, Carlos; Solar, Michael [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2016-02-21

    A gamma-ray detector composed of a single 28×28×20 mm{sup 3} LaBr{sub 3}:Ce crystal coupled to a custom built 4×4 array of silicon photomultipliers was tested over an energy range of 30 keV to 9.3 MeV. The silicon photomultipliers were initially calibrated using 20 ns light pulses generated by a light emitting diode. The photodetector responses measured as a function of the number of incident photons were found to be non-linear and consistent with model predictions. Using corrections for the non-linearity of the silicon photomultipliers, the detector showed a linear response to gamma-rays with energies from 100 keV to the maximum available energy of 9.3 MeV. The energy resolution was found to be 4% FWHM at 662 keV. Despite the large thickness of the scintillator (20 mm) and a 5 mm thick optical window, the detector was capable of measuring the positions of the gamma-ray interaction points. The position resolution was measured at 356 keV and was found to be 8 mm FWHM in the detector plane and 11 mm FWHM for the depth of interaction. The detector can be used as a building block of a larger calorimeter system that is capable of measuring gamma-ray energies up to tens of MeV.

  18. Operation and first results of the NEXT-DEMO prototype using a silicon photomultiplier tracking array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, V; Cárcel, S; Cervera, A; Díaz, J; Ferrario, P; Gil, A; Borges, F I G; Conde, C A N; Dias, T H V T; Fernandes, L M P; Freitas, E D C; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Dafni, T; Egorov, M; Gehman, V M; Goldschmidt, A; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Ferreira, A L

    2013-01-01

    NEXT-DEMO is a high-pressure xenon gas TPC which acts as a technological test-bed and demonstrator for the NEXT-100 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment. In its current configuration the apparatus fully implements the NEXT-100 design concept. This is an asymmetric TPC, with an energy plane made of photomultipliers and a tracking plane made of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) coated with TPB. The detector in this new configuration has been used to reconstruct the characteristic signature of electrons in dense gas, demonstrating the ability to identify the MIP and ''blob'' regions. Moreover, the SiPM tracking plane allows for the definition of a large fiducial region in which an excellent energy resolution of 1.82% FWHM at 511 keV has been measured (a value which extrapolates to 0.83% at the xenon Q ββ )

  19. Development of a prototype PET scanner with depth-of-interaction measurement using solid-state photomultiplier arrays and parallel readout electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lan, Kejian A; Bircher, Chad; Lou, Kai; Deng, Zhi

    2014-03-07

    In this study, we developed a prototype animal PET by applying several novel technologies to use solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) and improve imaging performance. Each PET detector has an 8 × 8 array of about 1.9 × 1.9 × 30.0 mm(3) lutetium-yttrium-oxyorthosilicate scintillators, with each end optically connected to an SSPM array (16 channels in a 4 × 4 matrix) through a light guide to enable continuous DOI measurement. Each SSPM has an active area of about 3 × 3 mm(2), and its output is read by a custom-developed application-specific integrated circuit to directly convert analogue signals to digital timing pulses that encode the interaction information. These pulses are transferred to and are decoded by a field-programmable gate array-based time-to-digital convertor for coincident event selection and data acquisition. The independent readout of each SSPM and the parallel signal process can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and enable the use of flexible algorithms for different data processes. The prototype PET consists of two rotating detector panels on a portable gantry with four detectors in each panel to provide 16 mm axial and variable transaxial field-of-view (FOV) sizes. List-mode ordered subset expectation maximization image reconstruction was implemented. The measured mean energy, coincidence timing and DOI resolution for a crystal were about 17.6%, 2.8 ns and 5.6 mm, respectively. The measured transaxial resolutions at the center of the FOV were 2.0 mm and 2.3 mm for images reconstructed with and without DOI, respectively. In addition, the resolutions across the FOV with DOI were substantially better than those without DOI. The quality of PET images of both a hot-rod phantom and mouse acquired with DOI was much higher than that of images obtained without DOI. This study demonstrates that SSPM arrays and advanced readout/processing electronics can be used to develop a practical DOI

  20. Studies on a silicon-photomultiplier-based camera for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaro, C.; Corti, D.; De Angelis, A.; Doro, M.; Manea, C.; Mariotti, M.; Rando, R.; Reichardt, I.; Tescaro, D.

    2017-12-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) represent a class of instruments which are dedicated to the ground-based observation of cosmic VHE gamma ray emission based on the detection of the Cherenkov radiation produced in the interaction of gamma rays with the Earth atmosphere. One of the key elements of such instruments is a pixelized focal-plane camera consisting of photodetectors. To date, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) have been the common choice given their high photon detection efficiency (PDE) and fast time response. Recently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are emerging as an alternative. This rapidly evolving technology has strong potential to become superior to that based on PMTs in terms of PDE, which would further improve the sensitivity of IACTs, and see a price reduction per square millimeter of detector area. We are working to develop a SiPM-based module for the focal-plane cameras of the MAGIC telescopes to probe this technology for IACTs with large focal plane cameras of an area of few square meters. We will describe the solutions we are exploring in order to balance a competitive performance with a minimal impact on the overall MAGIC camera design using ray tracing simulations. We further present a comparative study of the overall light throughput based on Monte Carlo simulations and considering the properties of the major hardware elements of an IACT.

  1. A photomultiplier-based secondary electron imaging system for a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, L.C.; Breese, M.B.H.; Silva, M.F. da; Soares, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to define, or recognise particular regions of interest or surface features is vital to the analysis and interpretation of spatially-resolved images collected with a nuclear microprobe. However, good topographic image contrast is difficult to accomplish using PIXE or RBS images due to their inherent insensitivity to topography, lack of elemental variation or poor statistics. Topographic image contrast is commonly obtained in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by detecting a large flux of secondary electrons produced by the focused keV electron beam. Similar systems have not been widely used on nuclear microprobes due to ion beam intensity fluctuations, which limit the minimum resolvable contrast and present a major limitation for this technique. This paper describes a secondary electron imaging system which has been developed on the Lisbon microprobe. It is based on a scintillator, a photomultiplier operated in a pulsed mode, a pulse shaping electronic chain and ADC, and requires no changes to the existing data acquisition system. Examples of the images obtained from materials such as patterned SiGe wafers and hydrogen-implanted silicon are given, and compared with SEM or optical images

  2. Performance of ultra-small silicon photomultiplier array with active area of 0.12 mm×0.12 mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Wang; Zongde, Chen; Chenhui, Li; Ran, He; Shenyuan, Wang; Baicheng, Li; Ruiheng, Wang; Kun, Liang, E-mail: lk@bnu.edu.cn; Ru, Yang; Dejun, Han

    2015-07-01

    We report the performance of an ultra-small silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) line array with 7 elements of 0.12×0.12 mm{sup 2} in active area, 0.2 mm in pitch and 120 micro cells in one element. The device features an epitaxial bulk quenching resistor concept, demonstrated high geometrical fill factor of 41% and photon detection efficiency (PDE) of 25.4% in the wavelength region between 430 nm and 480 nm while retaining high micro cell density around 10 000 mm{sup −2} and ~3 ns FWHM of dark pulses width; it also demonstrated dark count rate of less than 28.7 kHz, optical crosstalk of the order of 2% to 4%, and excellent photon number discrimination. A 0.15 mm×1.6 mm×1.6 mm lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal, corresponding to the width, length and height respectively, was successfully coupled to the 1×7 SiPM array for possible ultra-highly resolved positron emission tomography (PET) applications. This novel type of device has advantages particularly for small active area since the performances, such as PDE and response speed is one of the best among SiPMs with similarly high density of micro cells. It may pave a way for this type of SiPM as a promising pixel position sensitive device in imaging sensor applications. - Highlights: • The ultra-small SiPM line array with active area of 0.12 mm×0.12 mm was presented. • The ultra-small SiPM employs the bulk silicon structure as quenching resistor. • A considerable dynamic range and PDE over 25.4% @ 430 nm to 480 nm were characterized.

  3. A prototype detector using the neutron image intensifier and multi-anode type photomultiplier tube for pulsed neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hirotaku; Sato, Hirotaka; Hara, Kaoru Y.; Kamiyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We developed a neutron two-dimensional (2-D) detector for pulsed neutron imaging as a prototype detector, which was composed of a neutron image intensifier and a multi-anode type photomultiplier tube. A neutron transmission spectrum of α-Fe plate was measured by the prototype detector, and compared with the one measured by a typical neutron 2-D detector. The spectrum was in reasonable agreement with the one measured by the typical detector in the neutron wavelength region above 0.15 nm. In addition, a neutron transmission image of a cadmium indicator was obtained by the prototype detector. The usefulness of the prototype detector for pulsed neutron imaging was demonstrated. (author)

  4. photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  5. photomultiplier tube

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  6. A double photomultiplier Compton camera and its readout system for mice imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, Cristiano Lino [Physics Department Galileo Galilei, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 8, Padova 35131 (Italy) and INFN Padova, Via Marzolo 8, Padova 35131 (Italy); Atroshchenko, Kostiantyn [Physics Department Galileo Galilei, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 8, Padova 35131 (Italy) and INFN Legnaro, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro PD 35020 (Italy); Baldazzi, Giuseppe [Physics Department, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127, Italy and INFN Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Bello, Michele [INFN Legnaro, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro PD 35020 (Italy); Uzunov, Nikolay [Department of Natural Sciences, Shumen University, 115 Universitetska str., Shumen 9712, Bulgaria and INFN Legnaro, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro PD 35020 (Italy); Di Domenico, Giovanni [Physics Department, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, Ferrara 44122 (Italy) and INFN Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, Ferrara 44122 (Italy)

    2013-04-19

    We have designed a Compton Camera (CC) to image the bio-distribution of gamma-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in mice. A CC employs the 'electronic collimation', i.e. a technique that traces the gamma-rays instead of selecting them with physical lead or tungsten collimators. To perform such a task, a CC measures the parameters of the Compton interaction that occurs in the device itself. At least two detectors are required: one (tracker), where the primary gamma undergoes a Compton interaction and a second one (calorimeter), in which the scattered gamma is completely absorbed. Eventually the polar angle and hence a 'cone' of possible incident directions are obtained (event with 'incomplete geometry'). Different solutions for the two detectors are proposed in the literature: our design foresees two similar Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PMT, Hamamatsu H8500). Each PMT has 64 output channels that are reduced to 4 using a charge multiplexed readout system, i.e. a Series Charge Multiplexing net of resistors. Triggering of the system is provided by the coincidence of fast signals extracted at the last dynode of the PMTs. Assets are the low cost and the simplicity of design and operation, having just one type of device; among drawbacks there is a lower resolution with respect to more sophisticated trackers and full 64 channels Readout. This paper does compare our design of our two-Hamamatsu CC to other solutions and shows how the spatial and energy accuracy is suitable for the inspection of radioactivity in mice.

  7. photomultiplier tube

    CERN Multimedia

    A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  8. photomultiplier tube

    CERN Multimedia

    Philips. 150AVP. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  9. Gigapixel imaging with microlens arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Antony; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2016-03-01

    A crucial part of the drug discovery process involves imaging the response of thousands of cell cultures to candidate drugs. Quantitative parameters from these "high content screens", such as protein expression and cell morphology, are extracted from fluorescence and brightfield micrographs. Due to the sheer number of cells that need to imaged for adequate statistics, the imaging time itself is a major bottleneck. Automated microscopes image small fields-of-view (FOVs) serially, which are then stitched together to form gigapixel-scale mosaics. We have developed a microscopy architecture that reduces mechanical overhead of traditional large field-of-view by parallelizing the image capture process. Instead of a single objective lens imaging FOVs one by one, we employ a microlens array for continuous photon capture, resulting in a 3-fold throughput increase. In this contribution, we present the design and imaging results of this microscopy architecture in three different contrast modes: multichannel fluorescence, hyperspectral fluorescence and brightfield.

  10. Coded aperture imaging with uniformly redundant arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, E.E.; Cannon, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    A system is described which uses uniformly redundant arrays to image non-focusable radiation. The array is used in conjunction with a balanced correlation technique to provide a system with no artifacts so that virtually limitless signal-to-noise ratio is obtained with high transmission characteristics. The array is mosaicked to reduce required detector size over conventional array detectors. 15 claims

  11. GEM-based gaseous photomultipliers for UV and visible photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moermann, D.; Balcerzyk, M.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Singh, B.K.; Buzulutskov, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present the current status of our research on GEM-based gaseous photomultipliers. Detectors combining multi-GEM electron multipliers with semi-transparent and reflective photocathodes are discussed. We present recent progress in extending the sensitivity of these detectors into the visible range. We demonstrate the long-term stability of an argon-sealed bi-alkali photo-diode and provide preliminary results of a gas-sealed Kapton-GEM detector with a bi-alkali photocathode. The problem of ion-induced secondary electron emission is addressed

  12. Imaging spectroscopy using embedded diffractive optical arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford

    2017-09-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera based on diffractive optic arrays. This approach to hyperspectral imaging has been demonstrated in all three infrared bands SWIR, MWIR and LWIR. The hyperspectral optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of this infrared hyperspectral sensor. This new and innovative approach to an infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics that are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a small satellite, mini-UAV, commercial quadcopter or man portable. Also, an application of how this spectral imaging technology can easily be used to quantify the mass and volume flow rates of hydrocarbon gases. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. The detector array is divided into sub-images covered by each lenslet. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the number of simultaneous different spectral images collected each frame of the camera. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image

  13. Immersion cooling of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for nuclear medicine imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, R.R.; Stolin, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are compact, high amplification light detection devices that have recently been incorporated into magnetic field-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, it is preferable to cool them below room temperature. Most current methods are limited to the cooling of individual detector modules, increasing complexity and cost of scanners made-up of a large number of modules. In this work we investigated a new method of cooling, immersion of the detector modules in non-electrically conductive, cooled liquid. A small-scale prototype system was constructed to cool a relatively large area SiPM-based, scintillator detector module by immersing it in a circulating bath of mineral oil. Testing demonstrated that the system rapidly decreased and stabilized the temperature of the device. Operation of the detector illustrated the expected benefits of cooling, with no apparent degradation of performance attributable to immersion in fluid. - Highlights: • Immersion cooling is new, simple and inexpensive method to cool solid state based nuclear medicine scanner. • Method successfully tested on a scaled version of an SiPM-based PET detector module. • Can be scaled up to cool a complete PET scanner.

  14. Fast-neutron and gamma-ray imaging with a capillary liquid xenon converter coupled to a gaseous photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, I.; Coimbra, A. E. C.; Vartsky, D.; Arazi, L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Caspi, E. N.; Breskin, A.

    2017-09-01

    Gamma-ray and fast-neutron imaging was performed with a novel liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation detector read out by a Gaseous Photomultiplier (GPM). The 100 mm diameter detector prototype comprised a capillary-filled LXe converter/scintillator, coupled to a triple-THGEM imaging-GPM, with its first electrode coated by a CsI UV-photocathode, operated in Ne/5%CH4 at cryogenic temperatures. Radiation localization in 2D was derived from scintillation-induced photoelectron avalanches, measured on the GPM's segmented anode. The localization properties of 60Co gamma-rays and a mixed fast-neutron/gamma-ray field from an AmBe neutron source were derived from irradiation of a Pb edge absorber. Spatial resolutions of 12± 2 mm and 10± 2 mm (FWHM) were reached with 60Co and AmBe sources, respectively. The experimental results are in good agreement with GEANT4 simulations. The calculated ultimate expected resolutions for our application-relevant 4.4 and 15.1 MeV gamma-rays and 1-15 MeV neutrons are 2-4 mm and ~ 2 mm (FWHM), respectively. These results indicate the potential applicability of the new detector concept to Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR) and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography (DDEGR) of large objects.

  15. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  16. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Application components of ISPA tubes are shown: the CERN-developed anode chip, special windows for gamma and x-ray detection, scintillating crystal and fibre arrays for imaging and tracking of ionizing particles.

  17. Depth-of-interaction measurement in a single-layer crystal array with a single-ended readout using digital silicon photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-01-01

    We present the first experimental evaluation of a depth-of-interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). To measure DOI information from a mono-layer array of scintillation crystals with a single-ended readout, our group has previously proposed and developed a new method based on light spread using triangular reflectors. Since this method relies on measurement of the light distribution, dSiPM, which has a fully digital interface, has several merits for our DOI measurement. The DOI PET detector comprised of a dSiPM sensor (DPC-3200-22-44) coupled with a 14   ×   14 array of 2 mm  ×  2 mm  ×  20 mm unpolished LGSO crystals. All crystals were covered with triangular reflectors. To obtain a good performance of the DOI PET detector, several parameters of detector were selected as a preliminary experiment. Detector performance was evaluated with the selected parameters and the optimal experimental setup, and a DOI measurement was conducted by irradiating the crystal block at five DOI positions spaced at intervals of 4 mm. Maximum-likelihood estimation was employed for DOI positioning and the optimal DOI estimation scheme was also investigated in this study. As a result, the DOI PET detector showed clear crystal identification. The energy resolution (full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)) averaged over all depths was 10.21%  ±  0.15% at 511 keV, and time resolution averaged over all depths was 1198.61   ±   39.70 ps FWHM. The average DOI positioning accuracy for all depths was 74.22%  ±  6.77%, which equates to DOI resolution of 4.67 mm. Energy and DOI resolutions were uniform over all crystal positions except for the back parts of the array. Furthermore, additional simulation studies were conducted to verify the results of our DOI measurement method that is combined with dSiPM technology. In conclusion, our continuous DOI PET detector

  18. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  19. Imaging technique of whole-body scintigram in the event of breakdown of the photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Syoichi; Tonami, Syuichi; Yasui, Masakazu; Sugishita, Kouki; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto

    1997-01-01

    When the PMT and preamplifier are out of order, it is impossible to make a correct diagnosis because of defects on the scintigram. However, repair of the equipment may take a long time. In order to perform emergent whole-body scintigrams in the event of such breakdowns, we have developed a new approach named the lead-shield method. The major principles of this method involve placing a lead shield on the gamma camera such that it corresponds to the area of the abnormal PMT and making use of the normal area of the detector. The lead shield, 2 mm thick and 1.5 times as wide as the defect on a planar image, was situated perpendicular to the scan plane of the whole-body scintigram. The results showed that whole-body scintigrams obtained by the lead-shield method had the same quality as those obtained by the conventional method, and the spatial resolution and uniformity showed nearly no change despite some disadvantages such as lower sensitivity and shorter scan length. The lead-shield method can be a useful tool for the performance of whole-body scintigrams in cases of emergency when the PMT and preamplifier are out of order. (author)

  20. Imaging technique of whole-body scintigram in the event of breakdown of the photomultiplier tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Syoichi; Tonami, Syuichi; Yasui, Masakazu; Sugishita, Kouki; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    1997-10-01

    When the PMT and preamplifier are out of order, it is impossible to make a correct diagnosis because of defects on the scintigram. However, repair of the equipment may take a long time. In order to perform emergent whole-body scintigrams in the event of such breakdowns, we have developed a new approach named the lead-shield method. The major principles of this method involve placing a lead shield on the gamma camera such that it corresponds to the area of the abnormal PMT and making use of the normal area of the detector. The lead shield, 2 mm thick and 1.5 times as wide as the defect on a planar image, was situated perpendicular to the scan plane of the whole-body scintigram. The results showed that whole-body scintigrams obtained by the lead-shield method had the same quality as those obtained by the conventional method, and the spatial resolution and uniformity showed nearly no change despite some disadvantages such as lower sensitivity and shorter scan length. The lead-shield method can be a useful tool for the performance of whole-body scintigrams in cases of emergency when the PMT and preamplifier are out of order. (author)

  1. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabaioli, S., E-mail: simone.rabaioli@gmail.com [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); Berra, A.; Bolognini, D. [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Universita degli Studi di Trieste and INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Lietti, D. [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Penzo, A. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Prest, M. [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Stoppani, L. [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2012-12-11

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain ({approx}10{sup 6}). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  2. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  3. Fast disk array for image storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dan; Zhu, Zhichun; Jin, Hai; Zhang, Jiangling

    1997-01-01

    A fast disk array is designed for the large continuous image storage. It includes a high speed data architecture and the technology of data striping and organization on the disk array. The high speed data path which is constructed by two dual port RAM and some control circuit is configured to transfer data between a host system and a plurality of disk drives. The bandwidth can be more than 100 MB/s if the data path based on PCI (peripheral component interconnect). The organization of data stored on the disk array is similar to RAID 4. Data are striped on a plurality of disk, and each striping unit is equal to a track. I/O instructions are performed in parallel on the disk drives. An independent disk is used to store the parity information in the fast disk array architecture. By placing the parity generation circuit directly on the SCSI (or SCSI 2) bus, the parity information can be generated on the fly. It will affect little on the data writing in parallel on the other disks. The fast disk array architecture designed in the paper can meet the demands of the image storage.

  4. Photomultiplier gain stabilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Baud, P.; Sautiez, B.

    1958-07-01

    By the control and adjustment of magnetic deflection applied to the electron beam of a photomultiplier it has proved possible to flatten the gain curve, forming plateaux at levels dependent upon the voltage at intake. It should be possible to add this simple device to most photomultipliers on the market today. (author) [fr

  5. First characterization of the SPADnet sensor: a digital silicon photomultiplier for PET applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros-Daillon, E.; Maingault, L.; André, L.; Reboud, V.; Verger, L.; Charbon, E.; Bruschini, C.; Veerappan, C.; Stoppa, D.; Massari, N.; Perenzoni, M.; Braga, L. H. C.; Gasparini, L.; Henderson, R. K.; Walker, R.; East, S.; Grant, L.; Jatekos, B.; Lorincz, E.; Ujhelyi, F.; Erdei, G.; Major, P.; Papp, Z.; Nemeth, G.

    2013-12-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers have the ability to replace photomultiplier tubes when used as light sensors in scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Their timing properties, compactness, and magnetic field compatibility make them interesting for use in Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Imaging compatible Positron Emission Tomography. In this paper, we present a new fully digital Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) based detector fabricated in CMOS image sensor technology. It contains 16x8 pixels with a pitch of 610x571.2 μm2. The Dark Count Rate and the Photon Detection Probability of each SPAD has been measured and the homogeneity of these parameters in the entire 92000 SPAD array is shown. The sensor has been optically coupled to a single LYSO needle and a LYSO array. The scintillator crystal was irradiated with several gamma sources and the resulting images and energy spectra are presented.

  6. An anti-Cherenkov photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selove, W.; Cormell, L.R.; Dris, M.; Kononenko, W.; Robinson, B.; Yost, B.T.

    1982-01-01

    We have designed a special photomultiplier tube (PMT), with very much reduced sensitivity to Cherenkov light produced in the end window. These PMTs have been produced for us by EMI, and have been used in a modular calorimeter array. The design eliminates a 'hot-spot' problem which was of intolerable magnitude in our application. (orig.)

  7. The photomultiplier handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, A G

    2017-01-01

    Photomultipliers are extremely sensitive light detectors that can detect single photons. In multiplying the charge produced by incident light by up to 100 million times, these devices are essential to a wide range of functions, from medical instrumentation to astronomical observations. This complete and authoritative guide will provide students, practitioners, and researchers with a deeper understanding of the operating principles of these devices. Authored by an experienced user and manufacturer of photomultipliers, this handbook gives the reader insights into photomultiplier behaviour as a means to optimize performance. Diffuse and low level light sources are best served with a photomultiplier for the detection of single photon emissions. Light detection and electron multiplication are statistical in nature and the mathematics of these processes is derived from first principles. The book covers other related topics such as scintillation counting, light guides, and large area detectors. The usually complicat...

  8. PHASED ARRAY FEED CALIBRATION, BEAMFORMING, AND IMAGING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landon, Jonathan; Elmer, Michael; Waldron, Jacob; Jones, David; Stemmons, Alan; Jeffs, Brian D.; Warnick, Karl F.; Richard Fisher, J.; Norrod, Roger D.

    2010-01-01

    Phased array feeds (PAFs) for reflector antennas offer the potential for increased reflector field of view and faster survey speeds. To address some of the development challenges that remain for scientifically useful PAFs, including calibration and beamforming algorithms, sensitivity optimization, and demonstration of wide field of view imaging, we report experimental results from a 19 element room temperature L-band PAF mounted on the Green Bank 20 Meter Telescope. Formed beams achieved an aperture efficiency of 69% and a system noise temperature of 66 K. Radio camera images of several sky regions are presented. We investigate the noise performance and sensitivity of the system as a function of elevation angle with statistically optimal beamforming and demonstrate cancelation of radio frequency interference sources with adaptive spatial filtering.

  9. Flat dielectric metasurface lens array for three dimensional integral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianlei; Wang, Xiaorui; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Ying; Wu, Xiongxiong

    2018-05-01

    In conventional integral imaging, the singlet refractive lens array limits the imaging performance due to its prominent aberrations. Different from the refractive lens array relying on phase modulation via phase change accumulated along the optical paths, metasurfaces composed of nano-scatters can produce phase abrupt over the scale of wavelength. In this letter, we propose a novel lens array consisting of two neighboring flat dielectric metasurfaces for integral imaging system. The aspherical phase profiles of the metasurfaces are optimized to improve imaging performance. The simulation results show that our designed 5 × 5 metasurface-based lens array exhibits high image quality at designed wavelength 865 nm.

  10. Digital image processing software system using an array processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, R.J.; Portnoff, M.R.; Journeay, C.H.; Twogood, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile array processor-based system for general-purpose image processing was developed. At the heart of this system is an extensive, flexible software package that incorporates the array processor for effective interactive image processing. The software system is described in detail, and its application to a diverse set of applications at LLNL is briefly discussed. 4 figures, 1 table

  11. Volumetric real-time imaging using a CMUT ring array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jung Woo; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Gencel, Mustafa; Stephens, Douglas N; O'Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David J; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2012-06-01

    A ring array provides a very suitable geometry for forward-looking volumetric intracardiac and intravascular ultrasound imaging. We fabricated an annular 64-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array featuring a 10-MHz operating frequency and a 1.27-mm outer radius. A custom software suite was developed to run on a PC-based imaging system for real-time imaging using this device. This paper presents simulated and experimental imaging results for the described CMUT ring array. Three different imaging methods--flash, classic phased array (CPA), and synthetic phased array (SPA)--were used in the study. For SPA imaging, two techniques to improve the image quality--Hadamard coding and aperture weighting--were also applied. The results show that SPA with Hadamard coding and aperture weighting is a good option for ring-array imaging. Compared with CPA, it achieves better image resolution and comparable signal-to-noise ratio at a much faster image acquisition rate. Using this method, a fast frame rate of up to 463 volumes per second is achievable if limited only by the ultrasound time of flight; with the described system we reconstructed three cross-sectional images in real-time at 10 frames per second, which was limited by the computation time in synthetic beamforming.

  12. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    real time volumetric imaging system, which employs a wide transmit beam and receive mode parallel processing to increase image frame rate. Depth-of-field comparisons were made from simulated on-axis and off-axis beamplots at ranges from 30 to 160 mm for both coaxial and offset transmit and receive......Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  13. Volumetric Real-Time Imaging Using a CMUT Ring Array

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Jung Woo; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Gencel, Mustafa; Stephens, Douglas N.; O’Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David J.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2012-01-01

    A ring array provides a very suitable geometry for forward-looking volumetric intracardiac and intravascular ultrasound imaging. We fabricated an annular 64-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array featuring a 10-MHz operating frequency and a 1.27-mm outer radius. A custom software suite was developed to run on a PC-based imaging system for real-time imaging using this device.

  14. Sparse acoustic imaging with a spherical array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Xenaki, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of methods for sound source localization and sound field reconstruction with spherical microphone arrays have been proposed. These arrays have properties that are potentially very useful, e.g. omni-directionality, robustness, compensable scattering, etc. This paper propo...

  15. Stereo imaging and random array stratified imaging for cargo radiation inspecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingjin; Zeng Yu

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a Stereo Imaging and Random Array Stratified Imaging for cargo container radiation Inspecting. By using dual-line vertical detector array scan, a stereo image of inspected cargo can be obtained and watched with virtual reality view. The random detector array has only one-row of detectors but distributed in a certain horizontal dimension randomly. To scan a cargo container with this random array detector, a 'defocused' image is obtained. By using 'anti-random focusing', one layer of the image can be focused on the background of all defocused images from other layers. A stratified X-ray image of overlapped bike wheels is presented

  16. Vision communications based on LED array and imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jong-Ho; Jung, Sung-Yoon

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a brand new communication concept, called as "vision communication" based on LED array and image sensor. This system consists of LED array as a transmitter and digital device which include image sensor such as CCD and CMOS as receiver. In order to transmit data, the proposed communication scheme simultaneously uses the digital image processing and optical wireless communication scheme. Therefore, the cognitive communication scheme is possible with the help of recognition techniques used in vision system. By increasing data rate, our scheme can use LED array consisting of several multi-spectral LEDs. Because arranged each LED can emit multi-spectral optical signal such as visible, infrared and ultraviolet light, the increase of data rate is possible similar to WDM and MIMO skills used in traditional optical and wireless communications. In addition, this multi-spectral capability also makes it possible to avoid the optical noises in communication environment. In our vision communication scheme, the data packet is composed of Sync. data and information data. Sync. data is used to detect the transmitter area and calibrate the distorted image snapshots obtained by image sensor. By making the optical rate of LED array be same with the frame rate (frames per second) of image sensor, we can decode the information data included in each image snapshot based on image processing and optical wireless communication techniques. Through experiment based on practical test bed system, we confirm the feasibility of the proposed vision communications based on LED array and image sensor.

  17. A new detector concept for silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadigov, A., E-mail: saazik@yandex.ru [National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Ahmadov, F.; Ahmadov, G. [National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Ariffin, A.; Khorev, S. [Zecotek Photonics Inc., Vancouver (Canada); Sadygov, Z. [National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Suleymanov, S. [National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Zerrouk, F. [Zecotek Photonics Inc., Vancouver (Canada); Madatov, R. [Institute of Radiation Problems, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2016-07-11

    A new design and principle of operation of silicon photomultipliers are presented. The new design comprises a semiconductor substrate and an array of independent micro-phototransistors formed on the substrate. Each micro-phototransistor comprises a photosensitive base operating in Geiger mode and an individual micro-emitter covering a small part of the base layer, thereby creating, together with this latter, a micro-transistor. Both micro-emitters and photosensitive base layers are connected with two respective independent metal grids via their individual micro-resistors. The total value of signal gain in the proposed silicon photomultiplier is a result of both the avalanche gain in the base layer and the corresponding gain in the micro-transistor. The main goals of the new design are: significantly lower both optical crosstalk and after-pulse effects at high signal amplification, improve speed of single photoelectron pulse formation, and significantly reduce the device capacitance.

  18. Fast photomultiplier ELUP 151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, L.I.; Belokon', V.A.; Krasin, E.V.

    1992-01-01

    High-velocity photomultiplier is described. The latter is recommended to be used in nuclear physics, plasma physics, nuclear medical diagnostics and at measurement of fast-occurring process parameters. Main specifications are as follows: range of spectral sensitivity - 0.2-0.7 μm; limit of dinamic characteristic linearity - up to 5A; dark current at +20 deg C ambient temperature - maximum 10-8A, time of anode pulse growth - maximum 8 ns; photocathode quantum yield in the maximum of spectral characteristic (λ max =380-420 nm) - 24-26%; supply voltage - 4-5 kV

  19. Image scanning microscopy using a SPAD detector array (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Marco; Tortarolo, Giorgio; Buttafava, Mauro; Tosi, Alberto; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    The use of an array of detectors can help overcoming the traditional limitation of confocal microscopy: the compromise between signal and theoretical resolution. Each element independently records a view of the sample and the final image can be reconstructed by pixel reassignment or by inverse filtering (e.g. deconvolution). In this work, we used a SPAD array of 25 detectors specifically designed for this goal and our scanning microscopy control system (Carma) to acquire the partial images and to perform online image processing. Further work will be devoted to optimize the image reconstruction step and to improve the fill-factor of the detector.

  20. Modeling crosstalk in silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, L; Rosado, J; Blanco, F; Arqueros, F

    2013-01-01

    Optical crosstalk seriously limits the photon-counting resolution of silicon photomultipliers. In this work, realistic analytical models to describe the crosstalk effects on the response of these photodetectors are presented and compared with experimental data. The proposed models are based on the hypothesis that each pixel of the array has a finite number of available neighboring pixels to excite via crosstalk. Dead-time effects and geometrical aspects of the propagation of crosstalk between neighbors are taken into account in the models for different neighborhood configurations. Simple expressions to account for crosstalk effects on the pulse-height spectrum as well as to evaluate the excess noise factor due to crosstalk are also given. Dedicated measurements were carried out under both dark-count conditions and pulsed illumination. Moreover, the influence of afterpulsing on the measured pulse-height spectrum was studied, and a measurement of the recovery time of pixels was reported. High-resolution pulse-height spectra were obtained by means of a detailed waveform analysis, and the results have been used to validate our crosstalk models.

  1. Photoacoustic projection imaging using an all-optical detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, J.; Felbermayer, K.; Berer, T.

    2018-02-01

    We present a prototype for all-optical photoacoustic projection imaging. By generating projection images, photoacoustic information of large volumes can be retrieved with less effort compared to common photoacoustic computed tomography where many detectors and/or multiple measurements are required. In our approach, an array of 60 integrating line detectors is used to acquire photoacoustic waves. The line detector array consists of fiber-optic MachZehnder interferometers, distributed on a cylindrical surface. From the measured variation of the optical path lengths of the interferometers, induced by photoacoustic waves, a photoacoustic projection image can be reconstructed. The resulting images represent the projection of the three-dimensional spatial light absorbance within the imaged object onto a two-dimensional plane, perpendicular to the line detector array. The fiber-optic detectors achieve a noise-equivalent pressure of 24 Pascal at a 10 MHz bandwidth. We present the operational principle, the structure of the array, and resulting images. The system can acquire high-resolution projection images of large volumes within a short period of time. Imaging large volumes at high frame rates facilitates monitoring of dynamic processes.

  2. Transverse Oscillations for Phased Array Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    of superficial blood vessels. To broaden the usability of the method, it should be expanded to a phased array geometry enabling vector velocity imaging of the heart. Therefore, the scan depth has to be increased to 10-15 cm. This paper presents suitable pulse echo fields (PEF). Two lines are beamformed...... (correlation coefficient, R: -0.76), and therefore predict estimator performance. CV is correlated with the standard deviation (R=0.74). The results demonstrate the potential for using a phased array for vector velocity imaging at larger depths, and potentially for imaging the heart....

  3. Selectable six-element multicoil array for entire spine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, J.W.; Bluma-Walter, J.; Prorok, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This article introduces a new multicoil array that can provide entire spine imaging in two acquisitions with no need to manually reposition either the coil or the patient. A selectable contoured multicoil array with six elements was used to obtain coverage of the entire spine. The first four elements were used for imaging the upper spine region (cervical/thoracic) during the first acquisition, and the last four elements were used for imaging the lower spine region (thoracic/lumbar) during the second acquisition. The overall coil length was approximately 75 cm

  4. Development of gaseous photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sugiyama, H.; Okada, T.

    2014-01-01

    We have been developing gaseous photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with alkali photocathode combined with micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs). The potential advantage of the gaseous PMT is that it can achieve a very large effective area with adequate position and timing resolutions. In addition, it will be easily operated under a very high magnetic field, compared with the conventional vacuum-based PMT. To evaluate the gaseous PMTs filled with Ne and Ar based gas mixture, we have developed gaseous PMTs with an alkali photocathode combined with MPGDs such as a glass capillary plate, GEM, and Micromegas detector. We describe the recent development of the gaseous PMTs, particularly the production of the photocathode, gas gain, ion and photon feedbacks, quantum efficiency, and the characteristics in the magnetic field environment. (author)

  5. Active terahertz imaging with Ne indicator lamp detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeika, N. S.; Abramovich, A.; Yadid-Pecht, O.; Yitzhaky, Y.

    2009-08-01

    The advantages of terahertz (THz) imaging are well known. They penetrate well most non-conducting media and there are no known biological hazards, This makes such imaging systems important for homeland security, as they can be used to image concealed objects and often into rooms or buildings from the outside. There are also biomedical applications that are arising. Unfortunately, THz imaging is quite expensive, especially for real time systems, largely because of the price of the detector. Bolometers and pyroelectric detectors can each easily cost at least hundreds of dollars if not more, thus making focal plane arrays of them quite expensive. We have found that common miniature commercial neon indicator lamps costing typically about 30 cents each exhibit high sensitivity to THz radiation [1-3], with microsecond order rise times, thus making them excellent candidates for such focal plane arrays. NEP is on the order of 10-10 W/Hz1/2. Significant improvement of detection performance is expected when heterodyne detection is used Efforts are being made to develop focal plane array imagers using such devices at 300 GHz. Indeed, preliminary images using 4x4 arrays have already been obtained. An 8x8 VLSI board has been developed and is presently being tested. Since no similar imaging systems have been developed previously, there are many new problems to be solved with such a novel and unconventional imaging system. These devices act as square law detectors, with detected signal proportional to THz power. This allows them to act as mixers in heterodyne detection, thus allowing NEP to be reduced further by almost two orders of magnitude. Plans are to expand the arrays to larger sizes, and to employ super resolution techniques to improve image quality beyond that ordinarily obtainable at THz frequencies.

  6. Fabrication of prototype imaging arrays for SCUBA-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, G.C.; Beall, J.A.; Doriese, W.B.; Duncan, W.D.; Ferreira, L.S.; Irwin, K.D.; Reintsema, C.D.; Ullom, J.N.; Vale, L.R.; Xu, Y.; Zink, B.L.; Parkes, W.; Bunting, A.S.; Dunare, C.C.; Gundlach, A.M.; Stevenson, J.T.M.; Walton, A.J.; Schulte, E.; Corrales, E.; Sienicki, J.P.; Bintley, Dan; Ade, P.A.R.; Sudiwala, Rashmi V.; Woodcraft, Adam L.; Halpern, Mark; Holland, W.; Audley, M.D.; MacIntosh, M.

    2006-01-01

    Prototype imaging subarrays for SCUBA-2 (the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array) have been fabricated and tested. The pixel count (1280) of these wafer-scale imagers is significantly larger than any other low-temperature detectors produced to date, and represents a major step forward for the low-temperature detector community. These transition-edge-sensor (TES) based imagers utilize several innovations including in-focal-plane superconducting quantum intereference device (SQUID) multiplexers, micromachined Si block absorbers, and superconducting wafer hybridization. In this paper, we review the fabrication processes developed for these imagers and present recent optical data from a prototype imaging subarray

  7. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  8. Clinical evaluation of phased array multicoil for spine MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.M.; Forbes, G.S.; Onofrio, B.M.; Rasmusson, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    Often, it is necessary to image the entire spinal canal or cord. Current surface coil technology necessitates a small field of view (FOV) and multiple coil placements, prolonging the examination. The Phased Array Multicoil (General Electric, Milwaukee, Wis) allows for high-resolution imaging of a larger segment of the spinal axis (48 cm), negating the need for multiple coil placements. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether, this technology can produce higher-quality images with equal or better expediency in a high-volume clinical practice. The studies were performed with a modified 1.5-T system (General Electric, Milwaukee, Wis). Multiple small surface coils are electronically linked so that each coil images only a small segment of the spinal column. The individual images are then fused to display one high-resolution 512-matrix image with up to a 48-cm FOV. A variety of four coil arrays were tested, including a 24-cm FOV dedicated cervical coil, 48-cm FOV shaped cervical/thoracic and straight thoracic/lumbar coils, and a six-coil array 75-cm entire spine coil. The images were then evaluated for overall quality, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and area of coverage

  9. Scintillating fibre detectors using position-sensitive photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agoritsas, V.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Bing, O.; Bravar, A.; Ditta, J.; Drevenak, R.

    1995-01-01

    Scintillating fibre technology has made substantial progress, and has demonstrated great potential for fast tracking and triggering in high luminosity experiments in Particle Physics. Some recent issues of the RD-17 project at CERN are presented for fast and precise readout of scintillating fibre arrays, as well as for upgrade of position-sensitive photomultipliers. Excellent matching of the scintillating fibre and the position-sensitive photomultiplier, in particular in time characteristics, allowed to achieve excellent detector performances, typically a spatial resolution of ∼ 125 μm with time resolution better than 1 ns and detection efficiency greater than 95%. (author)10 refs.; 25 figs.; 1 tab

  10. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The ISPA tube is a position-sensitive photon detector. It belongs to the family of hybrid photon detectors (HPD), recently developed by CERN and INFN with leading photodetector firms. HPDs confront in a vacuum envelope a photocathode and a silicon detector. This can be a single diode or a pixelized detector. The electrons generated by the photocathode are efficiently detected by the silicon anode by applying a high-voltage difference between them. ISPA tube can be used in high-energy applications as well as bio-medical and imaging applications.

  11. Radiation imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, K.; Wiesen, E.J.; Woronowicz, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Improvements in the uniformity and resolution of scintillation cameras are described in detail. One of the problems in scintillation cameras is the non-uniform response of the photomultiplier array to light signals which results in non-uniformity of the displayed image. A novel method of overcoming the problem is presented. By electronically processing the signals from the photomultiplier array it is possible to deduce four co-ordinate signals viz +x, -x, +y and -y; the signals are summed to give the energy of the scintillation event. Details of the electronic circuits required are given. (U.K.)

  12. Photomultiplier tube artifacts on 67Ga-citrate imaging caused by loss of correction floods due to an off-peak status of one head of a dual-head γ-camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Joseph E; Song, Na; Jaini, Sridivya; Lorenzo, Ruth; Love, Charito

    2012-12-01

    γ-cameras use flood-field corrections to ensure image uniformity during clinical imaging. A loss or corruption of the correction data of one head of a dual-head camera can result in an off-peak artifactual appearance. We present our experience with the occurrence of such an incident on a (67)Ga scan. A patient was referred for a whole-body (67)Ga scan to evaluate for causes of neutropenic fever. Whole-body planar and static images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremities in multiple projections were obtained. Whole-body images showed decreased image quality on the anterior view obtained with detector 1 and an unremarkable posterior image obtained with detector 2. A problem with detector 2 was suspected, and additional static images were obtained after rotation of the detector heads. The posterior images taken with detector 1 showed photomultiplier tube outlines. The anterior images taken with detector 2 showed improved count and image quality. It was later found that the uniformity map for detector 2 had been lost and that this software malfunction led to the resulting imaging problem. When artifacts with an off-peak appearance are seen on scintigraphic images, evaluation of possible causes should include not only isotope window settings but also an incorrect or corrupted uniformity map.

  13. Coded aperture subreflector array for high resolution radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jonathan J.; Herrault, Florian; Kona, Keerti; Virbila, Gabriel; McGuire, Chuck; Wetzel, Mike; Fung, Helen; Prophet, Eric

    2017-05-01

    HRL Laboratories has been developing a new approach for high resolution radar imaging on stationary platforms. High angular resolution is achieved by operating at 235 GHz and using a scalable tile phased array architecture that has the potential to realize thousands of elements at an affordable cost. HRL utilizes aperture coding techniques to minimize the size and complexity of the RF electronics needed for beamforming, and wafer level fabrication and integration allow tiles containing 1024 elements to be manufactured with reasonable costs. This paper describes the results of an initial feasibility study for HRL's Coded Aperture Subreflector Array (CASA) approach for a 1024 element micromachined antenna array with integrated single-bit phase shifters. Two candidate electronic device technologies were evaluated over the 170 - 260 GHz range, GaN HEMT transistors and GaAs Schottky diodes. Array structures utilizing silicon micromachining and die bonding were evaluated for etch and alignment accuracy. Finally, the overall array efficiency was estimated to be about 37% (not including spillover losses) using full wave array simulations and measured device performance, which is a reasonable value at 235 GHz. Based on the measured data we selected GaN HEMT devices operated passively with 0V drain bias due to their extremely low DC power dissipation.

  14. Rice8987 Array: Gel images - RMOS | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us RMOS Rice8987 Array: Gel images Data detail Data name Rice8987 Array: Gel images DOI 10.1890...e by Wako), was used to other Dplate. Gel images were scanned by scanner (Molecular Dynamics Co.). Number of...Database Site Policy | Contact Us Rice8987 Array: Gel images - RMOS | LSDB Archive ...

  15. Photomultiplier protector for a fluorometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priarone, P.; St John, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The photometer is adapted for sensing radiation emitted by a chemical sample held in a cuvette received in a first compartment and includes a highly sensitive photomultiplier in a second compartment adjacent the first compartment for detecting fluorescent radiation emitted by the chemical sample and passing through an opening between the compartments. A mechanical protector assembly is provided for protecting the photomultiplier from ambient light and includes a movable light shield movable between a first position blocking the opening and a second position not blocking the opening. A knob is provided for moving the light shield to the first position to protect the photomultiplier from light entering from the first compartment when the first compartment is opened for insertion or removal of a cuvette, and for moving the light shield to the second position not blocking the opening to permit radiation emitted by the chemical sample to impinge upon the photomultiplier in the second compartment. The photometer also includes a mechanical interlocking assembly for ensuring that the first compartment cannot be opened unless the light shield is in the first position to prevent ambient light from entering the second compartment from the first compartment and reaching the photomultiplier

  16. Uncooled infrared focal plane array imaging in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shuyu

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the development of uncooled infrared focal plane array (UIFPA) imaging in China in the past decade. Sensors based on optical or electrical read-out mechanism were developed but the latter dominates the market. In resistive bolometers, VOx and amorphous silicon are still the two major thermal-sensing materials. The specifications of the IRFPA made by different manufactures were collected and compared. Currently more than five Chinese companies and institutions design and fabricate uncooled infrared focal plane array. Some devices have sensitivity as high as 30 mK; the largest array for commercial products is 640×512 and the smallest pixel size is 17 μm. Emphasis is given on the pixel MEMS design, ROIC design, fabrication, and packaging of the IRFPA manufactured by GWIC, especially on design for high sensitivities, low noise, better uniformity and linearity, better stabilization for whole working temperature range, full-digital design, etc.

  17. Performance evaluation of neuro-PET using silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jiwoong; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi@sogang.ac.kr; Jung, Jin Ho, E-mail: jinho1115@gmail.com; Kim, Sangsu; Im, Ki Chun

    2016-05-21

    Recently, we have developed the second prototype Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for human brain imaging. The PET system was comprised of detector block which consisted of 4×4 SiPMs and 4×4 Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate arrays, charge signal transmission method, high density position decoder circuit and FPGA-embedded ADC boards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the newly developed neuro-PET system. The energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, sensitivity, stability of the photo-peak position and count rate performance were measured. Tomographic image of 3D Hoffman brain phantom was also acquired to evaluate imaging capability of the neuro-PET. The average energy and timing resolutions measured for 511 keV gamma rays were 17±0.1% and 3±0.3 ns, respectively. Spatial resolution and sensitivity at the center of field of view (FOV) were 3.1 mm and 0.8%, respectively. The average scatter fraction was 0.4 with an energy window of 350–650 keV. The maximum true count rate and maximum NECR were measured as 43.3 kcps and 6.5 kcps at an activity concentration of 16.7 kBq/ml and 5.5 kBq/ml, respectively. Long-term stability results show that there was no significant change in the photo-peak position, energy resolution and count rate for 60 days. Phantom imaging studies were performed and they demonstrated the feasibility for high quality brain imaging. The performance tests and imaging results indicate that the newly developed PET is useful for brain imaging studies, if the axial FOV is extended to improve the system sensitivity.

  18. Development of a spherically focused phased array transducer for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingfei; Foiret, Josquin; Stephens, Douglas N.; Le Baron, Olivier; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2016-01-01

    A 1.5 MHz prolate spheroidal therapeutic array with 128 circular elements was designed to accommodate standard imaging arrays for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia. The implementation of this dual-array system integrates real-time therapeutic and imaging functions with a single ultrasound system (Vantage 256, Verasonics). To facilitate applications involving small animal imaging and therapy the array was designed to have a beam depth of field smaller than 3.5 mm and to electronically steer...

  19. Development of a magnetic nanoparticle susceptibility magnitude imaging array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko, Bradley W; Nadar, Priyanka M; Hoopes, P Jack; Diamond, Solomon G

    2014-01-01

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over five dilutions (R 2  > 0.98, p < 0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe ml −1  mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution. (paper)

  20. A depth-of-interaction PET detector using mutual gain-equalized silicon photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, W.; Weisenberger, A.G.; Dong, H.; Kross, Brian; Lee, S.; McKisson, J.; Zorn, Carl

    2012-01-01

    We developed a prototype high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications based on dual-ended readout of LYSO array with two silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Flood images, energy resolution, and depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for a LYSO array - 0.7 mm in crystal pitch and 10 mm in thickness - with four unpolished parallel sides. Flood images were obtained such that individual crystal element in the array is resolved. The energy resolution of the entire array was measured to be 33%, while individual crystal pixel elements utilizing the signal from both sides ranged from 23.3% to 27%. By applying a mutual-gain equalization method, a DOI resolution of 2 mm for the crystal array was obtained in the experiments while simulations indicate ∼1 mm DOI resolution could possibly be achieved. The experimental DOI resolution can be further improved by obtaining revised detector supporting electronics with better energy resolutions. This study provides a detailed detector calibration and DOI response characterization of the dual-ended readout SiPM-based PET detectors, which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner in the future.

  1. Multisite two-photon imaging of neurons on multielectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Steve M.; Lukina, Natalia; Longmuir, Kenneth J.; Wu, Yan

    2001-04-01

    We wish to understand how neural systems store, recall, and process information. We are using cultured networks of cortical neurons grown on microelectrode arrays as a model system for studying the emergent properties of ensembles of living neurons. We have developed a 2-way communication interface between the cultured network and a computer- generated animal, the Neurally Controlled Animat. Neural activity is used to control the behavior of the Animat, and 2- photon time-lapse imaging is carried out in order to observe the morphological changes that might underlie changes in neural processing. The 2-photon microscope is ideal for repeated imaging over hours or days, with submicron resolution and little photodamage. We have designed a computer-controlled microscope stage that allows imaging several locations in sequence, in order to collect more image data. For the latest progress, see: http://www.caltech.edu/~pinelab/PotterGroup.htm.

  2. Contact CMOS imaging of gaseous oxygen sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daivasagaya, Daisy S; Yao, Lei; Yi Yung, Ka; Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Cheung, Maurice C; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-10-01

    We describe a compact luminescent gaseous oxygen (O 2 ) sensor microsystem based on the direct integration of sensor elements with a polymeric optical filter and placed on a low power complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC). The sensor operates on the measurement of excited-state emission intensity of O 2 -sensitive luminophore molecules tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp) 3 ] 2+ ) encapsulated within sol-gel derived xerogel thin films. The polymeric optical filter is made with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that is mixed with a dye (Sudan-II). The PDMS membrane surface is molded to incorporate arrays of trapezoidal microstructures that serve to focus the optical sensor signals on to the imager pixels. The molded PDMS membrane is then attached with the PDMS color filter. The xerogel sensor arrays are contact printed on top of the PDMS trapezoidal lens-like microstructures. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. Correlated double sampling circuit, pixel address, digital control and signal integration circuits are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data is read out as a serial coded signal. The CMOS imager consumes a static power of 320 µW and an average dynamic power of 625 µW when operating at 100 Hz sampling frequency and 1.8 V DC. This CMOS sensor system provides a useful platform for the development of miniaturized optical chemical gas sensors.

  3. ATMAD: robust image analysis for Automatic Tissue MicroArray De-arraying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Paveau, Vincent; Cauchois, Cyril; Kervrann, Charles

    2018-04-19

    Over the last two decades, an innovative technology called Tissue Microarray (TMA), which combines multi-tissue and DNA microarray concepts, has been widely used in the field of histology. It consists of a collection of several (up to 1000 or more) tissue samples that are assembled onto a single support - typically a glass slide - according to a design grid (array) layout, in order to allow multiplex analysis by treating numerous samples under identical and standardized conditions. However, during the TMA manufacturing process, the sample positions can be highly distorted from the design grid due to the imprecision when assembling tissue samples and the deformation of the embedding waxes. Consequently, these distortions may lead to severe errors of (histological) assay results when the sample identities are mismatched between the design and its manufactured output. The development of a robust method for de-arraying TMA, which localizes and matches TMA samples with their design grid, is therefore crucial to overcome the bottleneck of this prominent technology. In this paper, we propose an Automatic, fast and robust TMA De-arraying (ATMAD) approach dedicated to images acquired with brightfield and fluorescence microscopes (or scanners). First, tissue samples are localized in the large image by applying a locally adaptive thresholding on the isotropic wavelet transform of the input TMA image. To reduce false detections, a parametric shape model is considered for segmenting ellipse-shaped objects at each detected position. Segmented objects that do not meet the size and the roundness criteria are discarded from the list of tissue samples before being matched with the design grid. Sample matching is performed by estimating the TMA grid deformation under the thin-plate model. Finally, thanks to the estimated deformation, the true tissue samples that were preliminary rejected in the early image processing step are recognized by running a second segmentation step. We

  4. Realization of cantilever arrays for parallel proximity imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarov, Y; Ivanov, Tz; Frank, A; Zoellner, J-P; Nikolov, N; Rangelow, I W

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterisation of self-actuating, and self-sensing cantilever arrays for large-scale parallel surface scanning. Each cantilever is integrated with a sharp silicon tip, a thermal-driven bimorph actuator, and a piezoresistive deflection sensor. Thus, the tip to the sample distance can be controlled individually for each cantilever. A radius of the tips below 10 nm is obtained, which enables nanometre in-plane surface imaging by Angstrom resolution in vertical direction. The fabricated cantilever probe arrays are also applicable for large-area manipulation, sub-10 nm metrology, bottom-up synthesis, high-speed gas analysis, for different bio-applications like recognition of DNA, RNA, or various biomarkers of a single disease, etc.

  5. Position-sensitive gaseous photomultipliers research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Francke, Tom; Peskov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Gaseous photomultipliers are defined as gas-filled devices capable of recording single ultraviolet (UV) and visible photons with high position resolution. Used in a variety of research areas, these detectors can be paired with computers to treat and store imaging information of UV-light. Position-Sensitive Gaseous Photomultipliers: Research and Applications explores the advancement of gaseous detectors as applied for single photon detection. Emphasizing emerging perspectives and new ways to apply gaseous detectors across research fields, this research-based publication is an essential reference source for engineers, physicists, graduate-level students, and researchers.

  6. Broadband image sensor array based on graphene-CMOS integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Stijn; Navickaite, Gabriele; Monasterio, Carles; Gupta, Shuchi; Piqueras, Juan José; Pérez, Raúl; Burwell, Gregory; Nikitskiy, Ivan; Lasanta, Tania; Galán, Teresa; Puma, Eric; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Konstantatos, Gerasimos; Koppens, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Integrated circuits based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) are at the heart of the technological revolution of the past 40 years, enabling compact and low-cost microelectronic circuits and imaging systems. However, the diversification of this platform into applications other than microcircuits and visible-light cameras has been impeded by the difficulty to combine semiconductors other than silicon with CMOS. Here, we report the monolithic integration of a CMOS integrated circuit with graphene, operating as a high-mobility phototransistor. We demonstrate a high-resolution, broadband image sensor and operate it as a digital camera that is sensitive to ultraviolet, visible and infrared light (300-2,000 nm). The demonstrated graphene-CMOS integration is pivotal for incorporating 2D materials into the next-generation microelectronics, sensor arrays, low-power integrated photonics and CMOS imaging systems covering visible, infrared and terahertz frequencies.

  7. Silicon Photomultipliers: Dark Current and its Statistical Spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto PAGANO

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this paper is to investigate on a statistical basis at the wafer level the relationship existing among the dark currents of the single pixel compared to the whole Silicon Photomultiplier array. This is the first time to our knowledge that such a comparison is made, crucial to pass this new technology to the semiconductor manufacturing standards. In particular, emission microscopy measurements and current measurements allowed us to conclude that optical trenches strongly improve the device performances.

  8. Improvements on Fresnel arrays for high contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhem, Roux; Laurent, Koechlin

    2018-03-01

    The Fresnel Diffractive Array Imager (FDAI) is based on a new optical concept for space telescopes, developed at Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (IRAP), Toulouse, France. For the visible and near-infrared it has already proven its performances in resolution and dynamic range. We propose it now for astrophysical applications in the ultraviolet with apertures from 6 to 30 meters, aimed at imaging in UV faint astrophysical sources close to bright ones, as well as other applications requiring high dynamic range. Of course the project needs first a probatory mission at small aperture to validate the concept in space. In collaboration with institutes in Spain and Russia, we will propose to board a small prototype of Fresnel imager on the International Space Station (ISS), with a program combining technical tests and astrophysical targets. The spectral domain should contain the Lyman- α line ( λ = 121 nm). As part of its preparation, we improve the Fresnel array design for a better Point Spread Function in UV, presently on a small laboratory prototype working at 260 nm. Moreover, we plan to validate a new optical design and chromatic correction adapted to UV. In this article we present the results of numerical propagations showing the improvement in dynamic range obtained by combining and adapting three methods : central obturation, optimization of the bars mesh holding the Fresnel rings, and orthogonal apodization. We briefly present the proposed astrophysical program of a probatory mission with such UV optics.

  9. Characterization of Multianode Photomultiplier Tubes for a Cherenkov Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninghoff, Morgen; Turisini, Matteo; Kim, Andrey; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Kubarovsky, Valery; Duquesne University Collaboration; Jefferson Lab Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In the Fall of 2017, Jefferson Lab's CLAS12 (CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer) detector is expecting the addition of a RICH (ring imaging Cherenkov) detector which will allow enhanced particle identification in the momentum range of 3 to 8 GeV/c. RICH detectors measure the velocity of charged particles through the detection of produced Cherenkov radiation and the reconstruction of the angle of emission. The emitted Cherenkov photons are detected by a triangular-shaped grid of 391 multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) made by Hamamatsu. The custom readout electronics consist of MAROC (multianode read out chip) boards controlled by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) boards, and adapters used to connect the MAROC boards and MAPMTs. The focus of this project is the characterization of the MAPMTs with the new front end electronics. To perform these tests, a black box setup with a picosecond diode laser was constructed with low and high voltage supplies. A highly automated procedure was developed to acquire data at different combinations of high voltage values, light intensities and readout electronics settings. Future work involves using the collected data in calibration procedures and analyzing that data to resolve the best location for each MAPMT. SULI, NSF.

  10. Microfabricated optically pumped magnetometer arrays for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, A. R.; Sheng, D.; Krzyzewski, S. P.; Geller, S.; Knappe, S.

    2017-02-01

    Optically-pumped magnetometers have demonstrated magnetic field measurements as precise as the best superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers. Our group develops miniature alkali atom-based magnetic sensors using microfabrication technology. Our sensors do not require cryogenic cooling, and can be positioned very close to the sample, making these sensors an attractive option for development in the medical community. We will present our latest chip-scale optically-pumped gradiometer developed for array applications to image magnetic fields from the brain noninvasively. These developments should lead to improved spatial resolution, and potentially sensitive measurements in unshielded environments.

  11. Advances in gas avalanche photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Breskin, Amos; Buzulutskov, A F; Chechik, R; Garty, E; Shefer, G; Singh, B K

    2000-01-01

    Gas avalanche detectors, combining solid photocathodes with fast electron multipliers, provide an attractive solution for photon localization over very large sensitive areas and under high illumination flux. They offer single-photon sensitivity and the possibility of operation under very intense magnetic fields. We discuss the principal factors governing the operation of gas avalanche photomultipliers. We summarize the recent progress made in alkali-halide and CVD-diamond UV-photocathodes, capable of operation under gas multiplication, and novel thin-film protected alkali-antimonide photocathodes, providing, for the first time, the possibility of operating gas photomultipliers in the visible range. Electron multipliers, adequate for these photon detectors, are proposed and some applications are briefly discussed.

  12. Scintillation counter: photomultiplier tube alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into the sample receiving zone. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (auth)

  13. Imaging subducted slabs using seismic arrays in the Western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, H. L.; Rost, S.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years array seismology has been used extensively to image the small scale structure of the Earth. Such structure likely represents chemical heterogeneity and is therefore essential in our understanding of mantle convection and the composition of the Earth’s deep interior. As subduction is the main source of (re)introducing slab material into the Earth, it is of particular interest to track these heterogeneities. Resolving details of the composition and deformation of subducted lithosphere can help provide constraints on the subduction process, the composition of the mantle and mantle convection. This study uses seismic array techniques to map seismic heterogeneities associated with western Pacfic subduction zones, where a variety of slab geometries have been previously observed. Seismic energy arriving prior to the PP arrival was analysed at Eielson Array (ILAR), Alaska. More than 200 earthquakes were selected with Mw ≥ 6 and with epicentral distances of 90-110deg, giving a good coverage of the PP precursor (P*P) wavefield. Initial findings indicate that the observed P*P arrive out of plane and are likely a result of scattering. These scatterers are linked to the subduction of the Pacific Plate under the Philippine Sea in the Izu-Bonin and Mariana subduction zones. To enable efficient processing of large datasets, a robust automatic coherent (but unpredicted) arrival detector algorithm has been developed to select suitable precursors. Slowness and backazimuth were calculated for each precursor and were used in conjunction with P*P arrival times to back-raytrace the energy from the array to the scatterer location. Processing of the full dataset will help refine models regarding slab deformation as they descend into the mantle as well as unveiling the depth of their descent.

  14. Ultrasonic phased array with surface acoustic wave for imaging cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ohara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To accurately measure crack lengths, we developed a real-time surface imaging method (SAW PA combining an ultrasonic phased array (PA with a surface acoustic wave (SAW. SAW PA using a Rayleigh wave with a high sensitivity to surface defects was implemented for contact testing using a wedge with the third critical angle that allows the Rayleigh wave to be generated. Here, to realize high sensitivity imaging, SAW PA was optimized in terms of the wedge and the imaging area. The improved SAW PA was experimentally demonstrated using a fatigue crack specimen made of an aluminum alloy. For further verification in more realistic specimens, SAW PA was applied to stainless-steel specimens with a fatigue crack and stress corrosion cracks (SCCs. The fatigue crack was visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and its length was measured with a high accuracy of better than 1 mm. The SCCs generated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs of a weld were successfully visualized with a satisfactory SNR, although responses at coarse grains appeared throughout the imaging area. The SCC lengths were accurately measured. The imaging results also precisely showed complicated distributions of SCCs, which were in excellent agreement with the optically observed distributions.

  15. Algorithms and Array Design Criteria for Robust Imaging in Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Binoy George

    Optical interferometry is a technique for obtaining high-resolution imagery of a distant target by interfering light from multiple telescopes. Image restoration from interferometric measurements poses a unique set of challenges. The first challenge is that the measurement set provides only a sparse-sampling of the object's Fourier Transform and hence image formation from these measurements is an inherently ill-posed inverse problem. Secondly, atmospheric turbulence causes severe distortion of the phase of the Fourier samples. We develop array design conditions for unique Fourier phase recovery, as well as a comprehensive algorithmic framework based on the notion of redundant-spaced-calibration (RSC), which together achieve reliable image reconstruction in spite of these challenges. Within this framework, we see that classical interferometric observables such as the bispectrum and closure phase can limit sensitivity, and that generalized notions of these observables can improve both theoretical and empirical performance. Our framework leverages techniques from lattice theory to resolve integer phase ambiguities in the interferometric phase measurements, and from graph theory, to select a reliable set of generalized observables. We analyze the expected shot-noise-limited performance of our algorithm for both pairwise and Fizeau interferometric architectures and corroborate this analysis with simulation results. We apply techniques from the field of compressed sensing to perform image reconstruction from the estimates of the object's Fourier coefficients. The end result is a comprehensive strategy to achieve well-posed and easily-predictable reconstruction performance in optical interferometry.

  16. Phased Array Imaging of Complex-Geometry Composite Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brath, Alex J; Simonetti, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    Progress in computational fluid dynamics and the availability of new composite materials are driving major advances in the design of aerospace engine components which now have highly complex geometries optimized to maximize system performance. However, shape complexity poses significant challenges to traditional nondestructive evaluation methods whose sensitivity and selectivity rapidly decrease as surface curvature increases. In addition, new aerospace materials typically exhibit an intricate microstructure that further complicates the inspection. In this context, an attractive solution is offered by combining ultrasonic phased array (PA) technology with immersion testing. Here, the water column formed between the complex surface of the component and the flat face of a linear or matrix array probe ensures ideal acoustic coupling between the array and the component as the probe is continuously scanned to form a volumetric rendering of the part. While the immersion configuration is desirable for practical testing, the interpretation of the measured ultrasonic signals for image formation is complicated by reflection and refraction effects that occur at the water-component interface. To account for refraction, the geometry of the interface must first be reconstructed from the reflected signals and subsequently used to compute suitable delay laws to focus inside the component. These calculations are based on ray theory and can be computationally intensive. Moreover, strong reflections from the interface can lead to a thick dead zone beneath the surface of the component which limits sensitivity to shallow subsurface defects. This paper presents a general approach that combines advanced computing for rapid ray tracing in anisotropic media with a 256-channel parallel array architecture. The full-volume inspection of complex-shape components is enabled through the combination of both reflected and transmitted signals through the part using a pair of arrays held in a yoke

  17. Silicon photomultipliers in AMIGA muon counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botti, Ana Martina [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Instituto de Tecnologias en Deteccion y Astroparticulas (ITeDA) (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre-Auger-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The project AMIGA (Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array) aims to extend the energy range at the Pierre Auger Observatory to observe cosmic rays of lower energies (down to ∝10{sup 17} eV) and to study the transition from extragalactic to galactic cosmic rays. AMIGA is compounded by an infill of surface detectors (employing Cherenkov radiation detection in water) and muon counters. The AMIGA muon counters consist of an array of buried modules composed of 64 scintillator bars, a multi-pixel Photo Multiplier Tube (PMT) and the corresponding electronic of acquisition which works along with the surface detector. Currently, ITeDA is evaluating the feasibility of replacing PMTs with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) without performing any substantial modification in the digital readout nor in the mechanical design. I present calibration results of a prototype module associated to the surface detector Toune of the Pierre Auger Observatory using a SiPM Hamamatsu S1257-100C plugged to the standard AMIGA front-end electronics. In addition, a study concerning gain stability and temperature variation has also been performed and is reported. I finally discuss a comparison between traces measured by both photodetectors (PMT and SiPM) for modules associated to the surface detector Toune.

  18. Characterization studies of Silicon Photomultipliers and crystals matrices for a novel time of flight PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Cortinovis, Daniele; Doroud, Katayoun; Garutti, Erika; Lecoq, Paul; Liu, Zheng; Martinez, Rosana; Paganoni, Marco; Pizzichemi, Marco; Silenzi, Alessandro; Xu, Chen; Zvolský, Milan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of crystal matrices and silicon photomultiplier arrays for a novel Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector, namely the external plate of the EndoTOFPET-US system. The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration aims to integrate Time-Of-Flight PET with ultrasound endoscopy in a novel multimodal device, capable to support the development of new biomarkers for prostate and pancreatic tumors. The detector consists in two parts: a PET head mounted on an ultrasound probe and an external PET plate. The challenging goal of 1 mm spatial resolution for the PET image requires a detector with small crystal size, and therefore high channel density: 4096 LYSO crystals individually readout by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) make up the external plate. The quality and properties of these components must be assessed before the assembly. The dark count rate, gain, breakdown voltage and correlated noise of the SiPMs are measured, while the LYSO crystals are evaluated in terms of light yield and en...

  19. Transition-edge sensor imaging arrays for astrophysics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burney, Jennifer Anne

    Many interesting objects in our universe currently elude observation in the optical band: they are too faint or they vary rapidly and thus any structure in their radiation is lost over the period of an exposure. Conventional photon detectors cannot simultaneously provide energy resolution and time-stamping of individual photons at fast rates. Superconducting detectors have recently made the possibility of simultaneous photon counting, imaging, and energy resolution a reality. Our research group has pioneered the use of one such detector, the Transition-Edge Sensor (TES). TES physics is simple and elegant. A thin superconducting film, biased at its critical temperature, can act as a particle detector: an incident particle deposits energy and drives the film into its superconducting-normal transition. By inductively coupling the detector to a SQUID amplifier circuit, this resistance change can be read out as a current pulse, and its energy deduced by integrating over the pulse. TESs can be used to accurately time-stamp (to 0.1 [mu]s) and energy-resolve (0.15 eV at 1.6 eV) near-IR/visible/near-UV photons at rates of 30~kHz. The first astronomical observations using fiber-coupled detectors were made at the Stanford Student Observatory 0.6~m telescope in 1999. Further observations of the Crab Pulsar from the 107" telescope at the University of Texas McDonald Observatory showed rapid phase variations over the near-IR/visible/near-UV band. These preliminary observations provided a glimpse into a new realm of observations of pulsars, binary systems, and accreting black holes promised by TES arrays. This thesis describes the development, characterization, and preliminary use of the first camera system based on Transition-Edge Sensors. While single-device operation is relatively well-understood, the operation of a full imaging array poses significant challenges. This thesis addresses all aspects related to the creation and characterization of this cryogenic imaging

  20. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, D., E-mail: dkuwahar@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ito, N. [Department of Intelligent System Engineering, Ube National College of Technology, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8555 (Japan); Nagayama, Y. [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yoshinaga, T. [Department of Applied Physics, National Defense Academy, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-0811 (Japan); Yamaguchi, S. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Sugito, S. [Equipment Development Center, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Kogi, Y. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyusyu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  1. A superconducting supercollider calorimeter photomultiplier tube preamplifier circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panescu, D; Lackey, J; Robl, P; Smith, W H [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.

    1992-07-15

    This study presents the design of the front end amplifier for a scintillator calorimeter with photomultiplier tube (PMT) readout. The design is based on analytical computations and SPICE simulations, and is checked against tests performed on a prototyped circuit. We were looking to achieve (1) a very low droop within the 4 ns after the integration of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) signal was completed, (2) a very low noise figure for the whole amplifier in a 100 MHz bandwidth, (3) an input impedance optimized for the PMT which is actually used, (4) baseline restoration as quick as possible at the output of the clip amps, (5) no loss of information due to the saturation at intermediary stages (e.g. integrator), and (6) an output driving 100 {Omega} twisted pair cables, or 50 {Omega} coaxial cables, in order to transmit the signal to switched capacitor arrays for analog storage. (orig.).

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements using microlens array and area imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Susanne; Lietz, Achim; Kroner, Margareta; Valler, Martin; Heilker, Ralf

    2004-02-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) assay formats are frequently used technologies in high-throughput screening. In this article, we have characterised the novel Plate::Vision(2) 96-microlens array reader (Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Germany) and compared it to the novel LEADseeker Generation IV multimodality imaging system (LEADseeker Gen IV; Amersham Biosciences UK Ltd., UK) for applications in the TRF mode. In europium measurements using the TRF mode, the Plate::Vision displayed a limit of detection for europium of approximately 3 pM, which was comparable to two established TRF readers, the Discovery and the Victor V (both PerkinElmer Life Sciences Inc., USA). The LEADseeker's limit of detection only extended down to europium concentrations of approximately 10 pM in these experiments. For TRF resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) experiments, a europium-biotin (Eu-biotin) conjugate was titrated with a streptavidin-allophycocyanin (SA-APC) conjugate. The Plate::Vision produced Z' values larger than 0.5 for the acceptor fluorophor emission with concentrations of Eu-biotin as low as 3 nM combined with 175 pM SA-APC. To achieve Z' values of at least 0.5 with the LEADseeker, concentrations of 10 nM Eu-biotin combined with SA-APC of at least 0.8 nM were required. In a drug screening application using TR-FRET, the energy transfer from a europium-labelled protein X (Eu-protein X) to a complex of biotinylated peptide Y with SA-APC was measured. Using the Plate::Vision, a Z' factor larger than 0.5 for the acceptor fluorophor emission was only obtained for a Eu-protein X concentration of at least 10 nM in combination with biotinylated peptide Y/SA-APC at saturating concentrations. Both the Plate::Vision and the LEADseeker show good quality results for applications in the TRF mode and enable an increased throughput based on their shortened measurement time in comparison to classic photomultiplier tube-based readers.

  3. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  4. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed

  5. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T. [Edison Welding Institute, 1250 Arthur E. Adams Drive, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  6. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Michel Antolovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach.

  7. Hodoscope module with miniature photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'zer, L.I.; Gribushin, A.M.; Zhil'tsov, L.Ya.; Matveeva, E.N.; Philipenko, T.D.; Sinev, N.B.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental Scintillation Magnetic Spectrometer (SMS) installation, whose main element is an extended hodoscope system, is being built for the accelerator of the High Energy Laboratory of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The authors describe the scintillation hodoscope of the SMS installation and present the applicable amplitude and time characteristics of several types of miniature photomultipliers (FEU-58, FEU-60, FEU-114-1, FEU-147-1, and R-1635 (Hamamatsu, Japan)), which were obtained with a 106 Ru radioactive source and standard plastic scintillators of two types, based on oxazoles in polystyrene and in polymethylmethacrylate

  8. Rectangle Surface Coil Array in a Grid Arrangement for Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-13

    magnet wires with insulating coating for rectangular surface coils. The wires are formed into four one turn 145mm x 32mm rectangular coils...switchable array, RF magnetic field, NQR, MRI, NMR, tuning, decoupling I. INTRODUCTION ESONANCE imaging can be accomplished using Nuclear Magnetic ...grid array. This achieves the switchable array configuration. Later, investigations will have circuit controlled multiplexer for switching to

  9. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Henderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast.

  10. Multi-viewpoint Image Array Virtual Viewpoint Rapid Generation Algorithm Based on Image Layering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lu; Piao, Yan

    2018-04-01

    The use of multi-view image array combined with virtual viewpoint generation technology to record 3D scene information in large scenes has become one of the key technologies for the development of integrated imaging. This paper presents a virtual viewpoint rendering method based on image layering algorithm. Firstly, the depth information of reference viewpoint image is quickly obtained. During this process, SAD is chosen as the similarity measure function. Then layer the reference image and calculate the parallax based on the depth information. Through the relative distance between the virtual viewpoint and the reference viewpoint, the image layers are weighted and panned. Finally the virtual viewpoint image is rendered layer by layer according to the distance between the image layers and the viewer. This method avoids the disadvantages of the algorithm DIBR, such as high-precision requirements of depth map and complex mapping operations. Experiments show that, this algorithm can achieve the synthesis of virtual viewpoints in any position within 2×2 viewpoints range, and the rendering speed is also very impressive. The average result proved that this method can get satisfactory image quality. The average SSIM value of the results relative to real viewpoint images can reaches 0.9525, the PSNR value can reaches 38.353 and the image histogram similarity can reaches 93.77%.

  11. The first telescope of the HEGRA air Cherenkov imaging telescope array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoyan, R.; Kankanian, R.; Krennrich, F.; Mueller, N.; Sander, H.; Sawallisch, P.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.; Beglarian, A.; Fernandez, J.; Fonseca, V.; Grewe, W.; Heusler, A.; Konopelko, A.K.; Lorenz, E.; Merck, M.; Plyasheshnikov, A.V.; Renker, D.; Samorski, M.; Sauerland, K.; Smarsch, E.; Stamm, W.; Ulrich, M.; Wiedner, C.A.; Wirth, H.

    1994-01-01

    In search of VHE γ ray emission from cosmic point sources a system of imaging Cherenkov telescopes is constructed at present on the Canarian island of La Palma; the first telescope has been operational since 1992. The Cherenkov light from air shower particles is collected by a 5 m 2 reflector. The camera at the focus contains 37 photomultipliers which sample the images of the Cherenkov flashes. The subsequent image analysis allows the discrimination of γ ray induced events from the much more abundant charged cosmic ray induced showers. The telescope has an effective energy threshold for γ showers of about 1.5 TeV. During the first year of operation a signal from the Crab nebula was detected. ((orig.))

  12. High-resolution imaging using a wideband MIMO radar system with two distributed arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dang-wei; Ma, Xiao-yan; Chen, A-Lei; Su, Yi

    2010-05-01

    Imaging a fast maneuvering target has been an active research area in past decades. Usually, an array antenna with multiple elements is implemented to avoid the motion compensations involved in the inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. Nevertheless, there is a price dilemma due to the high level of hardware complexity compared to complex algorithm implemented in the ISAR imaging system with only one antenna. In this paper, a wideband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar system with two distributed arrays is proposed to reduce the hardware complexity of the system. Furthermore, the system model, the equivalent array production method and the imaging procedure are presented. As compared with the classical real aperture radar (RAR) imaging system, there is a very important contribution in our method that the lower hardware complexity can be involved in the imaging system since many additive virtual array elements can be obtained. Numerical simulations are provided for testing our system and imaging method.

  13. Demosaicing and Superresolution for Color Filter Array via Residual Image Reconstruction and Sparse Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guangling

    2012-01-01

    A framework of demosaicing and superresolution for color filter array (CFA) via residual image reconstruction and sparse representation is presented.Given the intermediate image produced by certain demosaicing and interpolation technique, a residual image between the final reconstruction image and the intermediate image is reconstructed using sparse representation.The final reconstruction image has richer edges and details than that of the intermediate image. Specifically, a generic dictionar...

  14. 2D sparse array transducer optimization for 3D ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hoon; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2014-01-01

    A 3D ultrasound image is desired in many medical examinations. However, the implementation of a 2D array, which is needed for a 3D image, is challenging with respect to fabrication, interconnection and cabling. A 2D sparse array, which needs fewer elements than a dense array, is a realistic way to achieve 3D images. Because the number of ways the elements can be placed in an array is extremely large, a method for optimizing the array configuration is needed. Previous research placed the target point far from the transducer array, making it impossible to optimize the array in the operating range. In our study, we focused on optimizing a 2D sparse array transducer for 3D imaging by using a simulated annealing method. We compared the far-field optimization method with the near-field optimization method by analyzing a point-spread function (PSF). The resolution of the optimized sparse array is comparable to that of the dense array.

  15. Three-dimensional digital imaging based on shifted point-array encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jindong; Peng, Xiang

    2005-09-10

    An approach to three-dimensional (3D) imaging based on shifted point-array encoding is presented. A kind of point-array structure light is projected sequentially onto the reference plane and onto the object surface to be tested and thus forms a pair of point-array images. A mathematical model is established to formulize the imaging process with the pair of point arrays. This formulation allows for a description of the relationship between the range image of the object surface and the lateral displacement of each point in the point-array image. Based on this model, one can reconstruct each 3D range image point by computing the lateral displacement of the corresponding point on the two point-array images. The encoded point array can be shifted digitally along both the lateral and the longitudinal directions step by step to achieve high spatial resolution. Experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical predictions. This method is applicable for implementing 3D imaging of object surfaces with complex topology or large height discontinuities.

  16. Improved Focusing Method for 3-D Imaging using Row–Column-Addressed 2-D Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2017-01-01

    A row–column-addressed (RCA) 2-D array can be interpreted as two orthogonal 1-D arrays. By transmitting with row elements and receiving the echoes through column elements or vice versa, a rectilinear volume in front of the array can be beamformed. Since the transmit and receive 1-D arrays are ort...... measurements with a PZT λ/2-pitch 3 MHz 62+62 RCA 2-D transducer probe. A synthetic aperture imaging sequence with single element transmissions at a time, is designed for imaging down to 14 cm at a volume rate of 44 Hz....

  17. BI-ground microstrip array coil vs. conventional microstrip array coil for mouse imaging at 7 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ricardo; Terrones, M. A. López; Jakob, P. M.

    2012-10-01

    At high field strengths, the need for more efficient high frequency coils has grown. Since the radiation losses and the interaction between coil and sample increase proportionally to field strength, the quality factor (Q) and the sensitivity of the coil decrease as consequence of these negative effects. Since Zhang et al proposed in 2001 a new surface coil based on the microstrip transmission line for high frequency, different Tx-Rx phased arrays based on this concept have been already introduced in animal and whole body systems at high field strengths, each of them with different modifications in order to get better field homogeneity, SNR or isolation between coil elements in the array. All these arrays for animals systems have been built for rat imaging. One of these modifications is called BI-Ground Microstrip Array Coil (BIGMAC). The implementation of a smaller two-channel BIGMAC design for mouse imaging is studied and its performance compared to a two-channel conventional Microstrip array at 7 Tesla, the higher isolation by using BIGMAC elements in comparison with conventional Microstrip elements is shown in this work.

  18. Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruch, J.F.; Urban, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated. 2 figs

  19. Sampling phased array a new technique for signal processing and ultrasonic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Bulavinov, A.; Joneit, D.; Kröning, M.; Bernus, L.; Dalichow, M.H.; Reddy, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Different signal processing and image reconstruction techniques are applied in ultrasonic non-destructive material evaluation. In recent years, rapid development in the fields of microelectronics and computer engineering lead to wide application of phased array systems. A new phased array technique, called "Sampling Phased Array" has been developed in Fraunhofer Institute for non-destructive testing. It realizes unique approach of measurement and processing of ultrasonic signals. The sampling...

  20. 3-D Imaging using Row--Column-Addressed 2-D Arrays with a Diverging Lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that row–column-addressed (RCA) 2-D arrays can be an inexpensive alternative to fully addressed 2-D arrays. Generally imaging with an RCA 2-D array is limited to its forward-looking volume region. Constructing a double-curved RCA 2-D array or applying a diverging lens over......, is designed for imaging down to 14 cm at a volume rate of 88 Hz. The curvilinear imaging performance of a λ/2-pitch 3 MHz 62+62 RCA 2-D array is investigated as a function of depth, using a diverging lens with f-number of -1. The results of this study demonstrate that the proposed beamforming approach...

  1. 2D array design based on Fermat spiral for ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Graullera, Oscar; Martín, Carlos J; Godoy, Gregorio; Ullate, Luis G

    2010-02-01

    The main challenge faced by 3D ultrasonic imaging with 2D array transducers is the large number of elements required to achieve an acceptable level of quality in the images. Therefore, the optimisation of the array layout, in order to reduce the number of active elements in the aperture, has been a research topic in the last years. Nowadays, array technology has made viable the production of 2D arrays with larger flexibility on elements size, shape and position, allowing to study other configurations different to the classical matrix organisation, such as circular, archimedes spiral or polygonal layout between others. In this work, the problem of designing an imaging system array with large apertures and a very limited number of active elements (N(e)=128 and N(e)=256) using the Fermat spiral layout has been studied. As summary, a general discussion about the most interesting cases is presented.

  2. Sharpening spots: correcting for bleedover in cDNA array images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therneau, Terry; Tschumper, Renee C; Jelinek, Diane

    2002-03-01

    For cDNA array methods that depend on imaging of a radiolabel, we show that bleedover of one spot onto another, due to the gap between the array and the imaging media, can be a major problem. The images can be sharpened, however, using a blind convolution method based on the EM algorithm. The sharpened images look like a set of donuts, which concurs with our knowledge of the spotting process. Oversharpened images are actually useful as well, in locating the centers of each spot.

  3. Simulation of Silicon Photomultiplier Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Stefan; van Dam, Herman T.; Huizenga, Jan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Lohner, Herbert; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2009-12-01

    In a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), also referred to as multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC), many Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) are connected in parallel so as to combine the photon counting capabilities of each of these so-called microcells into a proportional light sensor. The discharge of a single microcell is relatively well understood and electronic models exist to simulate this process. In this paper we introduce an extended model that is able to simulate the simultaneous discharge of multiple cells. This model is used to predict the SiPM signal in response to fast light pulses as a function of the number of fired cells, taking into account the influence of the input impedance of the SiPM preamplifier. The model predicts that the electronic signal is not proportional to the number of fired cells if the preamplifier input impedance is not zero. This effect becomes more important for SiPMs with lower parasitic capacitance (which otherwise is a favorable property). The model is validated by comparing its predictions to experimental data obtained with two different SiPMs (Hamamatsu S10362-11-25u and Hamamatsu S10362-33-25c) illuminated with ps laser pulses. The experimental results are in good agreement with the model predictions.

  4. Timing coincidence studies with fast photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoof, M.A.; Raoof, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The time response of RCA C70045D photomultipliers was studied using a subnanosecond light flasher. The tubes, which have an output rise time of approximately 0.5 ns, were used in coincidence to study the variations in the fwhm of the time spectrum over a certain dynamic range of pulse amplitudes for both leading edge and constant fraction discrimination. A comparison has also been made for the measured time resolutions with some of the other fast photomultipliers. (orig.)

  5. New bi-dimensional SPAD arrays for time resolved single photon imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S., E-mail: tudisco@lns.infn.it [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Piemonte, C. [FBK-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via S. Croce 77, 38122 Trento (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serra, N.; Zorzi, N. [FBK-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via S. Croce 77, 38122 Trento (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Some of the first results concerning the electrical and optical performances of new bi-dimensional single photon avalanche diodes arrays for imaging applications are briefly presented. The planned arrays were realized at the Fondazione Bruno Kessler—Trento and tested at LNS–INFN. The proposed new solution, utilizing a new architecture with integrated quenching resistors, allows to simplify the electronic readout.

  6. New bi-dimensional SPAD arrays for time resolved single photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, R.; Tudisco, S.; Piemonte, C.; Lo Presti, D.; Anzalone, A.; Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Serra, N.; Zorzi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the first results concerning the electrical and optical performances of new bi-dimensional single photon avalanche diodes arrays for imaging applications are briefly presented. The planned arrays were realized at the Fondazione Bruno Kessler—Trento and tested at LNS–INFN. The proposed new solution, utilizing a new architecture with integrated quenching resistors, allows to simplify the electronic readout

  7. Comparison of blind imaging performance of Fizeau and Michelson type arrays for a partially resolved object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Avoort, C.; Den Herder, J.W.; Braat, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares two well-known types of interferometer arrays for optical aperture synthesis. An analytical model for both types describes the expected output, in terms of photon counts. The goal is to characterize the performance of both types of array for blind imaging of a wide-field or

  8. In-vivo evaluation of convex array synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an in-vivo study of synthetic transmit aperture (STA) imaging in comparison to conventional imaging, evaluating whether STA imaging is feasible in-vivo, and whether the image quality obtained is comparable to traditional scanned imaging in terms of penetration depth, spatial...

  9. Optimization of Performance Parameters for Large Area Silicon Photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Kathryn

    2008-10-01

    The goal of the GlueX experiment is to search for exotic hybrid mesons as evidence of gluonic excitations in an effort to better understand confinement. A key component of the GlueX detector is the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter (BCAL) located immediately inside a superconducting solenoid of approximately 2.5T. Because of this arrangement, traditional vacuum photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) which are affected significantly by magnetic fields cannot be used on the BCAL. The use of Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) as front-end detectors has been proposed. While the largest SiPMs that have been previously employed by other experiments are 1x1 mm^2, GlueX proposes to use large area SiPMs each composed of 16 - 3x3 mm^2 cells in a 4x4 array. This puts the GlueX collaboration in the unique position of driving the technology for larger area sensors. In this talk I will discuss tests done in Regina regarding performance parameters of prototype SiPM arrays delivered by SensL, a photonics research and development company based in Ireland, as well as sample 1x1 mm^2 and 3x3 mm^2 SiPMs.

  10. Performance of a thermal imager employing a hybrid pyroelectric detector array with MOSFET readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watton, R.; Mansi, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal imager employing a two-dimensional hybrid array of pyroelectric detectors with MOSFET readout has been built. The design and theoretical performance of the detector are discussed, and the results of performance measurements are presented. 8 references

  11. Three-dimensional real-time synthetic aperture imaging using a rotating phased array transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Dufait, Remi; Schoisswohl, Armin

    2002-01-01

    phased array, which is rotated over the volume of interest. The data is acquired using coded signals and synthetic transmit aperture imaging. Only one group of elements transmits at a time. The delays are set such as to form a cylindrical wave. The back-scattered signal carries information not only from......Current 3D real-time imaging is done either with sparse 2D arrays, or with mechanically moved phased arrays. The former results in a poor resolution and contrast due to a limited amount of elements. The latter has the disadvantage of low frame rates due to the sequential acquisition of the volume...... line-by-line and plane-by-plane. This paper describes an approach which combines mechanically moved phased array with synthetic transmit aperture imaging, resulting in high volume acquisition rates without a trade-off in image quality. The scan method uses a conventional fully populated 64 element...

  12. Algorithm-structured computer arrays and networks architectures and processes for images, percepts, models, information

    CERN Document Server

    Uhr, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    Computer Science and Applied Mathematics: Algorithm-Structured Computer Arrays and Networks: Architectures and Processes for Images, Percepts, Models, Information examines the parallel-array, pipeline, and other network multi-computers.This book describes and explores arrays and networks, those built, being designed, or proposed. The problems of developing higher-level languages for systems and designing algorithm, program, data flow, and computer structure are also discussed. This text likewise describes several sequences of successively more general attempts to combine the power of arrays wi

  13. Depth extraction method with high accuracy in integral imaging based on moving array lenslet technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-yao; Zhang, Juan; Zhao, Xue-wei; Song, Li-pei; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Xing

    2018-03-01

    In order to improve depth extraction accuracy, a method using moving array lenslet technique (MALT) in pickup stage is proposed, which can decrease the depth interval caused by pixelation. In this method, the lenslet array is moved along the horizontal and vertical directions simultaneously for N times in a pitch to get N sets of elemental images. Computational integral imaging reconstruction method for MALT is taken to obtain the slice images of the 3D scene, and the sum modulus (SMD) blur metric is taken on these slice images to achieve the depth information of the 3D scene. Simulation and optical experiments are carried out to verify the feasibility of this method.

  14. Frequency-domain imaging algorithm for ultrasonic testing by application of matrix phased arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolmatov Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Constantly increasing demand for high-performance materials and systems in aerospace industry requires advanced methods of nondestructive testing. One of the most promising methods is ultrasonic imaging by using matrix phased arrays. This technique allows to create three-dimensional ultrasonic imaging with high lateral resolution. Further progress in matrix phased array ultrasonic testing is determined by the development of fast imaging algorithms. In this article imaging algorithm based on frequency domain calculations is proposed. This approach is computationally efficient in comparison with time domain algorithms. Performance of the proposed algorithm was tested via computer simulations for planar specimen with flat bottom holes.

  15. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): A Nanosecond Time Scale Stereoscopic Array Trigger System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krennrich, Frank; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Dawson, J.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Krawzcynski, H.; Schroedter, M.

    2008-04-01

    Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays (VERITAS, HESS) have shown unprecedented background suppression capabilities for reducing cosmic-ray induced air showers, muons and night sky background fluctuations. Next-generation arrays with on the order of 100 telescopes offer larger collection areas, provide the possibility to see the air shower from more view points on the ground, have the potential to improve the sensitivity and give additional background suppression. Here we discuss the design of a fast array trigger system that has the potential to perform a real time image analysis allowing substantially improved background rate suppression at the trigger level.

  16. Development of portable phased array UT system for real-time flaw imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, M.

    1995-01-01

    Many functions and features of phased array UT technology must be useful for NDE in the industrial field. Some phased array UT systems have been developed for the inspection of nuclear pressure vessel and turbine components. However, phased array UT is still a special NDE technique and it has not been used widely in the past. The reasons of that are system size, cost, operator performance, equipment design and others. TOSHIBA has newly developed PC controlled portable phased array system to solve those problems. The portable phased array UT system is very compact and light but it is able to drive up to 32-channel linear array probe, to display real-time linear/sector B-scan, to display accumulated B-scan with an encoder and to display profile overlaid B-scan. The first applications were turbine component inspections for precise flaw investigation and flaw image data recording

  17. The use of the multiple-gradient array for geoelectrical resistivity and induced polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizebeokhai, Ahzegbobor P.; Oyeyemi, Kehinde D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of most conventional electrode configurations in electrical resistivity survey is often time consuming and labour intensive, especially when using manual data acquisition systems. Often, data acquisition teams tend to reduce data density so as to speed up field operation thereby reducing the survey cost; but this could significantly degrade the quality and resolution of the inverse models. In the present work, the potential of using the multiple-gradient array, a non-conventional electrode configuration, for practical cost effective and rapid subsurface resistivity and induced polarization mapping was evaluated. The array was used to conduct 2D resistivity and time-domain induced polarization imaging along two traverses in a study site at Ota, southwestern Nigeria. The subsurface was characterised and the main aquifer delineated using the inverse resistivity and chargeability images obtained. The performance of the multiple-gradient array was evaluated by correlating the 2D resistivity and chargeability images with those of the conventional Wenner array as well as the result of some soundings conducted along the same traverses using Schlumberger array. The multiple-gradient array has been found to have the advantage of measurement logistics and improved image resolution over the Wenner array.

  18. Fast photoacoustic imaging system based on 320-element linear transducer array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Bangzheng; Xing Da; Wang Yi; Zeng Yaguang; Tan Yi; Chen Qun

    2004-01-01

    A fast photoacoustic (PA) imaging system, based on a 320-transducer linear array, was developed and tested on a tissue phantom. To reconstruct a test tomographic image, 64 time-domain PA signals were acquired from a tissue phantom with embedded light-absorption targets. A signal acquisition was accomplished by utilizing 11 phase-controlled sub-arrays, each consisting of four transducers. The results show that the system can rapidly map the optical absorption of a tissue phantom and effectively detect the embedded light-absorbing target. By utilizing the multi-element linear transducer array and phase-controlled imaging algorithm, we thus can acquire PA tomography more efficiently, compared to other existing technology and algorithms. The methodology and equipment thus provide a rapid and reliable approach to PA imaging that may have potential applications in noninvasive imaging and clinic diagnosis

  19. Preliminary In-Vivo Evaluation of Convex Array Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Gammelmark, Kim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    of STA imaging in comparison to conventional imaging. The purpose is to evaluate whether STA imaging is feasible in-vivo. and whether the image quality obtained is comparable to traditional scanned imaging in terms of penetration depth, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and artifacts. Acquisition...... was done using our RASMUS research scanner and a 5.5 MHz convex array transducer. STA imaging applies spherical wave emulation using multi-element subapertures and a 20 mus linear FM signal as excitation pulse. For conventional imaging a 64 element aperture was used in transmit and receive with a 1.5 cycle...

  20. Superconducting Microwave Resonator Arrays for Submillimeter/Far-Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozian, Omid

    Superconducting microwave resonators have the potential to revolutionize submillimeter and far-infrared astronomy, and with it our understanding of the universe. The field of low-temperature detector technology has reached a point where extremely sensitive devices like transition-edge sensors are now capable of detecting radiation limited by the background noise of the universe. However, the size of these detector arrays are limited to only a few thousand pixels. This is because of the cost and complexity of fabricating large-scale arrays of these detectors that can reach up to 10 lithographic levels on chip, and the complicated SQUID-based multiplexing circuitry and wiring for readout of each detector. In order to make substantial progress, next-generation ground-based telescopes such as CCAT or future space telescopes require focal planes with large-scale detector arrays of 104--10 6 pixels. Arrays using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID) are a potential solution. These arrays can be easily made with a single layer of superconducting metal film deposited on a silicon substrate and pattered using conventional optical lithography. Furthermore, MKIDs are inherently multiplexable in the frequency domain, allowing ˜ 10 3 detectors to be read out using a single coaxial transmission line and cryogenic amplifier, drastically reducing cost and complexity. An MKID uses the change in the microwave surface impedance of a superconducting thin-film microresonator to detect photons. Absorption of photons in the superconductor breaks Cooper pairs into quasiparticles, changing the complex surface impedance, which results in a perturbation of resonator frequency and quality factor. For excitation and readout, the resonator is weakly coupled to a transmission line. The complex amplitude of a microwave probe signal tuned on-resonance and transmitted on the feedline past the resonator is perturbed as photons are absorbed in the superconductor. The perturbation can be

  1. Microscopy refocusing and dark-field imaging by using a simple LED array

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Guoan; Kolner, Christopher; Yang, Changhuei

    2011-01-01

    The condenser is one of the main components in most transmitted light compound microscopes. In this Letter, we show that such a condenser can be replaced by a programmable LED array to achieve greater imaging flexibility and functionality. Without mechanically scanning the sample or changing the microscope setup, the proposed approach can be used for dark-field imaging, bright-field imaging, microscopy sectioning, and digital refocusing. Images of a starfish embryo were acquired by using such...

  2. High resolution MR imaging of the hip using pelvic phased-array coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Mishima, Hajime; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    1997-01-01

    A pelvic phased-array coil was applied to obtain high resolution MR images of the hip. Three-mm-thick fast spin-echo images were obtained in seven hips. Images with a pelvic coil enhanced delineation of acetabular labrum and articular cartilage more clearly than those with a body coil or flexible-surface coil. The use of a pelvic coil in imaging of the hip may be of diagnostic value because of its superior delineation. (author)

  3. Reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images for multispectral x-ray imaging with a pinhole array and a flat Bragg mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, N.; Barbee, T. W.; Koch, J. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Welser, L. A.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a software package for reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images from a multiple monochromatic x-ray imager for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The instrument consists of a pinhole array, a multilayer Bragg mirror, and an image detector. The pinhole array projects hundreds of images onto the detector after reflection off the multilayer Bragg mirror, which introduces spectral dispersion along the reflection axis. The quasimonochromatic images of line emissions and continuum emissions can be used for measurement of temperature and density maps of implosion plasmas. In this article, we describe a computer-aided processing technique for systematic reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images from raw data. This technique provides flexible spectral bandwidth selection and allows systematic subtraction of continuum emission from line emission images

  4. Four-channel surface coil array for sequential CW-EPR image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Ayano; Emoto, Miho; Fujii, Hirotada; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    This article describes a four-channel surface coil array to increase the area of visualization for continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. A 776-MHz surface coil array was constructed with four independent surface coil resonators and three kinds of switches. Control circuits for switching the resonators were also built to sequentially perform EPR image acquisition for each resonator. The resonance frequencies of the resonators were shifted using PIN diode switches to decouple the inductively coupled coils. To investigate the area of visualization with the surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed using a glass cell phantom filled with a solution of nitroxyl radicals. The area of visualization obtained with the surface coil array was increased approximately 3.5-fold in comparison to that with a single surface coil resonator. Furthermore, to demonstrate the applicability of this surface coil array to animal imaging, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed in a living mouse with an exogenously injected nitroxyl radical imaging agent.

  5. Nanoscale imaging of photocurrent enhancement by resonator array photovoltaic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dongheon; Yoon, Yohan; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2018-04-01

    Nanoscale surface patterning commonly used to increase absorption of solar cells can adversely impact the open-circuit voltage due to increased surface area and recombination. Here, we demonstrate absorptivity and photocurrent enhancement using silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanosphere arrays on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cell that do not require direct surface patterning. Due to the combined effects of thin-film interference and whispering gallery-like resonances within nanosphere arrays, there is more than 20% enhancement in both absorptivity and photocurrent. To determine the effect of the resonance coupling between nanospheres, we perform a scanning photocurrent microscopy based on a near-field scanning optical microscopy measurement and find a substantial local photocurrent enhancement. The nanosphere-based antireflection coating (ARC), made by the Meyer rod rolling technique, is a scalable and a room-temperature process; and, can replace the conventional thin-film-based ARCs requiring expensive high-temperature vacuum deposition.

  6. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joshua; Zhang, Tiezhi; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source–dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10–15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source–dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented. (paper)

  7. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  8. A camac based data acquisition system for flat-panel image array readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, E.J.; Antonuk, L.E.; Berry, J.E.; Huang, W.; Mody, P.; Yorkston, J.; Longo, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A readout system has been developed to facilitate the digitization and subsequent display of image data from two-dimensional, pixellated, flat-panel, amorphous silicon imaging arrays. These arrays have been designed specifically for medical x-ray imaging applications. The readout system is based on hardware and software developed for various experiments at CERN and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Additional analog signal processing and digital control electronics were constructed specifically for this application. The authors report on the form of the resulting data acquisition system, discuss aspects of its performance, and consider the compromises which were involved in its design

  9. Performances of multi-channel ceramic photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.; Karolak, M.; Piret, Y.; Mouly, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    Ceramic electron multipliers with real metal dynodes and independent channels ware constructed using multilayer ceramic technology. Tests of these prototypes show their capability to form sensitive detectors such as photomultipliers or light intensifiers. Here, we present results for the photocathode sensitivity, dynode activation, gain, linearity range and dynamic characteristics as well as the effect of 3-year aging of the main operational functions. The advantages provided by the ceramic components are discussed. These results motivate the development of a compact 256 pixel ceramic photomultiplier. (author)

  10. Development of local oscillator integrated antenna array for microwave imaging diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahara, D.; Shinohara, S.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.

    2015-01-01

    Microwave imaging diagnostics are powerful tools that are used to obtain details of complex structures and behaviors of such systems as magnetically confined plasmas. For example, microwave imaging reflectometry and microwave imaging interferometers are suitable for observing phenomena that are involved with electron density fluctuations; moreover, electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics enable us to accomplish the significant task of observing MHD instabilities in large tokamaks. However, microwave imaging systems include difficulties in terms of multi-channelization and cost. Recently, we solved these problems by developing a Horn-antenna Mixer Array (HMA), a 50 - 110 GHz 1-D heterodyne- type antenna array, which can be easily stacked as a 2-D receiving array, because it uses an end-fire element. However, the HMA still evidenced problems owing to the requirement for local oscillation (LO) optics and an expensive high-power LO source. To solve this problem, we have developed an upgraded HMA, named the Local Integrated Antenna array (LIA), in which each channel has an internal LO supply using a frequency multiplier integrated circuit. Therefore, the proposed antenna array eliminates the need for both the LO optics and the high-power LO source. This paper describes the principle of the LIA, and provides details about an 8 channel prototype LIA

  11. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging

  12. Luminescence imaging strategies for drone-based PV array inspection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Riedel, Nicholas; Mantel, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this work is to perform outdoor defect detection imaging that will be used in a fast, accurate and automatic drone-based survey system for PV power plants. The imaging development focuses on techniques that do not require electrical contact, permitting automatic drone inspections...

  13. Research on geometric rectification of the Large FOV Linear Array Whiskbroom Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dia; Liu, Hui-tong; Dong, Hao; Liu, Xiao-bo

    2015-08-01

    To solve the geometric distortion problem of large FOV linear array whiskbroom image, a model of multi center central projection collinearity equation was founded considering its whiskbroom and linear CCD imaging feature, and the principle of distortion was analyzed. Based on the rectification method with POS, we introduced the angular position sensor data of the servo system, and restored the geometric imaging process exactly. An indirect rectification scheme aiming at linear array imaging with best scanline searching method was adopted, matrixes for calculating the exterior orientation elements was redesigned. We improved two iterative algorithms for this device, and did comparison and analysis. The rectification for the images of airborne imaging experiment showed ideal effect.

  14. Sampling phased array - a new technique for ultrasonic signal processing and imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Verkooijen, J.; Boulavinov, A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the improvement in the field of microelectronics and computer engineering has led to significant advances in ultrasonic signal processing and image construction techniques that are currently being applied to non-destructive material evaluation. A new phased array technique, called 'Sampling Phased Array', has been developed in the Fraunhofer Institute for Non-Destructive Testing([1]). It realises a unique approach of measurement and processing of ultrasonic signals. Th...

  15. Sampling phased array, a new technique for ultrasonic signal processing and imaging now available to industry

    OpenAIRE

    Verkooijen, J.; Bulavinov, A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 10 years the improvement in the field of microelectronics and computer engineering has led to significant advances in ultrasonic signal processing and image construction techniques that are currently being applied to non-destructive material evaluation. A new phased array technique, called "Sampling Phased Array" has been developed in the Fraunhofer Institute for non-destructive testing [1]. It realizes a unique approach of measurement and processing of ultrasonic signals. The s...

  16. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Real Time Stereoscopic Array Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrum, K.; Anderson, J.; Buckley, J.; Cundiff, T.; Dawson, J.; Drake, G.; Duke, C.; Haberichter, B.; Krawzcynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Madhavan, A.; Schroedter, M.; Smith, A.

    2009-05-01

    Future large arrays of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) such as AGIS and CTA are conceived to comprise of 50 - 100 individual telescopes each having a camera with 10**3 to 10**4 pixels. To maximize the capabilities of such IACT arrays with a low energy threshold, a wide field of view and a low background rate, a sophisticated array trigger is required. We describe the design of a stereoscopic array trigger that calculates image parameters and then correlates them across a subset of telescopes. Fast Field Programmable Gate Array technology allows to use lookup tables at the array trigger level to form a real-time pattern recognition trigger tht capitalizes on the multiple view points of the shower at different shower core distances. A proof of principle system is currently under construction. It is based on 400 MHz FPGAs and the goal is for camera trigger rates of up to 10 MHz and a tunable cosmic-ray background suppression at the array level.

  17. Improved 2-D resistivity imaging of features in covered karst terrain with arrays of implanted electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiflu, H. G.; Kruse, S. E.; Harro, D.; Loke, M. H.; Wilkinson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    28-electrode arrays with electrodes 2-5 meters apart, and the deep arrays buried at 4-8 meters depth. Ground penetrating radar surveys, SPT borings and coring data provide selected 'ground truthing'. The case studies show that inclusion of the deep electrode array permits karst features such as undulations at the top of limestone and raveling zones within surficial sediments to be imaged. These features are not accessible from surface arrays with equivalent surface footprints. The method also has better resolution at depth at the ends of the lines, where surface arrays are typically plotted with a trapezoidal truncation due to poor resolution at the lower corners of the profile.

  18. Reconstructing the CT number array from gray-level images and its application in PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Zhuang, Tian-ge; Wu, Wei

    2001-08-01

    Although DICOM compliant computed tomography has been prevailing in medical fields nowadays, there are some incompliant ones, from which we could hardly get the raw data and make an apropos interpretation due to the proprietary image format. Under such condition, one usually uses frame grabbers to capture CT images, the results of which could not be freely adjusted by radiologists as the original CT number array could. To alleviate the inflexibility, a new method is presented in this paper to reconstruct the array of CT number from several gray-level images acquired under different window settings. Its feasibility is investigated and a few tips are put forward to correct the errors caused respectively by 'Border Effect' and some hardware problems. The accuracy analysis proves it a good substitution for original CT number array acquisition. And this method has already been successfully used in our newly developing PACS and accepted by the radiologists in clinical use.

  19. Far-infrared imaging arrays for fusion plasma density and magnetic field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neikirk, D.P.; Rutledge, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Far-infrared imaging detector arrays are required for the determination of density and local magnetic field in fusion plasmas. Analytic calculations point out the difficulties with simple printed slot and dipole antennas on ungrounded substrates for use in submillimeter wave imaging arrays because of trapped surface waves. This is followed by a discussion of the use of substrate-lens coupling to eliminate the associated trapped surface modes responsible for their poor performance. This integrates well with a modified bow-tie antenna and permits diffraction-limited imaging. Arrays using bismuth microbolometers have been successfully fabricated and tested at 1222μm and 119μm. A 100 channel pilot experiment designed for the UCLA Microtor tokamak is described. (author)

  20. Spatio-spectral color filter array design for optimal image recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Keigo; Wolfe, Patrick J

    2008-10-01

    In digital imaging applications, data are typically obtained via a spatial subsampling procedure implemented as a color filter array-a physical construction whereby only a single color value is measured at each pixel location. Owing to the growing ubiquity of color imaging and display devices, much recent work has focused on the implications of such arrays for subsequent digital processing, including in particular the canonical demosaicking task of reconstructing a full color image from spatially subsampled and incomplete color data acquired under a particular choice of array pattern. In contrast to the majority of the demosaicking literature, we consider here the problem of color filter array design and its implications for spatial reconstruction quality. We pose this problem formally as one of simultaneously maximizing the spectral radii of luminance and chrominance channels subject to perfect reconstruction, and-after proving sub-optimality of a wide class of existing array patterns-provide a constructive method for its solution that yields robust, new panchromatic designs implementable as subtractive colors. Empirical evaluations on multiple color image test sets support our theoretical results, and indicate the potential of these patterns to increase spatial resolution for fixed sensor size, and to contribute to improved reconstruction fidelity as well as significantly reduced hardware complexity.

  1. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strindehag, O.

    1965-03-01

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a β-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10 -12 input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10 -12 to 10 -9 input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses

  2. Automatic test system of the photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiino, Kazuo; Kono, Koji; Ishii, Takanobu; Kasai, Seiji; Yamada, Sakue; Kitamura, Shoichi.

    1990-03-01

    A test system of R580 photomultipliers (PMTs) was constructed for the ZEUS experiment HERA. In this report, we will describe the general feature of the test system, each component of the setup, the procedure of the measurements, the data analyses and the results of the first 800 PMT measurements. (author)

  3. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O

    1965-03-15

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a {beta}-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10{sup -12} input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10{sup -12} to 10{sup -9} input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses.

  4. Development of a spherically focused phased array transducer for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingfei; Foiret, Josquin; Stephens, Douglas N; Le Baron, Olivier; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2016-07-21

    A 1.5 MHz prolate spheroidal therapeutic array with 128 circular elements was designed to accommodate standard imaging arrays for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia. The implementation of this dual-array system integrates real-time therapeutic and imaging functions with a single ultrasound system (Vantage 256, Verasonics). To facilitate applications involving small animal imaging and therapy the array was designed to have a beam depth of field smaller than 3.5 mm and to electronically steer over distances greater than 1 cm in both the axial and lateral directions. In order to achieve the required f number of 0.69, 1-3 piezocomposite modules were mated within the transducer housing. The performance of the prototype array was experimentally evaluated with excellent agreement with numerical simulation. A focal volume (2.70 mm (axial)  ×  0.65 mm (transverse)  ×  0.35 mm (transverse)) defined by the  -6 dB focal intensity was obtained to address the dimensions needed for small animal therapy. An electronic beam steering range defined by the  -3 dB focal peak intensity (17 mm (axial)  ×  14 mm (transverse)  ×  12 mm (transverse)) and  -8 dB lateral grating lobes (24 mm (axial)  ×  18 mm (transverse)  ×  16 mm (transverse)) was achieved. The combined testing of imaging and therapeutic functions confirmed well-controlled local heating generation and imaging in a tissue mimicking phantom. This dual-array implementation offers a practical means to achieve hyperthermia and ablation in small animal models and can be incorporated within protocols for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

  5. Development of a spherically focused phased array transducer for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingfei; Foiret, Josquin; Stephens, Douglas N.; Le Baron, Olivier; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2016-07-01

    A 1.5 MHz prolate spheroidal therapeutic array with 128 circular elements was designed to accommodate standard imaging arrays for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia. The implementation of this dual-array system integrates real-time therapeutic and imaging functions with a single ultrasound system (Vantage 256, Verasonics). To facilitate applications involving small animal imaging and therapy the array was designed to have a beam depth of field smaller than 3.5 mm and to electronically steer over distances greater than 1 cm in both the axial and lateral directions. In order to achieve the required f number of 0.69, 1-3 piezocomposite modules were mated within the transducer housing. The performance of the prototype array was experimentally evaluated with excellent agreement with numerical simulation. A focal volume (2.70 mm (axial)  ×  0.65 mm (transverse)  ×  0.35 mm (transverse)) defined by the  -6 dB focal intensity was obtained to address the dimensions needed for small animal therapy. An electronic beam steering range defined by the  -3 dB focal peak intensity (17 mm (axial)  ×  14 mm (transverse)  ×  12 mm (transverse)) and  -8 dB lateral grating lobes (24 mm (axial)  ×  18 mm (transverse)  ×  16 mm (transverse)) was achieved. The combined testing of imaging and therapeutic functions confirmed well-controlled local heating generation and imaging in a tissue mimicking phantom. This dual-array implementation offers a practical means to achieve hyperthermia and ablation in small animal models and can be incorporated within protocols for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

  6. Cardiac cine imaging at 3 Tesla: initial experience with a 32-element body-array coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenchel, Michael; Deshpande, Vibhas S; Nael, Kambiz; Finn, J Paul; Miller, Stephan; Ruehm, Stefan; Laub, Gerhard

    2006-08-01

    We sought to assess the feasibility of cardiac cine imaging and evaluate image quality at 3 T using a body-array coil with 32 coil elements. Eight healthy volunteers (3 men; median age 29 years) were examined on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens Medical Solutions) using a 32-element phased-array coil (prototype from In vivo Corp.). Gradient-recalled-echo (GRE) cine (GRAPPAx3), GRE cine with tagging lines, steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) cine (GRAPPAx3 and x4), and SSFP cine(TSENSEx4 andx6) images were acquired in short-axis and 4-chamber view. Reference images with identical scan parameters were acquired using the total-imaging-matrix (Tim) coil system with a total of 12 coil elements. Images were assessed by 2 observers in a consensus reading with regard to image quality, noise and presence of artifacts. Furthermore, signal-to-noise values were determined in phantom measurements. In phantom measurements signal-to-noise values were increased by 115-155% for the various cine sequences using the 32-element coil. Scoring of image quality yielded statistically significant increased image quality with the SSFP-GRAPPAx4, SSFP-TSENSEx4, and SSFP-TSENSEx6 sequence using the 32-element coil (P < 0.05). Similarly, scoring of image noise yielded a statistically significant lower noise rating with the SSFP-GRAPPAx4, GRE-GRAPPAx3, SSFP-TSENSEx4, and SSFP-TSENSEx6 sequence using the 32-element coil (P < 0.05). This study shows that cardiac cine imaging at 3 T using a 32-element body-array coil is feasible in healthy volunteers. Using a large number of coil elements with a favorable sensitivity profile supports faster image acquisition, with high diagnostic image quality even for high parallel imaging factors.

  7. Large-format InGaAs focal plane arrays for SWIR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Andrew D.; MacDougal, Michael H.; Manzo, Juan; Follman, David; Geske, Jonathan C.

    2012-06-01

    FLIR Electro Optical Components will present our latest developments in large InGaAs focal plane arrays, which are used for low light level imaging in the short wavelength infrared (SWIR) regime. FLIR will present imaging from their latest small pitch (15 μm) focal plane arrays in VGA and High Definition (HD) formats. FLIR will present characterization of the FPA including dark current measurements as well as the use of correlated double sampling to reduce read noise. FLIR will show imagery as well as FPA-level characterization data.

  8. Possible application of nonredundant pinhole arrays to fuel pin imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzins, G.J.; Han, K.S.

    1975-11-01

    LMFBR Safety Test Facility imaging experiments rely on emission of radiation by the fuel pins and thus appear to strongly complement radiographic techniques in that they are most employable during peak excursion--a time of least favorable radiographic signal--to--noise ratio. Radiography, on the other hand, can provide information long before or after the excursion--times of below threshold signal for direct imaging techniques. An underlying premise of any imaging experiment is that, in addition to sufficient brightness, sufficient contrast exists in the scene. A further restriction is imposed by intervening materials, such as the wall of a containment vessel, that not only absorb but also scatter the radiation. These questions are approached by examining the properties of potential recording instrumentation, of pinhole apertures, and of the necessary radiation sources

  9. Single photon imaging and timing array sensor apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Clayton

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating a three-dimension image of an object or target. The apparatus is comprised of a photon source for emitting a photon at a target. The emitted photons are received by a photon receiver for receiving the photon when reflected from the target. The photon receiver determines a reflection time of the photon and further determines an arrival position of the photon on the photon receiver. An analyzer is communicatively coupled to the photon receiver, wherein the analyzer generates a three-dimensional image of the object based upon the reflection time and the arrival position.

  10. Novel scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for nuclear physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, David

    2015-01-01

    Until comparatively recently, scintillator detectors were seen as an old-fashioned tool of nuclear physics with more attention being given to areas such as gamma-ray tracking using high-purity germanium detectors. Next-generation scintillator detectors, such as lanthanum bromide, which were developed for the demands of space science and gamma- ray telescopes, are found to have strong applicability to low energy nuclear physics. Their excellent timing resolution makes them very suitable for fast timing measurements and their much improved energy resolution compared to conventional scintillators promises to open up new avenues in nuclear physics research which were presently hard to access. Such 'medium-resolution' spectroscopy has broad interest across several areas of contemporary interest such as the study of nuclear giant resonances. In addition to the connections to space science, it is striking that the demands of contemporary medical imaging have strong overlap with those of experimental nuclear physics. An example is the interest in PET-MRI combined imaging which requires putting scintillator detectors in a high magnetic field environment. This has led to strong advances in the area of silicon photomultipliers, a solid-state replacement for photomultiplier tubes, which are insensitive to magnetic fields. Broad application to nuclear physics of this technology may be foreseen. (paper)

  11. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Topological Array Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew W.

    2010-03-01

    AGIS is a concept for the next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory. It will be an array of 36 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) sensitive in the energy range from 50 GeV to 200 TeV. The required improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation relative to the present generation instruments imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the telescopes and on the triggering and readout systems for AGIS. To maximize the capabilities of large arrays of IACTs with a low energy threshold, a wide field of view and a low background rate, a sophisticated array trigger is required. We outline the status of the development of a stereoscopic array trigger that calculates image parameters and correlates them across a subset of telescopes. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) implement the real-time pattern recognition to suppress cosmic rays and night-sky background events. A proof of principle system is being developed to run at camera trigger rates up to 10MHz and array-level rates up to 10kHz.

  12. Planetary Radar Imaging with the Deep-Space Network's 34 Meter Uplink Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, Victor; Tsao, P.; Lee, D.; Cornish, T.; Jao, J.; Slade, M.

    2011-01-01

    A coherent Uplink Array consisting of two or three 34-meter antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network has been developed for the primary purpose of increasing EIRP at the spacecraft. Greater EIRP ensures greater reach, higher uplink data rates for command and configuration control, as well as improved search and recovery capabilities during spacecraft emergencies. It has been conjectured that Doppler-delay radar imaging of lunar targets can be extended to planetary imaging, where the long baseline of the uplink array can provide greater resolution than a single antenna, as well as potentially higher EIRP. However, due to the well known R4 loss in radar links, imaging of distant planets is a very challenging endeavor, requiring accurate phasing of the Uplink Array antennas, cryogenically cooled low-noise receiver amplifiers, and sophisticated processing of the received data to extract the weak echoes characteristic of planetary radar. This article describes experiments currently under way to image the planets Mercury and Venus, highlights improvements in equipment and techniques, and presents planetary images obtained to date with two 34 meter antennas configured as a coherently phased Uplink Array.

  13. Hexabundles: imaging fibre arrays for low-light astronomical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julie; Robertson, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an imaging fibre bundle (“hexabundle”) that is suitable for low-light applications in astronomy. The most successful survey instruments at optical-infrared wavelengths today have obtained data on up to a million celestial sources using hundreds of multimode fibre...

  14. Anomaly effects of arrays for 3d geoelectrical resistivity imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The effectiveness of using a net of orthogonal or parallel sets of two-dimensional (2D) profiles for three- dimensional (3D) geoelectrical resistivity imaging has been evaluated. A series of 2D apparent resistivity data were generated over two synthetic models which represent geological or environmental conditions for a ...

  15. Evaluation of electrical crosstalk in high-density photodiode arrays for X-ray imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Fan; Juntunen, Mikko; Hietanen, Iiro

    2009-01-01

    Electrical crosstalk is one of the important parameters in the photodiode array detector for X-ray imaging applications, and it becomes more important when the density of the photodiode array becomes higher. This paper presents the design of the high-density photodiode array with 250 μm pitch and 50 μm gap. The electrical crosstalk of the demonstrated samples is evaluated and compared with different electrode configurations: cathode bias mode and anode bias mode. The measurement results show good electrical crosstalk, ∼0.23%, in cathode bias mode regardless of the bias voltage, and slightly decreased or increased electrical crosstalk in anode bias mode. Moreover, the quantum efficiency is also evaluated from the same samples, and it behaves similar to the electrical crosstalk. Finally, some design guidance of the high-density photodiode array is given based on the discussion.

  16. Design of a Compact Wideband Antenna Array for Microwave Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puskely

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, wideband antenna arrays aimed at microwave imaging applications and SAR applications operating at Ka band were designed. The antenna array feeding network is realized by a low-loss SIW technology. Moreover, we have replaced the large feed network comprised of various T and Y junctions by a simple broadband network of compact size to more reduce losses in the substrate integrated waveguide and also save space on the PCB. The designed power 8-way divider is complemented by a wideband substrate integrated waveguide to a grounded coplanar waveguide transition and directly connected to the antenna elements. The measured results of antenna array are consistent with our simulation. Obtained results of the developed array demonstrated improvement compared to previously developed binary feed networks with microstrip or SIW splitters.

  17. Development of a multi-channel horn mixer array for microwave imaging plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Naoki; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Nagayama, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Microwave to millimeter-wave diagnostics techniques, such as interferometry, reflectometry, scattering, and radiometry, have been powerful tools for diagnosing magnetically confined plasmas. The resultant measurements have clarified several physics issues, including instability, wave phenomena, and fluctuation-induced transport. Electron cyclotron emission imaging has been an important tool in the investigation of temperature fluctuations, while reflectometry has been employed to measure plasma density profiles and their fluctuations. We have developed a horn-antenna mixer array (HMA), a 50 - 110 GHz 1D antenna array, which can be easily stacked as a 2D array. This article describes an upgrade to the horn mixer array that combines well-characterized mixers, waveguide-to-microstrip line transitions, intermediate frequency amplifiers, and internal local oscillator modules using a monolithic microwave integrated circuit technology to improve system performance. We also report on the use of a multi-channel HMA system. (author)

  18. Comparison of polystyrene scintillator fiber array and monolithic polystyrene for neutron imaging and radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R., E-mail: raspberry@lanl.gov; Cutler, T. E.; Danly, C. R.; Espy, M. A.; Goglio, J. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Madden, A. C.; Mayo, D. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nelson, R. O.; Swift, A. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Zocco, T. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The neutron imaging diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility has been operating since 2011 generating neutron images of deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at peak compression. The current design features a scintillating fiber array, which allows for high imaging resolution to discern small-scale structure within the implosion. In recent years, it has become clear that additional neutron imaging systems need to be constructed in order to provide 3D reconstructions of the DT source and these additional views need to be on a shorter line of sight. As a result, there has been increased effort to identify new image collection techniques that improve upon imaging resolution for these next generation neutron imaging systems, such as monolithic deuterated scintillators. This work details measurements performed at the Weapons Neutron Research Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory that compares the radiographic abilities of the fiber scintillator with a monolithic scintillator, which may be featured in a future short line of sight neutron imaging systems.

  19. Design of area array CCD image acquisition and display system based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Li, Tianting; Pan, Yue; Dai, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    With the development of science and technology, CCD(Charge-coupled Device) has been widely applied in various fields and plays an important role in the modern sensing system, therefore researching a real-time image acquisition and display plan based on CCD device has great significance. This paper introduces an image data acquisition and display system of area array CCD based on FPGA. Several key technical challenges and problems of the system have also been analyzed and followed solutions put forward .The FPGA works as the core processing unit in the system that controls the integral time sequence .The ICX285AL area array CCD image sensor produced by SONY Corporation has been used in the system. The FPGA works to complete the driver of the area array CCD, then analog front end (AFE) processes the signal of the CCD image, including amplification, filtering, noise elimination, CDS correlation double sampling, etc. AD9945 produced by ADI Corporation to convert analog signal to digital signal. Developed Camera Link high-speed data transmission circuit, and completed the PC-end software design of the image acquisition, and realized the real-time display of images. The result through practical testing indicates that the system in the image acquisition and control is stable and reliable, and the indicators meet the actual project requirements.

  20. Large Imaging X-ray MKID Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazin, Benjamin

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors, or MKIDs, are a relatively new type of superconducting detector with built-in frequency domain multiplexing. Like Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) microbolometers, MKIDs can count single X-ray photons over a wide energy range and determine their energy and arrival time. MKIDs allow very large pixel counts with a simple room temperature microwave readout. In this investigation we will develop a new type of detector based on a MKID called the Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detector, or TKID. A TKID changes the basic MKID architecture by placing the inductor of the MKID on a suspended SiN membrane. The capacitor will remain on the bulk Si to reduce noise. Much like a TES, the TKID will sense changes in temperature of the isolated SiN island caused by photon absorption. The advantages of a TKID include lack of positional/geometry dependence, a more tunable pulse decay time, a relaxation of the MKID resonator material requirements, and more. We have already fabricated a TKID with the best energy resolution seen to date in any KID. Here we propose to improve the energy resolution below 10 eV, develop mushroom absorbers compatible with our TKIDs, and integrate these detectors into small arrays.

  1. Pseudo real-time imaging systems with nonredundant pinhole arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.S.; Berzins, G.J.; Roach, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques, because of their efficiency and three-dimensional information content, represent potentially powerful tools for LMFBR safety experiment diagnostics. These techniques should be even more powerful if the data can be interpreted in real time or in pseudo real time. For example, to satisfy the stated goals for LMFBR diagnostics (1-ms time resolution and 1-mm spatial resolution), it is conceivable that several hundred frames of coded data would be recorded. To unscramble all of this information into reconstructed images could be a laborious, time-consuming task. A way to circumvent the tedium is with the use of the described hybrid digital/analog real-time imaging system. Some intermediate results are described briefly

  2. Precise analysis of the metal package photomultiplier single photoelectron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirikov-Zorin, I.E.; Fedorko, I.; Sykora, I.; Tokar, S.; Menzione, A.

    2000-01-01

    A deconvolution method based on a sophisticated photomultiplier response function was used to analyse the compact metal package photomultiplier spectra taken in single photoelectron mode. The spectra taken by Hamamtsu R5600 and R5900 photomultipliers have been analysed. The detailed analysis shows that the method appropriately describes the process of charge multiplication in these photomultipliers in a wide range of working regimes and the deconvoluted parameters are established with about 1% accuracy. The method can be used for a detailed analysis of photomultiplier noise and for calibration purposes

  3. A Topological Array Trigger for AGIS, the Advanced Gamma ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krennrich, F.; Anderson, J.; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Dawson, J.; Drake, G.; Haberichter, W.; Imran, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Kreps, A.; Schroedter, M.; Smith, A.

    2008-12-01

    Next generation ground based γ-ray observatories such as AGIS1 and CTA2 are expected to cover a 1 km2 area with 50-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The stereoscopic view ol air showers using multiple view points raises the possibility to use a topological array trigger that adds substantial flexibility, new background suppression capabilities and a reduced energy threshold. In this paper we report on the concept and technical implementation of a fast topological trigger system, that makes use of real time image processing of individual camera patterns and their combination in a stereoscopic array analysis. A prototype system is currently under construction and we discuss the design and hardware of this topological array trigger system.

  4. Test and evaluation of IR detectors and arrays II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 22, 23, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Forney M.

    The present conference discusses a radiometric calibration system for IR cameras, a methodology for testing IR focal-plane arrays in simulated nuclear radiation environments, process optimization for Si:As In-bumped focal-plane arrays, precise MTF measurements for focal-plane arrays, and IR focal-plane array crosstalk measurement. Also discussed are an imaging metric for IR focal-plane arrays, optical stimuli for high-volume automated testing of 2D HgCdTe focal-plane arrays, the evaluation of a solid-state photomultiplier focal-plane array for SDI, spectral effects on bulk photoconductors operated at cryogenic temperatures, and a novel technique for measuring the ionizing radiation effects in MOS transistors.

  5. Rearranging the lenslet array of the compact passive interference imaging system with high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Wen, Desheng; Song, Zongxi

    2017-10-01

    With the development of aeronautics and astronautics, higher resolution requirement of the telescope was necessary. However, the increase in resolution of conventional telescope required larger apertures, whose size, weight and power consumption could be prohibitively expensive. This limited the further development of the telescope. This paper introduced a new imaging technology using interference—Compact Passive Interference Imaging Technology with High Resolution, and proposed a rearranging method for the arrangement of the lenslet array to obtain continuously object spatial frequency.

  6. Primary gamma ray selection in a hybrid timing/imaging Cherenkov array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postnikov E.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is a methodical study on hybrid reconstruction techniques for hybrid imaging/timing Cherenkov observations. This type of hybrid array is to be realized at the gamma-observatory TAIGA intended for very high energy gamma-ray astronomy (> 30 TeV. It aims at combining the cost-effective timing-array technique with imaging telescopes. Hybrid operation of both of these techniques can lead to a relatively cheap way of development of a large area array. The joint approach of gamma event selection was investigated on both types of simulated data: the image parameters from the telescopes, and the shower parameters reconstructed from the timing array. The optimal set of imaging parameters and shower parameters to be combined is revealed. The cosmic ray background suppression factor depending on distance and energy is calculated. The optimal selection technique leads to cosmic ray background suppression of about 2 orders of magnitude on distances up to 450 m for energies greater than 50 TeV.

  7. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B. [Xsirius, Inc, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  8. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  9. Distributed Read-out Imaging Device array for astronomical observations in UV/VIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmering, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    STJ (Superconducting Tunneling Junctions) are being developed as spectro-photometers in wavelengths ranging from the NIR to X-rays. 10x12 arrays of STJs have already been successfully used as optical imaging spectrometers with the S-Cam 3, on the William Hershel Telescope on La Palma and on the

  10. Linear array implementation of the EM algorithm for PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, K.; Patnaik, L.M.; Ramakrishna, J.

    1995-01-01

    The PET image reconstruction based on the EM algorithm has several attractive advantages over the conventional convolution back projection algorithms. However, the PET image reconstruction based on the EM algorithm is computationally burdensome for today's single processor systems. In addition, a large memory is required for the storage of the image, projection data, and the probability matrix. Since the computations are easily divided into tasks executable in parallel, multiprocessor configurations are the ideal choice for fast execution of the EM algorithms. In tis study, the authors attempt to overcome these two problems by parallelizing the EM algorithm on a multiprocessor systems. The parallel EM algorithm on a linear array topology using the commercially available fast floating point digital signal processor (DSP) chips as the processing elements (PE's) has been implemented. The performance of the EM algorithm on a 386/387 machine, IBM 6000 RISC workstation, and on the linear array system is discussed and compared. The results show that the computational speed performance of a linear array using 8 DSP chips as PE's executing the EM image reconstruction algorithm is about 15.5 times better than that of the IBM 6000 RISC workstation. The novelty of the scheme is its simplicity. The linear array topology is expandable with a larger number of PE's. The architecture is not dependant on the DSP chip chosen, and the substitution of the latest DSP chip is straightforward and could yield better speed performance

  11. A Parasitic Array Receiver for ISAR Imaging of Ship Targets Using a Coastal Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Santi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection and identification of ship targets navigating in coastal areas are essential in order to prevent maritime accidents and to take countermeasures against illegal activities. Usually, coastal radar systems are employed for the detection of vessels, whereas noncooperative ship targets as well as ships not equipped with AIS transponders can be identified by means of dedicated active radar imaging system by means of ISAR processing. In this work, we define a parasitic array receiver for ISAR imaging purposes based on the signal transmitted by an opportunistic coastal radar over its successive scans. In order to obtain the proper cross-range resolution, the physical aperture provided by the array is combined with the synthetic aperture provided by the target motion. By properly designing the array of passive devices, the system is able to correctly observe the signal reflected from the ships over successive scans of the coastal radar. Specifically, the upper bounded interelement spacing provides a correct angular sampling accordingly to the Nyquist theorem and the lower bounded number of elements of the array ensures the continuity of the observation during multiple scans. An ad hoc focusing technique has been then proposed to provide the ISAR images of the ships. Simulated analysis proved the effectiveness of the proposed system to provide top-view images of ship targets suitable for ATR procedures.

  12. Ontology-based, Tissue MicroArray oriented, image centered tissue bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viti Federica

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue MicroArray technique is becoming increasingly important in pathology for the validation of experimental data from transcriptomic analysis. This approach produces many images which need to be properly managed, if possible with an infrastructure able to support tissue sharing between institutes. Moreover, the available frameworks oriented to Tissue MicroArray provide good storage for clinical patient, sample treatment and block construction information, but their utility is limited by the lack of data integration with biomolecular information. Results In this work we propose a Tissue MicroArray web oriented system to support researchers in managing bio-samples and, through the use of ontologies, enables tissue sharing aimed at the design of Tissue MicroArray experiments and results evaluation. Indeed, our system provides ontological description both for pre-analysis tissue images and for post-process analysis image results, which is crucial for information exchange. Moreover, working on well-defined terms it is then possible to query web resources for literature articles to integrate both pathology and bioinformatics data. Conclusions Using this system, users associate an ontology-based description to each image uploaded into the database and also integrate results with the ontological description of biosequences identified in every tissue. Moreover, it is possible to integrate the ontological description provided by the user with a full compliant gene ontology definition, enabling statistical studies about correlation between the analyzed pathology and the most commonly related biological processes.

  13. Real-time 3D imaging methods using 2D phased arrays based on synthetic focusing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Jun; Song, Tai-Kyong

    2008-07-01

    A fast 3D ultrasound imaging technique using a 2D phased array transducer based on the synthetic focusing method for nondestructive testing or medical imaging is proposed. In the proposed method, each column of a 2D array is fired successively to produce transverse fan beams focused at a fixed depth along a given longitudinal direction and the resulting pulse echoes are received at all elements of a 2D array used. After firing all column arrays, a frame of high-resolution image along a given longitudinal direction is obtained with dynamic focusing employed in the longitudinal direction on receive and in the transverse direction on both transmit and receive. The volume rate of the proposed method can be increased much higher than that of the conventional 2D array imaging by employing an efficient sparse array technique. A simple modification to the proposed method can further increase the volume scan rate significantly. The proposed methods are verified through computer simulations.

  14. Real-time 2-D Phased Array Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Fogh, Nikolaj

    2018-01-01

    Echocardiography examination of the blood flow is currently either restricted to 1-D techniques in real-time or experimental off-line 2-D methods. This paper presents an implementation of transverse oscillation for real-time 2-D vector flow imaging (VFI) on a commercial BK Ultrasound scanner....... A large field-of-view (FOV) sequence for studying flow dynamics at 11 frames per second (fps) and a sequence for studying peak systolic velocities (PSV) with a narrow FOV at 36 fps were validated. The VFI sequences were validated in a flow-rig with continuous laminar parabolic flow and in a pulsating flow...

  15. Model independent approach to the single photoelectron calibration of photomultiplier tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldanha, R.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Wester, T.

    2017-08-01

    The accurate calibration of photomultiplier tubes is critical in a wide variety of applications in which it is necessary to know the absolute number of detected photons or precisely determine the resolution of the signal. Conventional calibration methods rely on fitting the photomultiplier response to a low intensity light source with analytical approximations to the single photoelectron distribution, often leading to biased estimates due to the inability to accurately model the full distribution, especially at low charge values. In this paper we present a simple statistical method to extract the relevant single photoelectron calibration parameters without making any assumptions about the underlying single photoelectron distribution. We illustrate the use of this method through the calibration of a Hamamatsu R11410 photomultiplier tube and study the accuracy and precision of the method using Monte Carlo simulations. The method is found to have significantly reduced bias compared to conventional methods and works under a wide range of light intensities, making it suitable for simultaneously calibrating large arrays of photomultiplier tubes.

  16. Digital electronics for 256 anode Hamamatsu H9500 PSPMT arrays in full-volume Compton imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J T; Grudberg, P M; Warburton, W K

    2014-01-01

    Ziock et al.'s [1] recent Monte Carlo study of a proposed ''full-volume'' Compton Imaging Camera concluded that simultaneously locating a Compton scatter event's multiple interaction points within a single large scintillator crystal might be possible at 1 mm spatial resolution using a coded aperture mask sandwiched between two light guides and coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier (PSPMT) to record the output light pattern. The method promises high efficiency at a relatively low cost. They are currently developing a lower resolution prototype using a large cubic scintillator (25.4 cm/side) whose masked face will be tiled with 25 Hamamatsu H9500 PSPMTs (6,400 outputs). XIA has contracted to develop and produce the readout electronics, which present several significant design challenges, including capturing all 6,400 anode outputs individually, with single photon sensitivity, in a compact format that will fit behind the tiled PSPMTs. 10,000 event/sec operation is desired, as is a cost of less than about $50/channel. In our approach, each PSPMT front end integrates the 256 anode signals and 8-1 multiplexes them to 32 differential outputs that are digitized in a PXI card using 4 octal 50 MHz ADCs. The multiplexers run at 8 MHz, sampling each anode at 1 MHz, which becomes the image frame rate. The ADC signals are demultiplexed and digitally filtered to extract the number of photons in each pixel in the full 2-D image. The design has been completed and built and is undergoing evaluation tests at the single PSPMT level

  17. High-resolution 3D laser imaging based on tunable fiber array link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sisi; Ruan, Ningjuan; Yang, Song

    2017-10-01

    Airborne photoelectric reconnaissance system with the bore sight down to the ground is an important battlefield situational awareness system, which can be used for reconnaissance and surveillance of complex ground scene. Airborne 3D imaging Lidar system is recognized as the most potential candidates for target detection under the complex background, and is progressing in the directions of high resolution, long distance detection, high sensitivity, low power consumption, high reliability, eye safe and multi-functional. However, the traditional 3D laser imaging system has the disadvantages of lower imaging resolutions because of the small size of the existing detector, and large volume. This paper proposes a high resolution laser 3D imaging technology based on the tunable optical fiber array link. The echo signal is modulated by a tunable optical fiber array link and then transmitted to the focal plane detector. The detector converts the optical signal into electrical signals which is given to the computer. Then, the computer accomplishes the signal calculation and image restoration based on modulation information, and then reconstructs the target image. This paper establishes the mathematical model of tunable optical fiber array signal receiving link, and proposes the simulation and analysis of the affect factors on high density multidimensional point cloud reconstruction.

  18. Cherenkov TOF PET with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenec, R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Pestotnik, R.

    2015-12-01

    As previously demonstrated, an excellent timing resolution below 100 ps FWHM is possible in time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) if the detection method is based on the principle of detecting photons of Cherenkov light, produced in a suitable material and detected by microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCP PMTs). In this work, the silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were tested for the first time as the photodetectors in Cherenkov TOF PET. The high photon detection efficiency (PDE) of SiPMs led to a large improvement in detection efficiency. On the other hand, the time response of currently available SiPMs is not as good as that of MCP PMTs. The SiPM dark counts introduce a new source of random coincidences in Cherenkov method, which would be overwhelming with present SiPM technology at room temperature. When the apparatus was cooled, its performance significantly improved.

  19. High-resolution imaging methods in array signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki

    in active sonar signal processing for detection and imaging of submerged oil contamination in sea water from a deep-water oil leak. The submerged oil _eld is modeled as a uid medium exhibiting spatial perturbations in the acoustic parameters from their mean ambient values which cause weak scattering...... of the incident acoustic energy. A highfrequency active sonar is selected to insonify the medium and receive the backscattered waves. High-frequency acoustic methods can both overcome the optical opacity of water (unlike methods based on electromagnetic waves) and resolve the small-scale structure...... of the submerged oil field (unlike low-frequency acoustic methods). The study shows that high-frequency acoustic methods are suitable not only for large-scale localization of the oil contamination in the water column but also for statistical characterization of the submerged oil field through inference...

  20. Seismic Imaging of the Source Physics Experiment Site with the Large-N Seismic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) consists of a series of chemical explosions at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand seismic wave generation and propagation from these explosions. To achieve this goal, we need an accurate geophysical model of the SPE site. A Large-N seismic array that was deployed at the SPE site during one of the chemical explosions (SPE-5) helps us construct high-resolution local geophysical model. The Large-N seismic array consists of 996 geophones, and covers an area of approximately 2 × 2.5 km. The array is located in the northern end of the Yucca Flat basin, at a transition from Climax Stock (granite) to Yucca Flat (alluvium). In addition to the SPE-5 explosion, the Large-N array also recorded 53 weight drops. Using the Large-N seismic array recordings, we perform body wave and surface wave velocity analysis, and obtain 3D seismic imaging of the SPE site for the top crust of approximately 1 km. The imaging results show clear variation of geophysical parameter with local geological structures, including heterogeneous weathering layer and various rock types. The results of this work are being incorporated in the larger 3D modeling effort of the SPE program to validate the predictive models developed for the site.

  1. Cherenkov luminescence measurements with digital silicon photomultipliers: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciarrocchi, Esther; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); INFN, section of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cherry, Simon R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Lehnert, Adrienne; Hunter, William C. J.; McDougald, Wendy; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Kinahan, Paul E. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    A feasibility study was done to assess the capability of digital silicon photomultipliers to measure the Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source. Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is possible with a charge coupled device (CCD) based technology, but a stand-alone technique for quantitative activity measurements based on Cherenkov luminescence has not yet been developed. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photon counting devices with a fast impulse response and can potentially be used to quantify β-emitting radiotracer distributions by CLI. In this study, a Philips digital photon counting (PDPC) silicon photomultiplier detector was evaluated for measuring Cherenkov luminescence. The PDPC detector is a matrix of avalanche photodiodes, which were read one at a time in a dark count map (DCM) measurement mode (much like a CCD). This reduces the device active area but allows the information from a single avalanche photodiode to be preserved, which is not possible with analog SiPMs. An algorithm to reject the noisiest photodiodes and to correct the measured count rate for the dark current was developed. The results show that, in DCM mode and at (10–13) °C, the PDPC has a dynamic response to different levels of Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source and transmitted through an opaque medium. This suggests the potential for this approach to provide quantitative activity measurements. Interestingly, the potential use of the PDPC in DCM mode for direct imaging of Cherenkov luminescence, as a opposed to a scalar measurement device, was also apparent. We showed that a PDPC tile in DCM mode is able to detect and image a β source through its Cherenkov radiation emission. The detector’s dynamic response to different levels of radiation suggests its potential quantitative capabilities, and the DCM mode allows imaging with a better spatial resolution than the conventional event-triggered mode. Finally, the same acquisition procedure and data processing could

  2. Cherenkov luminescence measurements with digital silicon photomultipliers: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciarrocchi, Esther; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Cherry, Simon R.; Lehnert, Adrienne; Hunter, William C. J.; McDougald, Wendy; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    A feasibility study was done to assess the capability of digital silicon photomultipliers to measure the Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source. Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is possible with a charge coupled device (CCD) based technology, but a stand-alone technique for quantitative activity measurements based on Cherenkov luminescence has not yet been developed. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photon counting devices with a fast impulse response and can potentially be used to quantify β-emitting radiotracer distributions by CLI. In this study, a Philips digital photon counting (PDPC) silicon photomultiplier detector was evaluated for measuring Cherenkov luminescence. The PDPC detector is a matrix of avalanche photodiodes, which were read one at a time in a dark count map (DCM) measurement mode (much like a CCD). This reduces the device active area but allows the information from a single avalanche photodiode to be preserved, which is not possible with analog SiPMs. An algorithm to reject the noisiest photodiodes and to correct the measured count rate for the dark current was developed. The results show that, in DCM mode and at (10–13) °C, the PDPC has a dynamic response to different levels of Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source and transmitted through an opaque medium. This suggests the potential for this approach to provide quantitative activity measurements. Interestingly, the potential use of the PDPC in DCM mode for direct imaging of Cherenkov luminescence, as a opposed to a scalar measurement device, was also apparent. We showed that a PDPC tile in DCM mode is able to detect and image a β source through its Cherenkov radiation emission. The detector’s dynamic response to different levels of radiation suggests its potential quantitative capabilities, and the DCM mode allows imaging with a better spatial resolution than the conventional event-triggered mode. Finally, the same acquisition procedure and data processing could

  3. Analysis of photon statistics with Silicon Photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ascenzo, N.; Saveliev, V.; Wang, L.; Xie, Q.

    2015-01-01

    The Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) is a novel silicon-based photodetector, which represents the modern perspective of low photon flux detection. The aim of this paper is to provide an introduction on the statistical analysis methods needed to understand and estimate in quantitative way the correct features and description of the response of the SiPM to a coherent source of light

  4. Modeling crosstalk and afterpulsing in silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosado, J.; Aranda, V.M.; Blanco, F.; Arqueros, F.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental method to characterize the crosstalk and afterpulsing in silicon photomultipliers has been developed and applied to two detectors fabricated by Hamamatsu. An analytical model of optical crosstalk that we presented in a previous publication has been compared with new measurements, confirming our results. Progresses on a statistical model to describe afterpulsing and delayed crosstalk are also shown and compared with preliminary experimental data

  5. Modeling crosstalk and afterpulsing in silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, J., E-mail: jaime_ros@fis.ucm.es; Aranda, V.M.; Blanco, F.; Arqueros, F.

    2015-07-01

    An experimental method to characterize the crosstalk and afterpulsing in silicon photomultipliers has been developed and applied to two detectors fabricated by Hamamatsu. An analytical model of optical crosstalk that we presented in a previous publication has been compared with new measurements, confirming our results. Progresses on a statistical model to describe afterpulsing and delayed crosstalk are also shown and compared with preliminary experimental data.

  6. 7 Tesla 22-channel wrap-around coil array for cervical spinal cord and brainstem imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Seifert, Alan C; Kim, Joo-Won; Borrello, Joseph; Xu, Junqian

    2017-10-01

    Increased signal-to-noise ratio and blood oxygenation level-dependent sensitivity at 7 Tesla (T) have the potential to enable high-resolution imaging of the human cervical spinal cord and brainstem. We propose a new two-panel radiofrequency coil design for these regions to fully exploit the advantages of ultra-high field. A two-panel array, containing four transmit/receive and 18 receive-only elements fully encircling the head and neck, was constructed following simulations demonstrating the B1+ and specific absorption rate (SAR) benefits of two-panel over one-panel arrays. This array was compared with a previously reported posterior-only array and tested for safety using a phantom. Its anatomical, functional, and diffusion MRI performance was demonstrated in vivo. The two-panel array produced more uniform B1+ across the brainstem and cervical spinal cord without compromising SAR, and achieved 70% greater receive sensitivity than the posterior-only array. The two-panel design enabled acceleration of R = 2 × 2 in two dimensions or R = 3 in a single dimension. High quality in vivo anatomical, functional, and diffusion images of the human cervical spinal cord and brainstem were acquired. We have designed and constructed a wrap-around coil array with excellent performance for cervical spinal cord and brainstem MRI at 7T, which enables simultaneous human cervical spinal cord and brainstem functional MRI. Magn Reson Med 78:1623-1634, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Geneva University - Silicon photomultiplier : features and applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 7 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11.15 a.m. - Science II, Auditoire 1S081, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 SILICON PHOTOMULTIPLIER : FEATURES AND APPLICATIONS Dr Giulio SARACINO   University of Naples, Federico II   Silicon photomultipliers were developed about ten years ago and their use, unlike traditional photomultiplier tubes, is increasing more and more. They are an evolution of the avalanche photodiode working in Geiger mode regime. Hundreds of such diodes are connected in parallel, allowing single photon response, high detection efficiency, high gain at low bias voltage and very good timing performance. In spite of their Geiger regime, they can be considered linear devices, until the number of photon...

  8. Research on Wide-field Imaging Technologies for Low-frequency Radio Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, B. Q.; An, T.; Chen, X.; Wu, X. C.; Lu, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Wide-field imaging of low-frequency radio telescopes are subject to a number of difficult problems. One particularly pernicious problem is the non-coplanar baseline effect. It will lead to distortion of the final image when the phase of w direction called w-term is ignored. The image degradation effects are amplified for telescopes with the wide field of view. This paper summarizes and analyzes several w-term correction methods and their technical principles. Their advantages and disadvantages have been analyzed after comparing their computational cost and computational complexity. We conduct simulations with two of these methods, faceting and w-projection, based on the configuration of the first-phase Square Kilometre Array (SKA) low frequency array. The resulted images are also compared with the two-dimensional Fourier transform method. The results show that image quality and correctness derived from both faceting and w-projection are better than the two-dimensional Fourier transform method in wide-field imaging. The image quality and run time affected by the number of facets and w steps have been evaluated. The results indicate that the number of facets and w steps must be reasonable. Finally, we analyze the effect of data size on the run time of faceting and w-projection. The results show that faceting and w-projection need to be optimized before the massive amounts of data processing. The research of the present paper initiates the analysis of wide-field imaging techniques and their application in the existing and future low-frequency array, and fosters the application and promotion to much broader fields.

  9. Enhanced imaging of magnetic structures in micropatterned arrays of Co dots and antidots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiolerio, Alessandro [Physics Department Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Celasco, Edvige [Physics Department Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Materials and Microsystems Laboratory (chi lab)-LATEMAR Unit, Lungo Piazza d' Armi 6, Chivasso (Torino) (Italy); Celegato, Federica [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10138 Torino (Italy); Guastella, Salvatore; Martino, Paola [Physics Department Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Allia, Paolo [Physics Department Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.allia@polito.it; Tiberto, Paola [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10138 Torino (Italy); Pirri, Fabrizio [Physics Department Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Materials and Microsystems Laboratory (chi lab)-LATEMAR Unit, Lungo Piazza d' Armi 6, Chivasso (Torino) (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    A specific technique of numerical treatment of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) signal has been developed to enhance the quality of raw images, in order both to improve their contrast and to gain better insight on the sample topography and on the local arrangement of the magnetisation vector. Basically, the technique consists in computing the optimum conformal transformation that allows one to superimpose two AFM images of the same area, acquired performing subsequent scans whose fast scan axis were mutually perpendicular, and applying the inverse transform to the second image. After MFM image superposition, the two datasets were either summed or subtracted, in order to improve the magnetic contrast. Computations have been done in a Matlab workspace with the help of Image Processing Toolbox 4.2. Improved MFM images obtained on both dots and antidots thin evaporated Co arrays in the demagnetised state (after performing alternate field demagnetisation parallel and perpendicular to the array plane) have been interpreted. Samples consisting of large-size patterns (1x1 mm) of circular dots/antidots with square/hexagonal lattices and minimum diameters of 1 {mu}m were prepared by optical lithography. The magnetic film thickness was chosen depending on resist thickness, and varied between 25 and 150 nm, with a fixed ratio 1:4 between metal/resist film thickness. MFM was exploited to obtain images of either intra-dot or inter-antidot magnetic structures.

  10. Development and characterization of a TES optical imaging array for astrophysics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burney, J.; Bay, T.J.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Castle, J.P.; Romani, R.W.; Tomada, A.; Nam, S.W.; Miller, A.J.; Martinis, J.; Wang, E.; Kenny, T.; Young, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Our research group has successfully developed photon detectors capable of both time-stamping and energy-resolving individual photons at very high rates in a wide band from the near-IR through optical and into the near-UV. We have fabricated 32-pixel arrays of these Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) devices and have mounted them in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator equipped with windows for direct imaging. We have characterized single pixel behavior; we have also begun operating multiple pixels simultaneously, starting the scaling process towards use of the full array. We emphasize the development of a metalized mask for our array that blocks photons from hitting the inter-pixel areas and reflects them onto the TESs. We also present calibration data on detector resolution, electronics noise, and optical alignment

  11. A Full Parallel Event Driven Readout Technique for Area Array SPAD FLIM Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiming Nie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a full parallel event driven readout method which is implemented in an area array single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD image sensor for high-speed fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. The sensor only records and reads out effective time and position information by adopting full parallel event driven readout method, aiming at reducing the amount of data. The image sensor includes four 8 × 8 pixel arrays. In each array, four time-to-digital converters (TDCs are used to quantize the time of photons’ arrival, and two address record modules are used to record the column and row information. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were performed in Matlab in terms of the pile-up effect induced by the readout method. The sensor’s resolution is 16 × 16. The time resolution of TDCs is 97.6 ps and the quantization range is 100 ns. The readout frame rate is 10 Mfps, and the maximum imaging frame rate is 100 fps. The chip’s output bandwidth is 720 MHz with an average power of 15 mW. The lifetime resolvability range is 5–20 ns, and the average error of estimated fluorescence lifetimes is below 1% by employing CMM to estimate lifetimes.

  12. High-resolution dynamic pressure sensor array based on piezo-phototronic effect tuned photoluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingzeng; Li, Zhou; Liu, Caihong; Zheng, Qiang; Shi, Xieqing; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Du, Shiyu; Zhai, Junyi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    A high-resolution dynamic tactile/pressure display is indispensable to the comprehensive perception of force/mechanical stimulations such as electronic skin, biomechanical imaging/analysis, or personalized signatures. Here, we present a dynamic pressure sensor array based on pressure/strain tuned photoluminescence imaging without the need for electricity. Each sensor is a nanopillar that consists of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Its photoluminescence intensity can be modulated dramatically and linearly by small strain (0-0.15%) owing to the piezo-phototronic effect. The sensor array has a high pixel density of 6350 dpi and exceptional small standard deviation of photoluminescence. High-quality tactile/pressure sensing distribution can be real-time recorded by parallel photoluminescence imaging without any cross-talk. The sensor array can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by semiconductor product lines. The proposed dynamic all-optical pressure imaging with excellent resolution, high sensitivity, good uniformity, and ultrafast response time offers a suitable way for smart sensing, micro/nano-opto-electromechanical systems.

  13. HIGH-SPEED IMAGING AND WAVEFRONT SENSING WITH AN INFRARED AVALANCHE PHOTODIODE ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranec, Christoph; Atkinson, Dani; Hall, Donald; Jacobson, Shane; Chun, Mark [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Hilo, HI 96720-2700 (United States); Riddle, Reed [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Law, Nicholas M., E-mail: baranec@hawaii.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States)

    2015-08-10

    Infrared avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays represent a panacea for many branches of astronomy by enabling extremely low-noise, high-speed, and even photon-counting measurements at near-infrared wavelengths. We recently demonstrated the use of an early engineering-grade infrared APD array that achieves a correlated double sampling read noise of 0.73 e{sup −} in the lab, and a total noise of 2.52 e{sup −} on sky, and supports simultaneous high-speed imaging and tip-tilt wavefront sensing with the Robo-AO visible-light laser adaptive optics (AO) system at the Palomar Observatory 1.5 m telescope. Here we report on the improved image quality simultaneously achieved at visible and infrared wavelengths by using the array as part of an image stabilization control loop with AO-sharpened guide stars. We also discuss a newly enabled survey of nearby late M-dwarf multiplicity, as well as future uses of this technology in other AO and high-contrast imaging applications.

  14. Modeling Photo-multiplier Gain and Regenerating Pulse Height Data for Application Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, Michael D.; Jones, Ashley R.

    2018-01-01

    Systems that adopt organic scintillation detector arrays often require a calibration process prior to the intended measurement campaign to correct for significant performance variances between detectors within the array. These differences exist because of low tolerances associated with photo-multiplier tube technology and environmental influences. Differences in detector response can be corrected for by adjusting the supplied photo-multiplier tube voltage to control its gain and the effect that this has on the pulse height spectra from a gamma-only calibration source with a defined photo-peak. Automated methods that analyze these spectra and adjust the photo-multiplier tube bias accordingly are emerging for hardware that integrate acquisition electronics and high voltage control. However, development of such algorithms require access to the hardware, multiple detectors and calibration source for prolonged periods, all with associated constraints and risks. In this work, we report on a software function and related models developed to rescale and regenerate pulse height data acquired from a single scintillation detector. Such a function could be used to generate significant and varied pulse height data that can be used to integration-test algorithms that are capable of automatically response matching multiple detectors using pulse height spectra analysis. Furthermore, a function of this sort removes the dependence on multiple detectors, digital analyzers and calibration source. Results show a good match between the real and regenerated pulse height data. The function has also been used successfully to develop auto-calibration algorithms.

  15. Curvilinear 3-D Imaging Using Row--Column-Addressed 2-D Arrays with a Diverging Lens: Feasibility Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Beers, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    imaging. Extended FOV and low channel count of double-curved RCA 2-D arrays make 3-D imaging possible with equipment in the price range of conventional 2-D imaging. This study proposes a delay-and-sum beamformation scheme specific to double-curved RCA 2-D arrays and validates its focusing ability based...... of this study demonstrate that the proposed beamforming approach is accurate for achieving correct time-of-flight calculations, and hence avoids geometrical distortions....

  16. Infrared laser transillumination CT imaging system using parallel fiber arrays and optical switches for finger joint imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Emori, Ryota; Inage, Hiroki; Goto, Masaki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Devaraj, Balasigamani; Akatsuka, Takao

    2004-05-01

    The heterodyne detection technique, on which the coherent detection imaging (CDI) method founds, can discriminate and select very weak, highly directional forward scattered, and coherence retaining photons that emerge from scattering media in spite of their complex and highly scattering nature. That property enables us to reconstruct tomographic images using the same reconstruction technique as that of X-Ray CT, i.e., the filtered backprojection method. Our group had so far developed a transillumination laser CT imaging method based on the CDI method in the visible and near-infrared regions and reconstruction from projections, and reported a variety of tomographic images both in vitro and in vivo of biological objects to demonstrate the effectiveness to biomedical use. Since the previous system was not optimized, it took several hours to obtain a single image. For a practical use, we developed a prototype CDI-based imaging system using parallel fiber array and optical switches to reduce the measurement time significantly. Here, we describe a prototype transillumination laser CT imaging system using fiber-optic based on optical heterodyne detection for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), by demonstrating the tomographic imaging of acrylic phantom as well as the fundamental imaging properties. We expect that further refinements of the fiber-optic-based laser CT imaging system could lead to a novel and practical diagnostic tool for rheumatoid arthritis and other joint- and bone-related diseases in human finger.

  17. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-07

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  18. A study of timing properties of Silicon Photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avella, Paola; De Santo, Antonella; Lohstroh, Annika; Sajjad, Muhammad T.; Sellin, Paul J.

    2012-12-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are solid-state pixelated photodetectors. Lately these sensors have been investigated for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET) applications, where very good coincidence time resolution of the order of hundreds of picoseconds imply spatial resolution of the order of cm in the image reconstruction. The very fast rise time typical of the avalanche discharge improves the time resolution, but can be limited by the readout electronics and the technology used to construct the device. In this work the parameters of the equivalent circuit of the device that directly affect the pulse shape, namely the quenching resistance and capacitance and the diode and parasitic capacitances, were calculated. The mean rise time obtained with different preamplifiers was also measured.

  19. Modeling the low-light response of photomultiplier tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Patrick; Niculescu, Ioana

    2017-09-01

    A number of crucial experiments exploring the intricate tomography of protons and neutrons will be carried out in Hall A at Jefferson Lab using the SuperBigBite Spectrometer (SBS), a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer sporting 0.5% momentum and 0.5 mr angular resolution. As part of the standard SBS detector package the Gas Ring Imaging Cherenkov (GRINCH) detector will help identify particles produced in the experiments. To determine which photomultiplier (PMT) tubes would be used in GRINCH, more than 900 29 mm 9125B PMTs were tested. Two models, were used to fit test data. For the parameters relevant to this study, results from both models were found to be equivalent, and will be discussed here.

  20. Two-dimensional Fast ESPRIT Algorithm for Linear Array SAR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yi-chao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The linear array Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR system is a popular research tool, because it can realize three-dimensional imaging. However, owning to limitations of the aircraft platform and actual conditions, resolution improvement is difficult in cross-track and along-track directions. In this study, a twodimensional fast Estimation of Signal Parameters by Rotational Invariance Technique (ESPRIT algorithm for linear array SAR imaging is proposed to overcome these limitations. This approach combines the Gerschgorin disks method and the ESPRIT algorithm to estimate the positions of scatterers in cross and along-rack directions. Moreover, the reflectivity of scatterers is obtained by a modified pairing method based on “region growing”, replacing the least-squares method. The simulation results demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm with high resolution, quick calculation, and good real-time response.

  1. Development of Silicon Photomultipliers and their Applications to GlueX Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Elton S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The GlueX experiment is a photoproduction experiment in Hall D at Jefferson Lab that is being commissioned for use with the new 12 GeV accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to search for Hybrid mesons, which are mesons with quark and gluon degrees of freedom. The barrel calorimeter of GlueX is instrumented with 4000 large-area (1.2 x1.2 cm2) silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). These photon sensors have properties similar to vacuum photomultipliers, but are unaffected by high magnetic fields. In our experiment they operate in magnetic fields exceeding 1T. After extensive tests with a variety of sensors, we chose the S12045(X) custom SiPM arrays manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation, also known as multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs). We will give an overview of this new technology as well as the experience gained during two commissioning periods with beam.

  2. Development of silicon photomultipliers and their applications to GlueX calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Elton S., E-mail: elton@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The GlueX experiment is a photoproduction experiment in Hall D at Jefferson Lab that is being commissioned for use with the new 12 GeV accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to search for Hybrid mesons, which are mesons with quark and gluon degrees of freedom. The barrel calorimeter of GlueX is instrumented with 4000 large-area (1.2 × 1.2 cm{sup 2}) silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). These photon sensors have properties similar to vacuum photomultipliers, but are unaffected by high magnetic fields. In our experiment they operate in magnetic fields exceeding 1T. After extensive tests with a variety of sensors, we chose the S12045(X) custom SiPM arrays manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation, also known as multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs). We will give an overview of this new technology as well as the experience gained during two commissioning periods with beam.

  3. Stabilization of the photomultiplier gain of a liquid scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhazov, I.D.; Dmitriev, V.D.; Kuznetsov, A.V.; Malkin, L.Z.; Petrov, B.F.; Sheremet'ev, A.K.; Shpakov, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    A stabilization system of photomultiplier gain, where light-emitting diode flashes have been used to obtain a reference signal, is described. The diode is placed just in the liquid scintilllator volume. The stabilization system contains several (according to the number of photomultipliers) identical channels, which of them consists of a colorimeter, a control trigger and an integrator with an operational amplifier. Increase of photomultiplier stability is reached by changing voltage of photomultiplier power according to the reference signal amplitude. The level of background and efficiency of neutron detection by a scintillation counter are unchanged when using the stabilization system for 10 days of measurements

  4. First results of systematic studies done with silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosio, C.; Gentile, S.; Kuznetsova, E.; Meddi, F.

    2008-01-01

    Multicell avalanche photodiode structure operated in Geiger mode usually referred as silicon photomultiplier is a new intensively developing technology for photon detection. Insensitivity to magnetic fields, low operation voltage and small size make silicon photomultipliers very attractive for high-energy physics, astrophysics and medical applications. The presented results are obtained during the first steps taken in order to develop a setup and measurement procedures which allow to compare properties of diverse samples of silicon photomultipliers available on market. The response to low-intensity light was studied for silicon photomultipliers produced by CPTA (Russia), Hamamatsu (Japan), ITC-irst (Italy) and SensL (Ireland).

  5. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier--a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-07-21

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm(3). For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  6. A flexible coil array for high resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriegl, R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), among other imaging techniques, has become a major backbone of modern medical diagnostics. MRI enables the non-invasive combined, identification of anatomical structures, functional and chemical properties, especially in soft tissues. Nonetheless, applications requiring very high spatial and/or temporal resolution are often limited by the available signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in MR experiments. Since first clinical applications, image quality in MRI has been constantly improved by applying one or several of the following strategies: increasing the static magnetic field strength, improvement of the radiofrequency (RF) detection system, development of specialized acquisition sequences and optimization of image reconstruction techniques. This work is concerned with the development of highly sensitive RF detection systems for biomedical ultra-high field MRI. In particular, auto-resonant RF coils based on transmission line technology are investigated. These resonators may be fabricated on flexible substrate which enables form-fitting of the RF detector to the target anatomy, leading to a significant SNR gain. The main objective of this work is the development of a flexible RF coil array for high-resolution MRI on a human whole-body 7 T MR scanner. With coil arrays, the intrinsically high SNR of small surface coils may be exploited for an extended field of view. Further, parallel imaging techniques are accessible with RF array technology, allowing acceleration of the image acquisition. Secondly, in this PhD project a novel design for transmission line resonators is developed, that brings an additional degree of freedom in geometric design and enables the fabrication of large multi-turn resonators for high field MR applications. This thesis describes the development, successful implementation and evaluation of novel, mechanically flexible RF devices by analytical and 3D electromagnetic simulations, in bench measurements and in MRI

  7. Spatial light modulator array with heat minimization and image enhancement features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kanti [Briarcliff Manor, NY; Sweatt, William C [Albuquerque, NM; Zemel, Marc [New Rochelle, NY

    2007-01-30

    An enhanced spatial light modulator (ESLM) array, a microelectronics patterning system and a projection display system using such an ESLM for heat-minimization and resolution enhancement during imaging, and the method for fabricating such an ESLM array. The ESLM array includes, in each individual pixel element, a small pixel mirror (reflective region) and a much larger pixel surround. Each pixel surround includes diffraction-grating regions and resolution-enhancement regions. During imaging, a selected pixel mirror reflects a selected-pixel beamlet into the capture angle of a projection lens, while the diffraction grating of the pixel surround redirects heat-producing unused radiation away from the projection lens. The resolution-enhancement regions of selected pixels provide phase shifts that increase effective modulation-transfer function in imaging. All of the non-selected pixel surrounds redirect all radiation energy away from the projection lens. All elements of the ESLM are fabricated by deposition, patterning, etching and other microelectronic process technologies.

  8. Numerical Study of a Crossed Loop Coil Array for Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.; Solis, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2008-01-01

    A coil design has been recently proposed by Temnikov (Instrum Exp Tech. 2005;48;636-637), with higher experimental signal-to-noise ratio than that of the birdcage coil. It is also claimed that it is possible to individually tune it with a single chip capacitor. This coil design shows a great resemble to the gradiometer coil. These results motivated us to numerically simulate a three-coil array for parallel magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy with multi nuclear capability. The magnetic field was numerical simulated by solving Maxwell's equations with the finite element method. Uniformity profiles were calculated at the midsection for one single coil and showed a good agreement with the experimental data. Then, two more coils were added to form two different coil arrays: coil elements were equally distributed by an angle of a 30 deg. angle. Then, uniformity profiles were calculated again for all cases at the midsection. Despite the strong interaction among all coil elements, very good field uniformity can be achieved. These numerical results indicate that this coil array may be a good choice for magnetic resonance imaging parallel imaging

  9. NeuroSeek dual-color image processing infrared focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarley, Paul L.; Massie, Mark A.; Baxter, Christopher R.; Huynh, Buu L.

    1998-09-01

    Several technologies have been developed in recent years to advance the state of the art of IR sensor systems including dual color affordable focal planes, on-focal plane array biologically inspired image and signal processing techniques and spectral sensing techniques. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) and the Air Force Research Lab Munitions Directorate have developed a system which incorporates the best of these capabilities into a single device. The 'NeuroSeek' device integrates these technologies into an IR focal plane array (FPA) which combines multicolor Midwave IR/Longwave IR radiometric response with on-focal plane 'smart' neuromorphic analog image processing. The readout and processing integrated circuit very large scale integration chip which was developed under this effort will be hybridized to a dual color detector array to produce the NeuroSeek FPA, which will have the capability to fuse multiple pixel-based sensor inputs directly on the focal plane. Great advantages are afforded by application of massively parallel processing algorithms to image data in the analog domain; the high speed and low power consumption of this device mimic operations performed in the human retina.

  10. Stability Measurements for Alignment of the NIF Neutron Imaging System Pinhole Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; Bower, D.E.; Drury, O.B.; Dzenitis, J.M.; Frank, M.; Buckles, R.A.; Munson, C.; Wilde, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    The alignment system for the National Ignition Facility's neutron imaging system has been commissioned and measurements of the relative stability of the 90-315 DIM, the front and the back of the neutron imaging pinhole array and an exploding pusher target have been made using the 90-135 and the 90-258 opposite port alignment systems. Additionally, a laser beam shot from the neutron-imaging Annex and reflected from a mirror at the back of the pinhole array was used to monitor the pointing of the pinhole. Over a twelve hour period, the relative stability of these parts was found to be within ∼ ±18 (micro)m rms even when using manual methods for tracking the position of the objects. For highly visible features, use of basic particle tracking techniques found that the front of the pinhole array was stable relative to the 90-135 opposite port alignment camera to within ±3.4 (micro)m rms. Reregistration, however, of the opposite port alignment systems themselves using the target alignment sensor was found to change the expected position of target chamber center by up to 194 (micro)m.

  11. Progress in GEM-based gaseous photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Chechik, R; Breskin, Amos; Buzulutskov, A F; Guedes, G P; Mörmann, D; Singh, B K

    2003-01-01

    We discuss recent progress in gaseous photomultipliers (GPMTs) comprising UV-to-visible spectral range photocathodes (PCs) coupled to multiple Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM). The PCs may be either semitransparent or reflective ones directly deposited on the first-GEM surface. These detectors provide high gain, even in noble gases, are sensitive to single photons, have nanosecond time resolution, and offer good localization. The operation of CsI-based GPMTs in CF sub 4 opens new applications in Cherenkov detectors, where both the radiator and the photosensor operate in the same gas. The latest results on sealed visible-light detectors, combining bialkali PCs and Kapton-made GEMs are presented.

  12. Performance of the hybrid photomultiplier tube (HPMT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomaker, R.J. [B.V. Delft Electronische Producten, Roden (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    The HPMT, which may be an alternative for PhotoMultiplier Tubes (PMT`s) in many applications, is a vacuum tube in which the latest technologies of photocathodes and photodiodes are combined. Photo-electrons are accelerated and bombarding a reversely biased PIN diode, where they create many electron-hole-pairs. The resulting charge pulse can be amplified and further processed. The HPMT shows many superior characteristics compared to regular PMT`s, because it does not suffer the statistical fluctuations common for electron multiplication processes. An energy resolution of up to 14 photo-electrons will be presented, together with striking figures for dynamic range and timing behavior.

  13. InGaAs focal plane arrays for low-light-level SWIR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougal, Michael; Hood, Andrew; Geske, Jon; Wang, Jim; Patel, Falgun; Follman, David; Manzo, Juan; Getty, Jonathan

    2011-06-01

    Aerius Photonics will present their latest developments in large InGaAs focal plane arrays, which are used for low light level imaging in the short wavelength infrared (SWIR) regime. Aerius will present imaging in both 1280x1024 and 640x512 formats. Aerius will present characterization of the FPA including dark current measurements. Aerius will also show the results of development of SWIR FPAs for high temperaures, including imagery and dark current data. Finally, Aerius will show results of using the SWIR camera with Aerius' SWIR illuminators using VCSEL technology.

  14. Radio Observations of the Ionosphere From an Imaging Array and a CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isham, B.; Gustavsson, B.; Bullett, T. W.; Bergman, J. E. S.; Rincón-Charris, A.; Bruhn, F.; Funk, P.

    2017-12-01

    The ionosphere is a source of many radio emissions in the various low-frequency, medium-frequency, and high-frequency bands (0 to 30 MHz). In addition to natural radio emissions, artificial emissions can be stimulated using high-power radiowave ionospheric modification facilities. Two complementary projects are underway for the purpose of improving our knowledge of the processes of radio emissions from the ionosphere. One project is the Aguadilla radio array, located in northwestern Puerto Rico. The Aguadilla array is intended to produce 2 to 25 MHz radio images of the ionosphere, as well as to perform bistatic radar imaging of the ionosphere over Puerto Rico. The array will consist of multiple antenna elements, each of which is a single active (electromagnetically short) crossed electric dipole. The elements are arranged within a roughly 200 by 300-meter core array, in a semi-random pattern providing an optimal distribution of baseline vectors, with 6-meter minimum spacing to eliminate spacial aliasing. In addition, several elements are arranged in a partial ring around the central core, providing a roughly four times expanded region in u-v space for improved image resolution and quality. Phase is maintained via cabled connections to a central location. A remote array is also being developed, in which phase is maintained between elements by through the use of GPS-disciplined rubidium clocks. The other project involves the GimmeRF radio instrument, designed for 0.3 to 30 MHz vector observation of the radio electric field, and planned for launch in 2020 on a CubeSat. The data rate that can be sustained by GimmeRF far exceeds any available communication strategy. By exploiting fast on-board computing and efficient artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for analysis and data selection, the usage of the telemetry link can be optimized and value added to the mission. Radio images recorded by the radio array from below the ionosphere can be directly compared with the

  15. Small-animal whole-body imaging using a photoacoustic full ring array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Guo, Zijian; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In this report, we present a novel 3D photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system for small-animal whole-body imaging. The PACT system, based on a 512-element full-ring transducer array, received photoacoustic signals primarily from a 2-mm-thick slice. The light was generated by a pulse laser, and can either illuminate from the top or be reshaped to illuminate the sample from the side, using a conical lens and an optical condenser. The PACT system was capable of acquiring an in-plane image in 1.6 s; by scanning the sample in the elevational direction, a 3D tomographic image could be constructed. We tested the system by imaging a cylindrical phantom made of human hairs immersed in a scattering medium. The reconstructed image achieved an in-plane resolution of 0.1 mm and an elevational resolution of 1 mm. After deconvolution in the elevational direction, the 3D image was found to match well with the phantom. The system was also used to image a baby mouse in situ; the spinal cord and ribs can be seen easily in the reconstructed image. Our results demonstrate that the PACT system has the potential to be used for fast small-animal whole-body tomographic imaging.

  16. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-d image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da; Braz, Delson

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source-detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7, 31 x 31 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl), BGO, CdWO 4 , LSO, GOS and GSO scintillation detectors with pixel dimensions ranging from 1 x 1 cm 2 to 10 x 10 μm 2 and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that results in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. A 2D image of two thyroid follicles simulated by using MCNP4B code is shown

  17. Design and performance of single photon APD focal plane arrays for 3-D LADAR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzler, Mark A.; Entwistle, Mark; Owens, Mark; Patel, Ketan; Jiang, Xudong; Slomkowski, Krystyna; Rangwala, Sabbir; Zalud, Peter F.; Senko, Tom; Tower, John; Ferraro, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    ×We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of focal plane arrays (FPAs) for use in 3-D LADAR imaging applications requiring single photon sensitivity. These 32 × 32 FPAs provide high-efficiency single photon sensitivity for three-dimensional LADAR imaging applications at 1064 nm. Our GmAPD arrays are designed using a planarpassivated avalanche photodiode device platform with buried p-n junctions that has demonstrated excellent performance uniformity, operational stability, and long-term reliability. The core of the FPA is a chip stack formed by hybridizing the GmAPD photodiode array to a custom CMOS read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) and attaching a precision-aligned GaP microlens array (MLA) to the back-illuminated detector array. Each ROIC pixel includes an active quenching circuit governing Geiger-mode operation of the corresponding avalanche photodiode pixel as well as a pseudo-random counter to capture per-pixel time-of-flight timestamps in each frame. The FPA has been designed to operate at frame rates as high as 186 kHz for 2 μs range gates. Effective single photon detection efficiencies as high as 40% (including all optical transmission and MLA losses) are achieved for dark count rates below 20 kHz. For these planar-geometry diffused-junction GmAPDs, isolation trenches are used to reduce crosstalk due to hot carrier luminescence effects during avalanche events, and we present details of the crosstalk performance for different operating conditions. Direct measurement of temporal probability distribution functions due to cumulative timing uncertainties of the GmAPDs and ROIC circuitry has demonstrated a FWHM timing jitter as low as 265 ps (standard deviation is ~100 ps).

  18. Virtual source reflection imaging of the Socorro Magma Body, New Mexico, using a dense seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, T. S.; Worthington, L. L.; Schmandt, B.; Hansen, S. M.; Bilek, S. L.; Aster, R. C.; Ranasinghe, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Socorro Magma Body (SMB) is one of the largest known actively inflating continental magmatic intrusions. Previous studies have relied on sparse instrument coverage to determine its spatial extent, depth, and seismic signature, which characterized the body as a thin sill with a surface at 19 km below the Earth's surface. However, over the last two decades, InSAR and magneto-telluric (MT) studies have shed new light on the SMB and invigorated the scientific debate of the spatial distribution and uplift rate of the SMB. We return to seismic imaging of the SMB with the Sevilleta Array, a 12-day deployment of approximately 800 vertical component, 10-Hz geophones north of Socorro, New Mexico above and around the estimated northern half of the SMB. Teleseismic virtual source reflection profiling (TVR) employs the free surface reflection off of a teleseismic P as a virtual source in dense arrays, and has been used successfully to image basin structure and the Moho in multiple tectonic environments. The Sevilleta Array recorded 62 teleseismic events greater than M5. Applying TVR to the data collected by the Sevilleta Array, we present stacks from four events that produced the with high signal-to-noise ratios and simple source-time functions: the February 11, 2015 M6.7 in northern Argentina, the February 19, 2015 M5.4 in Kamchatka, Russia, and the February 21, 2015 M5.1 and February 22, 2015 M5.5 in western Colombia. Preliminary results suggest eastward-dipping reflectors at approximately 5 km depth near the Sierra Ladrones range in the northwestern corner of the array. Further analysis will focus on creating profiles across the area of maximum SMB uplift and constraining basin geometry.

  19. A comparison of earthquake backprojection imaging methods for dense local arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskardes, G. D.; Hole, J. A.; Wang, K.; Michaelides, M.; Wu, Q.; Chapman, M. C.; Davenport, K. K.; Brown, L. D.; Quiros, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    Backprojection imaging has recently become a practical method for local earthquake detection and location due to the deployment of densely sampled, continuously recorded, local seismograph arrays. While backprojection sometimes utilizes the full seismic waveform, the waveforms are often pre-processed and simplified to overcome imaging challenges. Real data issues include aliased station spacing, inadequate array aperture, inaccurate velocity model, low signal-to-noise ratio, large noise bursts and varying waveform polarity. We compare the performance of backprojection with four previously used data pre-processing methods: raw waveform, envelope, short-term averaging/long-term averaging and kurtosis. Our primary goal is to detect and locate events smaller than noise by stacking prior to detection to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The objective is to identify an optimized strategy for automated imaging that is robust in the presence of real-data issues, has the lowest signal-to-noise thresholds for detection and for location, has the best spatial resolution of the source images, preserves magnitude, and considers computational cost. Imaging method performance is assessed using a real aftershock data set recorded by the dense AIDA array following the 2011 Virginia earthquake. Our comparisons show that raw-waveform backprojection provides the best spatial resolution, preserves magnitude and boosts signal to detect events smaller than noise, but is most sensitive to velocity error, polarity error and noise bursts. On the other hand, the other methods avoid polarity error and reduce sensitivity to velocity error, but sacrifice spatial resolution and cannot effectively reduce noise by stacking. Of these, only kurtosis is insensitive to large noise bursts while being as efficient as the raw-waveform method to lower the detection threshold; however, it does not preserve the magnitude information. For automatic detection and location of events in a large data set, we

  20. Improved SPICE electrical model of silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, D., E-mail: davide.marano@oact.inaf.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Bonanno, G.; Belluso, M.; Billotta, S.; Grillo, A.; Garozzo, S.; Romeo, G. [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Catalano, O.; La Rosa, G.; Sottile, G.; Impiombato, D.; Giarrusso, S. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2013-10-21

    The present work introduces an improved SPICE equivalent electrical model of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors, in order to simulate and predict their transient response to avalanche triggering events. In particular, the developed circuit model provides a careful investigation of the magnitude and timing of the read-out signals and can therefore be exploited to perform reliable circuit-level simulations. The adopted modeling approach is strictly related to the physics of each basic microcell constituting the SiPM device, and allows the avalanche timing as well as the photodiode current and voltage to be accurately simulated. Predictive capabilities of the proposed model are demonstrated by means of experimental measurements on a real SiPM detector. Simulated and measured pulses are found to be in good agreement with the expected results. -- Highlights: • An improved SPICE electrical model of silicon photomultipliers is proposed. • The developed model provides a truthful representation of the physics of the device. • An accurate charge collection as a function of the overvoltage is achieved. • The adopted electrical model allows reliable circuit-level simulations to be performed. • Predictive capabilities of the adopted model are experimentally demonstrated.

  1. Monolithic array of 32 SPAD pixels for single-photon imaging at high frame rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisa, Simone; Guerrieri, Fabrizio; Zappa, Franco

    2009-01-01

    We present a single-chip monolithic array of 32 Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD) and associated electronics for imaging at high frame rates and high sensitivity. Photodetectors, front-end circuitry and control electronics used to manage the array are monolithically integrated on the same chip in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS high-voltage technology. The array is composed of 32 'smart' pixels working in photon counting mode and functioning in a parallel fashion. Every cell comprises of an integrated SPAD photodetector, a novel quenching circuit named as Variable Load Quenching Circuit (VLQC), counting electronics and a buffer memory. Proper ancillary electronics that perform the arbitration of photon counts between two consecutive frames is integrated as well. Thanks to the presence of in-pixel memory registers, the inter-frame dead time between subsequent frames is limited to few nanoseconds. Since integration and download are performed simultaneously and the array can be addressed like a standard digital memory, the achievable maximum frame rate is very high in the order of hundreds of thousands of frame/s.

  2. Dual-Polarization, Multi-Frequency Antenna Array for use with Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in common aperture antenna technology were employed to utilize its proprietary genetic algorithmbased modeling tools in an effort to develop, build, and test a dual-polarization array for Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) applications. Final program results demonstrate the ability to achieve a lightweight, thin, higher-gain aperture that covers the desired spectral band. NASA employs various passive microwave and millimeter-wave instruments, such as spectral radiometers, for a range of remote sensing applications, from measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, to cosmic background emission. These instruments such as the HIRAD, SFMR (Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer), and LRR (Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer), provide unique data accumulation capabilities for observing sea surface wind, temperature, and rainfall, and significantly enhance the understanding and predictability of hurricane intensity. These microwave instruments require extremely efficient wideband or multiband antennas in order to conserve space on the airborne platform. In addition, the thickness and weight of the antenna arrays is of paramount importance in reducing platform drag, permitting greater time on station. Current sensors are often heavy, single- polarization, or limited in frequency coverage. The ideal wideband antenna will have reduced size, weight, and profile (a conformal construct) without sacrificing optimum performance. The technology applied to this new HIRAD array will allow NASA, NOAA, and other users to gather information related to hurricanes and other tropical storms more cost effectively without sacrificing sensor performance or the aircraft time on station. The results of the initial analysis and numerical design indicated strong potential for an antenna array that would satisfy all of the design requirements for a replacement HIRAD array. Multiple common aperture antenna methodologies were employed to achieve exceptional gain over the entire

  3. Evaluation of ultrasonic array imaging algorithms for inspection of a coarse grained material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pamel, A.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Brett, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Improving the ultrasound inspection capability for coarse grain metals remains of longstanding interest to industry and the NDE research community and is expected to become increasingly important for next generation power plants. A test sample of coarse grained Inconel 625 which is representative of future power plant components has been manufactured to test the detectability of different inspection techniques. Conventional ultrasonic A, B, and C-scans showed the sample to be extraordinarily difficult to inspect due to its scattering behaviour. However, in recent years, array probes and Full Matrix Capture (FMC) imaging algorithms, which extract the maximum amount of information possible, have unlocked exciting possibilities for improvements. This article proposes a robust methodology to evaluate the detection performance of imaging algorithms, applying this to three FMC imaging algorithms; Total Focusing Method (TFM), Phase Coherent Imaging (PCI), and Decomposition of the Time Reversal Operator with Multiple Scattering (DORT MSF). The methodology considers the statistics of detection, presenting the detection performance as Probability of Detection (POD) and probability of False Alarm (PFA). The data is captured in pulse-echo mode using 64 element array probes at centre frequencies of 1MHz and 5MHz. All three algorithms are shown to perform very similarly when comparing their flaw detection capabilities on this particular case.

  4. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1-) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI.

  5. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1(-)) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Frontend Receiver Electronics for High Frequency Monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS Imaging Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurun, Gokce; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design of CMOS receiver electronics for monolithic integration with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. A custom 8-inch wafer is fabricated in a 0.35 μm two-poly, four-metal CMOS process and then CMUT arrays are built on top of the application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) on the wafer. We discuss advantages of the single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS approach in terms of receive sensitivity and SNR. Low-noise and high-gain design of a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) optimized for a forward-looking volumetric-imaging CMUT array element is discussed as a challenging design example. Amplifier gain, bandwidth, dynamic range and power consumption trade-offs are discussed in detail. With minimized parasitics provided by the CMUT-on-CMOS approach, the optimized TIA design achieves a 90 fA/√Hz input referred current noise, which is less than the thermal-mechanical noise of the CMUT element. We show successful system operation with a pulse-echo measurement. Transducer noise-dominated detection in immersion is also demonstrated through output noise spectrum measurement of the integrated system at different CMUT bias voltages. A noise figure of 1.8 dB is obtained in the designed CMUT bandwidth of 10 MHz to 20 MHz. PMID:21859585

  7. Front-end receiver electronics for high-frequency monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS imaging arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurun, Gokce; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the design of CMOS receiver electronics for monolithic integration with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for highfrequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. A custom 8-inch (20-cm) wafer is fabricated in a 0.35-μm two-poly, four-metal CMOS process and then CMUT arrays are built on top of the application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) on the wafer. We discuss advantages of the single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS approach in terms of receive sensitivity and SNR. Low-noise and high-gain design of a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) optimized for a forward-looking volumetric-imaging CMUT array element is discussed as a challenging design example. Amplifier gain, bandwidth, dynamic range, and power consumption trade-offs are discussed in detail. With minimized parasitics provided by the CMUT-on-CMOS approach, the optimized TIA design achieves a 90 fA/√Hz input-referred current noise, which is less than the thermal-mechanical noise of the CMUT element. We show successful system operation with a pulseecho measurement. Transducer-noise-dominated detection in immersion is also demonstrated through output noise spectrum measurement of the integrated system at different CMUT bias voltages. A noise figure of 1.8 dB is obtained in the designed CMUT bandwidth of 10 to 20 MHz.

  8. Image Reconstruction in Radio Astronomy with Non-Coplanar Synthesis Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrick, L.

    2015-03-01

    Traditional radio astronomy imaging techniques assume that the interferometric array is coplanar, with a small field of view, and that the two-dimensional Fourier relationship between brightness and visibility remains valid, allowing the Fast Fourier Transform to be used. In practice, to acquire more accurate data, the non-coplanar baseline effects need to be incorporated, as small height variations in the array plane introduces the w spatial frequency component. This component adds an additional phase shift to the incoming signals. There are two approaches to account for the non-coplanar baseline effects: either the full three-dimensional brightness and visibility model can be used to reconstruct an image, or the non-coplanar effects can be removed, reducing the three dimensional relationship to that of the two-dimensional one. This thesis describes and implements the w-projection and w-stacking algorithms. The aim of these algorithms is to account for the phase error introduced by non-coplanar synthesis arrays configurations, making the recovered visibilities more true to the actual brightness distribution model. This is done by reducing the 3D visibilities to a 2D visibility model. The algorithms also have the added benefit of wide-field imaging, although w-stacking supports a wider field of view at the cost of more FFT bin support. For w-projection, the w-term is accounted for in the visibility domain by convolving it out of the problem with a convolution kernel, allowing the use of the two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform. Similarly, the w-Stacking algorithm applies a phase correction in the image domain to image layers to produce an intensity model that accounts for the non-coplanar baseline effects. This project considers the KAT7 array for simulation and analysis of the limitations and advantages of both the algorithms. Additionally, a variant of the Högbom CLEAN algorithm was used which employs contour trimming for extended source emission flagging. The

  9. Airship Sparse Array Antenna Radar Real Aperture Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing and Sparsity in Transform Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liechen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A conformal sparse array based on combined Barker code is designed for airship platform. The performance of the designed array such as signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed. Using the hovering characteristics of the airship, interferometry operation can be applied on the real aperture imaging results of two pulses, which can eliminate the random backscatter phase and make the image sparse in the transform domain. Building the relationship between echo and transform coefficients, the Compressed Sensing (CS theory can be introduced to solve the formula and achieving imaging. The image quality of the proposed method can reach the image formed by the full array imaging. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Infrared Imaging of Cotton Fiber Bundles Using a Focal Plane Array Detector and a Single Reflectance Accessory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Santiago Cintrón

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrared imaging is gaining attention as a technique used in the examination of cotton fibers. This type of imaging combines spectral analysis with spatial resolution to create visual images that examine sample composition and distribution. Herein, we report on the use of an infrared instrument equipped with a reflection accessory and an array detector system for the examination of cotton fiber bundles. Cotton vibrational spectra and chemical images were acquired by grouping pixels in the detector array. This technique reduced spectral noise and was employed to visualize cell wall development in cotton fibers bundles. Fourier transform infrared spectra reveal band changes in the C–O bending region that matched previous studies. Imaging studies were quick, relied on small amounts of sample and provided a distribution of the cotton fiber cell wall composition. Thus, imaging of cotton bundles with an infrared detector array has potential for use in cotton fiber examinations.

  11. Gain stabilization circuit of measuring devices with photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seda, J.; Sabol, J.

    1974-01-01

    A circuit is designed for the stabilization of the gain of measuring devices with photomultipliers, suitable especially for the stabilization of scintillation detection systems, in which the correction signal is applied to the photomultiplier grid placed between the photocathode and the first dynode. (J.K.)

  12. Linearity measurement of the XP 1210 fast photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuze, G.; Sawine, P.

    1969-01-01

    A new X Y method of photomultipliers linearity measurement has been tested which is more suitable for fast photomultiplier tubes. The XP 1210 gives a linearity limit of 70 mA for the gain 10, i.e. 3.5 V for a 50 Ω charge impedance

  13. Cell membrane conformation at vertical nanowire array interface revealed by fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthing, Trine; Bonde, Sara; Rostgaard, Katrine R; Martinez, Karen L; Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Sørensen, Claus B; Nygård, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The perspectives offered by vertical arrays of nanowires for biosensing applications in living cells depend on the access of individual nanowires to the cell interior. Recent results on electrical access and molecular delivery suggest that direct access is not always obtained. Here, we present a generic approach to directly visualize the membrane conformation of living cells interfaced with nanowire arrays, with single nanowire resolution. The method combines confocal z-stack imaging with an optimized cell membrane labelling strategy which was applied to HEK293 cells interfaced with 2–11 μm long and 3–7 μm spaced nanowires with various surface coatings (bare, aminosilane-coated or polyethyleneimine-coated indium arsenide). We demonstrate that, for all commonly used nanowire lengths, spacings and surface coatings, nanowires generally remain enclosed in a membrane compartment, and are thereby not in direct contact with the cell interior. (paper)

  14. Full image-processing pipeline in field-programmable gate array for a small endoscopic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Sheikh Shanawaz; Sousa, L. Natércia; Ferreira, Nuno Fábio; Sousa, Ricardo M.; Santos, Joao; Wäny, Martin; Morgado-Dias, F.

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopy is an imaging procedure used for diagnosis as well as for some surgical purposes. The camera used for the endoscopy should be small and able to produce a good quality image or video, to reduce discomfort of the patients, and to increase the efficiency of the medical team. To achieve these fundamental goals, a small endoscopy camera with a footprint of 1 mm×1 mm×1.65 mm is used. Due to the physical properties of the sensors and human vision system limitations, different image-processing algorithms, such as noise reduction, demosaicking, and gamma correction, among others, are needed to faithfully reproduce the image or video. A full image-processing pipeline is implemented using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) to accomplish a high frame rate of 60 fps with minimum processing delay. Along with this, a viewer has also been developed to display and control the image-processing pipeline. The control and data transfer are done by a USB 3.0 end point in the computer. The full developed system achieves real-time processing of the image and fits in a Xilinx Spartan-6LX150 FPGA.

  15. Silicon photomultiplier as a detector of Cherenkov photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpar, S.; Dolenec, R.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Krizan, P.; Mazuka, Y.; Pestotnik, R.; Stanovnik, A.; Yamaoka, M.

    2008-01-01

    A novel photon detector-i.e. the silicon photomultiplier-whose main advantage over conventional photomultiplier tubes is the operation in high magnetic fields, has been tested as a photon detector in a proximity focusing RICH with aerogel radiator. This type of RICH counter is proposed for the upgrade of the Belle detector at the KEK B-factory. Recently produced silicon photomultipliers show less noise and have larger size, which are important issues for a large area photon detector. We measured the single photon pulse height distribution, the timing resolution and the position sensitivity for different silicon photomultipliers (Hamamatsu MPPC HC025, HC050, and HC100). The silicon photomultipliers were then used to detect Cherenkov photons emitted by cosmic ray particles in a proximity focusing aerogel RICH. Various light guides were investigated in order to increase the detection efficiency

  16. Research of Infrared Imaging at Atmospheric Pressure Using a Substrate-Free Focal Plane Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jian-Xiong; Cheng Teng; Zhang Qing-Chuan; Zhang Yong; Mao Liang; Gao Jie; Wu Xiao-Ping; Chen Da-Peng

    2013-01-01

    An equivalent circuit model to the substrate-free focal plane array (FPA) is established. Using this fast and effective model, the performance of infrared (IR) imaging at atmospheric pressure is investigated and it is found that the substrate-free FPA has the ability of IR imaging at atmospheric pressure, whereas it has a slightly degraded noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) as compared with IR imaging under a high vacuum. This feature is also identified experimentally by a substrate-free FPA with pixel size of 50 × 50 μm 2 . The NETDs are measured to be 160 mK at 10 −2 Pa pressure and 1.08 K at atmospheric pressure

  17. Luminance and image quality analysis of an organic electroluminescent panel with a patterned microlens array attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hoang Yan; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Fang, Jheng-Hao; Hsu, Sheng-Chih; Lee, Jiun-Haw; Lin, Jia-Rong; Wei, Mao-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    Luminance and image quality observed from the normal direction of a commercial 2.0 inch panel based on organic electroluminescence (OEL) technology attached to regular and patterned microlens array films (MAFs) were studied and analyzed. When applying the regularly arranged MAF on the panel, a luminance enhancement of 23% was observed, accompanied by a reduction of the image quality index as low as 74%. By removing the microlenses on the emitting areas, the patterned MAF enhances the luminance efficiency of the OEL by 52% keeping the image quality index of the display as high as 94%, due to the effective light extraction in the glass substrate being less than the critical angle. 3D simulation based on a ray-tracing model was also established to investigate the spatial distribution of light rays radiated from an OEL pixel with different microstructures which showed consistent results with the experimental results

  18. Supplemental Blue LED Lighting Array to Improve the Signal Quality in Hyperspectral Imaging of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Mahlein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging systems used in plant science or agriculture often have suboptimal signal-to-noise ratio in the blue region (400–500 nm of the electromagnetic spectrum. Typically there are two principal reasons for this effect, the low sensitivity of the imaging sensor and the low amount of light available from the illuminating source. In plant science, the blue region contains relevant information about the physiology and the health status of a plant. We report on the improvement in sensitivity of a hyperspectral imaging system in the blue region of the spectrum by using supplemental illumination provided by an array of high brightness light emitting diodes (LEDs with an emission peak at 470 nm.

  19. Image quality improvement in megavoltage cone beam CT using an imaging beam line and a sintered pixelated array system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Anderson, Carryn M.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Stiles, Jared; Edwards, Drake S.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the improvement in megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) image quality enabled by the combination of a 4.2 MV imaging beam line (IBL) with a carbon electron target and a detector system equipped with a novel sintered pixelated array (SPA) of translucent Gd 2 O 2 S ceramic scintillator. Clinical MVCBCT images are traditionally acquired with the same 6 MV treatment beam line (TBL) that is used for cancer treatment, a standard amorphous Si (a-Si) flat panel imager, and the Kodak Lanex Fast-B (LFB) scintillator. The IBL produces a greater fluence of keV-range photons than the TBL, to which the detector response is more optimal, and the SPA is a more efficient scintillator than the LFB. Methods: A prototype IBL + SPA system was installed on a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator equipped with the MVision TM image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. A SPA strip consisting of four neighboring tiles and measuring 40 cm by 10.96 cm in the crossplane and inplane directions, respectively, was installed in the flat panel imager. Head- and pelvis-sized phantom images were acquired at doses ranging from 3 to 60 cGy with three MVCBCT configurations: TBL + LFB, IBL + LFB, and IBL + SPA. Phantom image quality at each dose was quantified using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) metrics. Head and neck, thoracic, and pelvic (prostate) cancer patients were imaged with the three imaging system configurations at multiple doses ranging from 3 to 15 cGy. The systems were assessed qualitatively from the patient image data. Results: For head and neck and pelvis-sized phantom images, imaging doses of 3 cGy or greater, and relative electron densities of 1.09 and 1.48, the CNR average improvement factors for imaging system change of TBL + LFB to IBL + LFB, IBL + LFB to IBL + SPA, and TBL + LFB to IBL + SPA were 1.63 (p -8 ), 1.64 (p -13 ), 2.66 (p -9 ), respectively. For all imaging doses, soft tissue contrast was more

  20. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ~9 fold higher density of fiber optic cables on its top facet compared to the bottom one and is illuminated by an incoherent light source, e.g., a simple light-emitting-diode (LED). The transmitted light pattern through the object is then sampled by this array of fiber optic cables, delivering a transmission image of the sample onto the other side of the taper, with ~3× magnification in each direction. This magnified image of the object, located at the bottom facet of the fiber array, is then projected onto the CMOS image sensor of the cellphone using two lenses. While keeping the sample and the cellphone camera at a fixed position, the fiber-optic array is then manually rotated with discrete angular increments of e.g., 1-2 degrees. At each angular position of the fiber-optic array, contact images are captured using the cellphone camera, creating a sequence of transmission images for the same sample. These multi-frame images are digitally fused together based on a shift-and-add algorithm through a custom-developed Android application running on the smart-phone, providing the final microscopic image of the sample, visualized through the screen of the phone. This final computation step improves the resolution and also removes spatial artefacts that arise due to non-uniform sampling of the transmission intensity at the fiber optic array surface. We validated the performance of this cellphone based Contact Scope by imaging resolution test charts and blood smears.

  1. Characterization of orthogonal transfer array CCDs for the WIYN one degree imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Michael; Ouellette, David; Boroson, Todd; Harbeck, Daniel; Martin, Pierre; Jacoby, George; Cavin, John; Sawyer, David; Boggs, Kasey; Bredthauer, Richard

    2012-03-01

    The WIYN One Degree Imager (ODI) will provide a one degree field of view for the WIYN 3.5 m telescope located on Kitt Peak near Tucson, Arizona. Its focal plane consists of an 8x8 grid of Orthogonal Transfer Array (OTA) CCD detectors. These detectors are the STA2200 OTA CCDs designed and fabricated by Semiconductor Technology Associates, Inc. and backside processed at the University of Arizona Imaging Technology Laboratory. Several lot runs of the STA2200 detectors have been fabricated. We have backside processed devices from these different lots and provide detector performance characterization, including noise, CTE, cosmetics, quantum efficiency, and some orthogonal transfer characteristics. We discuss the performance differences for the devices with different silicon thickness and resistivity. A fully buttable custom detector package has been developed for this project which allows hybridization of the silicon detectors directly onto an aluminum nitride substrate with an embedded pin grid array. This package is mounted on a silicon-aluminum alloy which provides a flat imaging surface of less than 20 microns peakvalley at the -100 C operating temperature. Characterization of the package performance, including low temperature profilometry, is described in this paper.

  2. Bi-dimensional arrays of SPAD for time-resolved single photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tudisco, S.; Lanzano, L.; Musumeci, F.; Neri, L.; Privitera, S.; Scordino, A.; Condorelli, G.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Sanfilippo, D.; Valvo, G.

    2009-01-01

    Many scientific areas like astronomy, biophysics, biomedicine, nuclear and plasma science, etc. are interested in the development of a new time-resolved single photon imaging device. Such a device represents today one of the most challenging goals in the field of photonics. In collaboration with Catania R and D staff of ST-Microelectronics (STM) we created, during the last few years, a new avalanche photosensor-Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) able to detect and count, with excellent performance, single photons. Further we will discuss the possible realization of a single photon imaging device through the many elements integration (bi-dimensional arrays) of SPADs. In order to achieve the goal, it is also important to develop an appropriate readout strategy able to address the time information of each individual sensor and in order to read a great number of elements easily. First prototypes were designed and manufactured by STM and the results are reported here. In the paper we will discuss in particular: (i) sensor performance (gain, photodetection efficiency, timing, after-pulsing, etc.); (ii) array performance (layout, cross-talk, etc.); (iii) readout strategy (quenching, electronics), and (iv) first imaging results (general performance).

  3. Self characterization of a coded aperture array for neutron source imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volegov, P. L., E-mail: volegov@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the stagnation stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, triangular tapers machined in gold foils. These gold foils are stacked to form an array of 20 apertures for pinhole imaging and three apertures for penumbral imaging. These apertures must be precisely aligned to accurately place the field of view of each aperture at the design location, or the location of the field of view for each aperture must be measured. In this paper we present a new technique that has been developed for the measurement and characterization of the precise location of each aperture in the array. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments at NIF.

  4. Muon tracking system with Silicon Photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Dahal, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; Pazos Clemens, L.; Candela, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Sablone, D.; Franchi, G.

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterisation and performance of a low cost muon tracking system consisting of plastic scintillator bars and Silicon Photomultipliers equipped with a customised front-end electronics based on a fast preamplifier network. This system can be used as a detector test bench for astroparticle physics and for educational and outreach purposes. We investigated the device behaviour in self-trigger and coincidence mode, without using LED and pulse generators, showing that with a relatively simple set up a complete characterisation work can be carried out. A high definition oscilloscope, which can easily be found in many university physics or engineering departments, has been used for triggering and data acquisition. Its capabilities have been exploited to discriminate real particles from the background

  5. Muon tracking system with Silicon Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Dahal, S. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Di Giovanni, A., E-mail: adriano.digiovanni@nyu.edu [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Pazos Clemens, L. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Candela, A.; D' Incecco, M.; Sablone, D. [Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN, Assergi (Italy); Franchi, G. [AGE Scientific Srl, Capezzano Pianore (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    We report the characterisation and performance of a low cost muon tracking system consisting of plastic scintillator bars and Silicon Photomultipliers equipped with a customised front-end electronics based on a fast preamplifier network. This system can be used as a detector test bench for astroparticle physics and for educational and outreach purposes. We investigated the device behaviour in self-trigger and coincidence mode, without using LED and pulse generators, showing that with a relatively simple set up a complete characterisation work can be carried out. A high definition oscilloscope, which can easily be found in many university physics or engineering departments, has been used for triggering and data acquisition. Its capabilities have been exploited to discriminate real particles from the background.

  6. LYSO crystal calorimeter readout with silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berra, A., E-mail: alessandro.berra@gmail.com [Università degli Studi dell' Insubria (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Cecchi, C.; Germani, S. [INFN sezione di Perugia (Italy); Guffanti, D. [Università degli Studi dell' Insubria (Italy); Lietti, D. [Università degli Studi dell' Insubria (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Lubrano, P.; Manoni, E. [INFN sezione di Perugia (Italy); Prest, M. [Università degli Studi dell' Insubria (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Rossi, A. [INFN sezione di Perugia (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    Large area Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPMs) are the new frontier of the development of readout systems for scintillating detectors. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected silicon micropixels operating in limited Geiger–Muller avalanche mode, and thus working as independent photon counters with a very high gain (∼10{sup 6}). This contribution presents the performance in terms of linearity and energy resolution of an electromagnetic homogeneous calorimeter composed of 9∼18X{sub 0} LYSO crystals. The crystals were readout by 36 4×4 mm{sup 2} SiPMs (4 for each crystal) produced by FBK-irst. This calorimeter was tested at the Beam Test Facility at the INFN laboratories in Frascati with a single- and multi-particle electron beam in the 100–500 MeV energy range.

  7. An LTCC Based Compact SIW Antenna Array Feed Network for a Passive Imaging Radiometer

    KAUST Repository

    Abuzaid, Hattan

    2013-02-05

    Passive millimeter-wave (PMMW) imaging is a technique that allows the detection of inherent millimeter-wave radiation emitted by bodies. Since different bodies with varying properties emit unequal power intensities, a contrast can be established to detect their presence. The advantage of this imaging scheme over other techniques, such as optical and infrared imaging, is its ability to operate under all weather conditions. This is because the relatively long wavelengths of millimeter-waves, as compared to visible light, penetrate through clouds, fog, and sandstorms. The core of a PMMW camera is an antenna, which receives the electromagnetic radiation from a scene. Because PMMW systems require high gains to operate, large antenna arrays are typically employed. This mandatory increase of antenna elements is associated with a large feeding network. Therefore, PMMW cameras usually have a big profile. In this work, two enabling technologies, namely, Substrate integrated Waveguide (SIW) and Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC), are coupled with an innovative design to miniaturize the passive front-end. The two technologies synergize very well with the shielded characteristics of SIW and the high density multilayer integration of LTCC. The proposed design involves a novel multilayer power divider, which is incorporated in a folded feed network structure by moving between layers. The end result is an efficient feeding network, which footprint is least affected by an increase in array size. This is because the addition of more elements is accommodated by a vertical expansion rather than a lateral one. To characterize the feed network, an antenna array has been designed and integrated through efficient transitions.The complete structure has been simulated and fabricated. The results demonstrate an excellent performance, manifesting in a gain of 20 dBi and a bandwidth of more than 11.4% at 35 GHz. These values satisfy the general requirements of a PMMW system.

  8. Development of large-area silicon photomultiplier detectors for PET applications at FBK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorzi, Nicola, E-mail: zorzi@fbk.eu [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento Povo (Italy); Melchiorri, Mirko; Piazza, Alessandro; Piemonte, Claudio; Tarolli, Alessandro [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento Povo (Italy)

    2011-04-21

    This paper reports on the development of large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors specifically designed for positron emission tomography (PET) instruments. The sensors under study are monolithic arrays of two different types: a 2x2 array of {approx}4x4 mm{sup 2} elements and an 8x8 array of 1.5x1.5 mm{sup 2} pixels. These devices are characterized at wafer level by means of an automatic test procedure, consisting of current-voltage curves in forward and reverse bias. The tests allowed selection of functioning devices and evaluation of the uniformity of basic parameters. Results of the electrical characterization are reported showing that acceptable values of yield together with rather uniform distribution of parameters have been obtained. Reliability of produced SiPMs has been proved by long-term accelerated stress tests.

  9. Development of large-area silicon photomultiplier detectors for PET applications at FBK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorzi, Nicola; Melchiorri, Mirko; Piazza, Alessandro; Piemonte, Claudio; Tarolli, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors specifically designed for positron emission tomography (PET) instruments. The sensors under study are monolithic arrays of two different types: a 2x2 array of ∼4x4 mm 2 elements and an 8x8 array of 1.5x1.5 mm 2 pixels. These devices are characterized at wafer level by means of an automatic test procedure, consisting of current-voltage curves in forward and reverse bias. The tests allowed selection of functioning devices and evaluation of the uniformity of basic parameters. Results of the electrical characterization are reported showing that acceptable values of yield together with rather uniform distribution of parameters have been obtained. Reliability of produced SiPMs has been proved by long-term accelerated stress tests.

  10. Tests of crossed-wire position sensitive photomultipliers for scintillating fiber particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdrisat, C.F.; Koechner, D.; Majewski, S.; Pourang, R.; Wilson, C.D.; Zorn, C.

    1995-01-01

    Several applications of two Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier tubes to the detection of high energy particles with scintillating fibers are discussed. The PMTs are of the multiwire anode grid design, type R2486 and R4135. These tubes were tested with both single samples and arrays of 2 and 3 mm diameter scintillating fibers. Measurements of position resolution of the PMTs using either the charge digitization or the delay line readout techniques were made. The results indicate an intrinsic inability of the technique to reconstruct the actual position of a fiber on the photocathode when its location falls halfway between two grid wires. A way to overcome this limit is suggested. (orig.)

  11. Development of 2D-ACAR apparatus using position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Saito, Haruo; Iwata, Tetsuya; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of Arts and Sciences; Uchida, Hiroshi; Omura, Tomohide

    1997-03-01

    A new two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation apparatus is described. Position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes coupled with two-dimensional arrays of small BGO scintillator blocks make simple and compact position-sensitive {gamma}-ray detectors. With a sample-detector distance of 5m, an angular resolution of 1.1 mrad FWHM and a coincidence count rate of {approx}2.4 c.p.s. per mCi are obtained. Its performance is demonstrated by the result of a test measurement for KI crystal in which non-localized positronium exists at low temperatures. (author)

  12. Ultrafast readout of scintillating fibers using upgraded position-sensitive photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onel, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental results obtained with commercially available position-sensitive photomultipliers (PSPM) coupled with 0.5 mm diameter scintillating fiber arrays show some promising performances such as space resolution better than 200 μm and time resolution ∼ 1.5 ns with a detection efficiency higher than 90%. Major progress has also been recently achieved with an upgrade of a PSPM based on new grid dynode structures. Two-track spatial resolution has been studied using the upgraded PSPM. Initial studies demonstrate that two tracks separated by a minimum distance of 3 mm are resolved

  13. OpenMSI Arrayed Analysis Toolkit: Analyzing Spatially Defined Samples Using Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Raad, Markus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); de Rond, Tristan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Rübel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Keasling, Jay D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Northen, Trent R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Bowen, Benjamin P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has primarily been applied in localizing biomolecules within biological matrices. Although well-suited, the application of MSI for comparing thousands of spatially defined spotted samples has been limited. One reason for this is a lack of suitable and accessible data processing tools for the analysis of large arrayed MSI sample sets. In this paper, the OpenMSI Arrayed Analysis Toolkit (OMAAT) is a software package that addresses the challenges of analyzing spatially defined samples in MSI data sets. OMAAT is written in Python and is integrated with OpenMSI (http://openmsi.nersc.gov), a platform for storing, sharing, and analyzing MSI data. By using a web-based python notebook (Jupyter), OMAAT is accessible to anyone without programming experience yet allows experienced users to leverage all features. OMAAT was evaluated by analyzing an MSI data set of a high-throughput glycoside hydrolase activity screen comprising 384 samples arrayed onto a NIMS surface at a 450 μm spacing, decreasing analysis time >100-fold while maintaining robust spot-finding. The utility of OMAAT was demonstrated for screening metabolic activities of different sized soil particles, including hydrolysis of sugars, revealing a pattern of size dependent activities. Finally, these results introduce OMAAT as an effective toolkit for analyzing spatially defined samples in MSI. OMAAT runs on all major operating systems, and the source code can be obtained from the following GitHub repository: https://github.com/biorack/omaat.

  14. A novel readout concept for multianode photomultiplier tubes with pad matrix anode layout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Vladimir [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)]. E-mail: Popov@jlab.org; Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Welch, Benjamin L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a new analog readout concept for multianode photomultiplier tubes with a pad matrix anode layout. This new readout technique is the result of a modification of a technique previously developed at the Detector Group of Jefferson Lab (V. Popov, US patent No: 6,747,263 B1) [V. Popov, S. Majewski, A.G. Weisenberger, Readout Electronics for Multianode Photomultiplier Tubes with Pad Matrix Anode Layout, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, IEEE 2003 Medical Imaging Conference Record, November 2003]. The new analog readout circuit provides the same analog conversion of matrix 2-D output into X and Y projective output with a significant reduction of analog outputs. The old readout network consists of resistors' matrix and current collecting amplifiers, and it provides decoupling of each anode output into two directions (one to X and one to Y coordinates), but a decoupling function that is carried out independent of photomultiplier tube gains nonuniformity. A newly developed readout network (US patent pending) also consists of resistors' matrix and current collecting amplifiers, but the new matrix includes an additional dumping resistor that provides an excess current from anode pad grounding. As a result, we subtract an extra current of high-gain pads in order to move the pads gain to an absolute minimum value for a given photomultiplier tube. This gain equalization procedure reduces image distortion related to gain nonuniformity. The new readout technique was used in several new radiation imaging detectors designed in the Detector Group of Jefferson Lab. It shows a visible readout uniformity and linearity improvement. The test results of an initial evaluation of this readout that is applied for data readout of four H8500 Hamamtsu PSPMT are presented.

  15. An overview of current developments in position-sensitive hybrid photon detectors and photo-multiplier tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Gys, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    Current developments in position-sensitive hybrid photon detectors and photo-multiplier tubes have stimulated increased interest from a variety of fields such as astronomy, biomedical imaging and high- energy physics. These devices are sensitive to single photons over a photon energy spectrum defined by the transmission of the optical entrance window and the photo-cathode type. Their spatial resolution ranges from a few millimeters for pad hybrid photon detectors and multi-anode photo-multiplier tubes down to a few tens of microns for pixel hybrid photon detectors and electron-bombarded charge-coupled devices. Basic technological and design aspects are assessed in this paper. (21 refs).

  16. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.giewekemeyer@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Philipp, Hugh T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Wilke, Robin N. [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Aquila, Andrew [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Osterhoff, Markus [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Zozulya, Alexey V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Kavli Institute of Cornell for Nanoscience, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mancuso, Adrian P. [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-08-07

    The advantages of a novel wide dynamic range hard X-ray detector are demonstrated for (ptychographic) coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 10{sup 8} 8-keV photons pixel{sup −1} s{sup −1}, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 10{sup 10} photons µm{sup −2} s{sup −1} within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described.

  17. Megahertz rate, volumetric imaging of bubble clouds in sonothrombolysis using a sparse hemispherical receiver array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, Christopher N.; Jones, Ryan M.; Goertz, David E.; O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-09-01

    It is well established that high intensity focused ultrasound can be used to disintegrate clots. This approach has the potential to rapidly and noninvasively resolve clot causing occlusions in cardiovascular diseases such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT). However, lack of an appropriate treatment monitoring tool is currently a limiting factor in its widespread adoption. Here we conduct cavitation imaging with a large aperture, sparse hemispherical receiver array during sonothrombolysis with multi-cycle burst exposures (0.1 or 1 ms burst lengths) at 1.51 MHz. It was found that bubble cloud generation on imaging correlated with the locations of clot degradation, as identified with high frequency (30 MHz) ultrasound following exposures. 3D images could be formed at integration times as short as 1 µs, revealing the initiation and rapid development of cavitation clouds. Equating to megahertz frame rates, this is an order of magnitude faster than any other imaging technique available for in vivo application. Collectively, these results suggest that the development of a device to perform DVT therapy procedures would benefit greatly from the integration of receivers tailored to bubble activity imaging.

  18. Frequency-difference MIT imaging of cerebral haemorrhage with a hemispherical coil array: numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharni, M; Griffiths, H; Ledger, P D

    2010-08-01

    The feasibility of detecting a cerebral haemorrhage with a hemispherical MIT coil array consisting of 56 exciter/sensor coils of 10 mm radius and operating at 1 and 10 MHz was investigated. A finite difference method combined with an anatomically realistic head model comprising 12 tissue types was used to simulate the strokes. Frequency-difference images were reconstructed from the modelled data with different levels of the added phase noise and two types of a priori boundary errors: a displacement of the head and a size scaling error. The results revealed that a noise level of 3 m degrees (standard deviation) was adequate for obtaining good visualization of a peripheral stroke (volume approximately 49 ml). The simulations further showed that the displacement error had to be within 3-4 mm and the scaling error within 3-4% so as not to cause unacceptably large artefacts on the images.

  19. Sparse interferometric millimeter-wave array for centimeter-level 100-m standoff imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Jonathan Y.; Lubin, Philip M.; Solomon, Steven L.; Ginn, Robert P.

    2013-05-01

    We present work on the development of a long range standoff concealed weapons detection system capable of imaging under very heavy clothing at distances exceeding 100 m with a cm resolution. The system is based off a combination of phased array technologies used in radio astronomy and SAR radar by using a coherent, multi-frequency reconstruction algorithm which can run at up to 1000 Hz frame rates and high SNR with a multi-tone transceiver. We show the flexible design space of our system as well as algorithm development, predicted system performance and impairments, and simulated reconstructed images. The system can be used for a variety of purposes including portal applications, crowd scanning and tactical situations. Additional uses include seeing through dust and fog.

  20. Absolute gain calibration system for the 349-pixel imaging element of the tactic telescope array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tickoo, A.K.; Dhar, V.K.; Venugopal, K.; Kaul, S.K.; Koul, R.; Bhatt, N.; Goyal, H.C.; Bhat, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    The imaging Element of the 4-element TACTIC telescope array has been in operation at Mt. Abu since 1997, for carrying detailed investigations of gamma-ray sources in the TeV energy range. In order to characterize the progenitor particle (Gamma-ray/cosmic-ray), a relative gain calibration system, based on a high intensity LED, has been in operation. However, for calorimetric purposes, an absolute gain calibration system is necessary and has been developed for an on-line calibration of 4 out of 349-pixels of its imaging camera, using 241 Am based light pulsers. The details of the experimental set-up and the results obtained so far are presented in this paper. (author)

  1. High resolution phoswich gamma-ray imager utilizing monolithic MPPC arrays with submillimeter pixelized crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, T; Kataoka, J; Nakamori, T; Kishimoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Sato, K; Ishikawa, Y; Yamamura, K; Kawabata, N; Ikeda, H; Kamada, K

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a high spatial resolution tweezers-type coincidence gamma-ray camera for medical imaging. This application consists of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) and submillimeter pixelized scintillator matrices. The MPPC array has 4 × 4 channels with a three-side buttable, very compact package. For typical operational gain of 7.5 × 10 5 at + 20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ± 5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to ≤ 400 kcps per channel. We selected Ce-doped (Lu,Y) 2 (SiO 4 )O (Ce:LYSO) and a brand-new scintillator, Ce-doped Gd 3 Al 2 Ga 3 O 12 (Ce:GAGG) due to their high light yield and density. To improve the spatial resolution, these scintillators were fabricated into 15 × 15 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm 2 pixels. The Ce:LYSO and Ce:GAGG scintillator matrices were assembled into phosphor sandwich (phoswich) detectors, and then coupled to the MPPC array along with an acrylic light guide measuring 1 mm thick, and with summing operational amplifiers that compile the signals into four position-encoded analog outputs being used for signal readout. Spatial resolution of 1.1 mm was achieved with the coincidence imaging system using a 22 Na point source. These results suggest that the gamma-ray imagers offer excellent potential for applications in high spatial medical imaging.

  2. Uncooled Terahertz real-time imaging 2D arrays developed at LETI: present status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, François; Meilhan, Jérôme; Dussopt, Laurent; Nicolas, Jean-Alain; Monnier, Nicolas; Sicard, Gilles; Siligaris, Alexandre; Hiberty, Bruno

    2017-05-01

    As for other imaging sensor markets, whatever is the technology, the commercial spread of terahertz (THz) cameras has to fulfil simultaneously the criteria of high sensitivity and low cost and SWAP (size, weight and power). Monolithic silicon-based 2D sensors integrated in uncooled THz real-time cameras are good candidates to meet these requirements. Over the past decade, LETI has been studying and developing such arrays with two complimentary technological approaches, i.e. antenna-coupled silicon bolometers and CMOS Field Effect Transistors (FET), both being compatible to standard silicon microelectronics processes. LETI has leveraged its know-how in thermal infrared bolometer sensors in developing a proprietary architecture for THz sensing. High technological maturity has been achieved as illustrated by the demonstration of fast scanning of large field of view and the recent birth of a commercial camera. In the FET-based THz field, recent works have been focused on innovative CMOS read-out-integrated circuit designs. The studied architectures take advantage of the large pixel pitch to enhance the flexibility and the sensitivity: an embedded in-pixel configurable signal processing chain dramatically reduces the noise. Video sequences at 100 frames per second using our 31x31 pixels 2D Focal Plane Arrays (FPA) have been achieved. The authors describe the present status of these developments and perspectives of performance evolutions are discussed. Several experimental imaging tests are also presented in order to illustrate the capabilities of these arrays to address industrial applications such as non-destructive testing (NDT), security or quality control of food.

  3. Time resolution performance studies of contemporary high speed photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.; Lo, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    The time resolution capabilities of prototype microchannel plate and static crossed-field photomultipliers have been investigated. Measurements were made of electron transit time, rise time, time response, single phtoelectron time spread and multiphotoelectron time spread for LEP HR350 proximity focused high gain curved microchannel plate and VPM-154A/1.6L static crossed-field photomultipliers. The experimental data have been compared with results obtained with conventionally designed high speed photomultipliers. Descriptions are given of both the measuring techniques and the measuring systems. 16 refs

  4. Time resolution performance studies of contemporary high speed photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.; Lo, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The time resolution capabilities of prototype microchannel plate and static crossed-field photomultipliers have been investigated. Measurements were made of electron transit time, rise time, time response, single photoelectron time spread and multiphotoelectron time spread for LEP HR350 proximity focused high gain curved microchannel plate and VPM-154A/1.6L static crossed-field photomultipliers. The experimental data have been compared with results obtained with conventionally designed RCS 8850 and C31024 high speed photomultipliers. Descriptions are given of both the measuring techniques and the measuring systems

  5. Future photomultiplier assemblies and associated electrons in large experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duteil, P.; Hammarstroem, R.; Innocenti, P.G.; Michelini, A.; Smith, B.; Soso, F.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a working group study on reducing costs of proposed counter experiments in high-energy physics where several thousand photomultipliers are involved. Photomultiplier design is briefly discussed and new designs are presented for tube housings and high-voltage supplies. An outline presentation is given of a simplified electronics system, based on the Eurocard, for fast logic, data handling, and associated power supplies, suitable for photomultipliers or wire counters. Substantial savings in cost are shown to be possible without affecting performance but with some loss in convenience. (Auth.)

  6. Silicon photomultipliers for positron emission tomography detectors with depth of interaction encoding capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghibakhsh, Farhad; Reznik, Alla; Rowlands, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are receiving increasing attention in the field of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors. Compared to photomultiplier tubes, they offer novel detector configurations for the extraction of depth of interaction (DOI) information, or enable emerging medical imaging modalities such as simultaneous PET-magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). In this article, we used 2x2x20 mm 3 LYSO scintillator crystals coupled to SiPMs on both ends (dual-ended readout configuration) to evaluate the detector performance for DOI-PET applications. We investigated the effect of scintillator crystal surface finishing on sensitivity and resolution of DOI, as well as on energy and timing resolution. Measurements indicate DOI sensitivity and resolution of 7.1% mm -1 and 2.1±0.6 mm for saw-cut, and 1.3% mm -1 and 9.0±1.5 mm, for polished scintillator crystals, respectively. Energy resolution varies from 19% when DOI is in the center, to 15% with DOI at either end of the saw-cut crystal, while it remains constant at ∼14% for polished scintillators. Based on our results we conclude that 2x2x20 mm 3 saw-cut (without any special side wall polishing) LYSO crystals coupled to 2x2 mm 2 silicon photomultipliers are optimal for isotropic 2 mm resolution DOI-PET applications.

  7. MR imaging of the prostate at 3 Tesla: comparison of an external phased-array coil to imaging with an endorectal coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosna, Jacob; Pedrosa, Ivan; Dewolf, William C; Mahallati, Houman; Lenkinski, Robert E; Rofsky, Neil M

    2004-08-01

    To qualitatively compare the image quality of torso phased-array 3-Tesla (3T) imaging of the prostate with that of endorectal 1.5-Tesla imaging. Twenty cases of torso phased-array prostate imaging performed at 3-Tesla with FSE T2 weighted images were evaluated by two readers independently for visualization of the posterior border (PB), seminal vesicles (SV), neurovascular bundles (NVB), and image quality rating (IQR). Studies were performed at large fields of view(FOV) (25 cm) (14 cases) (3TL) and smaller FOV (14 cm) (19 cases) (3TS). A comparison was made to 20 consecutive cases of 1.5-T endorectal evaluation performed during the same time period.Results. 3TL produced a significantly better image quality compared with the small FOV for PB (P = .0001), SV (P =.0001), and IQR (P = .0001). There was a marginally significant difference within the NVB category (P = .0535). 3TL produced an image of similar quality to image quality at 1.5 T for PB (P = .3893), SV (P = .8680), NB (P = .2684), and IQR (P = .8599). Prostate image quality at 3T with a torso phased-array coil can be comparable with that of endorectal 1.5-T imaging. These findings suggest that additional options are now available for magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate gland.

  8. High-frequency annular array with coaxial illumination for dual-modality ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) system used to obtain high-quality, co-registered images of mouse-embryo anatomy and vasculature. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) is utilized to obtain high-resolution anatomical images of small animals while PAI provides high-contrast images of the vascular network. The imaging system is based on a 40 MHz, 5-element, 6 mm aperture annular-array transducer with a 800 μm diameter hole through its central element. The transducer was integrated in a cage-plate assembly allowing for a collimated laser beam to pass through the hole so that the optical and acoustic beams were collinear. The assembly was mounted on a two-axis, motorized stage to enable the simultaneous acquisition of co-registered HFU and PA volumetric data. Data were collected from all five elements in receive and a synthetic-focusing algorithm was applied in post-processing to beamform the data and increase the spatial resolution and depth-of-field (DOF) of the HFU and PA images. Phantom measurements showed that the system could achieve high-resolution images (down to 90 μm for HFU and 150 μm for PAI) and a large DOF of >8 mm. Volume renderings of a mouse embryo showed that the scanner allowed for visualizing morphologically precise anatomy of the entire embryo along with corresponding co-registered vasculature. Major head vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus or rostral vein, were clearly identified as well as limb bud vasculature.

  9. Image-Guided Surgery of Primary Breast Cancer Using Ultrasound Phased Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ebbini, Emad S

    2004-01-01

    .... Piezocomposite transducer technology, especially for phased arrays, is providing high-quality HIFU applicators with increased bandwidth and reduced parasitic cross coupling between the array elements...

  10. Silicon Photomultiplier Performance in High ELectric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, J.; Morad, J.

    2016-12-01

    Roughly 27% of the universe is thought to be composed of dark matter. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) relies on the emission of light from xenon atoms after a collision with a dark matter particle. After a particle interaction in the detector, two things can happen: the xenon will emit light and charge. The charge (electrons), in the liquid xenon needs to be pulled into the gas section so that it can interact with gas and emit light. This allows LUX to convert a single electron into many photons. This is done by applying a high voltage across the liquid and gas regions, effectively ripping electrons out of the liquid xenon and into the gas. The current device used to detect photons is the photomultiplier tube (PMT). These devices are large and costly. In recent years, a new technology that is capable of detecting single photons has emerged, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). These devices are cheaper and smaller than PMTs. Their performance in a high electric fields, such as those found in LUX, are unknown. It is possible that a large electric field could introduce noise on the SiPM signal, drowning the single photon detection capability. My hypothesis is that SiPMs will not observe a significant increase is noise at an electric field of roughly 10kV/cm (an electric field within the range used in detectors like LUX). I plan to test this hypothesis by first rotating the SiPMs with no applied electric field between two metal plates roughly 2 cm apart, providing a control data set. Then using the same angles test the dark counts with the constant electric field applied. Possibly the most important aspect of LUX, is the photon detector because it's what detects the signals. Dark matter is detected in the experiment by looking at the ratio of photons to electrons emitted for a given interaction in the detector. Interactions with a low electron to photon ratio are more like to be dark matter events than those with a high electron to photon ratio. The ability to

  11. Coded aperture imaging: the modulation transfer function for uniformly redundant arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging uses many pinholes to increase the SNR for intrinsically weak sources when the radiation can be neither reflected nor refracted. Effectively, the signal is multiplexed onto an image and then decoded, often by a computer, to form a reconstructed image. We derive the modulation transfer function (MTF) of such a system employing uniformly redundant arrays (URA). We show that the MTF of a URA system is virtually the same as the MTF of an individual pinhole regardless of the shape or size of the pinhole. Thus, only the location of the pinholes is important for optimum multiplexing and decoding. The shape and size of the pinholes can then be selected based on other criteria. For example, one can generate self-supporting patterns, useful for energies typically encountered in the imaging of laser-driven compressions or in soft x-ray astronomy. Such patterns contain holes that are all the same size, easing the etching or plating fabrication efforts for the apertures. A new reconstruction method is introduced called delta decoding. It improves the resolution capabilities of a coded aperture system by mitigating a blur often introduced during the reconstruction step

  12. Characterization of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2D imaging acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da

    2007-05-01

    The image acquisition methods applied to nuclear medicine and radiobiology are a valuable research study for determination of thyroid anatomy to seek disorders associated to follicular cells. The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has also been used in problems related to radiation detection in order to map medical images since the improvement of data processing compatible with personnel computers (PC). This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array that could be coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD) through a fiber optic plate in order to map the follicles of thyroid gland. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits the application suggested here with spatial resolution of 10 μm and good detector efficiency. The methodology results are useful to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A source - detector simulation is performed by using a MCNP4B (Monte Carlo for Neutron Photon transport) general code considering different source energies, detector materials and geometries including pixel sizes and reflector types. The results demonstrate that by using MCNP4B code is possible to searching for useful parameters related to the systems used in nuclear medicine, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology studies to acquiring thyroid follicles images. (author)

  13. High resolution phoswich gamma-ray imager utilizing monolithic MPPC arrays with submillimeter pixelized crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Kamada, K.

    2013-05-01

    We report the development of a high spatial resolution tweezers-type coincidence gamma-ray camera for medical imaging. This application consists of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) and submillimeter pixelized scintillator matrices. The MPPC array has 4 × 4 channels with a three-side buttable, very compact package. For typical operational gain of 7.5 × 105 at + 20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ± 5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to acrylic light guide measuring 1 mm thick, and with summing operational amplifiers that compile the signals into four position-encoded analog outputs being used for signal readout. Spatial resolution of 1.1 mm was achieved with the coincidence imaging system using a 22Na point source. These results suggest that the gamma-ray imagers offer excellent potential for applications in high spatial medical imaging.

  14. Prostate cancer: body-array versus endorectal coil MR imaging at 3 T--comparison of image quality, localization, and staging performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Futterer, J.J.; Hambrock, T.; Takahashi, S.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Huisman, H.J.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Knipscheer, B.C.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively compare image quality and accuracy of prostate cancer localization and staging with body-array coil (BAC) versus endorectal coil (ERC) T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3 T, with histopathologic findings as the reference standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After

  15. Technical Note: Rapid prototyping of 3D grid arrays for image guided therapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittle, David; Holshouser, Barbara; Slater, James M.; Guenther, Bob D.; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional grid phantoms offer a number of advantages for measuring imaging related spatial inaccuracies for image guided surgery and radiotherapy. The authors examined the use of rapid prototyping technology for directly fabricating 3D grid phantoms from CAD drawings. We tested three different fabrication process materials, photopolymer jet with acrylic resin (PJ/AR), selective laser sintering with polyamide (SLS/P), and fused deposition modeling with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (FDM/ABS). The test objects consisted of rectangular arrays of control points formed by the intersections of posts and struts (2 mm rectangular cross section) and spaced 8 mm apart in the x, y, and z directions. The PJ/AR phantom expanded after immersion in water which resulted in permanent warping of the structure. The surface of the FDM/ABS grid exhibited a regular pattern of depressions and ridges from the extrusion process. SLS/P showed the best combination of build accuracy, surface finish, and stability. Based on these findings, a grid phantom for assessing machine-dependent and frame-induced MR spatial distortions was fabricated to be used for quality assurance in stereotactic neurosurgical and radiotherapy procedures. The spatial uniformity of the SLS/P grid control point array was determined by CT imaging (0.6x0.6x0.625 mm 3 resolution) and found suitable for the application, with over 97.5% of the control points located within 0.3 mm of the position specified in CAD drawing and none of the points off by more than 0.4 mm. Rapid prototyping is a flexible and cost effective alternative for development of customized grid phantoms for medical physics quality assurance.

  16. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  17. Photomultiplier tube having a plurality of sensing areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A single photomultiplier tube having four sensing areas each of which produces its own independent electrical signal that is related to the quantity of sensed matter that impinges on its area is described

  18. Replacement of a photomultiplier tube in a 2-inch thallium-doped sodium iodide gamma spectrometer with silicon photomultipliers and a light guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chankyu Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thallium-doped sodium iodide [NaI(Tl] scintillation detector is preferred as a gamma spectrometer in many fields because of its general advantages. A silicon photomultiplier (SiPM has recently been developed and its application area has been expanded as an alternative to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs. It has merits such as a low operating voltage, compact size, cheap production cost, and magnetic resonance compatibility. In this study, an array of SiPMs is used to develop an NaI(Tl gamma spectrometer. To maintain detection efficiency, a commercial NaI(Tl 2′ × 2′ scintillator is used, and a light guide is used for the transport and collection of generated photons from the scintillator to the SiPMs without loss. The test light guides were fabricated with polymethyl methacrylate and reflective materials. The gamma spectrometer systems were set up and included light guides. Through a series of measurements, the characteristics of the light guides and the proposed gamma spectrometer were evaluated. Simulation of the light collection was accomplished using the DETECT 97 code (A. Levin, E. Hoskinson, and C. Moison, University of Michigan, USA to analyze the measurement results. The system, which included SiPMs and the light guide, achieved 14.11% full width at half maximum energy resolution at 662 keV.

  19. Highly accelerated acquisition and homogeneous image reconstruction with rotating RF coil array at 7T-A phantom based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyan; Zuo, Zhentao; Jin, Jin; Xue, Rong; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-03-01

    Parallel imaging (PI) is widely used for imaging acceleration by means of coil spatial sensitivities associated with phased array coils (PACs). By employing a time-division multiplexing technique, a single-channel rotating radiofrequency coil (RRFC) provides an alternative method to reduce scan time. Strategically combining these two concepts could provide enhanced acceleration and efficiency. In this work, the imaging acceleration ability and homogeneous image reconstruction strategy of 4-element rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was numerically investigated and experimental validated at 7T with a homogeneous phantom. Each coil of RRFCA was capable of acquiring a large number of sensitivity profiles, leading to a better acceleration performance illustrated by the improved geometry-maps that have lower maximum values and more uniform distributions compared to 4- and 8-element stationary arrays. A reconstruction algorithm, rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating SENSE), was proposed to provide image reconstruction. Additionally, by optimally choosing the angular sampling positions and transmit profiles under the rotating scheme, phantom images could be faithfully reconstructed. The results indicate that, the proposed technique is able to provide homogeneous reconstructions with overall higher and more uniform signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) distributions at high reduction factors. It is hoped that, by employing the high imaging acceleration and homogeneous imaging reconstruction ability of RRFCA, the proposed method will facilitate human imaging for ultra high field MRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Substitution of photomultiplier tubes by photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, D.L.

    1990-04-01

    The application of Si semiconductors, either of the conventional or the avalanche type, as light amplifiers in radiation detection, has been studied aiming the substitution of photomultiplier (PM) tubes by photodiodes. The objective of this work is to compare the response of photodiodes and PM tubes when coupled to scintillation crystals. A Hamamatsu Si photodiode, model S 1337-66 B Q, was coupled to a Harshaw NaI (TI) scintillation crystal of window diameter equal to 25,4 mm. Its performance was evaluated by specially designed associated electronics, compatible with the photodiode characteristics. X-ray beams from 30 to 111 KeV were used to determine the response and the repeatability of the scintillator-photodiode and the scintillator-PM tube systems. The repeatability was found to be within 0,27% for the photodiode and 0,57% for the PM tube. This work confirmed that photodiodes can be used as light amplifiers, provided their characteristics, such as light spectrum response, are considered. It also shows that further studies are necessary in order to identify the applications in radiation detection where PM tubes might be replaced by photodiodes. (author)

  1. Charge reconstruction in large-area photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, M.; Montuschi, M.; Baldoncini, M.; Mantovani, F.; Ricci, B.; Andronico, G.; Antonelli, V.; Bellato, M.; Bernieri, E.; Brigatti, A.; Brugnera, R.; Budano, A.; Buscemi, M.; Bussino, S.; Caruso, R.; Chiesa, D.; Corti, D.; Dal Corso, F.; Ding, X. F.; Dusini, S.; Fabbri, A.; Fiorentini, G.; Ford, R.; Formozov, A.; Galet, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Giammarchi, M.; Giaz, A.; Insolia, A.; Isocrate, R.; Lippi, I.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Lombardi, P.; Marini, F.; Mari, S. M.; Martellini, C.; Meroni, E.; Mezzetto, M.; Miramonti, L.; Monforte, S.; Nastasi, M.; Ortica, F.; Paoloni, A.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pedretti, D.; Pelliccia, N.; Pompilio, R.; Previtali, E.; Ranucci, G.; Re, A. C.; Romani, A.; Saggese, P.; Salamanna, G.; Sawy, F. H.; Settanta, G.; Sisti, M.; Sirignano, C.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Strati, V.; Verde, G.; Votano, L.

    2018-02-01

    Large-area PhotoMultiplier Tubes (PMT) allow to efficiently instrument Liquid Scintillator (LS) neutrino detectors, where large target masses are pivotal to compensate for neutrinos' extremely elusive nature. Depending on the detector light yield, several scintillation photons stemming from the same neutrino interaction are likely to hit a single PMT in a few tens/hundreds of nanoseconds, resulting in several photoelectrons (PEs) to pile-up at the PMT anode. In such scenario, the signal generated by each PE is entangled to the others, and an accurate PMT charge reconstruction becomes challenging. This manuscript describes an experimental method able to address the PMT charge reconstruction in the case of large PE pile-up, providing an unbiased charge estimator at the permille level up to 15 detected PEs. The method is based on a signal filtering technique (Wiener filter) which suppresses the noise due to both PMT and readout electronics, and on a Fourier-based deconvolution able to minimize the influence of signal distortions—such as an overshoot. The analysis of simulated PMT waveforms shows that the slope of a linear regression modeling the relation between reconstructed and true charge values improves from 0.769 ± 0.001 (without deconvolution) to 0.989 ± 0.001 (with deconvolution), where unitary slope implies perfect reconstruction. A C++ implementation of the charge reconstruction algorithm is available online at [1].

  2. Radiation Damage Studies of Silicon Photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Bohn, P; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Rohlf, J.; Freeman, J.; Los, Sergey V.; Cascio, E.; Kuleshov, S.; Musienko, Y.; Piemonte, C.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the radiation hardness of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) manufactured by Fondazione Bruno Kessler in Italy (1 mm$^2$ and 6.2 mm$^2$), Center of Perspective Technology and Apparatus in Russia (1 mm$^2$ and 4.4 mm$^2$), and Hamamatsu Corporation in Japan (1 mm$^2$). The SiPMs were irradiated using a beam of 212 MeV protons at Massachusetts General Hospital, receiving fluences of up to $3 \\times 10^{10}$ protons per cm$^2$ with the SiPMs at operating voltage. Leakage currents were read continuously during the irradiation. The delivery of the protons was paused periodically to record scope traces in response to calibrated light pulses to monitor the gains, photon detection efficiencies, and dark counts of the SiPMs. The leakage current and dark noise are found to increase with fluence. Te leakage current is found to be proportional to the mean square deviation of the noise distribution, indicating the dark counts are due to increased random individual pixel activation, while SiPM...

  3. Reconstructing 3D profiles of flux distribution in array of unshunted Josephson junctions from 2D scanning SQUID microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, F.M.; Sergeenkov, S.; Araujo-Moreira, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    By using a specially designed algorithm (based on utilizing the so-called Hierarchical Data Format), we report on successful reconstruction of 3D profiles of local flux distribution within artificially prepared arrays of unshunted Nb-AlO x -Nb Josephson junctions from 2D surface images obtained via the scanning SQUID microscope. The analysis of the obtained results suggest that for large sweep areas, the local flux distribution significantly deviates from the conventional picture and exhibits a more complicated avalanche-type behavior with a prominent dendritic structure. -- Highlights: ► The penetration of external magnetic field into an array of Nb-AlO x -Nb Josephson junctions is studied. ► Using Scanning SQUID Microscope, 2D images of local flux distribution within array are obtained. ► Using specially designed pattern recognition algorithm, 3D flux profiles are reconstructed from 2D images.

  4. High-Resolution Spin-on-Patterning of Perovskite Thin Films for a Multiplexed Image Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woongchan; Lee, Jongha; Yun, Huiwon; Kim, Joonsoo; Park, Jinhong; Choi, Changsoon; Kim, Dong Chan; Seo, Hyunseon; Lee, Hakyong; Yu, Ji Woong; Lee, Won Bo; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite thin films have attracted significant attention as an alternative to silicon in photon-absorbing devices mainly because of their superb optoelectronic properties. However, high-definition patterning of perovskite thin films, which is important for fabrication of the image sensor array, is hardly accomplished owing to their extreme instability in general photolithographic solvents. Here, a novel patterning process for perovskite thin films is described: the high-resolution spin-on-patterning (SoP) process. This fast and facile process is compatible with a variety of spin-coated perovskite materials and perovskite deposition techniques. The SoP process is successfully applied to develop a high-performance, ultrathin, and deformable perovskite-on-silicon multiplexed image sensor array, paving the road toward next-generation image sensor arrays. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Development of gamma spectrometer using silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Kyu

    2011-02-01

    Gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the identity and quantity of gamma-emitters in nuclear physics, geochemistry and astrophysics. The scintillation detectors are being used as a gamma spectrometer generally, because of their higher gamma-ray detection efficiency and cheaper price than germanium semi-conductor detectors. A typical scintillation detector is composed of a scintillator, a window, and a photodetector. The photomultiplier (PM) tube has been the most widely used as a photodetector because of its advantages like high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, and wide dynamic range. Recently, the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) is being studied as a substitute of PM tube. The SiPM has almost same performance compared to PM tube but it has additional advantages; low operating voltage, small volume, and cheap production cost. In this research, the gamma spectrometer using SiPM instead of PM tube is developed. The use of SiPM as a photodetector makes the gamma spectrometer smaller, cheaper, easier to use. For photon transport and collection from the large area scintillator to the small area SiPM, a light guide is applied in this gamma spectrometer system. Before fabrication of light guide, DETECT simulation is performed to study and prospect characteristics of light guide structure. And actual light guides are fabricated on the basis of this simulation result. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is chosen as material of light guide, 5 sample light guides are fabricated in different lengths and coatings. As a scintillator crystal, same NaI(Tl) crystal is chosen. For measurement and analysis of gamma spectrometer system, 3 gamma spectrometer systems are composed: PM tube-based system, PM tube-based system with the light guide, SiPM-based system with the light guide. Through comparison between the results of each gamma spectrometer, the performances of gamma spectrometer system are analyzed by each component. Measurement results of the second system is well

  6. Calibration and Stokes Imaging with Full Embedded Element Primary Beam Model for the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, M.; Colegate, T.; Sutinjo, A. T.; Ung, D.; Wayth, R.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Lenc, E.; Pindor, B.; Morgan, J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Bell, M. E.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, Bi-Qing; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-11-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in Western Australia, is one of the low-frequency precursors of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. In addition to pursuing its own ambitious science programme, it is also a testbed for wide range of future SKA activities ranging from hardware, software to data analysis. The key science programmes for the MWA and SKA require very high dynamic ranges, which challenges calibration and imaging systems. Correct calibration of the instrument and accurate measurements of source flux densities and polarisations require precise characterisation of the telescope's primary beam. Recent results from the MWA GaLactic Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey show that the previously implemented Average Embedded Element (AEE) model still leaves residual polarisations errors of up to 10-20% in Stokes Q. We present a new simulation-based Full Embedded Element (FEE) model which is the most rigorous realisation yet of the MWA's primary beam model. It enables efficient calculation of the MWA beam response in arbitrary directions without necessity of spatial interpolation. In the new model, every dipole in the MWA tile (4 × 4 bow-tie dipoles) is simulated separately, taking into account all mutual coupling, ground screen, and soil effects, and therefore accounts for the different properties of the individual dipoles within a tile. We have applied the FEE beam model to GLEAM observations at 200-231 MHz and used false Stokes parameter leakage as a metric to compare the models. We have determined that the FEE model reduced the magnitude and declination-dependent behaviour of false polarisation in Stokes Q and V while retaining low levels of false polarisation in Stokes U.

  7. Three-Dimensional Magnetotelluric Imaging of the Cascadia Subduction Zone with an Amphibious Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, G. D.; Yang, B.; Bedrosian, P.; Kelbert, A.; Key, K.; Livelybrooks, D.; Parris, B. A.; Schultz, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from three-dimensional inversion of an amphibious magnetotelluric (MT) array consisting of 71 offshore and 75 onshore sites in the central part of Cascadia, to image down-dip and along strike variations of electrical conductivity, and to constrain the 3D distribution of fluids and melt in the subduction zone. The array is augmented by EarthScope TA MT data and legacy 2D profiles providing sparser coverage of western WA, OR, and northern CA. The prior model for the inversion includes ocean bathymetry, conductive marine sediments, and a resistive subducting plate, with geometry derived from the model of McCrory et al. (2012) and seismic tomography. Highly conductive features appear just above the interface with the a priori resistive plate in three zones. (1) In the area with marine MT data a conductive layer, which we associate with fluid-rich decollement and subduction channel sediments, extends eastward from the trench to underthrust the seaward edge of Siletzia, which is clearly seen as a thick crustal resistor. The downdip extent of the underthrust conductive layer is a remarkably uniform 35 km. (2) High conductivities, consistent with metamorphic fluids associated with eclogitization, occur near the forearc mantle corner. Conductivity is highly variable along strike, organized in a series of E-W to diagonal elongated conductive/resistive structures, whose significance remains enigmatic. (3) High conductivities associated with fluids and melts are found in the backarc, again exhibiting substantial along strike variability.

  8. Using field programmable gate array hardware for the performance improvement of ultrasonic wave propagation imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Jaffry Syed [Hamdard University, Karachi (Pakistan); Abbas, Syed Haider; Lee, Jung Ryul [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dong Hoon [Advanced Materials Research Team, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Recently, wave propagation imaging based on laser scanning-generated elastic waves has been intensively used for nondestructive inspection. However, the proficiency of the conventional software based system reduces when the scan area is large since the processing time increases significantly due to unavoidable processor multitasking, where computing resources are shared with multiple processes. Hence, the field programmable gate array (FPGA) was introduced for a wave propagation imaging method in order to obtain extreme processing time reduction. An FPGA board was used for the design, implementing post-processing ultrasonic wave propagation imaging (UWPI). The results were compared with the conventional system and considerable improvement was observed, with at least 78% (scanning of 100x100mm{sup 2} with 0.5 mm interval) to 87.5% (scanning of 200x200mm{sup 2} with 0.5 mm interval) less processing time, strengthening the claim for the research. This new concept to implement FPGA technology into the UPI system will act as a break-through technology for full-scale automatic inspection.

  9. Using field programmable gate array hardware for the performance improvement of ultrasonic wave propagation imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Jaffry Syed; Abbas, Syed Haider; Lee, Jung Ryul; Kang, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, wave propagation imaging based on laser scanning-generated elastic waves has been intensively used for nondestructive inspection. However, the proficiency of the conventional software based system reduces when the scan area is large since the processing time increases significantly due to unavoidable processor multitasking, where computing resources are shared with multiple processes. Hence, the field programmable gate array (FPGA) was introduced for a wave propagation imaging method in order to obtain extreme processing time reduction. An FPGA board was used for the design, implementing post-processing ultrasonic wave propagation imaging (UWPI). The results were compared with the conventional system and considerable improvement was observed, with at least 78% (scanning of 100x100mm 2 with 0.5 mm interval) to 87.5% (scanning of 200x200mm 2 with 0.5 mm interval) less processing time, strengthening the claim for the research. This new concept to implement FPGA technology into the UPI system will act as a break-through technology for full-scale automatic inspection

  10. Tiled Array of Pixelated CZT Imaging Detectors for ProtoEXIST2 and MIRAX-HXI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jaesub; Allen, Branden; Grindlay, Jonathan; Rodrigues, Barbara; Ellis, Jon Robert; Baker, Robert; Barthelmy, Scott; Mao, Peter; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Apple, Jeff

    2013-12-01

    We have assembled a tiled array (220 cm2) of fine pixel (0.6 mm) imaging CZT detectors for a balloon borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope, ProtoEXIST2. ProtoEXIST2 is a prototype experiment for a next generation hard X-ray imager MIRAX-HXI on board Lattes, a spacecraft from the Agencia Espacial Brasilieira. MIRAX will survey the 5 to 200 keV sky of Galactic bulge, adjoining southern Galactic plane and the extragalactic sky with 6 ' angular resolution. This survey will open a vast discovery space in timing studies of accretion neutron stars and black holes. The ProtoEXIST2 CZT detector plane consists of 64 of 5 mm thick 2 cm × 2 cm CZT crystals tiled with a minimal gap. MIRAX will consist of 4 such detector planes, each of which will be imaged with its own coded-aperture mask. We present the packaging architecture and assembly procedure of the ProtoEXIST2 detector. On 2012, Oct 10, we conducted a successful high altitude balloon experiment of the ProtoEXIST1 and 2 telescopes, which demonstrates their technology readiness for space application. During the flight both telescopes performed as well as on the ground. We report the results of ground calibration and the initial results for the detector performance in the balloon flight.

  11. Thermal imager based on the array light sensor device of 128×128 CdHgTe-photodiodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva V. P.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigation of developed thermal imager for middle (3—5 µm infrared region are presented and its applications features are discussed. The thermal imager consists of cooled to 80 K 128×128 diodes focal plane array on the base of cadmium–mercury–telluride compound and cryostat with temperature checking system. The photodiode array is bonded with readout device (silicon focal processor via indium microcontacts. The measured average value of noise equivalent temperature difference was NETD= 20±4 mK (background radiation temperature T = 300 K, field of view 2θ = 180°, the cooled diaphragm was not used.

  12. Non-Destructive Spent Fuel Characterization with Semiconducting Gallium Arsinde Neutron Imaging Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Gersch, Holly K.; Sanders, Jeffrey D.; Lee, John C.; Hammig, Mark D.; Hartman, Michael R.; Yong Hong Yang; Klann, Raymond T.; Elzen, Brian Van Der; Lindsay, John T.; Simpson, Philip A.

    2002-01-01

    High resistivity bulk grown GaAs has been used to produce thermal neutron imaging devices for use in neutron radiography and characterizing burnup in spent fuel. The basic scheme utilizes a portable Sb/Be source for monoenergetic (24 keV) neutron radiation source coupled to an Fe filter with a radiation hard B-coated pixellated GaAs detector array as the primary neutron detector. The coated neutron detectors have been tested for efficiency and radiation hardness in order to determine their fitness for the harsh environments imposed by spent fuel. Theoretical and experimental results are presented, showing detector radiation hardness, expected detection efficiency and the spatial resolution from such a scheme. A variety of advanced neutron detector designs have been explored, with experimental results achieving 13% thermal neutron detection efficiency while projecting the possibility of over 30% thermal neutron detection efficiency

  13. Active Sensor for Microwave Tissue Imaging with Bias-Switched Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, Farzad; Nikolova, Natalia K

    2018-05-06

    A prototype of a bias-switched active sensor was developed and measured to establish the achievable dynamic range in a new generation of active arrays for microwave tissue imaging. The sensor integrates a printed slot antenna, a low-noise amplifier (LNA) and an active mixer in a single unit, which is sufficiently small to enable inter-sensor separation distance as small as 12 mm. The sensor’s input covers the bandwidth from 3 GHz to 7.5 GHz. Its output intermediate frequency (IF) is 30 MHz. The sensor is controlled by a simple bias-switching circuit, which switches ON and OFF the bias of the LNA and the mixer simultaneously. It was demonstrated experimentally that the dynamic range of the sensor, as determined by its ON and OFF states, is 109 dB and 118 dB at resolution bandwidths of 1 kHz and 100 Hz, respectively.

  14. Real-time imaging systems for superconducting nanowire single-photon detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofherr, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Superconducting nanowire singe-photon detectors (SNSPD) are promising detectors in the field of applications, where single-photon resolution is required like in quantum optics, spectroscopy or astronomy. These cryogenic detectors gain from a broad spectrum in the optical and infrared range and deliver low dark counts and low jitter. This work provides a piece of deeper physical understanding of detector functionality in combination with highly engineered readout development. A detailed analysis focuses on the intrinsic detection mechanism of SNSPDs related to the detection in the infrared regime and the evolution of dark counts. With this fundamental knowledge, the next step is the development of a multi-pixel readout at cryogenic conditions. It is demonstrated, how two auspicious multi-pixel readout concepts can be realized, which enables statistical framing like in imaging applications using RSFQ electronics with fast framing rates and the readout of a detector array with continuous real-time single-photon resolution.

  15. Synaptic molecular imaging in spared and deprived columns of mouse barrel cortex with array tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Nicholas C; Collman, Forrest; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Burns, Randal; Smith, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    A major question in neuroscience is how diverse subsets of synaptic connections in neural circuits are affected by experience dependent plasticity to form the basis for behavioral learning and memory. Differences in protein expression patterns at individual synapses could constitute a key to understanding both synaptic diversity and the effects of plasticity at different synapse populations. Our approach to this question leverages the immunohistochemical multiplexing capability of array tomography (ATomo) and the columnar organization of mouse barrel cortex to create a dataset comprising high resolution volumetric images of spared and deprived cortical whisker barrels stained for over a dozen synaptic molecules each. These dataset has been made available through the Open Connectome Project for interactive online viewing, and may also be downloaded for offline analysis using web, Matlab, and other interfaces.

  16. First characterization of the Hamamatsu R11265 multi-anode photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvi, M.; Cassina, L.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Matteuzzi, C.; Pessina, G.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of the new Hamamatsu R11265-103-M64 multi-anode photomultiplier tube is presented. The sample available in our laboratory was tested and in particular the response to single photon was extensively studied. The gain, the anode uniformity and the dark current were measured. The tube behaviour in a longitudinal magnetic field up to 100 G was studied and the gain loss due to the ageing was quantified. The characteristics and performance of the photomultiplier tube make the R11265-103-M64 particularly tailored for an application in high energy physics experiments, such as in the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector at LHC. - Highlights: • We tested the new Hamamatsu R11265-103-M64 multi-anode photomultiplier tube. • We studied the response to single photon, the gain and the anode uniformity. • The tube behaviour in a longitudinal magnetic field up to 100 G was studied. • The gain loss due to the aging was quantified

  17. A gas proportional scintillation counter for use in large area detector systems without photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruch, J.E.F.; Brooke, G.; Kellermann, E.W.; Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1978-03-01

    The properties of a prototype gas proportional scintillation detector, for use in large numbers, are examined. The detector is designed to focus a light signal, which is proportional to ionisation loss, into a fibre optic lightguide. It is shown that a single charged particle traversing the detector produces enough light out of the lightguide to be seen by a TV camera. Problems of lifetime and large scale detector production are discussed. Properties of saturation, linearity, position sensitivity, and operating limits are examined. It is shown that an array of gas proportional scintillation detectors when used with fibre optic lightguides and TV camera readout could offer significant improvements in cost per area and reliability over a scintillator plus photomultiplier or a wire proportional chamber array. (author)

  18. Three-dimensional imaging through turbid media based on polarization-difference liquid-crystal microlens array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhaowei; Wei, Dong; Li, Dapeng; Xie, Xingwang; Chen, Mingce; Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Haiwei; Xie, Changsheng

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a polarization difference liquid-crystal microlens array (PD-LCMLA) for three dimensional imaging application through turbid media is fabricated and demonstrated. This device is composed of a twisted nematic liquidcrystal cell (TNLCC), a polarizer and a liquid-crystal microlens array. The polarizer is sandwiched between the TNLCC and LCMLA to help the polarization difference system achieving the orthogonal polarization raw images. The prototyped camera for polarization difference imaging has been constructed by integrating the PD-LCMLA with an image sensor. The orthogonally polarized light-field images are recorded by switching the working state of the TNLCC. Here, by using a special microstructure in conjunction with the polarization-difference algorithm, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional information in the scattering media can be retrieved from the polarization-difference imaging system with an electrically tunable PD-LCMLA. We further investigate the system's potential function based on the flexible microstructure. The microstructure provides a wide operation range in the manipulation of incident beams and also emerges multiple operation modes for imaging applications, such as conventional planar imaging, polarization imaging mode, and polarization-difference imaging mode. Since the PD-LCMLA demonstrates a very low power consumption, multiple imaging modes and simple manufacturing, this kind of device presents a potential to be used in many other optical and electro-optical systems.

  19. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ryul Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s.

  20. Application of position-sensitive detectors to positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Takaji; Uchida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Omura, Tomohide

    1994-01-01

    Positron imaging including positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to be a promising tool for basic and clinical research, because it makes possible the study of regional chemistry within multiple organs of the body in living human beings and experimental animals. New schemes of high resolution block detectors have been developed to improve the performance of positron imaging systems, which employ small segments of bismuth germanate (BGO) arrays and position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT). The coincidence detector resolution of less than 2.0 mm in full width at half maximum was achieved with the detectors, which is very close to the theoretical resolution limit in positron imaging. (author)

  1. UNCONTROLLED PHOTOMULTIPLIER CURRENT IN PHOTOEMISSION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Viazava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of photon energy from energy of photoelectron is base of photoemission radiation analysis. In such photoemission measurements except current of photocathode is always exist a reverse current from the collector of electrons to the photocathode in two-electrode sensors. There are various ways of reverse and uncontrolled current eliminating or reducing their influence. The constructive method is based on creating an electron-optical system of photoelectronic device, which would be a photoelectron energy analyzer. The second method – technological. However, it requires the manufacture of the photocathode and the dynode system in different vacuum chamber with subsequent connection to a single device in vacuum environment without exposure to the atmosphere. The purpose of this article is to determinate the effect of photoemission from photocathode chamber and the first dynode of photomultiplier on energy distribution of the photoelectrons from photocathode. To solve this problem authors obtained calibration curves for measuring pyrometer module ПИФ 4/2 with ФЭУ-114 as a sensor at supply voltage 1350 V and different decelerating voltages. The effect of illumination on the value of modulation coefficient on temperature k(T and wavelength k(λ is shown. In temperature measurements, this effect is evident in fact that at temperatures below 1400 K linear dependence ln k – T-1 is broken. Still this linear dependence is a necessary consequence of the fact that the measured temperature is color temperature. However, this calibration curve can be used to measure low temperature if the target measurements condition and calibration conditions are identical. In wavelength calibration, curve k(λ at λ > 760 nm is two-valued, that doesn’t allow to identify monochromatic radiation by this method and bring in errors in temperature measurements. 

  2. Pattern recognition trigger electronics for an imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, S.M.; Rose, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    For imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, which aim to detect electromagnetic air showers with cameras consisting of several hundred photomultiplier pixels, the single pixel trigger rate is dominated by fluctuations in night sky brightness and by ion feedback in the photomultipliers. Pattern recognition trigger electronics may be used to reject night sky background images, thus reducing the data rate to a manageable level. The trigger system described here detects patterns of 2, 3 or 4 adjacent pixel signals within a 331 pixel camera and gives a positive trigger decision in 65 ns. The candidate pixel pattern is compared with the contents of a pre-programmed memory. With the trigger decision timing controlled by a fixed delay the time-jitter inherent in the use of programmable gate arrays is avoided. This system is now in routine operation at the Whipple 10 m Telescope

  3. An Ultra-High Element Density pMUT Array with Low Crosstalk for 3-D Medical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Ling Ren

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A ~1 MHz piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (pMUT array with ultra-high element density and low crosstalk is proposed for the first time. This novel pMUT array is based on a nano-layer spin-coating lead zirconium titanium film technique and can be fabricated with high element density using a relatively simple process. Accordingly, key fabrication processes such as thick piezoelectric film deposition, low-stress Si-SOI bonding and bulk silicon removal have been successfully developed. The novel fine-pitch 6 × 6 pMUT arrays can all work at the desired frequency (~1 MHz with good uniformity, high performance and potential IC integration compatibility. The minimum interspace is ~20 μm, the smallest that has ever been achieved to the best of our knowledge. These arrays can be potentially used to steer ultrasound beams and implement high quality 3-D medical imaging applications.

  4. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Hack

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In terahertz (THz materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i vanadium oxide; (ii amorphous silicon; (iii a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  5. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-02-06

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8-14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  6. 1-Million droplet array with wide-field fluorescence imaging for digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Andrew C; Fisher, Jeffrey S; Tovar, Armando R; Hsieh, Albert T; Lin, Robert; Pentoney, Stephen L; Yang, David L; Lee, Abraham P

    2011-11-21

    Digital droplet reactors are useful as chemical and biological containers to discretize reagents into picolitre or nanolitre volumes for analysis of single cells, organisms, or molecules. However, most DNA based assays require processing of samples on the order of tens of microlitres and contain as few as one to as many as millions of fragments to be detected. Presented in this work is a droplet microfluidic platform and fluorescence imaging setup designed to better meet the needs of the high-throughput and high-dynamic-range by integrating multiple high-throughput droplet processing schemes on the chip. The design is capable of generating over 1-million, monodisperse, 50 picolitre droplets in 2-7 minutes that then self-assemble into high density 3-dimensional sphere packing configurations in a large viewing chamber for visualization and analysis. This device then undergoes on-chip polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and fluorescence detection to digitally quantify the sample's nucleic acid contents. Wide-field fluorescence images are captured using a low cost 21-megapixel digital camera and macro-lens with an 8-12 cm(2) field-of-view at 1× to 0.85× magnification, respectively. We demonstrate both end-point and real-time imaging ability to perform on-chip quantitative digital PCR analysis of the entire droplet array. Compared to previous work, this highly integrated design yields a 100-fold increase in the number of on-chip digitized reactors with simultaneous fluorescence imaging for digital PCR based assays.

  7. A new DOI detector design using discrete crystal array with depth-dependent reflector patterns and single-ended readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chaeyeong; Kang, Jihoon; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We developed a depth of interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using depth-dependent reflector patterns in a discrete crystal array. Due to the different reflector patterns at depth, light distribution was changed relative to depth. As a preliminary experiment, we measured DOI detector module crystal identification performance. The crystal consisted of a 9×9 array of 2 mmx2 mmx20 mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals. The crystal array was optically coupled to a 64-channel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with a 2 mmx2 mm anode size and an 18.1 mmx18.1 mm effective area. We obtained the flood image with an Anger-type calculation. DOI layers and 9×9 pixels were well distinguished in the obtained images. Preclinical PET scanners based on this detector design offer the prospect of high and uniform spatial resolution.

  8. A new DOI detector design using discrete crystal array with depth-dependent reflector patterns and single-ended readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chaeyeong [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Wonju 26493 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jihoon, E-mail: ray.jihoon.kang@gmail.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 50 Daehak-ro, Yeosu, Jeonnam 59626 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Hyun, E-mail: ychung@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Wonju 26493 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-21

    We developed a depth of interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using depth-dependent reflector patterns in a discrete crystal array. Due to the different reflector patterns at depth, light distribution was changed relative to depth. As a preliminary experiment, we measured DOI detector module crystal identification performance. The crystal consisted of a 9×9 array of 2 mmx2 mmx20 mm lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals. The crystal array was optically coupled to a 64-channel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with a 2 mmx2 mm anode size and an 18.1 mmx18.1 mm effective area. We obtained the flood image with an Anger-type calculation. DOI layers and 9×9 pixels were well distinguished in the obtained images. Preclinical PET scanners based on this detector design offer the prospect of high and uniform spatial resolution.

  9. Parallel image-acquisition in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with a surface coil array: Proof-of-concept experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Ayano; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    This article describes a feasibility study of parallel image-acquisition using a two-channel surface coil array in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. Parallel EPR imaging was performed by multiplexing of EPR detection in the frequency domain. The parallel acquisition system consists of two surface coil resonators and radiofrequency (RF) bridges for EPR detection. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method of parallel image-acquisition with a surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was carried out using a tube phantom. Technical issues in the multiplexing method of EPR detection were also clarified. We found that degradation in the signal-to-noise ratio due to the interference of RF carriers is a key problem to be solved.

  10. Infrared detectors, focal plane arrays, and imaging sensors; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert T.

    1989-10-01

    The present conference on advancements in IR detectors, Schottky-barrier focal plane arrays, CCD image analysis, and HgCdTe materials gives attention to a 256 x 256 PtSi array for IR astronomy, proposals for a second-generation meteosat's advanced optical payload, cryogenic bipolar technology for on-focal-plane signal processing, a parallel cellular processing system for fast generation of perspective plots, and ultrahigh-speed CCD image sensors for scanning applications. Also discussed are MBE GaAs rib waveguide experiments at 10.6 microns, an interferometric thermal detector, the development status of superconducting IR detector research, the absorption coefficients of n-type Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te samples, and the influence of the surface channel on crosstalk in HgCdTe photovoltaic arrays.

  11. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  12. Multi-Channel Deconvolution for Forward-Looking Phase Array Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cross-range resolution of forward-looking phase array radar (PAR is limited by the effective antenna beamwidth since the azimuth echo is the convolution of antenna pattern and targets’ backscattering coefficients. Therefore, deconvolution algorithms are proposed to improve the imaging resolution under the limited antenna beamwidth. However, as a typical inverse problem, deconvolution is essentially a highly ill-posed problem which is sensitive to noise and cannot ensure a reliable and robust estimation. In this paper, multi-channel deconvolution is proposed for improving the performance of deconvolution, which intends to considerably alleviate the ill-posed problem of single-channel deconvolution. To depict the performance improvement obtained by multi-channel more effectively, evaluation parameters are generalized to characterize the angular spectrum of antenna pattern or singular value distribution of observation matrix, which are conducted to compare different deconvolution systems. Here we present two multi-channel deconvolution algorithms which improve upon the traditional deconvolution algorithms via combining with multi-channel technique. Extensive simulations and experimental results based on real data are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed imaging methods.

  13. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brückner, Michael [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Becker, Katja [Justus Liebig University Giessen, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany); Frosch, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.frosch@uni-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  14. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brückner, Michael; Becker, Katja; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  15. The anatomy of a radio source hot spot : Very large baseline array imaging of 3C 205

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lonsdale, CJ; Barthel, PD

    Total intensity and linear polarization Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images of the high-redshift quasar 3C 205 at a wavelength of 18 cm reveal a complex curved hot-spot structure with polarization percentages frequently as high as 70%. A one-sided jet is detected emerging from the central

  16. Intensity correction method customized for multi-animal abdominal MR imaging with 3 T clinical scanner and multi-array coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuda, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Nakagami, Ryutaro; Furuta, Toshihiro; Fujii, Hirofumi; Sekine, Norio; Niitsu, Mamoru; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of multiple small animals in a single session increases throughput of preclinical imaging experiments. Such imaging using a 3-tesla clinical scanner with multi-array coil requires correction of intensity variation caused by the inhomogeneous sensitivity profile of the coil. We explored a method for correcting intensity that we customized for multi-animal MR imaging, especially abdominal imaging. Our institutional committee for animal experimentation approved the protocol. We acquired high resolution T 1 -, T 2 -, and T 2 * -weighted images and low resolution proton density-weighted images (PDWIs) of 4 rat abdomens simultaneously using a 3T clinical scanner and custom-made multi-array coil. For comparison, we also acquired T 1 -, T 2 -, and T 2 * -weighted volume coil images in the same rats in 4 separate sessions. We used software created in-house to correct intensity variation. We applied thresholding to the PDWIs to produce binary images that displayed only a signal-producing area, calculated multi-array coil sensitivity maps by dividing low-pass filtered PDWIs by low-pass filtered binary images pixel by pixel, and divided uncorrected T 1 -, T 2 -, or T 2 * -weighted images by those maps to obtain intensity-corrected images. We compared tissue contrast among the liver, spinal canal, and muscle between intensity-corrected multi-array coil images and volume coil images. Our intensity correction method performed well for all pulse sequences studied and corrected variation in original multi-array coil images without deteriorating the throughput of animal experiments. Tissue contrasts were comparable between intensity-corrected multi-array coil images and volume coil images. Our intensity correction method customized for multi-animal abdominal MR imaging using a 3T clinical scanner and dedicated multi-array coil could facilitate image interpretation. (author)

  17. Imaging of heart acoustic based on the sub-space methods using a microphone array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hanie; Almasganj, Farshad; Zoroufian, Arezoo

    2017-07-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death around the world. Phonocardiogram (PCG) is an important bio-signal which represents the acoustic activity of heart, typically without any spatiotemporal information of the involved acoustic sources. The aim of this study is to analyze the PCG by employing a microphone array by which the heart internal sound sources could be localized, too. In this paper, it is intended to propose a modality by which the locations of the active sources in the heart could also be investigated, during a cardiac cycle. In this way, a microphone array with six microphones is employed as the recording set up to be put on the human chest. In the following, the Group Delay MUSIC algorithm which is a sub-space based localization method is used to estimate the location of the heart sources in different phases of the PCG. We achieved to 0.14cm mean error for the sources of first heart sound (S 1 ) simulator and 0.21cm mean error for the sources of second heart sound (S 2 ) simulator with Group Delay MUSIC algorithm. The acoustical diagrams created for human subjects show distinct patterns in various phases of the cardiac cycles such as the first and second heart sounds. Moreover, the evaluated source locations for the heart valves are matched with the ones that are obtained via the 4-dimensional (4D) echocardiography applied, to a real human case. Imaging of heart acoustic map presents a new outlook to indicate the acoustic properties of cardiovascular system and disorders of valves and thereby, in the future, could be used as a new diagnostic tool. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric imaging of Cascadia subduction zone from an amphibious array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Egbert, G. D.; Key, K.; Bedrosian, P.; Livelybrooks, D.; Schultz, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present results from three-dimensional inversion of an amphibious magnetotelluric (MT) array consisting of 71 offshore and 75 onshore sites in the central part of Cascadia, to image down-dip and along strike variations of electrical conductivity, and constrain the 3D distribution of fluids and melt in the subduction zone. A larger scale array consisting of EarthScope transportable-array data and several 2D legacy profiles (e.g. EMSLAB, CAFE-MT, SWORMT) which covers WA, OR, northern CA and northern NV has been inverted separately, to provide a broader view of the subduction zone. Inverting these datasets including seafloor data, and involving strong coast effects presents many challenges, especially for the nominal TE mode impedances which have very anomalous phases in both land and seafloor sites. We find that including realistic bathymetry and conductive seafloor sediments significantly stabilizes the inversion, and that a two stage inversion strategy, first emphasizing fit to the more challenging TE data, improved overall data fits. We have also constrained the geometry of the (assumed resistive) subducting plates by extracting morphological parameters (e.g. upper boundary and thickness) from seismological models (McCrory et al 2012, Schmandt and Humphreys 2010). These constraints improve recovery and resolution of subduction related conductivity features. With the strategies mentioned above, we improved overall data fits, resulting in a model which reveals (for the first time) a conductive oceanic asthenosphere, extending under the North America plate. The most striking model features are conductive zones along the plate interface, including a continuous stripe of high conductivity just inboard of the coast, extending from the northern limits of our model in Washington state, to north-central Oregon. High conductivities also occur in patches near the tip of the mantle wedge, at depths appropriate for eclogitization, and at greater depth beneath the arc, in

  19. Sensitivity of an eight-element phased array coil in 3 Tesla MR imaging: a basic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Yoshiyasu; Miki, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Kiriyama, Ikuko; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Takahashi, Shizue; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the performance advantages of an 8-element phased array head coil (8 ch coil) over a conventional quadrature-type birdcage head coil (QD coil) with regard to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image uniformity in 3 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We scanned a phantom filled with silicon oil using an 8 ch coil and a QD coil in a 3T MR imaging system and compared the SNR and image uniformity obtained from T(1)-weighted spin echo (SE) images and T(2)-weighted fast SE images between the 2 coils. We also visually evaluated images from 4 healthy volunteers. The SNR with the 8 ch coil was approximately twice that with the QD coil in the region of interest (ROI), which was set as 75% of the area in the center of the phantom images. With regard to the spatial variation of sensitivity, the SNR with the 8 ch coil was lower at the center of the images than at the periphery, whereas the SNR with the QD coil exhibited an inverse pattern. At the center of the images with the 8 ch coil, the SNR was somewhat lower, and that distribution was relatively flat compared to that in the periphery. Image uniformity varied less with the 8 ch coil than with the QD coil on both imaging sequences. The 8 ch phased array coil was useful for obtaining high quality 3T images because of its higher SNR and improved image uniformity than those obtained with conventional quadrature-type birdcage head coil.

  20. Miniaturized Ultrasound Imaging Probes Enabled by CMUT Arrays with Integrated Frontend Electronic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. (Pierre) T.; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Wygant, Ira O.; Zhuang, Steve; Gencel, Mustafa; Choe, Jung Woo; Stephens, Douglas N.; de la Rama, Alan; Chen, Peter; Lin, Feng; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Mahajan, Aman; Seo, Chi Hyung; O’Donnell, Matthew; Truong, Uyen; Sahn, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays are conveniently integrated with frontend integrated circuits either monolithically or in a hybrid multichip form. This integration helps with reducing the number of active data processing channels for 2D arrays. This approach also preserves the signal integrity for arrays with small elements. Therefore CMUT arrays integrated with electronic circuits are most suitable to implement miniaturized probes required for many intravascular, intracardiac, and endoscopic applications. This paper presents examples of miniaturized CMUT probes utilizing 1D, 2D, and ring arrays with integrated electronics. PMID:21097106

  1. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging: 3-D Synthetic Aperture Imaging using Fully Addressed and Row-Column Addressed 2-D Transducer Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed

    the important diagnostic information in a noninvasive manner. Diagnostic and therapeutic decisions often require accurate estimates of e.g., organ, cyst, or tumor volumes. 3-D ultrasound imaging can provide these measurements without relying on the geometrical assumptions and operator-dependent skills involved...... is one of the factors for the widespread use of ultrasound imaging. The high price tag on the high quality 3-D scanners is limiting their market share. Row-column addressing of 2-D transducer arrays is a low cost alternative to fully addressed 2-D arrays, for 3-D ultrasound imaging. Using row....... Based on a set of acoustical measurements the center frequency, bandwidth, surface pressure, sensitivity, and acoustical cross-talks were evaluated and discussed. The imaging quality assessments were carried out based on Field II simulations as well as phantom measurements. Moreover, an analysis...

  2. Accelerated proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) using GRAPPA with a 32-channel phased-array coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Posse, Stefan; Lin, Yi-Ru; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Wald, Lawrence L; Wiggins, Graham C; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2008-05-01

    Parallel imaging has been demonstrated to reduce the encoding time of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Here we investigate up to 5-fold acceleration of 2D proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) at 3T using generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) with a 32-channel coil array, 1.5 cm(3) voxel size, TR/TE of 15/2000 ms, and 2.1 Hz spectral resolution. Compared to an 8-channel array, the smaller RF coil elements in this 32-channel array provided a 3.1-fold and 2.8-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the peripheral region and the central region, respectively, and more spatial modulated information. Comparison of sensitivity-encoding (SENSE) and GRAPPA reconstruction using an 8-channel array showed that both methods yielded similar quantitative metabolite measures (P > 0.1). Concentration values of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), and the sum of glutamate and glutamine (Glx) for both methods were consistent with previous studies. Using the 32-channel array coil the mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLB) were less than 8% for NAA, tCr, and Cho and less than 15% for mI and Glx at 2-fold acceleration. At 4-fold acceleration the mean CRLB for NAA, tCr, and Cho was less than 11%. In conclusion, the use of a 32-channel coil array and GRAPPA reconstruction can significantly reduce the measurement time for mapping brain metabolites. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Light Production in the Double Chooz Photomultiplier Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Crespo, J. I.; Gil-Botella, I.; Jimenez, S.; Lopez, M.; Novella, P.; Palomares, C.; Santorelli, R.; Verdugo, A.

    2012-09-13

    In this document we present a study of the phenomenon of light emission (called glowing) in the bases of the Hamamatsu R7081MOD-ASSY photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) used in the Double Chooz experiment. The tests have been carried out at the CIEMAT laboratories over a photomultiplier tube of the same model. We have studied the phenomenon making first a characterization of it, and then focusing on the dependence of the rate and the amount of emitted light versus voltage and temperature. In addition, we have looked for the possible existence of an ultraviolet component in the light which would be harmful for the experiment because it could be able to excite the scintillator liquid. Finally, we propose and test a method to reduce the light emission using a cover on the base of the photomultiplier tube.. (Author)

  4. Noise in the Measurement of Light with Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robben, F

    1968-05-15

    In order to be able to compare measurements derived from the anode current of a photomultiplier with measurement derived from photoelectron pulse counting, a systematic investigation of the properties of some photomultiplier tubes has been made. This has led to a correlation of the properties of a photomultiplier based on the quantum efficiency {eta}, the gain G, a photoelectron loss factor S and an effective dark rate D. In terms of these quantities the signal to noise ratio of an experimental measurement can be calculated, given the light flux and measurement technique. The fluctuations in a photomultiplier output are divided into two parts; Poisson fluctuations, and those due to excess noise. It is experimentally shown, from measurements on a 931A photomultiplier, that the excess noise exceeds the Poisson fluctuations only at very low frequencies, or long DC measurement times (> 10 s), for both pulse counting and anode current measurements. The Poisson fluctuations are found to be approximately the same for both pulse counting and anode current measurements, at both high light levels where the dark current, or dark pulses, are negligible, as well as at low light levels where the dark current is dominant. The excess noise is found to be somewhat greater in the case of anode current measurements. Thus both pulse counting and anode current measurement techniques have nearly identical noise properties, as far as the photomultiplier is concerned, and selection of either experimental technique depends primarily on the properties of the electronic equipment. By use of a synchronous detection technique, the variance of the pulse count was measured experimentally to an accuracy of {+-} 4 %, and was shown to be in agreement with that predicted by Poisson statistics.

  5. Imaging with a 90 frames/s microbolometer focal plane array and high-power terahertz free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dem'yanenko, M. A.; Esaev, D. G.; Knyazev, B. A.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Kulipanov, G. N.

    2008-01-01

    An uncooled microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) has been developed and used for imaging of objects illuminated by monochromatic coherent radiation of a free electron laser tunable in the range of 1.25-2.5 THz. A sensitivity threshold of 1.3x10 -3 W/cm 2 was obtained for the FPA with a homemade absolute interferometric power meter. Videos up to 90 frames/s were recorded in both transmission and reflection/scattering modes. When objects were illuminated by laser radiation scattered by a rough metal surface, speckled images were observed. Good quality terahertz images were achieved through the fast rotation of the scatterer

  6. Accuracy of single photoelectron time spread measurement of fast photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1975-01-01

    The accuracy of time spread measurements of fast photomultipliers was investigated, using single photoelectrons. The effect of the finite light pulse width on the measurement accuracy was determined and discussed. Experimental data were obtained on a special measuring system for light pulse widths ranging from 200 psec to 10 nsec, using fast photomultipliers 8850 and C31024 with optimized operating conditions for minimum transit time spread. A modified exponential function expression and curve-fitting parameters are given, which fit closely the experimentally obtained data over a wide dynamic range of light pulse widths. (U.S.)

  7. Application of CMOS Technology to Silicon Photomultiplier Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Ascenzo, Nicola; Zhang, Xi; Xie, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    We use the 180 nm GLOBALFOUNDRIES (GF) BCDLite CMOS process for the production of a silicon photomultiplier prototype. We study the main characteristics of the developed sensor in comparison with commercial SiPMs obtained in custom technologies and other SiPMs developed with CMOS-compatible processes. We support our discussion with a transient modeling of the detection process of the silicon photomultiplier as well as with a series of static and dynamic experimental measurements in dark and illuminated environments. PMID:28946675

  8. Design and implementation of Gm-APD array readout integrated circuit for infrared 3D imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-xia; Yang, Jun-hao; Liu, Zhao; Dong, Huai-peng; Wu, Jin; Sun, Wei-feng

    2013-09-01

    A single-photon detecting array of readout integrated circuit (ROIC) capable of infrared 3D imaging by photon detection and time-of-flight measurement is presented in this paper. The InGaAs avalanche photon diodes (APD) dynamic biased under Geiger operation mode by gate controlled active quenching circuit (AQC) are used here. The time-of-flight is accurately measured by a high accurate time-to-digital converter (TDC) integrated in the ROIC. For 3D imaging, frame rate controlling technique is utilized to the pixel's detection, so that the APD related to each pixel should be controlled by individual AQC to sense and quench the avalanche current, providing a digital CMOS-compatible voltage pulse. After each first sense, the detector is reset to wait for next frame operation. We employ counters of a two-segmental coarse-fine architecture, where the coarse conversion is achieved by a 10-bit pseudo-random linear feedback shift register (LFSR) in each pixel and a 3-bit fine conversion is realized by a ring delay line shared by all pixels. The reference clock driving the LFSR counter can be generated within the ring delay line Oscillator or provided by an external clock source. The circuit is designed and implemented by CSMC 0.5μm standard CMOS technology and the total chip area is around 2mm×2mm for 8×8 format ROIC with 150μm pixel pitch. The simulation results indicate that the relative time resolution of the proposed ROIC can achieve less than 1ns, and the preliminary test results show that the circuit function is correct.

  9. Characteristics of NaI detector in positron imaging device HEADTOME employing circular ring array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Shuichi; Kanno, Iwao; Aizawa, Yasuo; Murakami, Matsutaro; Uemura, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    In positron emission computed tomographs employing circular ring arrays of detectors, the performance of the imaging device has been specified ultimately by the characteristics of the detector. The responses of NaI detector were studied when detecting positron annihilation photon (511 keV). The study was mainly by using the NaI detector used in hybrid emission computed tomography (CT) ''HEADTOME'' we had developed. A series of measurements were carried out positioning two detectors with 40 cm distance and scanning 22 Na point source in water. Both detectors was inclined from 0 0 through 30 0 to change incident angle of positron annihilation toward crystal face. Energy window was set from 100 to 700 keV. The results were presented as follows; 1 Shortening the crystal length from 7 to 5 cm made sensitivity decrease about 10% and resolution deteriorate about 1 mm (FWHM). 2 As the results of varying the width of the crystal, 20 mm width was optimal at any incident angle. 3 The lead septum between the detectors was the thickness of 4 mm enough to reject multiple detector interactions (crosstalk). 4 Beam mask which was made of lead in order to improve spatial resolution and placed on crystal face worked effectively for incident angles from 0 0 to 15 0 but degraded uniformity of spatial resolution from 0 0 to through 30 0 . (author)

  10. Analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging by the combined field integral equation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H [Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, 10/B1D728, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2006-06-21

    We present the combined field integral equation (CFIE) method for analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three-dimensional models of coils and the human body were used to take into account the electromagnetic coupling. In the method of moments formulation, we applied triangular patches and the Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions to model arbitrarily shaped geometries. We first examined a rectangular loop coil to verify the CFIE method and also demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy. We then studied several eight-channel receive-only head coil arrays for 7.0 T SENSE functional MRI. Numerical results show that the signal dropout and the average SNR are two major concerns in SENSE coil array design. A good design should be a balance of these two factors.

  11. Imaging 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha Earthquake and Its Aftershock Sequence Combining Multiple Calibrated Global Seismic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, B.; Ghosh, A.

    2016-12-01

    The 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake provides a good opportunity to study the tectonics and earthquake hazards in the Himalayas, one of the most seismically active plate boundaries. Details of the seismicity patterns and associated structures in the Himalayas are poorly understood mainly due to limited instrumentation. Here, we apply a back-projection method to study the mainshock rupture and the following aftershock sequence using four large aperture global seismic arrays. All the arrays show eastward rupture propagation of about 130 km and reveal similar evolution of seismic energy radiation, with strong high-frequency energy burst about 50 km north of Kathmandu. Each single array, however, is typically limited by large azimuthal gap, low resolution, and artifacts due to unmodeled velocity structures. Therefore, we use a self-consistent empirical calibration method to combine four different arrays to image the Gorkha event. It greatly improves the resolution, can better track rupture and reveal details that cannot be resolved by any individual array. In addition, we also use the same arrays at teleseismic distances and apply a back-projection technique to detect and locate the aftershocks immediately following the Gorkha earthquake. We detect about 2.5 times the aftershocks recorded by the Advance National Seismic System comprehensive earthquake catalog during the 19 days following the mainshock. The aftershocks detected by the arrays show an east-west trend in general, with majority of the aftershocks located at the eastern part of the rupture patch and surrounding the rupture zone of the largest Mw 7.3 aftershock. Overall spatiotemporal aftershock pattern agrees well with global catalog, with our catalog showing more details relative to the standard global catalog. The improved aftershock catalog enables us to better study the aftershock dynamics, stress evolution in this region. Moreover, rapid and better imaging of aftershock distribution may aid rapid response

  12. Characterization of New-Generation Silicon Photomultipliers for Nuclear Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonders Marc A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photomultipliers have received a great deal of interest recently for use in applications spanning a wide variety of fields, including nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. For nuclear-related applications, the ability of silicon photomultipliers to discriminate neutrons from gamma rays using pulse shape discrimination when coupled with certain organic scintillators is a characteristic of utmost importance. This work reports on progress characterizing the performance of twenty different silicon photomultipliers from five manufacturers with an emphasis on pulse shape discrimination performance and timing. Results are presented on pulse shape discrimination performance as a function of overvoltage for 6-mm x 6-mm silicon photomultipliers, and the time response to stilbene is characterized for silicon photomultipliers of three different sizes. Finally, comparison with a photomultiplier tube shows that some new-generation silicon photomultipliers can perform as well as photomultiplier tubes in neutron-gamma ray discrimination.

  13. Characterization of New-Generation Silicon Photomultipliers for Nuclear Security Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonders, Marc A.; Chichester, David L.; Flaska, Marek

    2018-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers have received a great deal of interest recently for use in applications spanning a wide variety of fields, including nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. For nuclear-related applications, the ability of silicon photomultipliers to discriminate neutrons from gamma rays using pulse shape discrimination when coupled with certain organic scintillators is a characteristic of utmost importance. This work reports on progress characterizing the performance of twenty different silicon photomultipliers from five manufacturers with an emphasis on pulse shape discrimination performance and timing. Results are presented on pulse shape discrimination performance as a function of overvoltage for 6-mm x 6-mm silicon photomultipliers, and the time response to stilbene is characterized for silicon photomultipliers of three different sizes. Finally, comparison with a photomultiplier tube shows that some new-generation silicon photomultipliers can perform as well as photomultiplier tubes in neutron-gamma ray discrimination.

  14. Status of backthinned AlGaN based focal plane arrays for deep-UV imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchon, J.-L.; Lehoucq, G.; Truffer, J.-P.; Costard, E.; Frayssinet, E.; Semond, F.; Duboz, J.-Y.; Giuliani, A.; Réfrégiers, M.; Idir, M.

    2017-11-01

    The achievement of deep ultraviolet (UV) focal plane arrays (FPA) is required for both solar physics [1] and micro electronics industry. The success of solar mission (SOHO, STEREO [2], SDO [3]…), has shown the accuracy of imaging at wavelengths from 10 nm to 140 nm to reveal effects occurring in the sun corona. Deep UV steppers at 13 nm are another demanding imaging technology for the microelectronic industry in terms of uniformity and stability. A third application concerns beam shaping of Synchrotron lines [4]. Consequently, such wavelengths are of prime importance whereas the vacuum UV wavelengths are very difficult to detect due to the dramatic interaction of light with materials. The fast development of nitrides has given the opportunity to investigate AlGaN as a material for UV detection. Camera based on AlGaN present an intrinsic spectral selectivity and an extremely low dark current at room temperature. We have previously presented several FPA dedicated to deep UV based on 320 x 256 pixels of Schottky photodiodes with a pitch of 30 μm [4, 5]. AlGaN is grown on a silicon substrate instead of sapphire substrate only transparent down to 200 nm. After a flip-chip hybridization, silicon substrate and AlGaN basal layer was removed by dry etching. Then, the spectral responsivity of the FPA presented a quantum efficiency (QE) from 5% to 20% from 50 nm to 290 nm when removing the highly doped contact layer via a selective wet etching. This FPA suffered from a low uniformity incompatible with imaging, and a long time response due to variations of conductivity in the honeycomb. We also observed a low rejection of visible. It is probably due to the same honeycomb conductivity enhancement for wavelength shorter than 360 nm, i.e., the band gap of GaN. We will show hereafter an improved uniformity due to the use of a precisely ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) controlled process. The final membrane thickness is limited to the desertion layer. Neither access resistance

  15. A novel high electrode count spike recording array using an 81,920 pixel transimpedance amplifier-based imaging chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lee J; Cohen, Ethan; Ilg, Doug; Klein, Richard; Skeath, Perry; Scribner, Dean A

    2012-04-15

    Microelectrode recording arrays of 60-100 electrodes are commonly used to record neuronal biopotentials, and these have aided our understanding of brain function, development and pathology. However, higher density microelectrode recording arrays of larger area are needed to study neuronal function over broader brain regions such as in cerebral cortex or hippocampal slices. Here, we present a novel design of a high electrode count picocurrent imaging array (PIA), based on an 81,920 pixel Indigo ISC9809 readout integrated circuit camera chip. While originally developed for interfacing to infrared photodetector arrays, we have adapted the chip for neuron recording by bonding it to microwire glass resulting in an array with an inter-electrode pixel spacing of 30 μm. In a high density electrode array, the ability to selectively record neural regions at high speed and with good signal to noise ratio are both functionally important. A critical feature of our PIA is that each pixel contains a dedicated low noise transimpedance amplifier (∼0.32 pA rms) which allows recording high signal to noise ratio biocurrents comparable to single electrode voltage amplifier recordings. Using selective sampling of 256 pixel subarray regions, we recorded the extracellular biocurrents of rabbit retinal ganglion cell spikes at sampling rates up to 7.2 kHz. Full array local electroretinogram currents could also be recorded at frame rates up to 100 Hz. A PIA with a full complement of 4 readout circuits would span 1cm and could acquire simultaneous data from selected regions of 1024 electrodes at sampling rates up to 9.3 kHz. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Real-time two-photon lithography in controlled flow to create a single-microparticle array and particle-cluster array for optofluidic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Shi, Yang; Lao, Zhaoxin; Ni, Jincheng; Li, Guoqiang; Hu, Yanlei; Li, Jiawen; Chu, Jiaru; Wu, Dong; Sugioka, Koji

    2018-01-30

    Microarray technology provides an excellent platform for biomedical and biochemical research including basic scientific studies, drug discovery, and diagnostics. Here, we develop a novel method referred to as real-time two-photon lithography in a controlled flow in which femtosecond laser two-photon lithography is performed in situ in the sequential mode stopping and flowing the flow of liquid resin containing microparticles to achieve 100% trapping on a one-bead-to-one-trap basis. Polydisperse particles can be all trapped to form a desired array by freely designing trap structures, resulting in an unprecedentedly high capture efficiency of ∼100%. No persistent pressure is needed after trapping which reduces the complexity of the system. In addition, trapping of particle-cluster arrays with a controlled number of particles is also achieved via this method. The trapped particles inside the microchip are successfully applied as microlenses for high quality imaging. The present technology marks an essential step towards a versatile platform for the integration of bead-based assays and paves the way for developing innovative microfluidics, optofluidics, micro-optics and single-cell analysis devices.

  17. Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as novel photodetectors for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Belcari, Nicola; Giuseppina Bisogni, Maria; Corsi, Francesco; Foresta, Maurizio; Guerra, Pedro; Marcatili, Sara; Santos, Andres; Sportelli, Giancarlo

    2011-01-01

    Next generation PET scanners should fulfill very high requirements in terms of spatial, energy and timing resolution. Modern scanner performances are inherently limited by the use of standard photomultiplier tubes. The use of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) is proposed for the construction of a 4D-PET module of 4.8x4.8 cm 2 aimed to replace the standard PMT based PET block detector. The module will be based on a LYSO continuous crystal read on two faces by Silicon Photomultipliers. A high granularity detection surface made by SiPM matrices of 1.5 mm pitch will be used for the x-y photon hit position determination with submillimetric accuracy, while a low granularity surface constituted by 16 mm 2 SiPM pixels will provide the fast timing information (t) that will be used to implement the Time of Flight technique (TOF). The spatial information collected by the two detector layers will be combined in order to measure the Depth of Interaction (DOI) of each event (z). The use of large area multi-pixel Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) detectors requires the development of a multichannel Data Acquisition system (DAQ) as well as of a dedicated front-end in order not to degrade the intrinsic detector capabilities and to manage many channels. The paper describes the progress made on the development of the proof of principle module under construction at the University of Pisa.

  18. Counting efficiency formulae for two, three or four photomultiplier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.

    1993-01-01

    Counting efficiency formulae as a function of the non-detection probability and the electron distributions for systems with two, three or dour photomultipliers are obtained in this paper. It is assumed that the photocathode electron emission follows the Poisson distribution. The obtained formulae are basic to compute the counting efficiency in liquid scintillation spectrometers

  19. Next-Generation Microshutter Arrays for Large-Format Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Samuel; Kutyrev, Alexander; Brown, Ari; Li, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A next-generation microshutter array, LArge Microshutter Array (LAMA), was developed as a multi-object field selector. LAMA consists of small-scaled microshutter arrays that can be combined to form large-scale microshutter array mosaics. Microshutter actuation is accomplished via electrostatic attraction between the shutter and a counter electrode, and 2D addressing can be accomplished by applying an electrostatic potential between a row of shutters and a column, orthogonal to the row, of counter electrodes. Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology is used to fabricate the microshutter arrays. The main feature of the microshutter device is to use a set of standard surface micromachining processes for device fabrication. Electrostatic actuation is used to eliminate the need for macromechanical magnet actuating components. A simplified electrostatic actuation with no macro components (e.g. moving magnets) required for actuation and latching of the shutters will make the microshutter arrays robust and less prone to mechanical failure. Smaller-size individual arrays will help to increase the yield and thus reduce the cost and improve robustness of the fabrication process. Reducing the size of the individual shutter array to about one square inch and building the large-scale mosaics by tiling these smaller-size arrays would further help to reduce the cost of the device due to the higher yield of smaller devices. The LAMA development is based on prior experience acquired while developing microshutter arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), but it will have different features. The LAMA modular design permits large-format mosaicking to cover a field of view at least 50 times larger than JWST MSA. The LAMA electrostatic, instead of magnetic, actuation enables operation cycles at least 100 times faster and a mass significantly smaller compared to JWST MSA. Also, standard surface micromachining technology will simplify the fabrication process, increasing

  20. TRitium Activity Measurements with a PhotomultipliEr in Liquids–The TRAMPEL experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priester, Florian; Klein, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We have set up a new test device for measuring of tritiated water samples. • The device is very compact and easy and reliable in operation. • Easy integration in flow-through systems is possible. • The device has been operated at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe for several months. • The lower detection limit has been improved with regard to predecessors experiments. - Abstract: A common technique for the determination of the activity of tritiated water (HTO) is liquid scintillation counting (LSC). This implies sample taking, sample preparation and radioactive waste processing afterwards. When handling highly tritiated water special care has to be taken because of possible harmfulness of the sample. Furthermore, LSC devices are mostly large, heavy and expensive. The TRAMPEL experiment aims at measuring the activity of tritiated water in-line without sample taking. The device is intended to be easy to use and operate, quite inexpensive and compact. The measurement principle is based on electrons from β-decay which induce light in commercially available scintillation fibres. The light is detected by a small photomultiplier tube (PMT). A proof-of-principle was set up for static measurements using standard stainless steel parts. The complete device has a volume of less than 0.5 l.

  1. TRitium Activity Measurements with a PhotomultipliEr in Liquids–The TRAMPEL experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priester, Florian, E-mail: florian.priester@kit.edu; Klein, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have set up a new test device for measuring of tritiated water samples. • The device is very compact and easy and reliable in operation. • Easy integration in flow-through systems is possible. • The device has been operated at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe for several months. • The lower detection limit has been improved with regard to predecessors experiments. - Abstract: A common technique for the determination of the activity of tritiated water (HTO) is liquid scintillation counting (LSC). This implies sample taking, sample preparation and radioactive waste processing afterwards. When handling highly tritiated water special care has to be taken because of possible harmfulness of the sample. Furthermore, LSC devices are mostly large, heavy and expensive. The TRAMPEL experiment aims at measuring the activity of tritiated water in-line without sample taking. The device is intended to be easy to use and operate, quite inexpensive and compact. The measurement principle is based on electrons from β-decay which induce light in commercially available scintillation fibres. The light is detected by a small photomultiplier tube (PMT). A proof-of-principle was set up for static measurements using standard stainless steel parts. The complete device has a volume of less than 0.5 l.

  2. Focal Plane Detectors for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R. G.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Funk, S.; Otte, N.; Smith, A.; Tajima, H.; Williams, D.

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. It is being designed to achieve a significant improvement in sensitivity compared to current Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) Arrays. One of the main requirements in order that AGIS fulfills this goal will be to achieve higher angular resolution than current IACTs. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution may be achieved if the pixel size is reduced to 0.05 deg, i.e. two to three times smaller than for current IACT cameras. Here we present results from testing of alternatives being considered for AGIS, including both silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs).

  3. THE CHARA ARRAY ANGULAR DIAMETER OF HR 8799 FAVORS PLANETARY MASSES FOR ITS IMAGED COMPANIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; White, Russel J.; Jones, Jeremy; Boyajian, Tabetha; McAlister, Harold A.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Goldfinger, P. J.; Farrington, Christopher D.; Riedel, Adric R.; Huber, Daniel; Ireland, Michael; Von Braun, Kaspar; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    HR 8799 is an hF0 mA5 γ Doradus-, λ Bootis-, Vega-type star best known for hosting four directly imaged candidate planetary companions. Using the CHARA Array interferometer, we measure HR 8799's limb-darkened angular diameter to be 0.342 ± 0.008 mas (an error of only 2%). By combining our measurement with the star's parallax and photometry from the literature, we greatly improve upon previous estimates of its fundamental parameters, including stellar radius (1.44 ± 0.06 R ☉ ), effective temperature (7193 ± 87 K, consistent with F0), luminosity (5.05 ± 0.29 L ☉ ), and the extent of the habitable zone (HZ; 1.62-3.32 AU). These improved stellar properties permit much more precise comparisons with stellar evolutionary models, from which a mass and age can be determined, once the metallicity of the star is known. Considering the observational properties of other λ Bootis stars and the indirect evidence for youth of HR 8799, we argue that the internal abundance, and what we refer to as the effective abundance, is most likely near solar. Finally, using the Yonsei-Yale evolutionary models with uniformly scaled solar-like abundances, we estimate HR 8799's mass and age considering two possibilities: 1.516 +0.038 –0.024 M ☉ and 33 +7 –13.2 Myr if the star is contracting toward the zero-age main sequence or 1.513 +0.023 –0.024 M ☉ and 90 +381 –50 Myr if it is expanding from it. This improved estimate of HR 8799's age with realistic uncertainties provides the best constraints to date on the masses of its orbiting companions, and strongly suggests they are indeed planets. They nevertheless all appear to orbit well outside the HZ of this young star.

  4. Advances in CMOS solid-state photomultipliers for scintillation detector applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, James F.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Johnson, Erik B.; McClish, Mickel; Dokhale, Purushotthom; Shah, Kanai S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha; Chapman, Eric [Radiation Monitoring Devices, 44 Hunt Street, Watertownm, MA 02472 (United States); Augustine, Frank L., E-mail: JChristian@RMDInc.co [Augustine Engineering, 2115 Park Dale Ln, Encinitas, CA 92024 (United States)

    2010-12-11

    Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPMs) are a compact, lightweight, potentially low-cost alternative to a photomultiplier tube for a variety of scintillation detector applications, including digital-dosimeter and medical-imaging applications. Manufacturing SSPMs with a commercial CMOS process provides the ability for rapid prototyping, and facilitates production to reduce the cost. RMD designs CMOS SSPM devices that are fabricated by commercial foundries. This work describes the characterization and performance of these devices for scintillation detector applications. This work also describes the terms contributing to device noise in terms of the excess noise of the SSPM, the binomial statistics governing the number of pixels triggered by a scintillation event, and the background, or thermal, count rate. The fluctuations associated with these terms limit the resolution of the signal pulse amplitude. We explore the use of pixel-level signal conditioning, and characterize the performance of a prototype SSPM device that preserves the digital nature of the signal. In addition, we explore designs of position-sensitive SSPM detectors for medical imaging applications, and characterize their performance.

  5. The development of a high-resolution scintillating fiber tracker with silicon photomultiplier readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roper Yearwood, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    In this work I present the design and test results for a novel, modular tracking detector from scintillating fibers which are read out by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. The detector modules consist of 0.25 mm thin scintillating fibers which are closely packed in five-layer ribbons. Two ribbons are fixed to both sides of a carbon-fiber composite structure. Custom made SiPM arrays with a photo-detection efficiency of about 50% read out the fibers. Several 860 mm long and 32 mm wide tracker modules were tested in a secondary 12 GeV/c beam at the PS facilities, CERN in November of 2009. During this test a spatial resolution better than 0.05 mm at an average light yield of about 20 photons for a minimum ionizing particle was determined. This work details the characterization of scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers of different make and model. It gives an overview of the production of scintillating fiber modules. The behavior of detector modules during the test-beam is analyzed in detail and different options for the front-end electronics are compared. Furthermore, the implementation of the proposed tracking detector from scintillating fibers within the scope of the PERDaix experiment is discussed. The PERDaix detector is a permanent magnet spectrometer with a weight of 40 kg. It consists of 8 tracking detector layers from scintillating fibers, a time-of-flight detector from plastic scintillator bars with silicon photomultiplier readout and a transition radiation detector from an irregular fleece radiator and Xe/CO 2 filled proportional counting tubes. The PERDaix detector was launched with a helium balloon within the scope of the ''Balloon-Experiments for University Students'' (BEXUS) program from Kiruna, Sweden in November 2010. For a few hours PERDaix reached an altitude of 33 km and measured cosmic rays. In May 2011, the PERDaix detector was characterized during a test-beam at the PS-facilities at CERN. This work introduces methods for event

  6. Carbon-Ring Microelectrode Arrays for Electrochemical Imaging of Single Cell Exocytosis: Fabrication and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuqing; Trouillon, Raphaël; Svensson, Maria I.; Keighron, Jacqueline D.; Cans, Ann-Sofie; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Fabrication of carbon microelectrode arrays, with up to 15 electrodes in total tips as small as 10 to 50 μm, is presented. The support structures of microelectrodes were obtained by pulling multiple quartz capillaries together to form hollow capillary arrays before carbon deposition. Carbon ring microelectrodes were deposited by pyrolysis of acetylene in the lumen of these quartz capillary arrays. Each carbon deposited array tip was filled with epoxy, followed by beveling of the tip of the array to form a deposited carbon-ring microelectrode array (CRMA). Both the number of the microelectrodes in the array and the tip size are independently tunable. These CRMAs have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electrogenerated chemiluminescence. Additionally, the electrochemical properties were investigated with steady-state voltammetry. In order to demonstrate the utility of these fabricated microelectrodes in neurochemistry, CRMAs containing eight microring electrodes were used for electrochemical monitoring of exocytotic events from single PC12 cells. Subcellular temporal heterogeneities in exocytosis (ie. cold spots vs. hot spots) were successfully detected with the CRMAs. PMID:22339586

  7. 3-D Imaging using Row–Column-Addressed 2-D Arrays with a Diverging Lens: Phantom Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Beers, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    A double-curved diverging lens over a flat row– column-addressed (RCA) 2-D array can extend its inherent rectilinear 3-D imaging field-of-view (FOV) to a curvilinear volume region, which is necessary for applications such as abdominal and cardiac imaging. A concave lens with radius of 12.7 mm...... was manufactured using RTV664 silicone. The diverging properties of the lens were evaluated based on measurements on several phantoms. The measured 6 dB FOV in contact with a material similar to human soft tissue was less than 15% different from the theoretical predictions, i.e., a curvilinear FOV of 32...

  8. Enhanced depth-of-field of an integral imaging microscope using a bifocal holographic optical element-micro lens array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki-Chul; Lim, Young-Tae; Shin, Chang-Won; Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Hwang, Jae-Moon; Kim, Nam

    2017-08-15

    We propose and implement an integral imaging microscope with extended depth-of-field (DoF) using a bifocal holographic micro lens array (MLA). The properties of the two MLAs are switched via peristrophic multiplexing, where different properties of the MLA are recorded onto the single holographic optical element (HOE). The recorded MLA properties are perpendicular to each other: after the first mode is recorded, the HOE is rotated by 90° clockwise, and the second mode is recorded. The experimental results confirm that the DoF of the integral imaging microscopy system is extended successfully by using the bifocal MLA.

  9. New Optimizations of Microcalorimeter Arrays for High-Resolution Imaging X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline

    We propose to continue our successful research program in developing arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) for x-ray astrophysics. Our standard 0.3 mm TES pixel achieves better than 2.5-eV resolution, and we now make 32x32 arrays of such pixels. We have also achieved better than 1-eV resolution in smaller pixels, and promising performance in a range of position-sensitive designs. We propose to continue to advance the designs of both the single-pixel and position-sensitive microcalorimeters so that we can produce arrays suitable for several x-ray spectroscopy observatories presently in formulation. We will also investigate various array and pixel optimizations such as would be needed for large arrays for surveys, large- pixel arrays for diffuse soft x-ray measurements, or sub-arrays of fast pixels optimized for neutron-star burst spectroscopy. In addition, we will develop fabrication processes for integrating sub-arrays with very different pixel designs into a monolithic focal-plane array to simplify the design of the focal-plane assembly and make feasible new detector configurations such as the one currently baselined for AXSIO. Through a series of measurements on test devices, we have improved our understanding of the weak-link physics governing the observed resistive transitions in TES detectors. We propose to build on that work and ultimately use the results to improve the immunity of the detector to environmental magnetic fields, as well as its fundamental performance, in each of the targeted optimizations we are developing.

  10. Measurement of the modulation transfer function of a charge-coupled device array by the combination of the self-imaging effect and slanted edge method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Sedigheh; Madanipour, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, by a combination of the self-imaging effect for Ronchi gratings and the standard slanted edge modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement method for CCD cameras, the MTF of the CCD array without optics is measured. For this purpose, a Ronchi-type grating is illuminated by an expanded He-Ne laser. A self-image of the grating appears without optics on the CCD array that is located on the Talbot distance. The lines of the self-image of the grating are used as a slanted edge array. This method has all the advantages of the slanted edge method, and also since the array of the edge is ready, the total area of the CCD can be tested. The measured MTF is related to the CCD array without optics.

  11. A Novel 3D Imaging Method for Airborne Downward-Looking Sparse Array SAR Based on Special Squint Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D imaging technology based on antenna array is one of the most important 3D synthetic aperture radar (SAR high resolution imaging modes. In this paper, a novel 3D imaging method is proposed for airborne down-looking sparse array SAR based on the imaging geometry and the characteristic of echo signal. The key point of the proposed algorithm is the introduction of a special squint model in cross track processing to obtain accurate focusing. In this special squint model, point targets with different cross track positions have different squint angles at the same range resolution cell, which is different from the conventional squint SAR. However, after theory analysis and formulation deduction, the imaging procedure can be processed with the uniform reference function, and the phase compensation factors and algorithm realization procedure are demonstrated in detail. As the method requires only Fourier transform and multiplications and thus avoids interpolations, it is computationally efficient. Simulations with point scatterers are used to validate the method.

  12. Hot Spots Detection of Operating PV Arrays through IR Thermal Image Using Method Based on Curve Fitting of Gray Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall efficiency of PV arrays is affected by hot spots which should be detected and diagnosed by applying responsible monitoring techniques. The method using the IR thermal image to detect hot spots has been studied as a direct, noncontact, nondestructive technique. However, IR thermal images suffer from relatively high stochastic noise and non-uniformity clutter, so the conventional methods of image processing are not effective. The paper proposes a method to detect hotspots based on curve fitting of gray histogram. The result of MATLAB simulation proves the method proposed in the paper is effective to detect the hot spots suppressing the noise generated during the process of image acquisition.

  13. A pipelined architecture for real time correction of non-uniformity in infrared focal plane arrays imaging system using multiprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liang; Fu, Zhuang; Zhao, YanZheng; Yang, JunYan

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes a kind of pipelined electric circuit architecture implemented in FPGA, a very large scale integrated circuit (VLSI), which efficiently deals with the real time non-uniformity correction (NUC) algorithm for infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA). Dual Nios II soft-core processors and a DSP with a 64+ core together constitute this image system. Each processor undertakes own systematic task, coordinating its work with each other's. The system on programmable chip (SOPC) in FPGA works steadily under the global clock frequency of 96Mhz. Adequate time allowance makes FPGA perform NUC image pre-processing algorithm with ease, which has offered favorable guarantee for the work of post image processing in DSP. And at the meantime, this paper presents a hardware (HW) and software (SW) co-design in FPGA. Thus, this systematic architecture yields an image processing system with multiprocessor, and a smart solution to the satisfaction with the performance of the system.

  14. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  15. Real-time imaging of vertically aligned carbon nanotube array growth kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puretzky, A A; Eres, G; Rouleau, C M; Ivanov, I N; Geohegan, D B

    2008-01-01

    In situ time-lapse photography and laser irradiation are applied to understand unusual coordinated growth kinetics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays including pauses in growth, retraction, and local equilibration in length. A model is presented which explains the measured kinetics and determines the conditions for diffusion-limited growth. Laser irradiation of the growing nanotube arrays is first used to prove that the nanotubes grow from catalyst particles at their bases, and then increase their growth rate and terminal lengths

  16. The GCT camera for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapington, J. S.; Abchiche, A.; Allan, D.; Amans, J.-P.; Armstrong, T. P.; Balzer, A.; Berge, D.; Boisson, C.; Bousquet, J.-J.; Bose, R.; Brown, A. M.; Bryan, M.; Buchholtz, G.; Buckley, J.; Chadwick, P. M.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Daniel, M. K.; De Franco, A.; De Frondat, F.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Dumas, D.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Fasola, G.; Funk, S.; Gironnet, J.; Graham, J. A.; Greenshaw, T.; Hervet, O.; Hidaka, N.; Hinton, J. A.; Huet, J.-M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jegouzo, I.; Jogler, T.; Kawashima, T.; Kraus, M.; Laporte, P.; Leach, S.; Lefaucheur, J.; Markoff, S.; Melse, T.; Minaya, I. A.; Mohrmann, L.; Molyneux, P.; Moore, P.; Nolan, S. J.; Okumura, A.; Osborne, J. P.; Parsons, R. D.; Rosen, S.; Ross, D.; Rowell, G.; Rulten, C. B.; Sato, Y.; Sayede, F.; Schmoll, J.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Servillat, M.; Sol, H.; Stamatescu, V.; Stephan, M.; Stuik, R.; Sykes, J.; Tajima, H.; Thornhill, J.; Tibaldo, L.; Trichard, C.; Varner, G.; Vink, J.; Watson, J. J.; White, R.; Yamane, N.; Zech, A.; Zink, A.; Zorn, J.; CTA Consortium

    2017-12-01

    The Gamma Cherenkov Telescope (GCT) is one of the designs proposed for the Small Sized Telescope (SST) section of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The GCT uses dual-mirror optics, resulting in a compact telescope with good image quality and a large field of view with a smaller, more economical, camera than is achievable with conventional single mirror solutions. The photon counting GCT camera is designed to record the flashes of atmospheric Cherenkov light from gamma and cosmic ray initiated cascades, which last only a few tens of nanoseconds. The GCT optics require that the camera detectors follow a convex surface with a radius of curvature of 1 m and a diameter of 35 cm, which is approximated by tiling the focal plane with 32 modules. The first camera prototype is equipped with multi-anode photomultipliers, each comprising an 8×8 array of 6×6 mm2 pixels to provide the required angular scale, adding up to 2048 pixels in total. Detector signals are shaped, amplified and digitised by electronics based on custom ASICs that provide digitisation at 1 GSample/s. The camera is self-triggering, retaining images where the focal plane light distribution matches predefined spatial and temporal criteria. The electronics are housed in the liquid-cooled, sealed camera enclosure. LED flashers at the corners of the focal plane provide a calibration source via reflection from the secondary mirror. The first GCT camera prototype underwent preliminary laboratory tests last year. In November 2015, the camera was installed on a prototype GCT telescope (SST-GATE) in Paris and was used to successfully record the first Cherenkov light of any CTA prototype, and the first Cherenkov light seen with such a dual-mirror optical system. A second full-camera prototype based on Silicon Photomultipliers is under construction. Up to 35 GCTs are envisaged for CTA.

  17. N-Type delta Doping of High-Purity Silicon Imaging Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    A process for n-type (electron-donor) delta doping has shown promise as a means of modifying back-illuminated image detectors made from n-doped high-purity silicon to enable them to detect high-energy photons (ultraviolet and x-rays) and low-energy charged particles (electrons and ions). This process is applicable to imaging detectors of several types, including charge-coupled devices, hybrid devices, and complementary metal oxide/semiconductor detector arrays. Delta doping is so named because its density-vs.-depth characteristic is reminiscent of the Dirac delta function (impulse function): the dopant is highly concentrated in a very thin layer. Preferably, the dopant is concentrated in one or at most two atomic layers in a crystal plane and, therefore, delta doping is also known as atomic-plane doping. The use of doping to enable detection of high-energy photons and low-energy particles was reported in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. As described in more detail in those articles, the main benefit afforded by delta doping of a back-illuminated silicon detector is to eliminate a "dead" layer at the back surface of the silicon wherein high-energy photons and low-energy particles are absorbed without detection. An additional benefit is that the delta-doped layer can serve as a back-side electrical contact. Delta doping of p-type silicon detectors is well established. The development of the present process addresses concerns specific to the delta doping of high-purity silicon detectors, which are typically n-type. The present process involves relatively low temperatures, is fully compatible with other processes used to fabricate the detectors, and does not entail interruption of those processes. Indeed, this process can be the last stage in the fabrication of an imaging detector that has, in all other respects, already been fully processed, including metallized. This process includes molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) for deposition of three layers, including

  18. Locating non-volcanic tremor along the San Andreas Fault using a multiple array source imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, C.H.; Fuis, G.S.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Shelly, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) has been observed at several subduction zones and at the San Andreas Fault (SAF). Tremor locations are commonly derived by cross-correlating envelope-transformed seismic traces in combination with source-scanning techniques. Recently, they have also been located by using relative relocations with master events, that is low-frequency earthquakes that are part of the tremor; locations are derived by conventional traveltime-based methods. Here we present a method to locate the sources of NVT using an imaging approach for multiple array data. The performance of the method is checked with synthetic tests and the relocation of earthquakes. We also applied the method to tremor occurring near Cholame, California. A set of small-aperture arrays (i.e. an array consisting of arrays) installed around Cholame provided the data set for this study. We observed several tremor episodes and located tremor sources in the vicinity of SAF. During individual tremor episodes, we observed a systematic change of source location, indicating rapid migration of the tremor source along SAF. ?? 2010 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2010 RAS.

  19. Development of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) techniques in New Zealand: Array simulation, image synthesis and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, S. D.

    2008-04-01

    This thesis presents the design and development of a process to model Very Long Base Line Interferometry (VLBI) aperture synthesis antenna arrays. In line with the Auckland University of Technology (AUT) Institute for Radiophysics and Space Research (IRSR) aims to develop the knowledge, skills and experience within New Zealand, extensive use of existing radio astronomical software has been incorporated into the process namely AIPS (Astronomical Imaging Processing System), MIRIAD (a radio interferometry data reduction package) and DIFMAP (a program for synthesis imaging of visibility data from interferometer arrays of radio telescopes). This process has been used to model various antenna array configurations for two proposed New Zealand sites for antenna in a VLBI array configuration with existing Australian facilities and a passable antenna at Scott Base in Antarctica; and the results are presented in an attempt to demonstrate the improvement to be gained by joint trans-Tasman VLBI observation. It is hoped these results and process will assist the planning and placement of proposed New Zealand radio telescopes for cooperation with groups such as the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA), others in the Pacific Rim and possibly globally; also potential future involvement of New Zealand with the SKA. The developed process has also been used to model a phased building schedule for the SKA in Australia and the addition of two antennas in New Zealand. This has been presented to the wider astronomical community via the Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand Journal, and is summarized in this thesis with some additional material. A new measure of quality ("figure of merit") for comparing the original model image and final CLEAN images by utilizing normalized 2-D cross correlation is evaluated as an alternative to the existing subjective visual operator image comparison undertaken to date by other groups. This new unit of measure is then used ! in the presentation of the

  20. A new three-dimensional nonscanning laser imaging system based on the illumination pattern of a point-light-source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenze; Ma, Yayun; Han, Shaokun; Wang, Yulin; Liu, Fei; Zhai, Yu

    2018-06-01

    One of the most important goals of research on three-dimensional nonscanning laser imaging systems is the improvement of the illumination system. In this paper, a new three-dimensional nonscanning laser imaging system based on the illumination pattern of a point-light-source array is proposed. This array is obtained using a fiber array connected to a laser array with each unit laser having independent control circuits. This system uses a point-to-point imaging process, which is realized using the exact corresponding optical relationship between the point-light-source array and a linear-mode avalanche photodiode array detector. The complete working process of this system is explained in detail, and the mathematical model of this system containing four equations is established. A simulated contrast experiment and two real contrast experiments which use the simplified setup without a laser array are performed. The final results demonstrate that unlike a conventional three-dimensional nonscanning laser imaging system, the proposed system meets all the requirements of an eligible illumination system. Finally, the imaging performance of this system is analyzed under defocusing situations, and analytical results show that the system has good defocusing robustness and can be easily adjusted in real applications.

  1. The AlpArray Seismic Network: A Large-Scale European Experiment to Image the Alpine Orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, György; Molinari, Irene; Clinton, John; Bokelmann, Götz; Bondár, István; Crawford, Wayne C.; Dessa, Jean-Xavier; Doubre, Cécile; Friederich, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Florian; Giardini, Domenico; Gráczer, Zoltán; Handy, Mark R.; Herak, Marijan; Jia, Yan; Kissling, Edi; Kopp, Heidrun; Korn, Michael; Margheriti, Lucia; Meier, Thomas; Mucciarelli, Marco; Paul, Anne; Pesaresi, Damiano; Piromallo, Claudia; Plenefisch, Thomas; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Ritter, Joachim; Rümpker, Georg; Šipka, Vesna; Spallarossa, Daniele; Thomas, Christine; Tilmann, Frederik; Wassermann, Joachim; Weber, Michael; Wéber, Zoltán; Wesztergom, Viktor; Živčić, Mladen

    2018-04-01

    The AlpArray programme is a multinational, European consortium to advance our understanding of orogenesis and its relationship to mantle dynamics, plate reorganizations, surface processes and seismic hazard in the Alps-Apennines-Carpathians-Dinarides orogenic system. The AlpArray Seismic Network has been deployed with contributions from 36 institutions from 11 countries to map physical properties of the lithosphere and asthenosphere in 3D and thus to obtain new, high-resolution geophysical images of structures from the surface down to the base of the mantle transition zone. With over 600 broadband stations operated for 2 years, this seismic experiment is one of the largest simultaneously operated seismological networks in the academic domain, employing hexagonal coverage with station spacing at less than 52 km. This dense and regularly spaced experiment is made possible by the coordinated coeval deployment of temporary stations from numerous national pools, including ocean-bottom seismometers, which were funded by different national agencies. They combine with permanent networks, which also required the cooperation of many different operators. Together these stations ultimately fill coverage gaps. Following a short overview of previous large-scale seismological experiments in the Alpine region, we here present the goals, construction, deployment, characteristics and data management of the AlpArray Seismic Network, which will provide data that is expected to be unprecedented in quality to image the complex Alpine mountains at depth.

  2. Multiplier-free DCT approximations for RF multi-beam digital aperture-array space imaging and directional sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potluri, U S; Madanayake, A; Rajapaksha, N; Cintra, R J; Bayer, F M

    2012-01-01

    Multi-beamforming is an important requirement for broadband space imaging applications based on dense aperture arrays (AAs). Usually, the discrete Fourier transform is the transform of choice for AA electromagnetic imaging. Here, the discrete cosine transform (DCT) is proposed as an alternative, enabling the use of emerging fast algorithms that offer greatly reduced complexity in digital arithmetic circuits. We propose two novel high-speed digital architectures for recently proposed fast algorithms (Bouguezel, Ahmad and Swamy 2008 Electron. Lett. 44 1249–50) (BAS-2008) and (Cintra and Bayer 2011 IEEE Signal Process. Lett. 18 579–82) (CB-2011) that provide good approximations to the DCT at zero multiplicative complexity. Further, we propose a novel DCT approximation having zero multiplicative complexity that is shown to be better for multi-beamforming AAs when compared to BAS-2008 and CB-2011. The far-field array pattern of ideal DCT, BAS-2008, CB-2011 and proposed approximation are investigated with error analysis. Extensive hardware realizations, implementation details and performance metrics are provided for synchronous field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology from Xilinx. The resource consumption and speed metrics of BAS-2008, CB-2011 and the proposed approximation are investigated as functions of system word size. The 8-bit versions are mapped to emerging asynchronous FPGAs leading to significantly increased real-time throughput with clock rates at up to 925.6 MHz implying the fastest DCT approximations using reconfigurable logic devices in the literature. (paper)

  3. Microwave Imaging Using CMOS Integrated Circuits with Rotating 4 × 4 Antenna Array on a Breast Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A digital breast cancer detection system using 65 nm technology complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS integrated circuits with rotating 4 × 4 antenna array is presented. Gaussian monocycle pulses are generated by CMOS logic circuits and transmitted by a 4 × 4 matrix antenna array via two CMOS single-pole-eight-throw (SP8T switching matrices. Radar signals are received and converted to digital signals by CMOS equivalent time sampling circuits. By rotating the 4 × 4 antenna array, the reference signal is obtained by averaging the waveforms from various positions to extract the breast phantom target response. A signal alignment algorithm is proposed to compensate the phase shift of the signals caused by the system jitter. After extracting the scattered signal from the target, a bandpass filter is applied to reduce the noise caused by imperfect subtraction between original and the reference signals. The confocal imaging algorithm for rotating antennas is utilized to reconstruct the breast image. A 1 cm3 bacon block as a cancer phantom target in a rubber substrate as a breast fat phantom can be detected with reduced artifacts.

  4. Double-Stage Delay Multiply and Sum Beamforming Algorithm: Application to Linear-Array Photoacoustic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi; Adabi, Saba; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging medical imaging modality capable of providing high spatial resolution of Ultrasound (US) imaging and high contrast of optical imaging. Delay-and-Sum (DAS) is the most common beamforming algorithm in PAI. However, using DAS beamformer leads to low resolution images and considerable contribution of off-axis signals. A new paradigm namely Delay-Multiply-and-Sum (DMAS), which was originally used as a reconstruction algorithm in confocal microwave imaging...

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation.

  6. A new parallel algorithm and its simulation on hypercube simulator for low pass digital image filtering using systolic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hallaq, A.; Amin, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper introduces a new parallel algorithm and its simulation on a hypercube simulator for the low pass digital image filtering using a systolic array. This new algorithm is faster than the old one (Amin, 1988). This is due to the the fact that the old algorithm carries out the addition operations in a sequential mode. But in our new design these addition operations are divided into tow groups, which can be performed in parallel. One group will be performed on one half of the systolic array and the other on the second half, that is, by folding. This parallelism reduces the time required for the whole process by almost quarter the time of the old algorithm.(authors). 18 refs., 3 figs

  7. The recent development and study of silicon photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveliev, Valeri

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments and results from the study of a Silicon Solid State Photomultiplier (Si-PM) are presented. The basis of this new type of photodetector is a fine structure of microcells operating in the Geiger mode with an internal gain greater than 106. Common signal output allows for the detector to be operated in the proportional mode, and to reach a dynamic range of 1.5x103. Such photodetectors have shown single photon response at room temperature with a fast timing of ∼100ps. They are compact, robust and non-sensitive to magnetic fields. Results show the detection of low-intensity light in single photon mode and the detection of minimal ionizing particles using a scintillation tile for hadron calorimetry. The silicon photomultiplier is suitable for wide application in scintillation calorimetry, medical application, etc

  8. An Educational Kit Based On a Modular Silicon Photomultiplier System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caccia, Massimo; Chmill, Valery; Ebolese, Amedeo; Martemyanov, Alexander; Risigo, Fabio; Santoro, Romualdo; Locatelli, Marco; Pieracci, Maura; Tintori, Carlo

    2013-06-01

    Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPM) are state of the art light detectors with unprecedented single photon sensitivity and photon number resolving capability, representing a breakthrough in several fundamental and applied Science domains. An educational experiment based on a SiPM set-up is proposed in this article, guiding the student towards a comprehensive knowledge of this sensor technology while experiencing the quantum nature of light and exploring the statistical properties of the light pulses emitted by a LED. (authors)

  9. Dynamic range broadening for photomultipliers in kinetic spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumas, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    The circuit of switching on a photomultiplier with prestage modulation developed for kinetic spectrophotometry purposes is described. Distinguishing features of the scheme are wide range of control pulse duration (40 nc - 2.5 mc) and direct transistor photostart by laser light pulse. In the case of PM prestage modulation for the second dynode modulation depth attains 400 while PM opening time constitutes 40 nc

  10. An amplifier for VUV photomultiplier operating in cryogenic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Dahal, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; D'Inzeo, M.; Franchi, G.; Pazos Clemens, L.

    2016-01-01

    We present the characterisation of an amplifier potentially interesting for noble liquid detectors. The design has been conceived considering the requirements of low power consumption (less than 30 mW), low noise, amplification factor of 10 at 100 MHz and use of commercial components. The amplifier has been integrated onto an electronic board with a voltage divider to operate an Hamamatsu R11410 photomultiplier tube (used in XENON1T, Aprile et al. (2014) [1] dark matter experiment).

  11. An amplifier for VUV photomultiplier operating in cryogenic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Dahal, S. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Di Giovanni, A., E-mail: adriano.digiovanni@nyu.edu [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); D' Inzeo, M.; Franchi, G. [Age Scientific srl – Capezzano Pianore (Italy); Pazos Clemens, L. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-07-11

    We present the characterisation of an amplifier potentially interesting for noble liquid detectors. The design has been conceived considering the requirements of low power consumption (less than 30 mW), low noise, amplification factor of 10 at 100 MHz and use of commercial components. The amplifier has been integrated onto an electronic board with a voltage divider to operate an Hamamatsu R11410 photomultiplier tube (used in XENON1T, Aprile et al. (2014) [1] dark matter experiment).

  12. Characterization of a prototype matrix of Silicon PhotoMultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinu, N. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator (LAL), IN2P3-CNRS, 91898 Orsay (France)], E-mail: dinu@lal.in2p3.fr; Barrillon, P.; Bazin, C. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator (LAL), IN2P3-CNRS, 91898 Orsay (France); Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Fermi' , 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Bondil-Blin, S. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator (LAL), IN2P3-CNRS, 91898 Orsay (France); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK-irst), 38050 Trento (Italy); Chaumat, V. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator (LAL), IN2P3-CNRS, 91898 Orsay (France); Collazuol, G. [Scuola Normale Superiore (SNS), 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); De La Taille, C. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator (LAL), IN2P3-CNRS, 91898 Orsay (France); Del Guerra, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Fermi' , 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Llosa, G. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Fermi' , 56127 Pisa (Italy); Marcatili, S. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Fermi' , 56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Melchiorri, M.; Piemonte, C. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK-irst), 38050 Trento (Italy); Puill, V. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator (LAL), IN2P3-CNRS, 91898 Orsay (France); Tarolli, A. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK-irst), 38050 Trento (Italy); Vagnucci, J.F. [Laboratory of Linear Accelerator (LAL), IN2P3-CNRS, 91898 Orsay (France); Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK-irst), 38050 Trento (Italy)

    2009-10-21

    This work reports on the electrical as well as the optical characterizations of a prototype matrix of Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM). The electrical test consists of the measurement of the static (breakdown voltage, quenching resistance, post-breakdown dark current) as well as the dynamic characteristics (gain, dark count rate). The optical test consists of the estimation of the photon detection efficiency as a function of wavelength as well as operation voltage.

  13. Characterization of a prototype matrix of Silicon PhotoMultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinu, N.; Barrillon, P.; Bazin, C.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G.; Bondil-Blin, S.; Boscardin, M.; Chaumat, V.; Collazuol, G.; De La Taille, C.; Del Guerra, A.; Llosa, G.; Marcatili, S.; Melchiorri, M.; Piemonte, C.; Puill, V.; Tarolli, A.; Vagnucci, J.F.; Zorzi, N.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on the electrical as well as the optical characterizations of a prototype matrix of Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM). The electrical test consists of the measurement of the static (breakdown voltage, quenching resistance, post-breakdown dark current) as well as the dynamic characteristics (gain, dark count rate). The optical test consists of the estimation of the photon detection efficiency as a function of wavelength as well as operation voltage.

  14. Batch production of microchannel plate photo-multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Henry J.; Wetstein, Matthew; Elagin, Andrey

    2018-03-06

    In-situ methods for the batch fabrication of flat-panel micro-channel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) detectors (MCP-PMTs), without transporting either the window or the detector assembly inside a vacuum vessel are provided. The method allows for the synthesis of a reflection-mode photocathode on the entrance to the pores of a first MCP or the synthesis of a transmission-mode photocathode on the vacuum side of a photodetector entrance window.

  15. A small animal PET prototype based on Silicon Photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcatili, S; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G.; Del Guerra, A.; Collazuol, G.; Pedreschi, E.; Spinella, F.; Sportelli, G.; Marzocca, C.

    2011-01-01

    Next generation PET scanners should full fill very high requirements in terms of spatial, energy and timing resolution. Modern scanner performances are inherently limited by the use of standard photomultiplier tubes. The use of Silicon Photomultiplier (Si P M) matrices is proposed for the construction of a small animal PET system consisting of two detector heads based on Lyso continuos crystals. The use of large area multi-pixel Silicon Photomultiplier (Si P M) detectors requires the development of a multichannel Digital Acquisition system (DAQ) as well as of a dedicated front-end in order not to degrade the intrinsic detector capabilities. At the University of Pisa and INFN Pisa we developed a DAQ board for the read-out of 2 64-pixel Si P M matrices in time coincidence for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) applications. The proof of principles is based on 64-pixel detectors, but the whole system has been conceived to be easily scalable to a higher number of channels. Here we describe the Group-V INFN DASi P M 2 (Development and Application of Si P M) project and related results.

  16. Real-time algorithm for acoustic imaging with a microphone array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xun

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic phased array has become an important testing tool in aeroacoustic research, where the conventional beamforming algorithm has been adopted as a classical processing technique. The computation however has to be performed off-line due to the expensive cost. An innovative algorithm with real-time capability is proposed in this work. The algorithm is similar to a classical observer in the time domain while extended for the array processing to the frequency domain. The observer-based algorithm is beneficial mainly for its capability of operating over sampling blocks recursively. The expensive experimental time can therefore be reduced extensively since any defect in a testing can be corrected instantaneously.

  17. MOS solid-state detector arrays for x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppel, L.N.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of MOS detector arrays were used to sense directly patterns of soft x-rays, in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory experimental laser-fusion program. A linear self-scanning photodiode array (SSPA) is used in a wave-length-dispersive spectrometer. A frame transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) facilitates the use of an x-ray microscope. Measurements and calculations of the x-ray sensitivity of these devices are presented. Their linearity and dynamic range are discussed, as well as data recovery systems for each detector. Experiences in using these devices to detect pulses of x-rays in laser-fusion experiments are described

  18. OpenMSI Arrayed Analysis Toolkit: Analyzing Spatially Defined Samples Using Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Raad, Markus; de Rond, Tristan; Rübel, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    ://openmsinersc.gov), a platform for storing, sharing, and analyzing MSI data. By using a web-based python notebook (Jupyter), OMAAT is accessible to anyone without programming experience yet allows experienced users to leverage all features. OMAAT was :evaluated by analyzing an MSI data set of a high-throughput glycoside...... processing tools for the analysis of large arrayed MSI sample sets. The OpenMSI Arrayed Analysis Toolkit (OMAAT) is a software package that addresses the challenges of analyzing spatially defined samples in MSI data sets. OMAAT is written in Python and is integrated with OpenMSI (http...

  19. A novel Silicon Photomultiplier with bulk integrated quench resistors: utilization in optical detection and tracking applications for particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovics, Stefan, E-mail: stp@hll.mpg.de [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck Gesellschaft, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany); Andricek, Ladislav [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck Gesellschaft, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany); Diehl, Inge; Hansen, Karsten [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jendrysik, Christian [Infineon Technologies AG, Am Campeon 1-12, D-85579 Neubiberg (Germany); Krueger, Katja [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Lehmann, Raik; Ninkovic, Jelena [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck Gesellschaft, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany); Reckleben, Christian [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Richter, Rainer; Schaller, Gerhard; Schopper, Florian [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck Gesellschaft, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany); Sefkow, Felix [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-02-11

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are a promising candidate for replacing conventional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in many applications, thanks to ongoing developments and advances in their technology. Conventional SiPMs are generally an array of avalanche photo diodes, operated in Geiger mode and read out in parallel, thus leading to the necessity of a high ohmic quenching resistor. This resistor enables passive quenching and is usually located on top of the array, limiting the fill factor of the device. In this paper, a novel detector concept with a bulk integrated quenching resistor will be recapped. In addition, due to other advantages of this novel detector design, a new concept, in which these devices will be utilized as tracking detectors for particle physics applications will be introduced, as well as first simulation studies and experimental measurements of this new approach. - Highlights: • A novel SiPM concept with bulk integrated quenching resistor is shown. • First prototypes of these SiPMs as tracking detectors are proposed. • Simulations of the Geiger efficiency suggest feasible operations at low overbias. • First measurements of the electron detection efficiency show promising results. • Measurements are in good agreement with the simulations.

  20. An integrated circuit with transmit beamforming flip-chip bonded to a 2-D CMUT array for 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wygant, Ira O; Jamal, Nafis S; Lee, Hyunjoo J; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Karaman, Mustafa; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2009-10-01

    State-of-the-art 3-D medical ultrasound imaging requires transmitting and receiving ultrasound using a 2-D array of ultrasound transducers with hundreds or thousands of elements. A tight combination of the transducer array with integrated circuitry eliminates bulky cables connecting the elements of the transducer array to a separate system of electronics. Furthermore, preamplifiers located close to the array can lead to improved receive sensitivity. A combined IC and transducer array can lead to a portable, high-performance, and inexpensive 3-D ultrasound imaging system. This paper presents an IC flip-chip bonded to a 16 x 16-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array for 3-D ultrasound imaging. The IC includes a transmit beamformer that generates 25-V unipolar pulses with programmable focusing delays to 224 of the 256 transducer elements. One-shot circuits allow adjustment of the pulse widths for different ultrasound transducer center frequencies. For receiving reflected ultrasound signals, the IC uses the 32-elements along the array diagonals. The IC provides each receiving element with a low-noise 25-MHz-bandwidth transimpedance amplifier. Using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) clocked at 100 MHz to operate the IC, the IC generated properly timed transmit pulses with 5-ns accuracy. With the IC flip-chip bonded to a CMUT array, we show that the IC can produce steered and focused ultrasound beams. We present 2-D and 3-D images of a wire phantom and 2-D orthogonal cross-sectional images (Bscans) of a latex heart phantom.

  1. Imaging of the dynamic magnetic structure in a parallel array of shunted Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doderer, T.; Kaplunenko, V. K.; Mygind, Jesper

    1994-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) parallel array of shunted Josephson junctions is one of the basic elements in the family of rapid single-flux quantum logic circuits. It was found recently that current steps always show up in the current-voltage curve of the generator junction when an additional bias current...

  2. Array Design: Literature Survey For A High-Resolution Imaging Sonal System. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    radioastronomy or microwave arrays, or it may be elastic or acoustic (same as elastic but .-estricted to fields specified by a scalar quantity). There is...these are direction cosines (or sines) (see Ziomek 1985, or a radioastronomy book such as Perley et al. 1989). This 0 is because the Fourier

  3. Multistatic Array Sampling Scheme for Fast Near-Field Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    human-sized scene in 0.048sec− 0.101sec. Index Terms—Microwave imaging, multistatic radar, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). I. INTRODUCTION Near-field...configuration, but its computational demands are extreme. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) imaging has long been used to efficiently construct images sampled...with the block diagram depicted in Fig. 4. It is noted that the multistatic to monostatic correction is valid over a finite imaging domain. However, as

  4. Muon counting using silicon photomultipliers in the AMIGA detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Navas, S.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollant, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valbuena-Delgado, A.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2017-03-01

    AMIGA (Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array) is an upgrade of the Pierre Auger Observatory designed to extend its energy range of detection and to directly measure the muon content of the cosmic ray primary particle showers. The array will be formed by an infill of surface water-Cherenkov detectors associated with buried scintillation counters employed for muon counting. Each counter is composed of three scintillation modules, with a 10 m2 detection area per module. In this paper, a new generation of detectors, replacing the current multi-pixel photomultiplier tube (PMT) with silicon photo sensors (aka. SiPMs), is proposed. The selection of the new device and its front-end electronics is explained. A method to calibrate the counting system that ensures the performance of the detector is detailed. This method has the advantage of being able to be carried out in a remote place such as the one where the detectors are deployed. High efficiency results, i.e. 98% efficiency for the highest tested overvoltage, combined with a low probability of accidental counting (~2%), show a promising performance for this new system.

  5. An innovative silicon photomultiplier digitizing camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, M. [DPNC-Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Schioppa, E. Jr; Porcelli, A.; Pujadas, I.T.; Della Volpe, D.; Montaruli, T.; Cadoux, F.; Favre, Y.; Christov, A.; Rameez, M.; Miranda, L.D.M. [DPNC-Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Zietara, K.; Idzkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Ostrowski, M.; Stawarz, L.; Zagdanski, A. [Jagellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Aguilar, J.A. [DPNC-Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Universite Libre Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, Brussels (Belgium); Prandini, E.; Lyard, E.; Neronov, A.; Walter, R. [Universite de Geneve, Department of Astronomy, Geneva (Switzerland); Rajda, P.; Bilnik, W.; Kasperek, J.; Lalik, K.; Wiecek, M. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Blocki, J.; Mach, E.; Michalowski, J.; Niemiec, J.; Skowron, K.; Stodulski, M. [Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej im. H. Niewodniczanskiego Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Krakow (Poland); Bogacz, L. [Jagiellonian University, Department of Information Technologies, Krakow (Poland); Borkowski, J.; Frankowski, A.; Janiak, M.; Moderski, R. [Polish Academy of Science, Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw (Poland); Bulik, T.; Grudzinska, M. [University of Warsaw, Astronomical Observatory, Warsaw (Poland); Mandat, D.; Pech, M.; Schovanek, P. [Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Marszalek, A.; Stodulska, M. [Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej im. H. Niewodniczanskiego Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Krakow (Poland); Jagellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Pasko, P.; Seweryn, K. [Centrum Badan Kosmicznych Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Warsaw (Poland); Sliusar, V. [Universite de Geneve, Department of Astronomy, Geneva (Switzerland); Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Astronomical Observatory, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2017-01-15

    The single-mirror small-size telescope (SST-1M) is one of the three proposed designs for the small-size telescopes (SSTs) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project. The SST-1M will be equipped with a 4 m-diameter segmented reflector dish and an innovative fully digital camera based on silicon photo-multipliers. Since the SST sub-array will consist of up to 70 telescopes, the challenge is not only to build telescopes with excellent performance, but also to design them so that their components can be commissioned, assembled and tested by industry. In this paper we review the basic steps that led to the design concepts for the SST-1M camera and the ongoing realization of the first prototype, with focus on the innovative solutions adopted for the photodetector plane and the readout and trigger parts of the camera. In addition, we report on results of laboratory measurements on real scale elements that validate the camera design and show that it is capable of matching the CTA requirements of operating up to high moonlight background conditions. (orig.)

  6. Simultaneous molecular and anatomical imaging of the mouse in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Meadors, A Ken; Silverman, Robert W; Cherry, Simon R

    2002-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging technologies are opening up new windows into mouse biology. We have developed a mouse imaging system that integrates positron emission tomography (PET) with x-ray computed tomography (CT), allowing simultaneous anatomic and molecular imaging in vivo with the potential for precise registration of the two image volumes. The x-ray system consists of a compact mini-focal x-ray tube and an amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector with a low-noise CMOS readout. The PET system uses planar arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillator coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. We describe the design of this dual-modality imaging system and show, for the first time, simultaneously acquired PET and CT images in a phantom and in mice

  7. Simultaneous molecular and anatomical imaging of the mouse in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertzen, Andrew L [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Meadors, A Ken [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Silverman, Robert W [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cherry, Simon R [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2002-12-21

    Non-invasive imaging technologies are opening up new windows into mouse biology. We have developed a mouse imaging system that integrates positron emission tomography (PET) with x-ray computed tomography (CT), allowing simultaneous anatomic and molecular imaging in vivo with the potential for precise registration of the two image volumes. The x-ray system consists of a compact mini-focal x-ray tube and an amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector with a low-noise CMOS readout. The PET system uses planar arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillator coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. We describe the design of this dual-modality imaging system and show, for the first time, simultaneously acquired PET and CT images in a phantom and in mice.

  8. Imaging, object detection, and change detection with a polarized multistatic GPR array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W.

    2015-07-21

    A polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection factoring in the orientation of an object relative to the orientation of transceivers. The polarized detection system may operate on one of several modes of operation based on whether the imaging, object detection, or change detection is performed separately for each transceiver orientation. In combined change mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines changes across polarizations. In combined object mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging and object detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines objects across polarizations and performs change detection on the result. In combined image mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines images across polarizations and performs object detection followed by change detection on the result.

  9. MRI of the wrist at 7 tesla using an eight-channel array coil combined with parallel imaging: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gregory; Friedrich, Klaus M; Wang, Ligong; Vieira, Renata L R; Schweitzer, Mark E; Recht, Michael P; Wiggins, Graham C; Regatte, Ravinder R

    2010-03-01

    To determine the feasibility of performing MRI of the wrist at 7 Tesla (T) with parallel imaging and to evaluate how acceleration factors (AF) affect signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and image quality. This study had institutional review board approval. A four-transmit eight-receive channel array coil was constructed in-house. Nine healthy subjects were scanned on a 7T whole-body MR scanner. Coronal and axial images of cartilage and trabecular bone micro-architecture (3D-Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) with and without fat suppression, repetition time/echo time = 20 ms/4.5 ms, flip angle = 10 degrees , 0.169-0.195 x 0.169-0.195 mm, 0.5-1 mm slice thickness) were obtained with AF 1, 2, 3, 4. T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE), proton density-weighted FSE, and multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) sequences were also performed. SNR and CNR were measured. Three musculoskeletal radiologists rated image quality. Linear correlation analysis and paired t-tests were performed. At higher AF, SNR and CNR decreased linearly for cartilage, muscle, and trabecular bone (r < -0.98). At AF 4, reductions in SNR/CNR were:52%/60% (cartilage), 72%/63% (muscle), 45%/50% (trabecular bone). Radiologists scored images with AF 1 and 2 as near-excellent, AF 3 as good-to-excellent (P = 0.075), and AF 4 as average-to-good (P = 0.11). It is feasible to perform high resolution 7T MRI of the wrist with parallel imaging. SNR and CNR decrease with higher AF, but image quality remains above-average.

  10. High-throughput live-imaging of embryos in microwell arrays using a modular specimen mounting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoughe, Seth; Kim, Chiyoung; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2018-04-30

    High-throughput live-imaging of embryos is an essential technique in developmental biology, but it is difficult and costly to mount and image embryos in consistent conditions. Here, we present OMMAwell, a simple, reusable device to easily mount dozens of embryos in arrays of agarose microwells with customizable dimensions and spacing. OMMAwell can be configured to mount specimens for upright or inverted microscopes, and includes a reservoir to hold live-imaging medium to maintain constant moisture and osmolarity of specimens during time-lapse imaging. All device components can be fabricated by cutting pieces from a sheet of acrylic using a laser cutter or by making them with a 3D printer. We demonstrate how to design a custom mold and use it to live-image dozens of embryos at a time. We include descriptions, schematics, and design files for 13 additional molds for nine animal species, including most major traditional laboratory models and a number of emerging model systems. Finally, we provide instructions for researchers to customize OMMAwell inserts for embryos or tissues not described herein. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. A rapid compression technique for 4-D functional MRI images using data rearrangement and modified binary array techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma Vetri Selvi, G; Nadarajan, R

    2015-12-01

    Compression techniques are vital for efficient storage and fast transfer of medical image data. The existing compression techniques take significant amount of time for performing encoding and decoding and hence the purpose of compression is not fully satisfied. In this paper a rapid 4-D lossy compression method constructed using data rearrangement, wavelet-based contourlet transformation and a modified binary array technique has been proposed for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) images. In the proposed method, the image slices of fMRI data are rearranged so that the redundant slices form a sequence. The image sequence is then divided into slices and transformed using wavelet-based contourlet transform (WBCT). In WBCT, the high frequency sub-band obtained from wavelet transform is further decomposed into multiple directional sub-bands by directional filter bank to obtain more directional information. The relationship between the coefficients has been changed in WBCT as it has more directions. The differences in parent–child relationships are handled by a repositioning algorithm. The repositioned coefficients are then subjected to quantization. The quantized coefficients are further compressed by modified binary array technique where the most frequently occurring value of a sequence is coded only once. The proposed method has been experimented with fMRI images the results indicated that the processing time of the proposed method is less compared to existing wavelet-based set partitioning in hierarchical trees and set partitioning embedded block coder (SPECK) compression schemes [1]. The proposed method could also yield a better compression performance compared to wavelet-based SPECK coder. The objective results showed that the proposed method could gain good compression ratio in maintaining a peak signal noise ratio value of above 70 for all the experimented sequences. The SSIM value is equal to 1 and the value of CC is greater than 0.9 for all

  12. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUN AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY PROTOTYPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, Lynn D.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Benkevitch, Leonid; Cairns, Iver H.; Lobzin, Vasili; Emrich, David; Wayth, Randall B.; Arcus, Wayne; Morgan, Edward H.; Williams, Christopher; Prabu, T.; Vedantham, Harish; Williams, Andrew; White, Stephen M.; Allen, G.; Barnes, David; Bernardi, Gianni; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, Frank H.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9- 201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of 'low' to 'medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low-frequency radio interferometers come online over the next few years.

  13. Friction Stir Weld Inspection Through Conductivity Imaging Using Shaped Field MWM(Registered Trademark) - Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfine, Neil; Grundy, David; Zilberstein, Vladimir; Kinchen, David G.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welds (FSW) of Al 2195-T8 and Al 2219-T8, provided by Lockheed Martin Michoud Operations, were inspected for lack-of-penetration (LOP) defects using a custom designed MWM-Array, a multi-element eddy-current sensor. MWM (registered trademark) electrical conductivity mapping demonstrated high sensitivity to LOP as small as 0.75 mm (0.03 in.), as confirmed by metallographic data that characterized the extent of LOP defects. High sensitivity and high spatial resolution was achieved via a 37-element custom designed MWM-Array allowing LOP detection using the normalized longitudinal component of the MWM measured conductivity. This permitted both LOP detection and correlation of MWM conductivity features with the LOP defect size, as changes in conductivity were apparently associated with metallurgical features within the near-surface layer of the LOP defect zone. MWM conductivity mapping reveals information similar to macro-etching as the MWM-Array is sensitive to small changes in conductivity due to changes in microstructure associated with material thermal processing, in this case welding. The electrical conductivity measured on the root side of FSWs varies across the weld due to microstructural differences introduced by the FSW process, as well as those caused by planar flaws. Weld metal, i.e., dynamically recrystallized zone (DXZ), thermomechanically affected zone (TMZ), heat-affected zone (HAZ), and parent metal (PM) are all evident in the conductivity maps. While prior efforts had met with limited success for NDE (Nondestructive Evaluation) of dissimilar alloy, Al2219 to Al2195 FSW, the new custom designed multi-element MWM-Array achieved detection of all LOP defects even in dissimilar metal welds.

  14. Externally mounted radioactivity detector for MWD employing radial inline scintillator and photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, J.E.; Mumby, E.S.; Groeschel, V.E.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radioactivity well logging may be achieved by mounting a scintillator and photomultiplier tube in a single case interfacing with a hole extending through a drill collar at the lower end of a drill string so that measurements can be made while drilling. Radioactive sources (when required for well logging) are mounted in cavities which open to the exterior of the drill collar. Light from the scintillator is coupled directly to the aligned photomultiplier tube both of which are mounted in a case extending radially within the drill collar and sealingly engaging an electronics housing within the drill collar and the drill collar wall surrounding the hole. The scintillator is of greater diameter than the photomultiplier tube. A frustoconical light pipe connects the scintillator and the photomultiplier tube, channeling scintillation in the crystal to the photomultiplier to provide an amplified detection capability over that for a scintillator having the same diameter as the photomultiplier tube. (author)

  15. Characterization and optimization of Silicon Photomultipliers and small size scintillator tiles for future calorimeter applications

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2095312; Horváth, Ákos

    For the active layers of highly granular sampling calorimeters, small scintillator tiles read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) can be an interesting and cost effective alternative to silicon sensors. At CERN a test setup was realized for the development of new generations of calorimeters to characterize new types of Silicon Photomultipliers in terms of gain, noise, afterpulses and crosstalk and to study the impact of scintillator wrappings and the tile size on the measured light yield and uniformity. In this thesis work, the experimental setup is described and the steps for commissioning the equipment are discussed. Then, the temperature dependence of the Silicon Photomultiplier response will be investigated, including the dependence of bare Silicon Photomultipliers as well as Silicon Photomultipliers coupled to scintillator tiles. Finally, the tile-photomultiplier response for different tile sizes and coating options will be evaluated. The experimental setup will be extended to allow for the characteri...

  16. Limitations of Phased Array Beamforming in Open Rotor Noise Source Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane; Podboy, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    Phased array beamforming results of the F31/A31 historical baseline counter-rotating open rotor blade set were investigated for measurement data taken on the NASA Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Propulsion Rig in the 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel of NASA Glenn Research Center as well as data produced using the LINPROP open rotor tone noise code. The planar microphone array was positioned broadside and parallel to the axis of the open rotor, roughly 2.3 rotor diameters away. The results provide insight as to why the apparent noise sources of the blade passing frequency tones and interaction tones appear at their nominal Mach radii instead of at the actual noise sources, even if those locations are not on the blades. Contour maps corresponding to the sound fields produced by the radiating sound waves, taken from the simulations, are used to illustrate how the interaction patterns of circumferential spinning modes of rotating coherent noise sources interact with the phased array, often giving misleading results, as the apparent sources do not always show where the actual noise sources are located. This suggests that a more sophisticated source model would be required to accurately locate the sources of each tone. The results of this study also have implications with regard to the shielding of open rotor sources by airframe empennages.

  17. Comparative study of fast T 2-weighted images using respiratory triggered, breath-hold, fat suppression and phased array multi coil for liver evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbehusen, Cristiane L.; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Palacio, Glaucia A.S.; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare both qualitatively and quantitatively six T 2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences varying the respiratory compensation technique, associating or not fat tissue suppression and using different types of coils. We performed a prospective study of 71 consecutive patients that were submitted to MRI of the liver using a 1.5 T magnet. The six following pulse sequences were used: fat-suppressed respiratory triggered with conventional body coil; breath-hold fat-suppressed with conventional body coil; non-suppressed respiratory triggered with conventional body coil; breath-hold non fat-suppressed with conventional body coil; fat-suppressed respiratory triggered with phased-array multi coil; breath-hold fat-suppressed with phased-array multi coil. Images were analyzed quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratios and qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of hepatic contours, visibility of intrahepatic vessels and other segmental landmarks, and the presence of artifacts. Results: the qualitative analysis showed that the mean values obtained with the six sequences were 7.8, 4.6, 7.9, 5.2, 6.7 and 4.6 respectively. The respiratory-triggered sequences were better than the breath-hold sequences in both qualitative and quantitative analysis (p < 0.001). No significant differences in the values of signal-to-noise ratios and in overall image quality were found between the sequences with and without fat suppression (p . 0.05). The sequences using the body coil were similar in terms of image quality (p . 0.05) and better regarding signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained with the phased=array multi coil (p ,0.001). Our qualitative and quantitative results suggest that the best MRI sequences for the valuation of the liver are the sequences with respiratory triggering using a conventional body coil, with or without fat suppression. (author)

  18. INFN Camera demonstrator for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosi, G; Aramo, C.; Bertucci, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bitossi, M.; Brasolin, S.; Busetto, G.; Carosi, R.; Catalanotti, S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Consoletti, R.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Giulio, C.; Doro, M.; D'Urso, D.; Ferraro, G.; Ferrarotto, F.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giraudo, G.; Iacovacci, M.; Ionica, M.; Iori, M.; Longo, F.; Mariotti, M.; Mastroianni, S.; Minuti, M.; Morselli, A.; Paoletti, R.; Pauletta, G.; Rando, R.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Rugliancich, A.; Simone, D.; Stella, C.; Tonachini, A.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vagelli, V.; Verzi, V.; Vigorito, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array is a world-wide project for a new generation of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes of the Imaging class with the aim of exploring the highest energy region of the electromagnetic spectrum. With two planned arrays, one for each hemisphere, it will guarantee a good sky coverage in the energy range from a few tens of GeV to hundreds of TeV, with improved angular resolution and a sensitivity in the TeV energy region better by one order of magnitude than the currently operating arrays. In order to cover this wide energy range, three different telescope types are envisaged, with different mirror sizes and focal plane features. In particular, for the highest energies a possible design is a dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical scheme, with a compact focal plane. A silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based camera is being proposed as a solution to match the dimensions of the pixel (angular size of ~ 0.17 degrees). INFN is developing a camera demonstrator made by 9 Photo Sensor Modules (PSMs...

  19. 5@5 - A 5 GeV Energy Threshold Array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes at 5 km Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonian, F. A.; Konopelko, A. K.; Voelk, H. J.; Quintana, H.

    2000-10-01

    We discuss the concept and the performance of 5@5 - a stereoscopic array of several large imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes installed at a very high mountain elevation of about 5 km a.s.l. or more - for the study of the gamma-ray sky at energies from several GeV to 100 GeV. With its capability to detect the ``standard'' EGRET sources with spectra extending up to 10 GeV in exposure times from 1 to 103 seconds, such a detector may serve as an ideal "Gamma-Ray Timing Explorer" for the study of transient non-thermal phenomena like gamma-radiation from AGN jets, synchrotron flares of microquasars, the high energy (GeV) counterparts of Gamma Ray Bursts, etc. Such an instrument would also allow detailed studies of the spectral characteristics of persistent gamma-ray sources like pulsars, supernova remnants, plerions, radiogalaxies, etc, in the energy region between 10 GeV and 100 GeV, where the capabilities of both the current space-based and ground-based gamma-ray projects are quite limited. The existing technological achievements in the design and construction of multi (1000) pixel, high resolution imagers, as well as of large, 20 m diameter class multi-mirror dishes with rather modest optical requirements, would allow the construction of the "5@5" in a foreseeable future. The Llano de Chajnantor (or the neighboring Cerro Toco) in the Atacama desert of Northern Chile seems an ideal site for such a ``post - CANGAROO/H.E.S.S./MAGIC/VERITAS'' era ground-based gamma-ray detector. The large flat area of that site, which was recently chosen for the installation of one of the most powerful future astronomical instruments - the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) - could accomodate also an additional Cherenkov telescope array which requires a relatively compact area with a radius of about 100 m.

  20. Fully digital routing logic for single-photon avalanche diode arrays in highly efficient time-resolved imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominelli, Alessandro; Acconcia, Giulia; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan

    2018-03-01

    Time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) is a powerful optical technique, which permits recording fast luminous signals with picosecond precision. Unfortunately, given its repetitive nature, TCSPC is recognized as a relatively slow technique, especially when a large time-resolved image has to be recorded. In recent years, there has been a fast trend toward the development of TCPSC imagers. Unfortunately, present systems still suffer from a trade-off between number of channels and performance. Even worse, the overall measurement speed is still limited well below the saturation of the transfer bandwidth toward the external processor. We present a routing algorithm that enables a smart connection between a 32×32 detector array and five shared high-performance converters able to provide an overall conversion rate up to 10 Gbit/s. The proposed solution exploits a fully digital logic circuit distributed in a tree structure to limit the number and length of interconnections, which is a major issue in densely integrated circuits. The behavior of the logic has been validated by means of a field-programmable gate array, while a fully integrated prototype has been designed in 180-nm technology and analyzed by means of postlayout simulations.

  1. Non-descanned multifocal multiphoton microscopy with a multianode photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Jae Won; Yew, Elijah Y. S.; Kim, Daekeun; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) improves imaging speed over a point scanning approach by parallelizing the excitation process. Early versions of MMM relied on imaging detectors to record emission signals from multiple foci simultaneously. For many turbid biological specimens, the scattering of emission photons results in blurred images and degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have recently demonstrated that a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) placed in a descanned configuration can effectively collect scattered emission photons from each focus into their corresponding anodes significantly improving image SNR for highly scattering specimens. Unfortunately, a descanned MMM has a longer detection path resulting in substantial emission photon loss. Optical design constraints in a descanned geometry further results in significant optical aberrations especially for large field-of-view (FOV), high NA objectives. Here, we introduce a non-descanned MMM based on MAPMT that substantially overcomes most of these drawbacks. We show that we improve signal efficiency up to fourfold with limited image SNR degradation due to scattered emission photons. The excitation foci can also be spaced wider to cover the full FOV of the objective with minimal aberrations. The performance of this system is demonstrated by imaging interneuron morphological structures deep in the brains of living mice

  2. Non-descanned multifocal multiphoton microscopy with a multianode photomultiplier tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jae Won; Yew, Elijah Y. S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, Daekeun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dankook University (Korea, Republic of); Subramanian, Jaichandar [Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Nedivi, Elly [Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); So, Peter T. C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) improves imaging speed over a point scanning approach by parallelizing the excitation process. Early versions of MMM relied on imaging detectors to record emission signals from multiple foci simultaneously. For many turbid biological specimens, the scattering of emission photons results in blurred images and degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have recently demonstrated that a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) placed in a descanned configuration can effectively collect scattered emission photons from each focus into their corresponding anodes significantly improving image SNR for highly scattering specimens. Unfortunately, a descanned MMM has a longer detection path resulting in substantial emission photon loss. Optical design constraints in a descanned geometry further results in significant optical aberrations especially for large field-of-view (FOV), high NA objectives. Here, we introduce a non-descanned MMM based on MAPMT that substantially overcomes most of these drawbacks. We show that we improve signal efficiency up to fourfold with limited image SNR degradation due to scattered emission photons. The excitation foci can also be spaced wider to cover the full FOV of the objective with minimal aberrations. The performance of this system is demonstrated by imaging interneuron morphological structures deep in the brains of living mice.

  3. Study of a high gain microchannel plate photomultiplier having low statistical gain fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audier, M.

    1980-12-01

    A new photomultiplier configuration which synthesizes the performances of several models is proposed. The principles of microchannel plate photomultipliers are reviewed. The physical phenomena which limit the electron multiplication process in a microchannel and the detection efficiency of the microchannel plates are investigated. The operation of a herring-bone pattern device and of a system of two microchannel plate photomultipliers are described and characterized [fr

  4. Performance of 8- and 12-dynode stage multianode photo-multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibby, J.H. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Buckley, A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Chamonal, R.J.U. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: chamonal@ph.ed.ac.uk; Easo, S. [CCLRC, Rutherford Aplleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Eisenhardt, S. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Gibson, V. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Harnew, N. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Muheim, F. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Howard, A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Lawrence, J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Pickford, A. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Plackett, R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Price, D.R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Rademacker, J. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Smale, N. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Soler, F.J.P. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); CCLRC, Rutherford Aplleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Somerville, L. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Storey, J. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Websdale, D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Wotton, S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-01

    We report on studies of 64-channel Multianode Photo-Multiplier Tubes (MaPMTs) as photo-detectors for Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) counters. The newly available 8-dynode stage MaPMT was tested in particle beams at CERN. The MaPMT signals were read out directly with the Beetle1.2 chip which was designed for the LHCb environment and operates at 40MHz. The photon yield and signal losses were determined for a cluster of 3x3 close-packed MaPMTs. The performance of the 8-dynode stage MaPMT was compared to that of the 12-dynode stage MaPMT which has a larger intrinsic gain.

  5. HARDWARE REALIZATION OF CANNY EDGE DETECTION ALGORITHM FOR UNDERWATER IMAGE SEGMENTATION USING FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEX RAJ S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Underwater images raise new challenges in the field of digital image processing technology in recent years because of its widespread applications. There are many tangled matters to be considered in processing of images collected from water medium due to the adverse effects imposed by the environment itself. Image segmentation is preferred as basal stage of many digital image processing techniques which distinguish multiple segments in an image and reveal the hidden crucial information required for a peculiar application. There are so many general purpose algorithms and techniques that have been developed for image segmentation. Discontinuity based segmentation are most promising approach for image segmentation, in which Canny Edge detection based segmentation is more preferred for its high level of noise immunity and ability to tackle underwater environment. Since dealing with real time underwater image segmentation algorithm, which is computationally complex enough, an efficient hardware implementation is to be considered. The FPGA based realization of the referred segmentation algorithm is presented in this paper.

  6. Image processing system design for microcantilever-based optical readout infrared arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qiang; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Gong, Cheng; Liu, Xiaohua; Yu, Xiaomei; Yang, Lei; Liu, Weiyu

    2012-12-01

    Compared with the traditional infrared imaging technology, the new type of optical-readout uncooled infrared imaging technology based on MEMS has many advantages, such as low cost, small size, producing simple. In addition, the theory proves that the technology's high thermal detection sensitivity. So it has a very broad application prospects in the field of high performance infrared detection. The paper mainly focuses on an image capturing and processing system in the new type of optical-readout uncooled infrared imaging technology based on MEMS. The image capturing and processing system consists of software and hardware. We build our image processing core hardware platform based on TI's high performance DSP chip which is the TMS320DM642, and then design our image capturing board based on the MT9P031. MT9P031 is Micron's company high frame rate, low power consumption CMOS chip. Last we use Intel's company network transceiver devices-LXT971A to design the network output board. The software system is built on the real-time operating system DSP/BIOS. We design our video capture driver program based on TI's class-mini driver and network output program based on the NDK kit for image capturing and processing and transmitting. The experiment shows that the system has the advantages of high capturing resolution and fast processing speed. The speed of the network transmission is up to 100Mbps.

  7. A Coded Aperture Compressive Imaging Array and Its Visual Detection and Tracking Algorithms for Surveillance Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanxiao Wu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an application of a compressive imaging system to the problem of wide-area video surveillance systems. A parallel coded aperture compressive imaging system is proposed to reduce the needed high resolution coded mask requirements and facilitate the storage of the projection matrix. Random Gaussian, Toeplitz and binary phase coded masks are utilized to obtain the compressive sensing images. The corresponding motion targets detection and tracking algorithms directly using the compressive sampling images are developed. A mixture of Gaussian distribution is applied in the compressive image space to model the background image and for foreground detection. For each motion target in the compressive sampling domain, a compressive feature dictionary spanned by target templates and noises templates is sparsely represented. An l1 optimization algorithm is used to solve the sparse coefficient of templates. Experimental results demonstrate that low dimensional compressed imaging representation is sufficient to determine spatial motion targets. Compared with the random Gaussian and Toeplitz phase mask, motion detection algorithms using a random binary phase mask can yield better detection results. However using random Gaussian and Toeplitz phase mask can achieve high resolution reconstructed image. Our tracking algorithm can achieve a real time speed that is up to 10 times faster than that of the l1 tracker without any optimization.

  8. Strategies for shortening the output pulse of silicon photomultipliers

    OpenAIRE

    Antoranz Canales, Pedro; Miranda Pantoja, José Miguel; Yebras Rivera, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    In this work, three strategies for shortening the output pulse of a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) are reported. The first strategy is passive filtering, where band-pass filtering removes the lowest frequency components in the signal, getting a noticeable reduction in pulse width (a compression ratio of 10: 1 was obtained). In the second place, a reflectometric scheme is proposed where the amplified signal coming from the SiPM is injected into a signal splitter with one of its stubs connected...

  9. Actively-stabilized photomultiplier tube base for vacuum operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, M.A; Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    An actively stabilized photomultiplier tube (PMT) base design for an Amperex XP-2262B PMT is described. Positive-negative-positive transistors are used as low-impedance current sources to maintain constant voltages on the last three dynodes. This technique results in a highly stable, low-power tube base ideal for use with low-duty-factor beams, such as those found at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Furthermore, because of the low power usage of this large design, these bases can be sealed in a heat-conductive, electrically insulating material and used in a vacuum

  10. Wide aperture scintillation hodoscope with FEU-143 photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, L.G.; Ivanov, M.A.; Karpukhin, V.V.; Komarov, V.I.; Kulikov, A.V.; Yazkov, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Scintillation hodoscopes with FEU-143 photomultipliers are described. Every of two hodoscopes consists of 8 elements each of length 1400 mm and cross section 56x56 mm. The time and amplitude characteristics were obtained in real conditions of the physical experiment at the Protvino U-70 accelerator. A resolution on time difference between hits of two hodoscopes is 224 ps. A separation of pions and protons by their ionization losses is also provided at momenta less than 1000 MeV/c. 5 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Fast readout of scintillating fibres using position-sensitive photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agoritsas, V.; Akchurin, N.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Bing, O.; Bravar, A.; Ditta, J.; Dufournaud, J.; Dyachenko, V.A.; Giacomich, R.; Gorin, A.M.; Kuroda, K.; Magaudda, D.; Newsom, C.; Okada, K.; Onel, Y.; Penzo, A.; Rakhmatov, V.Ye.; Rykalin, V.I.; Salvato, G.; Savin, A.A.; Schiavon, P.; Sillou, D.; Solovyov, Yu.A.; Takeutchi, F.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Vasilchenko, V.G.; Yoshida, T.; Zaychenko, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Major progress has recently been achieved in the fast readout of scintillating fibres using position-sensitive photomultipliers (PSPMs). Experimental results obtained with commercially available PSPMs already show a space resolution better than 200 μm, a time resolution of about 1.5 ns with a detection efficiency higher than 90%, and the possibility of separating double hits with a minimum distance of ∼3 mm. An upgrade of PSPMs based on new dynode structures is also in progress. Results obtained with one new PSPM prototype in a magnetic field are also presented. (orig.)

  12. Development of a solid-state multi-sensor array camera for real time imaging of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, D; Gaydecki, P; Quek, S; Torres, V

    2007-01-01

    The development of a real-time magnetic field imaging camera based on solid-state sensors is described. The final laboratory comprises a 2D array of 33 x 33 solid state, tri-axial magneto-inductive sensors, and is located within a large current-carrying coil. This may be excited to produce either a steady or time-varying magnetic field. Outputs from several rows of sensors are routed to a sub-master controller and all sub-masters route to a master-controller responsible for data coordination and signal pre-processing. The data are finally streamed to a host computer via a USB interface and the image generated and displayed at a rate of several frames per second. Accurate image generation is predicated on a knowledge of the sensor response, magnetic field perturbations and the nature of the target respecting permeability and conductivity. To this end, the development of the instrumentation has been complemented by extensive numerical modelling of field distribution patterns using boundary element methods. Although it was originally intended for deployment in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reinforced concrete, it was soon realised during the course of the work that the magnetic field imaging system had many potential applications, for example, in medicine, security screening, quality assurance (such as the food industry), other areas of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), designs associated with magnetic fields, teaching and research

  13. Development of a solid-state multi-sensor array camera for real time imaging of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, D.; Gaydecki, P.; Quek, S.; Torres, V.

    2007-07-01

    The development of a real-time magnetic field imaging camera based on solid-state sensors is described. The final laboratory comprises a 2D array of 33 x 33 solid state, tri-axial magneto-inductive sensors, and is located within a large current-carrying coil. This may be excited to produce either a steady or time-varying magnetic field. Outputs from several rows of sensors are routed to a sub-master controller and all sub-masters route to a master-controller responsible for data coordination and signal pre-processing. The data are finally streamed to a host computer via a USB interface and the image generated and displayed at a rate of several frames per second. Accurate image generation is predicated on a knowledge of the sensor response, magnetic field perturbations and the nature of the target respecting permeability and conductivity. To this end, the development of the instrumentation has been complemented by extensive numerical modelling of field distribution patterns using boundary element methods. Although it was originally intended for deployment in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reinforced concrete, it was soon realised during the course of the work that the magnetic field imaging system had many potential applications, for example, in medicine, security screening, quality assurance (such as the food industry), other areas of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), designs associated with magnetic fields, teaching and research.

  14. Construction of static 3D ultrasonography image by radiation beam tracking method from 1D array probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doh, Il; Kim, Yong Tae; Ahn, Bong Young [Center for Medical Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Youn [Meta biomed Co.,Ltd, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes the construction of a static 3D ultrasonography image by tracking the radiation beam position during the handy operation of a 1D array probe to enable point-of-care use. The theoretical model of the transformation from the translational and rotational information of the sensor mounted on the probe to the reference Cartesian coordinate system was given. The signal amplification and serial communication interface module was made using a commercially available sensor. A test phantom was also made using silicone putty in a donut shape. During the movement of the hand-held probe, B-mode movie and sensor signals were recorded. B-mode images were periodically selected from the movie, and the gray levels of the pixels for each image were converted to the gray levels of 3D voxels. 3D and 2D images of arbitrary cross-section of the B-mode type were also constructed from the voxel data, and agreed well with the shape of the test phantom.

  15. Proton-recoil proportional-counter array for neutron-image construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.L.; Eichholz, J.J.; DeVolpi, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel-motion measurement capability of the fast-neutron hodoscope has been upgraded by the addition of a 360-detector proton-recoil proportional-counter array, which detects high-energy fission neutrons. The current sensitive amplifier/discriminator module for each detector fits into a 12.7 by 12.7 by 102 mm package and cost less than $100 per module. It has a 50 ns rise time, a noise level of 100 nA, and a deadtime per event of 200 ns. Provision has been provided for the independent adjustment of the input current versus discriminator voltage for each module. The new proportional-counters cost approximately $400 each. Each detector has been tested to have the same gain versus voltage response. A space-charge model relating count-rate changes to space-charge effects has also been developed. The new detector array has been operational for approximately two years and has become the main detector system in fuel-motion analysis. It has significantly improved the linearity, stability, count-rate capability, and setup ease of the hodoscope

  16. Spirally-patterned pinhole arrays for long-term fluorescence cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon Ung; Kang, YooNa; Moon, SangJun; Lee, Won Gu

    2015-11-07

    Fluorescence cell imaging using a fluorescence microscope is an extensively used technique to examine the cell nucleus, internal structures, and other cellular molecules with fluorescence response time and intensity. However, it is difficult to perform high resolution cell imaging for a long period of time with this technique due to necrosis and apoptosis depending on the type and subcellular location of the damage caused by phototoxicity. A large number of studies have been performed to resolve this problem, but researchers have struggled to meet the challenge between cellular viability and image resolution. In this study, we employ a specially designed disc to reduce cell damage by controlling total fluorescence exposure time without deterioration of the image resolution. This approach has many advantages such as, the apparatus is simple, cost-effective, and easily integrated into the optical pathway through a conventional fluorescence microscope.

  17. Development of outdoor luminescence imaging for drone-based PV array inspection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Riedel, Nicholas; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    2017-01-01

    This work has the goal to examined experimentally PV module imaging methods under natural light conditions, that will be used in a fast, accurate and automatic drone-based inspection system for PV power plants.......This work has the goal to examined experimentally PV module imaging methods under natural light conditions, that will be used in a fast, accurate and automatic drone-based inspection system for PV power plants....

  18. Double-Stage Delay Multiply and Sum Beamforming Algorithm: Application to Linear-Array Photoacoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi; Adabi, Saba; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging medical imaging modality capable of providing high spatial resolution of Ultrasound (US) imaging and high contrast of optical imaging. Delay-and-Sum (DAS) is the most common beamforming algorithm in PAI. However, using DAS beamformer leads to low resolution images and considerable contribution of off-axis signals. A new paradigm namely delay-multiply-and-sum (DMAS), which was originally used as a reconstruction algorithm in confocal microwave imaging, was introduced to overcome the challenges in DAS. DMAS was used in PAI systems and it was shown that this algorithm results in resolution improvement and sidelobe degrading. However, DMAS is still sensitive to high levels of noise, and resolution improvement is not satisfying. Here, we propose a novel algorithm based on DAS algebra inside DMAS formula expansion, double stage DMAS (DS-DMAS), which improves the image resolution and levels of sidelobe, and is much less sensitive to high level of noise compared to DMAS. The performance of DS-DMAS algorithm is evaluated numerically and experimentally. The resulted images are evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively using established quality metrics including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) and contrast ratio (CR). It is shown that DS-DMAS outperforms DAS and DMAS at the expense of higher computational load. DS-DMAS reduces the lateral valley for about 15 dB and improves the SNR and FWHM better than 13% and 30%, respectively. Moreover, the levels of sidelobe are reduced for about 10 dB in comparison with those in DMAS.

  19. Towards Optical Partial Discharge Detection with Micro Silicon Photomultipliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ren

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical detection is reliable in intrinsically characterizing partial discharges (PDs. Because of the great volume and high-level power supply of the optical devices that can satisfy the requirements in photosensitivity, optical PD detection can merely be used in laboratory studies. To promote the practical application of the optical approach in an actual power apparatus, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM-based PD sensor is introduced in this paper, and its basic properties, which include the sensitivity, pulse resolution, correlation with PD severity, and electromagnetic (EM interference immunity, are experimentally evaluated. The stochastic phase-resolved PD pattern (PRPD for three typical insulation defects are obtained by SiPM PD detector and are compared with those obtained using a high-frequency current transformer (HFCT and a vacuum photomultiplier tube (PMT. Because of its good performances in the above aspects and its additional advantages, such as the small size, low power supply, and low cost, SiPM offers great potential in practical optical PD monitoring.

  20. Optimization of the digital Silicon Photomultiplier for Cherenkov light detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frach, T

    2012-01-01

    The Silicon Photomultiplier is a promising alternative to fast vacuum photodetectors. We developed a fully digital implementation of the Silicon Photomultiplier. The sensor is based on a single photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) integrated in a standard CMOS process. Photons are detected directly by sensing the voltage at the SPAD anode using a dedicated cell electronics block next to each diode. This block also contains active quenching and recharge circuits as well as a one bit memory for the selective inhibit of detector cells. A balanced trigger network is used to propagate the trigger signal from all cells to the integrated time-to-digital converter. Photons are detected and counted as digital signals, thus making the sensor less susceptible to temperature variations and electronic noise. The integration with CMOS logic has the added benefit of low power consumption and possible integration of data post-processing in the sensor. In this paper, we discuss the sensor architecture together with its characteristics, and its possible optimizations for applications requiring the detection of Cherenkov light.

  1. Characterization of three high efficiency and blue sensitive silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, Adam Nepomuk, E-mail: otte@gatech.edu; Garcia, Distefano; Nguyen, Thanh; Purushotham, Dhruv

    2017-02-21

    We report about the optical and electrical characterization of three high efficiency and blue sensitive Silicon photomultipliers from FBK, Hamamatsu, and SensL. Key features of the tested devices when operated at 90% breakdown probability are peak photon detection efficiencies between 40% and 55%, temperature dependencies of gain and PDE that are less than 1%/°C, dark rates of ∼50 kHz/mm{sup 2} at room temperature, afterpulsing of about 2%, and direct optical crosstalk between 6% and 20%. The characteristics of all three devices impressively demonstrate how the Silicon-photomultiplier technology has improved over the past ten years. It is further demonstrated how the voltage and temperature characteristics of a number of quantities can be parameterized on the basis of physical models. The models provide a deeper understanding of the device characteristics over a wide bias and temperature range. They also serve as examples how producers could provide the characteristics of their SiPMs to users. A standardized parameterization of SiPMs would enable users to find the optimal SiPM for their application and the operating point of SiPMs without having to perform measurements thus significantly reducing design and development cycles.

  2. Segmented Subduction Across the Juan De Fuca Plate: Challenges in Imaging with an Amphibious Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, W. B.; Allen, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Cascadia Initiative (CI) is an amphibious array spanning the Juan de Fuca plate from formation at the ridge to the destruction of the slab in the mantle beneath western North America. This ambitions project has occupied over 300 onshore and offshore sites, providing an unprecedented opportunity to understand the dynamics of oceanic plates. The CI project is now in its fourth and final year of deployment. Here we present constraints on the structure of the Juan de Fuca plate and its interaction with western North America. We identify segmentation along the Cascadia subduction zone that can be traced back onto the Juan de Fuca plate prior to subduction. These results give insight into the life cycle of oceanic plates, from their creation at a mid-ocean ridge to their subduction and subsequent recycling into the mantle.

  3. Real time image synthesis on a SIMD linear array processor: algorithms and architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letellier, Laurent

    1993-01-01

    Nowadays, image synthesis has become a widely used technique. The impressive computing power required for real time applications necessitates the use of parallel architectures. In this context, we evaluate an SIMD linear parallel architecture, SYMPATI2, dedicated to image processing. The objective of this study is to propose a cost-effective graphics accelerator relying on SYMPATI2's modular and programmable structure. The parallelization of basic image synthesis algorithms on SYMPATI2 enables us to determine its limits in this application field. These limits lead us to evaluate a new structure with a fast intercommunication network between processors, but processors have to support the message consistency, which brings about a strong decrease in performance. To solve this problem, we suggest a simple network whose access priorities are represented by tokens. The simulations of this new architecture indicate that the SIMD mode causes a drastic cut in parallelism. To cope with this drawback, we propose a context switching procedure which reduces the SIMD rigidity and increases the parallelism rate significantly. Then, the graphics accelerator we propose is compared with existing graphics workstations. This comparison indicates that our structure, which is able to accelerate both image synthesis and image processing, is competitive and well-suited for multimedia applications. (author) [fr

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensing device based on a piezoelectric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Abbi; Masamune, Ken; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Lamperth, Michael; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a widely used medical technique, one of the drawbacks of which is the loss of direct sense of touch during the operation. Palpation is the use of fingertips to explore and make fast assessments of tissue morphology. Although technologies are developed to equip minimally invasive surgery tools with haptic feedback capabilities, the majority focus on tissue stiffness profiling and tool-tissue interaction force measurement. For greatly increased diagnostic capability, a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensor design is proposed, which allows minimally invasive surgery to be performed under image guidance, combining the strong capability of magnetic resonance imaging soft tissue and intuitive palpation. The sensing unit is based on a piezoelectric sensor methodology, which conforms to the stringent mechanical and electrical design requirements imposed by the magnetic resonance environment The sensor mechanical design and the device integration to a 0.2 Tesla open magnetic resonance imaging scanner are described, together with the device's magnetic resonance compatibility testing. Its design limitations and potential future improvements are also discussed. A tactile sensing unit based on a piezoelectric sensor principle is proposed, which is designed for magnetic resonance imaging guided interventions.

  5. Identification and Quantification of Microplastics in Wastewater Using Focal Plane Array-Based Reflectance Micro-FT-IR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagg, Alexander S; Sapp, Melanie; Harrison, Jesse P; Ojeda, Jesús J

    2015-06-16

    Microplastics (microplastics in these matrices has not been investigated. Although efficient methods for the analysis of microplastics in sediment samples and marine organisms have been published, no methods have been developed for detecting these pollutants within organic-rich wastewater samples. In addition, there is no standardized method for analyzing microplastics isolated from environmental samples. In many cases, part of the identification protocol relies on visual selection before analysis, which is open to bias. In order to address this, a new method for the analysis of microplastics in wastewater was developed. A pretreatment step using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was employed to remove biogenic material, and focal plane array (FPA)-based reflectance micro-Fourier-transform (FT-IR) imaging was shown to successfully image and identify different microplastic types (polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon-6, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene). Microplastic-spiked wastewater samples were used to validate the methodology, resulting in a robust protocol which was nonselective and reproducible (the overall success identification rate was 98.33%). The use of FPA-based micro-FT-IR spectroscopy also provides a considerable reduction in analysis time compared with previous methods, since samples that could take several days to be mapped using a single-element detector can now be imaged in less than 9 h (circular filter with a diameter of 47 mm). This method for identifying and quantifying microplastics in wastewater is likely to provide an essential tool for further research into the pathways by which microplastics enter the environment.

  6. A programmable systolic array correlator as a trigger processor for electron pairs in rich (ring image Cherenkov) counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männer, R.

    1989-12-01

    This paper describes a systolic array processor for a ring image Cherenkov counter which is capable of identifying pairs of electron circles with a known radius and a certain minimum distance within 15 μs. The processor is a very flexible and fast device. It consists of 128 x 128 processing elements (PEs), where one PE is assigned to each pixel of the image. All PEs run synchronously at 40 MHz. The identification of electron circles is done by correlating the detector image with the proper circle circumference. Circle centers are found by peak detection in the correlation result. A second correlation with a circle disc allows circles of closed electron pairs to be rejected. The trigger decision is generated if a pseudo adder detects at least two remaining circles. The device is controlled by a freely programmable sequencer. A VLSI chip containing 8 x 8 PEs is being developed using a VENUS design system and will be produced in 2μ CMOS technology.

  7. A programmable systolic array correlator as a trigger processor for electron pairs in RICH (ring image Cherenkov) counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenner, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a systolic array processor for a ring image Cherenkov counter which is capable of identifying pairs of electron circles with a known radius and a certain minimum distance within 15 μs. The processor is a very flexible and fast device. It consists of 128x128 processing elements (PEs), where one PE is assigned to each pixel of the image. All PEs run synchronously at 40 MHz. The identification of electron circles is done by correlating the detector image with the proper circle circumference. Circle centers are found by peak detection in the correlation result. A second correlation with a circle disc allows circles of closed electron pairs to be rejected. The trigger decision is generated if a pseudo adder detects at least two remaining circles. The device is controlled by a freely programmable sequencer. A VLSI chip containing 8x8 PEs is being developed using a VENUS design system and will be produced in 2μ CMOS technology. (orig.)

  8. Field programmable gate array based hardware implementation of a gradient filter for edge detection in colour images with subpixel precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhorn, M; Rosenberger, M; Correns, M; Blau, M; Goepfert, A; Rueckwardt, M; Linss, G

    2010-01-01

    Within the field of industrial image processing the use of colour cameras becomes ever more common. Increasingly the established black and white cameras are replaced by economical single-chip colour cameras with Bayer pattern. The use of the additional colour information is particularly important for recognition or inspection. Become interesting however also for the geometric metrology, if measuring tasks can be solved more robust or more exactly. However only few suitable algorithms are available, in order to detect edges with the necessary precision. All attempts require however additional computation expenditure. On the basis of a new filter for edge detection in colour images with subpixel precision, the implementation on a pre-processing hardware platform is presented. Hardware implemented filters offer the advantage that they can be used easily with existing measuring software, since after the filtering a single channel image is present, which unites the information of all colour channels. Advanced field programmable gate arrays represent an ideal platform for the parallel processing of multiple channels. The effective implementation presupposes however a high programming expenditure. On the example of the colour filter implementation, arising problems are analyzed and the chosen solution method is presented.

  9. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Phased arrays, ultrasonic imaging and nonlinear acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Ping Wu; Wennerstroem, Erik [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2004-09-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2003/2004. After a short introduction a review of beam forming fundamentals required for proper understanding phased array operation is included. The factors that determine lateral resolution during ultrasonic imaging of flaws in solids are analyzed and results of simulations modelling contact inspection of copper are presented. In the second chapter an improved synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) technique is introduced. The proposed SAI technique is characterized by an enhanced lateral resolution compared with the previously proposed extended synthetic aperture focusing technique (ESAFT). The enhancement of imaging performance is achieved due to more realistic assumption concerning the probability density function of scatterers in the region of interest. The proposed technique takes the form of a two-step algorithm using the result obtained in the first step as a prior for the second step. Final chapter contains summary of our recent experimental and theoretical research on nonlinear ultrasonics of unbounded interfaces. A new theoretical model for rough interfaces is developed, and the experimental results from the copper specimens that mimic contact cracks of different types are presented. Derivation of the theory and selected measurement results are given in appendix.

  10. Tomographic and analog 3-D simulations using NORA. [Non-Overlapping Redundant Image Array formed by multiple pinholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Bielefeld, M. J.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    The results of two computer simulations demonstrate the feasibility of using the nonoverlapping redundant array (NORA) to form three-dimensional images of objects with X-rays. Pinholes admit the X-rays to nonoverlapping points on a detector. The object is reconstructed in the analog mode by optical correlation and in the digital mode by tomographic computations. Trials were run with a stick-figure pyramid and extended objects with out-of-focus backgrounds. Substitution of spherical optical lenses for the pinholes increased the light transmission sufficiently that objects could be easily viewed in a dark room. Out-of-focus aberrations in tomographic reconstruction could be eliminated using Chang's (1976) algorithm.

  11. Usefulness of 3D-CE renal artery MRA using parallel imaging with array spatial sensitivity encoding technique (ASSET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibasaki, Toshiro; Seno Masafumi; Takoi, Kunihiro; Sato, Hirofumi; Hino, Tsuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    In this study of 3D contrast enhanced MR angiography of the renal artery using the array spatial sensitivity encoding technique (ASSET), the acquisition time per 1 phase shortened fairly. And using the technique of spectral inversion at lipids (SPECIAL) together with ASSET, the quality of image was improved by emphasizing the contrast. The timing of acquisition was determined by the test injection. We started acquiring the MR angiography 2 seconds after the arrival of maximum enhancement of the test injection at the upper abdominal aorta near the renal artery. As a result parenchymal enhancement was not visible and depiction of the segmental artery was possible in 14 (82%) of 17 patients. At the present time we consider it better not to use the Fractional number of excitation (NEX) together with ASSET, as it may cause various artifacts. (author)

  12. Real-Time Imaging with Frequency Scanning Array Antenna for Industrial Inspection Applications at W band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larumbe, Belen; Laviada, Jaime; Ibáñez-Loinaz, Asier; Teniente, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    A real-time imaging system based on a frequency scanning antenna for conveyor belt setups is presented in this paper. The frequency scanning antenna together with an inexpensive parabolic reflector operates at the W band enabling the detection of details with dimensions in the order of 2 mm. In addition, a low level of sidelobes is achieved by optimizing unequal dividers to window the power distribution for sidelobe reduction. Furthermore, the quality of the images is enhanced by the radiation pattern properties. The performance of the system is validated by showing simulation as well as experimental results obtained in real time, proving the feasibility of these kinds of frequency scanning antennas for cost-effective imaging applications.

  13. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  14. Characterisation of the Hamamatsu photomultipliers for the KM3NeT Neutrino Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiello, S.; Akrame, S.E.; Amélineau, F.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andre, M.; Androulakis, G.; Anghinolfi; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aublin, J.; Avgitas, T.; Baars, M.; Bagatelas, C.; Barbarino, G.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Biagioni, A.; Biernoth, C.; Bormuth, R.; Boumaaza, J.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Brânzas, H.; Briukhanova, N.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buis, E.; Buompane, R,; Busto, J.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Celli, S.; Chabab, M.; Cherubini, S.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coelho, J.A.B.; Coleiro, A.; Molla, M.C.; Coniglione, R.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Cuttone, G.; D’Onofrio, A.; Dallier, R.; De Sio, C.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, A.F.; Distefano, C.; Domi, A.; Donà, R.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dörr, M.; Durocher, M.; Eberl, T.; Van Eijk, D.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ferrara, G.; Fusco, L.A.; Gal, T.; Garufi, F.; Gauchery, S.; Geißelsöder, S.; Gialanella, L.; Giorgio, E.; Giuliante, A.; Gozzini, S.R.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Grasso, D.; Grégoire, T.; Grella, G.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Hekalo, A.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Hofestädt, J.; Illuminati, G.; James, C.W.; Jongen, M.; Jongewaard, B.; de Jong, M.; de Jong, P.; Kadler, M.; Kalaczynski, P.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.F.; Khan Chowdhury, N.R.; Kieft, G.; Kießling, D.; Koffeman, E.N.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Le Breton, A.; Leone, F.; Leonora, E.; Levi, G.; Lincetto, M.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Maggi, G.; Manczak, J.; Mannheim, K.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Markou, C.; Martin, L.; Martínez-Mora, J.A.; Martini, A.; Marzaioli, F.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.W.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Mijakowski, P.; Mollo, C.M.; Morganti, M.; Moser, M.; Moussa, A.; Muller, R.; Musumeci, M.; Nauta, L.; Navas, S.; Nicolau, C.A.; Nielsen, C.; Organokov, M.; Orlando, A.; Panagopoulos, V.; Papalashvili, G.; Papaleo, R.; Pavalas, G.E.; Pellegrini, G.; Pellegrino, C.; Pérez Romero, J.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Pisanti, O.; Poirè, C.; Polydefki, G.; Poma, G.E.; Popa, V.; Post, M.; Pradier, T.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Quinn, L.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Razzaque, S.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Richer, M.; Rovelli, A.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schermer, B.; Sciacca, V.; Seneca, J.; Sgura, I.; Shanidze, R.; Sharma, A.; Simeone, F.; Sinopoulou, A.; Spisso, B.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, D.; Steijger, J.; Stellacci, S.M.; Strandberg, B.; Stransky, D.; Stüven, T.; Taiuti, M.; Tatone, F.; Tayalati, Y.; Tenllado, E.; Thakore, T.; Timmer, P.; Trovato, A.; Tsagkli, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Tzanetatos, D.; Valieri, C.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Volkert, M.; de Waardt, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2018-01-01

    The Hamamatsu R12199-02 3-inch photomultiplier tube is the photodetector chosen for the first phase of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope. About 7000 photomultipliers have been characterised for dark count rate, timing spread and spurious pulses. The quantum efficiency, the gain and the peak-to-valley

  15. Scintillation hodoscope with working area of 50 x 50 cm based on hodoscopic photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borog, V.V.; Vasil'chenko, V.G.; Demekhin, A.V.; Dronov, V.V.; Rykalin, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    The choice of optimum designs for the sensitive elements of large hodoscopes based on hodoscopic photomultipliers is examined. The results of numerical calculations are confirmed by measurement results. The measured space resolution of one of the scintillation-hodoscope designs (with two hodoscopic photomultipliers) with a sensitive volume of 50 x 50 x 2 mm is ≤ +3 mm

  16. LOFAR tied-array imaging of Type III solar radio bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morosan, D.E.; et al., [Unknown; Hessels, J.W.T.; Markoff, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission which is often associated with energetic phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), the Sun has not been imaged extensively because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio

  17. LOFAR tied-array imaging of Type III solar radio bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morosan, D.E.; Gallagher, P.T.; Zucca, P.; Fallows, R.; Carley, E.P.; Mann, G.; Bisi, M.M.; Kerdraon, A.; Avruch, I.M.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The Sun is an active source of radio emission which is often associated with energetic phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), the Sun has not been imaged extensively because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio

  18. Improving the resolution of three-dimensional acoustic imaging with planar phased arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Jacobsen, Finn; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2012-01-01

    a transformation of coordinates that tends to make the response to a point source, the point spread function, more shift invariant. The result is a significant improvement in sound source imaging in the transformed coordinate system. However, the inverse transformation to Cartesian coordinates introduces range...

  19. A line array based near field imaging technique for characterising acoustical properties of elongated targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, F.P.G.

    1995-01-01

    With near field imaging techniques the acoustical pressure waves at distances other than the recorded can be calculated. Normally, acquisition on a two dimensional plane is necessary and extrapolation is performed by a Rayleigh integral. A near field single line instead of two dimensional plane

  20. Extension of photomultiplier tube dynamic range for the LHAASO-KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Hongkui, E-mail: lvhk@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sheng, Xiangdong; He, Huihai; Liu, Jia [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Zhongquan [Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Hou, Chao; Zhao, Jing [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-05-01

    In the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), the 1 km{sup 2} array (KM2A) requires linear measurement of optical intensity with a wide dynamic range. Over 5000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are employed in this experiment and developed as “two outputs” device (anode and dynode) to meet the relevant requirements. In this study, the linearity of the anode and the eighth dynode (DY8), which is limited by space charge effects and mainly related to the relative dynode voltage ratios of the PMT divider, is examined. A voltage divider for the Hamamatsu R11102 PMT is designed and a dramatically enhanced linearity is demonstrated. Test results show that this design can cover a wide dynamic range from 20 to 2×10{sup 5} photoelectrons and achieve a peak anode current of 380 mA at a PMT gain of 10{sup 5}, which satisfies the requirements of KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors. The circuit design has been successfully simulated using the simulation software Multisim. The details of PMT performance tests and simulations are described.

  1. Extension of photomultiplier tube dynamic range for the LHAASO-KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongkui; Sheng, Xiangdong; He, Huihai; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Zhongquan; Hou, Chao; Zhao, Jing

    2015-05-01

    In the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), the 1 km2 array (KM2A) requires linear measurement of optical intensity with a wide dynamic range. Over 5000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are employed in this experiment and developed as "two outputs" device (anode and dynode) to meet the relevant requirements. In this study, the linearity of the anode and the eighth dynode (DY8), which is limited by space charge effects and mainly related to the relative dynode voltage ratios of the PMT divider, is examined. A voltage divider for the Hamamatsu R11102 PMT is designed and a dramatically enhanced linearity is demonstrated. Test results show that this design can cover a wide dynamic range from 20 to 2×105 photoelectrons and achieve a peak anode current of 380 mA at a PMT gain of 105, which satisfies the requirements of KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors. The circuit design has been successfully simulated using the simulation software Multisim. The details of PMT performance tests and simulations are described.

  2. Extension of photomultiplier tube dynamic range for the LHAASO-KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Hongkui; Sheng, Xiangdong; He, Huihai; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Zhongquan; Hou, Chao; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    In the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), the 1 km 2 array (KM2A) requires linear measurement of optical intensity with a wide dynamic range. Over 5000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are employed in this experiment and developed as “two outputs” device (anode and dynode) to meet the relevant requirements. In this study, the linearity of the anode and the eighth dynode (DY8), which is limited by space charge effects and mainly related to the relative dynode voltage ratios of the PMT divider, is examined. A voltage divider for the Hamamatsu R11102 PMT is designed and a dramatically enhanced linearity is demonstrated. Test results show that this design can cover a wide dynamic range from 20 to 2×10 5 photoelectrons and achieve a peak anode current of 380 mA at a PMT gain of 10 5 , which satisfies the requirements of KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors. The circuit design has been successfully simulated using the simulation software Multisim. The details of PMT performance tests and simulations are described

  3. Performance study of Philips digital silicon photomultiplier coupled to scintillating crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Z.; Auffray, E.; Lecoq, P.; Paganoni, M.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and scintillators are often arranged in the shape of arrays in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems. Digital SiPMs provide signal readout in single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) level. From the photon count rate measurement of each SPAD cell of digital SiPM, we found that the output scintillating photons distribute in an area larger than the scintillator physical coupling area. Taking advantage of the possibility to enable/disable individual cells of the digital SiPM, a group of Lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals with different dimensions coupled to a digital SiPM was used to study the influence of using different SiPM active area on the number of photons detected, energy resolution and coincidence time resolution (CTR). For the same crystal coupled to the digital SiPM, the larger the active area of digital SiPM, the higher the number of photons detected. The larger active area of the digital SiPM also results in a better energy resolution after saturation...

  4. Evaluating performance of a pixel array semiconductor SPECT system for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Naoki; Zhao, Songji; Fujiki, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    Small animal imaging has recently been focused on basic nuclear medicine. We have designed and built a small animal SPECT imaging system using a semiconductor camera and a newly designed collimator. We assess the performance of this system for small object imaging. We employed an MGC 1500 (Acrorad Co.) camera including a CdTe semiconductor. The pixel size was 1.4 mm/pixel. We designed and produced a parallel-hole collimator with 20-mm hole length. Our SPECT system consisted of a semiconductor camera with the subject holder set on an electric rotating stage controlled by a computer. We compared this system with a conventional small animal SPECT system comprising a SPECT-2000H scanner with four Anger type cameras and pinhole collimators. The count rate linearity for estimation of the scatter was evaluated for a pie-chart phantom containing different concentrations of 99m Tc. We measured the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the 99m Tc SPECT line source along with scatter. The system volume sensitivity was examined using a flood source phantom which was 35 mm long with a 32-mm inside diameter. Additionally, an in vivo myocardial perfusion SPECT study was performed with a rat. With regards to energy resolution, the semiconductor camera (5.6%) was superior to the conventional Anger type camera (9.8%). In the count rate linearity evaluation, the regression lines of the SPECT values were y=0.019x+0.031 (r 2 =0.999) for our system and y=0.018x+0.060 (r 2 =0.997) for the conventional system. Thus, the scatter count using the semiconductor camera was less than that using the conventional camera. FWHMs of our system and the conventional system were 2.9±0.1 and 2.0±0.1 mm, respectively. Moreover, the system volume sensitivity of our system [0.51 kcps/(MBq/ml)/cm] was superior to that of the conventional system [0.44 kcps/(MBq/ml)/cm]. Our system provided clear images of the rat myocardium, sufficient for practical use in small animal imaging. Our SPECT system, utilizing a

  5. Submillimeter Array {sup 12}CO (2-1) Imaging of the NGC 6946 Giant Molecular Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ya-Lin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sakamoto, Kazushi; Pan, Hsi-An, E-mail: yalinwu@email.arizona.edu [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taiwan (China)

    2017-04-10

    We present a {sup 12}CO (2–1) mosaic map of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946 by combining data from the Submillimeter Array and the IRAM 30 m telescope. We identify 390 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from the nucleus to 4.5 kpc in the disk. GMCs in the inner 1 kpc are generally more luminous and turbulent, some of which have luminosities >10{sup 6} K km s{sup −1} pc{sup 2} and velocity dispersions >10 km s{sup −1}. Large-scale bar-driven dynamics likely regulate GMC properties in the nuclear region. Similar to the Milky Way and other disk galaxies, GMC mass function of NGC 6946 has a shallower slope (index > −2) in the inner region, and a steeper slope (index < −2) in the outer region. This difference in mass spectra may be indicative of different cloud formation pathways: gravitational instabilities might play a major role in the nuclear region, while cloud coalescence might be dominant in the outer disk. Finally, the NGC 6946 clouds are similar to those in M33 in terms of statistical properties, but they are generally less luminous and turbulent than the M51 clouds.

  6. 3-D Imaging Using Row-Column-Addressed Arrays With Integrated Apodization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Bagge, Jan Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pa, and the sensitivity was 0.299 ± 0.090 V/Pa. The nearest neighbor crosstalk level was -23.9 ± 3.7 dB, while the transmit-to-receive-elements crosstalk level was -40.2 ± 3.5 dB. Imaging of a 0.3-mm-diameter steel wire using synthetic transmit focusing with 62 single-element emissions demonstrated axial and lateral...

  7. Auralisations with loudspeaker arrays from a phased combination of the image source method and acoustical radiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy

    2017-01-01

    In order to create a simulation tool that is well-suited for small rooms with low diffusion and highly absorbing ceilings, a new room acoustic simulation tool has been developed that combines a phased version of the image source with acoustical radiosity and that considers the angle dependence...... impulse response, because more directional information is available with acoustical radiosity. Small rooms with absorbing surfaces are tested, because this is the room type that PARISM is particularly useful for....

  8. Auralizations with loudspeaker arrays from a phased combination of the image source method and acoustical radiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    In order to create a simulation tool that is well-suited for small rooms with low diffusion and highly absorbing ceilings, a new room acoustic simulation tool has been developed that combines a phased version of the image source with acoustical radiosity and that considers the angle dependence...... of the PARISM impulse response, because more directional information is available with acoustical radiosity. Small rooms with absorbing surfaces are tested, because this is the room type that PARISM is particularly useful for....

  9. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54 μm. After resampling to 54

  10. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.karellas@umassmed.edu; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pisa 56127, Italy and Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l., L. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  11. Characterization of silicon photomultipliers and validation of the electrical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Qiang, Yi; Ross, Steve; Burr, Kent

    2018-04-01

    This paper introduces a systematic way to measure most features of the silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). We implement an efficient two-laser procedure to measure the recovery time. Avalanche probability was found to play an important role in explaining the right behavior of the SiPM recovery process. Also, we demonstrate how equivalent circuit parameters measured by optical tests can be used in SPICE modeling to predict details of the time constants relevant to the pulse shape. The SiPM properties measured include breakdown voltage, gain, diode capacitor, quench resistor, quench capacitor, dark count rate, photodetection efficiency, cross-talk and after-pulsing probability, and recovery time. We apply these techniques on the SiPMs from two companies: Hamamatsu and SensL.

  12. Analysis of transit time spread on FBK silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acerbi, F.; Gola, A.; Ferri, A.; Zorzi, N.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we studied one of the aspects potentially limiting the single-photon time-resolution (SPTR) of the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM): the transit time spread (TTS). We illuminated the SiPM in different positions with a fast-pulsed laser collimated to a circular spot of 0.2 mm-diameter and acquired bi-dimensional maps of the avalanche-signal arrival time of RGB and RGB-HD SiPMs, produced at FBK. We studied the effect of both the number of bonding wires connecting the device to the package and the layout of the top-metal connection (on the device). We found that the TTS does not simply depend on the trace length between the cell and the bonding pad and it could vary in the range between tens of picoseconds (with 3 bonding connections) to more than one hundred of picoseconds (with one connection)

  13. Fast light pulse measurements and temporal fluctuations in photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehe, J.A.; Sipp, B.

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews the results on time fluctuations in high gain first dynode photomultipliers used in single photon timing experiments; the theoretical analysis of the measurement of the shape of light pulses is recalled and the previously obtained results concerning time dispersion in the photocathode, first dynode space are discussed. In addition, the influence of the variations of the electron transit time in the multiplier on the time resolution curves of the detector is examined: the curves obtained by leading-edge triggering of the anodic pulse show a strong dependence on the threshold level of the discriminator. A single-photoelectron timing resolution of 270ps is measured using a low leading edge discrimination [fr

  14. New method for determining avalanche breakdown voltage of silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirikov-Zorin, I.

    2017-01-01

    The avalanche breakdown and Geiger mode of the silicon p-n junction is considered. A precise physically motivated method is proposed for determining the avalanche breakdown voltage of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The method is based on measuring the dependence of the relative photon detection efficiency (PDE rel ) on the bias voltage when one type of carriers (electron or hole) is injected into the avalanche multiplication zone of the p-n junction. The injection of electrons or holes from the base region of the SiPM semiconductor structure is performed using short-wave or long-wave light. At a low overvoltage (1-2 V) the detection efficiency is linearly dependent on the bias voltage; therefore, extrapolation to zero PDE rel value determines the SiPM avalanche breakdown voltage with an accuracy within a few millivolts. [ru

  15. Study of silicon photomultipliers fast amplifier and thermoregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'antone, I.; Fabbri, L.; Foschi, E.; Guandalini, C.; Laurenti, G.; Lax, I.; Levi, G.; Quadrani, L.; Sbarra, Ca.; Sbarra, Cr.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Zuffa, M.

    2011-01-01

    The silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are adopted in various physical applications, from medical physics to astrophysics, for their advantages in terms of cost and weight with respect to traditional photo detectors. Their low bias voltage supply (about 30 V), hardiness and resistance to magnetic field are ideal characteristics for space application. In the frame of INFN-Irst collaboration, some of them have been developed and produced at FBK (Trento-Italy), and have been characterized in the INFN laboratories of Bologna (DaSiPM2 collaboration). The SiPM can be used in conjunction with fibres and counters in high energy physics experiments. To exploit the SiPM time resolution, a fast amplifier has been studied. The SiPM gain depends critically on temperature and a thermal stabilization is also necessary. The use of a thermoelectric cooler module based on a Peltier cell has been investigated, and the results are shown.

  16. The upgrade of the CMS hadron calorimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Strobbe, N

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the hadron calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently underway. The endcap sections will be upgraded in the winter of 2016–2017 and the barrel sections during the second LHC long shutdown in 2019. The existing photosensors will be replaced with about 16 000 new silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), resulting in the first large installation of SiPMs in a radiation environment. All associated front-end electronics will also be upgraded. This paper discusses the motivation for the upgrade and provides a description 17 of the new system, including the SiPMs with associated control electronics and the front-end readout cards.

  17. Characterization of the Hamamatsu 8" R5912-MOD Photomultiplier tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner

    2018-05-01

    Current and future neutrino and direct detection dark matter experiments hope to take advantage of improving technologies in photon detection. Many of these detectors are large, monolithic optical detectors that use relatively low-cost, large-area, and efficient photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). A candidate PMT for future experiments is a newly developed prototype Hamamatsu PMT, the R5912-MOD. In this paper we describe measurements made of the single photoelectron time and charge response of the R5912-MOD, as well as detail some direct comparisons to similar PMTs. Most of these measurements were performed on three R5912-MOD PMTs operating at gains close to 1 × 107. The transit time spread (σ) and the charge peak-to-valley were measured to be on average 680ps and 4.2 respectively. The results of this paper show the R5912-MOD is an excellent candidate for future experiments in several regards, particularly due to its narrow spread in timing.

  18. The performance of silicon photomultipliers in Cherenkov TOF PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolenec, Rok; Korpar, Samo; Krizan, Peter; Pestotink, Rok

    2015-01-01

    In time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) one of the main factors limiting the time resolution is the time evolution of the scintillation process. This can be avoided by using exclusively the Cherenkov light produced in a suitable material. Sub 100 ps FWHM timing has already been experimentally demonstrated but with a drawback of relatively low detection efficiency due to the photodetectors used. In this work silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are considered as a photodetector in Cherenkov TOF PET. The detection efficiency can be significantly improved by using SiPMs, however, at room temperature the SiPM dark counts introduce a significant source of fake coincidences. SiPM samples from different producers were tested in a simple back-to-back setup in combination with lead fluoride Cherenkov radiators. Results for coincidence timing, detection efficiency and effects of dark counts at different temperatures and SiPM overvoltages are presented.

  19. Measurement of amplitude fluctuations in a rapid response photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimbault, P.

    1961-01-01

    In order to measure amplitude fluctuations in a rapid response photomultiplier, two independent random variables are introduced which determine the shape of the anode pulse. The energy of each pulse, which depends directly on the gain and the variance, is the first variable; amplitude fluctuations, functions of the first variable, depend as well on the pulse width which in turn constitutes the second variable. The results obtained on the variations of the maximum impulse, using a steep-edged pulse broadening circuit, and those obtained on the statistical variations of the gain, are compared to show that the variance relative to the maximum amplitude of the signal is greater than that of the gain. Within the limits of these fluctuations are shown the contribution of the secondary emission coefficient of the first dynode, and that of the mean secondary emission coefficient of the multiplier. (author) [fr

  20. Case for a field-programmable gate array multicore hybrid machine for an image-processing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvic, Ryan N.; Ives, Robert W.; Lira, Javier; Molina, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    General purpose computer designers have recently begun adding cores to their processors in order to increase performance. For example, Intel has adopted a homogeneous quad-core processor as a base for general purpose computing. PlayStation3 (PS3) game consoles contain a multicore heterogeneous processor known as the Cell, which is designed to perform complex image processing algorithms at a high level. Can modern image-processing algorithms utilize these additional cores? On the other hand, modern advancements in configurable hardware, most notably field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have created an interesting question for general purpose computer designers. Is there a reason to combine FPGAs with multicore processors to create an FPGA multicore hybrid general purpose computer? Iris matching, a repeatedly executed portion of a modern iris-recognition algorithm, is parallelized on an Intel-based homogeneous multicore Xeon system, a heterogeneous multicore Cell system, and an FPGA multicore hybrid system. Surprisingly, the cheaper PS3 slightly outperforms the Intel-based multicore on a core-for-core basis. However, both multicore systems are beaten by the FPGA multicore hybrid system by >50%.

  1. LOW-FREQUENCY IMAGING OF FIELDS AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY 32 ELEMENT PROTOTYPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Christopher L.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Levine, Alan M. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); De Oliveira-Costa, Angelica; Hernquist, Lars L.; Bernardi, Gianni [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Bowman, Judd D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Briggs, Frank H. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Gaensler, B. M.; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Sadler, Elaine M. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) (Australia); Morales, Miguel F. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Sethi, Shiv K. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore (India); Arcus, Wayne; Crosse, Brian W. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Barnes, David G. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Bunton, John D. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping (Australia); Cappallo, Roger C.; Corey, Brian E., E-mail: clmw@mit.edu [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA (United States); and others

    2012-08-10

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency, wide-field-of-view radio interferometer under development at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. We have used a 32 element MWA prototype interferometer (MWA-32T) to observe two 50 Degree-Sign diameter fields in the southern sky, covering a total of {approx}2700 deg{sup 2}, in order to evaluate the performance of the MWA-32T, to develop techniques for epoch of reionization experiments, and to make measurements of astronomical foregrounds. We developed a calibration and imaging pipeline for the MWA-32T, and used it to produce {approx}15' angular resolution maps of the two fields in the 110-200 MHz band. We perform a blind source extraction using these confusion-limited images, and detect 655 sources at high significance with an additional 871 lower significance source candidates. We compare these sources with existing low-frequency radio surveys in order to assess the MWA-32T system performance, wide-field analysis algorithms, and catalog quality. Our source catalog is found to agree well with existing low-frequency surveys in these regions of the sky and with statistical distributions of point sources derived from Northern Hemisphere surveys; it represents one of the deepest surveys to date of this sky field in the 110-200 MHz band.

  2. Observations of a Cold Front at High Spatiotemporal Resolution Using an X-Band Phased Array Imaging Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mahre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While the vertical structure of cold fronts has been studied using various methods, previous research has shown that traditional methods of observing meteorological phenomena (such as pencil-beam radars in PPI/volumetric mode are not well-suited for resolving small-scale cold front phenomena, due to relatively low spatiotemporal resolution. Additionally, non-simultaneous elevation sampling within a vertical cross-section can lead to errors in analysis, as differential vertical advection cannot be distinguished from temporal evolution. In this study, a cold front from 19 September 2015 is analyzed using the Atmospheric Imaging Radar (AIR. The AIR transmits a 20-degree fan beam in elevation, and digital beamforming is used on receive to generate simultaneous receive beams. This mobile, X-band, phased-array radar offers temporal sampling on the order of 1 s (while in RHI mode, range sampling of 30 m (37.5 m native resolution, and continuous, arbitrarily oversampled data in the vertical dimension. Here, 0.5-degree sampling is used in elevation (1-degree native resolution. This study is the first in which a cold front has been studied via imaging radar. The ability of the AIR to obtain simultaneous RHIs at high temporal sampling rates without mechanical steering allows for analysis of features such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and feeder flow.

  3. Pulse shape discrimination based on fast signals from silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhao; Wei, Zhiyong; Fang, Meihua; Zhang, Zixia; Cheng, Can; Wang, Yi; Su, Huiwen; Ran, Youquan; Zhu, Qingwei; Zhang, He; Duan, Kai; Chen, Ming; Liu, Meng

    2018-06-01

    Recent developments in organic plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) enable a breakthrough in discrimination between neutrons and gammas. Plastic scintillator detectors coupled with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer many advantages, such as lower power consumption, smaller volume, and especially insensitivity to magnetic fields, compared with conventional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). A SensL SiPM has two outputs: a standard output and a fast output. It is known that the charge injected into the fast output electrode is typically approximately 2% of the total charge generated during the avalanche, whereas the charge injected into the standard output electrode is nearly 98% of the total. Fast signals from SiPMs exhibit better performance in terms of timing and time-correlated measurements compared with standard signals. The pulse duration of a standard signal is on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds, whereas the pulse duration of the main monopole waveform of a fast signal is a few tens of nanoseconds. Fast signals are traditionally thought to be suitable for photon counting at very high speeds but unsuitable for PSD due to the partial charge collection. Meanwhile, the standard outputs of SiPMs coupled with discriminating scintillators have yielded nice PSD performances, but there have been no reports on PSD using fast signals. Our analysis shows that fast signals can also provide discrimination if the rate of charge injection into the fast output electrode is fixed for each event, even though only a portion of the charge is collected. In this work, we achieved successful PSD using fast signals; meanwhile, using a coincidence timing window of less 3 nanoseconds between the readouts from both ends of the detector reduced the influence of the high SiPM dark current. We experimentally achieved good timing performance and PSD capability simultaneously.

  4. Blocking of photomultiplier tubes; Blocage de tubes photomultiplicateurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrivet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Limeil-Brevannes (France). Centre d' Etudes

    1968-07-01

    Development of a very simple apparatus having a single transistor. The gain is reduced by a factor of 1.5 to 3 x 10{sup 2} for the photomultipliers XP 1002, and of 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} for the photomultipliers 56-AVP and TVP. Blocking can be achieved in 40 ns if necessary (using a TRS-350 transistor), and the time required to return to the initial gain can be no longer than 40 ns with a TRS-200, for the blocking of several micro-seconds for example. 1000 {mu}s and above can be obtained with switching times which are longer but which can be less than 150 ns if needs be. An outside insulated supply can be avoided if the recurrence is low. A standard pulse generator is used for triggering. There is no other electronic equipment, and the device can be fitted easily into the space of the voltage divider. (author) [French] Etude et realisation d'un montage tres simple utilisant un seul transistor. Le gain est reduit d'un facteur 1.5 a 3.10{sup 2} sur des photomultiplicateurs XP 1002, et 10{sup 3} a 10{sup 4} sur les photomultiplicateurs 56 AVP et TVP. Le blocage peut etre atteint en 40 ns si necessaire (avec un transistor TRS-350), et le temps de retour au gain initial peut ne pas depasser 40 ns avec un TRS-200, pour des blocages de plusieurs micro-secondes, par exemple. On peut obtenir plus de 1000 {mu}s avec des temps de commutation plus importants, mais qui peuvent si besoin est ne pas etre superieurs a 150 ns. L'alimentation exterieure isolee peut etre evitee si la recurrence est faible. Pour le declenchement on utilise un generateur d'impulsions standard. Il n'y a aucune autre electronique, et le montage s'integre aisement dans l'encombrement du pont d'alimentation. (auteur)

  5. A 2 x 2 imaging MIMO system based on LED Visible Light Communications employing space balanced coding and integrated PIN array reception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiehui; Xu, Yinfan; Shi, Jianyang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed a 2 x 2 imaging Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO)-Visible Light Communication (VLC) system by employing Space Balanced Coding (SBC) based on two RGB LEDs and integrated PIN array reception. We experimentally demonstrated 1.4-Gbit/s VLC transmission at a distance of 2.5 m...

  6. Optimization of a phased-array transducer for multiple harmonic imaging in medical applications: frequency and topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, Guillaume M; Van Neer, Paul L M J; Danilouchkine, Mike G; Huijssen, Jacob; Verweij, Martin D; de Jong, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Second-harmonic imaging is currently one of the standards in commercial echographic systems for diagnosis, because of its high spatial resolution and low sensitivity to clutter and near-field artifacts. The use of nonlinear phenomena mirrors is a great set of solutions to improve echographic image resolution. To further enhance the resolution and image quality, the combination of the 3rd to 5th harmonics--dubbed the superharmonics--could be used. However, this requires a bandwidth exceeding that of conventional transducers. A promising solution features a phased-array design with interleaved low- and high-frequency elements for transmission and reception, respectively. Because the amplitude of the backscattered higher harmonics at the transducer surface is relatively low, it is highly desirable to increase the sensitivity in reception. Therefore, we investigated the optimization of the number of elements in the receiving aperture as well as their arrangement (topology). A variety of configurations was considered, including one transmit element for each receive element (1/2) up to one transmit for 7 receive elements (1/8). The topologies are assessed based on the ratio of the harmonic peak pressures in the main and grating lobes. Further, the higher harmonic level is maximized by optimization of the center frequency of the transmitted pulse. The achievable SNR for a specific application is a compromise between the frequency-dependent attenuation and nonlinearity at a required penetration depth. To calculate the SNR of the complete imaging chain, we use an approach analogous to the sonar equation used in underwater acoustics. The generated harmonic pressure fields caused by nonlinear wave propagation were modeled with the iterative nonlinear contrast source (INCS) method, the KZK, or the Burger's equation. The optimal topology for superharmonic imaging was an interleaved design with 1 transmit element per 6 receive elements. It improves the SNR by ~5 dB compared with

  7. Rectal cancer confined to the bowel wall: the role of 3 Tesla phased-array MR imaging in T categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolakoğlu Er, Hale; Peker, Elif; Erden, Ayşe; Erden, İlhan; Geçim, Ethem; Savaş, Berna

    2018-02-01

    To determine the diagnostic value of 3 Tesla MR imaging in detection of mucosal (Tis), submucosal (T 1 ) and muscularis propria (T 2 ) invasion in patients with early rectal cancer. A total of 50 consecutive patients who underwent 3 Tesla MR imaging and curative-intent intervention for MRI-staged Tis/T 1 /T 2 rectal cancer from March 2012 to December 2016 were included. The radiological T category of each rectal tumour was compared retrospectively with histopathological results assessed according to the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) classification. The sensitivities, specificities, and overall accuracy rates of 3 Tesla MR imaging for Tis, T 1 , and T 2 cases were calculated using MedCalc statistical software v. 16. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV of 3 Tesla MR imaging in T categorization for T 2 were: 93.7% [95% CI (0.79-0.99)], 77.7% [95% CI (0.52-0.93)], 88.2% [95% CI (0.75-0.94)] and 87.5% [95% CI (0.64-0.96)]; for T 1 were 92% [95% CI (0.63-0.99)], 91.8% [95% CI (0.78-0.98)], 80% [95% CI (0.57-0.92)] and 97.1% [95% CI (0.83-0.99)]; for Tis were: 20% [95% CI (0.51-0.71)], 100% [95% CI (0.92-1)], 100%, 91.8% [95% CI (0.87-0.94)], respectively. MR categorization accuracy rates for T 2 , T 1 and Tis were calculated as 88, 92 and 92%, respectively. 3 Tesla MR imaging seems to be useful for accurate categorization of T-stage in early rectal cancer, especially for T 1 cancers. The method is not a reliable tool to detect Tis cases. The potential for overstaging and understaging of the technique should be realized and taken into consideration when tailoring the treatment protocol for each patient. Advances in knowledge: High-resolution MR with phased-array coil is being increasingly used in the pre-operative assessment of rectal cancer. 3 Tesla high-resolution MR imaging allows improved definition of bowel wall and tumour infiltration.

  8. ASIC Development for Three-Dimensional Silicon Imaging Array for Cold Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, C.L.; Jagadish, U.; Bryan, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    An Integrated Circuit (IC) readout chip with four channels arranged so as to receive input charge from the corners of the chip was designed for use with 5- to 7-mm pixel detectors. This Application Specific IC (ASIC) can be used for cold neutron imaging, for study of structural order in materials using cold neutron scattering or for particle physics experiments. The ASIC is fabricated in a 0.5-(micro)m n-well AMI process. The design of the ASIC and the test measurements made is reported. Noise measurements are also reported

  9. Silicon photomultipliers in scintillation detectors used for gamma ray energies up to 6.1 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzicka-Kobylka, M.; Szczesniak, T.; Moszyński, M.; Swiderski, L.; Szawłowski, M.

    2017-12-01

    Majority of papers concerning scintillation detectors with light readout by means of silicon photomultipliers refer to nuclear medicine or radiation monitoring devices where energy of detected gamma rays do not exceed 2 MeV. Detection of gamma radiation with higher energies is of interest to e.g. high energy physics and plasma diagnostics. The aim of this paper is to study applicability (usefulness) of SiPM light readout in detection of gamma rays up to 6.1 MeV in combination with various scintillators. The reported measurements were made with 3 samples of one type of Hamamatsu TSV (Through-Silicon Via technology) MPPC arrays. These 4x4 channel arrays have a 50 × 50 μm2 cell size and 12 × 12 mm2 effective active area. The following scintillators were used: CeBr3, NaI:Tl, CsI:Tl. During all the tests detectors were located in a climatic chamber. The studies are focused on optimization of the MPPC performance for practical use in detection of high energy gamma rays. The optimization includes selection of the optimum operating voltage in respect to the required energy resolution, dynamic range, linearity and pulse amplitude. The presented temperature tests show breakdown voltage dependence on the temperature change and define requirements for a power supply and gain stabilization method. The energy spectra for energies between 511 keV and 6.1 MeV are also presented and compared with data acquired with a classic photomultiplier XP5212B readout. Such a comparison allowed study of nonlinearity of the tested MPPCs, correction of the energy spectra and proper analysis of the energy resolution.

  10. A position-sensitive scintillation detector for two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation using metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Koji; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Saito, Haruo; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Muramatsu, Shinichi; Nagai, Shota

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed and tested a prototype of a new position sensitive γ-ray detector which consists of an array of 2.6x2.6x18 mm 3 BGO scintillator blocks, a light guide, and four metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (R5900-00-C8) recently developed by Hamamatsu Photonics Co. Ltd. Scalability of the detector of this type makes it possible to construct a larger detector using many PS-PMTs, which will be useful for the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation apparatus

  11. 3D-printed microwell arrays for Ciona microinjection and timelapse imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint Gregory

    Full Text Available Ascidians such as Ciona are close chordate relatives of the vertebrates with small, simple embryonic body plans and small, simple genomes. The tractable size of the embryo offers considerable advantages for in toto imaging and quantitative analysis of morphogenesis. For functional studies, Ciona eggs are considerably more challenging to microinject than the much larger eggs of other model organisms such as zebrafish and Xenopus. One of the key difficulties is in restraining the eggs so that the microinjection needle can be easily introduced and withdrawn. Here we develop and test a device to cast wells in agarose that are each sized to hold a single egg. This injection mold is fabricated by micro-resolution stereolithography with a grid of egg-sized posts that cast corresponding wells in agarose. This 3D printing technology allows the rapid and inexpensive testing of iteratively refined prototypes. In addition to their utility in microinjection, these grids of embryo-sized wells are also valuable for timelapse imaging of multiple embryos.

  12. Single Photon Detection with Semiconductor Pixel Arrays for Medical Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mikulec, B

    2000-01-01

    This thesis explores the functioning of a single photon counting pixel detector for X-ray imaging. It considers different applications for such a device, but focuses mainly on the field of medical imaging. The new detector comprises a CMOS read-out chip called PCC containing 4096 identical channels each of which counts X-ray hits. The conversion of the X-rays to electric charge takes place in a semiconductor sensor which is segmented into 4096 matching square diodes of side length 170 um, the 'pixels'. The photon counting concept is based on setting a threshold in energy above which a hit is registered. The immediate advantages are the elimination of background and the in principle unlimited dynamic range. Moreover, this approach allows the use of an electronic shutter for arbitrary measurement periods. As the device was intended for operation in the energy range of ~10-70 keV, gallium arsenide was selected as the preferred sensor material. The development of this detector followed on from about 10 years of r...

  13. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Images: Data Processing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Richard; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S.; Mather, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the data reduction and analysis procedures that have been employed in our previous studies of spatial fluctuation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) using deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations. The self-calibration we apply removes a strong instrumental signal from the fluctuations that would otherwise corrupt the results. The procedures and results for masking bright sources and modeling faint sources down to levels set by the instrumental noise are presented. Various tests are performed to demonstrate that the resulting power spectra of these fields are not dominated by instrumental or procedural effects. These tests indicate that the large-scale ([greater, similar]30') fluctuations that remain in the deepest fields are not directly related to the galaxies that are bright enough to be individually detected. We provide the parameterization of these power spectra in terms of separate instrument noise, shot noise, and power-law components. We discuss the relationship between fluctuations measured at different wavelengths and depths, and the relations between constraints on the mean intensity of the CIB and its fluctuation spectrum. Consistent with growing evidence that the [approx]1-5 [mu]m mean intensity of the CIB may not be as far above the integrated emission of resolved galaxies as has been reported in some analyses of DIRBE and IRTS observations, our measurements of spatial fluctuations of the CIB intensity indicate the mean emission from the objects producing the fluctuations is quite low ([greater, similar]1 nW m-2 sr-1 at 3-5 [mu]m), and thus consistent with current [gamma]-ray absorption constraints. The source of the fluctuations may be high-z Population III objects, or a more local component of very low luminosity objects with clustering properties that differ from the resolved galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the upcoming space-based surveys to directly measure the epochs

  14. COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS IN DEEP SPITZER INFRARED ARRAY CAMERA IMAGES: DATA PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the data reduction and analysis procedures that have been employed in our previous studies of spatial fluctuation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) using deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations. The self-calibration we apply removes a strong instrumental signal from the fluctuations that would otherwise corrupt the results. The procedures and results for masking bright sources and modeling faint sources down to levels set by the instrumental noise are presented. Various tests are performed to demonstrate that the resulting power spectra of these fields are not dominated by instrumental or procedural effects. These tests indicate that the large-scale (∼>30') fluctuations that remain in the deepest fields are not directly related to the galaxies that are bright enough to be individually detected. We provide the parameterization of these power spectra in terms of separate instrument noise, shot noise, and power-law components. We discuss the relationship between fluctuations measured at different wavelengths and depths, and the relations between constraints on the mean intensity of the CIB and its fluctuation spectrum. Consistent with growing evidence that the ∼1-5 μm mean intensity of the CIB may not be as far above the integrated emission of resolved galaxies as has been reported in some analyses of DIRBE and IRTS observations, our measurements of spatial fluctuations of the CIB intensity indicate the mean emission from the objects producing the fluctuations is quite low (∼>1 nW m -2 sr -1 at 3-5 μm), and thus consistent with current γ-ray absorption constraints. The source of the fluctuations may be high-z Population III objects, or a more local component of very low luminosity objects with clustering properties that differ from the resolved galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the upcoming space-based surveys to directly measure the epochs inhabited by the populations producing these

  15. Anatomical Reconstruction and Functional Imaging Reveal an Ordered Array of Skylight Polarization Detectors in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Peter T; Henze, Miriam J; Bleul, Christiane; Baumann-Klausener, Franziska; Labhart, Thomas; Dickinson, Michael H

    2016-05-11

    Many insects exploit skylight polarization as a compass cue for orientation and navigation. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, photoreceptors R7 and R8 in the dorsal rim area (DRA) of the compound eye are specialized to detect the electric vector (e-vector) of linearly polarized light. These photoreceptors are arranged in stacked pairs with identical fields of view and spectral sensitivities, but mutually orthogonal microvillar orientations. As in larger flies, we found that the microvillar orientation of the distal photoreceptor R7 changes in a fan-like fashion along the DRA. This anatomical arrangement suggests that the DRA constitutes a detector for skylight polarization, in which different e-vectors maximally excite different positions in the array. To test our hypothesis, we measured responses to polarized light of varying e-vector angles in the terminals of R7/8 cells using genetically encoded calcium indicators. Our data confirm a progression of preferred e-vector angles from anterior to posterior in the DRA, and a strict orthogonality between the e-vector preferences of paired R7/8 cells. We observed decreased activity in photoreceptors in response to flashes of light polarized orthogonally to their preferred e-vector angle, suggesting reciprocal inhibition between photoreceptors in the same medullar column, which may serve to increase polarization contrast. Together, our results indicate that the polarization-vision system relies on a spatial map of preferred e-vector angles at the earliest stage of sensory processing. The fly's visual system is an influential model system for studying neural computation, and much is known about its anatomy, physiology, and development. The circuits underlying motion processing have received the most attention, but researchers are increasingly investigating other functions, such as color perception and object recognition. In this work, we investigate the early neural processing of a somewhat exotic sense, called

  16. Comparison of pelvic phased-array versus endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the superiority of endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over pelvic phased-array coil MRI at 1.5 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer. However, few have studied which evaluation is more accurate at 3 Tesla MRI. In this study, we compared the accuracy of local staging of prostate cancer using pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil MRI at 3 Tesla. Between January 2005 and May 2010, 151 patients underwent radical prostatectomy. All patients were evaluated with either pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil prostate MRI prior to surgery (63 endorectal coils and 88 pelvic phased-array coils). Tumor stage based on MRI was compared with pathologic stage. We calculated the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of each group in the evaluation of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Both endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI achieved high specificity, low sensitivity and moderate accuracy for the detection of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. There were statistically no differences in specificity, sensitivity and accuracy between the two groups. Overall staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were not significantly different between endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI.

  17. LORENTZ PHASE IMAGING AND IN-SITU LORENTZ MICROSCOPY OF PATTERNED CO-ARRAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VOLKOV, V.V.; ZHU, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding magnetic structures and properties of patterned and ordinary magnetic films at nanometer length-scale is the area of immense technological and fundamental scientific importance. The key feature to such success is the ability to achieve visual quantitative information on domain configurations with a maximum ''magnetic'' resolution. Several methods have been developed to meet these demands (Kerr and Faraday effects, differential phase contrast microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, SEMPA etc.). In particular, the modern off-axis electron holography allows retrieval of the electron-wave phase shifts down to 2π/N (with typical N = 10-20, approaching in the limit N ∼ 100) in TEM equipped with field emission gun, which is already successfully employed for studies of magnetic materials at nanometer scale. However, it remains technically demanding, sensitive to noise and needs highly coherent electron sources. As possible alternative we developed a new method of Lorentz phase microscopy [1,2] based on the Fourier solution [3] of magnetic transport-of-intensity (MTIE) equation. This approach has certain advantages, since it is less sensitive to noise and does not need high coherence of the source required by the holography. In addition, it can be realized in any TEM without basic hardware changes. Our approach considers the electron-wave refraction in magnetic materials (magnetic refraction) and became possible due to general progress in understanding of noninterferometric phase retrieval [4-6] dealing with optical refraction. This approach can also be treated as further development of Fresnel microscopy, used so far for imaging of in-situ magnetization process in magnetic materials studied by TEM. Figs. 1-3 show some examples of what kind information can be retrieved from the conventional Fresnel images using the new approach. Most of these results can be compared with electron-holographic data. Using this approach we can shed more light on fine details of

  18. Operating scheme for the light-emitting diode array of a volumetric display that exhibits multiple full-color dynamic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2017-07-01

    We designed and developed a control circuit for a three-dimensional (3-D) light-emitting diode (LED) array to be used in volumetric displays exhibiting full-color dynamic 3-D images. The circuit was implemented on a field-programmable gate array; therefore, pulse-width modulation, which requires high-speed processing, could be operated in real time. We experimentally evaluated the developed system by measuring the luminance of an LED with varying input and confirmed that the system works appropriately. In addition, we demonstrated that the volumetric display exhibits different full-color dynamic two-dimensional images in two orthogonal directions. Each of the exhibited images could be obtained only from the prescribed viewpoint. Such directional characteristics of the system are beneficial for applications, including digital signage, security systems, art, and amusement.

  19. Study of large hemispherical photomultiplier tubes for the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Amram, P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F. E.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bailey, D.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Becherini, Y.; Bellotti, R.; Beltramelli, J.; Bertin, V.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Blanc, F.; de Botton, N.; Boulesteix, J.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brooks, C. B.; Bradbury, S. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Burgio, G. F.; Cafagna, F.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, P.; Circella, M.; Colnard, C.; Compère, C.; Coniglione, R.; Cooper, S.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; Deschamps, A.; de Marzo, C.; Denans, D.; Destelle, J.-J.; de Vita, R.; Dinkelspiler, B.; Distefano, C.; Drogou, J.-F.; Druillole, F.; Engelen, J.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Falchini, E.; Favard, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferry, S.; Festy, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fopma, J.; Fuda, J.-L.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Girard, N.; Goret, P.; Graf, K.; Hallewell, G.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrouin, G.; Hößl, J.; Hoffmann, C.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karkar, S.; Karolak, M.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kooijman, P.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kuch, S.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Lafoux, H.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laschinsky, H.; Laubier, L.; Legou, T.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le van Suu, A.; Lo Nigro, L.; Lo Presti, D.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Maron, C.; Massol, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazéas, F.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J. E.; Migneco, E.; Millot, C.; Milovanovic, A.; Montanet, F.; Montaruli, T.; Morel, J.-P.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann, C.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nezri, E.; Niess, V.; Nooren, G. J.; Ogden, P.; Olivetto, C.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Papaleo, R.; Payre, P.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pineau, J.-P.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Potheau, R.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Real, D.; van Rens, B. A. P.; Réthoré, F.; Riccobene, G.; Rigaud, V.; Ripani, M.; Roca-Blay, V.; Rolin, J.-F.; Romita, M.; Rose, H. J.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Sacquin, Y.; Salesa, F.; Salomon, K.; Saouter, S.; Sapienza, P.; Shanidze, R.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schuster, W.; Sokalski, I.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stubert, D.; Taiuti, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Tilav, S.; Valdy, P.; Valente, V.; Vallage, B.; Vernin, P.; Virieux, J.; de Vries, G.; de Witt Huberts, P.; de Wolf, E.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zakharov, V.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2005-12-01

    The ANTARES neutrino telescope, to be immersed depth in the Mediterranean Sea, will consist of a three-dimensional matrix of 900 large area photomultiplier tubes housed in pressure-resistant glass spheres. The selection of the optimal photomultiplier was a critical step for the project and required an intensive phase of tests and developments carried out in close collaboration with the main manufacturers worldwide. This paper provides an overview of the tests performed by the collaboration and describes in detail the features of the photomultiplier tube chosen for ANTARES.

  20. Photomultiplier characteristics considerations for the deep underwater muon and neutrino detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the characteristics of photomultipliers for the Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detection (DUMAND) System are discussed. The pulse-height resolution, the afterpulsing phenomena and the gain sensitivity to the ambient magnetic field have been determined for large photocathode area photomultipliers. Furthermore, the transient time difference, the single photoelectron time spread, and the collection and photocathode quantum efficiency uniformity as a function of the position of the photocathode sensing area have been reviewed. Finally, an attempt has been made to estimate the photomultiplier reliability and its lifetime