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Sample records for imaging centers icmics

  1. Color Image Encryption Using Three-Dimensional Sine ICMIC Modulation Map and DNA Sequence Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenhao; Sun, Kehui; He, Yi; Yu, Mengyao

    Derived from Sine map and iterative chaotic map with infinite collapse (ICMIC), a three-dimensional hyperchaotic Sine ICMIC modulation map (3D-SIMM) is proposed based on a close-loop modulation coupling (CMC) method. Based on this map, a novel color image encryption algorithm is designed by employing a hybrid model of multidirectional circular permutation and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) masking. In this scheme, the pixel positions of image are scrambled by multidirectional circular permutation, and the pixel values are substituted by DNA sequence operations. The simulation results and security analysis show that the algorithm has good encryption effect and strong key sensitivity, and can resist brute-force, statistical, differential, known-plaintext and chosen-plaintext attacks.

  2. PACS for imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, T J

    2003-01-01

    PACS can be a difficult and confusing decision for any radiology provider, but it can be an even more dynamic question for an outpatient imaging center. Every center represents a unique situation and requires a specialized solution. Typically, most of what is said and discussed about PACS concentrates on solutions and requirements for hospital radiology facilities. Administrators of imaging centers have different problems from hospital administrators, and they need different answers. For imaging centers, the financial justification for PACS may be less immediate than for hospitals. The first thing that must be understood is that no PAC system can make a typical imaging center completely filmless, at least not for quite a while. A hospital has the ability to dictate to its internal referring physicians how a radiological study is delivered, whereas in an imaging center environment, the roles are very much reversed. Once the justification are made for the financial viability of PACS in an imaging center, the next question is how to finance the acquisition of PACS. The decision will depend on how you cost justify your PACS, as well as the shape of your business model, and it will come to a decision between capital purchase or contracting with an application service provider, or ASP. Historically, in the hospital-dominated marketplace, PAC systems have been treated as capital acquisitions. However, for most imaging center, owning the system is more of a problem than a benefit. ASPs increasingly represent a successful alternative for imaging centers. One of the biggest things to consider with PACS is how to store all of those images. There are typically two options, on-site and off-site, with a new "hybrid" option surfacing more recently. Each option has benefits for the user, but the benefits of off-site storage are increasing as the technology advances. Some of the benefits are data security and access. Other issues to address are HIPAA compliance, standardized

  3. PACS strategy for imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedel, Victoria; Zdanowicz, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) have been available in imaging centers for many years, but they often were less functional, were not well integrated into patient information systems, and lacked the network backbone to implement a system. As modalities are replaced and technology improves, the ability and time for an imaging center to acquire, integrate, and utilize PACS has arrived. However, each imaging center must determine why it should invest in PACS. A business plan is the fundamental need. Each imaging center must understand its target market, growth rate, and staffing plans. Additional considerations lie in current and future modality availability, the need for offsite delivery of images and reports, and the potential need for remote transmission of images. These issues must be identified and prioritized. A multidisciplinary team is essential. The most successful PACS implementation begins with complete involvement from all levels. The team should be comprised of people with complementary skills who are committed to a common purpose, set of performance goals, and approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable. The team must jointly decide on the project's objectives. These objectives fall under 4 categories: clinical, service, financial, and performance. PACS must be considered a tool to help accomplish each objective. The imaging center must determine its top priorities, then translate them into a technology "wish list." The center can then list those pieces of technology that are most important and prioritize them. There are even more considerations for connecting multiple imaging centers. The team must create a comprehensive request for proposal (RFP) and determine the vendors that will receive the document. Once the RFP responses have been received and the vendor has been selected, an effective training plan must be executed. Training plans should be competency-based, ensuring comfort and competency among all staff. Upon

  4. [Imaging center - optimization of the imaging process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, H-P

    2013-04-01

    Hospitals around the world are under increasing pressure to optimize the economic efficiency of treatment processes. Imaging is responsible for a great part of the success but also of the costs of treatment. In routine work an excessive supply of imaging methods leads to an "as well as" strategy up to the limit of the capacity without critical reflection. Exams that have no predictable influence on the clinical outcome are an unjustified burden for the patient. They are useless and threaten the financial situation and existence of the hospital. In recent years the focus of process optimization was exclusively on the quality and efficiency of performed single examinations. In the future critical discussion of the effectiveness of single exams in relation to the clinical outcome will be more important. Unnecessary exams can be avoided, only if in addition to the optimization of single exams (efficiency) there is an optimization strategy for the total imaging process (efficiency and effectiveness). This requires a new definition of processes (Imaging Pathway), new structures for organization (Imaging Center) and a new kind of thinking on the part of the medical staff. Motivation has to be changed from gratification of performed exams to gratification of process quality (medical quality, service quality, economics), including the avoidance of additional (unnecessary) exams. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. A fast image encryption algorithm based on chaotic map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenhao; Sun, Kehui; Zhu, Congxu

    2016-09-01

    Derived from Sine map and iterative chaotic map with infinite collapse (ICMIC), a new two-dimensional Sine ICMIC modulation map (2D-SIMM) is proposed based on a close-loop modulation coupling (CMC) model, and its chaotic performance is analyzed by means of phase diagram, Lyapunov exponent spectrum and complexity. It shows that this map has good ergodicity, hyperchaotic behavior, large maximum Lyapunov exponent and high complexity. Based on this map, a fast image encryption algorithm is proposed. In this algorithm, the confusion and diffusion processes are combined for one stage. Chaotic shift transform (CST) is proposed to efficiently change the image pixel positions, and the row and column substitutions are applied to scramble the pixel values simultaneously. The simulation and analysis results show that this algorithm has high security, low time complexity, and the abilities of resisting statistical analysis, differential, brute-force, known-plaintext and chosen-plaintext attacks.

  6. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira [University of Vermont and State Agricultural College

    2013-08-02

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  7. Building an imaging center: laying the foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, M Shane; Geise, Jon D; Reed, Mary A

    2005-01-01

    In Spring 2003, Central Louisiana Imaging, Inc. (CLII), an 11-member radiology group, decided to create a properly configured freestanding imaging center. Before moving forward with the project, CLII conducted extensive market research and learned the following: CLII's ability to draw patients from a broad geography (central Louisiana) would work in its favor While the defined market was shrinking slightly and made up of middle-income households, the population was fairly well insured and aging at a rate comparable to the nation. Given an aging population and advances in technology, market demand for imaging was projected to grow despite the shrinking population. There were opportunities to differentiate on quality technology, service offering, and customer service; the sophistication and positioning of competitors is more important than the sheer number of competitors. CLII's relationship with key referring physicians was likely portable and would translate into volume within the new center. The group measured each potential service or modality against 5 evaluation criteria to determine whether a market opportunity existed: demographic fit, projected market demand, competitive positioning, "anchor service," and synergy with CLII's strategy. Once the market opportunity was confirmed and the service offering was set, CLII completed a 5-year proforma in order to project cash flows, capital costs, and the anticipated return on investment. CLII opened the imaging center in September 2004. Ten months into opeations, the center was a measurable success. The levels, and break-even by month 4, volumes are currently at year 2 levels, and the center recently added nuclear medicine and its second magnetic resonance imaging system-11 months ahead of schedule.

  8. Cellular Imaging | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innovative imaging methods developed and refined within CCR revealed atomic-level structures of biological molecules and unveiled dynamic views of a cell’s interior that are driving the design of new treatments and diagnostics for cancer.

  9. Poison control center - Emergency number (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    For a poison emergency call 1-800-222-1222 anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the U.S. use this national ...

  10. Strategic planning for radiology: opening an outpatient diagnostic imaging center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leepson, Evan

    2003-01-01

    Launching a new diagnostic imaging center involves very specific requirements and roadmaps, including five major areas of change that have a direct impact on planning: Imaging and communication technology Finances and reimbursement Ownership structure of imaging entities Critical workforce shortages Imaging is moving outside radiology First, planning must focus on the strategic level of any organization, whether it is a multi-national corporation or a six-person radiology group. Think of all organizations as a triangle with three horizontal levels: strategic, managerial and operational. The strategic level of decision-making is at the top of the triangle, and here is where planning must take place. For strategic planning to work, there must be focused time and energy spent on this activity, usually away from the reading room and imaging center. There are five planning strategies, which must have the explicit goal of developing and growing the imaging center. The five strategies are: Clinical and quality issues, Governance and administration, Technology, Relationships, Marketing and business development. The best way to plan and implement these strategies is to create work groups of radiologists, technologists, and administrative and support staff. Once the group agrees on the strategy and tactic, it takes responsibility for implementation. Embarking on the launch of a new outpatient diagnostic imaging center is no small undertaking, and anyone who has struggled with such an endeavor can readily attest to the associated challenges and benefits. Success depends on many things, and one of the most important factors relates to the amount of time and the quality of effort spent on strategic planning at the outset. Neglecting or skimping on this phase may lead to unforeseen obstacles that could potentially derail the project.

  11. Defining the medical imaging requirements for a rural health center

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book establishes the criteria for the type of medical imaging services that should be made available to rural health centers, providing professional rural hospital managers with information that makes their work more effective and efficient. It also offers valuable insights into government, non-governmental and religious organizations involved in the planning, establishment and operation of medical facilities in rural areas. Rural health centers are established to prevent patients from being forced to travel to distant urban medical facilities. To manage patients properly, rural health centers should be part of regional and more complete systems of medical health care installations in the country on the basis of a referral and counter-referral program, and thus, they should have the infrastructure needed to transport patients to urban hospitals when they need more complex health care. The coordination of all the activities is only possible if rural health centers are led by strong and dedicated managers....

  12. The Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte M.; Jensen, Peter S.; Erritzoe, David

    2016-01-01

    We here describe a multimodality neuroimaging containing data from healthy volunteers and patients, acquired within the Lundbeck Foundation Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (Cimbi) in Copenhagen, Denmark. The data is of particular relevance for neurobiological research questions rela...... currently contains blood and in some instances saliva samples from about 500 healthy volunteers and 300 patients with e.g., major depression, dementia, substance abuse, obesity, and impulsive aggression. Data continue to be added to the Cimbi database and biobank....

  13. Hospital image and the positioning of service centers: an application in market analysis and strategy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S M; Clark, M

    1990-09-01

    The research confirms the coexistence of different images for hospitals, service centers within the same hospitals, and service programs offered by each of the service centers. The images of individual service centers are found not to be tied to the image of the host facility. Further, service centers and host facilities have differential rankings on the same service decision attributes. Managerial recommendations are offered for "image differentiation" between a hospital and its care centers.

  14. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  15. Cloud Image Data Center for Healthcare Network in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shao-Jen; Lai, Lai-Shiun; Gotcher, Donald; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Xu, Yeong-Yuh; Yang, Ching-Wen

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates how a healthcare network in Taiwan uses a practical cloud image data center (CIDC) to communicate with its constituent hospital branches. A case study approach was used. The study was carried out in the central region of Taiwan, with four hospitals belonging to the Veterans Hospital healthcare network. The CIDC provides synchronous and asynchronous consultation among these branches. It provides storage, platforms, and services on demand to the hospitals. Any branch-client can pull up the patient's medical images from any hospital off this cloud. Patients can be examined at the branches, and the images and reports can be further evaluated by physicians in the main Taichung Veterans General Hospital (TVGH) to enhance the usage and efficiency of equipment in the various branches, thereby shortening the waiting time of patients. The performance of the CIDC over 5 years shows: (1) the total number of cross-hospital images accessed with CDC in the branches was 132,712; and (2) TVGH assisted the branches in keying in image reports using the CIDC 4,424 times; and (3) Implementation of the system has improved management, efficiency, speed and quality of care. Therefore, the results lead to the recommendation of continuing and expanding the cloud computing architecture to improve information sharing among branches in the healthcare network.

  16. Patient-centered image and data management in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steil, Volker; Schneider, Frank; Kuepper, Beate; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Weisser, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Background: recent changes in the radiotherapy (RT) workflow through the introduction of complex treatment paradigms such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and, recently, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with their increase in data traffic for different data classes have mandated efforts to further integrate electronic data management for RT departments in a patient- and treatment-course-centered fashion. Methods: workflow in an RT department is multidimensional and multidirectional and consists of at least five different data classes (RT/machine data, patient-related documents such as reports and letters, progress notes, DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) image data, and non-DICOM image data). Data has to be handled in the framework of adaptive feedback loops with increasing frequency. This is in contrast to a radiology department where mainly DICOM image data and reports have to be widely accessible but are dealt with in a mainly unidirectional manner. When compared to a diagnostic Radiology Information System (RIS)/Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), additional legal requirements have to be conformed to when an integrated electronic RT data management system is installed. Among these are extended storage periods, documentation of treatment plan approval by physicians and physicist, documentation of informed consent, etc. Conclusion: since the transition to a paper- and filmless environment in medicine and especially m radiation ''neology is unavoidable this review discusses these issues and suggests a possible hardware and organizational architecture of an RT department information system under control of a Hospital Information System (HIS), based on combined features of genuine RT Record and Verify (R and V) Systems, PACS, and Electronic Medical Records (EMR). (orig.)

  17. STRUCTURE TENSOR IMAGE FILTERING USING RIEMANNIAN L1 AND L∞ CENTER-OF-MASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Angulo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Structure tensor images are obtained by a Gaussian smoothing of the dyadic product of gradient image. These images give at each pixel a n×n symmetric positive definite matrix SPD(n, representing the local orientation and the edge information. Processing such images requires appropriate algorithms working on the Riemannian manifold on the SPD(n matrices. This contribution deals with structure tensor image filtering based on Lp geometric averaging. In particular, L1 center-of-mass (Riemannian median or Fermat-Weber point and L∞ center-of-mass (Riemannian circumcenter can be obtained for structure tensors using recently proposed algorithms. Our contribution in this paper is to study the interest of L1 and L∞ Riemannian estimators for structure tensor image processing. In particular, we compare both for two image analysis tasks: (i structure tensor image denoising; (ii anomaly detection in structure tensor images.

  18. First PET Center in Mexico: the power of molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila R, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique modality. It represents the forefront of medical images and was developed as a quantitative technique for imaging biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. PET is unique because it produces images of the body's basic biochemistry or function. Traditional diagnostic techniques such as x-rays, CT scans or MRI, produce images of the body's anatomy or structure. The premise with these techniques is that the change in anatomy or structure that occurs with disease can be seen. However, biochemical processes are also altered with disease and may occur before there is a change gross anatomy. PET is an imaging technique that is used to visualize some of these processes. The development of PET as we know it today began in 1974 with the development of a single ring detector system by Phelps et al. Today, over 350 PET scanners are in use in the world, mainly in the USA (over 140), Europe (particularly in the Anglo-Saxon countries and France) and Japan. Many of these facilities also have their own cyclotron to produce the positron emitters. In the Southern hemisphere, only Australia, Argentina. and recently Mexico, have a very small number of PET facilities. (Author)

  19. First PET Center in Mexico: the power of molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila R, M.A. [Unidad PET, Facultad de Medicina, UNAM (Mexico)

    2001-09-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique modality. It represents the forefront of medical images and was developed as a quantitative technique for imaging biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. PET is unique because it produces images of the body's basic biochemistry or function. Traditional diagnostic techniques such as x-rays, CT scans or MRI, produce images of the body's anatomy or structure. The premise with these techniques is that the change in anatomy or structure that occurs with disease can be seen. However, biochemical processes are also altered with disease and may occur before there is a change gross anatomy. PET is an imaging technique that is used to visualize some of these processes. The development of PET as we know it today began in 1974 with the development of a single ring detector system by Phelps et al. Today, over 350 PET scanners are in use in the world, mainly in the USA (over 140), Europe (particularly in the Anglo-Saxon countries and France) and Japan. Many of these facilities also have their own cyclotron to produce the positron emitters. In the Southern hemisphere, only Australia, Argentina. and recently Mexico, have a very small number of PET facilities. (Author)

  20. The relationship among image, satisfaction and loyalty – innovative factor of competitiveness for shopping centers

    OpenAIRE

    Abrudan, Ioana-Nicoleta; Plaias, Ioan; Dabija, Dan-Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Currently, most markets are characterized by high competition among shopping centers. Under these circumstances, the evolution in the competitiveness and performance of the centers is increasingly linked to the success in the innovation of current activities, which is aimed at improving their image and increasing customer satisfaction and loyalty. The purpose of the present research is to study the influence of innovation activities through the image components on behavioural loyalty, mediate...

  1. Current use of imaging and electromagnetic source localization procedures in epilepsy surgery centers across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthaan, Brian E; Rados, Matea; Barsi, Péter; Boon, Paul; Carmichael, David W; Carrette, Evelien; Craiu, Dana; Cross, J Helen; Diehl, Beate; Dimova, Petia; Fabo, Daniel; Francione, Stefano; Gaskin, Vladislav; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Grigoreva, Elena; Guekht, Alla; Hirsch, Edouard; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Jung, Julien; Kalviainen, Reetta; Kelemen, Anna; Kimiskidis, Vasilios; Kobulashvili, Teia; Krsek, Pavel; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Larsson, Pål G; Leitinger, Markus; Lossius, Morten I; Luzin, Roman; Malmgren, Kristina; Mameniskiene, Ruta; Marusic, Petr; Metin, Baris; Özkara, Cigdem; Pecina, Hrvoje; Quesada, Carlos M; Rugg-Gunn, Fergus; Rydenhag, Bertil; Ryvlin, Philippe; Scholly, Julia; Seeck, Margitta; Staack, Anke M; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Stepanov, Valentin; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Trinka, Eugen; Uzan, Mustafa; Vogt, Viola L; Vos, Sjoerd B; Vulliémoz, Serge; Huiskamp, Geertjan; Leijten, Frans S S; Van Eijsden, Pieter; Braun, Kees P J

    2016-05-01

    In 2014 the European Union-funded E-PILEPSY project was launched to improve awareness of, and accessibility to, epilepsy surgery across Europe. We aimed to investigate the current use of neuroimaging, electromagnetic source localization, and imaging postprocessing procedures in participating centers. A survey on the clinical use of imaging, electromagnetic source localization, and postprocessing methods in epilepsy surgery candidates was distributed among the 25 centers of the consortium. A descriptive analysis was performed, and results were compared to existing guidelines and recommendations. Response rate was 96%. Standard epilepsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols are acquired at 3 Tesla by 15 centers and at 1.5 Tesla by 9 centers. Three centers perform 3T MRI only if indicated. Twenty-six different MRI sequences were reported. Six centers follow all guideline-recommended MRI sequences with the proposed slice orientation and slice thickness or voxel size. Additional sequences are used by 22 centers. MRI postprocessing methods are used in 16 centers. Interictal positron emission tomography (PET) is available in 22 centers; all using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Seventeen centers perform PET postprocessing. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is used by 19 centers, of which 15 perform postprocessing. Four centers perform neither PET nor SPECT in children. Seven centers apply magnetoencephalography (MEG) source localization, and nine apply electroencephalography (EEG) source localization. Fourteen combinations of inverse methods and volume conduction models are used. We report a large variation in the presurgical diagnostic workup among epilepsy surgery centers across Europe. This diversity underscores the need for high-quality systematic reviews, evidence-based recommendations, and harmonization of available diagnostic presurgical methods. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. A MURI Center for Intelligent Biomimetic Image Processing and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    times, labeled "plage" or "open space" or "natural", the system learns to associate multiple classes with a given input. Testbed image examples have shown...brain color perception and category learning. Commentary on "Coordinating perceptually grounded categories through language " by Luc Steels and Tony...Symposium on Computational Intelligence (ISCI), Kosice, Slovakia, June 2002. 9. Carpenter, G.A., Award from the Slovak Artificial Intelligence Society, 2002

  3. Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science Center for Computational Imaging XNAT: A multimodal data archive and processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Robert L; Yvernault, Benjamin C; Boyd, Brian D; Damon, Stephen M; Gibney, Kyla David; Conrad, Benjamin N; Phillips, Nicholas S; Rogers, Baxter P; Gao, Yurui; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has developed a database built on XNAT housing over a quarter of a million scans. The database provides framework for (1) rapid prototyping, (2) large scale batch processing of images and (3) scalable project management. The system uses the web-based interfaces of XNAT and REDCap to allow for graphical interaction. A python middleware layer, the Distributed Automation for XNAT (DAX) package, distributes computation across the Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education high performance computing center. All software are made available in open source for use in combining portable batch scripting (PBS) grids and XNAT servers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Automated daily quality control analysis for mammography in a multi-unit imaging center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundell, Veli-Matti; Mäkelä, Teemu; Meaney, Alexander; Kaasalainen, Touko; Savolainen, Sauli

    2018-01-01

    Background The high requirements for mammography image quality necessitate a systematic quality assurance process. Digital imaging allows automation of the image quality analysis, which can potentially improve repeatability and objectivity compared to a visual evaluation made by the users. Purpose To develop an automatic image quality analysis software for daily mammography quality control in a multi-unit imaging center. Material and Methods An automated image quality analysis software using the discrete wavelet transform and multiresolution analysis was developed for the American College of Radiology accreditation phantom. The software was validated by analyzing 60 randomly selected phantom images from six mammography systems and 20 phantom images with different dose levels from one mammography system. The results were compared to a visual analysis made by four reviewers. Additionally, long-term image quality trends of a full-field digital mammography system and a computed radiography mammography system were investigated. Results The automated software produced feature detection levels comparable to visual analysis. The agreement was good in the case of fibers, while the software detected somewhat more microcalcifications and characteristic masses. Long-term follow-up via a quality assurance web portal demonstrated the feasibility of using the software for monitoring the performance of mammography systems in a multi-unit imaging center. Conclusion Automated image quality analysis enables monitoring the performance of digital mammography systems in an efficient, centralized manner.

  5. Assessment of diabetic teleretinal imaging program at the Portland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Grace L; Hoban, Keely L; Jun, Weon; Riedel, Kevin J; Pedersen, Amy L; Hayes, John

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective chart review of 200 diabetic patients who had teleretinal imaging performed between January 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, at Portland Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center outpatient clinics to assess the effectiveness of the diabetic teleretinal imaging program. Twenty patients (10%) had diabetic retinopathy. Ninety percent of the available teleretinal imaging studies were of adequate quality for interpretation. In accordance with local VA policy at that time, all teleretinal imaging patients should have been referred for a dilated retinal examination the following year. Image readers referred 97.5% of the patients to eye clinics for subsequent eye examinations, but the imagers scheduled appointments for only 80% of these patients. The redundancy rate, i.e., patients who had an eye examination within the past 6 mo, was 11%; the duplicate recall rate, i.e., patients who had a second teleretinal imaging performed within 1 yr of the eye examination, was 37%. Rates of timely diabetic eye examinations at clinics with teleretinal imaging programs, particularly when teleretinal imaging and eye clinics were colocated at the same community-based outpatient clinic, were higher than those without a teleretinal imaging program. We concluded that the Portland VA Medical Center's teleretinal imaging program was successful in increasing the screening rate for diabetic retinopathy.

  6. MRI quality assurance using the ACR phantom in a multi-unit imaging center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihalainen, Toni M.; Kuusela, Linda J.; Savolainen, Sauli E.; Loennroth, Nadja T.; Peltonen, Juha I.; Uusi-Simola, Jouni K.; Timonen, Marjut H.; Sipilae, Outi E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instrumentation is vulnerable to technical and image quality problems, and quality assurance is essential. In the studied regional imaging center the long-term quality assurance has been based on MagNET phantom measurements. American College of Radiology (ACR) has an accreditation program including a standardized image quality measurement protocol and phantom. The ACR protocol includes recommended acceptance criteria for clinical sequences and thus provides possibility to assess the clinical relevance of quality assurance. The purpose of this study was to test the ACR MRI phantom in quality assurance of a multi-unit imaging center. Material and methods. The imaging center operates 11 MRI systems of three major manufacturers with field strengths of 3.0 T, 1.5 T and 1.0 T. Images of the ACR phantom were acquired using a head coil following the ACR scanning instructions. Both ACR T1- and T2-weighted sequences as well as T1- and T2-weighted brain sequences in clinical use at each site were acquired. Measurements were performed twice. The images were analyzed and the results were compared with the ACR acceptance levels. Results. The acquisition procedure with the ACR phantom was faster than with the MagNET phantoms. On the first and second measurement rounds 91% and 73% of the systems passed the ACR test. Measured slice thickness accuracies were not within the acceptance limits in site T2 sequences. Differences in the high contrast spatial resolution between the ACR and the site sequences were observed. In 3.0 T systems the image intensity uniformity was slightly lower than the ACR acceptance limit. Conclusion. The ACR method was feasible in quality assurance of a multi-unit imaging center and the ACR protocol could replace the MagNET phantom tests. An automatic analysis of the images will further improve cost-effectiveness and objectiveness of the ACR protocol

  7. Applied high-speed imaging for the icing research program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Howard; Owens, Jay; Shin, Jaiwon

    1992-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center provides scientists a scaled, controlled environment to simulate natural icing events. The closed-loop, low speed, refrigerated wind tunnel offers the experimental capability to test for icing certification requirements, analytical model validation and calibration techniques, cloud physics instrumentation refinement, advanced ice protection systems, and rotorcraft icing methodology development. The test procedures for these objectives all require a high degree of visual documentation, both in real-time data acquisition and post-test image processing. Information is provided to scientific, technical, and industrial imaging specialists as well as to research personnel about the high-speed and conventional imaging systems will be on the recent ice protection technology program. Various imaging examples for some of the tests are presented. Additional imaging examples are available from the NASA Lewis Research Center's Photographic and Printing Branch.

  8. Evaluation of an improved technique for automated center lumen line definition in cardiovascular image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratama van Andel, Hugo A.F.; Meijering, Erik; Vrooman, Henri A.; Stokking, Rik; Lugt, Aad van der; Monye, Cecile de

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate a new method for automated definition of a center lumen line in vessels in cardiovascular image data. This method, called VAMPIRE, is based on improved detection of vessel-like structures. A multiobserver evaluation study was conducted involving 40 tracings in clinical CTA data of carotid arteries to compare VAMPIRE with an established technique. This comparison showed that VAMPIRE yields considerably more successful tracings and improved handling of stenosis, calcifications, multiple vessels, and nearby bone structures. We conclude that VAMPIRE is highly suitable for automated definition of center lumen lines in vessels in cardiovascular image data. (orig.)

  9. The relationship among image, satisfaction and loyalty – innovative factor of competitiveness for shopping centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana-Nicoleta Abrudan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, most markets are characterized by high competition among shopping centers. Under these circumstances, the evolution in the competitiveness and performance of the centers is increasingly linked to the success in the innovation of current activities, which is aimed at improving their image and increasing customer satisfaction and loyalty. The purpose of the present research is to study the influence of innovation activities through the image components on behavioural loyalty, mediated by satisfaction (affective loyalty and conative loyalty. The authors aim to investigate, using a questionnaire survey among the customers of Cluj-Napoca shopping centers, the relationship among the components of image and satisfaction and the various types of loyalty. The conclusions of the structural equations modelling reveal that most components of the image (assortment, price, loyalty policy, décor, service and communication directly and positively influence satisfaction, and that satisfaction and conative loyalty mediate the relationship between image and behavioural loyalty. The results reveal important managerial implications from the point of view of innovative actions of shopping centers, which can contribute to attracting and keeping customers, these contributing not only to creating loyal patrons, but also to increasing their competitiveness and to achieving better positioning.

  10. Trends in the Use of Medical Imaging to Diagnose Appendicitis at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repplinger, Michael D; Weber, Andrew C; Pickhardt, Perry J; Rajamanickam, Victoria P; Svenson, James E; Ehlenbach, William J; Westergaard, Ryan P; Reeder, Scott B; Jacobs, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    To quantify the trends in imaging use for the diagnosis of appendicitis. A retrospective study covering a 22-year period was conducted at an academic medical center. Patients were identified by International Classification of Diseases-9 diagnosis code for appendicitis. Medical record data extraction of these patients included imaging test used (ultrasound, CT, or MRI), gender, age, and body mass index (BMI). The proportion of patients undergoing each scan was calculated by year. Regression analysis was performed to determine whether age, gender, or BMI affected imaging choice. The study included a total of 2,108 patients, including 967 (43.5%) females and 599 (27%) children (imaging used for the diagnosis of appendicitis decreased over time (P medical center, CT use increased more than 20-fold. However, no statistically significant trend was found for increased use of ultrasound or MRI. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Granot

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a a data acquisition device (DAD at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site. The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  12. Local experience on radionuclide myocardial imaging in the Philippines at the Philippine Heart Center for Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villacorta, E.V.

    1977-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Department of the Philippine Heart Center has introduced the detection of coronary heart disease through myocardiac perfusion imaging. The cardiovascular procedures are availed of free-of-charge to registered PHCA patients excepting for the costly TI-201 imaging. In summary, coronary perfusion in imaging should be an integral part of coronary arteriography. Barring the expensive cost of TI-120, myocardial perfusion imaging is ideal for detection of coronary heart disease. Experience shows better sensitivity of TI-201 than exercise ECG for detection of ischemia. Another non-invasive procedure for the detection of acute infarction is the radionuclide imaging using a bone radiopharmaceutical Tc99m prophosphate. In conclusion, acute infarct imaging is a valuable adjunct to ECG and enzyme studies. (RTD)

  13. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    OpenAIRE

    Chalavi Sima; Simmons Andrew; Dijkstra Hildebrand; Barker Gareth J; Reinders AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in ...

  14. Soft X-ray imaging by optically stimulated luminescence from color centers in lithium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfigli, F. [ENEA, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy)], E-mail: bonfigli@frascati.enea.it; Almaviva, S.; Baldacchini, G.; Bollanti, S.; Flora, F.; Lai, A.; Montereali, R.M. [ENEA, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Nichelatti, E. [ENEA, C.R. Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 S.Maria di Galeria (Rome) (Italy); Tomassetti, G.; Ritucci, A.; Reale, L. [Universita de L' Aquila e INFN, Dip. di Fisica, Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy); Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.A. [MISDC of VNIIFTRI Mendeleevo, Moscow region, 141570 (Russian Federation); Larciprete, R. [ISC-CNR, Sezione Montelibretti, Via Salaria, Km. 29.3, 00016 Monterotondo Scalo (Rome) (Italy); Gregoratti, L.; Kiskinova, M. [Sincrotrone Trieste, S. S. 14, Km. 163.5, 34012 Basovizza (TS) (Italy)

    2007-07-15

    An innovative X-ray imaging detector based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence from color centers in lithium fluoride is presented. Regular photoluminescent patterns produced on LiF samples by different intense X-ray sources, like synchrotrons, laser plasma sources and a capillary discharge laser have been investigated by a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope. The use of a LiF-based imaging plate for X-ray microscopy is also discussed showing microradiographies of small animals.

  15. Breast Imaging: How We Manage Diagnostic Technology at a Multidisciplinary Breast Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Tejerina Bernal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the most important aspects and problems related to the management of breast cancer imaging, at a center specialized in breast pathology. We review the established and emerging diagnostic techniques, their indications, and peculiarities: digital mammography, CAD systems, and the recent digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound and complementary elastography, molecular imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging, advanced sequences (diffusion, and positron emission mammography (PEM. The adequate integration and rational management of these techniques is essential, but this is not always easy, in order to achieve a successful diagnosis.

  16. A User-Centered Cooperative Information System for Medical Imaging Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Enrique J.; Quiles, Jose A.; Sanz, Marcos F.; del Pozo, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    Presents a cooperative information system for remote medical imaging diagnosis. General computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) problems addressed are definition of a procedure for the design of user-centered cooperative systems (conceptual level); and improvement of user feedback and optimization of the communication bandwidth in highly…

  17. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalavi, Sima; Simmons, Andrew; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Barker, Gareth J; Reinders, AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in multi-center studies, we present data from a study in which we aimed to optimize a set of volumetric MRI-protocols to define a protocol giving data that are consistent and reproducible across two centers and over time. Optimization was achieved based on data quality and quantitative measures, in our case using FreeSurfer and Voxel Based Morphometry approaches. Our approach consisted of a series of five comparisons. Firstly, a single-center dataset was collected, using a range of candidate pulse-sequences and parameters chosen on the basis of previous literature. Based on initial results, a number of minor changes were implemented to optimize the pulse-sequences, and a second single-center dataset was collected. FreeSurfer data quality measures were compared between datasets in order to determine the best performing sequence(s), which were taken forward to the next stage of testing. We subsequently acquired short-term and long-term two-center reproducibility data, and quantitative measures were again assessed to determine the protocol with the highest reproducibility across centers. Effects of a scanner software and hardware upgrade on the reproducibility of the protocols at one of the centers were also evaluated. Assessing the quality measures from the first two datasets allowed us to define artefact-free protocols, all with high image quality as assessed by FreeSurfer. Comparing the quantitative test and retest measures, we found high within-center reproducibility for all protocols, but lower

  18. Outpatient imaging center valuations: do you need a fair-market value analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonsman, G S

    2001-01-01

    Typically, outpatient diagnostic imaging centers are formed as partnerships between radiologists, radiologists and hospitals, and/or radiologists and diagnostic imaging center management companies. As a result of these partnership structures, the question of equity valuation frequently arises. It is not only important to understand when an independent valuation would be required, but also what "type" of valuation needs to be performed. The type of valuation may vary based upon the use of the valuation. In partnerships that involve hospitals and physicians, the federal anti-kickback statutes (fraud and abuse laws) require that all transactions between referring physicians and hospitals be consummated at fair-market value. In addition, tax-exempt hospitals that enter into partnerships with physicians are required to enter into those transactions at fair-market value or risk losing their tax-exempt status. Fair-market value is also typically the standard of value that all partnerships strive to conduct equity transactions with shareholders. Qualifications required by those who perform independent fair-market value opinions include: Proper business valuation training and focus on valuations as a primary business Focus on the healthcare industry and specifically on the valuation of diagnostic imaging centers In order to perform a reasonable business valuation analysis, the appraiser must have access to a significant amount of financial, operational and legal information. The analyst must be able to understand the history of the imaging center as well as the projected future of the center. Ultimately, a valuation is a measurement of the estimated future cash flows of the center--risk adjusted--in order to quantify the present value of those cash flows.

  19. The trochlear pre-ossification center: a normal developmental stage and potential pitfall on MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaimes, Camilo [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jimenez, Mauricio [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Marin, Diana [Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Ho-Fung, Victor; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The hypertrophic changes that occur in the cartilage of an epiphysis prior to the onset of ossification are known as the pre-ossification center. Awareness of the appearance of the pre-ossification center on MR images is important to avoid confusing normal developmental changes with pathology. The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of the trochlear pre-ossification center on MR imaging and examine age and gender differences. We retrospectively analyzed MR images from 61 children. The trochleas were categorized into three types on the basis of signal intensity (SI). Trochlear types were compared to age and gender. There was no significant difference between the ages of boys and girls. Type 1 trochleas showed homogeneous SI on all pulse sequences. Type 2 trochleas demonstrated a focus of high SI in the epiphyseal cartilage on fat-suppressed water-sensitive sequences, with high or intermediate SI on gradient-echo images (pre-ossification center). Type 3 trochleas showed low SI on fat-suppressed water-sensitive sequences and gradient-echo images. Thirty-seven trochleas were described as type 1, sixteen as type 2 and eight as type 3. ANOVAs confirmed a statistically significant difference in the age of children with type 3 trochleas and those with types 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). Spearman rank correlations determined a positive relationship between trochlear type and age of the children (r = 0.53). Development-related changes in the trochlea follow a predictable pattern. The signal characteristics of the pre-ossification center likely reflect normal chondrocyte hypertrophy and an increase in free water in the matrix. (orig.)

  20. Molecular image in biomedical research. Molecular imaging unit of the National Cancer Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Bruzon, J.; Mulero Anhiorte, F.

    2010-01-01

    This article has two basic objectives. firstly, it will review briefly the most important imaging techniques used in biomedical research indicting the most significant aspects related to their application in the preclinical stage. Secondly, it will present a practical application of these techniques in a pure biomedical research centre (not associated to a clinical facility). Practical aspects such as organisation, equipment, work norms, shielding of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) Imaging Unit will be shown. This is a pioneering facility in the application of these techniques in research centres without any dependence or any direct relationship with other hospital Nuclear Medicine services. (Author) 7 refs.

  1. Assessment of inpatient multimodal cardiac imaging appropriateness at large academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remfry, Andrew; Abrams, Howard; Dudzinski, David M; Weiner, Rory B; Bhatia, R Sacha

    2015-11-14

    Responding to concerns regarding the growth of cardiac testing, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) published Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for various cardiac imaging modalities. Single modality cardiac imaging appropriateness has been reported but there have been no studies assessing the appropriateness of multiple imaging modalities in an inpatient environment. A retrospective study of the appropriateness of cardiac tests ordered by the inpatient General Internal Medicine (GIM) and Cardiology services at three Canadian academic hospitals was conducted over two one-month periods. Cardiac tests characterized were transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), single-photon emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT), and diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Overall, 553 tests were assessed, of which 99.8% were classifiable by AUC. 91% of all studies were categorized as appropriate, 4% may be appropriate and 5% were rarely appropriate. There were high rates of appropriate use of all modalities by GIM and Cardiology throughout. Significantly more appropriate diagnostic catheterizations were ordered by Cardiology than GIM (93% vs. 82%, p = imaging modalities in this multi-centered study on Cardiology and GIM inpatients in the acute care setting. The rate of appropriate ordering was high across all imaging modalities. We recommend further work towards improving appropriate utilization of cardiac imaging resources focus on the out-patient setting.

  2. Management role of surgical center nurses: perceptions by means of images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Dalcól

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the perceptions of surgical center nurses concerning their work environment and management role. Qualitative study conducted with 10 nurse supervisors in public and private hospitals, by means of individual projective interviews, from February to August 2013. The interviews were transcribed and submitted to content analysis. The results allowed analysis of the perceptions of nurses by means of images, such as: strategist, chameleon, conductor, flagship, owl head, and superhero. Regarding the environment, they described images associated with purposes and physical characteristics of the unit, highlighting it as the heart of the hospital. Regarding the management role, the images were associated with leadership, decision-making, adaptation, flexibility, teamwork and supervision. The results showed that nurses had a proactive but sometimes idealized view of their performance. It is of utmost importance that they reflect on their role and try to give their performance higher visibility.

  3. Acute cervical spine injuries: prospective MR imaging assessment at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, R W; Benedetti, P F; Drake, C M; Ivanovic, M; Levine, R A; Beatty, C S; Nemzek, W R; McFall, R A; Ontell, F K; Bishop, D M; Poirier, V C; Chong, B W

    1999-10-01

    To determine the weighted average sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the prospective detection of acute neck injury and to compare these findings with those of a comprehensive conventional radiographic assessment. Conventional radiography and MR imaging were performed in 199 patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with suspected cervical spine injury. Weighted sensitivities and specificities were calculated, and a weighted average across eight vertebral levels from C1 to T1 was formed. Fourteen parameters indicative of acute injury were tabulated. Fifty-eight patients had 172 acute cervical injuries. MR imaging depicted 136 (79%) acute abnormalities and conventional radiography depicted 39 (23%). For assessment of acute fractures, MR images (weighted average sensitivity, 43%; CI: 21%, 66%) were comparable to conventional radiographs (weighted average sensitivity, 48%; CI: 30%, 65%). MR imaging was superior to conventional radiography in the evaluation of pre- or paravertebral hemorrhage or edema, anterior or posterior longitudinal ligament injury, traumatic disk herniation, cord edema, and cord compression. Cord injuries were associated with cervical spine spondylosis (P < .05), acute fracture (P < .001), and canal stenosis (P < .001). MR imaging is more accurate than radiography in the detection of a wide spectrum of neck injuries, and further study is warranted of its potential effect on medical decision making, clinical outcome, and cost-effectiveness.

  4. Eating behavior and body image perception of pregnant women attending a high-risk outpatient center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Guimarães Nobre

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the eating behavior and body image perception in pregnant women attending a high-risk outpatient center. Methods: A quantitative, cross-sectional, observational study conducted with 28 overweight pregnant women attending the first consultation in the nutrition outpatient center of a maternity hospital in Fortaleza-CE, from December 2010 to February 2011. It has been used a pre-established form containing data on the characterization of the sample (socioeconomic, obstetric, and nutritional, the BES (Binge Eating Scale to assess binge eating and BSQ (Body Shape Questionnaire to assess the severity or absence of body image disorder. The variables were presented as mean ± standard deviation and simple frequency and percentage. The Pearson’s correlation was used to verify the relation between body image and binge eating, considering p <0.05. Results: The pregnant women studied had a mean age of 29.4 ± 6.3 years and mean gestational age of 24.6 ± 8.2 weeks. It was found a prevalence of 71.5% (n=20 of body image disorder and 17.8% (n=5 of binge eating. It was also observed a direct and significant correlation between the body image perception and the degree of binge eating (r=0.4358, p=0.020. Conclusion: The high rate of body image disorder positively related to a significant binge eating indicates an unfavorable adjustment of this group of pregnant women to alterations in weight and body shape and size, which are inherent to pregnancy, standing out as group that needs special attention by the professional team. doi:10.5020/18061230.2014.p256

  5. Survey of Compliance with Radiation Protection Standards in Diagnostic Imaging Centers of Khuzestan Province in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farshid mahmoudi

    2017-03-01

    rooms in 32 diagnostic imaging centers in Khuzestan Province, Iran, 2015. The centers were chosen through random cluster sampling method. The data were obtained using open-ended interview and a checklist designed based on the recommendations of the International Commission for Radiation Protection and Atomic Energy Organization of Iran. Results: The compliance rates with regard to radiology room, radiology equipment, darkroom, and radiographer’s protection were 80.76%, 80.47%, 69.28%, and 93.12%, respectively. Maximum and minimum rates of compliance with the standards were related to performance of the cassette tray (100% and hopper status (25%, respectively. Comparison of public and private imaging centers in terms of safety standards showed no significant differences (P>0.05.Conclusion: The observance of the radiation protection standards in Khuzestan Province was in a relativly desirable condition. However, there are some shortcomings in compliance with the principles of protection in the darkroom. In this regard, with recommend adopting protection measures such as timelyreplacement of processing solution, appropriate ventilation of darkroom, provisionof protection equipment and appliances, and protection training required for entering the darkroom.

  6. ACCURACY COMPARISON OF ALGORITHMS FOR DETERMINATION OF IMAGE CENTER COORDINATES IN OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Starasotnikau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy in determination of coordinates for image having simple shapes is considered as one of important and significant parameters in metrological optoelectronic systems such as autocollimators, stellar sensors, Shack-Hartmann sensors, schemes for geometric calibration of digital cameras for aerial and space imagery, various tracking systems. The paper describes a mathematical model for a measuring stand based on a collimator which projects a test-object onto a photodetector of an optoelectronic device. The mathematical model takes into account characteristic noises for photodetectors: a shot noise of the desired signal (photon and a shot noise of a dark signal, readout and spatial heterogeneity of CCD (charge-coupled device matrix elements. In order to reduce noise effect it is proposed to apply the Wiener filter for smoothing an image and its unambiguous identification and also enter a threshold according to brightness level. The paper contains a comparison of two algorithms for determination of coordinates in accordance with energy gravity center and contour. Sobel, Pruitt, Roberts, Laplacian Gaussian, Canni detectors have been used for determination of the test-object contour. The essence of the algorithm for determination of coordinates lies in search for an image contour in the form of a circle with its subsequent approximation and determination of the image center. An error calculation has been made while determining coordinates of a gravity center for test-objects of various diameters: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 pixels of a photodetector and also signalto-noise ratio values: 200, 100, 70, 20, 10. Signal-to-noise ratio has been calculated as a difference between maximum image intensity of the test-object and the background which is divided by mean-square deviation of the background. The accuracy for determination of coordinates has been improved by 0.5-1 order in case when there was an increase in a signal-to-noise ratio. Accuracy

  7. Design and Verification of Remote Sensing Image Data Center Storage Architecture Based on Hadoop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D.; Zhou, X.; Jing, Y.; Cong, W.; Li, C.

    2018-04-01

    The data center is a new concept of data processing and application proposed in recent years. It is a new method of processing technologies based on data, parallel computing, and compatibility with different hardware clusters. While optimizing the data storage management structure, it fully utilizes cluster resource computing nodes and improves the efficiency of data parallel application. This paper used mature Hadoop technology to build a large-scale distributed image management architecture for remote sensing imagery. Using MapReduce parallel processing technology, it called many computing nodes to process image storage blocks and pyramids in the background to improve the efficiency of image reading and application and sovled the need for concurrent multi-user high-speed access to remotely sensed data. It verified the rationality, reliability and superiority of the system design by testing the storage efficiency of different image data and multi-users and analyzing the distributed storage architecture to improve the application efficiency of remote sensing images through building an actual Hadoop service system.

  8. Research on auto-calibration technology of the image plane's center of 360-degree and all round looking camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Xu, Xiping

    2015-10-01

    The 360-degree and all round looking camera, as its characteristics of suitable for automatic analysis and judgment on the ambient environment of the carrier by image recognition algorithm, is usually applied to opto-electronic radar of robots and smart cars. In order to ensure the stability and consistency of image processing results of mass production, it is necessary to make sure the centers of image planes of different cameras are coincident, which requires to calibrate the position of the image plane's center. The traditional mechanical calibration method and electronic adjusting mode of inputting the offsets manually, both exist the problem of relying on human eyes, inefficiency and large range of error distribution. In this paper, an approach of auto- calibration of the image plane of this camera is presented. The imaging of the 360-degree and all round looking camera is a ring-shaped image consisting of two concentric circles, the center of the image is a smaller circle and the outside is a bigger circle. The realization of the technology is just to exploit the above characteristics. Recognizing the two circles through HOUGH TRANSFORM algorithm and calculating the center position, we can get the accurate center of image, that the deviation of the central location of the optic axis and image sensor. The program will set up the image sensor chip through I2C bus automatically, we can adjusting the center of the image plane automatically and accurately. The technique has been applied to practice, promotes productivity and guarantees the consistent quality of products.

  9. Seismological Imaging of Melt Production Regions Beneath the Backarc Spreading Center and Volcanic Arc, Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Douglas; Pozgay, Sara; Barklage, Mitchell; Pyle, Moira; Shiobara, Hajime; Sugioka, Hiroko

    2010-05-01

    We image the seismic velocity and attenuation structure of the mantle melt production regions associated with the Mariana Backarc Spreading Center and Mariana Volcanic Arc using data from the Mariana Subduction Factory Imaging Experiment. The passive component of this experiment consisted of 20 broadband seismographs deployed on the island chain and 58 ocean-bottom seismographs from June, 2003 until April, 2004. We obtained the 3D P and S wave velocity structure of the Mariana mantle wedge from a tomographic inversion of body wave arrivals from local earthquakes as well as P and S arrival times from large teleseismic earthquakes determined by multi-channel cross correlation. We also determine the 2-D attenuation structure of the mantle wedge using attenuation tomography based on local and regional earthquake spectra, and a broader-scale, lower resolution 3-D shear velocity structure from inversion of Rayleigh wave phase velocities using a two plane wave array analysis approach. We observe low velocity, high attenuation anomalies in the upper mantle beneath both the arc and backarc spreading center. These anomalies are separated by a higher velocity, lower attenuation region at shallow depths (< 80 km), implying distinct magma production regions for the arc and backarc in the uppermost mantle. The largest magnitude anomaly beneath the backarc spreading center is found at shallower depth (25-50 km) compared to the arc (50-100 km), consistent with melting depths estimated from the geochemistry of arc and backarc basalts (K. Kelley, pers. communication). The velocity and attenuation signature of the backarc spreading center is narrower than the corresponding anomaly found beneath the East Pacific Rise by the MELT experiment, perhaps implying a component of focused upwelling beneath the spreading center. The strong velocity and attenuation anomaly beneath the spreading center contrasts strongly with preliminary MT inversion results showing no conductivity anomaly in the

  10. Differentiating os acromiale from normally developing acromial ossification centers using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfeld, Matthew [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Wang, Annie; Bencardino, Jenny [New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Acromial fusion may not be complete until age 18-25, making it questionable to diagnose os acromiale in adolescents. Os acromiale may exist in adolescents and can be differentiated from a developing acromial ossification center based on MRI findings. A total of 128 MRIs of the shoulder were randomly and blindly reviewed retrospectively by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The MRIs consisted of two groups: (1) 56 of os acromiale in adults (25-74 years old, mean, 50) and (2) 72 consecutive of adolescents (12-17 years old, mean, 14.5). The following were assessed at the interface between the distal acromion and os acromiale/developing ossification center(s): presence of os acromiale vs. developing acromion, orientation, margins, and edema within and adjacent to it. Fifty-one adults and 49 adolescents were included. Exclusions were due to poor image quality or confounding findings (n = 7) or complete acromial fusion (n = 21 adolescents). Utilizing accepted definitions of os acromiale, all adult cases (100 %) were accurately diagnosed as os acromiale, with transverse interface orientation and irregular margins (94 %, R = 0.86, p < 0.00001). Forty-five (92 %) adolescent cases were accurately diagnosed as normally developing acromion with arched interface and lobulated margins (92 %, R = 0.92, p < 0.000001). Four (8 %) adolescent cases were diagnosed as having os acromiale, with transverse orientation and irregular margins. Thirty-five (69 %) and 46 (90 %) adults had marrow and interface edema, respectively. Six (12 %) and eight (16 %) adolescents had marrow and interface edema, respectively, including the four concluded to be os acromiale. Adolescents may have imaging findings consistent with os acromiale. The diagnosis of os acromiale should be based on imaging features and not limited by age. (orig.)

  11. Differentiating os acromiale from normally developing acromial ossification centers using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfeld, Matthew; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Wang, Annie; Bencardino, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Acromial fusion may not be complete until age 18-25, making it questionable to diagnose os acromiale in adolescents. Os acromiale may exist in adolescents and can be differentiated from a developing acromial ossification center based on MRI findings. A total of 128 MRIs of the shoulder were randomly and blindly reviewed retrospectively by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The MRIs consisted of two groups: (1) 56 of os acromiale in adults (25-74 years old, mean, 50) and (2) 72 consecutive of adolescents (12-17 years old, mean, 14.5). The following were assessed at the interface between the distal acromion and os acromiale/developing ossification center(s): presence of os acromiale vs. developing acromion, orientation, margins, and edema within and adjacent to it. Fifty-one adults and 49 adolescents were included. Exclusions were due to poor image quality or confounding findings (n = 7) or complete acromial fusion (n = 21 adolescents). Utilizing accepted definitions of os acromiale, all adult cases (100 %) were accurately diagnosed as os acromiale, with transverse interface orientation and irregular margins (94 %, R = 0.86, p < 0.00001). Forty-five (92 %) adolescent cases were accurately diagnosed as normally developing acromion with arched interface and lobulated margins (92 %, R = 0.92, p < 0.000001). Four (8 %) adolescent cases were diagnosed as having os acromiale, with transverse orientation and irregular margins. Thirty-five (69 %) and 46 (90 %) adults had marrow and interface edema, respectively. Six (12 %) and eight (16 %) adolescents had marrow and interface edema, respectively, including the four concluded to be os acromiale. Adolescents may have imaging findings consistent with os acromiale. The diagnosis of os acromiale should be based on imaging features and not limited by age. (orig.)

  12. Infrared imaging spectroscopy of the Galactic center - Distribution and motions of the ionized gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, T. M.; Beckwith, S. V. W.; Forrest, W. J.; Pipher, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    High spatial spectral resolution IR images of the Galactic center in the Br-gamma recombination line of hydrogen were taken. A coherent filament of gas extending from north of IRS 1, curving around IRS 16/Sgr A complex, and continuing to the southwest, is seen. Nine stellar sources have associated Br-gamma emission. The total Br-gamma line flux in the filament is approximately 3 x 10 exp -15 W/sq m. The distribution and kinematics of the northern arm suggest orbital motion; the observations are accordingly fit with elliptical orbits in the field of a central point of mass.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of soft-tissue metastases: our experience at an orthopedic oncology center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammon, Jennifer; Jain, Abhishek; Bleakney, Robert; Mohankumar, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and magnetic resonance imaging appearance of metastasis presenting as a soft-tissue mass. A retrospective chart review was performed on 51 patients who presented to an orthopedic oncology center with soft-tissue masses, with a histology-proven diagnosis of soft-tissue metastasis, over a 14-year period. Their magnetic resonance imaging, primary origin, and follow-up have been assessed. Soft-tissue metastasis was identified in patients ranging from 18 to 85 years old. Most (80%) of the masses were located deep to the deep fascia. In our cohort of patients, melanoma was the most common primary malignancy contributing to soft-tissue metastasis (21.8%). Among soft-tissue metastasis from solid organs, breast and lung were the most frequent (9.1% each). Five patients had soft-tissue metastases from an unknown primary. Imaging diagnosis of soft-tissue metastases is challenging as it can demonstrate imaging appearances similar to primary soft-tissue sarcoma. The presence of a known malignancy may not be evident in everyone, and even if available, histopathology will be necessary for diagnosis if this is the only site of recurrence/metastasis to differentiate from a primary soft-tissue sarcoma. Moreover, soft-tissue metastasis may be the initial presentation of a malignancy. Primary malignancies with soft-tissue metastasis carry a poor prognosis; hence, prompt diagnosis and management in essential. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of soft-tissue metastases: our experience at an orthopedic oncology center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammon, Jennifer; Jain, Abhishek; Bleakney, Robert; Mohankumar, Rakesh [Mount Sinai Hospital and University of Toronto, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    To assess the prevalence and magnetic resonance imaging appearance of metastasis presenting as a soft-tissue mass. A retrospective chart review was performed on 51 patients who presented to an orthopedic oncology center with soft-tissue masses, with a histology-proven diagnosis of soft-tissue metastasis, over a 14-year period. Their magnetic resonance imaging, primary origin, and follow-up have been assessed. Soft-tissue metastasis was identified in patients ranging from 18 to 85 years old. Most (80%) of the masses were located deep to the deep fascia. In our cohort of patients, melanoma was the most common primary malignancy contributing to soft-tissue metastasis (21.8%). Among soft-tissue metastasis from solid organs, breast and lung were the most frequent (9.1% each). Five patients had soft-tissue metastases from an unknown primary. Imaging diagnosis of soft-tissue metastases is challenging as it can demonstrate imaging appearances similar to primary soft-tissue sarcoma. The presence of a known malignancy may not be evident in everyone, and even if available, histopathology will be necessary for diagnosis if this is the only site of recurrence/metastasis to differentiate from a primary soft-tissue sarcoma. Moreover, soft-tissue metastasis may be the initial presentation of a malignancy. Primary malignancies with soft-tissue metastasis carry a poor prognosis; hence, prompt diagnosis and management in essential. (orig.)

  15. Improving surface and defect center chemistry of fluorescent nanodiamonds for imaging purposes--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, Andreas; Hemelaar, Simon Robert; Schirhagl, Romana

    2015-10-01

    Diamonds are widely used for jewelry owing to their superior optical properties accounting for their fascinating beauty. Beyond the sparkle, diamond is highly investigated in materials science for its remarkable properties. Recently, fluorescent defects in diamond, particularly the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) center, have gained much attention: The NV(-) center emits stable, nonbleaching fluorescence, and thus could be utilized in biolabeling, as a light source, or as a Förster resonance energy transfer donor. Even more remarkable are its spin properties: with the fluorescence intensity of the NV(-) center reacting to the presence of small magnetic fields, it can be utilized as a sensor for magnetic fields as small as the field of a single electron spin. However, a reproducible defect and surface and defect chemistry are crucial to all applications. In this article we review methods for using nanodiamonds for different imaging purposes. The article covers (1) dispersion of particles, (2) surface cleaning, (3) particle size selection and reduction, (4) defect properties, and (5) functionalization and attachment to nanostructures, e.g., scanning probe microscopy tips.

  16. Imaging a non-singular rotating black hole at the center of the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, F.; Gourgoulhon, E.; Paumard, T.; Vincent, F. H.

    2018-06-01

    We show that the rotating generalization of Hayward’s non-singular black hole previously studied in the literature is geodesically incomplete, and that its straightforward extension leads to a singular spacetime. We present another extension, which is devoid of any curvature singularity. The obtained metric depends on three parameters and, depending on their values, yields an event horizon or not. These two regimes, named respectively regular rotating Hayward black hole and naked rotating wormhole, are studied both numerically and analytically. In preparation for the upcoming results of the Event Horizon Telescope, the images of an accretion torus around Sgr A*, the supermassive object at the center of the Galaxy, are computed. These images contain, even in the absence of a horizon, a central faint region which bears a resemblance to the shadow of Kerr black holes and emphasizes the difficulty of claiming the existence of an event horizon from the analysis of strong-field images. The frequencies of the co- and contra-rotating orbits at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) in this geometry are also computed, in the hope that quasi-periodic oscillations may permit to compare this model with Kerr’s black hole on observational grounds.

  17. Automated vessel shadow segmentation of fovea-centered spectral-domain images from multiple OCT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high reso- lution, three-dimensional (3D) cross sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma.1 Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment requires a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using different scanning devices, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, the use of OCT imaging devices from different vendors, combined with patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation, potentially leading to incorrect patient diagnosis or treatment analysis. Image registration can be used to precisely compare disease states by registering differing 3D scans to one another. In order to align 3D scans from different time- points and vendors using registration, landmarks are required, the most obvious being the retinal vasculature. Presented here is a fully automated cross-vendor method to acquire retina vessel locations for OCT registration from fovea centred 3D SD-OCT scans based on vessel shadows. Noise filtered OCT scans are flattened based on vendor retinal layer segmentation, to extract the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer of the retina. Voxel based layer profile analysis and k-means clustering is used to extract candidate vessel shadow regions from the RPE layer. In conjunction, the extracted RPE layers are combined to generate a projection image featuring all candidate vessel shadows. Image processing methods for vessel segmentation of the OCT constructed projection image are then applied to optimize the accuracy of OCT vessel shadow segmentation through the removal of false positive shadow regions such as those caused by exudates and cysts. Validation of segmented vessel shadows uses

  18. Image-guided chemoport insertion by interventional radiologists: A single-center experience on periprocedural complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaacob, Yazmin; Nguyen, Dang V; Mohamed, Zahiah; Ralib, A Razali A; Zakaria, Rozman; Muda, Sobri

    2013-01-01

    To report our early experience in image-guided chemoport insertions by interventional radiologists. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary center with 161 chemoport insertions done from June 2008 to June 2010. The chemoports were inserted either at the angiography suite or at the mobile operation theater unit. Ninety percent of the chemoports had right internal jugular vein (IJV) as the entry site. Other entry sites included the left IJV, subclavian veins and the inferior vena cava. Immediate and early complications were recorded. All insertions were performed under image guidance with the aid of ultrasound and fluoroscopy. The technical success rate was 99.4%. In terms of immediate complications, there were only two cases of arterial puncture that resolved with local compression. No pneumothorax or air embolism was documented. Twenty-six early complications were recorded. The most common early complication was catheter blockage (12/161; 7.4%), followed by catheter-related infection (9/161; 5.6%). Other complications were catheter malposition, venous thrombosis and catheter dislodgement or leak. A total of 11 (6.8%) chemoports had to be removed within 30 days; most of them were due to infections that failed to respond to systemic antibiotic therapy. In terms of place of procedure, there were no significant differences in complication rates between the angiography suite and the mobile operation theater unit. Image-guided chemoport insertion by interventional radiologist gives low periprocedural complication rates. Using right IJV as the entry site, the image guidance gives good success rate with least complication

  19. Central nervous system imaging in childhood Langerhans cell histiocytosis – a reference center analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, Luciana; Schöning, Stefan; Hattingen, Elke; Sörensen, Jan; Jurcoane, Alina; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was (1) to describe central nervous system (CNS) manifestations in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) based on images sent to a reference center and meeting minimum requirements and (2) to assess the inter-rater agreement of CNS-MRI results, which represents the overall reproducibility of this investigation. We retrospectively reviewed brain MRI examinations in children with LCH, for which MRI minimum requirements were met. Abnormalities were rated by two experienced neuroradiologists, and the inter-rater agreement was assessed. Out of a total of 94 imaging studies, only 31 MRIs met the minimum criteria, which included T2w, FLAIR, T1w images before/after contrast in at least two different section planes, and thin post contrast sagittal slices T1w through the sella. The most common changes were osseous abnormalities, followed by solid enlargement of the pineal gland, thickened enhancing stalk and signal changes of the dentate nucleus. Whereas inter-rater agreement in assessing most of the CNS lesions was relatively high (κ > 0.61), the application of minimum criteria often did not allow to evaluate the posterior pituitary. The diversity of radiological protocols from different institutions leads to difficulties in the diagnosis of CNS abnormalities in children with LCH. Although the inter-rater agreement between neuroradiologists was high, not all the LCH manifestations could be completely ruled out when using the minimum criteria. Brain MRIs should therefore follow LCH guideline protocols and include T1 pre-gadolinium sagittal images, and be centrally reviewed in order to improve the comparison of clinical trials

  20. Ambient radiation monitoring at a PET/CT imaging center within a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.C.; Chen, Y.W.; Chuang, Y.W.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Potential environmental dose rates in a patient waiting room at the PET/CT Imaging Center within our Nuclear Medicine Department (N.M.D.) are evaluated by both of the computer modeling method and real-time monitoring in practical settings. The maximum dose rate is directly read from a peak dose-rate frozen-up, digital gamma G-M survey meter. The design basis of our PET/CT Imaging Center facility has assumed a maximum total of five 18 FDG-patients presented at any given time either in an Am or a Pm session according to two separated drug batch delivering runs. Due to the relatively high gamma energy of 511 keV emitted by the F- 18 labeled compound, we have remodeled our facility with a 0.5-cm thick Pb wall and larger space separations between rooms that include a PET/CT scan room, two separated 18 FDG i.v. injection rooms, and a delayed-phase patient waiting room. Patient could normally complete two separate PET/CT scan runs, if a delayed-phase scan is needed, within three hours time frame from an initial dose of 370 MBq (10 mCi) that has a physical half-live of 110 minutes for an F-18 labeled compound. When all the needed scans are finished, the patient is released from our PET/CT Imaging Center that has to follow the radiation safety guideline of less than 50 mSv/hr (5 m R/hr) at one meter distance. During typical operation, each drug i.v. injection room or the scan room is restricted to one patient access only. As a worst case scenario, the maximum ambient dose rate may only occur when two or more delayed phase patients would stay in the PET/CT waiting room that is excluded for other non-PET patient use. Theoretically using a computer discrete-ordinate integrating methods, dose rates at one meter distance from a mid-point geometry, based on a simulated 10 mCi F-18 point, line or volumetric source (assuming 170 cm in height and 20 cm in radius of homogeneous water media), can also be calculated to give values of 5.71, 4.73 and 3

  1. Astigmatic single photon emission computed tomography imaging with a displaced center of rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Smith, M.F.; Stone, C.D.; Jaszczak, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    A filtered backprojection algorithm is developed for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with an astigmatic collimator having a displaced center of rotation. The astigmatic collimator has two perpendicular focal lines, one that is parallel to the axis of rotation of the gamma camera and one that is perpendicular to this axis. Using SPECT simulations of projection data from a hot rod phantom and point source arrays, it is found that a lack of incorporation of the mechanical shift in the reconstruction algorithm causes errors and artifacts in reconstructed SPECT images. The collimator and acquisition parameters in the astigmatic reconstruction formula, which include focal lengths, radius of rotation, and mechanical shifts, are often partly unknown and can be determined using the projections of a point source at various projection angles. The accurate determination of these parameters by a least squares fitting technique using projection data from numerically simulated SPECT acquisitions is studied. These studies show that the accuracy of parameter determination is improved as the distance between the point source and the axis of rotation of the gamma camera is increased. The focal length to the focal line perpendicular to the axis of rotation is determined more accurately than the focal length to the focal line parallel to this axis. copyright 1998 American Association of Physicists in Medicine

  2. SU-F-J-177: A Novel Image Analysis Technique (center Pixel Method) to Quantify End-To-End Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Snyder, K [Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI (United States); Scheib, S [Varian Medical System, Barton (Switzerland); Qin, Y; Li, H [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a novel image analysis technique, “center pixel method”, to quantify end-to-end tests accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom. The phantom was scanned with 0.8 mm slice thickness. The treatment isocenter was placed at the center of the phantom. In the treatment room, CBCT images of the phantom (kVp=77, mAs=1022, slice thickness 1 mm) were acquired to register to the reference CT images. 6D couch correction were applied based on the registration results. Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)-based Winston Lutz (WL) tests were performed to quantify the errors of the targeting accuracy of the system at 15 combinations of gantry, collimator and couch positions. The images were analyzed using two different methods. a) The classic method. The deviation was calculated by measuring the radial distance between the center of the central BB and the full width at half maximum of the radiation field. b) The center pixel method. Since the imager projection offset from the treatment isocenter was known from the IsoCal calibration, the deviation was determined between the center of the BB and the central pixel of the imager panel. Results: Using the automatic registration method to localize the phantom and the classic method of measuring the deviation of the BB center, the mean and standard deviation of the radial distance was 0.44 ± 0.25, 0.47 ± 0.26, and 0.43 ± 0.13 mm for the jaw, MLC and cone defined field sizes respectively. When the center pixel method was used, the mean and standard deviation was 0.32 ± 0.18, 0.32 ± 0.17, and 0.32 ± 0.19 mm respectively. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that the center pixel method accurately analyzes the WL images to evaluate the targeting accuracy of the radiosurgery system. The work was supported by a Research Scholar Grant, RSG-15-137-01-CCE from the American

  3. Variability in prostate and seminal vesicle delineations defined on magnetic resonance images, a multi-observer, -center and -sequence study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, Tufve; Jonsson, Joakim; Söderström, Karin

    2013-01-01

    and approximately equal for the prostate and seminal vesicles. Large differences in variability were observed for individual patients, and also for individual imaging sequences used at the different centers. There was however no indication of decreased variability with higher field strength. CONCLUSION: The overall......BACKGROUND: The use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as a part of preparation for radiotherapy is increasing. For delineation of the prostate several publications have shown decreased delineation variability using MR compared to computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the present work....... Two physicians from each center delineated the prostate and the seminal vesicles on each of the 25 image sets. The variability between the delineations was analyzed with respect to overall, intra- and inter-physician variability, and dependence between variability and origin of the MR images, i...

  4. Impact of a program of diagnostic imaging quality control in mammography centers of the Federal District, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Rosangela da Silveira; Ferreira, Rubemar de Souza [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste (CRCN/CNEN-CO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil)]. E-mail: rcorrea@cnen.gov.br; Peixoto, Joao Emilio [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silver, Lynn Dee [New York Health Department, New York, NY (United States); Dias, Cintia Melazo [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (Diplan/CNEN), Braslia, DF (Brazil). Distrito do Planalto Central; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Hwang, Suy Ferreira [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-03-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the quality and the impact of an intervention involving inspection and education in mammography centers of the Federal District, Brazil. Materials and methods: Forty one mammography centers in the Federal District were studied in the period between 2000 and 2002. The intervention involved an initial inspection followed by a training activity and notification of mammography centers by the Federal District Sanitary Vigilance authority. The imaging quality was compared before and after the intervention. Results: None of the 36 centers which completed the study reached more than 90% compliance with the standard imaging quality prior to the interventions, whereas ten were above 90% afterwards. Major improvements were observed in chassis maintenance, breast compression and visualization of microcalcifications. Conclusion: Despite the availability of a great number of mammography centers in the Federal District, most of them did not meet the required quality standards. The intervention has shown to be effective for improving the imaging quality, however a continued action is required to solve the remaining problems and increase the impact of the program. (author)

  5. Building an outpatient imaging center: A case study at genesis healthcare system, part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanci, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In the second of 2 parts, this article will focus on process improvement projects utilizing a case study at Genesis HealthCare System located in Zanesville, OH. Operational efficiency is a key step in developing a freestanding diagnostic imaging center. The process improvement projects began with an Expert Improvement Session (EIS) on the scheduling process. An EIS session is a facilitated meeting that can last anywhere from 3 hours to 2 days. Its intention is to take a group of people involved with the problem or operational process and work to understand current failures or breakdowns in the process. Recommendations are jointly developed to overcome any current deficiencies, and a work plan is structured to create ownership over the changes. A total of 11 EIS sessions occurred over the course of this project, covering 5 sections: Scheduling/telephone call process, Pre-registration, Verification/pre-certification, MRI throughput, CT throughput. Following is a single example of a project focused on the process improvement efforts. All of the process improvement projects utilized a quasi methodology of "DMAIC" (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control).

  6. Time Spent by Breast Imaging Radiologists to Perform Value-Added Activities at an Academic Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Mesa, Fernando; Klevos, Geetika; Arheart, Kristopher; Banks, James; Yepes, Monica; Net, Jose

    2017-04-01

    Health care reform in the United States has generated a paradigm shift in the practice of radiology aimed at increasing the degree of patient-centered care. We conducted a study to quantify the amount of time breast imaging radiologists spend on value-added activities at an academic comprehensive cancer center located in Miami, Florida, and accredited by the American College of Radiology as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence. A prospective, observational study was conducted during a period of 20 consecutive workdays. Three participating breast imaging radiologists maintained a real-time log of each activity performed. A generalized linear model was used to perform a 1-way analysis of variance. An alpha level of .05 was used to determine statistical significance. The average daily time dedicated to these activities was 92.1 minutes (range, 56.4-132.2). The amount of time significantly differed among breast imaging radiologists and correlated with their assigned daily role (P value-added activities to help improve patients' experience across the continuity of their care. We propose that similar studies be conducted at other institutions to better assess the magnitude of this finding across different breast imaging care settings.

  7. Development of an image processing system at the Technology Applications Center, UNM: Landsat image processing in mineral exploration and related activities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budge, T.K.

    1980-09-01

    This project was a demonstration of the capabilities of Landsat satellite image processing applied to the monitoring of mining activity in New Mexico. Study areas included the Navajo coal surface mine, the Jackpile uranium surface mine, and the potash mining district near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Computer classifications of a number of land use categories in these mines were presented and discussed. A literature review of a number of case studies concerning the use of Landsat image processing in mineral exploration and related activities was prepared. Included in this review is a discussion of the Landsat satellite system and the basics of computer image processing. Topics such as destriping, contrast stretches, atmospheric corrections, ratioing, and classification techniques are addressed. Summaries of the STANSORT II and ELAS software packages and the Technology Application Center's Digital Image Processing System (TDIPS) are presented

  8. Breast Imaging Utilizing Dedicated Gamma Camera and (99m)Tc-MIBI: Experience at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and Review of the Literature Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Sapir, Einat; Golan, Orit; Menes, Tehillah; Weinstein, Yuliana; Lerman, Hedva

    2016-07-01

    The scope of the current article is the clinical role of gamma cameras dedicated for breast imaging and (99m)Tc-MIBI tumor-seeking tracer, as both a screening modality among a healthy population and as a diagnostic modality in patients with breast cancer. Such cameras are now commercially available. The technology utilizing a camera composed of a NaI (Tl) detector is termed breast-specific gamma imaging. The technology of dual-headed camera composed of semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride detectors that directly converts gamma-ray energy into electronic signals is termed molecular breast imaging. Molecular breast imaging system has been installed at the Department of Nuclear medicine at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv in 2009. The article reviews the literature well as our own experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function using EPR Spectroscopy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a technique for studying chemical species that have one or more unpaired electrons.  The current invention describes Echo-based Single Point Imaging (ESPI), a novel EPR image formation strategy that allows in vivo imaging of physiological function.  The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing an in vivo imaging using Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to measure active oxygen species.

  10. Analysis of the image of pion-emitting sources in the source center-of-mass frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yanyu; Feng, Qichun; Huo, Lei; Zhang, Jingbo; Liu, Jianli; Tang, Guixin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin, Heilongjiang (China); Zhang, Weining [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin, Heilongjiang (China); Dalian University of Technology, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian, Liaoning (China)

    2017-08-15

    In this paper, we try a method to extract the image of pion-emitting source function in the center-of-mass frame of the source (CMFS). We choose identical pion pairs according to the difference of their energy and use these pion pairs to build the correlation function. The purpose is to reduce the effect of ΔEΔt, thus the corresponding imaging result can tend to the real source function. We examine the effect of this method by comparing its results with real source functions extracted from models directly. (orig.)

  11. Paroxysmal occipital discharges suppressed by eye opening: Spectrum of clinical and imaging features at a tertiary care center in India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavna Kaul; Garima Shukla; Vinay Goyal; Achal Srivastava; Madhuri Behari

    2012-01-01

    Background: Paroxysmal occipital discharges (PODs) demonstrating the phenomena of fixation-off sensitivity have classically been described in childhood epilepsies with occipital paroxysms. Aim: We attempted to delineate the demographic, clinical and imaging characteristics of patients whose interictal electroencephalograms (EEGs) showed occipital discharges with fixation-off sensitivity at our center. Materials and Methods: During the period between 2003 and 2005, patients whose interictal EE...

  12. Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Nanodiamonds: Cathodoluminescence Imaging Marker in the Near Infrared

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Huiliang; Aharonovich, Igor; Glenn, David R.; Schalek, R.; Magyar, Andrew P.; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that nanodiamonds fabricated to incorporate silicon-vacancy (Si-V) color centers provide bright, spectrally narrow, and stable cathodoluminescence (CL) in the near-infrared. Si-V color centers containing nanodiamonds are promising as non-bleaching optical markers for correlated CL and secondary electron microscopy, including applications to nanoscale bioimaging.

  13. Comparative analysis of MR imaging, Ictal SPECT and EEG in temporal lobe epilepsy: a prospective IAEA multi-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaknun, John J. [University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); IAEA, Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, Wien (Austria); Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Maes, Alex [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vazquez, Silvia [Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, FLENI, Department of Radiology, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dupont, Patrick [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Dondi, Maurizio [Ospedale Maggiore, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15

    MR imaging, ictal single-photon emission CT (SPECT) and ictal EEG play important roles in the presurgical localization of epileptic foci. This multi-center study was established to investigate whether the complementary role of perfusion SPECT, MRI and EEG for presurgical localization of temporal lobe epilepsy could be confirmed in a prospective setting involving centers from India, Thailand, Italy and Argentina. We studied 74 patients who underwent interictal and ictal EEG, interictal and ictal SPECT and MRI before surgery of the temporal lobe. In all but three patients, histology was reported. The clinical outcome was assessed using Engel's classification. Sensitivity values of all imaging modalities were calculated, and the add-on value of SPECT was assessed. Outcome (Engel's classification) in 74 patients was class I, 89%; class II, 7%; class III, 3%; and IV, 1%. Regarding the localization of seizure origin, sensitivity was 84% for ictal SPECT, 70% for ictal EEG, 86% for MRI, 55% for interictal SPECT and 40% for interictal EEG. Add-on value of ictal SPECT was shown by its ability to correctly localize 17/22 (77%) of the seizure foci missed by ictal EEG and 8/10 (80%) of the seizure foci not detected by MRI. This prospective multi-center trial, involving centers from different parts of the world, confirms that ictal perfusion SPECT is an effective diagnostic modality for correctly identifying seizure origin in temporal lobe epilepsy, providing complementary information to ictal EEG and MRI. (orig.)

  14. Comparative analysis of MR imaging, Ictal SPECT and EEG in temporal lobe epilepsy: a prospective IAEA multi-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaknun, John J.; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Maes, Alex; Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Vazquez, Silvia; Dupont, Patrick; Dondi, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    MR imaging, ictal single-photon emission CT (SPECT) and ictal EEG play important roles in the presurgical localization of epileptic foci. This multi-center study was established to investigate whether the complementary role of perfusion SPECT, MRI and EEG for presurgical localization of temporal lobe epilepsy could be confirmed in a prospective setting involving centers from India, Thailand, Italy and Argentina. We studied 74 patients who underwent interictal and ictal EEG, interictal and ictal SPECT and MRI before surgery of the temporal lobe. In all but three patients, histology was reported. The clinical outcome was assessed using Engel's classification. Sensitivity values of all imaging modalities were calculated, and the add-on value of SPECT was assessed. Outcome (Engel's classification) in 74 patients was class I, 89%; class II, 7%; class III, 3%; and IV, 1%. Regarding the localization of seizure origin, sensitivity was 84% for ictal SPECT, 70% for ictal EEG, 86% for MRI, 55% for interictal SPECT and 40% for interictal EEG. Add-on value of ictal SPECT was shown by its ability to correctly localize 17/22 (77%) of the seizure foci missed by ictal EEG and 8/10 (80%) of the seizure foci not detected by MRI. This prospective multi-center trial, involving centers from different parts of the world, confirms that ictal perfusion SPECT is an effective diagnostic modality for correctly identifying seizure origin in temporal lobe epilepsy, providing complementary information to ictal EEG and MRI. (orig.)

  15. The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Digital Imaging Network, Picture Archival and Communication System, and Radiology Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldszal, A F; Brown, G K; McDonald, H J; Vucich, J J; Staab, E V

    2001-06-01

    In this work, we describe the digital imaging network (DIN), picture archival and communication system (PACS), and radiology information system (RIS) currently being implemented at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH). These systems are presently in clinical operation. The DIN is a redundant meshed network designed to address gigabit density and expected high bandwidth requirements for image transfer and server aggregation. The PACS projected workload is 5.0 TB of new imaging data per year. Its architecture consists of a central, high-throughput Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data repository and distributed redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) servers employing fiber-channel technology for immediate delivery of imaging data. On demand distribution of images and reports to clinicians and researchers is accomplished via a clustered web server. The RIS follows a client-server model and provides tools to order exams, schedule resources, retrieve and review results, and generate management reports. The RIS-hospital information system (HIS) interfaces include admissions, discharges, and transfers (ATDs)/demographics, orders, appointment notifications, doctors update, and results.

  16. Time-motion analysis of factors affecting patient throughput in an MR imaging center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donohue, J.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The high cost of MR imaging makes efficient use essential. In an effort to increase patient throughput, attention has been focused on shortening the imaging time through reductions in matrix size and number of excitations, and through the use of newer ''fast imaging'' techniques. Less attention has been given to other time-consuming aspects not directly related to imaging time. The authors undertook a time-motion study using a daily log of minute-by-minute activities associated with an MR imaging examination. The times required for the following components of the examination were measured: total study time, examination set-up time, intrastudy physician ''image review'' time, and interstudy patient turnover time. The time lost to claustrophobic reactions, patients' failure to appear for scheduled examinations, unanticipated patient care (sedation, reassurance), and equipment malfunction was also analyzed. Actual imaging time accounted for a relatively small proportion (42%) of total study time. Other factors such as intrastudy image review time (15%), interstudy patient turnover time (11%), and time lost due to claustrophobic reactions, patients' failure to appear for scheduled examinations, and equipment malfunction contributed significantly to the total study time. Simple solutions to these problems can contribute greatly to increasing patient throughput

  17. Comparison of semi-automated center-dot and fully automated endothelial cell analyses from specular microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruoka, Sachiko; Nakakura, Shunsuke; Matsuo, Naoko; Yoshitomi, Kayo; Katakami, Chikako; Tabuchi, Hitoshi; Chikama, Taiichiro; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-30

    To evaluate two specular microscopy analysis methods across different endothelial cell densities (ECDs). Endothelial images of one eye from each of 45 patients were taken by using three different specular microscopes (three replicates each). To determine the consistency of the center-dot method, we compared SP-6000 and SP-2000P images. CME-530 and SP-6000 images were compared to assess the consistency of the fully automated method. The SP-6000 images from the two methods were compared. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the three measurements were calculated, and parametric multiple comparisons tests and Bland-Altman analysis were performed. The ECD mean value was 2425 ± 883 (range 516-3707) cells/mm 2 . ICC values were > 0.9 for all three microscopes for ECD, but the coefficients of variation (CVs) were 0.3-0.6. For ECD measurements, Bland-Altman analysis revealed that the mean difference was 42 cells/mm 2 between the SP-2000P and SP-6000 for the center-dot method; 57 cells/mm 2 between the SP-6000 measurements from both methods; and -5 cells/mm 2 between the SP-6000 and CME-530 for the fully automated method (95% limits of agreement: - 201 to 284 cell/mm 2 , - 410 to 522 cells/mm 2 , and - 327 to 318 cells/mm 2 , respectively). For CV measurements, the mean differences were - 3, - 12, and 13% (95% limits of agreement - 18 to 11, - 26 to 2, and - 5 to 32%, respectively). Despite using three replicate measurements, the precision of the center-dot method with the SP-2000P and SP-6000 software was only ± 10% for ECD data and was even worse for the fully automated method. Japan Clinical Trials Register ( http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm9 ) number UMIN 000015236.

  18. Imaging button battery ingestions and insertions in children: a 15-year single-center review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugmire, Brian S.; Trout, Andrew T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lin, Tom K.; Pentiuk, Scott [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati, OH (United States); De Alarcon, Alessandro; Hart, Catherine K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Recent studies have shown an increase in morbidity associated with button battery ingestions in children. To perform a comprehensive, imaging-focused review of all patients with confirmed button battery ingestions/insertions imaged at our institution in the last 15 years. Radiology reports from Jan. 1, 2000, to July 12, 2015, were searched for the terms ''battery'' and ''batteries.'' Confirmed cases of battery ingestion/insertion for which images were available were reviewed. Cases were reviewed for imaging studies performed, imaging findings, patient demographics, clinical history and management. Two pediatric gastroenterologists reviewed endoscopic images and graded mucosal injuries in selected cases. Two hundred seventy-six cases were reviewed. All patients were imaged with radiography, 19 with fluoroscopy (6.8%), and 4 with CT (1.4%). Batteries retained in the esophagus (n = 27, 9.8%) were larger in diameter on average than those that had passed distally (22.1 ± 3.3 mm vs. 13.7 ± 1.6 mm, P<0.0001). Battery diameter ≥20 mm was associated with esophageal impaction (P<0.0001) and higher grade esophageal injury (P<0.0001). Mean battery diameter was greater for patients with grade 1 or higher mucosal injury than for patients with no mucosal injury (22.1 ± 2.1 mm vs. 14.7 ± 4.5 mm, P<0.0001). Sixteen percent (4/25) of patients with grade ≥1 esophageal injury had batteries in the stomach on initial imaging. Five patients (1.8%) had serious clinical complications (e.g., esophageal perforation, tracheoesophageal fistula). Button batteries >20mm in diameter warrant increased clinical scrutiny due to higher likelihood and severity of injury. Implementation of recent pediatric gastroenterology societal guidelines will likely lead to a substantial increase in the number of CT and MRI examinations. (orig.)

  19. Increase in Utilization of Afterhours Medical Imaging: A Study of Three Canadian Academic Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Shivani; Dhalla, Irfan; Lebovic, Gerald; Rogalla, Patrik; Dowdell, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to assess trends in afterhours medical imaging utilization for emergency department (ED) and inpatient (IP) patient populations from 2006-2013, including analysis by modality and specialty and with adjustment for patient volume. For this retrospective study, we reviewed the number of CT, MRI, and ultrasound studies performed for the ED and IP patients during the afterhours time period (5pm - 8am on weekdays and 24 hours on weekends and statutory holidays) from 2006-2013 at three different Canadian academic hospitals. We used the Jonckheere-Terpstra (JT) test to determine statistical significance of imaging and patient volume trends. A regression model was used to examine whether there was an increasing trend over time in the volume of imaging tests per 1000 patients. For all three sites from 2006-2013 during the afterhours time period: There was a statistically significant increasing trend in total medical imaging volume, which also held true when the volumes were assessed by modality and by specialty. There was a statistically significant increasing trend in ED and IP patient volume. When medical imaging volumes were adjusted for patient volumes, there was a statistically significant increasing trend in imaging being performed per patient. Afterhours medical imaging volumes demonstrated a statistically significant increasing trend at all three sites from 2006-2013 when assessed by total volume, modality, and specialty. During the same time period and at all three sites, the ED and IP patient volumes also demonstrated a statistically significant increasing trend with more medical imaging, however, being performed per patient. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-E-J-137: Image Registration Tool for Patient Setup in Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, W [Borame Medical Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, W [Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A potential validation tool for compensating patient positioning error was developed using 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registration. Methods: For 2D/3D registration, digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images were applied. The ray-casting algorithm is the most straightforward method for generating DRR. We adopted the traditional ray-casting method, which finds the intersections of a ray with all objects, voxels of the 3D-CT volume in the scene. The similarity between the extracted DRR and orthogonal image was measured by using a normalized mutual information method. Two orthogonal images were acquired from a Cyber-Knife system from the anterior-posterior (AP) and right lateral (RL) views. The 3D-CT and two orthogonal images of an anthropomorphic phantom and head and neck cancer patient were used in this study. For 3D/3D registration, planning CT and in-room CT image were applied. After registration, the translation and rotation factors were calculated to position a couch to be movable in six dimensions. Results: Registration accuracies and average errors of 2.12 mm ± 0.50 mm for transformations and 1.23° ± 0.40° for rotations were acquired by 2D/3D registration using an anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom. In addition, registration accuracies and average errors of 0.90 mm ± 0.30 mm for transformations and 1.00° ± 0.2° for rotations were acquired using CT image sets. Conclusion: We demonstrated that this validation tool could compensate for patient positioning error. In addition, this research could be the fundamental step for compensating patient positioning error at the first Korea heavy-ion medical accelerator treatment center.

  1. SU-E-J-137: Image Registration Tool for Patient Setup in Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M; Suh, T; Cho, W; Jung, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A potential validation tool for compensating patient positioning error was developed using 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registration. Methods: For 2D/3D registration, digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images were applied. The ray-casting algorithm is the most straightforward method for generating DRR. We adopted the traditional ray-casting method, which finds the intersections of a ray with all objects, voxels of the 3D-CT volume in the scene. The similarity between the extracted DRR and orthogonal image was measured by using a normalized mutual information method. Two orthogonal images were acquired from a Cyber-Knife system from the anterior-posterior (AP) and right lateral (RL) views. The 3D-CT and two orthogonal images of an anthropomorphic phantom and head and neck cancer patient were used in this study. For 3D/3D registration, planning CT and in-room CT image were applied. After registration, the translation and rotation factors were calculated to position a couch to be movable in six dimensions. Results: Registration accuracies and average errors of 2.12 mm ± 0.50 mm for transformations and 1.23° ± 0.40° for rotations were acquired by 2D/3D registration using an anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom. In addition, registration accuracies and average errors of 0.90 mm ± 0.30 mm for transformations and 1.00° ± 0.2° for rotations were acquired using CT image sets. Conclusion: We demonstrated that this validation tool could compensate for patient positioning error. In addition, this research could be the fundamental step for compensating patient positioning error at the first Korea heavy-ion medical accelerator treatment center

  2. Variations in PET/CT methodology for oncologic imaging at U.S. academic medical centers: an imaging response assessment team survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael M; Badawi, Ramsey D; Wahl, Richard L

    2011-02-01

    In 2005, 8 Imaging Response Assessment Teams (IRATs) were funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as supplemental grants to existing NCI Cancer Centers. After discussion among the IRATs regarding the need for increased standardization of clinical and research PET/CT methodology, it became apparent that data acquisition and processing approaches differ considerably among centers. To determine the variability in detail, a survey of IRAT sites and IRAT affiliates was performed. A 34-question instrument evaluating patient preparation, scanner type, performance approach, display, and analysis was developed. Fifteen institutions, including the 8 original IRATs and 7 institutions that had developed affiliate IRATs, were surveyed. The major areas of variation were (18)F-FDG dose (259-740 MBq [7-20 mCi]) uptake time (45-90 min), sedation (never to frequently), handling of diabetic patients, imaging time (2-7 min/bed position), performance of diagnostic CT scans as a part of PET/CT, type of acquisition (2-dimensional vs. 3-dimensional), CT technique, duration of fasting (4 or 6 h), and (varying widely) acquisition, processing, display, and PACS software--with 4 sites stating that poor-quality images appear on PACS. There is considerable variability in the way PET/CT scans are performed at academic institutions that are part of the IRAT network. This variability likely makes it difficult to quantitatively compare studies performed at different centers. These data suggest that additional standardization in methodology will be required so that PET/CT studies, especially those performed quantitatively, are more comparable across sites.

  3. Routine Cross-Sectional Head Imaging Before Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Tertiary Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajedi, Payam I; Mitchell, Jason; Herskovits, Edward H; Raghavan, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is generally contraindicated in patients with intracranial mass lesions or in the presence of increased intracranial pressure. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of incidental abnormalities on routine cross-sectional head imaging, including CT and MRI, that would preclude subsequent ECT. This retrospective study involved a review of the electronic medical records of 105 patients (totaling 108 imaging studies) between April 27, 2007, and March 20, 2015, referred for cranial CT or MRI with the primary indication of pre-ECT evaluation. The probability of occurrence of imaging findings that would preclude ECT was computed. A cost analysis was also performed on the practice of routine pre-ECT imaging. Of the 105 patients who presented with the primary indication of ECT clearance (totaling 108 scans), 1 scan (0.93%) revealed findings that precluded ECT. None of the studies demonstrated findings that indicated increased intracranial pressure. A cost analysis revealed that at least $18,662.70 and 521.97 relative value units must be expended to identify one patient with intracranial pathology precluding ECT. The findings of this study demonstrate an extremely low prevalence of findings that preclude ECT on routine cross-sectional head imaging. The costs incurred in identifying a potential contraindication are high. The authors suggest that the performance of pre-ECT neuroimaging be driven by the clinical examination. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Design and implementation of the Molecular Imaging Unit for large animais at the National Center for Cardiovascular Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.; Delgado Alberquilla, R.; Moreno Lopez, J.; Escudero Toro, R.

    2011-01-01

    in this paper describes the most iraportant imaging techniques to be used with the latest equipment as well as the future of PET-MRI combination, its application in research on large animals and the implications for the design of the units, shielding calculation management, sources of radiation and waste. This has reguired value and integrate the specific requirements of a research center in terms of bio security, care of large animals (pigs), health status of animals in an environment of highly demanding conditions PR.

  5. Research on imaging, sensing, and characterization of cells at Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hui-Chen; Chang, Chun-Fang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Chu, Chih-Wei; Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Hatanaka, Koji; Hsieh, Tung-Han; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Chung; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Yang, Fu-Liang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-12-01

    Development of imaging, sensing, and characterization of cells at Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS) of Academia Sinica in Taiwan is progressing rapidly. The research on advanced lattice light sheet microscopy for temporal visualization of cells in three dimensions at sub-cellular resolution shows novel imaging results. Label-free observation on filopodial dynamics provides a convenient assay on cancer cell motility. The newly-developed software enables us to track the movement of two types of particles through different channels and reconstruct the co-localized tracks. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for detecting urinary microRNA for diagnosis of acute kidney injury demonstrates excellent sensitivity. A fully automated and integrated portable reader was constructed as a home-based surveillance system for post-operation hepatocellular carcinoma. New microfluidic cell culture devices for fast and accurate characterizations prove various diagnosis capabilities.

  6. Detection of a compact radio source near the center of a gravitational lens: quasar image or galactic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenstein, M.V.; Shapiro, I.I.; Cohen, N.L.

    1983-01-01

    By use of a new, very sensitive interferometric system, a faint, compact radio source has been detected near the center of the galaxy that acts as the main part of a gravitational lens. This lens forms two previously discovered images of the quasar Q0957 + 561, which lies in the direction of the constellation Ursa Major. The newly detected source has a core smaller than 0.002 arc second in diameter with a flux density of 0.6 +- 0.1 millijansky at the 13-centimeter wavelength of the radio observations. This source could be the predicted third image of the transparent gravitational lens, the central core of the galaxy, or some combination of the two. It is not yet possible to choose reliably between these alternatives

  7. Knowledge of the Costs of Diagnostic Imaging: A Survey of Physician Trainees at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Duszak, Richard; Gelbard, Rondi B; Mullins, Mark E

    2016-11-01

    To study the awareness of postgraduate physician trainees across a variety of specialties regarding the costs of common imaging examinations. During early 2016, we conducted an online survey of all 1,238 physicians enrolled in internships, residencies, and fellowships at a large academic medical center. Respondents were asked to estimate Medicare national average total allowable fees for five commonly performed examinations: two-view chest radiograph, contrast-enhanced CT abdomen and pelvis, unenhanced MRI lumbar spine, complete abdominal ultrasound, and unenhanced CT brain. Responses within ±25% of published amounts were deemed correct. Respondents were also asked about specialty, postgraduate year of training, previous radiology education, and estimated number of imaging examinations ordered per week. A total of 381 of 1,238 trainees returned complete surveys (30.8%). Across all five examinations, only 5.7% (109/1,905) of responses were within the correct ±25% range. A total of 76.4% (291/381) of all respondents incorrectly estimated every examination's cost. Estimation accuracy was not associated with number of imaging examinations ordered per week or year of training. There was no significant difference in cost estimation accuracy between those who participated in medical school radiology electives and those who did not (P = .14). Only 17.5% of trainees considered their imaging cost knowledge adequate. Overall, 75.3% desire integration of cost data into clinical decision support and/or computerized physician order entry systems. Postgraduate physician trainees across all disciplines demonstrate limited awareness of the costs of commonly ordered imaging examinations. Targeted medical school education and integration of imaging cost information into clinical decision support / computerized physician order entry systems seems indicated. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Teogenes Augusto da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and methods: previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results: in none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/ year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion: in the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. (author)

  9. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  10. Imaging algorithms and CT protocols in trauma patients: survey of Swiss emergency centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinzpeter, R.; Alkadhi, Hatem; Boehm, T.; Boll, D.; Constantin, C.; Del Grande, F.; Fretz, V.; Leschka, S.; Ohletz, T.; Broennimann, M.; Schmidt, S.; Treumann, T.; Poletti, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    To identify imaging algorithms and indications, CT protocols, and radiation doses in polytrauma patients in Swiss trauma centres. An online survey with multiple choice questions and free-text responses was sent to authorized level-I trauma centres in Switzerland. All centres responded and indicated that they have internal standardized imaging algorithms for polytrauma patients. Nine of 12 centres (75 %) perform whole-body CT (WBCT) after focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography; 3/12 (25 %) use WBCT for initial imaging. Indications for WBCT were similar across centres being based on trauma mechanisms, vital signs, and presence of multiple injuries. Seven of 12 centres (58 %) perform an arterial and venous phase of the abdomen in split-bolus technique. Six of 12 centres (50 %) use multiphase protocols of the head (n = 3) and abdomen (n = 4), whereas 6/12 (50 %) use single-phase protocols for WBCT. Arm position was on the patient's body during scanning (3/12, 25 %), alongside the body (2/12, 17 %), above the head (2/12, 17 %), or was changed during scanning (5/12, 42 %). Radiation doses showed large variations across centres ranging from 1268-3988 mGy*cm (DLP) per WBCT. Imaging algorithms in polytrauma patients are standardized within, but vary across Swiss trauma centres, similar to the individual WBCT protocols, resulting in large variations in associated radiation doses. (orig.)

  11. Imaging algorithms and CT protocols in trauma patients: survey of Swiss emergency centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzpeter, R.; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Boehm, T. [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Department of Radiology, Chur (Switzerland); Boll, D. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Constantin, C. [Spital Wallis, Department of Radiology, Visp (Switzerland); Del Grande, F. [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Department of Radiology, Lugano (Switzerland); Fretz, V. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Winterthur (Switzerland); Leschka, S. [Kantonsspital St Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Gallen (Switzerland); Ohletz, T. [Kantonsspital Aarau, Department of Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); Broennimann, M. [University Hospital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Schmidt, S. [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Treumann, T. [Luzerner Kantonsspital, Institute of Radiology, Luzern 16 (Switzerland); Poletti, P.A. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneve (Switzerland)

    2017-05-15

    To identify imaging algorithms and indications, CT protocols, and radiation doses in polytrauma patients in Swiss trauma centres. An online survey with multiple choice questions and free-text responses was sent to authorized level-I trauma centres in Switzerland. All centres responded and indicated that they have internal standardized imaging algorithms for polytrauma patients. Nine of 12 centres (75 %) perform whole-body CT (WBCT) after focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography; 3/12 (25 %) use WBCT for initial imaging. Indications for WBCT were similar across centres being based on trauma mechanisms, vital signs, and presence of multiple injuries. Seven of 12 centres (58 %) perform an arterial and venous phase of the abdomen in split-bolus technique. Six of 12 centres (50 %) use multiphase protocols of the head (n = 3) and abdomen (n = 4), whereas 6/12 (50 %) use single-phase protocols for WBCT. Arm position was on the patient's body during scanning (3/12, 25 %), alongside the body (2/12, 17 %), above the head (2/12, 17 %), or was changed during scanning (5/12, 42 %). Radiation doses showed large variations across centres ranging from 1268-3988 mGy*cm (DLP) per WBCT. Imaging algorithms in polytrauma patients are standardized within, but vary across Swiss trauma centres, similar to the individual WBCT protocols, resulting in large variations in associated radiation doses. (orig.)

  12. Ontology-based, Tissue MicroArray oriented, image centered tissue bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viti Federica

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue MicroArray technique is becoming increasingly important in pathology for the validation of experimental data from transcriptomic analysis. This approach produces many images which need to be properly managed, if possible with an infrastructure able to support tissue sharing between institutes. Moreover, the available frameworks oriented to Tissue MicroArray provide good storage for clinical patient, sample treatment and block construction information, but their utility is limited by the lack of data integration with biomolecular information. Results In this work we propose a Tissue MicroArray web oriented system to support researchers in managing bio-samples and, through the use of ontologies, enables tissue sharing aimed at the design of Tissue MicroArray experiments and results evaluation. Indeed, our system provides ontological description both for pre-analysis tissue images and for post-process analysis image results, which is crucial for information exchange. Moreover, working on well-defined terms it is then possible to query web resources for literature articles to integrate both pathology and bioinformatics data. Conclusions Using this system, users associate an ontology-based description to each image uploaded into the database and also integrate results with the ontological description of biosequences identified in every tissue. Moreover, it is possible to integrate the ontological description provided by the user with a full compliant gene ontology definition, enabling statistical studies about correlation between the analyzed pathology and the most commonly related biological processes.

  13. The Effect of Depo Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA) on Cerebral Food Motivation Centers: A Pilot Study using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Tania; Bao, Pinglei; Lerner, Alexander; Anderson, Lindsey; Page, Kathleen; Stanczyk, Frank; Mishell, Daniel; Segall-Gutierrez, Penina

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective is to examine activation of food motivation centers in the brain before and 8 weeks after depo medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) administration. This prospective experimental pilot study examined the effects of DMPA on food motivation centers utilizing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in eight nonobese, ovulatory subjects. fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal was measured using a 3-Tesla Scanner while participants viewed images of high-calorie foods, low-calorie foods and nonfood objects. fMRI scans were performed at baseline and 8 weeks after participants received one intramuscular dose of DMPA 150 mg. fMRI data were analyzed using the FMRIB Software Library. Changes in adiposity and circulating leptin and ghrelin levels were also measured. There was a greater BOLD signal response to food cues in brain regions associated with food motivation (anterior cingulate gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex) 8 weeks after DMPA administration compared to baseline (z>2.3, pmotivation may guide the development of interventions to prevent weight gain in DMPA users. These data support a neural origin as one of the mechanisms underlying weight gain in DMPA users and may guide future research examining weight gain and contraception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A center-median filtering method for detection of temporal variation in coronal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plowman Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Events in the solar corona are often widely separated in their timescales, which can allow them to be identified when they would otherwise be confused with emission from other sources in the corona. Methods for cleanly separating such events based on their timescales are thus desirable for research in the field. This paper develops a technique for identifying time-varying signals in solar coronal image sequences which is based on a per-pixel running median filter and an understanding of photon-counting statistics. Example applications to “EIT waves” (named after EIT, the EUV Imaging Telescope on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and small-scale dynamics are shown, both using 193 Å data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The technique is found to discriminate EIT waves more cleanly than the running and base difference techniques most commonly used. It is also demonstrated that there is more signal in the data than is commonly appreciated, finding that the waves can be traced to the edge of the AIA field of view when the data are rebinned to increase the signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Feasibility and resolution limits of opto-magnetic imaging of neural network activity in brain slices using color centers in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadas, Mürsel; Wojciechowski, Adam M.; Huck, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We suggest a novel approach for wide-field imaging of the neural network dynamics of brain slices that uses highly sensitivity magnetometry based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. Invitro recordings in brain slices is a proven method for the characterization of electrical neural activi...... cell. Our results suggest that imaging of slice activity will be possible with the upcoming generation of NV magnetic field sensors, while single-shot imaging of planar cell activity remains challenging....

  16. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Vegetation Damage at Stennis Space Center using IKONOS Image Classification Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ross, Kenton W.; Graham, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina hit southwestern Mississippi on August 29, 2005, at 9:45 a.m. CDT as a category 3 storm with surges up to approx. 9 m and sustained winds of approx. 120 mph. The hurricane's wind, rain, and flooding devastated several coastal towns, from New Orleans through Mobile. The storm also caused significant damage to infrastructure and vegetation of NASA's SSC (Stennis Space Center). Storm recovery at SSC involved not only repairs of critical infrastructure but also forest damage mitigation (via timber harvests and control burns to reduce fire risk). This presentation discusses an effort to use commercially available high spatial resolution multispectral IKONOS data for vegetation damage assessment, based on data collected over SSC on September 2, 2005.

  17. Activity-based costing via an information system: an application created for a breast imaging center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, H; Langer, J; Padua, E; Reaves, J

    2001-06-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is a process that enables the estimation of the cost of producing a product or service. More accurate than traditional charge-based approaches, it emphasizes analysis of processes, and more specific identification of both direct and indirect costs. This accuracy is essential in today's healthcare environment, in which managed care organizations necessitate responsible and accountable costing. However, to be successfully utilized, it requires time, effort, expertise, and support. Data collection can be tedious and expensive. By integrating ABC with information management (IM) and systems (IS), organizations can take advantage of the process orientation of both, extend and improve ABC, and decrease resource utilization for ABC projects. In our case study, we have examined the process of a multidisciplinary breast center. We have mapped the constituent activities and established cost drivers. This information has been structured and included in our information system database for subsequent analysis.

  18. SU-E-P-02: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center (RPC) Credentialing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, C; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: IROC Houston issues credentials for NCI sponsored study groups. Requirements for credentialing might include any combination of questionnaires, knowledge assessment forms, benchmarks, or phantom irradiations. Credentialing requirements for specific protocols can be found on IROC Houston's website (irochouston.mdanderson.org). The website also houses the credentialing status inquiry (CSI) form. Once an institution has reviewed the protocol's credentialing requirements, a CSI form should be completed and submitted to IROC Houston. This form is used both to request whether requirements have been met as well as to notify IROC Houston that the institution requests credentialing for a specific protocol. IROC Houston will contact the institution to discuss any delinquent requirements. Once the institution has met all requirements IROC Houston issues a credentialing letter to the institution and will inform study groups and other IROC offices of the credentials. Institutions can all phone the IROC Houston office to initiate credentialing or ask any credentialing related questions. Results: Since 2010 IROC has received 1313 credentialing status inquiry forms. We received 317 in 2010, 266 in 2011, 324 in 2012, and 406 in 2013. On average we receive 35 phone calls per week with multiple types of credentialing questions. Decisions regarding credentialing status are based on the protocol specifications and previous completed credentialing by the institution. In some cases, such as for general IMRT credentialing, up to 5 sites may be credentialed based on the credentialing of one main center. Each of these situations is handled individually. Conclusion: IROC Houston will issue radiation therapy credentials for the NCI trials in the National Clinical Trials Network. Credentialing requirements

  19. SU-E-P-02: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center (RPC) Credentialing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador, C; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: IROC Houston issues credentials for NCI sponsored study groups. Requirements for credentialing might include any combination of questionnaires, knowledge assessment forms, benchmarks, or phantom irradiations. Credentialing requirements for specific protocols can be found on IROC Houston's website (irochouston.mdanderson.org). The website also houses the credentialing status inquiry (CSI) form. Once an institution has reviewed the protocol's credentialing requirements, a CSI form should be completed and submitted to IROC Houston. This form is used both to request whether requirements have been met as well as to notify IROC Houston that the institution requests credentialing for a specific protocol. IROC Houston will contact the institution to discuss any delinquent requirements. Once the institution has met all requirements IROC Houston issues a credentialing letter to the institution and will inform study groups and other IROC offices of the credentials. Institutions can all phone the IROC Houston office to initiate credentialing or ask any credentialing related questions. Results: Since 2010 IROC has received 1313 credentialing status inquiry forms. We received 317 in 2010, 266 in 2011, 324 in 2012, and 406 in 2013. On average we receive 35 phone calls per week with multiple types of credentialing questions. Decisions regarding credentialing status are based on the protocol specifications and previous completed credentialing by the institution. In some cases, such as for general IMRT credentialing, up to 5 sites may be credentialed based on the credentialing of one main center. Each of these situations is handled individually. Conclusion: IROC Houston will issue radiation therapy credentials for the NCI trials in the National Clinical Trials Network. Credentialing requirements and the CSI form

  20. Radiological imaging features and clinicopathological correlation of hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor: experience in a single tertiary cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Driscoll, Dearbhail; Athanasian, Edward; Hameed, Meera; Hwang, Sinchun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the imaging features of hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor (HFLT), which has a propensity towards local recurrence and the potential to transform into myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma (MIFS). The study included 8 patients with a diagnosis of HFLT and imaging at a tertiary cancer center. Imaging studies included radiographs (n = 2), ultrasound (n = 3), and MRI (n = 16). Imaging features were evaluated including location, calcification, sonographic echogenicity, vascular flow, size, border, signal characteristics, contrast enhancement, and blooming on MRI. The HFLT was located in the ankle/foot in 4 out of 8 and was subcutaneous in 8 out of 8, ranging in size from 2 to 18 cm. Histology at initial diagnosis was HFLT in 5 out of 8 and HFLT with MIFS in 3 out of 8. None was calcified on radiography. On ultrasound 2 out of 3 were heterogeneously echogenic with ≥10 foci of vascular flow. Two out of 8 patients had MRI only at local recurrence. The tumor border was infiltrative in 4 out of 6 at initial diagnosis and in 2 patients with MRI at recurrence only. Fat and septae were present in 7 out of 8 at initial diagnosis and at recurrence. Signal intensity was iso-/hypointense to muscle on T1-weighted sequences in more than two thirds of the tumor in 4 out of 7 and hyperintense to muscle in at least one third of the tumor on fluid-sensitive sequences in 6 out of 8. Contrast enhancement was heterogeneous in 7 out of 7; blooming in two thirds of the tumor on gradient-echo sequence MRI indicated hemorrhage. The HFLT commonly presents as a mass with an infiltrative border, interspersed fat and septations at initial diagnosis and local recurrence on MRI regardless of histology of HFLT alone or with MIFS. Hemosiderin deposits may be detected as blooming on gradient-echo sequences. (orig.)

  1. Inappropriateness of cardiovascular radiological imaging testing; a tertiary care referral center study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Carpeggiani

    Full Text Available AIMS: Radiological inappropriateness in medical imaging leads to loss of resources and accumulation of avoidable population cancer risk. Aim of the study was to audit the appropriateness rate of different cardiac radiological examinations. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With a retrospective, observational study we reviewed clinical records of 818 consecutive patients (67 ± 12 years, 75% males admitted from January 1-May 31, 2010 to the National Research Council - Tuscany Region Gabriele Monasterio Foundation cardiology division. A total of 940 procedures were audited: 250 chest x-rays (CXR; 240 coronary computed tomographies (CCT; 250 coronary angiographies (CA; 200 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI. For each test, indications were rated on the basis of guidelines class of recommendation and level of evidence: definitely appropriate (A, including class I, appropriate, and class IIa, probably appropriate, uncertain (U, class IIb, probably inappropriate, or inappropriate (I, class III, definitely inappropriate. Appropriateness was suboptimal for all tests: CXR (A = 48%, U = 10%, I = 42%; CCT (A = 58%, U = 24%, I = 18%; CA (A = 45%, U = 25%, I = 30%; PCI (A = 63%, U = 15%, I = 22%. Top reasons for inappropriateness were: routine on hospital admission (70% of inappropriate CXR; first line application in asymptomatic low-risk patients (42% of CCT or in patients with unchanged clinical status post-revascularization (20% of CA; PCI in patients either asymptomatic or with miscellaneous symptoms and without inducible ischemia on non-invasive testing (36% of inappropriate PCI. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Public healthcare system--with universal access paid for with public money--is haemorrhaging significant resources and accumulating avoidable long-term cancer risk with inappropriate cardiovascular imaging prevention.

  2. Online Angiography Image-Based FFR Assessment During Coronary Catheterization: A Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornowski, Ran; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Assali, Abid; Greenberg, Gabriel; Valtzer, Orna; Lavi, Ifat

    2018-03-15

    To assess the diagnostic performance of angiography-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRangio) measurements in patients with stable coronary artery disease when used online in the catheterization laboratory during routine coronary angiography. FFR, an index of the hemodynamic severity of coronary stenosis, is derived from invasive measurements using a pressure-monitoring guidewire and hyperemic stimulus. While FFR is the gold standard, it remains under-utilized. FFRangio may have several advantages owing to the reduced operator time, no wire-related or procedural complications, and no need for administration of vasodilators. FFRangio is a novel technology that uses a patient's hemodynamic data and routine angiograms to generate FFR values at each point along the coronary tree. We present the online application of the system where FFRangio was successfully used in the catheterization laboratory during routine coronary angiography and compared to invasive FFR. Fifty-three patients (79% men) and 60 coronary lesions were analyzed. Values derived using FFRangio ranged from 0.58-0.96 and correlated closely (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r=0.91; Psystem. In this single-center experience, FFRangio values showed high correlation rates to invasive FFR.

  3. SU-E-J-109: Testing the KV Imaging Center Congruence with Radiation Isocenter of Small MLC and SRS Cone Field On Two Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu,; Chen, Y; Yu, Y; Liu, H [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Orthogonal kV image pairs are used for target localization when fiducial markers are implanted. CBCT is used to verify cone SRS setup. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate the isocenter congruence between radiation fields and kV imaging center. This study used a simple method to evaluate the isocenter congruence, and compared the results for MLC and cone fields on two different Linacs. Methods: Varian OBI block was attached on the couch. It has a central 1mm BB with markers on three surfaces to align with laser. KV and MV images were taken at four cardinal angles. A 3x3cm2 MLC field and a 20mm cone field were irradiated respectively. On each kV image, the distance from BB center to the kV graticule center were measured. On the MV image of MLC field, the center of radiation field was determined manually, while for cone field, the Varian AM maintenance software was used to analyze the distance between BB and radiation field. The subtraction of the two distances gives the discrepancy between kV and radiation centers. Each procedure was repeated on five days at Trilogy and TrueBeam respectively. Results: The maximum discrepancy was found in the longitudinal direction at 180° gantry angel. It was 1.5±0.1mm for Trilogy and 0.6±0.1mm for TrueBeam. For Trilogy, although radiation center wobbled only 0.7mm and image center wobbled 0.8mm, they wobbled to the opposite direction. KV Pair using gantry 180° should be avoided in this case. Cone vs. kV isocenter has less discrepancy than MLC for Trilogy. Conclusion: Radiation isocenter of MLC and cone field is different, so is between Trilogy and TrueBeam. The method is simple and reproducible to check kV and radiation isocenter congruence.

  4. SU-E-J-109: Testing the KV Imaging Center Congruence with Radiation Isocenter of Small MLC and SRS Cone Field On Two Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu,; Chen, Y; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Orthogonal kV image pairs are used for target localization when fiducial markers are implanted. CBCT is used to verify cone SRS setup. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate the isocenter congruence between radiation fields and kV imaging center. This study used a simple method to evaluate the isocenter congruence, and compared the results for MLC and cone fields on two different Linacs. Methods: Varian OBI block was attached on the couch. It has a central 1mm BB with markers on three surfaces to align with laser. KV and MV images were taken at four cardinal angles. A 3x3cm2 MLC field and a 20mm cone field were irradiated respectively. On each kV image, the distance from BB center to the kV graticule center were measured. On the MV image of MLC field, the center of radiation field was determined manually, while for cone field, the Varian AM maintenance software was used to analyze the distance between BB and radiation field. The subtraction of the two distances gives the discrepancy between kV and radiation centers. Each procedure was repeated on five days at Trilogy and TrueBeam respectively. Results: The maximum discrepancy was found in the longitudinal direction at 180° gantry angel. It was 1.5±0.1mm for Trilogy and 0.6±0.1mm for TrueBeam. For Trilogy, although radiation center wobbled only 0.7mm and image center wobbled 0.8mm, they wobbled to the opposite direction. KV Pair using gantry 180° should be avoided in this case. Cone vs. kV isocenter has less discrepancy than MLC for Trilogy. Conclusion: Radiation isocenter of MLC and cone field is different, so is between Trilogy and TrueBeam. The method is simple and reproducible to check kV and radiation isocenter congruence

  5. Cost and detection rate of glaucoma screening with imaging devices in a primary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Alfonso Anton,1–4 Monica Fallon,3,5 Francesc Cots,2 María A Sebastian,6 Antonio Morilla-Grasa,4 Sergi Mojal,3 Xavier Castells2 1Medicine School, Universidad Internacional de Cataluña, 2Servei d’Estudies, Parc de Salut Mar, 3Instituto Hospital del Mar de Investigaciones Médicas (IMIM, 4Glaucoma Department, Instituto Catalán de Retina (ICR, 5Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, 6Centro de Atención Primaria Larrard, Barcelona, Spain Purpose: To analyze the cost and detection rate of a screening program for detecting glaucoma with imaging devices. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, a glaucoma screening program was applied in a population-based sample randomly selected from a population of 23,527. Screening targeted the population at risk of glaucoma. Examinations included optic disk tomography (Heidelberg retina tomograph [HRT], nerve fiber analysis, and tonometry. Subjects who met at least 2 of 3 endpoints (HRT outside normal limits, nerve fiber index ≥30, or tonometry ≥21 mmHg were referred for glaucoma consultation. The currently established (“conventional” detection method was evaluated by recording data from primary care and ophthalmic consultations in the same population. The direct costs of screening and conventional detection were calculated by adding the unit costs generated during the diagnostic process. The detection rate of new glaucoma cases was assessed. Results: The screening program evaluated 414 subjects; 32 cases were referred for glaucoma consultation, 7 had glaucoma, and 10 had probable glaucoma. The current detection method assessed 677 glaucoma suspects in the population, of whom 29 were diagnosed with glaucoma or probable glaucoma. Glaucoma screening and the conventional detection method had detection rates of 4.1% and 3.1%, respectively, and the cost per case detected was 1,410 and 1,435€, respectively. The cost of screening 1 million inhabitants would be 5.1 million euros and would allow

  6. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ≤SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (≤SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  7. Paroxysmal occipital discharges suppressed by eye opening: spectrum of clinical and imaging features at a tertiary care center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Bhavna; Shukla, Garima; Goyal, Vinay; Srivastava, Achal; Behari, Madhuri

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal occipital discharges (PODs) demonstrating the phenomena of fixation-off sensitivity have classically been described in childhood epilepsies with occipital paroxysms. We attempted to delineate the demographic, clinical and imaging characteristics of patients whose interictal electroencephalograms (EEGs) showed occipital discharges with fixation-off sensitivity at our center. During the period between 2003 and 2005, patients whose interictal EEGs showed PODs were included in the study. A detailed history, clinical examination and EEG findings along with imaging characteristics were analyzed. Of the 9,104 interictal EEGs screened during the study period, 11 patients (6 females and 5 males) aged between 5 and 17 years were identified to have PODs with fixation-off sensitivity. Five had history of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Three patients could be classified under Panayiotopoulos syndrome; the remaining 8 (72.2%) patients had symptomatic epilepsy. This study suggests that the phenomenon of fixation-off sensitivity is found not only in patients of idiopathic focal epilepsies, but also in a substantial number of patients of symptomatic epilepsy. The high proportion of symptomatic epilepsy with phenomenon of fixation-off sensitivity may be related to the referral pattern.

  8. Estimation of center line and diameter of brain blood vessel using three-dimensional blood vessel matching method with head three-dimensional CTA image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Masashi; Shinohara, Toshihiro; Nakayama, Masato; Nakasako, Noboru

    2010-01-01

    To support and automate the brain blood vessel disease diagnosis, a novel method to obtain the center line and the diameter of a blood vessel is proposed with a three-dimensional head computed tomographic angiography (CTA) image. Although the line thinning processing with distance transform or gray information is generally used to obtain the blood vessel center line, this method is not essentially one to obtain the center line and tends to yield extra lines depending on CTA images. In this study, the center line of the blood vessel is obtained by tracing the vessel. The blood vessel is traced by sequentially estimating the center point and direction of the blood vessel. The center point and direction of the blood vessel are estimated by taking the correlation between the blood vessel and a solid model of the blood vessel that is designed by considering noise influence. In addition, the vessel diameter is also estimated by correlating the blood vessel and the blood vessel model of which the diameter is variable. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by experimentally applied the proposed method to an actual three-dimensional head CTA image. (author)

  9. A comparative study on PET and SPECT image formation systems for a proper scanner choice in a considered PET center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.R. dos; Oliveira, A. de; Oliveira, C.L. de

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In the last twenty years, the conjunction of technology and research had provided exceptional conditions for improvements on the quality of life, specially on nuclear medicine. In this area, the developed technology is being applied, making available better diagnoses and therapy to a variety of diseases. Since then the short-lived radionuclides were available only in the large physics research centers. The increasing clinical applications have led to the rapid rise in the number of compact cyclotrons throughout the world. All medical cyclotrons currently are suitable for sustaining programs for PET research and clinical application. To date, up to 122 medical cyclotrons have been established worldwide, and Brazil is about to install a new dedicated cyclotron (RDS111 from CTI), to its first PET Center, in Rio de Janeiro. Also the number of scanners worldwide has increased, mainly those based on the positrons emission and annihilation. The better result gotten in the final contrast of the object imposes a comparative study and analysis of the image formation process, either in a system based on a Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT), as well as on Positron Emission Tomography (PET.) This comparative study should at least follow same increasing rates of the new devices with technological advances. That kind of study can be helpful on the decision of what type of scan should be the proper one, to a PET Center, on a specific region. Obviously, many other parameters are involved in that decision, and this discussion and analyses are the main subject of the present work. The objective is to make available a realistic comparative scenario. Many of the new devices have been introduced making progresses. As an example, in the new PET scanners, the reduction of examination time, and the remarkable improvement on the diagnoses based on images. As a consequence, we have a broadening on application, better performance, and making possible the

  10. Image-guided cryoablation for the treatment of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease: a single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prologo, J.D. [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology and Image-Guided Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Passalacqua, Matthew; Patel, Indravadan; Bohnert, Nathan [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Corn, David J. [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The role of image-guided thermal ablation techniques for the nonoperative local management of painful osseous metastatic disease has expanded during recent years, and several advantages of cryoablation in this setting have emerged. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate and report a single-center experience of CT-guided percutaneous cryoablation in the setting of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease. This study was approved by the institutional review board and is compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Electronic medical records of all patients who underwent percutaneous image-guided palliative cryoablation at our institution were reviewed (n = 61). An intent-to-treat analysis was performed. Records were reviewed for demographic data and anatomical data, primary tumor type, procedure details, and outcome - including change in analgesic requirements (expressed as morphine equivalent dosages), pain scores (utilizing the clinically implemented visual analog scale), subsequent therapies (including radiation and/or surgery), and complications during the 24 h following the procedure and at 3 months. Patients were excluded (n = 7) if data were not retrospectively identifiable at the defined time points. Fifty-four tumors were ablated in 50 patients. There were statistically significant decreases in the median VAS score and narcotic usage at both 24 h and 3 months (p < 0.000). Six patients (11 %) incurred complications related to their therapy. Two patients had no relief at 24 h, of which both reported worsened pain at 3 months. One patient had initial relief but symptom recurrence at 3 months. Four patients went on to have radiation therapy of the ablation site at some point following the procedure. CT-guided cryoablation is a safe, effective, reproducible procedural option for the nonoperative local treatment of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease. (orig.)

  11. Image-guided cryoablation for the treatment of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease: a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prologo, J.D.; Passalacqua, Matthew; Patel, Indravadan; Bohnert, Nathan; Corn, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of image-guided thermal ablation techniques for the nonoperative local management of painful osseous metastatic disease has expanded during recent years, and several advantages of cryoablation in this setting have emerged. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate and report a single-center experience of CT-guided percutaneous cryoablation in the setting of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease. This study was approved by the institutional review board and is compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Electronic medical records of all patients who underwent percutaneous image-guided palliative cryoablation at our institution were reviewed (n = 61). An intent-to-treat analysis was performed. Records were reviewed for demographic data and anatomical data, primary tumor type, procedure details, and outcome - including change in analgesic requirements (expressed as morphine equivalent dosages), pain scores (utilizing the clinically implemented visual analog scale), subsequent therapies (including radiation and/or surgery), and complications during the 24 h following the procedure and at 3 months. Patients were excluded (n = 7) if data were not retrospectively identifiable at the defined time points. Fifty-four tumors were ablated in 50 patients. There were statistically significant decreases in the median VAS score and narcotic usage at both 24 h and 3 months (p < 0.000). Six patients (11 %) incurred complications related to their therapy. Two patients had no relief at 24 h, of which both reported worsened pain at 3 months. One patient had initial relief but symptom recurrence at 3 months. Four patients went on to have radiation therapy of the ablation site at some point following the procedure. CT-guided cryoablation is a safe, effective, reproducible procedural option for the nonoperative local treatment of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease. (orig.)

  12. Investigating Frequency of Reasons for Referring to CBCT in a Private Imaging Center in Yazd from 2010 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Rafii

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A CBCT system (Cone Beam Computed Tomography is a new method in the application of radiography in dental science that provides three-dimensional data of the hard and soft tissue, without magnification or distotion. Information obtained via this diagnostic imaging can be utilized in treatment planning. Methods: In this retrospective descriptive study, the CBCT prescription of all dentists (DDS & Expert were investigated in a private Center of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (426 patients in Yazd from Oct 2010 to Dec 2012 (26 months and the following information was extracted: age, sex, years of prescription, reason of prescription, academic level of prescriber. Moreover, data was analyzed utilizing SPSS Version 16. Results: The study results revealed that 64.8% of patients aged between 30 to 60 years. Prevalence of male and female patients was approximately equal. Most CBCT prescriptions were by general dentists (44% and then it belonged to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (32.2%. CBCT was requested most for implant (88%. Number of CBCT requests in 2010 was 18.5%; in 2011 was 29.3% and in 2012 was 52.1%. Conclusion: Patients referred for evaluation before implant involve one of the main reasons for the CBCT request. However, it seems that the using CBCT was not limited to implant and will be developed in oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, root canals therapy and other dental treatments.

  13. Retratos do Brasil: uma coleção do Rockefeller Archive Center Images of Brazil: a Rockefeller Archive Center collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lopes de Lacerda

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo objetiva apresentar uma descrição comentada da coleção fotográfica sobre o Brasil pertencente aos arquivos da Fundação Rockefeller nos Estados Unidos, o Rockefeller Archive Center. Traz informações sobre a origem de tal documentação, bem como sobre as formas de sua acumulação, tendo em vista compreender o contexto de produção daqueles documentos visuais. Tais documentos dizem respeito às relações entre a Fundação Rockefeller e organismos brasileiros voltados para o combate a doenças como a febre amarela, a malária e a ancilostomíase entre os anos 1920 e 1940.This article describes and comments on the collection of photographs of Brazil that belongs to the Rockefeller Foundation archives (Rockefeller Archive Center in the United States. It also contains information about the origin of such documents and the way they were collected, as well as analyzes the context in which these visual documents were produced. They record the relationship between Rockefeller Foundation and Brazilian institutions engaged in the combat against yellow fever, malaria and ancyclostomiasis from 1920 to 1940.

  14. Considering a pedagogy of adress through the time image: a philosophical, curational and pedagogic project centered on artium’s collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Trafí-Prats

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the foundations and research process of a curatorial-pedagogic project centered on reactivating ARTIUM’s Collection (Vitoria, Spain. In this process art and pedagogy are seen as scenes of address, or spaces of production of difference between the positions that the cultural, museum, curricular text offers, and the responses given by its interpreters, students, viewers. Different moments of this research process are discussed, including: 1 The reactivation of the expressive languages of ARTIUMartworks through a Deleuzian image theory and a pedagogy of address, 2 the production of a dilemmatic museum space centered on producing knowledge from visitors’ memories, experiences and subjectivities, 3 the activation of this space through a Laboratory of Logics of Vision, 4 the production of visual narratives experimenting with the concept of image-time by the participants in such Laboratory.

  15. MO-FG-204-09: High Spatial Resolution and Artifact-Free CT Bone Imaging at Off-Centered Positions: An Application of Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G; Li, K; Gomez-Cardona, D; Budde, A; Hsieh, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although the anatomy of interest should be positioned as close as possible to the isocenter of CT scanners, off-centering may be inevitable during certain exams in clinical practice such as lumbar spine and elbow imaging. Off-centering degrades image sharpness, generates streak artifacts, and sometimes creates blooming artifacts due to truncation. The purpose of this work was to investigate whether the use of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) can alleviate the negative impacts of off-centering to achieve high quality CT bone imaging. Methods: Both an anthropomorphic phantom and an ex vivo swine elbow sample were scanned at centered and off-centered positions using clinical CT bone scan protocols. The magnitude of off-centering was determined from localizer radiographs. Both FBP and MBIR reconstructions were performed. For FBP, both standard and Bone Plus kernels commonly used in bone imaging were used. Objective assessment of image sharpness, noise standard deviation, and noise nonuniformity were performed. Additionally, we retrospectively analyzed human subject data acquired under off-centered conditions as a validation study. Results: In FBP images of the phantom, off-centering by 10 cm led to a 14% increase in noise (p<1e-3) and a 68% increase in noise nonuniformity (p<0.02). A visible drop in bone sharpness was observed. In contrast, no significant difference in the noise magnitude or the noise nonuniformity between the centered and off-centered MBIR images was found. The image sharpness of off-centered MBIR images outperformed that of FBP images reconstructed with the Bone Plus kernel. In images of the swine elbow off-centered by 20 cm, not only was the noise and spatial resolution performance improved by MBIR, truncation artifacts were also elliminated. The human subject study generated similar results, in which the visibility of the off-centered lumbar spine was significantly improved. Conclusion: High quality CT bone imaging at off-centered

  16. Separating twin images and locating the center of a microparticle in dense suspensions using correlations among reconstructed fields of two parallel holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hangjian; Katz, Joseph

    2014-09-20

    This paper deals with two issues affecting the application of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for measuring the spatial distribution of particles in a dense suspension, namely discriminating between real and virtual images and accurate detection of the particle center. Previous methods to separate real and virtual fields have involved applications of multiple phase-shifted holograms, combining reconstructed fields of multiple axially displaced holograms, and analysis of intensity distributions of weakly scattering objects. Here, we introduce a simple approach based on simultaneously recording two in-line holograms, whose planes are separated by a short distance from each other. This distance is chosen to be longer than the elongated trace of the particle. During reconstruction, the real images overlap, whereas the virtual images are displaced by twice the distance between hologram planes. Data analysis is based on correlating the spatial intensity distributions of the two reconstructed fields to measure displacement between traces. This method has been implemented for both synthetic particles and a dense suspension of 2 μm particles. The correlation analysis readily discriminates between real and virtual images of a sample containing more than 1300 particles. Consequently, we can now implement DHM for three-dimensional tracking of particles when the hologram plane is located inside the sample volume. Spatial correlations within the same reconstructed field are also used to improve the detection of the axial location of the particle center, extending previously introduced procedures to suspensions of microscopic particles. For each cross section within a particle trace, we sum the correlations among intensity distributions in all planes located symmetrically on both sides of the section. This cumulative correlation has a sharp peak at the particle center. Using both synthetic and recorded particle fields, we show that the uncertainty in localizing the axial

  17. The role of endorectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the management of early rectal lesions in a tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rikesh Kumar; Sayers, Adele Elizabeth; Kumar, Prashanth; Khulusi, Sam; Razack, Abdul; Hunter, Iain Andrew

    2014-12-01

    In early rectal cancer, ERUS has a vital role in determining radical or local excision based on identification of T-stage. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMs) has a reduced morbidity and mortality compared with radical surgery. Correct identification of lesions that can be managed with TEMs is therefore imperative. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of ERUS in identifying mucosal/submucosal lesions and thus their suitability for TEMs. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of patients who underwent ERUS was carried out over an initial 25-month period at a tertiary colorectal center. Our main outcome measures were T-stage measured using ERUS or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (indicating suitability for local excision, ie, ≤ T1) with correlation with that of the subsequent surgical specimen and improvement in accuracy over time. After data analysis and review, the study was repeated over the subsequent 12 months to establish whether there was a learning curve with the use of ERUS. Over the initial period, 52 patients who met the inclusion criteria underwent ERUS. T-staging was accurate in 73.1% (38/52) with identification of ≤ T1 lesions having a sensitivity of 70.8% and a specificity 100%. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of MRI was similar to that of ERUS (72.7%, 70.0%, and 100% respectively). Over the subsequent period, 23 patients underwent ERUS with T-staging accuracy improving to 78.3% (18/23) (P = .777). In our experience, ERUS is a useful adjunct to clinical assessment and pelvic MRI in determining suitability for local excision. Its 100% specificity in determining that a lesion is limited to the mucosa or submucosa aids in the assessment of lesions that are being considered for submucosal resection. Over the time periods assessed, improvement in T-staging accuracy was demonstrated, which might be due to the presence of a learning curve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Trends in the utilization of medical imaging from 2003 to 2011: clinical encounters offer a complementary patient-centered focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodoo, Martey S; Duszak, Richard; Hughes, Danny R

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate trends in utilization and spending for medical imaging, using medical visits resulting in imaging as a novel metric of utilization. Utilization and spending for medical imaging were examined using (1) Medicare Part B claims data from 2003 to 2011 to measure per-enrollee spending and (2) household component events data on the elderly Medicare-age population from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey from 2003 to 2010 to measure utilization as a function of clinical encounters. Annual health spending and Medicare payments for imaging for the elderly population grew from $294 per enrollee in 2003 to $418 in 2006 and had declined to $390 by 2011. Over this entire time, however, annual medical visits by a similar Medicare-age (≥ 65 years old) population resulting in imaging trended consistently downward, from 12.8% in 2003 to 10.6% in 2011. Despite early growth and then more recent declines in average Medicare spending per enrollee since 2003, the percentage of patient encounters resulting in medical imaging has significantly and consistently declined nationwide. Spending alone is thus an incomplete measure of changes in the role and utilization of medical imaging in overall patient care. As policymakers focus on medical imaging, a thoughtful analysis of payment policy influencing imaging utilization, and its role in concurrent and downstream patient care, will be critical to ensure appropriate patient access. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neutron Imaging in Cultural Heritage Research at the FRM II Reactor of the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Schillinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron Imaging is ideally suited for applications in cultural heritage even at small reactors with moderate image resolution. However, recently, high resolution imaging is being increasingly used for advanced studies, especially in paleontology. The special contrast for hydrogen and between neighboring elements in the periodic system allows for new applications that are not accessible for X-rays, like organic material in enclosed containers made of ceramics or metals, fossilized bones in chalk rock or in ferrous “red” beds, and even for animal and hominid teeth. Fission neutrons permit the examination of large samples that otherwise show large attenuation for thermal neutrons.

  20. Quantitative description of the morphology and ossification center in the axial skeleton of 20-week gestation formalin-fixed human fetuses using magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabert, Steren; Villalobos, Manuel; Ulloa, Patricia; Salas, Rodrigo; Tejos, Cristian; San Martin, Sebastian; Pereda, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Human tissues are usually studied using a series of two-dimensional visualizations of in vivo or cutout specimens. However, there is no precise anatomical description of some of the processes of human fetal development. The purpose of our study is to develop a quantitative description of the normal axial skeleton by means of high-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) images, collected from six normal 20-week-old human fetuses fixed in formaldehyde. Fetuses were collected after spontaneous abortion and subsequently fixed with formalin. They were imaged using a 1.5 T MR scanner with an isotropic spatial resolution of 200 µm. The correct tissue discrimination between ossified and cartilaginous bones was confirmed by comparing the images achieved by MR scans and computerized axial tomographies. The vertebral column was segmented out from each image using a specially developed semi-automatic algorithm. Vertebral body dimensions and inter-vertebral distances were larger in the lumbar region, in agreement with the beginning of the ossification process from the thoracolumbar region toward the sacral and cephalic ends. In this article, we demonstrate the feasibility of using MR images to study the ossification process in formalin-fixed fetal tissues. A quantitative description of the ossification centers of vertebral bodies and arches is presented. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A system architecture for sharing de-identified, research-ready brain scans and health information across clinical imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Ann L; van Erp, Theo G M; Kesselman, Carl; D'Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment.

  2. Trainee Knowledge of Imaging Appropriateness and Safety: Results of a Series of Surveys From a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Thaddeus D; Duszak, Richard; Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Gelbard, Rondi B; Mullins, Mark E

    2017-10-31

    In order to provide high quality care to their patients and utilize imaging most judiciously, physician trainees should possess a working knowledge of appropriate use, radiation dose, and safety. Prior work has suggested knowledge gaps in similar areas. We aimed to evaluate the knowledge of imaging appropriateness, radiation dose, and MRI and contrast safety of physician trainees across a variety of specialties. Between May 2016 and January 2017, three online surveys were distributed to all interns, residents, and fellows in ACGME accredited training programs at a large academic institution over two academic years. Response rates to three surveys ranged from 17.2% (218 of 1266) for MRI and contrast material safety, 19.1% (242 of 1266) for imaging appropriateness, to19.9% (246 of 1238) for radiation dose. Overall 72% (509 of 706) of survey respondents reported regularly ordering diagnostic imaging examinations, but fewer than half (47.8%; 470 of 984) could correctly estimate radiation dose across four commonly performed imaging studies. Only one third (34%; 167 of 488) of trainees chose appropriate imaging in scenarios involving pregnant patients. Trainee post-graduate year was not significantly correlated with overall radiation safety scores, and no significant difference was found between radiation safety or appropriate imaging scores of those who participated in a medical school radiology elective vs. those who did not. A total of 84% (57 of 68) of radiology trainees and 43% (269 of 630) of non-radiology trainees considered their knowledge adequate but that correlated only weakly correlated to actual knowledge scores (pimaging safety exist among many trainees. In order to enhance the value of imaging at the population level, further work is needed to assess the most appropriate method and stage of training to address these knowledge gaps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging combined with T2-weighted images in the detection of small breast cancer: a single-center multi-observer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lian-Ming; Chen, Jie; Hu, Jiani; Gu, Hai-Yan; Xu, Jian-Rong; Hua, Jia

    2014-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. However, it remains a difficult diagnosis problem to differentiate between benign and malignant breast lesions, especially in small early breast lesions. To assess the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) combined with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for small breast cancer characterization. Fifty-eight patients (65 lesions) with a lesion breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including DWI and histological analysis. Three observers with varying experience levels reviewed MRI. The probability of breast cancer in each lesion on MR images was recorded with a 5-point scale. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were compared by using the Z test; sensitivity and specificity were determined with the Z test after adjusting for data clustering. AUC of T2WI and DWI (Observer 1, 0.95; Observer 2, 0.91; Observer 3, 0.83) was greater than that of T2WI (Observer 1, 0.80; Observer 2, 0.74; Observer 3, 0.70) for all observers (P breast cancer characterization. It should be considered selectively in the preoperative evaluation of patients with small lesions of the breast.

  4. Flying with Antares DLR-H2 – From Stereo images to multi view. Image making from the research of the German Aerospace Center (DLR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öhlmann, Dietmar; Kallo, Dr Josef

    2013-01-01

    3-Dimensional scientific illustrations have been used by the German Aerospace Center for more than 20 years. Dietmar Öhlmann has transformed over the years scientific abstract information into visual presentations in hologram, S3D, and M§D media. The latest project Antares DLR-H2, the first emission free flying airplane in the world has been documented in 3D through stereoscopic video. Its research and progress have been documented in two and three dimensional media, a project still in progress.

  5. Risks of propofol sedation/anesthesia for imaging studies in pediatric research: eight years of experience in a clinical research center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiringoda, Ruwan; Thurm, Audrey E; Hirschtritt, Matthew E; Koziol, Deloris; Wesley, Robert; Swedo, Susan E; O'Grady, Naomi P; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2010-06-01

    To quantify the incidence of adverse events associated with anesthesia given for research-driven imaging studies and to identify risk factors for those events in pediatric research subjects. Retrospective cohort study. National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Children and adolescents enrolled in clinical research protocols who required anesthesia for research-related imaging studies from January 2000 to September 2008. Propofol sedation/anesthesia. The occurrence of respiratory, cardiovascular, and all anesthesia-related adverse events that required intervention while receiving anesthetics for research-driven imaging studies and other noninvasive procedures. We identified 607 children who received 1480 propofol anesthetic procedures for imaging studies. Seventy percent of anesthetics were given to subjects with severe diseases and significant disabilities (American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status [ASA] III). Anesthesia had a mean (SD) duration of 115 (55) minutes, and in 12.5% of procedures, an airway device was necessary. There were 98 notable respiratory, cardiovascular, and other events in 79 anesthetic procedures, a rate of 534 per 10 000 anesthetic procedures with 1 or more adverse events. There was no long-lasting morbidity or mortality. The ASA classification (odds ratio [OR], 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-6.88), anesthetic effect duration (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.25-1.70), and presence of airway abnormalities (OR, 4.41; 95% CI, 1.60-12.12) were independently associated with adverse events during anesthetic use. In our clinical research sample of high-risk children who received sedation/anesthesia by an anesthesiologist, we observed a low incidence of adverse events and no long-term complications. Risk factors for adverse events included higher ASA classification, increasing anesthetic duration, and presence of airway abnormalities.

  6. An RNA replication-center assay for high content image-based quantifications of human rhinovirus and coxsackievirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lötzerich Mark

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Picornaviruses are common human and animal pathogens, including polio and rhinoviruses of the enterovirus family, and hepatits A or food-and-mouth disease viruses. There are no effective countermeasures against the vast majority of picornaviruses, with the exception of polio and hepatitis A vaccines. Human rhinoviruses (HRV are the most prevalent picornaviruses comprising more than one hundred serotypes. The existing and also emerging HRVs pose severe health risks for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Here, we developed a serotype-independent infection assay using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (mabJ2 detecting double-strand RNA. Results Immunocytochemical staining for RNA replication centers using mabJ2 identified cells that were infected with either HRV1A, 2, 14, 16, 37 or coxsackievirus (CV B3, B4 or A21. MabJ2 labeled-cells were immunocytochemically positive for newly synthesized viral capsid proteins from HRV1A, 14, 16, 37 or CVB3, 4. We optimized the procedure for detection of virus replication in settings for high content screening with automated fluorescence microscopy and single cell analysis. Our data show that the infection signal was dependent on multiplicity, time and temperature of infection, and the mabJ2-positive cell numbers correlated with viral titres determined in single step growth curves. The mabJ2 infection assay was adapted to determine the efficacy of anti-viral compounds and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs blocking enterovirus infections. Conclusions We report a broadly applicable, rapid protocol to measure infection of cultured cells with enteroviruses at single cell resolution. This assay can be applied to a wide range of plus-sense RNA viruses, and hence allows comparative studies of viral infection biology without dedicated reagents or procedures. This protocol also allows to directly compare results from small compound or siRNA infection screens

  7. Time evaluation of image-guided radiotherapy in patients with spinal bone metastases. A single-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rief, H.; Habermehl, D.; Schubert, K.; Debus, J.; Combs, S.E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Time is an important factor during immobilization for radiotherapy (RT) of painful spinal bone metastases. The different RT techniques currently in use have differing impacts on medical staff requirements, treatment planning and radiation delivery. This prospective analysis aimed to evaluate time management during RT of patients with spine metastases, focusing particularly on the impact of image-guided RT (IGRT). Between 21 March 2013 and 17 June 2013, we prospectively documented the time associated with the core work procedures involving the patient during the first day of RT at three different linear accelerators (LINACs). The study included 30 patients; 10 in each of three groups. Groups 1 and 2 were treated with a single photon field in the posterior-anterior direction; group 3 received a three-dimensional conformal treatment plan. The median overall durations of one treatment session were 24 and 25.5 min for the conventional RT groups and 15 min for IGRT group. The longest single procedure was patient immobilization in group 1 (median 9.5 min), whereas this was image registration and matching in groups 2 and 3 (median duration 9.5 and 5 min, respectively). Duration of irradiation (beam-on time) was similar for all groups at 4 or 5 min. The shortest immobilization procedure was observed in group 3 with a median of 3 min, compared to 4 min in group 2 and 9.5 min in group 1. With this analysis, we have shown for the first time that addition of modern IGRT does not extend the overall treatment time for patients with painful bone metastases and can be applied as part of clinical routine in a palliative setting. The choice of treatment technique should be based upon the patient's performance status, as well as the size of the target volume and location of the metastasis. (orig.) [German] Der Zeitfaktor ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil bei der Immobilisation waehrend der Radiotherapie (RT) bei schmerzhaften Knochenmetastasen der Wirbelsaeule. Unterschiedliche RT

  8. Korean Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System features of follicular thyroid adenoma and carcinoma: a single-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Won; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong Hyun; Baek, Jin Wook; Lee, Yoo Jin; Baek, Hye Jin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic efficacy of Korean Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (K-TIRADS) features for distinguishing follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA) from follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC). From January 2013 to July 2016, 46 follicular neoplasms in 45 patients who underwent preoperative thyroid ultrasonography (US) and thyroid surgery were included. The US features of each thyroid nodule were retrospectively evaluated by a single radiologist using a picture archiving and communication system. The diagnostic indices of K-TIRADS for follicular neoplasms were calculated according to whether K-TIRADS category 4 lesions were excluded or classified as benign or malignant. Of the 46 follicular neoplasms (mean size, 3.1±1.6 cm), 37 were FTAs (mean size, 3.1±1.7 cm) and nine were FTCs (mean size, 3.0±1.5 cm). A statistically significant difference was found between FTAs and FTCs regarding the margin (P=0.035), while no significant differences were observed in the composition, echogenicity, shape, orientation, calcification, or vascularity of the lesions (P<0.05). The FTAs belonged to K-TIRADS categories 3 (n=22) and 4 (n=15), while the FTCs belonged to K-TIRADS categories 3 (n=4), 4 (n=4), and 5 (n=1). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of K-TIRADS categories between FTAs and FTCs (P=0.184).K-TIRADS features were not helpful for distinguishing FTA from FTC, although follicular neoplasms showed a high prevalence of K-TIRADS categories 3 and 4

  9. Korean Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System features of follicular thyroid adenoma and carcinoma: a single-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Won; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong Hyun; Baek, Jin Wook; Lee, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic efficacy of Korean Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (K-TIRADS) features for distinguishing follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA) from follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC). From January 2013 to July 2016, 46 follicular neoplasms in 45 patients who underwent preoperative thyroid ultrasonography (US) and thyroid surgery were included. The US features of each thyroid nodule were retrospectively evaluated by a single radiologist using a picture archiving and communication system. The diagnostic indices of K-TIRADS for follicular neoplasms were calculated according to whether K-TIRADS category 4 lesions were excluded or classified as benign or malignant. Of the 46 follicular neoplasms (mean size, 3.1±1.6 cm), 37 were FTAs (mean size, 3.1±1.7 cm) and nine were FTCs (mean size, 3.0±1.5 cm). A statistically significant difference was found between FTAs and FTCs regarding the margin (P=0.035), while no significant differences were observed in the composition, echogenicity, shape, orientation, calcification, or vascularity of the lesions (P<0.05). The FTAs belonged to K-TIRADS categories 3 (n=22) and 4 (n=15), while the FTCs belonged to K-TIRADS categories 3 (n=4), 4 (n=4), and 5 (n=1). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of K-TIRADS categories between FTAs and FTCs (P=0.184).K-TIRADS features were not helpful for distinguishing FTA from FTC, although follicular neoplasms showed a high prevalence of K-TIRADS categories 3 and 4.

  10. Postoperative Neurosurgical Infection Rates After Shared-Resource Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Single-Center Experience with 195 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinevski, Nikolaj; Sarnthein, Johannes; Vasella, Flavio; Fierstra, Jorn; Pangalu, Athina; Holzmann, David; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver

    2017-07-01

    To determine the rate of surgical-site infections (SSI) in neurosurgical procedures involving a shared-resource intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (ioMRI) scanner at a single institution derived from a prospective clinical quality management database. All consecutive neurosurgical procedures that were performed with a high-field, 2-room ioMRI between April 2013 and June 2016 were included (N = 195; 109 craniotomies and 86 endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures). The incidence of SSIs within 3 months after surgery was assessed for both operative groups (craniotomies vs. transsphenoidal approach). Of the 109 craniotomies, 6 patients developed an SSI (5.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-9.8%), including 1 superficial SSI, 2 cases of bone flap osteitis, 1 intracranial abscess, and 2 cases of meningitis/ventriculitis. Wound revision surgery due to infection was necessary in 4 patients (4%). Of the 86 transsphenoidal skull base surgeries, 6 patients (7.0%, 95% CI 1.5-12.4%) developed an infection, including 2 non-central nervous system intranasal SSIs (3%) and 4 cases of meningitis (5%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the likelihood of infection significantly decreased with the number of operations in the new operational setting (odds ratio 0.982, 95% CI 0.969-0.995, P = 0.008). The use of a shared-resource ioMRI in neurosurgery did not demonstrate increased rates of infection compared with the current available literature. The likelihood of infection decreased with the accumulating number of operations, underlining the importance of surgical staff training after the introduction of a shared-resource ioMRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of quality control and instrumentation performance metrics for diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging instruments in the multi-center clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Samuel T.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Warren, Robert V.; Hill, Brian; Roblyer, Darren; Leproux, AnaÑ--s.; Durkin, Amanda F.; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Haghany, Hosain; Mantulin, William W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Instrument equivalence and quality control are critical elements of multi-center clinical trials. We currently have five identical Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Imaging (DOSI) instruments enrolled in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN, #6691) trial located at five academic clinical research sites in the US. The goal of the study is to predict the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 60 patients. In order to reliably compare DOSI measurements across different instruments, operators and sites, we must be confident that the data quality is comparable. We require objective and reliable methods for identifying, correcting, and rejecting low quality data. To achieve this goal, we developed and tested an automated quality control algorithm that rejects data points below the instrument noise floor, improves tissue optical property recovery, and outputs a detailed data quality report. Using a new protocol for obtaining dark-noise data, we applied the algorithm to ACRIN patient data and successfully improved the quality of recovered physiological data in some cases.

  12. Biological Visualization, Imaging and Simulation(Bio-VIS) at NASA Ames Research Center: Developing New Software and Technology for Astronaut Training and Biology Research in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    The Bio- Visualization, Imaging and Simulation (BioVIS) Technology Center at NASA's Ames Research Center is dedicated to developing and applying advanced visualization, computation and simulation technologies to support NASA Space Life Sciences research and the objectives of the Fundamental Biology Program. Research ranges from high resolution 3D cell imaging and structure analysis, virtual environment simulation of fine sensory-motor tasks, computational neuroscience and biophysics to biomedical/clinical applications. Computer simulation research focuses on the development of advanced computational tools for astronaut training and education. Virtual Reality (VR) and Virtual Environment (VE) simulation systems have become important training tools in many fields from flight simulation to, more recently, surgical simulation. The type and quality of training provided by these computer-based tools ranges widely, but the value of real-time VE computer simulation as a method of preparing individuals for real-world tasks is well established. Astronauts routinely use VE systems for various training tasks, including Space Shuttle landings, robot arm manipulations and extravehicular activities (space walks). Currently, there are no VE systems to train astronauts for basic and applied research experiments which are an important part of many missions. The Virtual Glovebox (VGX) is a prototype VE system for real-time physically-based simulation of the Life Sciences Glovebox where astronauts will perform many complex tasks supporting research experiments aboard the International Space Station. The VGX consists of a physical display system utilizing duel LCD projectors and circular polarization to produce a desktop-sized 3D virtual workspace. Physically-based modeling tools (Arachi Inc.) provide real-time collision detection, rigid body dynamics, physical properties and force-based controls for objects. The human-computer interface consists of two magnetic tracking devices

  13. Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellum, C.D.; Fisher, L.M.; Tegtmeyer, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the advantages of the use of excretory urography for diagnosis. According to the authors, excretory urography remains the basic radiologic examination of the urinary tract and is the foundation for the evaluation of suspected urologic disease. Despite development of the newer diagnostic modalities such as isotope scanning, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonsance imaging (MRI), excretory urography has maintained a prominent role in ruorradiology. Some indications have been altered and will continue to change with the newer imaging modalities, but the initial evaluation of suspected urinary tract structural abnormalities; hematuria, pyuria, and calculus disease is best performed with excretory urography. The examination is relatively inexpensive and simple to perform, with few contraindictions. Excretory urography, when properly performed, can provide valuable information about the renal parenchyma, pelvicalyceal system, ureters, and urinary bladder

  14. A study on change in the center frequency depending on the fat content and on change in the fat saturation image with the use of a self-manufactured phantom depending on the center frequency adjustment method in an MRI breast scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Bok; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Gho, Hee-Jin; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Joo, Kyu-Ji; Kim, Young-Jae

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the changes in the center frequency according to the fat content the using a self-manufactured phantom. In addition, the change in the fat saturation image according to when the center frequency was applied automatically or adjusted manually was analyzed to determine the importance of a manual adjustment of the center frequency. Distilled water and animal fat were solidified in a 10-ml syringe to manufacture nine phantoms for each condition (18 in total). A MR scanner at 1.5 Tesla was used to obtain a T1-weighted three dimensional fast low-angle shot (T1 3D FLASH) dynamic fat saturation image according to the spectral attenuated inversion recovery(SPAIR) method. The images obtained were classified into the following before analyzing the center frequencies for each image: Test A (image where fat was not saturated), Test B (image where fat was saturated in an automatic adjustment of the center frequency), and Test C (image where fat was saturated in a manual adjustment of the center frequency). The signal intensity (SI) values of water, fat and background were measured to calculate the signal to noise ratio (SNR) before examining the difference in the SNRs of water and fat (SNR difference = water SNR — fat SNR). The mean center frequency in Tests A, B and C was 63.631179 MHz when the fat content was 70% or lower. The mean center frequency for Tests A and B was 63.631002 MHz when the fat content was 80% or higher, which was 226 Hz lower than that for Test C (63.631228 MHz). The water SIs of Tests A, B and C with increasing fat content showed a pattern of change similar to that of the fat SIs of Tests A and C. On the other hand, the fat SI of Test B was similar to that of Test A when the fat content was 80%, which showed a large difference in change. The water SNRs of Tests A, B and C, and the fat SNR and SNR differences of Tests A and C showed similar changes according to the fat content. The difference between the fat SNR and the SNR of Test B

  15. A new automatic algorithm for quantification of myocardial infarction imaged by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance: experimental validation and comparison to expert delineations in multi-center, multi-vendor patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engblom, Henrik; Tufvesson, Jane; Jablonowski, Robert; Carlsson, Marcus; Aletras, Anthony H; Hoffmann, Pavel; Jacquier, Alexis; Kober, Frank; Metzler, Bernhard; Erlinge, David; Atar, Dan; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2016-05-04

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using magnitude inversion recovery (IR) or phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) has become clinical standard for assessment of myocardial infarction (MI). However, there is no clinical standard for quantification of MI even though multiple methods have been proposed. Simple thresholds have yielded varying results and advanced algorithms have only been validated in single center studies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an automatic algorithm for MI quantification in IR and PSIR LGE images and to validate the new algorithm experimentally and compare it to expert delineations in multi-center, multi-vendor patient data. The new automatic algorithm, EWA (Expectation Maximization, weighted intensity, a priori information), was implemented using an intensity threshold by Expectation Maximization (EM) and a weighted summation to account for partial volume effects. The EWA algorithm was validated in-vivo against triphenyltetrazolium-chloride (TTC) staining (n = 7 pigs with paired IR and PSIR images) and against ex-vivo high resolution T1-weighted images (n = 23 IR and n = 13 PSIR images). The EWA algorithm was also compared to expert delineation in 124 patients from multi-center, multi-vendor clinical trials 2-6 days following first time ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (n = 124 IR and n = 49 PSIR images). Infarct size by the EWA algorithm in vivo in pigs showed a bias to ex-vivo TTC of -1 ± 4%LVM (R = 0.84) in IR and -2 ± 3%LVM (R = 0.92) in PSIR images and a bias to ex-vivo T1-weighted images of 0 ± 4%LVM (R = 0.94) in IR and 0 ± 5%LVM (R = 0.79) in PSIR images. In multi-center patient studies, infarct size by the EWA algorithm showed a bias to expert delineation of -2 ± 6 %LVM (R = 0.81) in IR images (n = 124) and 0 ± 5%LVM (R = 0.89) in

  16. Precipitable water and surface humidity over global oceans from special sensor microwave imager and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, Wenqing; Wentz, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Global fields of precipitable water W from the special sensor microwave imager were compared with those from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. They agree over most ocean areas; both data sets capture the two annual cycles examined and the interannual anomalies during an ENSO episode. They show significant differences in the dry air masses over the eastern tropical-subtropical oceans, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. In these regions, comparisons with radiosonde data indicate that overestimation by the ECMWF model accounts for a large part of the differences. As a check on the W differences, surface-level specific humidity Q derived from W, using a statistical relation, was compared with Q from the ECMWF model. The differences in Q were found to be consistent with the differences in W, indirectly validating the Q-W relation. In both W and Q, SSMI was able to discern clearly the equatorial extension of the tongues of dry air in the eastern tropical ocean, while both ECMWF and climatological fields have reduced spatial gradients and weaker intensity.

  17. Radiation Therapy Deficiencies Identified During On-Site Dosimetry Visits by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston Quality Assurance Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kry, Stephen F; Dromgoole, Lainy; Alvarez, Paola; Leif, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Taylor, Paige; Followill, David S

    2017-12-01

    To review the dosimetric, mechanical, and programmatic deficiencies most frequently observed during on-site visits of radiation therapy facilities by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Quality Assurance Center in Houston (IROC Houston). The findings of IROC Houston between 2000 and 2014, including 409 institutions and 1020 linear accelerators (linacs), were compiled. On-site evaluations by IROC Houston include verification of absolute calibration (tolerance of ±3%), relative dosimetric review (tolerances of ±2% between treatment planning system [TPS] calculation and measurement), mechanical evaluation (including multileaf collimator and kilovoltage-megavoltage isocenter evaluation against Task Group [TG]-142 tolerances), and general programmatic review (including institutional quality assurance program vs TG-40 and TG-142). An average of 3.1 deficiencies was identified at each institution visited, a number that has decreased slightly with time. The most common errors are tabulated and include TG-40/TG-142 compliance (82% of institutions were deficient), small field size output factors (59% of institutions had errors ≥3%), and wedge factors (33% of institutions had errors ≥3%). Dosimetric errors of ≥10%, including in beam calibration, were seen at many institutions. There is substantial room for improvement of both dosimetric and programmatic issues in radiation therapy, which should be a high priority for the medical physics community. Particularly relevant was suboptimal beam modeling in the TPS and a corresponding failure to detect these errors by not including TPS data in the linac quality assurance process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tempo de enfermagem em centro de diagnóstico por imagem: desenvolvimento de instrumento Nursing time in a diagnostic imaging center: development of an instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Weidle Marques da Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um instrumento para medir o tempo despendido pela equipe de enfermagem, nas intervenções realizadas em centros de diagnóstico por imagem. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal desenvolvido em hospital geral particular, conforme estas etapas: A Identificação das atividades de enfermagem por meio de revisão bibliográfica e observação em campo. B Mapeamento cruzado das atividades identificadas em intervenções de enfermagem, conforme a Classificação de Intervenções de Enfermagem (NIC. C Validação das intervenções. D Teste-piloto do instrumento com utilização da técnica de amostragem do trabalho. RESULTADOS: Foram validadas pelos juízes 92 atividades de enfermagem correspondentes a 32 intervenções da Classificação de Intervenções de Enfermagem NIC. As intervenções mais frequentes foram: Assistência em Exames, Documentação, Gerenciamento de Caso, Acompanhamento por telefone, Cuidados na admissão e Troca de Informações sobre cuidados de Saúde. CONCLUSÃO: O instrumento proposto para medição do tempo de trabalho da enfermagem, fundamentado nas intervenções de enfermagem em Centro de Diagnóstico por Imagem, foi validado e encontra-se disponível para utilização.OBJECTIVE: To develop an instrument to measure the time spent by nursing staff in interventions performed in diagnostic imaging centers. METHODS: Cross-sectional study conducted in private general hospital, according to these steps: A Identification of nursing activities through literature review and field observation. B Crossed-mapping of the activities identified in nursing interventions, according to the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC. C Validation of interventions. D Pilot-test with instrument's utilization, with work-sampling technique. RESULTS: Were validated by the judges 92 nursing activities corresponding to 32 interventions NIC.. These interventions were most frequent: Assistance in exams, Documentation, Case Management

  19. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resourceintegration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. Ausage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw onresources across their individual usage processes to create v...

  20. 2011 Las Conchas Post Fire Center Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set consists of photo centers of raw aerial images representing multi-spectral (red, green, blue, near-infrared) digital aerial imagery of the Las Conchas...

  1. Imaging features of primary Sarcomas of the great vessels in CT, MRI and PET/CT: a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, Christian von; Meyer, Bernhard; Fegbeutel, Christine; Länger, Florian; Bengel, Frank; Wacker, Frank; Rodt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the imaging features of primary sarcomas of the great vessels in CT, MRI and 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Thirteen patients with a primary sarcoma of the great vessels were retrospectively evaluated. All available images studies including F-18 FDG PET(/CT) (n = 4), MDCT (n = 12) and MRI (n = 6) were evaluated and indicative image features of this rare tumor entity were identified. The median interval between the first imaging study and the final diagnosis was 11 weeks (0–12 weeks). The most frequently observed imaging findings suggestive of malignant disease in patients with sarcomas of the pulmonary arteries were a large filling defect with vascular distension, unilaterality and a lack of improvement despite effective anticoagulation. In patients with aortic sarcomas we most frequently observed a pedunculated appearance and an atypical location of the filling defect. The F-18 FDG PET(/CT) examinations demonstrated an unequivocal hypermetabolism of the lesion in all cases (4/4). MRI proved lesion vascularization in 5/6 cases. Intravascular unilateral or atypically located filling defects of the great vessels with vascular distension, a pedunculated shape and lack of improvement despite effective anticoagulation are suspicious for primary sarcoma on MDCT or MRI. MR perfusion techniques can add information on the nature of the lesion but the findings may be subtle and equivocal. F-18 FDG PET/CT may have a potential role in these patients and may be considered as part of the imaging workup

  2. Center for Coastline Security Technology, Year-2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glegg, Stewart; Glenn, William; Furht, Borko; Beaujean, P. P; Frisk, G; Schock, S; VonEllenrieder, K; Ananthakrishnan, P; An, E; Granata, R

    2007-01-01

    ...), the Imaging Technology Center, the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, and the University Consortium for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security at Florida Atlantic University...

  3. Design and implementation of the Molecular Imaging Unit for large animals at the National Center for Cardiovascular Research; Diseno y puesta en marcha de la Unidad de Imagen Molecular para animales grandes del Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, G.; Delgado Alberquilla, R.; Moreno Lopez, J.; Escudero Toro, R.

    2011-07-01

    in this paper describes the most important imaging techniques to be used with the latest equipment as well as the future of PET-MRI combination, its application in research on large animals and the implications for the design of the units, shielding calculation management sources of radiation and waste. This has required value and integrate the specific requirements of a research center in terms of bio security, care of large animals (pigs), health status of animals in an environment of highly demanding conditions PR.

  4. A configuração da imagem de um shopping center na percepção de consumidores locais La configuración de la imagen de un centro comercial en la percepción de los consumidores locales The image configuration of a shopping center in the perception of local consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Sperandio Milan

    2013-04-01

    (11,55% y la dimensión cognitiva (6,68% lo que indica que sus respectivos atributos fueron evocados con menos frecuencia por los consumidores.The present study consists in identifying the image of a Shopping Center in the perspective of local consumers. Images are understood as a being organized as a net of meanings or schemes, which are arranged around a few central elements, socially accepted and shared. Identifying the mental image that consumers have regarding Shopping Center is relevant to direct marketing strategies and actions. Starting from exploratory research was used Method of Image Configuration (MCI, already tested and validated research instrument for identification of images in organizations, products, services and brands, we configured, within a sample of 400 consumers, which is the collective image of consumers on the Shopping Center under study. With base on the Central Nucleus Theory, was identified the attributes and dimensions (cognitive, emotional, functional and symbolic related to images formed by the consumers. The results were displayed in the Graphic of Image Configuration (GCI, which presents the attributes that make up the shopping images, the proximity of these attributes with the Central Image and the size they belong. By the results, the Shopping Center image is more closely linked to functional elements, or the physical features it offers, and symbolic elements, or the meaning that the Shopping Center represents and conveys to consumers. Therefore, the most salient dimensions were the functional dimension (48.06% and the symbolic dimension (33.71% representing over 80% of VT (Total Value of the attributes most remembered and readily evoked. From this, one might think that these two dimensions are the attributes most representative of the common understanding of the interviewers about the Shopping Center. The dimensions less salient were the emotional dimension (11.55% and the cognitive dimension (6.68% indicating that their respective

  5. Comparison of myocardial Perfusion imaging by thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography with SUNY4001 (adenosine) and exercise. Crossover clinical trial at multi-center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamazaki, Junichi

    2004-01-01

    We compared the ischemic diagnosis ability and adverse events of 201 Tl myocardial perfusion imaging with SUNY4001 (adenosine) stress to that with exercise (ergometer) stress both on random crossover trial. Thirty one known or suspected chronic stable angina patients who are able to exercise and 10 healthy volunteers were enrolled for the trial. The early and delayed images were obtained by SPECT imaging. The concordance of diagnoses [ischemia vs. no ischemia] between the two types of stresses was 97.3% (36/37) [Kappa: 0.9068]. The sensitivity and specificity based on the exercise test were 100% (6/6) and 96.8% (30/31) respectively. The incidence of adverse events caused by SUNY4001 and the exercise were 44.7% (17/38) and 52.6% (20/38), respectively. Major adverse events caused by SUNY4001 were blood pressure (BP) decrease, flushing and headache. And those by exercise were ST decrease, dyspnea and chest pain. None of the adverse events required the intervention or caused life-threatening complication in the trial. The trial showed that the ischemic diagnosis ability and safety of 201 Tl scintigraphy with SUNY4001 stress are almost equal to those of the exercise stress that is considered as the standard stress method. We concluded that 201 Tl imaging with SUNY4001 is safe and useful for detecting ischemic heart disease, especially for patients unable to exercise adequately. (author)

  6. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, L. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Boysel, M. B. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Smith, D. R. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States)

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  7. Acute opioid withdrawal is associated with increased neural activity in reward-processing centers in healthy men: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Lin, Joanne C; Clemenson, Anna; Encisco, Ellen; Sun, John; Hoang, Dan; Alva, Heather; Erlendson, Matthew; Clark, J David; Younger, Jarred W

    2015-08-01

    Opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed for chronic pain. One expected consequence of long-term opioid use is the development of physical dependence. Although previous resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated signal changes in reward-associated areas following morphine administration, the effects of acute withdrawal on the human brain have been less well-investigated. In an earlier study by our laboratory, ondansetron was shown to be effective in preventing symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. The purpose of this current study was to characterize neural activity associated with acute opioid withdrawal and examine whether these changes are modified by ondansetron. Ten participants were enrolled in this placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, crossover study and attended three acute opioid withdrawal sessions. Participants received either placebo or ondansetron (8Ymg IV) before morphine administration (10Ymg/70Ykg IV). Participants then underwent acute naloxone-precipitated withdrawal during a resting state fMRI scan. Objective and subjective opioid withdrawal symptoms were assessed. Imaging results showed that naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal was associated with increased neural activity in several reward processing regions, including the right pregenual cingulate, putamen, and bilateral caudate, and decreased neural activity in networks involved in sensorimotor integration. Ondansetron pretreatment did not have a significant effect on the imaging correlates of opioid withdrawal. This study presents a preliminary investigation of the regional changes in neural activity during acute opioid withdrawal. The fMRI acute opioid withdrawal model may serve as a tool for studying opioid dependence and withdrawal in human participants. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C. [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States); Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Surgery (United States); Matsumoto, Alan H., E-mail: ahm4d@virginia.edu [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 {+-} 5.6 mm; range 1.5-25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 {+-} 9.7 mm; range 2.2-41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  9. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C.; Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 ± 5.6 mm; range 1.5–25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 ± 9.7 mm; range 2.2–41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  10. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in / Jacobs Retina Center Department of Psychology University of California, San Francisco Department of University School of Optometry Maui Community College Maui Community College Space Grant Program Montana

  11. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  12. Proton beam spatial distribution and Bragg peak imaging by photoluminescence of color centers in lithium fluoride crystals at the TOP-IMPLART linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Picardi, L.; Nenzi, P.; Trinca, E.; Vadrucci, M.; Bonfigli, F.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2017-11-01

    Solid-state radiation detectors based on the photoluminescence of stable point defects in lithium fluoride crystals have been used for advanced diagnostics during the commissioning of the segment up to 27 MeV of the TOP-IMPLART proton linear accelerator for proton therapy applications, under development at ENEA C.R. Frascati, Italy. The LiF detectors high intrinsic spatial resolution and wide dynamic range allow obtaining two-dimensional images of the beam transverse intensity distribution and also identifying the Bragg peak position with micrometric precision by using a conventional optical fluorescence microscope. Results of the proton beam characterization, among which, the estimation of beam energy components and dynamics, are reported and discussed for different operating conditions of the accelerator.

  13. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative staging of rectal adenocarcinoma: Experience from a regional Australian cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rohen; Ung, Kim Ann; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-01

    Selection of the optimal treatment pathway in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma relies on accurate locoregional staging. This study aims to assess the accuracy of staging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in particular, its accuracy in differentiating patients with early stage disease from those with more advanced disease who benefit from a different treatment approach. Patients who were staged with MRI and received surgery as the first line of treatment for biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum were identified. Comparison was made between the clinical stage on MRI and the pathological stage of the surgical specimen. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of MRI was assessed. In all, 58 eligible patients were identified. In 31% of patients, the extent of disease was underrepresented on preoperative MRI. Sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of anorectal MRI in detecting stage II/III disease status in this cohort was 59, 71 and 62%, respectively. MRI underestimated the pathological stage in many patients in this series who may have benefited from the addition of neoadjuvant radiotherapy to their management. This study supports further refinement of preoperative staging and demonstrates that impressive results from highly controlled settings may be difficult to reproduce in community practice. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  15. Image, Image, Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    With all the talk today about accountability, budget cuts, and the closing of programs in public education, teachers cannot overlook the importance of image in the field of industrial technology. It is very easy for administrators to cut ITE (industrial technology education) programs to save school money--money they might shift to teaching the…

  16. Automated digital image analysis of islet cell mass using Nikon's inverted eclipse Ti microscope and software to improve engraftment may help to advance the therapeutic efficacy and accessibility of islet transplantation across centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmyr, Valery; Bonner, Caroline; Lukowiak, Bruno; Pawlowski, Valerie; Dellaleau, Nathalie; Belaich, Sandrine; Aluka, Isanga; Moermann, Ericka; Thevenet, Julien; Ezzouaoui, Rimed; Queniat, Gurvan; Pattou, Francois; Kerr-Conte, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Reliable assessment of islet viability, mass, and purity must be met prior to transplanting an islet preparation into patients with type 1 diabetes. The standard method for quantifying human islet preparations is by direct microscopic analysis of dithizone-stained islet samples, but this technique may be susceptible to inter-/intraobserver variability, which may induce false positive/negative islet counts. Here we describe a simple, reliable, automated digital image analysis (ADIA) technique for accurately quantifying islets into total islet number, islet equivalent number (IEQ), and islet purity before islet transplantation. Islets were isolated and purified from n = 42 human pancreata according to the automated method of Ricordi et al. For each preparation, three islet samples were stained with dithizone and expressed as IEQ number. Islets were analyzed manually by microscopy or automatically quantified using Nikon's inverted Eclipse Ti microscope with built-in NIS-Elements Advanced Research (AR) software. The AIDA method significantly enhanced the number of islet preparations eligible for engraftment compared to the standard manual method (p image analysis utilizing the Nikon Instruments software is an unbiased, simple, and reliable teaching tool to comprehensively assess the individual size of each islet cell preparation prior to transplantation. Implementation of this technology to improve engraftment may help to advance the therapeutic efficacy and accessibility of islet transplantation across centers.

  17. Implementing MRI-based target delineation for cervical cancer treatment within a rapid workflow environment for image-guided brachytherapy: A practical approach for centers without in-room MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Feuerlein, Sebastian; Kim, Taeho; Garda, Allison; Watkins, W Tyler; Erickson, Sarah; Ornan, Afshan; Showalter, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based intracavitary brachytherapy offers several advantages over computed tomography (CT)-based brachytherapy, but many centers are unable to offer it at the time of brachytherapy because of logistic and/or financial considerations. We have implemented a method of integrating MRI into a CT-guided, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy workflow in clinics that do not have immediately available MRI capability. At our institution, patients receiving high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy as a component of the definitive treatment of cervical cancer have a Smit sleeve placed during the first brachytherapy fraction in a dedicated suite with in-room CT-on-rails. After the first fraction of brachytherapy, an MRI is obtained with the Smit sleeve, but no applicator, in place. For each subsequent fraction, CT scans are coregistered to the MRI scan by the Smit sleeve. The gross target volume is defined by MRI and overlaid on the CT images for each brachytherapy treatment for dose optimization. This MRI-integrated workflow adds workflow is a feasible compromise to preserve an efficient workflow while integrating MRI target delineation, and it provides many of the advantages of both MRI- and CT-based brachytherapy. The future collection and analysis of clinical data will serve to compare the proposed approach to non-MRI containing techniques. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Can pre-operative axial CT imaging predict syndesmosis instability in patients sustaining ankle fractures? Seven years' experience in a tertiary trauma center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, Tsz Wai; Chan, Chung Yan Grace; Chan, Wun Cheung Samuel; Yuen, Ming Keung [Tuen Mun Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tuen Mun (China); Yeung, Yuk Nam [Tune Mun Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Tuen Mun (China)

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the diagnostic accuracy of CT measurements in predicting syndesmosis instability of injured ankle, with correlation to operative findings. From July 2006 to June 2013, 123 patients presented to a single tertiary hospital who received pre-operative CT for ankle fractures were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation for fractures and intra-operative syndesmosis integrity tests. The morphology of incisura fibularis was categorized as deep or shallow. The tibiofibular distance (TFD) between the medial border of the fibula and the nearest point of the lateral border of tibia were measured at anterior (aTFD), middle (mTFD), posterior (pTFD), and maximal (maxTFD) portions across the syndesmosis on axial CT images at 10 mm proximal to the tibial plafond. Statistical analysis was performed with independent samples t test and ROC curve analysis. Intraobserver reproducibility and inter-observers agreement were also evaluated. Of the 123 patients, 39 (31.7 %) were operatively diagnosed with syndesmosis instability. No significant difference of incisura fibularis morphology (deep or shallow) and TFDs was demonstrated respective to genders. The axial CT measurements were significantly higher in ankles diagnosed with syndesmosis instability than the group without (maxTFD means 7.2 ± 2.96 mm vs. 4.6 ± 1.4 mm, aTFD mean 4.9 ± 3.7 mm vs. 1.8 ± 1.4 mm, mTFD mean 5.3 ± 2.4 mm vs. 3.2 ± 1.6 mm, pTFD mean 5.3 ± 1.8 mm vs. 4.1 ± 1.3 mm, p < 0.05). Their respective cutoff values with best sensitivity and specificity were calculated; the aTFD (AUC 0.798) and maxTFD (AUC 0.794) achieved the highest diagnostic accuracy. The optimal cutoff levels were aTFD = 4 mm (sensitivity, 56.4 %; specificity, 91.7 %) and maxTFD = 5.65 mm (sensitivity, 74.4 %; specificity, 79.8 %). The inter-observer agreement was good for all aTFD, mTFD, pTFD, and maxTFD measurements (ICC 0.959, 0.799, 0.783, and 0.865). The ICC

  19. Can pre-operative axial CT imaging predict syndesmosis instability in patients sustaining ankle fractures? Seven years' experience in a tertiary trauma center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Tsz Wai; Chan, Chung Yan Grace; Chan, Wun Cheung Samuel; Yuen, Ming Keung; Yeung, Yuk Nam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the diagnostic accuracy of CT measurements in predicting syndesmosis instability of injured ankle, with correlation to operative findings. From July 2006 to June 2013, 123 patients presented to a single tertiary hospital who received pre-operative CT for ankle fractures were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation for fractures and intra-operative syndesmosis integrity tests. The morphology of incisura fibularis was categorized as deep or shallow. The tibiofibular distance (TFD) between the medial border of the fibula and the nearest point of the lateral border of tibia were measured at anterior (aTFD), middle (mTFD), posterior (pTFD), and maximal (maxTFD) portions across the syndesmosis on axial CT images at 10 mm proximal to the tibial plafond. Statistical analysis was performed with independent samples t test and ROC curve analysis. Intraobserver reproducibility and inter-observers agreement were also evaluated. Of the 123 patients, 39 (31.7 %) were operatively diagnosed with syndesmosis instability. No significant difference of incisura fibularis morphology (deep or shallow) and TFDs was demonstrated respective to genders. The axial CT measurements were significantly higher in ankles diagnosed with syndesmosis instability than the group without (maxTFD means 7.2 ± 2.96 mm vs. 4.6 ± 1.4 mm, aTFD mean 4.9 ± 3.7 mm vs. 1.8 ± 1.4 mm, mTFD mean 5.3 ± 2.4 mm vs. 3.2 ± 1.6 mm, pTFD mean 5.3 ± 1.8 mm vs. 4.1 ± 1.3 mm, p < 0.05). Their respective cutoff values with best sensitivity and specificity were calculated; the aTFD (AUC 0.798) and maxTFD (AUC 0.794) achieved the highest diagnostic accuracy. The optimal cutoff levels were aTFD = 4 mm (sensitivity, 56.4 %; specificity, 91.7 %) and maxTFD = 5.65 mm (sensitivity, 74.4 %; specificity, 79.8 %). The inter-observer agreement was good for all aTFD, mTFD, pTFD, and maxTFD measurements (ICC 0.959, 0.799, 0.783, and 0.865). The ICC

  20. Forest Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Technology Applications Center, with other government and academic agencies, provided technology for improved resources management to the Cibola National Forest. Landsat satellite images enabled vegetation over a large area to be classified for purposes of timber analysis, wildlife habitat, range measurement and development of general vegetation maps.

  1. Center of mass detection via an active pixel sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Minch, Brad (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrara (Inventor); Fossum, Eric (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An imaging system for identifying the location of the center of mass (COM) in an image. In one aspect, an imaging system includes a plurality of photosensitive elements arranged in a matrix. A center of mass circuit coupled to the photosensitive elements includes a resistive network and a normalization circuit including at least one bipolar transistor. The center of mass circuit identifies a center of mass location in the matrix and includes: a row circuit, where the row circuit identifies a center of mass row value in each row of the matrix and identifies a row intensity for each row; a horizontal circuit, where the horizontal circuit identifies a center of mass horizontal value; and a vertical circuit, where the vertical circuit identifies a center of mass vertical value. The horizontal and vertical center of mass values indicate the coordinates of the center of mass location for the image.

  2. Retrospective single center study of the efficacy of large spot 532 nm laser for the treatment of facial capillary malformations in 44 patients with the use of three-dimensional image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiek, Bartłomiej; Rożalski, Michał; Kowalewski, Cezary; Ambroziak, Marcin

    2017-10-01

    We wanted to asses the efficacy of large spot 532 nm laser for the treatment of facial capillary malformations with the use of three-dimensional (3D) image analysis. Retrospective single center study on previously non-treated patients with facial capillary malformations (CM) was performed. A total of 44 consecutive Caucasian patients aged 5-66 were included. Patients had 3D photography performed before and after and had at least one single session of treatment with 532 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser with contact cooling, fluencies ranging from 8 to 11.5 J/cm 2 , pulse duration ranging from 5 to 9 milliseconds and spot size ranging from 5 to 10 mm. Objective analysis of percentage improvement based on 3D digital assessment of combined color and area improvement (global clearance effect [GCE]) were performed. Median maximal improvement achieved during the treatment (GCE max ) was 70.4%. Mean number of laser procedures required to achieve this improvement was 7.1 (ranging from 2 to 14)). Improvement of minimum 25% (GCE 25) was achieved by all patients, of minimum 50% (GCE 50) by 77.3%, of minimum 75% (GCE 75) by 38.6%, and of minimum 90% (GCE 90) by 13.64. Large spot 532 nm laser is highly effective in the treatment of facial CM. 3D color and area image analysis provides an objective method to compare different methods of facial CM treatment in future studies. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:743-749, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. 78 FR 4419 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ...: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, Biomedical Imaging and Engineering Area Review. Date... . Name of Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, Member Conflict: Nanotechnology...

  4. Marketing and Community Mental Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferniany, Isaac W.; Garove, William E.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that a marketing approach can be applied to community mental health centers. Marketing is a management orientation of providing services for, not to, patients in a systematic manner, which can help mental health centers improve services, strengthen community image, achieve financial independence and aid in staff recruitment. (Author)

  5. Iowa Water Center | Iowa Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Iowa State University Extension Iowa Water Center Submitted by mollyd on April 24, 2012 - 09 :42 Advancing the state of water knowledge and management The Iowa Water Center is a part of a nationwide network of university-based water centers created to encourage interdisciplinary water research

  6. Aftermath of World Trade Center Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image was taken by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) aboard the Landsat 7 satellite on September 12, 2001, at roughly 11:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time. Visit the NASA home page for photos from the space station and MODIS, and GlobalSecurity.org for images from other satellites. Image courtesy USGS Landsat 7 team, at the EROS Data Center.

  7. Importance of Grid Center Arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaogullari, O.; Usul, N.

    2012-12-01

    In Digital Elevation Modeling, grid size is accepted to be the most important parameter. Despite the point density and/or scale of the source data, it is freely decided by the user. Most of the time, arrangement of the grid centers are ignored, even most GIS packages omit the choice of grid center coordinate selection. In our study; importance of the arrangement of grid centers is investigated. Using the analogy between "Raster Grid DEM" and "Bitmap Image", importance of placement of grid centers in DEMs are measured. The study has been conducted on four different grid DEMs obtained from a half ellipsoid. These grid DEMs are obtained in such a way that they are half grid size apart from each other. Resulting grid DEMs are investigated through similarity measures. Image processing scientists use different measures to investigate the dis/similarity between the images and the amount of different information they carry. Grid DEMs are projected to a finer grid in order to co-center. Similarity measures are then applied to each grid DEM pairs. These similarity measures are adapted to DEM with band reduction and real number operation. One of the measures gives function graph and the others give measure matrices. Application of similarity measures to six grid DEM pairs shows interesting results. These four different grid DEMs are created with the same method for the same area, surprisingly; thirteen out of 14 measures state that, the half grid size apart grid DEMs are different from each other. The results indicated that although grid DEMs carry mutual information, they have also additional individual information. In other words, half grid size apart constructed grid DEMs have non-redundant information.; Joint Probability Distributions Function Graphs

  8. Stephenson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City is an NCI-designated cancer center at the forefront of NCI-supported cancer research. Learn more about the Stephenson Cancer Center's mission.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  10. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  11. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  12. Las prácticas lúdicas en la calle y la imagen del centro de la ciudad en Santiago de Chile = Recreational practices on the street and the image of the city center of Santiago de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Calvet Tapia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza la relación de la imagen del espacio central de una ciudad y la calle como escenario de esparcimiento y las prácticas lúdicas que en ellas se manifiestan. Los espacios que permiten o promueven las actividades lúdicas y festivas, ya sean parques, plazas, paseos o simplemente calles, en el Centro de la ciudad de Santiago de Chile responden a la necesidad consensual de todos los actores que componen ese espacio. Contribuyen a crear sentimientos de pertenencia e identidad, a disimular las diferencias sociales, como también constituyen una necesidad desde el punto de vista turístico y comercial. Mejoran la calidad de vida de los habitantes, a la vez que construyen una imagen positiva del territorio. Los espacios lúdicos y las actividades lúdicas son utilizados como instrumento por todos los actores y colectividades sociales, ya sea para ordenar, normalizar y estructurar dichos espacios y dichas prácticas; o para criticar y subvertir ese orden; o para obtener beneficios económicos. No existe una relación de causa-efecto entre la organización espacial planificada y las vivencias y apropiación de un espacio por parte de la población. Dicho de otra manera las personas no necesariamente usan o viven el espacio según sea la voluntadinstitucional.This article examines the relationship between the images of central and the street as a leisurely space in a city against the recreational practices that are enacted in them. The spaces that foster festive and recreational activities, such as parks, squares or simply streets in the center of Santiago de Chile meet a consensual need of all actors involved. They contribute to create feelings of belonging and identity, to soften social differences, in addition to responding to the needs of trade and tourism. They improve the quality of life of the city residents and build a positive image of the territory. Recreational spaces are used as tools by all

  13. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-01-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  14. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  15. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  16. Tehran Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Tehran Nuclear Research Center was formerly managed by the University of Tehran. This Center, after its transformation to the AEOI, has now become a focal point for basic research in the area of Nuclear Energy in Iran

  17. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  18. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  19. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster ... Sitemap RSS E-mail Inside CPSC Accessibility Privacy Policy Budget, Performances & Finance Open Government Freedom of Information ( ...

  1. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  2. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  3. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  4. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Science Learning Center Making science and health easy for everyone to understand Home News Our Team What We Do ... Collaboration Conferences Current Projects Publications Contact The Genetic Science Learning Center at The University of Utah is a ...

  5. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  6. Data Center Tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  7. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.

    1988-12-01

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  8. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure ulcer - wound care center; Decubitus ulcer - wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical ... flow, or swollen legs Certain wounds may not heal well due to: ...

  9. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  10. Satellite medical centers project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  11. Digital cine-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Kazuhiro

    1992-01-01

    Digitization of fluoroscopic images has been developed for the digital cine imaging system as a result of the computer technology, television technology, and popularization of interventional radiology. Present digital cine imaging system is able to offer images similar to cine film because of the higher operatability and better image quality with the development of interventional radiology. As a result, its higher usefulness for catheter diagnosis examination except for interventional radiology was reported, and the possibility of having filmless cine is close to becoming a reality. However several problems have been pointed out, such as spatial resolution, time resolution, storage and exchangeability of data, disconsolidated viewing functions, etc. Anyhow, digital cine imaging system has some unresolved points and lots the needs to be discussed. The tendency of digitization is the passage of the time and we have to promote a study for more useful digital cine imaging system in team medical treatment which centers on the patients. (author)

  12. Handbook on data centers

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Samee Ullah

    2015-01-01

    This handbook offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research achievements in the field of data centers. Contributions from international, leading researchers and scholars offer topics in cloud computing, virtualization in data centers, energy efficient data centers, and next generation data center architecture.  It also comprises current research trends in emerging areas, such as data security, data protection management, and network resource management in data centers. Specific attention is devoted to industry needs associated with the challenges faced by data centers, such as various power, cooling, floor space, and associated environmental health and safety issues, while still working to support growth without disrupting quality of service. The contributions cut across various IT data technology domains as a single source to discuss the interdependencies that need to be supported to enable a virtualized, next-generation, energy efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly data cente...

  13. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    in order to relate the results to the service levels used in call centers. Furthermore, the generic nature of the approximation is demonstrated by applying it to a system incorporating a dynamic priority scheme. In the last paper Optimization of overflow policies in call centers, overflows between agent......The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructure...... in modern call centers allows for a high level of customization, but also induces complicated operational processes. The size of the industry together with the complex and labor intensive nature of large call centers motivates the research carried out to understand the underlying processes. The customizable...

  14. The guiding center Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recursion relations determining the guiding center Langrangian Λ and the associated guiding center variables to all orders are derived. We consider some particularly simple forms of Λ obtainable by specific choices of certain arbitrary functions appearing as free parameters in the theory. It is, for example, possible to locally define the guiding center variables so that the expression for the corresponding Langrangian is unchanged by all higher order terms. (orig.)

  15. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  16. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  17. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Business with VA Acquisition, Logistics, & Construction Small & Veteran Business Programs VetBiz.gov Financial & Asset Enterprise Management Security Investigation Center/Background Clearances Freedom of Information ...

  18. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  19. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  20. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  1. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  2. Audio Visual Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Audiovisual Services Center provides still photographic documentation with laboratory support, video documentation, video editing, video duplication, photo/video...

  3. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  4. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  5. The Amsterdam Sexual Abuse Case (ASAC)-study in day care centers: longitudinal effects of sexual abuse on infants and very young children and their parents, and the consequences of the persistence of abusive images on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindauer, Ramón J. L.; Brilleslijper-Kater, Sonja N.; Diehle, Julia; Verlinden, Eva; Teeuw, Arianne H.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Tuinebreijer, Wilco; Bosschaart, Thekla F.; van Duin, Esther; Verhoeff, Arnoud

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundLittle research has been done on the signs of child sexual abuse (CSA) in infants and very young children, or on the consequences that such abuse ¿ including the persistence of the abusive pornographic images on the internet ¿ might have for the children and their parents. The effects of

  6. The Amsterdam Sexual Abuse Case (ASAC)-study in day care centers: longitudinal effects of sexual abuse on infants and very young children and their parents, and the consequences of the persistence of abusive images on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindauer, R.J.L.; Brilleslijper-Kater, S.N.; Diehle, J.; Verlinden, E.; Teeuw, A.H.; Middeldorp, C.M.; Tuinebreijer, W.; Bosschaart, T.F.; van Duin, E.; Verhoeff, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little research has been done on the signs of child sexual abuse (CSA) in infants and very young children, or on the consequences that such abuse ¿ including the persistence of the abusive pornographic images on the internet ¿ might have for the children and their parents. The effects of

  7. The Amsterdam Sexual Abuse Case (ASAC)-study in day care centers: longitudinal effects of sexual abuse on infants and very young children and their parents, and the consequences of the persistence of abusive images on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindauer, R.J.L.; Brilleslijper-Kater, S.N.; Diehle, J.; Verlinden, E.; Teeuw, A.H.; Middeldorp, C.M.; Tuinebreijer, W.; Bosschaart, T.F.; van Duin, E.; Verhoeff, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little research has been done on the signs of child sexual abuse (CSA) in infants and very young children, or on the consequences that such abuse - including the persistence of the abusive pornographic images on the internet - might have for the children and their parents. The effects of

  8. ASTER 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  9. MODIS 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  10. Plan for radiological security at a university health center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiaman Mendoza, G.M.; Sanchez Riojas, M.M.; Felix JImenez, D.

    1998-01-01

    This work shows a radiological security plan applied to a Basic Radiological Service at a university health center. Factors taken into account were installation designs, equipment operation parameters, work procedures, image system and responsibilities

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  12. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  13. From Periphery To Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carré, David

    2014-01-01

    the notions of Center/Periphery. As Hermans (2001) proposed, center and periphery are not fixed ‘I-positions’ of the self; in this vein, these notions are explored as relevant theoretical tools for addressing the developmental trajectories involved in the construction of scientific identities. In sum...

  14. ENERGY RESOURCES CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Virginia

    1979-11-01

    First I will give a short history of this Center which has had three names and three moves (and one more in the offing) in three years. Then I will tell you about the accomplishments made in the past year. And last, I will discuss what has been learned and what is planned for the future. The Energy and Environment Information Center (EEIC), as it was first known, was organized in August 1975 in San Francisco as a cooperative venture by the Federal Energy Administration (FEA), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These three agencies planned this effort to assist the public in obtaining information about energy and the environmental aspects of energy. The Public Affairs Offices of FEA, ERDA and EPA initiated the idea of the Center. One member from each agency worked at the Center, with assistance from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Information Research Group (LBL IRG) and with on-site help from the EPA Library. The Center was set up in a corner of the EPA Library. FEA and ERDA each contributed one staff member on a rotating basis to cover the daily operation of the Center and money for books and periodicals. EPA contributed space, staff time for ordering, processing and indexing publications, and additional money for acquisitions. The LBL Information Research Group received funds from ERDA on a 189 FY 1976 research project to assist in the development of the Center as a model for future energy centers.

  15. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Danbury, CT 06810 203-748-6000 Accredited Since March 1998 Corvallis Birth & Women's Health Center Accredited 2314 NW Kings Blvd, Suite ... Washington, DC 20002 202-398-5520 Accredited Since March 2001 Flagstaff Birth and Women's Center Accredited 401 West Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ ...

  16. Technology Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerson, E.L.; Shepherd, E.W.; Minor, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A Transportation Technology Center (TTC) has been established at Sandia to address the transportation of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The Technology Information Center (TIC) acts as TTC's clearing house for nuclear material transportation information. TIC's activities are divided into three activities: public information, policy information, and technical information. Some of the uses of TIC's activities are briefly outlined

  17. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  18. Synthetic Aperture Imaging in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Pedersen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    with high precision, and the imaging is easily extended to real-time 3D scanning. This paper presents the work done at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging in the area of SA imaging. Three areas that benefit from SA imaging are described. Firstly a preliminary in-vivo evaluation comparing conventional B...

  19. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...... center theorem of Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart. We then develop numerical methods for the detection of relative Lyapunov center bifurcations along branches of RPOs and for their computation. We apply our methods to Lagrangian REs of the N-body problem....

  20. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  1. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  2. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  3. User-centered design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Joo Hyun; Kim, Hyeong Heon

    2008-01-01

    The simplification philosophy, as an example, that both of EPRI-URD and EUR emphasize is treated mostly for the cost reduction of the nuclear power plants, but not for the simplification of the structure of user's tasks, which is one of the principles of user-centered design. A user-centered design is a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable. However, the nuclear power plants offered these days by which the predominant reactor vendors are hardly user-centered but still designer-centered or technology-centered in viewpoint of fulfilling user requirements. The main goal of user-centered design is that user requirements are elicited correctly, reflected properly into the system requirements, and verified thoroughly by the tests. Starting from the user requirements throughout to the final test, each requirement should be traceable. That's why requirement traceability is a key to the user-centered design, and main theme of a requirement management program, which is suggested to be added into EPRI-URD and EUR in the section of Design Process. (author)

  4. A comparison of field-only electronic portal imaging hard copies with double exposure port films in radiation therapy treatment setup confirmation to determine its clinical application in a radiotherapy center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatherly, Kay; Smylie, Josephine; Rodger, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in which treatment sites field-only hard copy electronic portal images (EPI) captured during a treatment exposure could replace traditional double exposed port films in a busy radiation oncology department. Methods and Materials: The three linear accelerators in the William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre (WBRC) at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne are each equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). These devices can be used daily on all patients where the treatment fields are within the size constraint of the cassette, for example, less than 25 x 25 cm. Port films using radiographic film in hard cassettes were previously considered the standard method of field placement verification. After the radiation therapists were trained in all program aspects of capturing, enhancing, and producing hard copies of EPIs, a study was developed to evaluate the possibility of replacing port films with EPI hard copies within the established departmental procedures. Comparison of EPI hard copy with the simulator film and the port film of the same field was carried out by the radiation oncologist specialists. Seventy-eight comparison sets were generated and grouped into seven anatomical regions for evaluation by the radiation oncologist specialist responsible for each particular region. The outcome decision was the preferred imaging option. Where no preference was stated, EPI became the modality of choice, as it increased the efficiency of work practice. Results: The results indicate that field-only EPI can be considered to be at least as clinically useful for treatment verification in the following sites: breast, chest, hip, spine, and large pelvic fields. Port films using a standard, double exposure technique were considered necessary for partial brain fields, small pelvis fields, extremities, and radical head and neck fields. Conclusion: The quality of field-only images captured using an EPID has been favorably assessed to be equivalent to, or an

  5. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruckdeschel, John

    1999-01-01

    ... through screening, and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. In addition, the Center created and supports education programs to provide increased cancer awareness and established working collaborations with the James...

  6. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  7. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a search site for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  8. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  9. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  10. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  11. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  12. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  13. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data Consumer Opinion Surveys About CPSC About CPSC Chairman Commissioners Contact / FAQ ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  15. Climate Prediction Center - Outlooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather Service NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS home page Climate Prediction Center Home Site Map News Web resources and services. HOME > Outreach > Publications > Climate Diagnostics Bulletin Climate Diagnostics Bulletin - Tropics Climate Diagnostics Bulletin - Forecast Climate Diagnostics

  16. Heart Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rounds Seminar Series & Daily Conferences Fellowships and Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Education Resources Library & Learning Resource Center CME Resources THI Journal THI Cardiac Society Register for the Cardiac Society ...

  17. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  18. National Automotive Center - NAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Encouraged by the advantages of collaboration, the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) worked with the Secretary of the...

  19. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  20. Mobility Data Analytics Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mobility Data Analytics Center aims at building a centralized data engine to efficiently manipulate : large-scale data for smart decision making. Integrating and learning the massive data are the key to : the data engine. The ultimate goal of underst...

  1. HUD Homeownership Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD Homeownership Centers (HOCs) insure single family Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgages and oversee the selling of HUD homes. FHA has four Homeownership...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  3. - Oklahoma Water Resources Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development Ag Business Community & Rural Development Crops Family & Consumer Sciences Gardening Family & Consumer Sciences Food & Ag Products Center Horticulture & Landscape Architecture & Landscape Architecture Natural Resource Ecology & Management Plant & Soil Sciences

  4. World data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapley, Alan H.; Hart, Pembroke J.

    One of the lasting heritages of the International Geophysical Year (1957-58) is the system of world data centers (WDC) through which there has been international exchange of a wide variety of geophysical data on a continuing basis. This voluntary exchange mechanism has been remarkably successful. The basic operating costs of the centers are provided by the host country. The international exchanges are mainly by barter. The data providers number in the thousands and the users in the tens of thousands.

  5. Predicting behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia with pattern classification in multi-center structural MRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meyer

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that MRI, a widespread imaging technology, can individually identify bvFTD with high accuracy in multi-center imaging data, paving the road to personalized diagnostic approaches in the future.

  6. Rickets on MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecklund, K.; Jaramillo, D. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Doria, A.S. [Department of Radiology, Instituto da Crianca - Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1999-09-01

    Background. The pathologic changes at the physis in patients with rickets have been well demonstrated histologically. Radiographs can depict only the associated osseous abnormalities. Patients and methods. We report two children in whom MR imaging demonstrated rachitic changes in the physeal cartilage beyond the well-recognized bony features. Results. The striking appearance of the physes and the physes of the secondary ossification centers confirm that MR imaging can successfully evaluate the cartilaginous structures of the developing skeleton. Conclusion. Though MR imaging is clearly unnecessary for the diagnosis of rickets, it is important that the typical features are not misinterpreted as other pathology. (orig.) With 6 figs., 6 refs.

  7. Rickets on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecklund, K.; Jaramillo, D.; Doria, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Background. The pathologic changes at the physis in patients with rickets have been well demonstrated histologically. Radiographs can depict only the associated osseous abnormalities. Patients and methods. We report two children in whom MR imaging demonstrated rachitic changes in the physeal cartilage beyond the well-recognized bony features. Results. The striking appearance of the physes and the physes of the secondary ossification centers confirm that MR imaging can successfully evaluate the cartilaginous structures of the developing skeleton. Conclusion. Though MR imaging is clearly unnecessary for the diagnosis of rickets, it is important that the typical features are not misinterpreted as other pathology. (orig.)

  8. Thickness-Independent Ultrasonic Imaging Applied to Abrasive Cut-Off Wheels: An Advanced Aerospace Materials Characterization Method for the Abrasives Industry. A NASA Lewis Research Center Technology Transfer Case History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.; Farmer, Donald A.

    1998-01-01

    Abrasive cut-off wheels are at times unintentionally manufactured with nonuniformity that is difficult to identify and sufficiently characterize without time-consuming, destructive examination. One particular nonuniformity is a density variation condition occurring around the wheel circumference or along the radius, or both. This density variation, depending on its severity, can cause wheel warpage and wheel vibration resulting in unacceptable performance and perhaps premature failure of the wheel. Conventional nondestructive evaluation methods such as ultrasonic c-scan imaging and film radiography are inaccurate in their attempts at characterizing the density variation because a superimposing thickness variation exists as well in the wheel. In this article, the single transducer thickness-independent ultrasonic imaging method, developed specifically to allow more accurate characterization of aerospace components, is shown to precisely characterize the extent of the density variation in a cut-off wheel having a superimposing thickness variation. The method thereby has potential as an effective quality control tool in the abrasives industry for the wheel manufacturer.

  9. Development of the image registration program for portal and DRR images in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ito, Takeshi; Nakazeko, Kazuma; Tachibana, Atsuhi; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose an image registration program of portal images and digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) images used as simulation images for external beam radiation therapy planning. First, the center of the radiation field in a portal image taken using a computed radiograhy cassette is matched to the center of the portal image. Then scale points projected on a DRR image and the portal image are deleted, and the portal image with the radiation field is extracted. Registration of the DRR and portal images is performed using mutual information as the registration criterion. It was found that the absolute displacement misregistrations in two directions (x, y) were 1.2±0.7 mm and 0.5±0.3 mm, respectively, and rotation disagreement about the z axis 0.3±0.3deg. It was concluded the proposed method was applicable to image registration of portal and DRR images in radiation therapy. (author)

  10. Image Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Image Gallery Share: The Image Gallery contains high-quality digital photographs available from ... Select a category below to view additional thumbnail images. Images are available for direct download in 2 ...

  11. Quantitative assessment of dynamic PET imaging data in cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Mark; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Mankoff, David A; Doot, Robert K; Pierce, Larry A; Kurland, Brenda F; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    Clinical imaging in positron emission tomography (PET) is often performed using single-time-point estimates of tracer uptake or static imaging that provides a spatial map of regional tracer concentration. However, dynamic tracer imaging can provide considerably more information about in vivo biology by delineating both the temporal and spatial pattern of tracer uptake. In addition, several potential sources of error that occur in static imaging can be mitigated. This review focuses on the application of dynamic PET imaging to measuring regional cancer biologic features and especially in using dynamic PET imaging for quantitative therapeutic response monitoring for cancer clinical trials. Dynamic PET imaging output parameters, particularly transport (flow) and overall metabolic rate, have provided imaging end points for clinical trials at single-center institutions for years. However, dynamic imaging poses many challenges for multicenter clinical trial implementations from cross-center calibration to the inadequacy of a common informatics infrastructure. Underlying principles and methodology of PET dynamic imaging are first reviewed, followed by an examination of current approaches to dynamic PET image analysis with a specific case example of dynamic fluorothymidine imaging to illustrate the approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Compression for radiological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1992-07-01

    The viewing of radiological images has peculiarities that must be taken into account in the design of a compression technique. The images may be manipulated on a workstation to change the contrast, to change the center of the brightness levels that are viewed, and even to invert the images. Because of the possible consequences of losing information in a medical application, bit preserving compression is used for the images used for diagnosis. However, for archiving the images may be compressed to 10 of their original size. A compression technique based on the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) takes the viewing factors into account by compressing the changes in the local brightness levels. The compression technique is a variation of the CCITT JPEG compression that suppresses the blocking of the DCT except in areas of very high contrast.

  13. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  14. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors

  15. The USC Epigenome Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Peter W

    2009-10-01

    The University of Southern California (USC, CA, USA) has a long tradition of excellence in epigenetics. With the recent explosive growth and technological maturation of the field of epigenetics, it became clear that a dedicated high-throughput epigenomic data production facility would be needed to remain at the forefront of epigenetic research. To address this need, USC launched the USC Epigenome Center as the first large-scale center in academics dedicated to epigenomic research. The Center is providing high-throughput data production for large-scale genomic and epigenomic studies, and developing novel analysis tools for epigenomic research. This unique facility promises to be a valuable resource for multidisciplinary research, education and training in genomics, epigenomics, bioinformatics, and translational medicine.

  16. International Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from Veterans Crisis Line Search Enter ... Experience (TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers ... Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research Research ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  1. QUAD FAMILY CENTERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PINAYEV, I.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that beam position monitors (BPM) utilizing signals from pickup electrodes (PUE) provide good resolution and relative accuracy. The absolute accuracy (i.e. position of the orbit in the vacuum chamber) is not very good due to the various reasons. To overcome the limitation it was suggested to use magnetic centers of quadrupoles for the calibration of the BPM [1]. The proposed method provides accuracy better then 200 microns for centering of the beam position monitors using modulation of the whole quadrupole family

  2. Lied Transplant Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  3. Starting an aphasia center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Roberta J

    2011-08-01

    Starting an aphasia center can be an enormous challenge. This article provides initial issues to review and consider when deciding whether starting a new organization is right for you. Determining the need for the program in your community, the best size and possible affiliation for the organization, and available resources, as well as developing a business plan, marketing the program, and building awareness in the community, are some of the factors that are discussed. Specific examples related to starting the Aphasia Center of California are provided. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center ...

  5. BI-RADS: Its Influence on the Diagnosis, behavior of Doctors and Patients Who have been Imaged in a Center of the City of Ibague (Colombia),2002-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Cordoba, Alma Patricia; Lopez Rivera, Ricardo; Rodriguez Avila, Diana

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of the Breast Imaging Report and Database System (BI-RADS) on the behavior of radiologists, general medics, and users. Methods: Descriptive,correlative, and retrospective quantitative study of 6.389 examinations conducted between 2002 and 2004, and registered in the database (presented at the Colombian Conference of Radiology in 1998). The sample consisted of 281 patients; the error margin was 3%. Results:The average age of the women studied was 52 years. 84,7% of them were from Ibague; from social strata 3 and 4. The reason for consultation was mastalgy (24,91%), mass (24,20%), and prevention (23,13%). The radiologists found mammary density (25% to 50%) in 117 persons.Conclusion: An aging and sedentary female population with good access to the health care system was found. Most of them requested consultation because they had symptoms. The radiologists followed the criteria of BI-RADS classification whose diagnostic certainty was found adequate. Medical conducts for BI-RADS 4 and 5 were carried out. Few users changed their habits after the study and management. The diagnosis of breast cancer happens in advanced stages; there are few pathological findings of carcinoma in situ.

  6. Crib Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Department of Health (HRSA) NICHD text4baby ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  9. Distribution center consolidation games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, F.; Slikker, M.

    2005-01-01

    We study a location-inventory model to analyze the impact of consolidation of distribution centers on facility and inventory costs. We introduce a cooperative game and show that when demand processes are i.i.d. the core is non-empty, i.e., consolidation allows for a stable division of the minimal

  10. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  11. School Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  12. The Women's Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Catharine R.; And Others

    Barnard College has created a Women's Center that devotes itself to the task of reaffirming the dignity, autonomy, and equality of women. For too long society has held that women are less rational than men, less capable than men, and thus that educating women is less useful than educating men. Replacing myth with fact is the responsibility of…

  13. Climate Prediction Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather Service NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS home page Climate Prediction Center Home Site Map News Organization Enter Search Term(s): Search Search the CPC Go NCEP Quarterly Newsletter Climate Highlights U.S Climate-Weather El Niño/La Niña MJO Blocking AAO, AO, NAO, PNA Climatology Global Monsoons Expert

  14. Ocean Prediction Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Media Facebook Twitter YouTube Search Search For Go NWS All NOAA Weather Analysis & Forecasts of Commerce Ocean Prediction Center National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Analysis & Unified Surface Analysis Ocean Ocean Products Ice & Icebergs NIC Ice Products NAIS Iceberg Analysis

  15. National Pesticide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How can I protect my pets when using pesticides around them? More FAQs FAQ Comics Video FAQs From NPIC: Fact Sheets Videos Web Apps Podcasts Outreach Materials NPIC Professional Resources Social Media: National Pesticide Information Center Tweets by NPICatOSU Please read our ...

  16. Queering the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Composition classrooms and writing centers are spaces where negotiation of academic, social, cultural, and political identities are ubiquitous, yet research has not produced adequate theory and practice to help tutors and writers navigate identity production and its politics. This article seeks to begin conversations that might lead to better…

  17. Precision Joining Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. W.; Westphal, D. A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10-12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of U.S. industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG&G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  18. Centering of quadrupole family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinayev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for finding the individual centers for a family of quadrupoles fed with a single power supply is described. The method is generalized for using the correctors adjacent to the quadrupoles. Theoretical background is presented as well as experimental data for the NSLS rings. The method accuracy is also discussed

  19. Guiding center drift equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1979-03-01

    The quations for particle guiding center drift orbits are given in a new magnetic coordinate system. This form of the equations not only separates the fast motion along the lines from the slow motion across, but also requires less information about the magnetic field than many other formulations of the problem

  20. vCenter troubleshooting

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Chuck

    2015-01-01

    The book is designed for the competent vCenter administrator or anyone who is responsible for the vSphere environment. It can be used as a guide by vSphere architects and VMware consultants for a successful vSphere solution. You should have good knowledge and an understanding of core elements and applications of the vSphere environment.

  1. Water Resources Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untitled Document  Search Welcome to the University of Hawai'i at Manoa Water Resources Research Center At WRRC we concentrate on addressing the unique water and wastewater management problems and issues elsewhere by researching water-related issues distinctive to these areas. We are Hawaii's link in a network

  2. Starting a sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning.

  3. The Precarious Question of Black Cultural Centers Versus Multicultural Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princes, Carolyn D. W.

    This paper discusses the role of black cultural centers on university campuses, focusing on whether black cultural centers or multicultural centers best meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student body and society. It examines the historical role of black cultural centers as vehicles to promote educational opportunity, student retention, and…

  4. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  5. Stern-Center Potsdam; Stern-Center Potsdam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-07-01

    The ''Stern-Center Potsdam'' is a star-shaped shopping mall in the city center. [German] Das Stern-Center in Potsdam bietet als Einkaufszentrum vor den Toren Berlins Platz fuer eine Vielzahl von Geschaeften. Die sternfoermige Gebaeudestruktur des Centers bildet den Mittelpunkt des Stadtviertels 'Am Stern'. (orig.)

  6. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F.; Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [de

  7. The Amsterdam Sexual Abuse Case (ASAC)-study in day care centers: longitudinal effects of sexual abuse on infants and very young children and their parents, and the consequences of the persistence of abusive images on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindauer, Ramón J L; Brilleslijper-Kater, Sonja N; Diehle, Julia; Verlinden, Eva; Teeuw, Arianne H; Middeldorp, Christel M; Tuinebreijer, Wilco; Bosschaart, Thekla F; van Duin, Esther; Verhoeff, Arnoud

    2014-11-08

    Little research has been done on the signs of child sexual abuse (CSA) in infants and very young children, or on the consequences that such abuse - including the persistence of the abusive pornographic images on the internet - might have for the children and their parents. The effects of CSA can be severe, and a variety of risk- and protective factors, may influence those effects. CSA may affect the psychosocial-, emotional-, cognitive-, and physical development of children, their relationships with their parent(s), and the relations between parents. In the so called 'the Amsterdam sexual abuse case' (ASAC), infants and very young children were victimized by a day-care employee and most of the victims were boys. Research involving the children and their parents would enable recognition of the signs of CSA in very young children and understanding the consequences the abuse might have on the long term. The proposed research project consists of three components: (I) An initial assessment to identify physical- or psychological signs of CSA in infants and very young children who are thought to have been sexually abused (n = 130); (II) A cross-sequential longitudinal study of children who have experienced sexual abuse, or for whom there are strong suspicions; (III) A qualitative study in which interviews are conducted with parents (n = 25) and with therapists treating children from the ASAC. Parents will be interviewed on the perceived condition of their child and family situation, their experiences with the service responses to the abuse, the effects of legal proceedings and media attention, and the impact of knowing that pornographic material has been disseminated on the internet. Therapists will be interviewed on their clinical experiences in treating children and parents. The assessments will extend over a period of several years. The outcome measures will be symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), dissociative symptoms, age-inappropriate sexual behaviors

  8. NREL's Education Center Programs | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL's Education Center Programs NREL's Education Center Programs There are a variety of educational programs offered through NREL's education center to inspire our community to explore the science neighbors, campus and trail maps, and more. A photo of the NREL Education Center exterior. Programs for

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center : Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on

  10. Image Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Laura Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    In large datasets, it is time consuming or even impossible to pick out interesting images. Our proposed solution is to find statistics to quantify the information in each image and use those to identify and pick out images of interest.

  11. Image Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance that explains the process for getting images approved in One EPA Web microsites and resource directories. includes an appendix that shows examples of what makes some images better than others, how some images convey meaning more than others

  12. Data imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepy, G.

    1999-01-01

    After an introduction about data imaging in general, the principles of imaging data collected via neutron scattering experiments are presented. Some computer programs designed for data imaging purposes are reviewed. (K.A.)

  13. Revisiting the student centered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    2018-01-01

    Has the orthodoxy of progressive pedagogy, or what praise as the student centered, become means of an overall managerial turn that erodes students’ freedom do learn? This is the main question in Bruce Macfarlane’s book Freedom to learn - The Threat to Student Academic Freedom and Why it Needs...... to be Reclaimed (2017). In eighth well-written chapters, Macfarlane explores an often-overlooked paradox in higher education teaching and learning: The idea of the student centered learning, deriving from humanist psychology and progressive pedagogy, has been hijacked by increased and continuous demands of bodily......, cognitive and emotional performance that restricts students’ freedom to develop as autonomous adults. Macfarlane’s catch 22 is, however, that his heritage from humanist psychology, i.e. the idea that we as humans are born with an inner potential that we should be free to realise though education...

  14. Radial MR images of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewes, R.C.; Miller, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    To profile optimally each portion of the meniscus, the authors use the multiangle, multisection feature of a General Electric SIGNA 1.5-T imager to produce radial images centered on each meniscus. A total of 12-15 sections are imaged at 10 0 -15 0 intervals of each meniscus, yielding perpendicular images of the entire meniscus, comparable with the arthrographic tangential views. The authors review their technique and demonstrate correlation cases between the radial gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state sequences, sagittal and coronal MR images, and arthrograms. Radial images should be a routine part of knee MR imaging

  15. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  16. The Center is Everywhere

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberg, David H.

    2012-01-01

    "The Center is Everywhere" is a sculpture by Josiah McElheny, currently (through October 14, 2012) on exhibit at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. The sculpture is based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using hundreds of glass crystals and lamps suspended from brass rods to represent the three-dimensional structure mapped by the SDSS through one of its 2000+ spectroscopic plugplates. This article describes the scientific ideas behind this sculpture, emphasizing the p...

  17. An application of image processing techniques in computed tomography image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan

    2007-01-01

    number of animals and image slices, automation of the process was desirable. The open-source and free image analysis program ImageJ was used. A macro procedure was created that provided the required functionality. The macro performs a number of basic image processing procedures. These include an initial...... process designed to remove the scanning table from the image and to center the animal in the image. This is followed by placement of a vertical line segment from the mid point of the upper border of the image to the image center. Measurements are made between automatically detected outer and inner...... boundaries of subcutaneous adipose tissue along this line segment. This process was repeated as the image was rotated (with the line position remaining unchanged) so that measurements around the complete circumference were obtained. Additionally, an image was created showing all detected boundary points so...

  18. Breast Imaging: The Face of Imaging 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ray Cody; Parikh, Jay R

    2016-08-01

    In preparation for impending changes to the health care delivery and reimbursement models, the ACR has provided a roadmap for success via the Imaging 3.0 (®)platform. The authors illustrate how the field of breast imaging demonstrates the following Imaging 3.0 concepts: value, patient-centered care, clinical integration, structured reporting, outcome metrics, and radiology's role in the accountable care organization environment. Much of breast imaging's success may be adapted and adopted by other fields in radiology to ensure that all radiologists become more visible and provide the value sought by patients and payers. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pancreatic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potsaid, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical use of [ 75 Se] selenomethionine for visualising the pancreas is described. The physiological considerations, imaging procedure, image interpretations and reliability are considered. (C.F.)

  20. Evaluate Data Center Network Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilimon, Artur

    through a data center network, which is usually built with layer 2 switches and layer 3 routers. The topology of the data center network is crucial for latency in the data communication to and from the data center and between servers in the data center. Tests can be conducted to measure latency and other...... Engineering, scientists evaluate data center network topologies with an SDN-based (Software-Defined Networking) control framework measuring network performance – primarily latency. This can be used to plan data center scaling by testing how a new topology will function before changes are made. Data center...... performance parameters for different data center network topologies. It is however important that tests can be repeated and reproduced to have comparable information from the tests. There are, of course, many topologies that can be used for data center networks. At DTU Fotonik, Department of Photonics...

  1. Planning for the Mercy Center for Breast Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, V Ed

    2002-01-01

    During the last months of 2000, administrators at the Mercy San Juan Medical Center in Carmichael, Calif., convened a steering committee to plan the Mercy Center for Breast Health. The Steering Committee was composed of the director of ancillary and support services, the oncology clinical nurse specialist, the RN manager of the oncology nursing unit, the RN surgery center manager, and me, the manager of imaging services. The committee was responsible for creating a new business with five specific objectives: to position the Center as a comprehensive diagnostic and resource center for women; to generate physician referrals to the Breast Center through various vehicles; to create awareness of the Breast Center's capabilities among area radiologists; to create awareness of the Breast Center among employees of six sister facilities; to create "brand awareness" for the Mercy Center for Breast Health among referring physicians and patients who could use competing centers in the area. The Steering Committee's charter was to design a center with a feminine touch and ambience and to provide a "one-stop shopping" experience for patients. A major component of the Breast Center is the Dianne Haselwood Resource Center, which provides patients with educational support and information. The Steering Committee brought its diverse experience and interests to bear on arranging for equipment acquisition, information and clerical systems, staffing, clinic office design, patient care and marketing. Planning the Mercy Center for Breast Health has been a positive challenge that brought together many elements of the organization and people from different departments and specialties to create a new business venture. Our charge now is to grow and to live up to our vision of offering complete breast diagnostic, education and support services in one location.

  2. Solar Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  3. New Mexico Center for Isotopes in Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchiel, Scott W.

    2012-12-13

    The purpose of the New Mexico Center for Isotopes in Medicine (NMCIM) is to support research, education and service missions of the UNM College of Pharmacy Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Program (COP RSP) and the Cancer Research and Treatment Center (CRTC). NMCIM developed and coordinated unique translational research in cancer radioimaging and radiotherapy agents based on novel molecules developed at UNM and elsewhere. NMCIM was the primary interface for novel radioisotopes and radiochemistries developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for SPECT/PET imaging and therapy. NMCIM coordinated the use of the small animal imaging facility with the CRTC provided support services to assist investigators in their studies. NMCIM developed education and training programs that benefited professional, graduate, and postdoctoral students that utilized its unique facilities and technologies. UNM COP RSP has been active in writing research and training grants, as well as supporting contract research with industrial partners. The ultimate goal of NMCIM is to bring new radiopharmaceutical imaging and therapeutic agents into clinical trials that will benefit the health and well being of cancer and other patients in New Mexico and the U.S.

  4. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  5. FFTF Work Control Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    A centralized Work Control Center (WCC) is responsible for assuring that maintenance and modification of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is performed in accordance with written procedures that ensure design integrity, personnel and public safety, and equipment and system availability for the computerized Master Information Data Acquisition System (MIDAS). Each maintenance task is logged into MIDAS from a Work Request from that has been reviewed and prioritized by the WCC. Thereafter, MIDAS is used to track schedule, manpower and material requirements; authorize field work; and close out the maintenance activity

  6. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  7. Image city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities.......Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities....

  8. Image Understanding Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-30

    Reconnaissance des Formes et Intelligence Artificielle , Sept. 1981, Nancy, France. [11] T.C. Henderson and B. Bhanu, "Extraction of Planar Faces from...34Semantic Description of Aerial Images Using Stochastic Labeling," IEEE Trans. on Pattern Recognition and Machine Intelligence , Nov. 1981. [2] R. Ohlander...Tenenbaum, "MSYS: A System for Reasoning About Scenes," Tech. Note 121, Artificial Intelligence Center, SRI Intl., Menlo Park, CA, 1976. [7]. D. Marr

  9. Radar Image, Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The southeast part of the island of Hokkaido, Japan, is an area dominated by volcanoes and volcanic caldera. The active Usu Volcano is at the lower right edge of the circular Lake Toya-Ko and near the center of the image. The prominent cone above and to the left of the lake is Yotei Volcano with its summit crater. The city of Sapporo lies at the base of the mountains at the top of the image and the town of Yoichi -- the hometown of SRTM astronaut Mamoru Mohri -- is at the upper left edge. The bay of Uchiura-Wan takes up the lower center of the image. In this image, color represents elevation, from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest. The radar image has been overlaid to provide more details of the terrain. Due to a processing problem, an island in the center of this crater lake is missing and will be properly placed when further SRTM swaths are processed. The horizontal banding in this image is a processing artifact that will be removed when the navigation information collected by SRTM is fully calibrated. This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 100 by 150 kilometers (62

  10. Center of Excellence for Laser Applications in Medicine, Microlaser Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, R. H.

    2003-01-17

    The Center of Excellence for Laser Applications in Medicine at the Schepens Eye Research Institute (SERI) is a Center for: A core group of researchers who support each other and their various projects for real-time medical imaging and diagnostics in contiguous space at SERI. Clinical collaborators who participate in the core research at SERI, MEEI, and local ophthalmology practices, and at associated sites around the world. Industrial partners who transfer our technology to commercial products that will reach clinical usage everywhere. Students, post-doctoral associates and medical fellows who work with us and learn how to practice real-time medical imaging and diagnostics.

  11. Illinois Accelerator Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Cooper, Charlie A.

    The Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) hosts a new accelerator development program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. IARC provides access to Fermi's state-of-the-art facilities and technologies for research, development and industrialization of particle accelerator technology. In addition to facilitating access to available existing Fermi infrastructure, the IARC Campus has a dedicated 36,000 ft2 Heavy Assembly Building (HAB) with all the infrastructure needed to develop, commission and operate new accelerators. Connected to the HAB is a 47,000 ft2 Office, Technology and Engineering (OTE) building, paid for by the state, that has office, meeting, and light technical space. The OTE building, which contains the Accelerator Physics Center, and nearby Accelerator and Technical divisions provide IARC collaborators with unique access to world class expertise in a wide array of accelerator technologies. At IARC scientists and engineers from Fermilab and academia work side by side with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in accelerator science and translate them into applications for the nation's health, wealth and security.

  12. Phenomenological three center model

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Gherghescu, R A; Nagame, Y; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results on ternary fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf suggest the existence of a short-lived quasi-molecular state. We present a three-center phenomenological model able to explain such a state by producing a new minimum in the deformation energy at a separation distance very close to the touching point. The shape parametrization chosen by us allows to describe the essential geometry of the systems in terms of one independent coordinate, namely, the distance between the heavy fragment centers. The shell correction (also treated phenomenologically) only produces quantitative effects; qualitatively it is not essential for the new minimum. Half-lives of some quasi-molecular states which could be formed in sup 1 sup 0 B accompanied fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 Cm, sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 sup , sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 Fm, sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 sup , sup 2 sup 6 sup 0 No, and sup 2 sup 6 sup 2 Rf are roughly estimated. (authors)

  13. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, Kenneth F. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  14. Rapid guiding center calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.

    1995-04-01

    Premature loss of high energy particles, and in particular fusion alpha particles, is very deleterious in a fusion reactor. Because of this it is necessary to make long-time simulations, on the order of the alpha particle slowing down time, with a number of test particles sufficient to give predictions with reasonable statistical accuracy. Furthermore it is desirable to do this for a large number of equilibria with different characteristic magnetic field ripple, to best optimize engineering designs. In addition, modification of the particle distribution due to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes such as the saw tooth mode present in the plasma can be important, and this effect requires additional simulation. Thus the large number of necessary simulations means any increase of computing speed in guiding center codes is an important improvement in predictive capability. Previous guiding center codes using numerical equilibria such as ORBIT evaluated the local field strength and ripple magnitude using Lagrangian interpolation on a grid. Evaluation of these quantities four times per time step (using a fourth order Runge-Kutta routine) constitutes the major computational effort of the code. In the present work the authors represent the field quantities through an expansion in terms of pseudo-cartesian coordinates formed from the magnetic coordinates. The simplicity of the representation gives four important advantages over previous methods

  15. Recombination luminescence from H centers and conversion of H centers into I centers in alkali iodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzina, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    The study is aimed at the search for H-plus-electron centers of luminescence and the investigation of the conversion of H- into I centers by the luminescence of H-plus-electron centers in alkali iodide crystals. KI, RbI and NaI crystals were studied at 12 K. H and F centers were created by irradiation with ultraviolet light corresponding to the absorption band of anion excitons. Then the excitation of electron centers by red light irradiation was followed. The spectra of stimulated recombination luminescence were studied. The luminescence of H-plus- electron centers had been observed and the conclusion was made that this center was formed on immobile H centers. In case of stable H centers the optically stimulated conversion of H centers into I centers occurs. The assumption is advanced on the spontaneous annihilation of near placed unstable F, H centers which leads to the creation of H-plus-electron luminescence centers and to the spontaneous H-I-centers conversion [ru

  16. Nuclear medicine: the Philippine Heart Center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    The following is a report of a three (3) months on-the-job training in Nuclear Medicine at the Nuclear Medicine Department of the Philippine Heart Center. The hospital has current generation nuclear medicine instruments with data processor and is capable of a full range of in vivo and in vitro procedures. Gamma camera is the principal instrument for imaging in nuclear medicine used in the Philippine Heart Center. Thyroid scanning procedure is being performed with these instruments. Also the cardiovascular procedures, the pulmonary, skeletal, renal and hepatobiliary procedures were being performed with the use of gamma camera. Special emphasis is on nuclear cardiology since the PHC attends primarily to cardiovascular patients. (auth.)

  17. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidneys - dialysis centers; Dialysis - what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers; End-stage renal disease - dialysis ... to a tube that connects to the dialysis machine. Your blood will flow through the tube, into ...

  18. VT Designated Growth Center Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Growth centers aim to align public infrastructure and private building investments with a local framework of policies and regulations to ensure that 20 years of...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas ... Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless ... ADMINISTRATION Veterans Health Administration Veterans Benefits Administration ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center ... Advanced Search Where to Get Help PTSD Coach Online Tools to help you manage stress. Search Pilots ...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enter to expand a main menu option (Health, Benefits, etc). 3. To enter and activate the submenu ... Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help ...

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's ... Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff ...

  3. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from ... Resource Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower Protection Transparency Media Room Inside ...

  5. National Center for Biotechnology Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to NCBI Sign Out NCBI National Center for Biotechnology Information Search database All Databases Assembly Biocollections BioProject ... Search Welcome to NCBI The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access ...

  6. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities

  7. Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center (DMAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center (DMAC) is a 39,000-square-foot facility that doubles the warfare center's high-secured performance assessment capabilities. DMAC...

  8. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional ... TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan ...

  9. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ... Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web ...

  10. Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As seen on the center's logo, the mission statement for FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) reads: "Protecting Human and Animal Health." To achieve this broad...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless ... crisis or having thoughts of suicide, visit VeteransCrisisLine.net for more resources. Close this modal

  12. VT Designated Village Centers Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This community revitalization program helps maintain or evolve small to medium-sized historic centers with existing civic and commercial buildings. The designation...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Contact Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional ... Locations Contact Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers VA » Health Care » PTSD: National Center for ...

  14. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans ...

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA Providers and Staff Disaster Responders Medical Doctors Community Providers and Clergy ... Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sports Clinic Training - Exposure - Experience (TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Contact Us ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Screens Trauma Exposure Measures Assessment Request Form List of All Measures Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention ... and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s ...

  19. Center for Prostate Disease Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Prostate Disease Research is the only free-standing prostate cancer research center in the U.S. This 20,000 square foot state-of-the-art basic science...

  20. School-Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care group, such as a community health center, hospital, or health department. A few are run by the school district itself. Centers often get money from charities and the government so they can give care ...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from Veterans Crisis ... Rehabilitation & Employment Dependents' Educational Assistance Survivor Benefits Home Loans Life Insurance Appeals Modernization Burials & Memorials Cemetery Services ...

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ... Search Tips Modify Your Search How to Obtain Articles Alerts User Guide Purpose and Scope Find Assessment ...

  3. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

  4. Landsat TM and ETM+ 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  5. Maxillofacial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larheim, T.A. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Maxillofacial Radiology; Westesson, P.L. [Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY (United States). Div. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2006-07-01

    Maxillofacial imaging has evolved dramatically over the past two decades with development of new cross-sectional imaging techniques. Traditional maxillofacial imaging was based on plain films and dental imaging. However, today's advanced imaging techniques with CT and MRI have only been partially implemented for maxillofacial questions. This book bridges the gap between traditional maxillofacial imaging and advanced medical imaging. We have applied CT and MRI to a variety of maxillofacial cases and these are illustrated with high-quality images and multiple planes. A comprehensive chapter on imaging anatomy is also included. This book is useful for oral and maxillofacial radiologists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, dentists, radiologists, plastic surgeons, head and neck surgeons, and others that work with severe maxillofacial disorders. (orig.)

  6. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers

  7. Students build glovebox at Space Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Students in the Young Astronaut Program at the Coca-Cola Space Science Center in Columbus, GA, constructed gloveboxes using the new NASA Student Glovebox Education Guide. The young astronauts used cardboard copier paper boxes as the heart of the glovebox. The paper boxes transformed into gloveboxes when the students pasted poster-pictures of an actual NASA microgravity science glovebox inside and outside of the paper boxes. The young astronauts then added holes for gloves and removable transparent top covers, which completed the construction of the gloveboxes. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  8. Virtual Meteorological Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Brinzila

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A virtual meteorological center, computer based with Internet possibility transmission of the information is presented. Circumstance data is collected with logging field meteorological station. The station collects and automatically save data about the temperature in the air, relative humidity, pressure, wind speed and wind direction, rain gauge, solar radiation and air quality. Also can perform sensors test, analyze historical data and evaluate statistical information. The novelty of the system is that it can publish data over the Internet using LabVIEW Web Server capabilities and deliver a video signal to the School TV network. Also the system performs redundant measurement of temperature and humidity and was improved using new sensors and an original signal conditioning module.

  9. Microtubule-Organizing Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingchao; Akhmanova, Anna

    2017-10-06

    The organization of microtubule networks is crucial for controlling chromosome segregation during cell division, for positioning and transport of different organelles, and for cell polarity and morphogenesis. The geometry of microtubule arrays strongly depends on the localization and activity of the sites where microtubules are nucleated and where their minus ends are anchored. Such sites are often clustered into structures known as microtubule-organizing centers, which include the centrosomes in animals and spindle pole bodies in fungi. In addition, other microtubules, as well as membrane compartments such as the cell nucleus, the Golgi apparatus, and the cell cortex, can nucleate, stabilize, and tether microtubule minus ends. These activities depend on microtubule-nucleating factors, such as γ-tubulin-containing complexes and their activators and receptors, and microtubule minus end-stabilizing proteins with their binding partners. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on how such factors work together to control microtubule organization in different systems.

  10. Interactive design center.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  11. Center for dielectric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Biggers, J. V.

    1984-05-01

    This report focuses upon the parts of the Center program which have drawn most extensively upon Navy funds. In the basic study of polarization processes in high K dielectrics, major progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms in relaxor ferroelectric in the perovskite structure families. A new effort is also being mounted to obtain more precise evaluation of the internal stress effects in fine grained barium titanate. Related to reliability, studies of the effects of induced macro-defects are described, and preparation for the evaluation of space charge by internal potential distribution measurements discussed. To develop new processing methods for very thin dielectric layers, a new type of single barrier layer multilayer is discussed, and work on the thermal evaporation of oriented crystalline antimony sulphur iodide describe.

  12. The satellite situation center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teague, M.J.; Sawyer, D.M.; Vette, J.I.

    1982-01-01

    Considerations related to the early planning for the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) took into account the desirability of an establishment of specific entities for generating and disseminating coordination information for both retrospective and predictive periods. The organizations established include the IMS/Satellite Situation Center (IMS/SSC) operated by NASA. The activities of the SSC are related to the preparation of reports on predicted and actually achieved satellite positions, the response to inquiries, the compilation of information on satellite experiments, and the issue of periodic status summaries. Attention is given to high-altitude satellite services, other correlative satellite services, non-IMS activities of the SSC, a summary of the SSC request activity, and post-IMS and future activities

  13. Citizen centered design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Mulder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Today architecture has to design for rapidly changing futures, in a citizen-centered way. That is, architecture needs to embrace meaningful design. Societal challenges ask for a new paradigm in city-making, which combines top-down public management with bottom-up social innovation to reach meaningful design. The biggest challenge is indeed to embrace a new collaborative attitude, a participatory approach, and to have the proper infrastructure that supports this social fabric. Participatory design and transition management are future-oriented, address people and institutions. Only through understanding people in context and the corresponding dynamics, one is able to design for liveable and sustainable urban environments, embracing the human scale.

  14. Assessment of panoral radiograph quality in a dental treatment center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Abdul-Wahab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The quality of orthopantogram (OPG images is primarily a function of patient positioning during image capture. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the quality of digital panoral radiographic images obtained by using the same imaging device in a large dental treatment center on the basis of the radiography technician operator securing the image. Materials and Methods: Three hundred OPGs radiographs taken on a Kodak 8000C Digital Panoramic and Cephalometric System device in a large dental treatment center comprised the sample. The most recent OPGs beginning at May 2010 through 2007 were selected for three radiography technicians until subgroups of 100 OPGs per technician were obtained. Each panoral was evaluated by two investigators for 21 OPG image errors. Results: Mean panoral total score was 14.71 and mean grade was 2.41 for the entire sample indicating a “good” quality. Significant differences were found among technicians for 3 of 21 panoral fault variables. The relative contribution to inferior OPG quality was greatest for the following positioning faults in rank order: Gazebo effect (11.3%, condyles pushed out (11.0%, unclear nasal structures (10.0%, airspace over U6s (9.5%, and condyles image top (9.0%. Conclusions: There were no significant differences among technicians for overall quality indicators (total score and grade. However, statistically significant differences among the three technicians were found for image error wide anterior teeth, Gazebo effect, and unclear nasal structures.

  15. Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Christopher M.; Ross, Larry; Kaldenbach, Karen Yvonne; Estigneev, Yuri; Murievav, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. government has been assisting the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) for many years with nuclear weapons transportation security (NWTS) through the provision of specialized guard escort railcars and cargo railcars with integrated physical security and communication systems, armored transport vehicles, and armored escort vehicles. As a natural continuation of the NWTS program, a partnership has been formed to construct a training center that will provide counterterrorism training to personnel in all branches of the RF MOD. The Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center (ACTC) is a multinational, multiagency project with funding from Canada, RF and the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy. ACTC will be a facility where MOD personnel can conduct basic through advanced training in various security measures to protect Category IA material against the threat of terrorist attack. The training will enhance defense-in-depth principles by integrating MOD guard force personnel into the overall physical protection systems and improving their overall response time and neutralization capabilities. The ACTC project includes infrastructure improvements, renovation of existing buildings, construction of new buildings, construction of new training facilities, and provision of training and other equipment. Classroom training will be conducted in a renovated training building. Basic and intermediate training will be conducted on three different security training areas where various obstacles and static training devices will be constructed. The central element of ACTC, where advanced training will be held, is the 'autodrome,' a 3 km road along which various terrorist events can be staged to challenge MOD personnel in realistic and dynamic nuclear weapons transportation scenarios. This paper will address the ACTC project elements and the vision for training development and integrating this training into actual nuclear weapons transportation operations.

  16. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  17. Imaging angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Natalie; Donaldson, Stephanie; Price, Pat

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for direct imaging of effects on tumor vasculature in assessment of response to antiangiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents. Imaging tumor vasculature depends on differences in permeability of vasculature of tumor and normal tissue, which cause changes in penetration of contrast agents. Angiogenesis imaging may be defined in terms of measurement of tumor perfusion and direct imaging of the molecules involved in angiogenesis. In addition, assessment of tumor hypoxia will give an indication of tumor vasculature. The range of imaging techniques available for these processes includes positron emission tomography (PET), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), perfusion computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US).

  18. Speckle imaging of globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sams, B.J. III

    1990-01-01

    Speckle imaging is a powerful tool for high resolution astronomy. Its application to the core regions of globular clusters produces high resolution stellar maps of the bright stars, but is unable to image the faint stars which are most reliable dynamical indicators. The limits on resolving these faint, extended objects are physical, not algorithmic, and cannot be overcome using speckle. High resolution maps may be useful for resolving multicomponent stellar systems in the cluster centers. 30 refs

  19. Experimental evaluation of ballistic hazards in imaging diagnostic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Serious hazards for human health and life and devices in close proximity to the magnetic resonance scanners (MRI scanners) include the effects of being hit by ferromagnetic objects attracted by static magnetic field (SMF) produced by scanner magnet – the so-called ballistic hazards classified among indirect electromagnetic hazards. International safety guidelines and technical literature specify different SMF threshold values regarding ballistic hazards – e.g. 3 mT (directive 2004/40/EC, EN 60601-2-33), and 30 mT (BMAS 2009, directive proposal 2011). Investigations presented in this article were performed in order to experimentally verify SMF threshold for ballistic hazards near MRI scanners used in Poland. Investigations were performed with the use of a laboratory source of SMF (0–30 mT) and MRI scanners of various types. The levels of SMF in which metal objects of various shapes and 0.4–500 g mass are moved by the field influence were investigated. The distance from the MRI scanners (0.2–3T) where hazards may occur were also investigated. Objects investigated under laboratory conditions were moved by SMF of 2.2–15 mT magnetic flux density when they were freely suspended, but were moved by the SMF of 5.6–22 mT when they were placed on a smooth surface. Investigated objects were moved in fields of 3.5–40 mT by MRI scanners. Distances from scanner magnet cover, where ballistic hazards might occur are: up to 0.5 m for 0.2–0.3T scanners; up to 1.3 m for 0.5T scanners; up to 2.0 m for 1.5T scanners and up to 2.5 m for 3T scanners (at the front and back of the magnet). It was shown that SMF of 3 mT magnetic flux density should be taken as the threshold for ballistic hazards. Such level is compatible with SMF limit value regarding occupational safety and health-protected areas/zones, where according to the Polish labor law the procedures of work environment inspection and prevention measures regarding indirect electromagnetic hazards should be applied. Presented results do not support the increase up to 30 mT of the SMF limit for protected area

  20. Experimental evaluation of ballistic hazards in imaging diagnostic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-04-01

    Serious hazards for human health and life and devices in close proximity to the magnetic resonance scanners (MRI scanners) include the effects of being hit by ferromagnetic objects attracted by static magnetic field (SMF) produced by scanner magnet - the so-called ballistic hazards classified among indirect electromagnetic hazards. International safety guidelines and technical literature specify different SMF threshold values regarding ballistic hazards - e.g. 3 mT (directive 2004/40/EC, EN 60601-2-33), and 30 mT (BMAS 2009, directive proposal 2011). Investigations presented in this article were performed in order to experimentally verify SMF threshold for ballistic hazards near MRI scanners used in Poland. Investigations were performed with the use of a laboratory source of SMF (0-30 mT) and MRI scanners of various types. The levels of SMF in which metal objects of various shapes and 0.4-500 g mass are moved by the field influence were investigated. The distance from the MRI scanners (0.2-3T) where hazards may occur were also investigated. Objects investigated under laboratory conditions were moved by SMF of 2.2-15 mT magnetic flux density when they were freely suspended, but were moved by the SMF of 5.6-22 mT when they were placed on a smooth surface. Investigated objects were moved in fields of 3.5-40 mT by MRI scanners. Distances from scanner magnet cover, where ballistic hazards might occur are: up to 0.5 m for 0.2-0.3T scanners; up to 1.3 m for 0.5T scanners; up to 2.0 m for 1.5T scanners and up to 2.5 m for 3T scanners (at the front and back of the magnet). It was shown that SMF of 3 mT magnetic flux density should be taken as the threshold for ballistic hazards. Such level is compatible with SMF limit value regarding occupational safety and health-protected areas/zones, where according to the Polish labor law the procedures of work environment inspection and prevention measures regarding indirect electromagnetic hazards should be applied. Presented results do not support the increase up to 30 mT of the SMF limit for protected area.

  1. Organization of private imaging centers with new legal considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Kourosh Abdollahifard

    2009-01-01

    "nSomebody spent all of his or her life for learning piano (playing).But piano is very expensive. Working with piano is vital need of his life but he has no money. All of his assests (capital)were his art . He needed a full and perfect piano. He had about10 friends which bought a piano for him. He played piano and his friends enjoyed from music and gain some financial benefits of his concerts. Only an artist can understand that pleasure of the pianist is unique and much more than his fri...

  2. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  3. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. This paper discusses a detailed Study Plan which was prepared describing planned geochronology and field studies to assess the chronology of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center and other Quaternary volcanic centers in the region. A paper was published discussing the geomorphic and soil evidence for a late Pleistocene or Holoceno age for the main cone of the center. The purpose of this paper was to expose the ideas concerning the age of the Lathrop Wells center to scientific scrutiny. Additionally, field evidence was described suggesting the Lathrop Wells center may have formed from multiple eruptive events with significant intervals of no activity between events. This interpretation breaks with established convention in the volcanological literature that small volume basalt centers are monogenetic

  4. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  5. The ATOMKI Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biri, S.; Kormany, Z.; Berzi, I.; Hunyadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 a new division was established in our institute: the ATOMKI Accelerator Center (AAC). Before this time the facilities and staff of AAC belonged to other departments of the institute. The re-organization however, was necessary. It was understood that the translocation of all the accelerators into a centralized unit is advantageous in numerous fields. Here we just mention some of them. The submission of any instrumentation type proposal (EU or domestic) will be easier and has a higher chance to be supported. The organization and distribution of the beamtimes will be more equal and optimal. The usage of the maintenance and spare tools can became better and cheaper. The operating staff (cca. 20 person) can serve at more than one accelerator and the teams can help each other. The accelerator center actually became a fourth new basic unit of the institute besides the three traditional scientific divisions (see the Atomki homepage for the organization chart). The following six main facilities belong to the accelerator center: Cyclotron; VdG-5 accelerator; VdG-1 accelerator; ECR ion source; Isotope separator; Tandetron (under installation). In figure 1 the placements of these machines are shown in an artistic 3D map of the Atomki. The table 1 summarizes the main parameters of the accelerators. More detailed technical specification of the machines can be found in the new homepage of the center. In 2009 all the accelerators operated as scheduled, safely and without major breakdowns. After the experiences in the first months it can be concluded that the new center works well both for technical and human point of views. In the next sub-chapters the 2009 operation and development details of the individual accelerators are summarized. Cyclotron operation. The operation of the cyclotron in 2009 was concentrated to the usual 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 2009 hours; the time

  6. Urogenital imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin; Asbach, P.; Beyersdorff, D.; Hein, P.; Lemke, U.

    2008-01-01

    The book in direct diagnosis in radiology, urogenital imaging, includes information concerning definition, imaging signs and clinical aspects on the following topics: kidneys and adrenals, the urinary tract, the male genitals and the female genitals

  7. Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  8. Microwave imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorino, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the most relevant theoretical and algorithmic aspects of modern microwave imaging approaches Microwave imaging-a technique used in sensing a given scene by means of interrogating microwaves-has recently proven its usefulness in providing excellent diagnostic capabilities in several areas, including civil and industrial engineering, nondestructive testing and evaluation, geophysical prospecting, and biomedical engineering. Microwave Imaging offers comprehensive descriptions of the most important techniques so far proposed for short-range microwave imaging-in

  9. 'Motor control center obsolescence'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    A significant and growing problem within the global nuclear industry is the aging of motor control center (MCC) components. MCC's have a very important role in the safety and critical to generation requirements of a nuclear power plant. Although many OEM's MCC's such as ITE/Telemechanique, GE, Westinghouse, Cutler Hammer, Klockner Moeller, etc. have been used throughout the global nuclear industry, they all have one common aspect obsolescence. Obsolescence of various components within the MCC's such as molded case circuit breakers, starters, relays, heaters, contactors, etc. are impacting the reliability of the MCC to serve its intended function. The paper will discuss the options which the nuclear industry is faced with to increase the reliability of the MCC's while maintaining design control, qualification and meeting budget constraints. The options as listed below shall be discussed in detail with examples to enhance the readers understanding of the situation: 1) Component by component replacement: The hurdles associated with trying to find equivalent components to replace the obsolete components while still worki (mechanically and electrically) in the original cubicle will be presented. 2) Complete MCC cubicle with new internal components replacement: The process of supplying a replacement cubicle, with all new internal components and new door to replace the original cubicle will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of the advantages and dis-advantages of the two methods to bring the MCC to an as new condition with the overall goal of increasing reliability. (author)

  10. The DESY Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waloschek, P.

    1988-01-01

    On November 12, 1964, the 6 GeV electrons synchrotron and the associated utility facilities were dedicated for regular operation. Since that date, the DESY Research Center, the German Electron Synchrotron in Hamburg, has offered to scientists from all over the world unique facilities in which to study the smallest constituents of matter. At present, some 580 physicists participate in DESY's research work on particle physics and high energy physics. Most of them are university teachers, a great many come from abroad. Their home institutions make considerable contributions to setting up the measuring equipment. Another 500 physicists annually make use of the extensive synchrotron radiation facilities available at DESY. DESY is one of the thirteen national research laboratories in the Federal Republic of Germany; its annual government grants for operation and personnel (1300 staff members in 1988) amount to some DM 150 million. In addition, some DM 950 million will be invested into the construction of the new HERA facility between 1984 and 1990, of which 15% will be contributed by foreign institutions. The ordinary budget of DESY is paid 90% by the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) and 10% by the city of Hamburg. (orig.)

  11. Space Operations Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) is a tool that provides an online learning environment where students can learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through a series of training modules. SOLC is also an effective media for NASA to showcase its contributions to the general public. SOLC is a Web-based environment with a learning platform for students to understand STEM through interactive modules in various engineering topics. SOLC is unique in its approach to develop learning materials to teach schoolaged students the basic concepts of space operations. SOLC utilizes the latest Web and software technologies to present this educational content in a fun and engaging way for all grade levels. SOLC uses animations, streaming video, cartoon characters, audio narration, interactive games and more to deliver educational concepts. The Web portal organizes all of these training modules in an easily accessible way for visitors worldwide. SOLC provides multiple training modules on various topics. At the time of this reporting, seven modules have been developed: Space Communication, Flight Dynamics, Information Processing, Mission Operations, Kids Zone 1, Kids Zone 2, and Save The Forest. For the first four modules, each contains three components: Flight Training, Flight License, and Fly It! Kids Zone 1 and 2 include a number of educational videos and games designed specifically for grades K-6. Save The Forest is a space operations mission with four simulations and activities to complete, optimized for new touch screen technology. The Kids Zone 1 module has recently been ported to Facebook to attract wider audience.

  12. Energy Efficiency Center - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obryk, E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The Energy Efficiency Center (EEC) activities have been concentrated on Energy Efficiency Network (SEGE), education and training of energy auditors. EEC has started studies related to renewable fuels (bio fuel, wastes) and other topics related to environment protection. EEC has continued close collaboration with Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway. It has been organized and conducted Seminar and Workshop on ''How to Reduce Energy and Water Cost in Higher Education Buildings'' for general and technical managers of the higher education institutions. This Seminar was proceeded by the working meeting on energy efficiency strategy in higher education at the Ministry of National Education. EEC has worked out proposal for activities of Cracow Regional Agency for Energy Efficiency and Environment and has made offer to provide services for this Agency in the field of training, education and consulting. The vast knowledge and experiences in the field of energy audits have been used by the members of EEC in lecturing at energy auditors courses authorized by the National Energy Efficiency Agency (KAPE). Altogether 20 lectures have been delivered. (author)

  13. Vector magnetic field microscopy using nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertz, B.J.; Wijnheijmer, A.P.; Fuchs, G.D.; Nowakowski, M.E.; Awschalom, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    The localized spin triplet ground state of a nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond can be used in atomic-scale detection of local magnetic fields. Here we present a technique using ensembles of these defects in diamond to image fields around magnetic structures. We extract the local magnetic field

  14. Method of center localization for objects containing concentric arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Elena G.; Shvets, Evgeny A.; Nikolaev, Dmitry P.

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a method for automatic center location of objects containing concentric arcs. The method utilizes structure tensor analysis and voting scheme optimized with Fast Hough Transform. Two applications of the proposed method are considered: (i) wheel tracking in video-based system for automatic vehicle classification and (ii) tree growth rings analysis on a tree cross cut image.

  15. Tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Tomography is used to image anatomy of organs as in the case of CT and MRI or image body functions as in the case of SPECT and PET. The theory of reconstruction applies equally well to CT, SPECT and PET with a minor differences. The main difference between SPECT and PET is that SPECT images single photon emitters (radionuclides) which emit normal gamma rays (like Tc-99m), whereas PET images positron emitting radionuclides such as O 15 or F 18 . The word tomography means drawing of the body. Every tomography results in an image of the inside of the body and is represented as a slice. (author)

  16. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, Paul W.; Schoenberg, Kurt F.

    2006-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, or LANSCE, uses the first truly high-current medium-energy proton linear accelerator, which operated originally at a beam power of 1 MW for medium-energy nuclear physics. Today LANSCE continues operation as one of the most versatile accelerator-based user facilities in the world. During eight months of annual operation, scientists from around the world work at LANSCE to execute an extraordinarily broad program of defense and civilian research. Several areas operate simultaneously. The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) is a moderated spallation source (meV to keV), the Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNR) is a bare spallation neutron source (keV to 800 MeV), and a new ultra-cold neutron source will be operational in 2005. These sources give LANSCE the ability to produce and use neutrons with energies that range over 14 orders of magnitude. LANSCE also supplies beam to WNR and two other areas for applications requiring protons. In a proton radiography (pRad) area, a sequence of narrow proton pulses is transmitted through shocked materials and imaged to study dynamic properties. In 2005, LANSCE began operating a facility that uses 100-MeV protons to produce medical radioisotopes. To sustain a vigorous program beyond this decade, LANSCE has embarked on a project to refurbish key elements of the facility and to plan capabilities beyond those that presently exist

  17. Digitalization influence on shopping centers strategic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioniţă Irene Mihaela

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Shopping centers are an important aspect of the extremely dynamic life of the 21st century consumer. Nowadays, worldwide, shopping centers represent significant multimillion euro investments, remarking themselves with bold architectures and structures and an individual brand image. Retail markets are currently under transformation by a confluence of new retailing technologies, dramatic shifts in the demographic profile and preferences of more affluent and educated shoppers. Part of the market share in modern retail moved to new forms of selling, which weakened the offer of some traditional retailers, while also creating opportunities for retailers to move and integrate their offerings with new digital tools (via electronic commerce, social commerce and mobile commerce. Meeting customer needs and increasing sales are the primary drivers behind retailers use of information systems and technology (IS/IT. New developments in IS/IT offer new opportunities and challenges for organizations and society. The current paper proposes to analyze the way digital media and information technology (computers and mobile devices influences the virtual and physical shopping experiences, and shopping centers management consequently. The need for communication & sales channels integration, the impact of new information technologies (IT’s, the growing role of social / digital media, the balance between personalization and privacy – all represent challenges retail industry needs to currently adapt to face digitalization. E-commerce is transforming both consumer behavior and retailing business models, by greatly expanding shopping convenience, selection and affordability.

  18. Production and Distribution Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    Steel, Coca Cola , Standard Oil of Ohio, and Martin Marietta have been involved in joint research with members of the Center. The number of Faculty...permitted the establishment of the Center and supports its continuing development. The Center has also received research sponsorship from the Joint...published relating to results developed within the PDRC under Offce of Naval Research sponsorship . These reports are listed in Appendix A. Many of these

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report ... Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act ... Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ...

  2. Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research (CRSR) was established as a research organization to promote successful return to duty and community reintegration of...

  3. Center for Environmental Health Sciences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The primary research objective of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) at the University of Montana is to advance knowledge of environmental impacts...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget ... Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury ...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web Links Advanced Search About Us National Center ...

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Organizations History Budget and Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business ...

  8. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget ... Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ...

  9. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...

  10. Bistable amphoteric centers in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitina, A. G.; Zuev, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that, at thermodynamic equilibrium, the release of charge carriers from the localized states of bistable amphoteric centers into quasi-free states depends on the degree of compensation. This brings about different functional dependences of the concentration of free charge carriers on temperature. It is found that, in uncompensated semiconductors, the concentration of free charge carriers follows the same dependence in the case of bistable amphoteric centers and bistable amphoteric U - centers, although the distributions of charge carriers over the charge states and configurations are different for these types of centers. The results can be used for interpreting various experimental data insufficiently explained in the context of the traditional approach

  11. Center for Neuroscience & Regenerative Medicine

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) was established as a collaborative intramural federal program involving the U.S. Department of Defense...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics ...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research Research ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics VA ...

  15. Consolidated Copayment Processing Center (CCPC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Consolidated Copayment Processing Center (CCPC) database contains Veteran patient contact and billing information in order to support the printing and mailing of...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  17. Laser imaging for clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houten, John P.; Cheong, Wai-Fung; Kermit, Eben L.; King, Richard A.; Spilman, Stanley D.; Benaron, David A.

    1995-03-01

    Medical optical imaging (MOI) uses light emitted into opaque tissues in order to determine the interior structure and chemical content. These optical techniques have been developed in an attempt to prospectively identify impending brain injuries before they become irreversible, thus allowing injury to be avoided or minimized. Optical imaging and spectroscopy center around the simple idea that light passes through the body in small amounts, and emerges bearing clues about tissues through which it passed. Images can be reconstructed from such data, and this is the basis of optical tomography. Over the past few years, techniques have been developed to allow construction of images from such optical data at the bedside. We have used a time-of-flight system reported earlier to monitor oxygenation and image hemorrhage in neonatal brain. This article summarizes the problems that we believe can be addressed by such techniques, and reports on some of our early results.

  18. Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freihaut, Jim [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the following efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable incentive

  19. Techbelt Energy Innovation Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Hazel [Youngstown State Univ., OH (United States); Nestic, Dave [TechBelt Energy Innovation Center, Warren, OH (United States); Hripko, Michael [Youngstown State Univ., OH (United States); Abraham, Martin [Youngstown State Univ., OH (United States)

    2017-06-30

    This project consisted of three main components 1) The primary goal of the project was to renovate and upgrade an existing commercial building to the highest possible environmentally sustainable level for the purpose of creating an energy incubator. This initiative was part of the Infrastructure Technologies Program, through which a sustainable energy demonstration facility was to be created and used as a research and community outreach base for sustainable energy product and process incubation; 2) In addition, fundamental energy related research on wind energy was performed; a shrouded wind turbine on the Youngstown State University campus was commissioned; and educational initiatives were implemented; and 3) The project also included an education and outreach component to inform and educate the public in sustainable energy production and career opportunities. Youngstown State University and the Tech Belt Energy Innovation Center (TBEIC) renovated a 37,000 square foot urban building which is now being used as a research and development hub for the region’s energy technology innovation industry. The building houses basic research facilities and business development in an incubator format. In addition, the TBEIC performs community outreach and education initiatives in advanced and sustainable energy. The building is linked to a back warehouse which will eventually be used as a build-out for energy laboratory facilities. The projects research component investigated shrouded wind turbines, and specifically the “Windcube” which was renamed the “Wind Sphere” during the course of the project. There was a specific focus on the development in the theory of shrouded wind turbines. The goal of this work was to increase the potential efficiency of wind turbines by improving the lift and drag characteristics. The work included computational modeling, scale models and full-sized design and construction of a test turbine. The full-sized turbine was built on the YSU

  20. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of ‘image registration paths’ to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10-9).

  1. Curent requirements for image management in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steil, V.; Schneider, F.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F.; Roehner, F.; Weisser, G.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment techniques of increasing complexity such as dynamic/rotational techniques mandate digital management and increasingly image guidance. This constantly increases requirements for image management and archiving. This article discusses the current status of these requirements and will present potential image administration strategies. Fundamentals of image administration and storage/archiving are presented (DICOM Standard, radiotherapy-specific issues) along the typical patient pathway (demographic data, radiotherapy treatment planning, signatures/approval of plan and image data, archiving of plan and image data). Different strategies for image management are presented (archiving centered on individual application vs. integral approach with central archiving in a DICOM-RT-PACS governed by a radiation oncology information system (ROCIS)). Infrastructural requirements depending on the amount of image data generated in the department are discussed. Application-centered image management provides access to image data including all relevant RT-specific elements. This approach, however, is not migration-safe, requires significant administrative work to ensure a redundancy level that protects against data loss and does not provide datasets that are linked to respective therapeutic interventions. Therefore, centralized image management and archiving that links images to patients and individual steps in the treatment pathway within a standardized DICOM(-RT) environment is preferable despite occasional problems with visualization of specific data elements. (orig.)

  2. Recasting image of contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimon Jg; Kiragu, K

    1993-03-01

    Even though contraceptives are linked to sex which, along with sensuality and peer acceptance, is used to market consumer goods, contraceptives are promoted in a hygienic, clinical way. Glamorous images which divert from adverse health effects are used to sell unhealthy goods, e.g., alcohol and cigarettes, but technical and intimidating promotion techniques centering on risks are used to promote family planning (FP) products and services which actually save the lives of mothers and children and improve their health. Until recently, only the medical system provided FP products and services so consumers identified them with illness and a help-seeking behavior. The image of contraceptives must be remolded to gain people's attention. To avoid instilling mistrust of a method in consumers, even those who believe in birth spacing, it is important for images to be positive and to reflect accurate information. In Indonesia, the Dualima condom has been linked to responsible fatherhood thereby creating a positive image and removing the negative image of a condom being linked to illicit sex. In the US, condom adds show the user in control, especially in reference to AIDS. Prior to promotion of any contraceptive, complete, clear communication and marketing plans are needed to identify and to focus on consumers' perceived needs. A survey in Egypt shows that the most important attributes of a contraceptive are ease of use, healthiness, and effectiveness and that Egyptians considered IUDs to best fit these attributes. Images of contraceptive users often determine whether potential users do choose to use contraceptives. For example, in Cameroon and the Philippines, female users are considered to be smart, rich, educated, confident and in control of their lives. In the Philippines, male users are perceived to be loving, caring, and considerate husbands. The mass medias can improve providers' public image as was the case in Turkey and Egypt.

  3. Automatic measurement of images on astrometric plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Gil, A.; Lopez Garcia, A.; Martinez Gonzalez, J. M.; Yershov, V.

    1994-04-01

    We present some results on the process of automatic detection and measurement of objects in overlapped fields of astrometric plates. The main steps of our algorithm are the following: determination of the Scale and Tilt between charge coupled devices (CCD) and microscope coordinate systems and estimation of signal-to-noise ratio in each field;--image identification and improvement of its position and size;--image final centering;--image selection and storage. Several parameters allow the use of variable criteria for image identification, characterization and selection. Problems related with faint images and crowded fields will be approached by special techniques (morphological filters, histogram properties and fitting models).

  4. Imaging of melorheostosis : emphasis on MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hyon; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Jong Yeol; Shin, Tae Bum; Kim, Young Whan; Pak, Hyo Yong; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeong Hwan [College of Medicine, Catholic University of Taegu-Hyosung, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Kyung Hwan [Kumi CHA General Hospital, College of Medicine, Pochon CHA University, Kumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of various radiographic imaging modalities in the diagnosis and characterization of melorheostosis. We retrospectively evaluated the plain film (n=3D8), computed tomographic (CT) imaging (n=3D5) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n=3D5) findings of eight patients with melorheostosis diagnosed by bone biopsy (n=3D4) and characteristic radiographic findings (n=3D8). MR images were obtained with a 1.5-T scanner focused on the region of maximal radiographic abnormality. Pulse sequences include T1-weighted SE. T2-weighted fast SE (n=3D5) and postcontrast imaging (n=3D4). In order to define subtle enhancement of the lesions, subtraction MR images were obtained in one case. Imaging findings were analyzed with particular emphasis on the distribution lesions along the sclerotome, differential radiographic findings between diaphyseal and metaepiphyseal lesions of the long bones, as seen on plain radiographs, and the density and signal characteristics of hyperostotic lesions, as seen on CT and MR images. Characteristic distribution along the sclerotome was identified in five of eight cases mainly along C6 and 7 (n=3D2) and L3, 4 and 5 (n=3D3) sclerotomes. In diaphyseal melorherostosis (8/8), a characteristic finding, i.e., a wax flowing down from the candle, was identified on plain radiographs. In all three patients with metaepiphyseal melorheostosis (3/8), multiple round or oval hyperostotic lesions were seen in the epipysis and metaphysis of the long bones. On CT, the marrow cavity was partly obliterated by hyperostotic lesions in all five patients with endosteal hyperostosis. Among these, central ground glass opacity with a sclerotic rim was seen in three patients. Periosteal hyperostosis was seen in two of five cases, being visualized as irregular excrescence in the periosteal region and surrounding soft tissue. Individual hyperostosis was visualized as hypointense on T1-weighted images and as a hyperintense center with a surrounding

  5. Building the Southern California Earthquake Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T. H.; Henyey, T.; McRaney, J. K.

    2004-12-01

    Kei Aki was the founding director of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), a multi-institutional collaboration formed in 1991 as a Science and Technology Center (STC) under the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). Aki and his colleagues articulated a system-level vision for the Center: investigations by disciplinary working groups would be woven together into a "Master Model" for Southern California. In this presentation, we will outline how the Master-Model concept has evolved and how SCEC's structure has adapted to meet scientific challenges of system-level earthquake science. In its first decade, SCEC conducted two regional imaging experiments (LARSE I & II); published the "Phase-N" reports on (1) the Landers earthquake, (2) a new earthquake rupture forecast for Southern California, and (3) new models for seismic attenuation and site effects; it developed two prototype "Community Models" (the Crustal Motion Map and Community Velocity Model) and, perhaps most important, sustained a long-term, multi-institutional, interdisciplinary collaboration. The latter fostered pioneering numerical simulations of earthquake ruptures, fault interactions, and wave propagation. These accomplishments provided the impetus for a successful proposal in 2000 to reestablish SCEC as a "stand alone" center under NSF/USGS auspices. SCEC remains consistent with the founders' vision: it continues to advance seismic hazard analysis through a system-level synthesis that is based on community models and an ever expanding array of information technology. SCEC now represents a fully articulated "collaboratory" for earthquake science, and many of its features are extensible to other active-fault systems and other system-level collaborations. We will discuss the implications of the SCEC experience for EarthScope, the USGS's program in seismic hazard analysis, NSF's nascent Cyberinfrastructure Initiative, and other large collaboratory programs.

  6. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  7. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  8. 76 FR 6486 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ...: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; RFA Panel: Topics in Bacterial Pathogenesis. Date... Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Neurodegeneration, Trauma, Immunology and Imaging. Date: March 7-8... 6487

  9. 75 FR 4576 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ...: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, Academic-Industry Partnership in Cancer Imaging.... Place: Ritz Carlton Hotel, 1150 22nd Street, NW., Washington, DC 20037. Contact Person: Fouad A. El...

  10. 75 FR 32956 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ...: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel, Member Conflict: Bone and Cartilage Biology. Date... Review Special Emphasis Panel, Small Business: Cell Biology and Molecular Imaging. Date: June 30, 2010...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available skip to page content Attention A T users. To access the menus on this page please perform the following steps. 1. Please switch auto forms ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? ... Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning ...

  13. Person-Centered Transition Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Craig A.; Bates, Paul E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a person-centered planning approach for involving students with disabilities and their families in the transition planning process. Components of person-centered planning are discussed, including development of a personal profile, identification of future lifestyle preferences, action steps and responsible parties, and necessary changes…

  14. Potential energy center site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    Past studies by the AEC, NRC, NSF and others have indicated that energy centers have certain advantages over dispersed siting. There is the need, however, to investigate such areas as possible weather modifications due to major heat releases, possible changes in Federal/state/local laws and institutional arrangements to facilitate implementation of energy centers, and to assess methods of easing social and economic pressures on a surrounding community due to center construction. All of these areas are under study by ERDA, but there remains the major requirement for the study of a potential site to yield a true assessment of the energy center concept. In this regard the Division of Nuclear Research and Applications of ERDA is supporting studies by the Southern and Western Interstate Nuclear Boards to establish state and utility interest in the concept and to carry out screening studies of possible sites. After selection of a final site for center study , an analysis will be made of the center including technical areas such as heat dissipation methods, water resource management, transmission methods, construction methods and schedules, co-located fuel cycle facilities, possible mix of reactor types, etc. Additionally, studies of safeguards, the interaction of all effected entities in the siting, construction, licensing and regulation of a center, labor force considerations in terms of local impact, social and economic changes, and financing of a center will be conducted. It is estimated that the potential site study will require approximately two years

  15. Climate Prediction Center - Seasonal Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather Service NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS home page Climate Prediction Center Site Map News Forecast Discussion PROGNOSTIC DISCUSSION FOR MONTHLY OUTLOOK NWS CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER COLLEGE PARK MD INFLUENCE ON THE MONTHLY-AVERAGED CLIMATE. OUR MID-MONTH ASSESSMENT OF LOW-FREQUENCY CLIMATE VARIABILITY IS

  16. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care » PTSD: National Center for PTSD » Public » Videos PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... Prescribing for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" ( ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care » PTSD: National Center for PTSD » Public » Videos PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... Prescribing for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" ( ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What is PILOTS? Quick Search Tips Modify ...

  1. Improving Productivity via QWL Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Marion T.; Hansen, Gary B.

    1980-01-01

    Gives a brief history of productivity improvement legislation in the United States and of the development and demise of the National Center for Productivity and Quality of Working Life (QWL). Describes existing productivity and QWL centers, including their locations, scope, services, and activities, and urges greater support at the federal level.…

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff ... Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web Links Advanced Search About Us ...

  3. Head Start Center Design Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This guide contains suggested criteria for planning, designing, and renovating Head Start centers so that they are safe, child-oriented, developmentally appropriate, beautiful, environmentally sensitive, and functional. The content is based on the U.S. General Services Administration's Child Care Center Design Guide, PBS-P140, which was intended…

  4. Spherical Torus Center Stack Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Kessel; M. Ono; M. Peng; J. Schmidt; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

    2002-01-01

    The low aspect ratio spherical torus (ST) configuration requires that the center stack design be optimized within a limited available space, using materials within their established allowables. This paper presents center stack design methods developed by the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Project Team during the initial design of NSTX, and more recently for studies of a possible next-step ST (NSST) device

  5. Spatial Distribution of Market Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Morshedul Islam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to find the location pattern, distribution and their sphere of influences of market centers in Rangpur City Corporation, Bangladesh. Rangpur is facing some problems like a traffic jam, noisy environment, population pressure etc due to the over population in full day long in the center of this city, all of the whole sale and retail sale markets are located in the middle. Location of Market is always influencing the daily life of the city population who are directly or indirectly connected with the market. If the market strategically distributed in an area they don’t face such kind of problems. Analysis or investigation shows that at about all of the market centers are located in the center of Rangpur and in the residential area of Rangpur. The maximum 67% market centers are found in the high-income residential area. Rangpur City Corporation, Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics and survey of Bangladesh provided the maps, reports and relevant documents of the study. The spatial dispersion pattern of market centers is clustered together at one place 0.33(Nearest Neighbor Index value, R found in the study area. Geographical Information System (GIS and other software also used to analyze the maps and diagrams. Investigation refers that, the market of Rangpur city have a clustered pattern and different levels of market centers found on the bases of centrality scores. By this centrality scores or levels, found the variation of influencing spheres of market centers in Rangpur City.

  6. Allegheny County Kane Regional Center Census

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Total number of residents in each Kane Regional Center facility by race and gender. The Kane Regional Centers are skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers run by...

  7. Cerenkov Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial...

  8. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  9. Pengembangan Model Manajemen ICT Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkun Elmunsyah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Pengembangan Model Manajemen ICT Center. Kemendiknas telah melakukan investasi  cukup besar berupa pembangunan Jejaring komputer pendidikan nasional yang disebut Jaringan Pendidikan Nasional (Jardiknas, pada sekolah menengah kejuruan (SMK di seluruh Indonesia yang dikenal dengan nama ICT center. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menemukan model manajemen ICT center sesuai karakteristik SMK sehingga dapat memberikan kontribusi mutu pada SMK tersebut. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian pengembangan atau Research and Development yang dikembangkan oleh Borg and Gall. Hasil secara keseluruhan penelitian menunjukkan berdasarkan uji coba keefektivan kinerja manajemen pada skala terbatas dan lebih luas menunjukkan bahwa model manajemen ICT center memenuhi kriteria sangat efektif. Kata-kata kunci: Jardiknas, SMK, model manajemen ICT center, kontribusi mutu

  10. Image compression of bone images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayrapetian, A.; Kangarloo, H.; Chan, K.K.; Ho, B.; Huang, H.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiment conducted to compare the diagnostic performance of a compressed bone image with the original. The compression was done on custom hardware that implements an algorithm based on full-frame cosine transform. The compression ratio in this study is approximately 10:1, which was decided after a pilot experiment. The image set consisted of 45 hand images, including normal images and images containing osteomalacia and osteitis fibrosa. Each image was digitized with a laser film scanner to 2,048 x 2,048 x 8 bits. Six observers, all board-certified radiologists, participated in the experiment. For each ROC session, an independent ROC curve was constructed and the area under that curve calculated. The image set was randomized for each session, as was the order for viewing the original and reconstructed images. Analysis of variance was used to analyze the data and derive statistically significant results. The preliminary results indicate that the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed image is comparable to that of the original image

  11. Safety in paediatric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.; Filice, I.; Murray, D.; Thomas, K.

    2006-01-01

    Those of us working in a dedicated paediatric environment are aware of the important safety issues with regard to paediatrics. Our goal when working with paediatric patients, the goal is to obtain the best quality images while keeping patients safe and their distress to a minimum. This article will discuss some of the issues regarding paediatric safety in a diagnostic imaging department, including radiation doses and the risk to paediatric patients, reducing medication errors, safe sedation practice and environmental safety. Also discussed are some conditions requiring special consideration to maintain patient safety such as epiglottitis and suspected child abuse. Promotion of a patient/family-centered care system will create an environment of trust where parents or guardians will know that their children are being well cared for in a safe, effective environment. (author)

  12. Heart Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Johnson Space Flight Center's device to test astronauts' heart function in microgravity has led to the MultiWire Gamma Camera, which images heart conditions six times faster than conventional devices. Dr. Jeffrey Lacy, who developed the technology as a NASA researcher, later formed Proportional Technologies, Inc. to develop a commercially viable process that would enable use of Tantalum-178 (Ta-178), a radio-pharmaceutical. His company supplies the generator for the radioactive Ta-178 to Xenos Medical Systems, which markets the camera. Ta-178 can only be optimally imaged with the camera. Because the body is subjected to it for only nine minutes, the radiation dose is significantly reduced and the technique can be used more frequently. Ta-178 also enables the camera to be used on pediatric patients who are rarely studied with conventional isotopes because of the high radiation dosage.

  13. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast , and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup; the Post Show Dome; the Astronaut Memorial; and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program.

  14. NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Since hydrogen is the most abundant element in all living organisms, proton NMR lends itself well as a method of investigation in biology and medicine. NMR imaging has some special advantages as a diagnostic tool: no ionizing radiation is used, it is noninvasive; it provides a safer means of imaging than the use of x-rays, gamma rays, positrons, or heavy ions. In contrast with ultrasound, the radiation penetrates the bony structures without attenuation. In additional to morphological information, NMR imaging provides additional diagnostic insights through relaxation parameters, which are not available from other imaging methods. In the decade since the first primitive NMR images were obtained, the quality of images now obtained approaches those from CT x-ray scanners. Prototype instruments are being constructed for clinical evaluation and the first whole-body scanners are beginning to appear on the market at costs comparable to CT scanners. Primary differences in equipment for conventional NMR and NMR imaging are the much larger aperture magnets that are required for the examination of human subjects and the addition of coils to generate field gradients and facilities for manipulating the gradients. Early results from clinical trials in many parts of the world are encouraging, and in a few years, the usefuleness of this modality of medical imaging to the medical profession in diagnosis and treatment of disease will be defined. 10 figures

  15. Nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.H.; Reid, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear imaging, utilizing relatively low photon energy emitting isotopes, allows an assessment of anatomic configuration and organ function. This method of imaging is predicted on the utilization of physiologically active radioisotope-labeled compounds or biologically active radioisotopes. Localization of such isotopes in normal or abnormal concentrations may be due to varying physiological or pathological mechanisms

  16. Cerenkov imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L J; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial structures. Imaging can basically be done using a sensitive camera optimized for low-light conditions, and it has a better resolution than any other nuclear imaging modality. CLI has been shown to effectively diagnose disease with regularly used PET isotope ((18)F-FDG) in clinical setting. Cerenkov luminescence tomography, Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy, and intraoperative Cerenkov imaging have also been explored with positive conclusions expanding the current range of applications. Cerenkov has also been used to improve PET imaging resolution since the source of both is the radioisotope being used. Smart imaging agents have been designed based on modulation of the Cerenkov signal using small molecules and nanoparticles giving better insight of the tumor biology. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  18. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  19. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:22275207

  20. Medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology almost 25 years ago, non-invasive imaging has become firmly established as an essential tool in the diagnosis of disease. Fully three-dimensional imaging of internal organs is now possible, b and for studies which explore the functional status of the body. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function are available, and scanners which combine anatomical and functional imaging in a single device are under development. Such techniques have been made possible through r ecent technological and mathematical advances. This series of lectures will review both the physical basis of medical imaging techniques using X-rays, gamma and positron emitting radiosiotopes, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and the mathematical methods used to reconstruct three-dimentional distributions from projection data. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simple radiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo biochemistry. They ...

  1. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  2. Emergency Operations Center ribbon cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Center Director Gene Goldman and special guests celebrate the opening of the site's new Emergency Operations Center on June 2. Participants included (l t r): Steven Cooper, deputy director of the National Weather Service Southern Region; Tom Luedtke, NASA associate administrator for institutions and management; Charles Scales, NASA associate deputy administrator; Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour; Gene Goldman, director of Stennis Space Center; Jack Forsythe, NASA assistant administrator for the Office of Security and Program Protection; Dr. Richard Williams, NASA chief health and medical officer; and Weldon Starks, president of Starks Contracting Company Inc. of Biloxi.

  3. Java advanced medical image toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunder, T.H.C.; O'Keefe, G.J.; Scott, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Java Advanced Medical Image Toolkit (jAMIT) has been developed at the Center for PET and Department of Nuclear Medicine in an effort to provide a suite of tools that can be utilised in applications required to perform analysis, processing and visualisation of medical images. jAMIT uses Java Advanced Imaging (JAI) to combine the platform independent nature of Java with the speed benefits associated with native code. The object-orientated nature of Java allows the production of an extensible and robust package which is easily maintained. In addition to jAMIT, a Medical Image VO API called Sushi has been developed to provide access to many commonly used image formats. These include DICOM, Analyze, MINC/NetCDF, Trionix, Beat 6.4, Interfile 3.2/3.3 and Odyssey. This allows jAMIT to access data and study information contained in different medical image formats transparently. Additional formats can be added at any time without any modification to the jAMIT package. Tools available in jAMIT include 2D ROI Analysis, Palette Thresholding, Image Groping, Image Transposition, Scaling, Maximum Intensity Projection, Image Fusion, Image Annotation and Format Conversion. Future tools may include 2D Linear and Non-linear Registration, PET SUV Calculation, 3D Rendering and 3D ROI Analysis. Applications currently using JAMIT include Antibody Dosimetry Analysis, Mean Hemispheric Blood Flow Analysis, QuickViewing of PET Studies for Clinical Training, Pharamcodynamic Modelling based on Planar Imaging, and Medical Image Format Conversion. The use of jAMIT and Sushi for scripting and analysis in Matlab v6.1 and Jython is currently being explored. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  4. Practice Patterns Analysis of Ocular Proton Therapy Centers: The International OPTIC Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrbacek, Jan; Mishra, Kavita K.; Kacperek, Andrzej; Dendale, Remi; Nauraye, Catherine; Auger, Michel; Herault, Joel; Daftari, Inder K.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Shih, Helen A.; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Denker, Andrea; Heufelder, Jens; Horwacik, Tomasz; Swakoń, Jan; Hoehr, Cornelia; Duzenli, Cheryl; Pica, Alessia; Goudjil, Farid; Mazal, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the planning, treatment, and follow-up strategies worldwide in dedicated proton therapy ocular programs. Methods and Materials: Ten centers from 7 countries completed a questionnaire survey with 109 queries on the eye treatment planning system (TPS), hardware/software equipment, image acquisition/registration, patient positioning, eye surveillance, beam delivery, quality assurance (QA), clinical management, and workflow. Results: Worldwide, 28,891 eye patients were treated with protons at the 10 centers as of the end of 2014. Most centers treated a vast number of ocular patients (1729 to 6369). Three centers treated fewer than 200 ocular patients. Most commonly, the centers treated uveal melanoma (UM) and other primary ocular malignancies, benign ocular tumors, conjunctival lesions, choroidal metastases, and retinoblastomas. The UM dose fractionation was generally within a standard range, whereas dosing for other ocular conditions was not standardized. The majority (80%) of centers used in common a specific ocular TPS. Variability existed in imaging registration, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rarely being used in routine planning (20%). Increased patient to full-time equivalent ratios were observed by higher accruing centers (P=.0161). Generally, ophthalmologists followed up the post–radiation therapy patients, though in 40% of centers radiation oncologists also followed up the patients. Seven centers had a prospective outcomes database. All centers used a cyclotron to accelerate protons with dedicated horizontal beam lines only. QA checks (range, modulation) varied substantially across centers. Conclusions: The first worldwide multi-institutional ophthalmic proton therapy survey of the clinical and technical approach shows areas of substantial overlap and areas of progress needed to achieve sustainable and systematic management. Future international efforts include research and development for imaging and planning software upgrades

  5. Practice Patterns Analysis of Ocular Proton Therapy Centers: The International OPTIC Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: Jan.hrbacek@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Mishra, Kavita K. [Ocular Tumor Proton Therapy Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Kacperek, Andrzej [National Proton Therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Dendale, Remi; Nauraye, Catherine; Auger, Michel [Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Orsay (France); Herault, Joel [Centre Lacassagne, Nice (France); Daftari, Inder K. [Ocular Tumor Proton Therapy Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Trofimov, Alexei V.; Shih, Helen A.; Chen, Yen-Lin E. [F. H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Denker, Andrea [Protons for Therapy, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Heufelder, Jens [BerlinProtonen am HZB, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Horwacik, Tomasz; Swakoń, Jan [Institute of Nuclear Physic, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Hoehr, Cornelia; Duzenli, Cheryl [BC Cancer Agency – TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Pica, Alessia [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Goudjil, Farid; Mazal, Alejandro [Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Orsay (France); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the planning, treatment, and follow-up strategies worldwide in dedicated proton therapy ocular programs. Methods and Materials: Ten centers from 7 countries completed a questionnaire survey with 109 queries on the eye treatment planning system (TPS), hardware/software equipment, image acquisition/registration, patient positioning, eye surveillance, beam delivery, quality assurance (QA), clinical management, and workflow. Results: Worldwide, 28,891 eye patients were treated with protons at the 10 centers as of the end of 2014. Most centers treated a vast number of ocular patients (1729 to 6369). Three centers treated fewer than 200 ocular patients. Most commonly, the centers treated uveal melanoma (UM) and other primary ocular malignancies, benign ocular tumors, conjunctival lesions, choroidal metastases, and retinoblastomas. The UM dose fractionation was generally within a standard range, whereas dosing for other ocular conditions was not standardized. The majority (80%) of centers used in common a specific ocular TPS. Variability existed in imaging registration, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rarely being used in routine planning (20%). Increased patient to full-time equivalent ratios were observed by higher accruing centers (P=.0161). Generally, ophthalmologists followed up the post–radiation therapy patients, though in 40% of centers radiation oncologists also followed up the patients. Seven centers had a prospective outcomes database. All centers used a cyclotron to accelerate protons with dedicated horizontal beam lines only. QA checks (range, modulation) varied substantially across centers. Conclusions: The first worldwide multi-institutional ophthalmic proton therapy survey of the clinical and technical approach shows areas of substantial overlap and areas of progress needed to achieve sustainable and systematic management. Future international efforts include research and development for imaging and planning software upgrades

  6. IMDISP - INTERACTIVE IMAGE DISPLAY PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    screen at once, the image can be "subsampled." For example, if the image were subsampled by a factor of 2, every other pixel from every other line would be displayed, starting from the upper left corner of the image. Any positive integer may be used for subsampling. The user may produce a histogram of an image file, which is a graph showing the number of pixels per DN value, or per range of DN values, for the entire image. IMDISP can also plot the DN value versus pixels along a line between two points on the image. The user can "stretch" or increase the contrast of an image by specifying low and high DN values; all pixels with values lower than the specified "low" will then become black, and all pixels higher than the specified "high" value will become white. Pixels between the low and high values will be evenly shaded between black and white. IMDISP is written in a modular form to make it easy to change it to work with different display devices or on other computers. The code can also be adapted for use in other application programs. There are device dependent image display modules, general image display subroutines, image I/O routines, and image label and command line parsing routines. The IMDISP system is written in C-language (94%) and Assembler (6%). It was implemented on an IBM PC with the MS DOS 3.21 operating system. IMDISP has a memory requirement of about 142k bytes. IMDISP was developed in 1989 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Additional planetary images can be obtained from the National Space Science Data Center at (301) 286-6695.

  7. Subjective matters: from image quality to image psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovskaya, Elena A.; De Ridder, Huib

    2013-03-01

    From the advent of digital imaging through several decades of studies, the human vision research community systematically focused on perceived image quality and digital artifacts due to resolution, compression, gamma, dynamic range, capture and reproduction noise, blur, etc., to help overcome existing technological challenges and shortcomings. Technological advances made digital images and digital multimedia nearly flawless in quality, and ubiquitous and pervasive in usage, provide us with the exciting but at the same time demanding possibility to turn to the domain of human experience including higher psychological functions, such as cognition, emotion, awareness, social interaction, consciousness and Self. In this paper we will outline the evolution of human centered multidisciplinary studies related to imaging and propose steps and potential foci of future research.

  8. KCC1: First Nanoparticle developed by KAUST Catalysis Center

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    KCC1 is the first Nanoparticle developed by KAUST Catalysis Center. Director of KAUST Catalysis Center, Dr. Jean-Marie Basset, Senior Research Scientist at KCC, Dr. Vivek Polshettiwar, and Dr. Dongkyu Cha of the Advanced Nanofabrication Imaging & Characterization Core Laboratory discuss the details of this recent discovery. This video was produced by KAUST Visualization Laboratory and KAUST Technology Transfer and Innovation - Terence McElwee, Director, Technology Transfer and Innovation - IP@kaust.edu.sa This technology is part of KAUST\\'s technology commercialization program that seeks to stimulate development and commercial use of KAUST-developed technologies. For more information email us at ip@kaust.edu.sa.

  9. Human-Centered Design Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, David J.; Howard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    For NASA, human-centered design (HCD) seeks opportunities to mitigate the challenges of living and working in space in order to enhance human productivity and well-being. Direct design participation during the development stage is difficult, however, during project formulation, a HCD approach can lead to better more cost-effective products. HCD can also help a program enter the development stage with a clear vision for product acquisition. HCD tools for clarifying design intent are listed. To infuse HCD into the spaceflight lifecycle the Space and Life Sciences Directorate developed the Habitability Design Center. The Center has collaborated successfully with program and project design teams and with JSC's Engineering Directorate. This presentation discusses HCD capabilities and depicts the Center's design examples and capabilities.

  10. Shopping Malls - ShoppingCenters

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Collected from a variety of sources both commercial and internal, this layer represents shopping center locations within Volusia County and is maintained by the...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Polytrauma Rehabilitation Spinal Cord Injury Telehealth Womens Health Issues Wellness Programs MyHealtheVet Nutrition Quitting Smoking Vaccines & Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  12. Center for Worker's Compensation Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the NIOSH Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies (CWCS) is to use workers’ compensation data and systems to improve workplace safety and health....

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... America's Freedoms Special Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer Sports Clinic Training - Exposure - Experience (TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Espanol Apps, Videos and More Mobile Apps Videos Web Links PTSD Site Search For Professionals Professional Section ... Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web Links Advanced Search About Us National Center for ...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What is ... Advisory Boards History and Achievements Divisions and Staff Leadership Divisions Executive Behavioral Science Clinical Neurosciences Dissemination & Training ...

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics VA Open Data VA App Store National Resource Directory Grants ...

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery ... and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get Help for PTSD Help with ...

  18. Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ETSC is EPA’s technical support and resource centers responsible for providing specialized scientific and engineering support to decision-makers in the Agency’s ten regional offices, states, communities, and local businesses.

  19. Records Center Program Billing System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — RCPBS supports the Records center programs (RCP) in producing invoices for the storage (NARS-5) and servicing of National Archives and Records Administration’s...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Publications Toolkits Videos Web Links Advanced Search About Us National Center for PTSD What We Do Mission and Overview Goals and Objectives Looking Ahead Annual Reports Research Initiatives Education Initiatives Advisory Boards History and Achievements Divisions and ...

  1. Transportation Research & Analysis Computing Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The technical objectives of the TRACC project included the establishment of a high performance computing center for use by USDOT research teams, including those from...

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics VA Open Data VA App Store National Resource Directory Grants ...

  3. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery ... Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1) Social Media Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required ...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get Help for PTSD Help with ... Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What ...

  5. Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC) at PNNL brings together industry-leading software, real-time grid data, and advanced computation into a fully...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources ... Job with VA Health Care Jobs (VA Careers) Travel Nurses Get Job Help Vets in the Workplace ...

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Data VA App Store National Resource Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  8. Africa Center for Strategic Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The Africa Center for Strategic Studies supports democratic governance in Africa by offering senior African civilian and military leaders a rigorous academic and practical program in civil-military...

  9. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources ... Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1) Social Media Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required ...

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Executive Biographies Organizations History Budget and Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency ... Applications VA Forms State and Local Resources Strat Plan FY 2014-2020 VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) ... Professional Section: Prescribing for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What ...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research Research Home About VA Research Services Programs News, Events and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers ...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business ... Search Where to Get Help PTSD Coach Online Tools to help you manage stress. Search Pilots Search ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the following steps. 1. Please switch auto forms mode to off. 2. Hit enter to expand a ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery ...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... a VA Appointment Crisis Prevention Mental Health PTSD Public Health Veterans Access, Choice & Accountability Act Benefits General Benefits ... Quitting Smoking Vaccines & Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers ...

  16. National Center on Elder Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Synthesize and disseminate high quality research on elder abuse to encourage the translation of research into practice. ... to further the field for those interested in elder abuse identification and prevention. What’s Happening National Center on ...

  17. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Executive Biographies Organizations History Budget and Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics VA ...

  19. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers - KML

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a KML file for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Apply for VA Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional ... Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview Adult Interviews Adult Self Report Child Measures Deployment Measures DSM-5 Measures PTSD ...

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Website Site Map Content Inventory Accessibility Privacy and Security Updating of Web Site Web Site Policies Important ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  3. Classification of Security Operation Centers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, P

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Security Operation Centers (SOCs) are a necessary service for organisations that want to address compliance and threat management. While there are frameworks in existence that addresses the technology aspects of these services, a holistic framework...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of VA Executive Biographies Organizations History Budget and Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation ( ... America's Freedoms Special Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer Sports Clinic Training - ...

  5. National Center for Health Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Search the CDC National Center for Health Statistics Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Survey of Family Growth Vital Records National Vital Statistics System National Death Index Vital Statistics Rapid Release ...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business ... Search How to Obtain Articles Alerts User Guide Purpose and Scope Find Assessment Measures Instrument Authority List ...

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer Sports Clinic Training - Exposure - Experience (TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers ...

  8. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics VA Open Data VA App Store National Resource ... Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web Links Advanced Search About Us National Center for PTSD What ...

  9. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... The National Center for PTSD does not provide direct clinical care, individual referrals or benefits information. For ... Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents Adaptive Sports Program ADMINISTRATION Veterans Health Administration Veterans Benefits Administration ...

  10. CENTER FOR CYBER SECURITY STUDIES

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Center for Cyber Security Studies is to enhance the education of midshipmen in all areas of cyber warfare, to facilitate the sharing of expertise...

  11. Poison control center - emergency number

    Science.gov (United States)

    For a POISON EMERGENCY call: 1-800-222-1222 ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this ...

  12. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ron; Hunter, James; Schirato, Richard; Vogel, Sven; Swift, Alicia; Ickes, Tim; Ward, Bill; Losko, Adrian; Tremsin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging because of its sensitivity to light elements and greater penetration of high-Z materials. Energy-resolved neutron imaging can provide contrast enhancements for elements and isotopes due to the variations with energy in scattering cross sections due to nuclear resonances. These cross section differences exist due to compound nuclear resonances that are characteristic of each element and isotope, as well as broader resonances at higher energies. In addition, multi-probe imaging, such as combined photon and neutron imaging, is a powerful tool for discerning properties and features in materials that cannot be observed with a single probe. Recently, we have demonstrated neutron imaging, both radiography and computed tomography, using the moderated (Lujan Center) and high-energy (WNR facility) neutron sources at LANSCE. Flat panel x-ray detectors with suitable scintillator-converter screens provide good sensitivity for both low and high neutron energies. Micro-Channel-Plate detectors and iCCD scintillator camera systems that provide the fast time gating needed for energy-resolved imaging have been demonstrated as well. Examples of recent work will be shown including fluid flow in plants and imaging through dense thick objects. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, and performed by Los Alamos National Security LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  13. Image perception and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1987-01-01

    The author develops theoretical and practical models of image perception and image processing, based on phenomenology and structuralism and leading to original perception: fundamental for a positivistic approach of research work for the development of artificial intelligence that will be able in an automated system fo 'reading' X-ray pictures.

  14. Image perception and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1987-01-01

    The author develops theoretical and practical models of image perception and image processing, based on phenomenology and structuralism and leading to original perception: fundamental for a positivistic approach of research work for the development of artificial intelligence that will be able in an automated system fo 'reading' X-ray pictures. (orig.) [de

  15. Retinal imaging and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of

  16. COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lafon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present specific capabilities and limitations of the use of color digital images in a characterization process. The whole process is investigated, from the acquisition of digital color images to the analysis of the information relevant to various applications in the field of material characterization. A digital color image can be considered as a matrix of pixels with values expressed in a vector-space (commonly 3 dimensional space whose specificity, compared to grey-scale images, is to ensure a coding and a representation of the output image (visualisation printing that fits the human visual reality. In a characterization process, it is interesting to regard color image attnbutes as a set of visual aspect measurements on a material surface. Color measurement systems (spectrocolorimeters, colorimeters and radiometers and cameras use the same type of light detectors: most of them use Charge Coupled Devices sensors. The difference between the two types of color data acquisition systems is that color measurement systems provide a global information of the observed surface (average aspect of the surface: the color texture is not taken into account. Thus, it seems interesting to use imaging systems as measuring instruments for the quantitative characterization of the color texture.

  17. Italy INAF Analysis Center Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activity of the Italian INAF VLBI Analysis Center. Our Analysis Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics. IRA runs the observatories of Medicina and Noto, where two 32-m VLBI AZ-EL telescopes are situated. This report contains the AC's VLBI data analysis activities and shortly outlines the investigations into the co-locations of space geodetic instruments.

  18. Design of Shanghai irradiation center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fugen; Lu Zhongwen; Xue Xiangrong; Yao Zewu; Du Bende; Xu Zhicheng; Du Kangsen

    1988-01-01

    Shanghai Irradiation Center, situated in westrn suburb of Shanghai, was completed in August, 1986. At present, a 6.55 x 10 15 Bq 60 Co source has been loaded, though the designed activity of maximum loading is 18.5 x 10 10 Bq. the center is designed mainly for irradiation preservation of food and sterilization of medical devices and tools. Its processing ability is 10 t/h for potatoes

  19. User-Centered Data Management

    CERN Document Server

    Catarci, Tiziana; Kimani, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This lecture covers several core issues in user-centered data management, including how to design usable interfaces that suitably support database tasks, and relevant approaches to visual querying, information visualization, and visual data mining. Novel interaction paradigms, e.g., mobile and interfaces that go beyond the visual dimension, are also discussed. Table of Contents: Why User-Centered / The Early Days: Visual Query Systems / Beyond Querying / More Advanced Applications / Non-Visual Interfaces / Conclusions

  20. The Comparison between Teacher Centered and Student Centered Educational Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Anvar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Various approaches to learning are suggested & practiced. The traditional medical education were more teacher centered oriented . In this method the students’ involvement in the process of learning is not remarkable, but the new approach to medical education supports the students involvement. This study evaluated the various method of lecturing considering students involvements.Methods: One hundred two first year medical and nursing students involved in this study and their opinion about these two methods of learning were obtained by filling of a questionnaire. The subject of the lectures was “general psychology” which was carried out 50% by the students and 50% by the teacher. The statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS program.Results: Considering students opinion in student-centered method the various aspect of learning such as mutual understanding, use of textbooks and references were significantly increased , whereasother aspects of learning such as self esteem, study time, innovation, and study attitude though were improved, but were not significant as compared with teacher centered method. In teacher-centeredmethod the understanding of the subjects was significantly increased .Other aspects of learning such as motivation and concentration were improved but not significantly as compared with studentcentered method.Conclusion: As the result showed student centered method was favored in several aspects of learning while in teacher centered method only understanding of the subject was better . Careful choice of teaching method to provide a comprehensive learning experience should take into account these differences.Key words: TEACHER CENTERED, STUDENT CENTERED, LEARNING