WorldWideScience

Sample records for imaging breast tumors

  1. Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Breast: Imaging Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eun Deok; Kim, Min Kyun; Kim, Jeong Soo; Whang, In Yong

    2013-01-01

    Focal neuroendocrine differentiation can be found in diverse histological types of breast tumors. However, the term, neuroendocrine breast tumor, indicates the diffuse expression of neuroendocrine markers in more than 50% of the tumor cell population. The imaging features of neuroendocrine breast tumor have not been accurately described due to extreme rarity of this tumor type. We present a case of a pathologically confirmed, primary neuroendocrine breast tumor in a 42-year-old woman, with imaging findings difficult to be differentiated from that of invasive ductal carcinoma

  2. Mesenchymal Tumors of the Breast: Imaging and the Histopathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Mi; Kim, Eun Kyung; You, Jae Kyoung; Kim, Yee Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Various benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors can occur in the breast. Most radiologists are unfamiliar with the imaging features of these tumors and the imaging features have not been described in the radiologic literature. It is important that radiologists should be familiar with the broad spectrum of imaging features of rare mesenchymal breast tumors. In this pictorial review, we demonstrate the sonographic findings and the corresponding pathologic findings of various mesenchymal tumors of the breast as defined by the World Health Organization classification system

  3. Imaging of breast tumors using MR-elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, J.; Sinkus, R.; Leussler, C.; Dargatz, M.; Roeschmann, P.; Schrader, D.; Lorenzen, M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Imaging of breast tumors using MR-Elastography. Material and method: Low-frequency mechanical waves are transmitted into breast-tissue by means of an oscillator. The local characteristics of the mechanical wave are determined by the elastic properties of the tissue. By means of a motion-sensitive spin-echo-sequence these waves can be displayed within the phase of the MR image. Subsequently, these images can be used to reconstruct the local distribution of elasticity. In-vivo measurements were performed in 3 female patients with malignant tumors of the breast. Results: All patients tolerated the measurement set-up without any untoward sensation in the contact area of skin and oscillator. The waves completely penetrated the breast, encompassing the axilla and regions close to the chest wall. All tumors were localized by MRE as structures of markedly stiffer tissue when compared to the surrounding tissue. Furthermore, in one patient, a metastasis in an axillary lymph node was detected. In all patients, local regions of increased elasticity were found in the remaining parenchyma of the breast, which, however, did not reach the high levels of elasticity found in the tumors. Conclusion: MRE is an imaging modality enabling adjunct tissue differentiation of mammary tumors. (orig.) [de

  4. Terahertz Imaging of Three-Dimensional Dehydrated Breast Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Wu, Yuhao; Gauch, John; Campbell, Lucas K.; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the application of terahertz imaging to three-dimensional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast cancer tumors. The results demonstrate the capability of terahertz for in-depth scanning to produce cross section images without the need to slice the tumor. Samples of tumors excised from women diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma are investigated using a pulsed terahertz time domain imaging system. A time of flight estimation is used to obtain vertical and horizontal cross section images of tumor tissues embedded in paraffin block. Strong agreement is shown comparing the terahertz images obtained by electronically scanning the tumor in-depth in comparison with histopathology images. The detection of cancer tissue inside the block is found to be accurate to depths over 1 mm. Image processing techniques are applied to provide improved contrast and automation of the obtained terahertz images. In particular, unsharp masking and edge detection methods are found to be most effective for three-dimensional block imaging.

  5. Imaging findings in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongna; Zhang Shengjian; Liu Haiquan; Peng Weijun; Li Ruimin; Gu Yajia; Wang Xiaohong; Mao Jian; Shen Xigang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the radiological appearance and pathological features of breast phyllodes tumors (PTs), and to enhance the recognition of the tumor. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging findings were retrospectively reviewed in 24 women with PTs confirmed by surgical pathology. All of the 24 patients had preoperative MRI and sonography, and 10 had preoperative mammography. Results: The histologic findings were benign, borderline and malignant PTs in 16.7% (4/24), 45.8% (11/24) and 37.5% (9/24) of cases, respectively. The tumor size (p = 0.001), irregular shape on sonographic imaging (p = 0.039), internal non-enhanced septations (p = 0.009), silt-like changes in enhanced images (p = 0.006) and signal changes from T2-weighted to enhanced images on MRI (p = 0.001) correlated significantly with the histologic grade; the BI-RADS category of the MRI could reflect the PT's histologic grade with a correlation coefficient of 0.440 (p = 0.031). If the category BI-RADS ≥4a was considered to be a suspicious malignant lesion, the diagnostic accuracy of mammography, US and MRI would be 70% (7/10), 62.5% (15/24) and 95.8% (23/24), respectively. Conclusion: The tumor size and several US and MRI findings can be used to help preoperatively determine the histologic grade of breast PTs. When a patient presents with a progressively enlarging, painless breast mass, MRI should be recommended first.

  6. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia S; Ciubuc, John D; Parra, Karla; Manciu, Marian; Bennet, Kevin E; Valenzuela, Paloma; Sundin, Emma M; Durrer, William G; Reza, Luis; Francia, Giulio

    2017-08-01

    Although not yet ready for clinical application, methods based on Raman spectroscopy have shown significant potential in identifying, characterizing, and discriminating between noncancerous and cancerous specimens. Real-time and accurate medical diagnosis achievable through this vibrational optical method largely benefits from improvements in current technological and software capabilities. Not only is the acquisition of spectral information now possible in milliseconds and analysis of hundreds of thousands of data points achieved in minutes, but Raman spectroscopy also allows simultaneous detection and monitoring of several biological components. Besides demonstrating a significant Raman signature distinction between nontumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, our study demonstrates that Raman can be used as a label-free method to evaluate epidermal growth factor activity in tumor cells. Comparative Raman profiles and images of specimens in the presence or absence of epidermal growth factor show important differences in regions attributed to lipid, protein, and nucleic acid vibrations. The occurrence, which is dependent on the presence of epidermal growth factor, of new Raman features associated with the appearance of phosphothreonine and phosphoserine residues reflects a signal transduction from the membrane to the nucleus, with concomitant modification of DNA/RNA structural characteristics. Parallel Western blotting analysis reveals an epidermal growth factor induction of phosphorylated Akt protein, corroborating the Raman results. The analysis presented in this work is an important step toward Raman-based evaluation of biological activity of epidermal growth factor receptors on the surfaces of breast cancer cells. With the ultimate future goal of clinically implementing Raman-guided techniques for the diagnosis of breast tumors (e.g., with regard to specific receptor activity), the current results just lay the foundation for

  7. Imaging tumor vascularization for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.; Klaase, J. M.; van den Engh, F. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in western women. Current screening and diagnostic imaging modalities, like x-ray mammography and ultrasonography, focus on morphological changes of breast tissue. However, these techniques still miss some cancers and often falsely

  8. Pulsed terahertz imaging of breast cancer in freshly excised murine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Chavez, Tanny; Khan, Kamrul; Wu, Jingxian; Chakraborty, Avishek; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Bailey, Keith; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2018-02-01

    This paper investigates terahertz (THz) imaging and classification of freshly excised murine xenograft breast cancer tumors. These tumors are grown via injection of E0771 breast adenocarcinoma cells into the flank of mice maintained on high-fat diet. Within 1 h of excision, the tumor and adjacent tissues are imaged using a pulsed THz system in the reflection mode. The THz images are classified using a statistical Bayesian mixture model with unsupervised and supervised approaches. Correlation with digitized pathology images is conducted using classification images assigned by a modal class decision rule. The corresponding receiver operating characteristic curves are obtained based on the classification results. A total of 13 tumor samples obtained from 9 tumors are investigated. The results show good correlation of THz images with pathology results in all samples of cancer and fat tissues. For tumor samples of cancer, fat, and muscle tissues, THz images show reasonable correlation with pathology where the primary challenge lies in the overlapping dielectric properties of cancer and muscle tissues. The use of a supervised regression approach shows improvement in the classification images although not consistently in all tissue regions. Advancing THz imaging of breast tumors from mice and the development of accurate statistical models will ultimately progress the technique for the assessment of human breast tumor margins.

  9. Analogues of estradiol as potential breast tumor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.E.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Ferriera, N.L.; Jagoda, E.M.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The radioiodinated analogue of estradiol, 11β-methoxy-17α-[/sup 125/I]iodovinylestradiol (MIVE/sub 2/), has been shown to be a good candidate for the imaging of estrogen dependent breast tumors. Although there has been no extensive study on the sensitivity of radiotracers of this type, the authors have not observed localization of the radiotracer in metastatic lesions containing less than 20 fmole estrogen receptor/mg protein or in bone metasteses. In order to improve the sensitivity, they have examined several structural analogues of moxestrol (the parent structure for MIVE/sub 2/) for affinity to the ER isolated from immature rat uterus. The 11β-ethyl analogue (EEE/sub 2/) of ethynyl estradiol (EE/sub 2/) exhibits the highest affinity with the 11β-methyl analogue second best. Although the lipophilicity is also very high this compound should not be much more lipophilic than 16-iodoestradiol or MIVE/sub 2/ since the introduction of iodine increases the log P by greater than 1. The distribution of the tritiated derivative of EEE/sub 2/ is under study

  10. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of breast tumors with MRI and PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinker, K.; Marino, M.A.; Meyer-Baese, A.; Helbich, T.H.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is an indispensable tool in breast imaging for many indications. Several functional parameters with MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) have been assessed for imaging of breast tumors and their combined application is defined as multiparametric imaging. Available data suggest that multiparametric imaging using different functional MRI and PET parameters can provide detailed information about the hallmarks of cancer and may provide additional specificity. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast comprises established MRI parameters, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), MR proton spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRSI) as well as combinations of radiological and MRI techniques (e.g. PET/CT and PET/MRI) using radiotracers, such as fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast can be performed at different field-strengths (range 1.5-7 T). Emerging parameters comprise novel promising techniques, such as sodium imaging ( 23 Na MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRSI), chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as various specific radiotracers. Multiparametric and molecular imaging has multiple applications in breast imaging. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast is an evolving field that will enable improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring for personalized medicine in breast cancer. (orig.) [de

  11. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubuc, John

    Methods built on Raman spectroscopy have shown major potential in describing and discriminating between malignant and benign specimens. Accurate, real-time medical diagnosis benefits in substantial improvements through this vibrational optical method. Not only is acquisition of data possible in milliseconds and analysis in minutes, Raman allows concurrent detection and monitoring of all biological components. Besides validating a significant Raman signature distinction between non-tumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, this study reveals a label-free method to assess overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in tumor cells. EGFR overexpression sires Raman features associated with phosphorylated threonine and serine, and modifications of DNA/RNA characteristics. Investigations by gel electrophoresis reveal EGF induction of phosphorylated Akt, agreeing with the Raman results. The analysis presented is a vital step toward Raman-based evaluation of EGF receptors in breast cancer cells. With the goal of clinically applying Raman-guided methods for diagnosis of breast tumors, the current results lay the basis for proving label-free optical alternatives in making prognosis of the disease.

  12. How to measure breast cancer tumoral size at MR imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin-Naggara, I.; Siles, Pascale; Trop, I.; Chopier, J.; Darai, E.; Bazot, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences to measure tumor size. Methods: Eighty-six women (mean age: 53 years (30–78)) who underwent preoperative MRI for breast cancer were included. Maximal diameters of the index tumor (IT) and of the whole extent of the tumor (WET) were measured on T2-weighted (T2W) sequences, on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) T1-weighted (T1W) sequences and on Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP) reconstructions. Agreements with pathological size were evaluated using concordance correlation coefficient (k). Results: Median pathological size of IT was 20 mm (13–25 mm, interquartile range). Median pathological size of the WET was 29 mm (16–50 mm, interquartile range). Measurement of IT showed a good concordance with pathological size, with best results using T2W (k = 0.690) compared to MIP (k = 0.667), early-subtracted DCE frame (k = 0.630) and early-native DCE frame (k = 0.588). IT was visible on T2W in 83.7% and accurately measured within 5 mm in 69.9%. Measurement of WET was superior using early-subtracted DCE frame (k = 0.642) compared to late-native frame (k = 0.635), early-native frame (k = 0.631), late-subtracted frame (k = 0.620) and MIP (k = 0.565). However, even using early-subtracted frame, WET was accurately measured within 5 mm only 39.3%. Conclusion: If visible, IT size is best measured on T2W with a good accuracy (69%) whereas WET is best estimated on early-subtracted DCE frame. However, when adjacent additional sites exist around IT, suspected surrounding disease components need to be proved by pathological analysis

  13. Bromine-77-labeled estrogen receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals for breast tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElvany, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two derivatives of 16α-bromoestradiol, both with and without an 11β-methoxy substituent, have been labeled with bromine-77 and evaluated as potential breast tumor imaging agents. Extensive characterization of these radiotracers in animal models has demonstrated their effective concentration in estrogen target tissues. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated the potential of radiolabeled estrogens for breast tumor imaging; however, the suboptimal decay properties of bromine-77 limit the utility of these agents in imaging studies. These results with 77 -Br-labeled estrogens suggest that estrogen derivatives labeled with other radionuclides should provide enhanced image resolution with various imaging devices. Although the decay characteristics of bromine-77 are such that it is not ideally suited to imaging with conventional gamma cameras, it may be a useful radionuclide for therapeutic applications

  14. Ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to detect breast tumors. Comparison with ultrasonography and mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Eri; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Iwamura, Akira; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shinpei

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to accurately detect breast tumors. Sixty-five breast carcinomas and 24 fibroadenomas were examined by an SE pulse sequence using a 0.2 Tesla unit. Subtraction MR images were obtained every minute during dynamic study with Gd-DTPA. Almost all breast tumors were seen as very bright masses, and the margin of the mass was clearly demonstrated on subtraction MR images. Breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas showed characteristic time-intensity curves on dynamic study. Time-intensity curves of the early peak type and plateau type were seen in 97% of breast carcinomas, while the gradually increasing type was seen in 92% of fibroadenomas. The detectability of breast carcinoma was 98% by MRI, 98% by ultrasonography, and 87% by mammography. That of fibroadenoma was 95% by MRI, 91% by ultrasonography and 60% by mammography. Sensitivity and specificity for breast carcinoma were 98% and 92% for MRI and 97% and 71% for ultrasonography. For fibroadenoma, they were 96% and 98% for MRI and 89% and 92% for ultrasonography. (author)

  15. Ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to detect breast tumors. Comparison with ultrasonography and mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terao, Eri; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Iwamura, Akira; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shinpei (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-09-01

    We evaluated the ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to accurately detect breast tumors. Sixty-five breast carcinomas and 24 fibroadenomas were examined by an SE pulse sequence using a 0.2 Tesla unit. Subtraction MR images were obtained every minute during dynamic study with Gd-DTPA. Almost all breast tumors were seen as very bright masses, and the margin of the mass was clearly demonstrated on subtraction MR images. Breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas showed characteristic time-intensity curves on dynamic study. Time-intensity curves of the early peak type and plateau type were seen in 97% of breast carcinomas, while the gradually increasing type was seen in 92% of fibroadenomas. The detectability of breast carcinoma was 98% by MRI, 98% by ultrasonography, and 87% by mammography. That of fibroadenoma was 95% by MRI, 91% by ultrasonography and 60% by mammography. Sensitivity and specificity for breast carcinoma were 98% and 92% for MRI and 97% and 71% for ultrasonography. For fibroadenoma, they were 96% and 98% for MRI and 89% and 92% for ultrasonography. (author).

  16. Imaging breast tumor vascularization for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.; Klaase, J.M.; van den Engh, F.M.; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in western women. Current screening and diagnostic imaging modalities, like x-ray mammography and ultrasonography, focus on morphological changes of breast tissue. However, these techniques still miss some cancers and often falsely

  17. 3D tumor measurement in cone-beam CT breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Ning, Ruola

    2004-05-01

    Cone-beam CT breast imaging provides a digital volume representation of a breast. With a digital breast volume, the immediate task is to extract the breast tissue information, especially for suspicious tumors, preferably in an automatic manner or with minimal user interaction. This paper reports a program for three-dimensional breast tissue analysis. It consists of volumetric segmentation (by globally thresholding), subsegmentation (connection-based separation), and volumetric component measurement (volume, surface, shape, and other geometrical specifications). A combination scheme of multi-thresholding and binary volume morphology is proposed to fast determine the surface gradients, which may be interpreted as the surface evolution (outward growth or inward shrinkage) for a tumor volume. This scheme is also used to optimize the volumetric segmentation. With a binary volume, we decompose the foreground into components according to spatial connectedness. Since this decomposition procedure is performed after volumetric segmentation, it is called subsegmentation. The subsegmentation brings the convenience for component visualization and measurement, in the whole support space, without interference from others. Upon the tumor component identification, we measure the following specifications: volume, surface area, roundness, elongation, aspect, star-shapedness, and location (centroid). A 3D morphological operation is used to extract the cluster shell and, by delineating the corresponding volume from the grayscale volume, to measure the shell stiffness. This 3D tissue measurement is demonstrated with a tumor-borne breast specimen (a surgical part).

  18. Discrimination of Breast Tumors in Ultrasonic Images by Classifier Ensemble Trained with AdaBoost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Atsushi; Shimizu, Akinobu; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    In this paper, we propose a novel method for acurate automated discrimination of breast tumors (carcinoma, fibroadenoma, and cyst). We defined 199 features related to diagnositic observations noticed when a doctor judges breast tumors, such as internal echo, shape, and boundary echo. These features included novel features based on a parameter of log-compressed K distribution, which reflect physical characteristics of ultrasonic B-mode imaging. Furthermore, we propose a discrimination method of breast tumors by using an ensemble classifier based on the multi-class AdaBoost algorithm with effective features selection. Verification by analyzing 200 carcinomas, 30 fibroadenomas and 30 cycts showed the usefulness of the newly defined features and the effectiveness of the discrimination by using an ensemble classifier trained by AdaBoost.

  19. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  20. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Qian, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy

  1. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Zheng-1@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Hollingsworth, Alan B. [Mercy Women’s Center, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120 (United States); Qian, Wei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy.

  2. Imaging diagnostics of breast metastases from extramammary tumors; Bildgebende Diagnostik bei Brustmetastasen extramammaerer Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienbeck, S.; Lotz, J. [Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Goettingen (Germany); Nemat, S. [Universitaet Homburg/Saar, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Surov, A. [Universitaet Leipzig, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Breast metastases of solid extramammary tumors are very rare in comparison to primary malignancies of the breast and account for only 0.33-6.3% of all malignant neoplasms of the breast. The most common primary tumors are malignant melanoma, distant sarcomas, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, renal cell cancer and thyroid cancer in decreasing order of frequency. This review article summarizes the clinical features and the different imaging findings of breast metastases from different extramammary solid tumors. Breast metastases are often incidental findings in computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) imaging. Mammography shows two different imaging patterns, namely focal lesions and diffuse architectural distortion with skin thickening. Breast metastases presenting as focal masses usually occur as solitary and more rarely as multiple round lesions with a smooth edge boundary. Associated calcifications are rare findings. Diffuse architectural distortion with skin thickening is more common in breast metastases from most gastric tumors, ovarian cancer and rhabdomyosarcoma. Using ultrasound most lesions are hypoechoic, oval or round with smooth boundaries and posterior acoustic enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria of breast metastases show an inconstant signal behavior that cannot be safely classified as benign or malignant. In summary, in patients with known malignancies the presence of breast metastases should be considered even with imposing clinically and radiologically benign findings. (orig.) [German] Brustmetastasen solider extramammaerer Tumoren sind im Vergleich zu primaeren Malignomen der Brust mit einer Praevalenz von 0,33-6,3 % aller boesartigen Neubildungen in der Brust sehr selten. Die haeufigsten Primaertumoren sind dabei das maligne Melanom, ferner Sarkome, Bronchial-, Ovarial-, Nierenzell- und Schilddruesenkarzinome mit einer absteigenden Haeufigkeit ihres Auftretens. In dieser Uebersichtsarbeit werden die

  3. Automatic detection and classification of breast tumors in ultrasonic images using texture and morphological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanni; Wang, Yuanyuan; Jiao, Jing; Guo, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Due to severe presence of speckle noise, poor image contrast and irregular lesion shape, it is challenging to build a fully automatic detection and classification system for breast ultrasonic images. In this paper, a novel and effective computer-aided method including generation of a region of interest (ROI), segmentation and classification of breast tumor is proposed without any manual intervention. By incorporating local features of texture and position, a ROI is firstly detected using a self-organizing map neural network. Then a modified Normalized Cut approach considering the weighted neighborhood gray values is proposed to partition the ROI into clusters and get the initial boundary. In addition, a regional-fitting active contour model is used to adjust the few inaccurate initial boundaries for the final segmentation. Finally, three textures and five morphologic features are extracted from each breast tumor; whereby a highly efficient Affinity Propagation clustering is used to fulfill the malignancy and benign classification for an existing database without any training process. The proposed system is validated by 132 cases (67 benignancies and 65 malignancies) with its performance compared to traditional methods such as level set segmentation, artificial neural network classifiers, and so forth. Experiment results show that the proposed system, which needs no training procedure or manual interference, performs best in detection and classification of ultrasonic breast tumors, while having the lowest computation complexity.

  4. Human breast tumor imaging using 111In labeled monoclonal antibody: Anthymic mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban An Khaw; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Bailes, J.S.; Schneider, S.L.; Lancaster, J.; Lasher, J.C.; McGuire, W.L.; Powers, J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 323/A3, an IgG1, was raised against the human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 and recognized a 43 Kd membrane associated glycoprotein. Histochemical studies with the antibody detected 75% of metastatic lymph nodes, 59% of primary breast tumors, and showed some staining in 20% of benign breast lesions. For radionuclide imaging, the MoAb 323/A3 was labeled with both 125 I and 111 In, via covalently coupled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) by the mixed anhydride method. The antibody activity of the DTPA modified 323/A3 was assessed by an immunoassay using viable and fixed MCF-7 target cells. Male athymic nude mice bearing BT-20 human mammary tumors were injected with dual 125 I/ 111 In labeled DTPA 323/A3 via the tail veins. The animals were imaged with a gamma camera equipped with a pinhole collimator at 1-3 h, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 days after the tracer administration. On day 5 or 6, the animals were killed, and the biodistribution of the radiotracers was determined for the blood, thyroid, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, gastro-intestinal tract and tumor. Target to blood ratio at 6 days for the 111 In tracer was 24:1 in the group with a mean tumor weight of 0.492 g, and 13:1 in another group with a mean tumor weight of 0.1906 g (day 5). However, the 125 I activity showed only 3.6:1 and 5.4:1 target to blood ratios in the corresponding groups. The larger tumors localized less 111 I tracer (27.13%±7.57% injected dose/g, Mean±SD) than the smaller tumors (52.75%±22.25% ID/g). Analysis of the gamma images showed that the maximum tracer concentration occurred in the tumors at about 2 to 3 days after intravenous tracer administration. The excellent tumor resolution observed with BT-20 tumors may be due to increased 43 Kd glycoprotein antigen density in this tumor cell line. (orig.)

  5. Improving oncoplastic breast tumor bed localization for radiotherapy planning using image registration algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, Marek; Skalski, Andrzej; Ciepiela, Izabela; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about tumor bed localization and its shape analysis is a crucial factor for preventing irradiation of healthy tissues during supportive radiotherapy and as a result, cancer recurrence. The localization process is especially hard for tumors placed nearby soft tissues, which undergo complex, nonrigid deformations. Among them, breast cancer can be considered as the most representative example. A natural approach to improving tumor bed localization is the use of image registration algorithms. However, this involves two unusual aspects which are not common in typical medical image registration: the real deformation field is discontinuous, and there is no direct correspondence between the cancer and its bed in the source and the target 3D images respectively. The tumor no longer exists during radiotherapy planning. Therefore, a traditional evaluation approach based on known, smooth deformations and target registration error are not directly applicable. In this work, we propose alternative artificial deformations which model the tumor bed creation process. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the most commonly used deformable registration algorithms: B-Splines free form deformations (B-Splines FFD), different variants of the Demons and TV-L1 optical flow. The evaluation procedure includes quantitative assessment of the dedicated artificial deformations, target registration error calculation, 3D contour propagation and medical experts visual judgment. The results demonstrate that the currently, practically applied image registration (rigid registration and B-Splines FFD) are not able to correctly reconstruct discontinuous deformation fields. We show that the symmetric Demons provide the most accurate soft tissues alignment in terms of the ability to reconstruct the deformation field, target registration error and relative tumor volume change, while B-Splines FFD and TV-L1 optical flow are not an appropriate choice for the breast tumor bed localization problem

  6. Quantitative image analysis of cellular heterogeneity in breast tumors complements genomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yinyin; Failmezger, Henrik; Rueda, Oscar M; Ali, H Raza; Gräf, Stefan; Chin, Suet-Feung; Schwarz, Roland F; Curtis, Christina; Dunning, Mark J; Bardwell, Helen; Johnson, Nicola; Doyle, Sarah; Turashvili, Gulisa; Provenzano, Elena; Aparicio, Sam; Caldas, Carlos; Markowetz, Florian

    2012-10-24

    Solid tumors are heterogeneous tissues composed of a mixture of cancer and normal cells, which complicates the interpretation of their molecular profiles. Furthermore, tissue architecture is generally not reflected in molecular assays, rendering this rich information underused. To address these challenges, we developed a computational approach based on standard hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections and demonstrated its power in a discovery and validation cohort of 323 and 241 breast tumors, respectively. To deconvolute cellular heterogeneity and detect subtle genomic aberrations, we introduced an algorithm based on tumor cellularity to increase the comparability of copy number profiles between samples. We next devised a predictor for survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer that integrated both image-based and gene expression analyses and significantly outperformed classifiers that use single data types, such as microarray expression signatures. Image processing also allowed us to describe and validate an independent prognostic factor based on quantitative analysis of spatial patterns between stromal cells, which are not detectable by molecular assays. Our quantitative, image-based method could benefit any large-scale cancer study by refining and complementing molecular assays of tumor samples.

  7. Phylloedes tumor of breast: findings at mammography, sonography and color Doppler imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kun Choon; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Kim, Young Hwan; Choi, Hye Yong; Baek, Seung Yon; Yoon, Jeong Hyun

    1994-01-01

    The phylloides tumor of the breast is rare. the purposes of this study were to find the characteristic findings at mammography, sonography, and color Doppler imaging and to evaluate the usefulness of color Doppler study as an additional modality in the diagnosis of phylloides tumor and differentiation between benign and malignant varieties. Eight cases, who were pathologically proven as pylloides tumors, were retrospectively studied. The findings at histologic examination suggested benign in five, malignantin two, and borderline in one. We analyzed the mammograms of all eight patients and sonogram and color Doppler images of four patients. Phylloides tumors were seen as dense masses with lobulated margins in mammograms. On sonography, they showed relatively well-defined masses with in homogenous internal echo pattern and central echogenic areas. They were characterized by the presence of arterial and venous flows in the center and periphery of the lesion on color Doppler imaging and spectral analysis. We conclude that mammographic, sonographic and even color Doppler findings are not predictive of benign or malignant nature of the phylloides tumor. However, mammography and sonography with color Doppler interrogation are helpful in the diagnosis of phylloides tumor

  8. 99mTc-glycopeptide: Synthesis, biodistribution and imaging in breast tumor-bearing rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, I-C.; Tsao Ning; Huang Yahui; Ho Yensheng; Wu Chungchin; Yu Dongfang; Yang, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to develop a glycopeptide (GP) to be used as a carrier for anti-cancer drug delivery. GP was synthesized by conjugating glutamate peptide and chitosan using carbodiimide as a coupling agent. Elemental analysis and capillary electrophoresis confirmed the purity was >95%. GP was labeled with sodium pertechnetate (Na 99m TcO 4 ) for in vitro and in vivo studies. Rhenium-GP was synthesized to support the binding site of 99m Tc at the glutamate positions 3-5. In vitro cellular uptake of 99m Tc-GP was performed in breast cancer cells. Cytosol had 60% whereas nucleus had 40% uptake of 99m Tc-GP. When cancer cells were incubated with glutamate or aspartate, followed by 99m Tc-GP, there was decreased uptake in cells treated with glutamate but not aspartate. The findings indicated that cellular uptake of 99m Tc-GP was via glutamate transporters. In addition, 99m Tc-GP was able to measure uptake differences after cells treated with paclitaxel. Biodistribution and planar imaging were conducted in breast tumor-bearing rats. Biodistribution of 99m Tc-GP showed increased tumor-to-tissue ratios as a function of time. Planar images confirmed that 99m Tc-GP could assess tumor uptake changes after paclitaxel treatment. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that GP could target tumor cells, thus, GP may be a useful carrier for anti-cancer drug delivery

  9. Quantitative diffusion weighted imaging parameters in tumor and peritumoral stroma for prediction of molecular subtypes in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ting; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Peng; Li, Hui; Zhang, Juan; Shao, Guoliang; Li, Lihua

    2018-03-01

    Breast cancer can be classified into four molecular subtypes of Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2 and Basal-like, which have significant differences in treatment and survival outcomes. We in this study aim to predict immunohistochemistry (IHC) determined molecular subtypes of breast cancer using image features derived from tumor and peritumoral stroma region based on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). A dataset of 126 breast cancer patients were collected who underwent preoperative breast MRI with a 3T scanner. The apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were recorded from DWI, and breast image was segmented into regions comprising the tumor and the surrounding stromal. Statistical characteristics in various breast tumor and peritumoral regions were computed, including mean, minimum, maximum, variance, interquartile range, range, skewness, and kurtosis of ADC values. Additionally, the difference of features between each two regions were also calculated. The univariate logistic based classifier was performed for evaluating the performance of the individual features for discriminating subtypes. For multi-class classification, multivariate logistic regression model was trained and validated. The results showed that the tumor boundary and proximal peritumoral stroma region derived features have a higher performance in classification compared to that of the other regions. Furthermore, the prediction model using statistical features, difference features and all the features combined from these regions generated AUC values of 0.774, 0.796 and 0.811, respectively. The results in this study indicate that ADC feature in tumor and peritumoral stromal region would be valuable for estimating the molecular subtype in breast cancer.

  10. Molecular imaging of neutropilin-1 receptor using photoacoustic spectroscopy in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cao, Minsong; Liu, Bo; Miller, Kathy D.; Guo, Lili

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to develop and test a molecular probe that can detect the expression of neutropilin-1 receptor (NPR-1) in vivo using fluorescence imaging and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: NPR-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and some breast cancer cells, and binds to vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF165, a growth factor associated with pathological tumor angiogenesis. This receptor is coexpressed with VEGFR2 and shown to enhance the binding of VEGF165; therefore, it has the potential to be used as a marker of angiogenic activity and targeted for therapy. Material and Methods: A peptide specific to NPR-1 receptor was synthesized and conjugated to a NIR fluorochrome (IRDye800CW) and was intravenously injected into mice with breast tumors (MCF7VEGF). Probe kinetics was monitored in vivo via near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) within an optical imager for up to 72 hours within the tumor and compared to other organs (liver, muscle) for binding specificity. A multivariate fitting algorithm was used to spectrally deconvolve the IRDye800CW from endogenous hemoglobin signature (hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation). Results: Dynamics of the NIR fluorescence signal within the first hour after injection indicates specific binding compared to muscle, with an average tumor-to-muscle ration of 2.00 (+/- 0.27). Spectral analysis clearly indentified the presence of the NPR-1 probe. Based on calibration data, the average tumor concentration from both NIRF and PCT-S was measured to be ~200-300nM. Conclusion: These preliminary results show the capability of PCT to image an exogenous probe in vivo in addition to its hemoglobin state.

  11. Computer-aided global breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy: performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Zheng, Bin; Cheng, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used increasingly in breast cancer diagnosis and assessment of cancer treatment efficacy. In this study, we applied a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to automatically segment breast regions depicting on MR images and used the kinetic image features computed from the global breast MR images acquired before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to build a new quantitative model to predict response of the breast cancer patients to the chemotherapy. To assess performance and robustness of this new prediction model, an image dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 151 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy was retrospectively assembled and used. Among them, 63 patients had "complete response" (CR) to chemotherapy in which the enhanced contrast levels inside the tumor volume (pre-treatment) was reduced to the level as the normal enhanced background parenchymal tissues (post-treatment), while 88 patients had "partially response" (PR) in which the high contrast enhancement remain in the tumor regions after treatment. We performed the studies to analyze the correlation among the 22 global kinetic image features and then select a set of 4 optimal features. Applying an artificial neural network trained with the fusion of these 4 kinetic image features, the prediction model yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.83+/-0.04. This study demonstrated that by avoiding tumor segmentation, which is often difficult and unreliable, fusion of kinetic image features computed from global breast MR images without tumor segmentation can also generate a useful clinical marker in predicting efficacy of chemotherapy.

  12. 99mTc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-FROP peptide for MCF-7 breast tumor targeting and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadpour, Sajjad; Noaparast, Zohreh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2018-02-19

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the world. Development of novel tumor-specific radiopharmaceuticals for early breast tumor diagnosis is highly desirable. In this study we developed 99m Tc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-Lys-FROP peptide with the ability of specific binding to MCF-7 breast tumor. The FROP-1 peptide was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC) and labeled with 99m Tc using tricine/EDDA co-ligand. The cellular specific binding of 99m Tc-HYNIC-FROP was evaluated on different cell lines as well as with blocking experiment on MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma). The tumor targeting and imaging of this labeled peptide were performed on MCF-7 tumor bearing mice. Radiochemical purity for 99m Tc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-FROP was 99% which was determined with ITLC method. This radiolabeled peptide showed high stability in normal saline and serum about 98% which was monitored with HPLC method. In saturation binding experiments, the binding constant (K d ) to MCF-7 cells was determined to be 158 nM. Biodistribution results revealed that the 99m Tc-HYNIC-FROP was mainly exerted from urinary route. The maximum tumor uptake was found after 30 min post injection (p.i.); however maximum tumor/muscle ratio was seen at 15 min p.i. The tumor uptake of this labeled peptide was specific and blocked by co-injection of excess FROP. According to the planar gamma imaging result, tumor was clearly visible due to the tumor uptake of 99m Tc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-FROP in mouse after 15 min p.i. The 99m Tc-HYNIC-(tricine/EDDA)-FROP is considered a promising probe with high specific binding to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  13. Investigation of Metastatic Breast Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression Using Dual Optical/SPECT Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antich, Peter P; Constantinescu, Anca; Lewis, Matthew; Mason, Ralph; Richer, Edmond

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our project is to image tumor growth, metastatic development and vascular changes, both to characterize tumor dynamics during growth for application in diagnostic and prognostic imaging...

  14. Differential expression of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers for imaging in male and female breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen F Vermeulen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5-1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with female breast cancer. METHODS: Tissue microarrays containing 133 male breast cancer and 32 gynecomastia cases were stained by immunohistochemistry for a panel of membrane-bound targets and compared with data on 266 female breast cancers. RESULTS: Growth factor receptors were variably expressed in 4.5% (MET up to 38.5% (IGF1-R of male breast cancers. Compared to female breast cancer, IGF1-R and carbonic anhydrase 12 (CAXII were more frequently and CD44v6, MET and FGFR2 less frequently expressed in male breast cancer. Expression of EGFR, HER2, CAIX, and GLUT1 was not significantly different between male and female breast cancer. Further, 48.1% of male breast cancers expressed at least one and 18.0% expressed multiple growth factor receptors. Since individual membrane receptors are expressed in only half of male breast cancers, a panel of membrane markers will be required for molecular imaging strategies to reach sensitivity. A potential panel of markers for molecular imaging, consisting of EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, CD44v6, CAXII, GLUT1, and CD44v6 was positive in 77% of male breast cancers, comparable to female breast cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Expression patterns of growth factor receptors and hypoxia membrane proteins in male breast cancer are different from female breast cancer. For molecular imaging strategies, a putative panel consisting of markers for EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, GLUT1, CAXII, CD44v6 was positive in 77% of cases and might be considered for development of

  15. The Contribution of Three-Dimensional Power Doppler Imaging in the Preoperative Assessment of Breast Tumors: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kalmantis

    2009-01-01

    Methods. One hundred and twenty five women with clinically or mammographically suspicious findings were referred for 3D Power Doppler ultrasound prior to surgery. Histological diagnosis was conducted after surgery and compared with ultrasound findings. Sonographic criteria used for breast cancer diagnosis were based on a system that included morphological characteristics and criteria of the vascular pattern of a breast mass by Power Doppler imaging. Results. Seventy-two lesions were histopathologically diagnosed as benign and 53 tumors as malignant. Three-dimensional ultrasound identified 49 out of 53 histologically confirmed breast cancers resulting in a sensitivity of 92.4% and a specificity of 86.1% in diagnosing breast malignancy (PPV: 0.83, NPV:0.94. Conclusions. 3D ultrasonography is a valuable tool in identifying preoperatively the possibility of a tumor to be malignant.

  16. Value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the breast for the differentiation of fat necrosis and tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerner, Jonas; Krug, Kathrin Barbara [University Hospital Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Malter, Wolfram [University Hospital Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Markiefka, Birgid [University Hospital Cologne (Germany). Inst. of Pathology

    2018-02-15

    In rare cases the differentiation of tumor recurrence and fat necrosis in patients with breast-conserving surgery with or without radiotherapy can be challenging. In such cases magnetic resonance imaging features, in particular strong vs. faint contrast enhancement and diffusion restriction vs. non-restriction can help to characterize such lesions.

  17. Computer-based image studies on tumor nests mathematical features of breast cancer and their clinical prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Wei; Qu, Ai-Ping; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Chen, Chuang; Sun, Sheng-Rong; Hu, Ming-Bai; Liu, Juan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The expending and invasive features of tumor nests could reflect the malignant biological behaviors of breast invasive ductal carcinoma. Useful information on cancer invasiveness hidden within tumor nests could be extracted and analyzed by computer image processing and big data analysis. Tissue microarrays from invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 202) were first stained with cytokeratin by immunohistochemical method to clearly demarcate the tumor nests. Then an expert-aided computer analysis system was developed to study the mathematical and geometrical features of the tumor nests. Computer recognition system and imaging analysis software extracted tumor nests information, and mathematical features of tumor nests were calculated. The relationship between tumor nests mathematical parameters and patients' 5-year disease free survival was studied. There were 8 mathematical parameters extracted by expert-aided computer analysis system. Three mathematical parameters (number, circularity and total perimeter) with area under curve >0.5 and 4 mathematical parameters (average area, average perimeter, total area/total perimeter, average (area/perimeter)) with area under curve nests could be a useful parameter to predict the prognosis of early stage breast invasive ductal carcinoma.

  18. Phyllodes tumor of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubells, M.; Uixera, I.; Miranda, V.; Gil de Ramales, V.; Bulto, J. A.; Mendez, M.; Morcillo, E.

    1999-01-01

    To study the phyllodes tumors of the breast diagnosed in our hospital, assessing the clinical, mammographic, ultrasonographic and color Doppler ultrasound findings. A retrospective study was carried out of 20 histologically diagnosed cases of phyllodes tumor of the breast over a 20-year period, taking into account patient age, clinical signs, mammographic and ultrasonographic findings, surgical treatment and recurrences. The clinical presentation was that of a palpable, usually painless, mass with a firm, elastic consistency. Mammographic images showed a lesion of homogeneous density and well-defined, round or lobulated margins. Two tumors contained large calcifications associated with previous fibroadenoma. Ultrasound revealed a slightly enhanced solid nodule of homogeneous echogenicity. Color Doppler ultrasound disclosed the presence of hypervascularization. The lesions were treated by surgical enucleation with follow-up examination every 6 months. Recurrences were treated by radical mastectomy. The phyllodes tumor of the breast is difficult to diagnose because of its similarity to the fibroadenoma. However, it should be suspected in the presence of a late-developing, rapidly growing mass. Mammography and breast ultrasound are of diagnostic utility, but the definitive diagnosis requires biopsy. (Author) 12 refs

  19. [Fluorine-18 labeled androgens and progestins; imaging agents for tumors of prostate and breast]: Technical progress report, February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzenellenbogen, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This project develops fluorine-18 labeled steroids that possess high binding affinity and selectivity for androgen and progesterone receptors and can be used as positron-emission tomographic imaging agents for prostate tumors and breast tumors, respectively. These novel diagnostic agents may enable an accurate estimation of tumor dissemination, such as metastasis of prostate cancer and lymph node involvement of breast cancer, and an in vivo determination of the endocrine responsiveness of these tumors. They will provide essential information for the selection of alternative therapies thereby improving the management of prostate and breast cancer patients. 14 refs., 1 tab

  20. The development of fluoroandrogens and fluoroprogestins as potential imaging agents for receptor-positive prostate and breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, S.J.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The assay of progesterone receptor (PR) concentration in breast tumors and androgen receptor (AR) concentration in prostate tumors enables hormone responsive neoplasms to be distinguished from those that are non-responsive. In principle, a positron-emitting progestin or androgen with suitably high affinity and selectivity for PR and AR, respectively, and an adequately high specific activity might provide a means for imaging receptor-positive tumors and quantifying their receptor content in vivo. The use of fluorine-18 as a radiolabel, coupled with the use of positron emission transaxial tomography, appears to be a most favorable approach in the development of receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo imaging. Therefore, we have begun a systematic investigation of the development of fluorine-substituted androgens and progestins that might be prepared in F-18 labeled form as probes for AR and PR. (author)

  1. Dual in vivo Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Imaging of HER2 Expression in Breast Tumors for Diagnosis, Margin Assessment, and Surgical Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Maeda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker-specific imaging probes offer ways to improve molecular diagnosis, intraoperative margin assessment, and tumor resection. Fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging probes are of particular interest for clinical applications because the combination enables deeper tissue penetration for tumor detection while maintaining imaging sensitivity compared to a single optical imaging modality. Here we describe the development of a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeting imaging probe to visualize differential levels of HER2 expression in a breast cancer model. Specifically, we labeled trastuzumab with Black Hole Quencher 3 (BHQ3 and fluorescein for photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging of HER2 overexpression, respectively. The dual-labeled trastuzumab was tested for its ability to detect HER2 overexpression in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated an over twofold increase in the signal intensity for HER2-overexpressing tumors in vivo, compared to low–HER2-expressing tumors, using photoacoustic imaging. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of detecting tumors and positive surgical margins by fluorescence imaging. These results suggest that multimodal HER2-specific imaging of breast cancer using the BHQ3-fluorescein trastuzumab enables molecular-level detection and surgical margin assessment of breast tumors in vivo. This technique may have future clinical impact for primary lesion detection, as well as intraoperative molecular-level surgical guidance in breast cancer.

  2. Discriminating between benign and malignant breast tumors using 3D convolutional neural network in dynamic contrast enhanced-MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2017-03-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are the state-of-the-art deep learning network architectures that can be used in a range of applications, including computer vision and medical image analysis. It exhibits a powerful representation learning mechanism with an automated design to learn features directly from the data. However, the common 2D CNNs only use the two dimension spatial information without evaluating the correlation between the adjoin slices. In this study, we established a method of 3D CNNs to discriminate between malignant and benign breast tumors. To this end, 143 patients were enrolled which include 66 benign and 77 malignant instances. The MRI images were pre-processed for noise reduction and breast tumor region segmentation. Data augmentation by spatial translating, rotating and vertical and horizontal flipping is applied to the cases to reduce possible over-fitting. A region-of-interest (ROI) and a volume-of-interest (VOI) were segmented in 2D and 3D DCE-MRI, respectively. The enhancement ratio for each MR series was calculated for the 2D and 3D images. The results for the enhancement ratio images in the two series are integrated for classification. The results of the area under the ROC curve(AUC) values are 0.739 and 0.801 for 2D and 3D methods, respectively. The results for 3D CNN which combined 5 slices for each enhancement ratio images achieved a high accuracy(Acc), sensitivity(Sens) and specificity(Spec) of 0.781, 0.744 and 0.823, respectively. This study indicates that 3D CNN deep learning methods can be a promising technology for breast tumor classification without manual feature extraction.

  3. A novel duct-lobular segmentectomy for breast tumors with nipple discharge using near-infrared indocyanine green fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A 44-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with pathological nipple discharge from her left breast. Ultrasonography revealed a solid tumor beneath her left areola that measured 17 mm in diameter with a dilated mammary duct. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed an early-enhanced cystic tumor and a dilated mammary duct. We performed a duct-lobular segmentectomy using near-infrared indocyanine green (ICG-fluorescence imaging. Under general anesthesia, a silicone tube was inserted into an orifice of a fluid-discharging mammary duct, and 1 mL dye-fluorescence liquid containing ICG and indigo carmine was injected into the mammary duct. A periareolar incision was made, and the fluorescence image of the demarcated mammary duct segment was obtained. The mammary duct segment was dissected, along with the demarcation line. The cystic lesion and dilated mammary duct were fully resected, and the pathological diagnosis was intraductal papilloma of the breast. We report that near-infrared ICG fluorescence could be applied for imaging of the mammary duct segment, and the fluorescence image allowed for easier duct-lobular segmentectomy for nipple discharge.

  4. [Contrastive study on conventional ultrasound, compression elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Ping; Deng, Jin; Tian, Shuangming; Qian, Ying; Wu, Xiaomin; Ma, Shuhua; Li, Jiale

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of conventional ultrasound, compression elastography (CE) and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors. A total of 98 patients with liver lesions were included in the study. The images of conventional ultrasound, CE and the values of virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) of breast lesions were obtained. The diagnostic performance of conventional ultrasound, CE and ARFI were assessed by using pathology as the gold standard, and then evaluate the diagnosis efficiency of these three approaches in differential diagnosing benign and malignant breast tumors. The specificity, sensitivity and accuracy in the diagnosis of malignant breast tumors for conventional ultrasound were 80.0%, 81.1% and 81.7%, respectively, whereas for CE elastic score were 85.7%, 86.7% and 86.3%, respectively. With a cutoff value of 3.71 for the SR, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy in diagnosis of malignant breast tumors were 97.1%, 83.3% and 88.4%, respectively. With a cutoff value of 3.78 m/s for VTQ, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy in diagnosis of malignant breast tumors were 94.3%, 91.7% and 92.6%, respectively. The difference in diagnosis efficiency among ARFI, CE and conventional ultrasound in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors was significant (Pbenign and malignant breast tumors. But the diagnosis efficiency of ARFI is superior to CE and conventional ultrasound. The three approaches can help each other in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors.

  5. Comparative analysis of full-field digital mammography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of malignant breast tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chuan; Meng Xiaochun; Kong Qingcong; Wang Xiaohong; Zhang Jiansheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively compare the efficacy of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of mammary cancer. Methods: 93 cases suspected mammary lesions both received FFDM and MRI examinations. Compared with pathology, we analyzed the imaging features of mammary cancer in these two methods and investigated the capability of these two methods in mammary cancer diagnosis. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of positive cases, predictive value of negative cases and accuracy of FFDM in mammary cancer were 84.48%, 80.00%, 87.50%, 75.68% and 82.80% respectively; the detection rate for multi-focus was 55.56%. And the detection rate for microcalcifications in FFDM examination (29/69) was much higher than in MR/(7/69). The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of positive cases, predictive value of negative cases and accuracy of MR/in mammary cancer diagnosis were 94.82%, 97.14%, 98.21%, 91.89% and 95.69%, respectively; the detection rate for multi-focus was 83.33%. The spiculate margin, ringed enhancement of the peripheral part of tumor and the fast-in-and-fast-out type of the time-signal intensity curve were the diagnostic signs of breast cancer. Conclusion: FFDM was sensitive for breast microcalcifications and could be feasible for breast cancer screening. MR/had a high sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis, which could be effective for pre-operation estimation. (authors)

  6. Efficacy of dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using echo-planar imaging in differential diagnosis of breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Ayako

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging is a useful method in differentiating malignant breast tumors from benign lesions. Invasive breast carcinomas enhance more rapidly than benign lesions such as fibroadenomas, papillomas, and proliferative fibrocystic diseases. However, significant overlap in the dynamic profile of benign and malignant lesions may occur, resulting in relatively low specificity, which is an inherent limitation of this technique. The author attempted to improve diagnostic accuracy by utilizing dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC-MRI) with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence. Twenty-two patients underwent DSC-MRI using a 1.5-T unit (Magnetom Vision, Siemens). Images were obtained before, during and after the bolus injection of 20 mL of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The signal reduction rate within the first 30 seconds (ΔRT2) was calculated by the following equation: ΔRT2 = (postcontrast signal intensity-precontrast signal intensity) /precontrast signal intensity. A rapid, strong decrease in signal intensity was observed on the first pass of the contrast material in all cases of carcinoma, whereas no or only a minimal decrease in signal intensity was observed in all but one of the benign lesions. This method seems to be more accurate than T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging in the differentiation benign and malignant breast lesions. Since DSC-MRI can be performed quickly, subsequent conventional T1-weighted imaging can provide additional information about the morphologic features of lesions, to further support the diagnosis. In conclusion, DSC-MRI seems to be a promising method for the accurate preoperative assessment of breast lesions. (author)

  7. Efficacy of dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using echo-planar imaging in differential diagnosis of breast tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Ayako [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-07-01

    It has been shown that T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging is a useful method in differentiating malignant breast tumors from benign lesions. Invasive breast carcinomas enhance more rapidly than benign lesions such as fibroadenomas, papillomas, and proliferative fibrocystic diseases. However, significant overlap in the dynamic profile of benign and malignant lesions may occur, resulting in relatively low specificity, which is an inherent limitation of this technique. The author attempted to improve diagnostic accuracy by utilizing dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC-MRI) with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence. Twenty-two patients underwent DSC-MRI using a 1.5-T unit (Magnetom Vision, Siemens). Images were obtained before, during and after the bolus injection of 20 mL of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The signal reduction rate within the first 30 seconds ({Delta}RT2) was calculated by the following equation: {Delta}RT2 (postcontrast signal intensity-precontrast signal intensity) /precontrast signal intensity. A rapid, strong decrease in signal intensity was observed on the first pass of the contrast material in all cases of carcinoma, whereas no or only a minimal decrease in signal intensity was observed in all but one of the benign lesions. This method seems to be more accurate than T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging in the differentiation benign and malignant breast lesions. Since DSC-MRI can be performed quickly, subsequent conventional T1-weighted imaging can provide additional information about the morphologic features of lesions, to further support the diagnosis. In conclusion, DSC-MRI seems to be a promising method for the accurate preoperative assessment of breast lesions. (author)

  8. Accurate and reproducible invasive breast cancer detection in whole-slide images: A Deep Learning approach for quantifying tumor extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gilmore, Hannah; Basavanhally, Ajay; Feldman, Michael; Ganesan, Shridar; Shih, Natalie N. C.; Tomaszewski, John; González, Fabio A.; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing ability to routinely and rapidly digitize whole slide images with slide scanners, there has been interest in developing computerized image analysis algorithms for automated detection of disease extent from digital pathology images. The manual identification of presence and extent of breast cancer by a pathologist is critical for patient management for tumor staging and assessing treatment response. However, this process is tedious and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. For computerized methods to be useful as decision support tools, they need to be resilient to data acquired from different sources, different staining and cutting protocols and different scanners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of a deep learning-based method to automatically identify the extent of invasive tumor on digitized images. Here, we present a new method that employs a convolutional neural network for detecting presence of invasive tumor on whole slide images. Our approach involves training the classifier on nearly 400 exemplars from multiple different sites, and scanners, and then independently validating on almost 200 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our approach yielded a Dice coefficient of 75.86%, a positive predictive value of 71.62% and a negative predictive value of 96.77% in terms of pixel-by-pixel evaluation compared to manually annotated regions of invasive ductal carcinoma.

  9. A Quantitative Diffuse Reflectance Imaging (QDRI) System for Comprehensive Surveillance of the Morphological Landscape in Breast Tumor Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brandon S; Schindler, Christine E; Brown, Jonathon Q; Wilke, Lee G; Mulvey, Christine S; Krieger, Marlee S; Gallagher, Jennifer; Geradts, Joseph; Greenup, Rachel A; Von Windheim, Jesko A; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing effort to address the clear clinical unmet needs surrounding breast conserving surgery (BCS), our group has developed a next-generation multiplexed optical-fiber-based tool to assess breast tumor margin status during initial surgeries. Specifically detailed in this work is the performance and clinical validation of a research-grade intra-operative tool for margin assessment based on diffuse optical spectroscopy. Previous work published by our group has illustrated the proof-of-concept generations of this device; here we incorporate a highly optimized quantitative diffuse reflectance imaging (QDRI) system utilizing a wide-field (imaging area = 17 cm(2)) 49-channel multiplexed fiber optic probe, a custom raster-scanning imaging platform, a custom dual-channel white LED source, and an astronomy grade imaging CCD and spectrograph. The system signal to noise ratio (SNR) was found to be greater than 40 dB for all channels. Optical property estimation error was found to be less than 10%, on average, over a wide range of absorption (μa = 0-8.9 cm(-1)) and scattering (μs' = 7.0-9.7 cm(-1)) coefficients. Very low inter-channel and CCD crosstalk was observed (2% max) when used on turbid media (including breast tissue). A raster-scanning mechanism was developed to achieve sub-pixel resolution and was found to be optimally performed at an upsample factor of 8, affording 0.75 mm spatially resolved diffuse reflectance images (λ = 450-600 nm) of an entire margin (area = 17 cm(2)) in 13.8 minutes (1.23 cm(2)/min). Moreover, controlled pressure application at the probe-tissue interface afforded by the imaging platform reduces repeated scan variability, providing operative time scales with improved sensitivity to regions of focal disease that may otherwise be overlooked.

  10. A Quantitative Diffuse Reflectance Imaging (QDRI System for Comprehensive Surveillance of the Morphological Landscape in Breast Tumor Margins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S Nichols

    Full Text Available In an ongoing effort to address the clear clinical unmet needs surrounding breast conserving surgery (BCS, our group has developed a next-generation multiplexed optical-fiber-based tool to assess breast tumor margin status during initial surgeries. Specifically detailed in this work is the performance and clinical validation of a research-grade intra-operative tool for margin assessment based on diffuse optical spectroscopy. Previous work published by our group has illustrated the proof-of-concept generations of this device; here we incorporate a highly optimized quantitative diffuse reflectance imaging (QDRI system utilizing a wide-field (imaging area = 17 cm(2 49-channel multiplexed fiber optic probe, a custom raster-scanning imaging platform, a custom dual-channel white LED source, and an astronomy grade imaging CCD and spectrograph. The system signal to noise ratio (SNR was found to be greater than 40 dB for all channels. Optical property estimation error was found to be less than 10%, on average, over a wide range of absorption (μa = 0-8.9 cm(-1 and scattering (μs' = 7.0-9.7 cm(-1 coefficients. Very low inter-channel and CCD crosstalk was observed (2% max when used on turbid media (including breast tissue. A raster-scanning mechanism was developed to achieve sub-pixel resolution and was found to be optimally performed at an upsample factor of 8, affording 0.75 mm spatially resolved diffuse reflectance images (λ = 450-600 nm of an entire margin (area = 17 cm(2 in 13.8 minutes (1.23 cm(2/min. Moreover, controlled pressure application at the probe-tissue interface afforded by the imaging platform reduces repeated scan variability, providing <1% variation across repeated scans of clinical specimens. We demonstrate the clinical utility of this device through a pilot 20-patient study of high-resolution optical parameter maps of the ratio of the β-carotene concentration to the reduced scattering coefficient. An empirical cumulative

  11. Intravital multiphoton imaging reveals multicellular streaming as a crucial component of in vivo cell migration in human breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsialou, Antonia; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Liu, Huiping; Clarke, Michael; Condeelis, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. Cell migration is an essential component of almost every step of the metastatic cascade, especially the early step of invasion inside the primary tumor. In this report, we have used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize the different migration patterns of human breast tumor cells in live primary tumors. We used xenograft tumors of MDA-MB-231 cells as well as a low passage xenograft tumor from orthotopically injected patient-derived breast tumor cells. Direct visualization of human tumor cells in vivo shows two patterns of high-speed migration inside primary tumors: a. single cells and b. multicellular streams (i.e., cells following each other in a single file but without cohesive cell junctions). Critically, we found that only streaming and not random migration of single cells was significantly correlated with proximity to vessels, with intravasation and with numbers of elevated circulating tumor cells in the bloodstream. Finally, although the two human tumors were derived from diverse genetic backgrounds, we found that their migratory tumor cells exhibited coordinated gene expression changes that led to the same end-phenotype of enhanced migration involving activating actin polymerization and myosin contraction. Our data are the first direct visualization and assessment of in vivo migration within a live patient-derived breast xenograft tumor. PMID:25013744

  12. Primary extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Srivastava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma (EES is a rare soft tissue tumor that is morphologically indistinguishable from skeletal ES. We report a case of a 25-year-old female with recurrent EES/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of right breast with imaging findings on mammogram, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging breast, and positron emission tomography–computed tomography.

  13. A Simplified Approach to Measure the Effect of the Microvasculature in Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging Applied to Breast Tumors: Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, Jose R; Goa, Pål E; Sjøbakk, Torill E; Østlie, Agnes; Fjøsne, Hans E; Bathen, Tone F

    2016-11-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative change of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) at low- and medium-b-value regimens as a surrogate marker of microcirculation, to study its correlation with dynamic contrast agent-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-derived parameters, and to assess its potential for differentiation between malignant and benign breast tumors. Materials and Methods Ethics approval and informed consent were obtained. From May 2013 to June 2015, 61 patients diagnosed with either malignant or benign breast tumors were prospectively recruited. All patients were scanned with a 3-T MR imager, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and DCE MR imaging. Parametric analysis of DWI and DCE MR imaging was performed, including a proposed marker, relative enhanced diffusivity (RED). Spearman correlation was calculated between DCE MR imaging and DWI parameters, and the potential of the different DWI-derived parameters for differentiation between malignant and benign breast tumors was analyzed by dividing the sample into equally sized training and test sets. Optimal cut-off values were determined with receiver operating characteristic curve analysis in the training set, which were then used to evaluate the independent test set. Results RED had a Spearman rank correlation of 0.61 with the initial area under the curve calculated from DCE MR imaging. Furthermore, RED differentiated cancers from benign tumors with an overall accuracy of 90% (27 of 30) on the test set with 88.2% (15 of 17) sensitivity and 92.3% (12 of 13) specificity. Conclusion This study presents promising results introducing a simplified approach to assess results from a DWI protocol sensitive to the intravoxel incoherent motion effect by using only three b values. This approach could potentially aid in the differentiation, characterization, and monitoring of breast pathologies. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. Investigation of Metastatic Breast Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression Using Dual Optical/SPECT Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antich, Peter P

    2006-01-01

    .... The proposed training plan will lead to advanced skills in research design, data management and analysis and in working with interdisciplinary research teams to improve outcomes of care of patients with breast cancer...

  15. Differentiation between benign phyllodes tumors and fibroadenomas of the breast on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitani, Takeshi, E-mail: kamitani@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Matsuo, Yoshio, E-mail: yymatsuo@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yabuuchi, Hidetake, E-mail: yabuuchi@shs.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Fujita, Nobuhiro, E-mail: n-fujita@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Nagao, Michinobu, E-mail: minagao@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Imaging and Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kawanami, Satoshi, E-mail: kawanami_01@mac.com [Department of Molecular Imaging and Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yonezawa, Masato, E-mail: ymasato@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yamasaki, Yuzo, E-mail: yyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tokunaga, Eriko, E-mail: eriko@surg2.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery and Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); and others

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that contribute to the differentiation between phyllodes tumors (PTs) and fibroadenomas (FAs) on MR imaging. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 19 PTs and 18 FAs with ≥2 cm diameter. The presence or absence of a capsule and internal septum, the extent of lobulation, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were determined. The presence or absence of a cystic component, the time–intensity curve, and the signal intensity on delayed-phase contrast-enhanced T1WI were also evaluated in 31 patients (16 PTs and 17 FAs) who underwent a contrast-enhanced study. Results: Cystic components were seen in 10 of the 16 PTs (63%) and in 4 of the 17 FAs (24%; P = 0.03). The PTs showed strong lobulation more frequently compared to the FAs (14/19 [74%] vs. 7/18 [39%], respectively; P = 0.04). Though there was no significant difference, PT tended to be heterogeneous more frequently on the delayed phase of the contrast-enhanced T1WI compared to the FA (11/16 [69%] vs. 7/17 [41%], respectively). No significant difference was found in the other findings. Conclusions: Although PTs and FAs show similar MR findings, the presence of a cystic component, strong lobulation, and heterogeneity on delayed-phase contrast-enhanced T1WI suggests a PT.

  16. Differentiation between benign phyllodes tumors and fibroadenomas of the breast on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Takeshi; Matsuo, Yoshio; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Nagao, Michinobu; Kawanami, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Masato; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Tokunaga, Eriko

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that contribute to the differentiation between phyllodes tumors (PTs) and fibroadenomas (FAs) on MR imaging. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 19 PTs and 18 FAs with ≥2 cm diameter. The presence or absence of a capsule and internal septum, the extent of lobulation, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were determined. The presence or absence of a cystic component, the time–intensity curve, and the signal intensity on delayed-phase contrast-enhanced T1WI were also evaluated in 31 patients (16 PTs and 17 FAs) who underwent a contrast-enhanced study. Results: Cystic components were seen in 10 of the 16 PTs (63%) and in 4 of the 17 FAs (24%; P = 0.03). The PTs showed strong lobulation more frequently compared to the FAs (14/19 [74%] vs. 7/18 [39%], respectively; P = 0.04). Though there was no significant difference, PT tended to be heterogeneous more frequently on the delayed phase of the contrast-enhanced T1WI compared to the FA (11/16 [69%] vs. 7/17 [41%], respectively). No significant difference was found in the other findings. Conclusions: Although PTs and FAs show similar MR findings, the presence of a cystic component, strong lobulation, and heterogeneity on delayed-phase contrast-enhanced T1WI suggests a PT

  17. Breast cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, M.; Villena, C.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in female breast imaging have substantially influenced the diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of breast cancer in the past few years. Mammography using conventional or digital technique is considered the gold standard for the early detection of breast cancer. Other modalities such as breast ultrasound and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast play an important role in diagnostic imaging, staging, and follow-up of breast cancer. Percutaneous needle biopsy is a faster, less invasive, and more cost-effective method than surgical biopsy for verifying the histological diagnosis. New methods such as breast tomosynthesis, contrast-enhanced mammography, and positron emission tomography promise to further improve breast imaging. Further studies are mandatory to adapt these new methods to clinical needs and to evaluate their performance in clinical practice. (orig.) [de

  18. Microwave Breast Imaging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Rubæk, Tonny

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the applicability of microwave radiation for breast cancer detection. Microwave imaging systems are categorized based on their hardware architecture. The advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques are discussed. The fundamental tradeoffs are indicated between...... various requirements to be fulfilled in the design of an imaging system for breast cancer detection and some strategies to overcome these limitations....

  19. Optical Imaging of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2011-01-01

    As the increased prevalence of breast cancer and the advances in breast evaluation awareness have resulted in an increased number of breast examinations and benign breast biopsies, several investigations have been performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy for breast lesions. Optical imaging of the breast that uses nearinfrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue is a novel non-invasive imaging technique to characterize breast lesions in clinical practice. This review provides a summary of the current state of optical breast imaging and it describes the basic concepts of optical imaging, the potential clinical applications for breast cancer imaging and its potential incorporation with other imaging modalities

  20. Brca1/p53 deficient mouse breast tumor hemodynamics during hyperoxic respiratory challenge monitored by a novel wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Tromberg, Bruce; Cerussi, Albert; Choi, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Current imaging modalities allow precise visualization of tumors but do not enable quantitative characterization of the tumor metabolic state. Such quantitative information would enhance our understanding of tumor progression and response to treatment, and to our overall understanding of tumor biology. To address this problem, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument which combines two optical imaging modalities, spatially modulated imaging (MI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm × 5 cm) field of view. Using MI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are estimated using a Monte Carlo model. From the spatial maps of local absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, tissue composition information is extracted in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. Using LSI, the reflectance of a 785 nm laser speckle pattern on the tissue is acquired and analyzed to compute maps of blood perfusion in the tissue. Tissue metabolism state is estimated from the values of blood perfusion, volume and oxygenation state. We currently are employing the WiFI instrument to study tumor development in a BRCA1/p53 deficient mice breast tumor model. The animals are monitored with WiFI during hyperoxic respiratory challenge. At present, four tumors have been measured with WiFI, and preliminary data suggest that tumor metabolic changes during hyperoxic respiratory challenge can be determined.

  1. Combined approach of perioperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging and intraoperative 18F-FDG handheld gamma probe detection for tumor localization and verification of complete tumor resection in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knopp Michael V

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT has become an established method for detecting hypermetabolic sites of known and occult disease and is widely used in oncology surgical planning. Intraoperatively, it is often difficult to localize tumors and verify complete resection of tumors that have been previously detected on diagnostic PET/CT at the time of the original evaluation of the cancer patient. Therefore, we propose an innovative approach for intraoperative tumor localization and verification of complete tumor resection utilizing 18F-FDG for perioperative PET/CT imaging and intraoperative gamma probe detection. Methods Two breast cancer patients were evaluated. 18F-FDG was administered and PET/CT was acquired immediately prior to surgery. Intraoperatively, tumors were localized and resected with the assistance of a handheld gamma probe. Resected tumors were scanned with specimen PET/CT prior to pathologic processing. Shortly after the surgical procedure, patients were re-imaged with PET/CT utilizing the same preoperatively administered 18F-FDG dose. Results One patient had primary carcinoma of breast and a metastatic axillary lymph node. The second patient had a solitary metastatic liver lesion. In both cases, preoperative PET/CT verified these findings and demonstrated no additional suspicious hypermetabolic lesions. Furthermore, intraoperative gamma probe detection, specimen PET/CT, and postoperative PET/CT verified complete resection of the hypermetabolic lesions. Conclusion Immediate preoperative and postoperative PET/CT imaging, utilizing the same 18F-FDG injection dose, is feasible and image quality is acceptable. Such perioperative PET/CT imaging, along with intraoperative gamma probe detection and specimen PET/CT, can be used to verify complete tumor resection. This innovative approach demonstrates promise for assisting the oncologic surgeon in localizing and

  2. Intra-operative Cerenkov Imaging for Guiding Breast Cancer Surgery and Assessing Tumor Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    application, 13/492,606 • One travel award to attend WMIC in Dublin (2012) • One class taught as lead instructor ( Mechatronics system ) • Three classes...paraffin- embedded tissue: five years on. Cytometry. 1989;10:229–241. 15. Meng LJ, Fu G, Roy EJ, Suppe B, Chen CT. An ultrahigh resolution SPECT system for...residual cancer. This grant aims to develop a system to assess tumor margins during surgery, with the eventual goal of reducing re-excision surgery

  3. Pathogenesis and progression of fibroepithelial breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arno

    2006-01-01

    Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumor are fibroepithelial breast tumors. These tumors are biphasic, i.e. they are composed of stroma and epithelium. The behavior of fibroadenomas is benign, whereas phyllodes tumors can recur and even metastasize. Classification criteria for both tumors show considerable

  4. Noninvasive imaging of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medarova, Z.

    2009-01-01

    With the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies, it is highly advantageous to be able to determine their efficacy, to improve overall patient survival. Non-invasive imaging techniques are currently available for visualizing different pathological conditions of the human body, but their use for cancer monitoring is limited due to the lack of tumor-specific imaging probes. This review will attempt to summarize the current clinical diagnostic approaches for breast cancer detection, staging, and therapy assessment. In addition, I will present some novel concepts from the field of molecular imaging that form the basis of some of our research. We believe that this general imaging strategy has the potential of significantly advancing our ability to diagnose breast cancer at the earliest stages of the pathology, before any overt clinical symptoms have developed, as well as to better direct the development of molecularly-targeted individualized therapy protocols.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Local Tumor Staging in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: A Comparison With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, Johannes; Nagarajah, James; Buchbender, Christian; Hoffmann, Oliver; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael; Poeppel, Thorsten; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H; Umutlu, Lale; Kinner, Sonja

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast for lesion detection and local tumor staging of patients with primary breast cancer in comparison to PET/computed tomography (CT) and MRI. The study was approved by the local institutional review board. Forty-nine patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in our study. All patients underwent a PET/CT, and subsequently, a contrast-enhanced PET/MRI of the breast after written informed consent was obtained before each examination. Two radiologists independently evaluated the corresponding data sets (PET/CT, PET/MRI, and MRI) and were instructed to identify primary tumors lesions as well as multifocal/multicentric and bilateral disease. Furthermore, the occurrence of lymph node metastases was assessed, and the T-stage for each patient was determined. Histopathological verification of the local tumor extent and the axillary lymph node status was available for 30 of 49 and 48 of 49 patients, respectively. For the remaining patients, a consensus characterization was performed for the determination of the T-stage and nodal status, taking into account the results of clinical staging, PET/CT, and PET/MRI examinations. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in diagnostic performance between the different imaging procedures. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Positron emission tomography/MRI and MRI correctly identified 47 (96%) of the 49 patients with primary breast cancer, whereas PET/CT enabled detection of 46 (94%) of 49 breast cancer patients and missed a synchronous carcinoma in the contralateral breast in 1 patient. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, no significant differences could be obtained between the 3 imaging procedures for the identification of primary breast cancer lesions (P > 0.05). Positron emission tomography/MRI and

  6. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  7. Análise computacional da textura de tumores de mama em imagens por ultrassom de pacientes submetidas a cirurgia conservadora Computer-assisted analysis of breast tumors texture on sonographic images of patients submitted to breast-conserving surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Maria de Azevedo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as características de textura de lesões de mama em imagens por ultrassom de pacientes submetidas a cirurgia conservadora que apresentaram, ou não, recidiva. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: As imagens de ultrassom de 36 pacientes submetidas a cirurgia conservadora, com 12 tendo apresentado recidiva local e 24 que não apresentaram recidiva no local da cirurgia, foram divididas em: 3 malignas na mama oposta, 7 nódulos benignos, 5 hiperplasias atípicas e 9 alterações fibrocísticas. A textura das lesões foi quantificada utilizando-se dez parâmetros calculados da matriz de coocorrência e da curva de complexidade. Análise discriminante linear foi aplicada aos parâmetros para discriminação de lesões de mama em pacientes submetidas a cirurgia conservadora que apresentaram, ou não, recidiva. RESULTADOS: Avaliando-se a capacidade dos parâmetros em distinguir as recidivas do grupo composto por lesões não recidivas benignas e hiperplasias atípicas, obteve-se especificidade de 100%, com valores de acurácia e sensibilidade superiores a 91%. Num segundo teste, foi possível distinguir as cinco hiperplasias, das lesões não recidivas benignas. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar do número reduzido de casos, os resultados obtidos são encorajadores, sugerindo que o uso da quantificação da textura pode auxiliar na diferenciação entre lesões benignas, hiperplasias atípicas e lesões malignas de origem recidiva.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the features of breast lesion texture on sonographic images of patients submitted to breast-conserving surgery, with or without tumor recurrence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sonographic images of 36 patients submitted to conservative surgery for breast cancer, 12 of them with, and 24 without local recurrence, included 3 contralateral malignant lesions, 7 benign lumps (3 cysts and 4 fibroadenomas, 5 atypical hyperplasias and 9 fibrocystic changes. The quantification of features of breast

  8. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of breast tumors with MRI and PET/MRI; Multiparametrische und molekulare Bildgebung von Brusttumoren mit MRT und PET-MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Division fuer Molekulare und Gender Bildgebung, Wien (Austria); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York (United States); State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Florida (United States); Marino, M.A. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Division fuer Molekulare und Gender Bildgebung, Wien (Austria); Policlinico Universitario G. Martino, University of Messina, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Morphologic and Functional Imaging, Messina (Italy); Meyer-Baese, A. [State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Florida (United States); Helbich, T.H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Division fuer Molekulare und Gender Bildgebung, Wien (Austria)

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is an indispensable tool in breast imaging for many indications. Several functional parameters with MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) have been assessed for imaging of breast tumors and their combined application is defined as multiparametric imaging. Available data suggest that multiparametric imaging using different functional MRI and PET parameters can provide detailed information about the hallmarks of cancer and may provide additional specificity. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast comprises established MRI parameters, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), MR proton spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRSI) as well as combinations of radiological and MRI techniques (e.g. PET/CT and PET/MRI) using radiotracers, such as fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast can be performed at different field-strengths (range 1.5-7 T). Emerging parameters comprise novel promising techniques, such as sodium imaging ({sup 23}Na MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRSI), chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as various specific radiotracers. Multiparametric and molecular imaging has multiple applications in breast imaging. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast is an evolving field that will enable improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring for personalized medicine in breast cancer. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) der Brust ist ein etabliertes nichtinvasives bildgebendes Verfahren mit vielfaeltigen Indikationen. In den letzten Jahren wurden zahlreiche funktionelle MRT- und Positronenemissionstomographie(PET)-Parameter in der Brustbildgebung evaluiert, und ihre kombinierte Anwendung ist als multiparametrische Bildgebung definiert. Bisherige Daten legen nahe, dass die multiparametrische Bildgebung mit MRT und PET

  9. Fundamental considerations in the design of fluorine-18 labeled progestins and androgens as imaging agents for receptor-positive tumors of the breast and prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, S.J.; Katzenellenbogen, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A review is given of the structural and functional features which are important in the design and development of imaging agents for the progesterone receptor (PR) and the androgen receptor (AR) directed towards imaging receptor-positive tumors in the breast and prostate respectively. In particular the effects of various substituents on the biological activities and homologous receptor binding of progesterone, testosterone, nortestosterone and dihydrotestosterone are discussed. The effect of fluorine substitution on the affinities of progestins and androgens for their respective receptors is described. Other ligand systems that have high affinity for AR and PR and which may provide good bases for the design of fluorine-substituted imaging agents are also discussed. Finally, previous studies with radiolabelled progestins and androgens are described. (U.K.)

  10. Wide-field lifetime-based FRET imaging for the assessment of early functional distribution of transferrin-based delivery in breast tumor-bearing small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Targeted drug delivery is a critical aspect of successful cancer therapy. Assessment of dynamic distribution of the drug provides relative concentration and bioavailability at the target tissue. The most common approach of the assessment is intensity-based imaging, which only provides information about anatomical distribution. Observation of biomolecular interactions can be performed using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Thus, FRET-based imaging can assess functional distribution and provide potential therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we used wide-field lifetime-based FRET imaging for the study of early functional distribution of transferrin delivery in breast cancer tumor models in small animals. Transferrin is a carrier for cancer drug delivery. Its interaction with its receptor is within a few nanometers, which is suitable for FRET. Alexa Fluor® 700 and Alexa Fluor® 750 were conjugated to holo-transferrin which were then administered via tail vein injection to the mice implanted with T47D breast cancer xenografts. Images were continuously acquired for 60 minutes post-injection. The results showed that transferrin was primarily distributed to the liver, the urinary bladder, and the tumor. The cellular uptake of transferrin, which was indicated by the level of FRET, was high in the liver but very low in the urinary bladder. The results also suggested that the fluorescence intensity and FRET signals were independent. The liver showed increasing intensity and increasing FRET during the observation period, while the urinary bladder showed increasing intensity but minimal FRET. Tumors gave varied results corresponding to their FRET progression. These results were relevant to the biomolecular events that occurred in the animals.

  11. Apparent diffusion coefficients of breast tumors. Clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Soeda, Hiroyasu; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Oda, Yoshinao; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for the differential diagnosis of breast tumors and to determine the relation between ADC and tumor cellularity. One hundred and thirty-six female patients (age range, 17-83 years; average age, 51.7 years) with 140 histologically proven breast tumors underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) using the spin-echo echo-planar technique, and the ADCs of the tumors were calculated using 3 different b values, 0, 500, and 1000 s/mm 2 . The diagnoses consisted of fibroadenoma (FA, n=16), invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified (IDC, n=117), medullary carcinoma (ME, n=3) and mucinous carcinoma (MU, n=4). Tumor cellularity was calculated from surgical specimens. The ADCs of breast tumors and cellularity were compared between different histological types by analysis of variance and Scheffe's post hoc test. The correlation between tumor cellularity and ADC was analyzed by Pearson correlation test. Significant differences were observed in ADCs between FA and all types of cancers (P 2 =0.451). The ADC may potentially help in differentiating benign and malignant breast tumors. Tumor ADC correlates inversely with tumor cellularity. (author)

  12. Contrast-enhanced near-infrared laser mammography with a prototype breast scanner: feasibility study with tissue phantoms and preliminary results of imaging experimental tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, T; Hochmuth, A; Malich, A; Reichenbach, J R; Fleck, M; Kaiser, W A

    2001-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical mammography without contrast has a low specificity. The application of optical contrast medium may improve the performance. The concentration-dependent detectability of a new NIR contrast medium was determined with a prototype optical breast scanner. In vivo imaging of experimental tumors was performed. The NIR contrast agent NIR96010 is a newly synthesized, hydrophilic contrast agent for NIR mammography. A concentration-dependent contrast resolution was determined for tissue phantoms consisting of whole milk powder and gelatin. A central part of the phantoms measuring 2 x 2 cm2 without contrast was replaced with phantom material containing 1 micromol/L to 25 nmol/L NIR96010. The composite phantoms were measured with a prototype NIR breast scanner with lasers of lambda1 = 785 nm and lambda2 = 850 nm wavelength. Intensity profiles and standard deviations of the transmission signal in areas with and without contrast were determined by linear fit procedures. Signal-to-noise ratios and spatial resolution as a function of contrast concentration were determined. Near-infrared imaging of five tumor-bearing SCID mice (MX1 breast adenocarcinoma, tumor diameter 5-10 mm) was performed before and after intravenous application of 2 micromol/kg NIR96010. Spectrometry showed an absorption maximum of the contrast agent at 755 nm. No spectral shifts occurred in protein-containing solution. Signal-to-noise ratio in the transmission intensity profiles ranged from 1.1 at 25 nmol/L contrast to 28 at 1 micromol/L. At concentrations contrast-enhanced images, with better delineation after contrast administration. In postcontrast absorption profiles, a 44.1% +/- 11.3% greater absorption increase was seen in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue. The laser wavelength lambda1 of the prototype laser mammography device was not situated at maximum absorption of the contrast agent NIR96010 but on the descending shoulder of the absorption spectrum. This implies a 20

  13. A methodology for comprehensive breast cancer Ki67 labeling index with intra-tumor heterogeneity appraisal based on hexagonal tiling of digital image analysis data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancoulaine, Benoit; Laurinaviciene, Aida; Herlin, Paulette; Besusparis, Justinas; Meskauskas, Raimundas; Baltrusaityte, Indra; Iqbal, Yasir; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2015-10-19

    Digital image analysis (DIA) enables higher accuracy, reproducibility, and capacity to enumerate cell populations by immunohistochemistry; however, the most unique benefits may be obtained by evaluating the spatial distribution and intra-tissue variance of markers. The proliferative activity of breast cancer tissue, estimated by the Ki67 labeling index (Ki67 LI), is a prognostic and predictive biomarker requiring robust measurement methodologies. We performed DIA on whole-slide images (WSI) of 302 surgically removed Ki67-stained breast cancer specimens; the tumour classifier algorithm was used to automatically detect tumour tissue but was not trained to distinguish between invasive and non-invasive carcinoma cells. The WSI DIA-generated data were subsampled by hexagonal tiling (HexT). Distribution and texture parameters were compared to conventional WSI DIA and pathology report data. Factor analysis of the data set, including total numbers of tumor cells, the Ki67 LI and Ki67 distribution, and texture indicators, extracted 4 factors, identified as entropy, proliferation, bimodality, and cellularity. The factor scores were further utilized in cluster analysis, outlining subcategories of heterogeneous tumors with predominant entropy, bimodality, or both at different levels of proliferative activity. The methodology also allowed the visualization of Ki67 LI heterogeneity in tumors and the automated detection and quantitative evaluation of Ki67 hotspots, based on the upper quintile of the HexT data, conceptualized as the "Pareto hotspot". We conclude that systematic subsampling of DIA-generated data into HexT enables comprehensive Ki67 LI analysis that reflects aspects of intra-tumor heterogeneity and may serve as a methodology to improve digital immunohistochemistry in general.

  14. Comprehensive imaging of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body MRI at 1.5 and 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Gerwin P. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: gerwin.schmidt@med.uni-muenchen.de; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Haug, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bauerfeind, Ingo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy for the detection of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body-MRI (WB-MRI) at 1.5 or 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT. Materials and methods: Thirty-three female patients with breast cancer and suspicion of recurrence underwent FDG-PET-CT and WB-MRI. Coronal T1w-TSE- and STIR-sequences, HASTE-imaging of the lungs, contrast-enhanced T1w- and T2w-TSE-sequences of the liver, brain and abdomen were performed, using a WB-MRI-scanner at 1.5 (n = 23) or 3 T (n = 10). Presence of local recurrence, lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease was assessed using clinical and radiological follow-up as a standard of reference. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 20 of 33 patients. Overall 186 malignant foci were detected with WB-MRI and PET-CT. Both modalities revealed two recurrent tumors of the breast. PET-CT detected more lymph node metastases (n = 21) than WB-MRI (n = 16). WB-MRI was more precise in the detection of distant metastases (n = 154 versus n = 147). Sensitivity was 93% (172/186) and 91% (170/186) for WB-MRI and PET-CT, specificity was 86% (66/77) and 90% (69/77), respectively. Examination times for WB-MRI at 1.5 and 3 T were 51 and 43 min, respectively, examination time for PET-CT was 103 min. Conclusion: WB-MRI and PET-CT are useful for the detection of tumor recurrence in the follow-up of breast cancer. WB-MRI is highly sensitive to distant metastatic disease. PET-CT is more sensitive in detecting lymph node involvement. Tumor screening with WB-MRI is feasible at 1.5 and 3 T, scan time is further reduced at 3 T with identical resolution.

  15. Development of a Tc-99m labeled sigma-2 receptor-specific ligand as a potential breast tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok-Rye; Yang, Biao; Ploessl, Karl; Chumpradit, Sumalee; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Acton, Paul D.; Wheeler, Kenneth; Mach, Robert H.; Kung, Hank F.

    2001-01-01

    A novel in vivo imaging agent, 99m Tc labeled [(N-[2-((3'-N'-propyl-[3,3,1]aza-bicyclononan-3α-yl)(2''-methoxy-5- methyl-phenylcarbamate) (2-mercaptoethyl)amino)acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolato] technetium(V) oxide), [ 99m Tc]2, displaying specific binding towards sigma-2 receptors was prepared and characterized. In vitro binding assays showed that the rhenium surrogate of [ 99m Tc]2, Re-2, displayed excellent binding affinity and selectivity towards sigma-2 receptors (K i = 2,723 and 22 nM for sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptor, respectively). Preparation of [ 99m Tc]2 was achieved by heating the S-protected starting material, 1, in the presence of acid, reducing agent (stannous glucoheptonate) and sodium [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate. The lipophilic racemic mixture was successfully prepared in 10 to 50% yield and the radiochemical purity was >98%. Separation of the isomers, peak A and peak B, was successfully achieved by using a chiralpak AD column eluted with an isocratic solvent (n-hexane/isopropanol; 3:1; v/v). The peak A and peak B appear to co-elute with the isomers of the surrogate, Re-2, under the same HPLC condition. Biodistribution studies in tumor bearing mice (mouse mammary adenocarcinoma, cell line 66, which is known to over-express sigma-2 receptors) showed that the racemic [ 99m Tc]2 localized in the tumor. Uptake in the tumor was 2.11, 1.30 and 1.11 %dose/gram at 1, 4 and 8 hr post iv injection, respectively, suggesting good uptake and retention in the tumor cells. The tumor uptake was significantly, but incompletely, blocked (about 25-30% blockage) by co-injection of 'cold' (+)pentazocine or haloperidol (1 mg/Kg). A majority of the radioactivity localized in the tumor tissue was extractable (>60%), and the HPLC analysis showed that it is the original compound, racemic [ 99m Tc]2 (>98% pure). The distribution of the purified peak A and peak B was determined in the same tumor bearing mice at 4 hr post iv injection. The tumor uptake was similar for both isomers

  16. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  17. The Human Cell Surfaceome of Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Júlia Pinheiro Chagas; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Pieprzyk, Martin; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Old, Lloyd J.; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; de Souza, Sandro José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cell surface proteins are ideal targets for cancer therapy and diagnosis. We have identified a set of more than 3700 genes that code for transmembrane proteins believed to be at human cell surface. Methods. We used a high-throuput qPCR system for the analysis of 573 cell surface protein-coding genes in 12 primary breast tumors, 8 breast cell lines, and 21 normal human tissues including breast. To better understand the role of these genes in breast tumors, we used a series of bioinformatics strategies to integrates different type, of the datasets, such as KEGG, protein-protein interaction databases, ONCOMINE, and data from, literature. Results. We found that at least 77 genes are overexpressed in breast primary tumors while at least 2 of them have also a restricted expression pattern in normal tissues. We found common signaling pathways that may be regulated in breast tumors through the overexpression of these cell surface protein-coding genes. Furthermore, a comparison was made between the genes found in this report and other genes associated with features clinically relevant for breast tumorigenesis. Conclusions. The expression profiling generated in this study, together with an integrative bioinformatics analysis, allowed us to identify putative targets for breast tumors. PMID:24195083

  18. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvi Radhakrishna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the breast is primarily used as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. A breast MRI is mainly used for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, to help measure the size of the cancer, look for other tumors in the breast, and to check for tumors in the opposite breast. For certain women at high risk for breast cancer, a screening MRI is recommended along with a yearly mammogram. MRI is known to give some false positive results which mean more test and/or biopsies for the patient. Thus, although breast MRI is useful for women at high risk, it is rarely recommended as a screening test for women at average risk of breast cancer. Also, breast MRI does not show calcium deposits, known as micro-calcifications which can be a sign of breast cancer.

  19. Bone tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeod, R.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of this chapter is on the contribution of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the care of patients with bone neoplasms. These modalities are emphasized because of their relative newness and not because they are considered more significant than the other more established examinations. Routine radiographs remain the most informative and essential imaging procedures for the diagnosis of bone tumors

  20. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  1. Imaging of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaensler, E H.L. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.).

  2. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudgar, Amy V; Mankoff, David A

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine, basing treatment approaches on patient traits and specific molecular features of disease processes, has an important role in the management of patients with breast cancer as targeted therapies continue to improve. PET imaging offers noninvasive information that is complementary to traditional tissue biomarkers, including information about tumor burden, tumor metabolism, receptor status, and proliferation. Several PET agents that image breast cancer receptors can visually demonstrate the extent and heterogeneity of receptor-positive disease and help predict which tumors are likely to respond to targeted treatments. This review presents applications of PET imaging in the targeted treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MRI of breast tumors with emphasis on histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Masako

    1991-01-01

    Breast MR imaging is now expected as the third most important diagnostic modality. The author investigated relationship between signal intensity of T2 weighted images (T2WI) and various pathological findings of 51 mass lesions in 51 female patients. T2WI were not effective in differentiation between malignant and benign lesions. High signal intensity areas defined visually well correlated with pathological tissues with large water content such as necrosis, edema, cyst, and dilatated ducts. There was also good correlation between low signal intensity areas and pathological tissue with less water content such as fibrosis, scar, and hyalinization. Signal intensity measured by tumor/fat ratio had no correlation with water content. It probably indicates that visually defined signal intensity is more reliable than the measured ratio. In conclusion, it is warrented to say that T2WI is a good tool for investigating secondary changes of breast tumors and helpful in diangosis of high intensity tumors described above. (author)

  4. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRIs of breast cancer patients: Impact on tumor size estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Ji Eun; Kim, Sung Hun; Lee, Ah Won

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the degree of background parenchymal enhancement affects the accuracy of tumor size estimation based on breast MRI. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-two patients who had known breast cancer and underwent breast MRIs were recruited in our study. The total number of breast cancer cases was 339. All images were assessed retrospectively for the level of background parenchymal enhancement based on the BI-RADS criteria. Maximal lesion diameters were measured on the MRIs, and tumor types (mass vs. non-mass) were assessed. Tumor size differences between the MRI-based estimates and estimates based on pathological examinations were analyzed. The relationship between accuracy and tumor types and clinicopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: The cases included minimal (47.5%), mild (28.9%), moderate (12.4%) and marked background parenchymal enhancement (11.2%). The tumors of patients with minimal or mild background parenchymal enhancement were more accurately estimated than those of patients with moderate or marked enhancement (72.1% vs. 56.8%; p = 0.003). The tumors of women with mass type lesions were significantly more accurately estimated than those of the women with non-mass type lesions (81.6% vs. 28.6%; p < 0.001). The tumor of women negative for HER2 was more accurately estimated than those of women positive for HER2 (72.2% vs. 51.6%; p = 0.047). Conclusion: Moderate and marked background parenchymal enhancement is related to the inaccurate estimation of tumor size based on MRI. Non-mass type breast cancer and HER2-positive breast cancer are other factors that may cause inaccurate assessment of tumor size

  5. Anti-HER2 immunoliposomes for selective delivery of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging probes to HER2-overexpressing breast tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Scott R.; Macedo, Luciana F.; Barth, Eugene D.; Tkaczuk, Katherine H.; Martin, Stuart S.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Halpern, Howard J.; Brodie, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging is an emerging modality that can detect and localize paramagnetic molecular probes (so-called spin probes) in vivo. We previously demonstrated that nitroxide spin probes can be encapsulated in liposomes at concentrations exceeding 100 mM, at which nitroxides exhibit a concentration-dependent quenching of their EPR signal that is analogous to the self-quenching of fluorescent molecules. Therefore, intact liposomes encapsulating high concentrations of nitroxides exhibit greatly attenuated EPR spectral signals, and endocytosis of such liposomes represents a cell-activated contrast-generating mechanism. After endocytosis, the encapsulated nitroxide is liberated and becomes greatly diluted in the intracellular milieu. This dequenches the nitroxides to generate a robust intracellular EPR signal. It is therefore possible to deliver a high concentration of nitroxides to cells while minimizing background signal from unendocytosed liposomes. We report here that intracellular EPR signal can be selectively generated in a specific cell type by exploiting its expression of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2). When targeted by anti-HER2 immunoliposomes encapsulating quenched nitroxides, Hc7 cells, which are novel HER2-overexpressing cells derived from the MCF7 breast tumor cell line, endocytose the liposomes copiously, in contrast to the parent MCF7 cells or control CV1 cells, which do not express HER2. HER2-dependent liposomal delivery enables Hc7 cells to accumulate 750 μM nitroxide intracellularly. Through the use of phantom models, we verify that this concentration of nitroxides is more than sufficient for EPR imaging, thus laying the foundation for using EPR imaging to visualize HER2-overexpressing Hc7 tumors in animals. PMID:20066490

  6. Multicenter prospective study of magnetic resonance imaging prior to breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Liu, Yinhua; Xu, Ling; Duan, Xuening; Li, Ting; Qin, Naishan; Kang, Hua; Jiang, Hongchuan; Yang, Deqi; Qu, Xiang; Jiang, Zefei; Yu, Chengze

    2014-01-01

    This multicenter prospective study aimed to assess the utility of dynamic enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer. The research subjects were drawn from patients with primary early resectable breast cancer treated in the breast disease centers of six three-level hospitals in Beijing from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012. The participants were allocated to a breast-conserving surgery group (breast-conserving group) or a total mastectomy group (total mastectomy group). Enhanced MRI was used to measure breast volume, longest diameter of tumor and tumor volume. The correlations between these measurements and those derived from histopathologic findings were assessed. The relationships between the success rate of breast-conserving surgery and MRI- and pathology-based measurement results were statistically analyzed in the breast-conserving group. The study included 461 cases in the total mastectomy group and 195 in the breast-conserving group. Allocation to these groups was based on clinical indications and patient preferences. The cut-off for concurrence between MRI- and pathology-based measurements of the longest diameter of tumor was set at 0.3 cm. In the total mastectomy group, the confidence interval for 95% concurrence of these measurements was 35.41%-44.63%. Correlation coefficients for MRI and histopathology-based measurements of breast volume, tumor volume and tumor volume/breast volume ratio were r = 0.861, 0.569, and 0.600, respectively (all P surgery were 100% and 88.54%, respectively. There were significant correlations between dynamic enhanced MRI- and histopathology-based measurements of the longest diameter of breast lesions, breast and tumor volumes, and breast volume/tumor volume ratios. Preoperative MRI examination improves the success rate of breast-conserving surgery.

  7. Gamma-ray detectors for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark B.; Goode, Allen R.; Majewski, Stan; Steinbach, Daniela; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.; Farzanpay, Farzin

    1997-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer of American women and is the leading cause of cancer-related death among women aged 15 - 54; however recent years have shown that early detection using x-ray mammography can lead to a high probability of cure. However, because of mammography's low positive predictive value, surgical or core biopsy is typically required for diagnosis. In addition, the low radiographic contrast of many nonpalpable breast masses, particularly among women with radiographically dense breasts, results in an overall rate of 10% to 25% for missed tumors. Nuclear imaging of the breast using single gamma emitters (scintimammography) such as (superscript 99m)Tc, or positron emitters such as F-18- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for positron emission tomography (PET), can provide information on functional or metabolic tumor activity that is complementary to the structural information of x-ray mammography, thereby potentially reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies and missed cancers. This paper summarizes recent data on the efficacy of scintimammography using conventional gamma cameras, and describes the development of dedicated detectors for gamma emission breast imaging. The detectors use new, high density crystal scintillators and large area position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). Detector design, imaging requirements, and preliminary measured imaging performance are discussed.

  8. Imaging of the Adolescent Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katie N.

    2013-01-01

    The mainstay of breast imaging in the adolescent is ultrasonography. There is occasionally a need for additional imaging, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging of the adolescent breast differs substantially from the adult in both the imaging modalities utilized and the relative likelihood of pathologies encountered. The majority of lesions in the adolescent are benign, but the presence of a breast lesion may cause anxiety to patients and their families due to the wide awareness of breast malignancy in the adult population. It is important to be aware of the imaging modalities available to image the adolescent breast to prevent unnecessary radiation exposure while answering the clinical question. The current recommendations for adolescent diagnostic and screening breast imaging will be reviewed. Benign breast lesions such as fibroadenomas, fibrocystic change, pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia, gynecomastia, and posttraumatic or infectious lesions with their associated imaging findings and management will be outlined. Additionally, review of breast malignancies that can affect adolescents will provide the reader with features to distinguish benign from malignant processes in the adolescent based on imaging findings and clinical presentation. PMID:24872737

  9. Imaging findings of sacral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Sung Hye; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2003-01-01

    The various pathologic conditions detected at CT and MRI and subsumed by the term 'sacral tumor' include primary bone tumors, sacral canal tumors and metastases. Among these, metastases are much more common than primary bone tumors, of which chordoma is the most common. Although the imaging findings of sacral tumors are nonspecific, a patient's age and sex, and specific findings such as calcification or fluid-fluid levels, can help radiologists in their differential diagnosis. We describe the imaging findings of primary sacral tumors, emphasizing the MRI findings

  10. Detecting somatostatin receptor in breast tumor tissue and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongjian; Yu Xian; Lin Wei; Ding Xuan; Huang Shizhang; Lu Guangming

    2002-01-01

    The authors observe the difference of somatostatin receptor (SSR) between benign and malignant breast tumor and the relation between SSR and estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) in breast tumor tissue, and to predict the clinical value of detecting breast tumor by SSR receptor imaging. These tissues excised from operation in breast tumor were divided into 4 groups: breast malignant tumor group (BMTG) and its control group (C1G), breast benign tumor group (BBTG) and its control group (C2G). SSR was detected by radioligand binding assay (RBA) and ER, PR by LsAB method in these groups. Results is: (1) The SSR express quantity is 108.6 +- 67.3 fmol/mg pr, 37.2 +- 9.6 fmol/mg pr, 43.4 +- 12.6 fmol/mg pr 33.9 +- 10.2 fmol/mg pr respectively in BMTG, C1G, BBTG, C2G. The SSR of BMTG is the most among these groups, the difference is obvious, P 0.05); (2) The correlation coefficient of SSR and ER is 0.859, SSR and PR is 0.750. Most breast tumor tissues express high density SSR, the authors suppose that malignant tumor can been distinguished from benign tumor preliminarily by SSR receptor imaging. There is a good correlation between SSR and ER, PR, detecting SSR may predict the quality of tumor and the prognosis of the patient

  11. Bilateral malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast | Odik | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... biphasic tumors, arising from the intra-lobular breast stroma. It constitutes less than 1%of all breast tumors. Bilateralmalignant phyllodes tumor is uncommon.We report a case of 32-year oldmultiparouswoman who died of multi-organ metastatic disease. The diagnosis was based on histology report of the breast specimen.

  12. Augmented reality for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancati, Alberto; Angrigiani, Claudio; Nava, Maurizio B; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Ventrice, Fernando; Dorr, Julio

    2018-02-21

    Augmented reality (AR) enables the superimposition of virtual reality reconstructions onto clinical images of a real patient, in real time. This allows visualization of internal structures through overlying tissues, thereby providing a virtual transparency vision of surgical anatomy. AR has been applied to neurosurgery, which utilizes a relatively fixed space, frames, and bony references; the application of AR facilitates the relationship between virtual and real data. Augmented Breast imaging (ABI) is described. Breast MRI studies for breast implant patients with seroma were performed using a Siemens 3T system with a body coil and a four-channel bilateral phased-array breast coil as the transmitter and receiver, respectively. The contrast agent used was (CA) gadolinium (Gd) injection (0.1 mmol/kg at 2 ml/s) by a programmable power injector. Dicom formated images data from 10 MRI cases of breast implant seroma and 10 MRI cases with T1-2 N0 M0 breast cancer, were imported and transformed into Augmented reality images. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence, 3D cursor use, and joystick fly-through. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) to the breast can improve clinical outcomes, giving an enhanced view of the structures to work on. It should be further studied to determine its utility in clinical practice.

  13. Assessment of breast tumor size in electrical impedance scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungwhan

    2012-01-01

    Electrical impedance scanning (EIS) is a newly introduced imaging technique for early breast cancer detection. In EIS, we apply a sinusoidal voltage between a hand-held electrode and a scanning probe placed on the breast skin to make current travel through the breast. We measure induced currents (Neumann data) through the scanning probe. In this paper, we investigate the frequency-dependent behavior of the induced complex potential and show how the frequency differential of the current measurement on the scanning probe reflects the contrast in complex conductivity values between surrounding and cancerous tissues. Furthermore, we develop the formula for breast tumor size using the frequency differential of the current measurement and provide its feasibility. (paper)

  14. Overdiagnosis in breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andy; Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    The main harm of overdiagnosis is overtreatment. However a form of overdiagnosis also occurs when foci of cancer are found by imaging in addition to the symptomatic lesion when this leads to additional treatment which does not benefit the patient. Even if overtreatment is avoided, knowledge of the diagnosis can still cause psychological harm. Overdiagnosis is an inevitable effect of mammographic screening as the benefit comes from diagnosing breast cancer prior to clinical detectability. Estimates of the rate of overdiagnosis at screening are around 10%. DCIS represents 20% of cancers detected by screening and is the main focus in the overdiagnosis debate. Detection and treatment of low grade DCIS and invasive tubular cancer would appear to represent overdiagnosis in most cases. Supplementary screening with tomosynthesis or US are both likely to increase overdiagnosis as both modalities detect predominantly low grade invasive cancers. MRI causes overdiagnosis because it is so sensitive that it detects real tumour foci which after radiotherapy and systemic therapy do not, in many cases go on and cause local recurrence if the women had had no MRI and undergone breast conservation and adjuvant therapy with these small foci left in situ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The usefulness of US with contrast agent on breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hye An; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hak Hee; Son, Sang Bum; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Jae Mun; Hahn, Sung Tae; Kim, Choon Yul

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of US with contrast agent breast tumors. Fifteen breast tumors in fourteen patients underwent color Doppler US before and after intravenous injection of a microbubble contrast agent (Levovist, Schering AG, Berlin, Germany). Benign lesions were 8 and malignant lesions were 7 among these. Real-time power Doppler ultrasonographic images were recorded on a videotape and representative images were color-printed. Tumor vascularity was analyzed on real-time images in regard to its presence or absence, and changes in diameter and number of vessels, presence or absence of blush around the vessels. Two observers reached a consensus. Results of malignant tumors were compared with those of benign tumors. Color Doppler signal intensity increased in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Number of vessel increased in 9 of 15 cases (60%) and diameter of vessel increased in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Vascular blush around the enhanced vessel was present in 5 of 15 patients (53%). Color Doppler signal increased in 5 of 8 benign lesions (63%) and 7 of 7 malignant lesions (100%). Number of vessel increased in 4 of 8 benign lesion (50%) and 5 of 7 malignant lesions (71%). Diameter of vessel increased in 5 of 8 benign lesions (63%) and 7 of 7 malignant lesions (100%). Blush around the enhanced vessel was present in one of 8 benign lesions (13%) and 4 of 7 malignant lesions (57%). The time to peak enhancement was shorter in malignant cases (mean=45 sec) than benign cases (mean=82 sec). US with contrast agent on breast tumors is effective to detect blood flow within the mass and may be helpful to differentiate malignant from benign lesions.

  16. Soft tissue tumors - imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.

    1985-01-01

    Soft Tissue Tumors - Imaging Methods: Imaging methods play an important diagnostic role in soft tissue tumors concerning a preoperative evaluation of localization, size, topographic relationship, dignity, and metastatic disease. The present paper gives an overview about diagnostic methods available today such as ultrasound, thermography, roentgenographic plain films and xeroradiography, radionuclide methods, computed tomography, lymphography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Besides sonography particularly computed tomography has the most important diagnostic value in soft tissue tumors. The application of a recently developed method, the magnetic resonance imaging, cannot yet be assessed in its significance. (orig.) [de

  17. Breast cancer imaging with mouse monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, P.; Wang Taqui; Unger, M.; Rosenthall, L.

    1989-10-01

    The localization of /sup 111/In-labelled MA5 monoclonal antibody, reactive with a breast tumor associated antigen, was studied in 17 patients. MA5 was selected because (1) it reacts with >95% of primary and metastatic lesions, (2) the recognized antigen is present on the cell surface in vivo and (3) MA5 gives excellent localization in human breast tumor xenografts. Each patient received 2 mg antibody labeled with 5 mCi /sup 111/In and in some cases, 3 mg or 18 mg unlabeled carrier antibody. No serious allergic reactions were noted. There was a large uptake in the liver, less significant uptake in the spleen and bone and minimal accumulation in the bowel. Bone lesions, primary tumors, soft tissue recurrences and lung metastases larger than 3 cm diameter were imaged, while only 1 lesion smaller than 3 cm was detected. Non specific accumulation of tracer was noted at the site of a port-a-cath, in a hematoma, in fibrocystic lesions, and at sites of previous radiation treatment. Extensive fibrosis and poor vascularization characteristic of breast tumors may explain in part the limited sensitivity of the imaging. (orig.).

  18. Breast cancer tumor classification using LASSO method selection approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celaya P, J. M.; Ortiz M, J. A.; Martinez B, M. R.; Solis S, L. O.; Castaneda M, R.; Garza V, I.; Martinez F, M.; Ortiz R, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide among women. Early tumor detection is key in reducing breast cancer deaths and screening mammography is the widest available method for early detection. Mammography is the most common and effective breast cancer screening test. However, the rate of positive findings is very low, making the radiologic interpretation monotonous and biased toward errors. In an attempt to alleviate radiological workload, this work presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD x) method aimed to automatically classify tumor lesions into malign or benign as a means to a second opinion. The CAD x methos, extracts image features, and classifies the screening mammogram abnormality into one of two categories: subject at risk of having malignant tumor (malign), and healthy subject (benign). In this study, 143 abnormal segmentation s (57 malign and 86 benign) from the Breast Cancer Digital Repository (BCD R) public database were used to train and evaluate the CAD x system. Percentile-rank (p-rank) was used to standardize the data. Using the LASSO feature selection methodology, the model achieved a Leave-one-out-cross-validation area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Auc) of 0.950. The proposed method has the potential to rank abnormal lesions with high probability of malignant findings aiding in the detection of potential malign cases as a second opinion to the radiologist. (Author)

  19. Breast cancer tumor classification using LASSO method selection approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celaya P, J. M.; Ortiz M, J. A.; Martinez B, M. R.; Solis S, L. O.; Castaneda M, R.; Garza V, I.; Martinez F, M.; Ortiz R, J. M., E-mail: morvymm@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801, Col. Centro, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide among women. Early tumor detection is key in reducing breast cancer deaths and screening mammography is the widest available method for early detection. Mammography is the most common and effective breast cancer screening test. However, the rate of positive findings is very low, making the radiologic interpretation monotonous and biased toward errors. In an attempt to alleviate radiological workload, this work presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD x) method aimed to automatically classify tumor lesions into malign or benign as a means to a second opinion. The CAD x methos, extracts image features, and classifies the screening mammogram abnormality into one of two categories: subject at risk of having malignant tumor (malign), and healthy subject (benign). In this study, 143 abnormal segmentation s (57 malign and 86 benign) from the Breast Cancer Digital Repository (BCD R) public database were used to train and evaluate the CAD x system. Percentile-rank (p-rank) was used to standardize the data. Using the LASSO feature selection methodology, the model achieved a Leave-one-out-cross-validation area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Auc) of 0.950. The proposed method has the potential to rank abnormal lesions with high probability of malignant findings aiding in the detection of potential malign cases as a second opinion to the radiologist. (Author)

  20. [Tumor and tumor-like benign mesenchymal lesions of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisceglia, M; Nirchio, V; Carosi, I; Cappucci, U; Decata, A; Paragone, T; Di Mattia, A L

    1995-02-01

    All the spectrum is encompassed of those miscellaneous pathologic entities occurring in the mammary stroma which are on record up to date other than "mixed fibroepithelial" tumors (fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumors) and tumors both "pure" and "mixed" originating from myoepithelium (adenomyoepitheliomas and pleomorphic adenomas). Also they were excluded those dysreactive-autoimmune diseases (sarcoidosis, sclerosing lymphocytic lobulitis, lobular granulomatous mastitis) and those inflammatory-infectious conditions (tuberculosis, actinomycosis, foreign body reactions, Mondor's disease) which can mimick breast tumors clinically or on image analysis, but on the contrary not evoking the idea of a tumor on histology. Specifically, inflammatory pseudotumor, myofibroblastoma, leiomyoma, neurinoma/neurofibroma, benign fibrous histiocytoma, hemangiopericytoma, fibromatosis, nodular fascitis, variants of lipoma, mesenchymoma, amartoma and its variants, hemangiomas, pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia of stroma, amyloid tumor, granular cell tumor, are consecutively described and discussed, with a large list of references enclosed to each rubric. Most of the pictures are taken from personally observed lesions of the breast. Only few pictures referred to are from their analogue lesions which occurred in soft parts of other locations, with specific mention of that when it was the case. Of note after reviewing the literature the fact that no glomus tumor, nor Kaposi's sarcoma either sporadic or in the context of any immunodeficiency, nor myelolipoma has been recorded yet.

  1. Genomic Heterogeneity of Breast Tumor Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Shriver, Craig D.; Ellsworth, Darrell L.

    2009-01-01

    Pathological grade is a useful prognostic factor for stratifying breast cancer patients into favorable (low-grade, well-differentiated tumors) and less favorable (high-grade, poorly-differentiated tumors) outcome groups. Under the current system of tumor grading, however, a large proportion of tumors are characterized as intermediate-grade, making determination of optimal treatments difficult. In an effort to increase objectivity in the pathological assessment of tumor grade, differences in chromosomal alterations and gene expression patterns have been characterized in low-grade, intermediate-grade, and high-grade disease. In this review, we outline molecular data supporting a linear model of progression from low-grade to high-grade carcinomas, as well as contradicting genetic data suggesting that low-grade and high-grade tumors develop independently. While debate regarding specific pathways of development continues, molecular data suggest that intermediate-grade tumors do not comprise an independent disease subtype, but represent clinical and molecular hybrids between low-grade and high-grade tumors. Finally, we discuss the clinical implications associated with different pathways of development, including a new clinical test to assign grade and guide treatment options. PMID:20689613

  2. Imaging tumors of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadei, R., E-mail: roberto.casadei@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rinaldi, R. [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, E., E-mail: eugenio.rimondi@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Bianchi, G., E-mail: giuseppe.bianchi@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Patellar tumors are rare; only a few series have been described in the literature and radiographic diagnosis can be challenging. We reviewed all patellar tumors at one institution and reviewed the literature. Materials and methods: In an evaluation of the database at one institution from 1916 to 2009, 23,000 bone tumors were found. Of these, 41 involved the patella. All had imaging studies and microscopic diagnostic confirmation. All medical records, imaging studies, and pathology were reviewed. Results: There were 15 females and 26 males, ranging from 8 to 68 years old (average 30). There were 30 benign tumors; eight giant cell tumors, eight chondroblastomas, seven osteoid osteomas, two aneurysmal bone cysts, two ganglions, one each of chondroma, exostosis, and hemangioma. There were 11 malignant tumors: five hemangioendotheliomas, three metastases, one lymphoma, one plasmacytoma, and one angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Patellar tumors are rare and usually benign. As the patella is an apophysis, the most frequent lesions are giant cell tumor in the adult and chondroblastoma in children. Osteoid osteomas were frequent in our series and easily diagnosed. Metastases are the most frequent malignant diagnoses in the literature; in our series malignant vascular tumors were more common. These lesions are often easily analyzed on radiographs. CT and MR define better the cortex, soft tissue extension, and fluid levels. This study presents the imaging patterns of the more common patellar tumors in order to help the radiologist when confronted with a lesion in this location.

  3. Circulating tumor cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidard, Francois-Clement; Proudhon, Charlotte; Pierga, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decade, technically reliable circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection methods allowed the collection of large datasets of CTC counts in cancer patients. These data can be used either as a dynamic prognostic biomarker or as tumor material for "liquid biopsy". Breast cancer appears to be the cancer type in which CTC have been the most extensively studied so far, with level-of-evidence-1 studies supporting the clinical validity of CTC count in both early and metastatic stage. This review summarizes and discusses the clinical results obtained in breast cancer patients, the issues faced by the molecular characterization of CTC and the biological findings about cancer biology and metastasis that were obtained from CTC. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 3. Erasmus course on magnetic resonance imaging: breast module. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    The third Erasmus Course provides an overwiew of the NMR imaging success of mammary gland cancers. Emphasis is taken on contrast media, postprocessing, technocal problems and pitfalls, as well as the clinical relevance of tumor angiogenesis, histopathology, diagnostic criteria of fast imaging and ultrafast imaging, benign and malignant lesions, prognosis, prosthesis, metastases, multicentricity, chemotherapy and indications of breast cancer

  5. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Aghighi

    Full Text Available Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment.Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a proof of concept for clinical translation of our observations.4T1 tumors showed central areas of high signal on T1 and low signal on T2 weighted MR images, which corresponded to extracellular nanoparticles in a necrotic core on histopathology. MMTV-PyMT tumors showed little change on T1 but decreased signal on T2 weighted images, which correlated to compartmentalized nanoparticles in tumor associated macrophages. Only 4T1 tumors demonstrated significantly increased R1 relaxation rates of the tumor core compared to the tumor periphery (p<0.001. Transendothelial USPIO leakage was significantly higher for 4T1 tumors (3.4±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100cm3 compared to MMTV-PyMT tumors (1.0±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100 cm3. Likewise, ferumoxytol imaging in patients showed similar findings with

  6. Tomosynthesis Breast Imaging Early Detection and Characterization of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamberg, Leena

    2000-01-01

    A digital tomosynthesis mammography method was developed with which to obtain tomographic images of the breast by acquiring a series of low radiation dose images as the x-ray tube moves in an arc above the breast...

  7. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis with a Second-Generation US Contrast Medium in a Rat Breast Tumor Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Nam Kug; Gong, Gyung Yub

    2008-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is an important factor for tumor growth, treatment response and prognosis. Noninvasive imaging methods for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis have been studied, but a method for the quantification of tumor angiogenesis has not been established. This study was designed to evaluate tumor angiogenesis in a rat breast tumor model by the use of a contrast enhanced ultrasound (US) examination with a second-generation US contrast agent. The alkylating agent 19N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of 30-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats. Three to four months later, breast tumors were detected along the mammary lines of the rats. A total of 17 breast tumors larger than 1 cm in nine rats were evaluated by gray-scale US, color Doppler US and contrast-enhanced US using SonoVue. The results were recorded as digital video images; time-intensity curves and hemodynamic parameters were analyzed. Pathological breast tumor specimens were obtained just after the US examinations. The tumor specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and the expression of CD31, an endothelial cell marker, was determined by immunohistochemical staining. We also evaluated the pathological diagnosis of the tumors and the microvessel density (MVD). Spearman's correlation and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for the analysis. The pathological diagnoses were 11 invasive ductal carcinomas and six benign intraductal epithelial proliferations. The MVD did not correlate with the pathological diagnosis. However, blood volume (BV) showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD (Spearman's correlation, p < 0.05). Contrast-enhanced US using a second-generation US contrast material was useful for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis of breast tumors in the rat

  8. Brain Tumor Image Segmentation in MRI Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peni Agustin Tjahyaningtijas, Hapsari

    2018-04-01

    Brain tumor segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. Treatment of patients with brain tumors is highly dependent on early detection of these tumors. Early detection of brain tumors will improve the patient’s life chances. Diagnosis of brain tumors by experts usually use a manual segmentation that is difficult and time consuming because of the necessary automatic segmentation. Nowadays automatic segmentation is very populer and can be a solution to the problem of tumor brain segmentation with better performance. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of MRI-based brain tumor segmentation methods. There are number of existing review papers, focusing on traditional methods for MRI-based brain tumor image segmentation. this paper, we focus on the recent trend of automatic segmentation in this field. First, an introduction to brain tumors and methods for brain tumor segmentation is given. Then, the state-of-the-art algorithms with a focus on recent trend of full automatic segmentaion are discussed. Finally, an assessment of the current state is presented and future developments to standardize MRI-based brain tumor segmentation methods into daily clinical routine are addressed.

  9. CYBPET: a cylindrical PET system for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimian, A. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Nuclear Research Center for Agriculture and Medicine (NRCAM-AEOI), P.O. BOX. (31485-498), Karaj, Iran, Islamic Republic of and Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, University of Rome, La Sapienza, Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: akarimian@nrcam.org; Thompson, C.J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC (Canada); Sarkar, S. [Medical physics Department of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and (RCSTIM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Raisali, G. [Nuclear Research Center for Agriculture and Medicine (NRCAM-AEOI), P.O. BOX. (31485-498), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pani, R. [Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Davilu, H. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sardari, D. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-06-11

    We propose a Cylindrical Breast PET (CYBPET) system for breast imaging with patients in the prone position. An individual pendulous breast is covered by thin plastic to provide reduced pressure fixation and surrounded by the crystals inside the CYBPET ring. Each breast is imaged separately. The rest of the body is shielded properly to minimize the contribution of scattered photons from the other breast and the rest of the body. To compare the CYBPET with whole-body PET (WB-PET) the simulations of CYBPET and a WB-PET (GE-Advance) for a 10 mm tumor inside the breast with a lesion to background (breast) activity concentration of 6 to 1 were made. The noise effective count rate (NECR) of CYBPET is about twice that of WB-PET at activity concentrations less than 3.1 {mu}Ci/cc. The spatial resolution of CYBPET is better by 25% than the WB-PET.

  10. CYBPET: a cylindrical PET system for breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimian, A.; Thompson, C.J.; Sarkar, S.; Raisali, G.; Pani, R.; Davilu, H.; Sardari, D.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a Cylindrical Breast PET (CYBPET) system for breast imaging with patients in the prone position. An individual pendulous breast is covered by thin plastic to provide reduced pressure fixation and surrounded by the crystals inside the CYBPET ring. Each breast is imaged separately. The rest of the body is shielded properly to minimize the contribution of scattered photons from the other breast and the rest of the body. To compare the CYBPET with whole-body PET (WB-PET) the simulations of CYBPET and a WB-PET (GE-Advance) for a 10 mm tumor inside the breast with a lesion to background (breast) activity concentration of 6 to 1 were made. The noise effective count rate (NECR) of CYBPET is about twice that of WB-PET at activity concentrations less than 3.1 μCi/cc. The spatial resolution of CYBPET is better by 25% than the WB-PET

  11. International study on inter-reader variability for circulating tumor cells in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Riethdorf, Sabine; Bidard, François-Clement; Vaucher, Isabelle; Khazour, Mustapha; Rothe, Francoise; Metallo, Jessica; Rouas, Ghizlane; Payne, Rachel E.; Coombes, Raoul Charles; Teufel, Ingrid; Andergassen, Ulrich; Apostolaki, Stella; Politaki, Eleni; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Bessi, Silvia; Pestrin, Martta; di Leo, Angelo; Campion, Michael; Reinholz, Monica; Perez, Edith; Piccart, Martine; Borgen, Elin; Naume, Bjorn; Jimenez, Jose; Aura, Claudia Monica; Zorzino, Laura; Cassatella, Maria Cristina; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Mostert, Bianca; Sleijfer, Stefan; Kraan, Jaco; Janni, Wolfgang; Fehm, Tanja; Rack, Brigitte; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Repollet, Madeline; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Miller, Craig; Sotiriou, Christos; Michiels, Stefan; Pantel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionCirculating tumor cells (CTCs) have been studied in breast cancer with the CellSearch® system. Given the low CTC counts in non-metastatic breast cancer, it is important to evaluate the inter-reader agreement. MethodsCellSearch® images (N = 272) of either CTCs or white blood cells or

  12. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins.

  13. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F; Brussel, Aram SA van; Groep, Petra van der; Morsink, Folkert HM; Bult, Peter; Wall, Elsken van der; Diest, Paul J van

    2012-01-01

    Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6) resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R) that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate

  14. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  15. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  16. Non-invasive thermal IR detection of breast tumor development in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jason R.; Young, Madison A.; Dréau, D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2015-03-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy comprises the treatment of breast cancer for many patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that can be used in real-time to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy. This novel enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8- 10 μm) and selective heating of blood (~0.5 °C) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Post-acquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and is sensitive to the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent and enhanced thermal imaging modalities were used to estimate breast cancer tumor volumes as a function of time in 19 murine subjects over a 30-day study period. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after Day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging and the enhanced IR images, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging is capable monitoring tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses. This novel IR technique could be used to estimate tumor margins in real-time during surgical procedures.

  17. In vivo 31P MR spectroscopy of breast tumors: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Bo Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Suh, Tae Suk; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Jung, Sang Seol

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the various phosphorus metabolism of breast tumors with use of in vivo phosphorus-31 ( 31 P) MR spectroscopy (MRS). Five patients with breast tumor (benign in two, malignant in three) and three normal healthy volunteers participated in this study. All in vivo 31 P MRS examinations were performed on 1.5T whole-body MRI/MRS system by using a Free Induction Decay (FID) pulse sequence. T1-weighted MR images were used for localization of tumors. Peak areas for each phosphorus metabolite were measured using a Marquart algorithm. Breast carcinoma had a substantially larger phosphomonoester (PME) and a smaller phosphocreatine (PCr) peak intensity than normal breast tissue. This was reflected in the relatively higher PME/PCr ratio of breast carcinomas as well as phosphodiester (PDE)/PCr, inorganic phosphate (Pi)/PCr, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)/PCr ratios, compared with normal controls. The mean pH value of breast tumor demonstrating the alkaline nature was higher than that of normal controls. Spectral patterns between benign breast disease and normal breast tissue were quite similar, and differentiation was not established. Our preliminary study suggests that in vivo 31 P MRS is a noninvasive examination which may be useful in the early differentiation of malignant breast tumors from normal and benign conditions. However, normal control and benign conditions could not be characterized on the basis of the phosphorus metabolite ratios

  18. A volume indicator for breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardno, P.A.; Nicoll, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a technique that could measure quickly and accurately the change in breast cancer dimensions would be of particular benefit for elderly women where the first line of treatment in non surgical. Non surgical treatments have varying responses on the individual patient and it is important to establish as early as possible whether or not a tratment is effective. This paper looks at developing a technique that uses a series of parallel ultrasound images (1mm separation), of the breast cancer (in-vivo). These images, obtained using a 7.5 MHz linear array probe are processed to give tumour dimensions using three different methods which rely on thresholding individual images and linking the tumour peices. (author)

  19. Quantification of Estrogen Receptor Expression in Normal Breast Tissue in Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer and Association With Tumor Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, H Evin; Blair, Cindy K; Sweeney, Carol; Salama, Mohamed E

    2017-09-01

    Estrogen exposure is important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and is a contributing risk factor. In this study we quantified estrogen receptor (ER) alpha expression in normal breast epithelium (NBR) in women with breast cancer and correlated it with breast cancer subtypes. Tissue microarrays were constructed from 204 breast cancer patients for whom normal breast tissue away from tumor was available. Slides stained with ER were scanned and expression in normal terminal duct lobular epithelium was quantitated using computer-assisted image analysis. ER expression in normal terminal duct lobular epithelium of postmenopausal women with breast cancer was significantly associated with estrogen and triple (estrogen, progesterone receptors, and HER2) negative phenotypes. Also increased age at diagnosis was significantly associated with ER expression in NBR. ER positivity in normal epithelium did not vary by tumor size, lymph node status, tumor grade, or stage. On the basis of quantitative image analysis, we confirm that ER expression in NBR increases with age in women with breast cancer, and report for the first time, a significant association between ER expression in NBR with ER-negative and triple-negative cancers in postmenopausal women.

  20. Quantum dot loaded immunomicelles for tumor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levchenko Tatyana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical imaging is a promising method for the detection of tumors in animals, with speed and minimal invasiveness. We have previously developed a lipid coated quantum dot system that doubles the fluorescence of PEG-grafted quantum dots at half the dose. Here, we describe a tumor-targeted near infrared imaging agent composed of cancer-specific monoclonal anti-nucleosome antibody 2C5, coupled to quantum dot (QD-containing polymeric micelles, prepared from a polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE conjugate. Its production is simple and involves no special equipment. Its imaging potential is great since the fluorescence intensity in the tumor is twofold that of non-targeted QD-loaded PEG-PE micelles at one hour after injection. Methods Para-nitrophenol-containing (5% PEG-PE quantum dot micelles were produced by the thin layer method. Following hydration, 2C5 antibody was attached to the PEG-PE micelles and the QD-micelles were purified using dialysis. 4T1 breast tumors were inoculated subcutaneously in the flank of the animals. A lung pseudometastatic B16F10 melanoma model was developed using tail vein injection. The contrast agents were injected via the tail vein and mice were depilated, anesthetized and imaged on a Kodak Image Station. Images were taken at one, two, and four hours and analyzed using a methodology that produces normalized signal-to-noise data. This allowed for the comparison between different subjects and time points. For the pseudometastatic model, lungs were removed and imaged ex vivo at one and twenty four hours. Results The contrast agent signal intensity at the tumor was double that of the passively targeted QD-micelles with equally fast and sharply contrasted images. With the side views of the animals only tumor is visible, while in the dorsal view internal organs including liver and kidney are visible. Ex vivo results demonstrated that the agent detects melanoma nodes in a lung

  1. 18F-Fluoride PET/CT tumor burden quantification predicts survival in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Ana E; Santos, Allan; Sasse, André Deeke; Cabello, Cesar; Oliveira, Paulo; Mosci, Camila; Souza, Tiago; Amorim, Barbara; Lima, Mariana; Ramos, Celso D; Etchebehere, Elba

    2017-05-30

    In bone-metastatic breast cancer patients, there are no current imaging biomarkers to identify which patients have worst prognosis. The purpose of our study was to investigate if skeletal tumor burden determined by 18F-Fluoride PET/CT correlates with clinical outcomes and may help define prognosis throughout the course of the disease. Bone metastases were present in 49 patients. On multivariable analysis, skeletal tumor burden was significantly and independently associated with overall survival (p breast cancer patients (40 for primary staging and the remainder for restaging after therapy). Clinical parameters, primary tumor characteristics and skeletal tumor burden were correlated to overall survival, progression free-survival and time to bone event. The median follow-up time was 19.5 months. 18F-Fluoride PET/CT skeletal tumor burden is a strong independent prognostic imaging biomarker in breast cancer patients.

  2. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p < 0.001) and to have marked intensity than were ILC foci (63% IDC vs 32% ILC; p < 0.001). Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging correctly revealed all pathology-proven foci of invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p < 0.0001). Overall, direct-conversion molecular breast imaging showed all known invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular

  3. Comparative Analysis of Logistic Regression, Support Vector Machine and Artificial Neural Network for the Differential Diagnosis of Benign and Malignant Solid Breast Tumors by the Use of Three-Dimensional Power Doppler Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shou Tung; Hsiao, Yi Hsuan; Kuo, Shou Jen; Tseng, Hsin Shun; Wu, Hwa Koon; Chen, Dar Ren; Huang, Yu Len

    2009-01-01

    Logistic regression analysis (LRA), Support Vector Machine (SVM) and a neural network (NN) are commonly used statistical models in computeraided diagnostic (CAD) systems for breast ultrasonography (US). The aim of this study was to clarify the diagnostic ability of the use of these statistical models for future applications of CAD systems, such as three-dimensional (3D) power Doppler imaging, vascularity evaluation and the differentiation of a solid mass. A database that contained 3D power Doppler imaging pairs of non-harmonic and tissue harmonic images for 97 benign and 86 malignant solid tumors was utilized. The virtual organ computer-aided analysis-imaging program was used to analyze the stored volumes of the 183 solid breast tumors. LRA, an SVM and NN were employed in comparative analyses for the characterization of benign and malignant solid breast masses from the database. The values of area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, referred to as Az values for the use of non-harmonic 3D power Doppler US with LRA, SVM and NN were 0.9341, 0.9185 and 0.9086, respectively. The Az values for the use of harmonic 3D power Doppler US with LRA, SVM and NN were 0.9286, 0.8979 and 0.9009, respectively. The Az values of six ROC curves for the use of LRA, SVM and NN for non-harmonic or harmonic 3D power Doppler imaging were similar. The diagnostic performances of these three models (LRA, SVM and NN) are not different as demonstrated by ROC curve analysis. Depending on user emphasis for the use of ROC curve findings, the use of LRA appears to provide better sensitivity as compared to the other statistical models

  4. Image to physical space registration of supine breast MRI for image guided breast surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Rebekah H.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a desirable option for many women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and involves a lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, approximately 50% of eligible women will elect for mastectomy over BCT despite equal survival benefit (provided margins of excised tissue are cancer free) due to uncertainty in outcome with regards to complete excision of cancerous cells, risk of local recurrence, and cosmesis. Determining surgical margins intraoperatively is difficult and achieving negative margins is not as robust as it needs to be, resulting in high re-operation rates and often mastectomy. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) can provide detailed information about tumor margin extents, however diagnostic images are acquired in a fundamentally different patient presentation than that used in surgery. Therefore, the high quality diagnostic MRIs taken in the prone position with pendant breast are not optimal for use in surgical planning/guidance due to the drastic shape change between preoperative images and the common supine surgical position. This work proposes to investigate the value of supine MRI in an effort to localize tumors intraoperatively using image-guidance. Mock intraoperative setups (realistic patient positioning in non-sterile environment) and preoperative imaging data were collected from a patient scheduled for a lumpectomy. The mock intraoperative data included a tracked laser range scan of the patient's breast surface, tracked center points of MR visible fiducials on the patient's breast, and tracked B-mode ultrasound and strain images. The preoperative data included a supine MRI with visible fiducial markers. Fiducial markers localized in the MRI were rigidly registered to their mock intraoperative counterparts using an optically tracked stylus. The root mean square (RMS) fiducial registration error using the tracked markers was 3.4mm. Following registration, the average closest point distance between the MR

  5. PET imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardieri, E.; Crippa, F.

    2001-01-01

    The basis of tumour imaging with PET is a specific uptake mechanism of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Among the potential tracers for breast cancer (fluorodeoxyglucose, methionine, tyrosine, fluoro-estradiol, nor-progesterone), 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with fluorine (FDG) is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical because breast cancer is particularly avid of FDG and 18 F has the advantages of the a relatively long physical half-life. Mammography is the first choice examination in studying breast masses, due to its very good performances, an excellent compliance and the best value regarding the cost/effectiveness aspects. The FDG uptake in tissue correlates with the histological grade and potential aggressiveness of breast cancer and this may have prognostic consequences. Besides the evaluation of breast lesions, FDG-PET shows a great efficacy in staging lymph node involvement prior surgery and this could have a great value in loco-regional staging. Whole body PET provides also information with regard to metastasis localizations both in soft tissue and bone, and plays an important clinical role mainly in detecting recurrent metastatic disease. In fact for its metabolic characteristics PET visualizes regions of enhanced metabolic activity and can complete other imaging modalities based on structural anatomic changes. Even though CT and MRI show superior resolution characteristics, it has been demonstrated that PET provides more accurate information in discriminating between viable tumour, fibrotic scar or necrosis. These statements are coming from the examination of more than 2000 breast cancer detection

  6. SU-E-J-182: A Feasibility Study Evaluating Automatic Identification of Gross Tumor Volume for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R; Palta, M; Chang, Z

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a computerized pharmacokinetic model-free Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) segmentation method based on dynamic contrastenhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data that can improve physician GTV contouring efficiency. Methods: 12 patients with biopsy-proven early stage breast cancer with post-contrast enhanced DCE-MRI images were analyzed in this study. A fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering-based method was applied to segment 3D GTV from pre-operative DCE-MRI data. A region of interest (ROI) is selected by a clinician/physicist, and the normalized signal evolution curves were calculated by dividing the signal intensity enhancement value at each voxel by the pre-contrast signal intensity value at the corresponding voxel. Three semi-quantitative metrics were analyzed based on normalized signal evolution curves: initial Area Under signal evolution Curve (iAUC), Immediate Enhancement Ratio (IER), and Variance of Enhancement Slope (VES). The FCM algorithm wass applied to partition ROI voxels into GTV voxels and non-GTV voxels by using three analyzed metrics. The partition map for the smaller cluster is then generated and binarized with an automatically calculated threshold. To reduce spurious structures resulting from background, a labeling operation was performed to keep the largest three-dimensional connected component as the identified target. Basic morphological operations including hole-filling and spur removal were useutilized to improve the target smoothness. Each segmented GTV was compared to that drawn by experienced radiation oncologists. An agreement index was proposed to quantify the overlap between the GTVs identified using two approaches and a thershold value of 0.4 is regarded as acceptable. Results: The GTVs identified by the proposed method were overlapped with the ones drawn by radiation oncologists in all cases, and in 10 out of 12 cases, the agreement indices were above the threshold of 0.4. Conclusion: The proposed automatic segmentation method was shown to

  7. SU-E-J-182: A Feasibility Study Evaluating Automatic Identification of Gross Tumor Volume for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R; Palta, M; Chang, Z [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a computerized pharmacokinetic model-free Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) segmentation method based on dynamic contrastenhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data that can improve physician GTV contouring efficiency. Methods: 12 patients with biopsy-proven early stage breast cancer with post-contrast enhanced DCE-MRI images were analyzed in this study. A fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering-based method was applied to segment 3D GTV from pre-operative DCE-MRI data. A region of interest (ROI) is selected by a clinician/physicist, and the normalized signal evolution curves were calculated by dividing the signal intensity enhancement value at each voxel by the pre-contrast signal intensity value at the corresponding voxel. Three semi-quantitative metrics were analyzed based on normalized signal evolution curves: initial Area Under signal evolution Curve (iAUC), Immediate Enhancement Ratio (IER), and Variance of Enhancement Slope (VES). The FCM algorithm wass applied to partition ROI voxels into GTV voxels and non-GTV voxels by using three analyzed metrics. The partition map for the smaller cluster is then generated and binarized with an automatically calculated threshold. To reduce spurious structures resulting from background, a labeling operation was performed to keep the largest three-dimensional connected component as the identified target. Basic morphological operations including hole-filling and spur removal were useutilized to improve the target smoothness. Each segmented GTV was compared to that drawn by experienced radiation oncologists. An agreement index was proposed to quantify the overlap between the GTVs identified using two approaches and a thershold value of 0.4 is regarded as acceptable. Results: The GTVs identified by the proposed method were overlapped with the ones drawn by radiation oncologists in all cases, and in 10 out of 12 cases, the agreement indices were above the threshold of 0.4. Conclusion: The proposed automatic segmentation method was shown to

  8. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  9. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author) [pt

  10. Multimodality assessment of breast tumor physiology and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Muhammad; Rosen, Mark; Schultz, Susan; Englander, Sarah; Sehgal, S.; Tomaszewski, M.; Schnall, Mitchell

    2005-04-01

    The objective is to compare power Doppler sonography (PD) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (MR) and PET SUV in assessing the vascularity of benign and malignant breast lesions. Sixty two patients with 89 lesions (59 malignant lesions, 30 benign lesions) were evaluated by PD, MRI (MR) and PET SUV prior to surgery. Each imaging modality was evaluated independently. Lesion vascularity on PD was graded as avascular, intermediately vascular, or hypervascular. On MR, degree of maximal enhancement (minimal, moderate, or marked) and the kinetic pattern of enhancement (persistent, plateau, washout) were graded separately. For malignant lesions, PET SUV values were correlated with MRI kinetics. Gamma variable analysis was performed to assess the degree of correlation. Of the 89 lesions 44 were invasive ductal carcinoma, 2 were intraductal cancers, 6 were invasive lobular carcinoma, and 7 were invasive cancers with mixture of ductal and lobular features. There was a high degree of correlation between degree of maximal enhancement and enhancement kinetics on MRI (G=0.074, pInvasive malignancy demonstrated moderate correlation between SUV and MRI kinetics (G=0.64, p=0.14). There is a variable degree of correlation between various imaging modalities in assessing breast lesion vascularity. Further evaluation on the relationship between subjective reader assessment and objective quantitative image analysis is required to elucidate the differences in these measures of breast tumor physiology. This work was supported in part by the NIH grant P01CA085424-03.

  11. Clinical and ultrasonographic features of male breast tumors: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei-Hsin; Li, Anna Fen-Yau; Chou, Yi-Hong; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Chen, Ying-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine clinical and ultrasonographic characteristics of male breast tumors. The medical records of male patients with breast lesions were retrieved from an electronic medical record database and a pathology database and retrospectively reviewed. A total of 112 men (125 breast masses) with preoperative breast ultrasonography (US) were included (median age, 59.50 years; age range, 15-96 years). Data extracted included patient age, if the lesions were bilateral, palpable, and tender, and the presence of nipple discharge. Breast lesion features on static US images were reviewed by three experienced radiologists without knowledge of physical examination or pathology results, original breast US image interpretations, or surgical outcomes. The US features were documented according to the BI-RADS (Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System) US lexicons. A forth radiologist compiled the data for analysis. Of the 125 breast masses, palpable tender lumps and bilateral synchronous masses were more likely to be benign than malignant (both, 100% vs 0%, P nipples were common in malignant lesions (P nipple, irregular shape, the presence of an echogenic halo, predominantly internal vascularity, and rich color flow signal on color Doppler ultrasound were significantly related to malignancy (all, P < 0.05). An echogenic halo and the presence of rich color flow signal were independent predictors of malignancy. Specific clinical and US characteristics of male breast tumors may help guide treatment, and determine if surgery or conservative treatment is preferable.

  12. ADC mapping of benign and malignant breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhams, R.; Matsunaga, Keiji; Kan, Shinichi; Hata, Hirofumi; Iwabuchi, Keiichi; Kuranami, Masaru; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Ozaki, Masanori

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions and evaluating the detection accuracy of the cancer extension. We used DWI to obtain images of 191 benign and malignant lesions (24 benign, 167 malignant) before surgical excision. The ADC values of the benign and malignant lesions were compared, as were the values of noninvasive ductal carcinoma (NIDC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). We also evaluated the ADC map, which represents the distribution of ADC values, and compared it with the cancer extension. The mean ADC value of each type of lesion was as follows: malignant lesions, 1.22±0.31 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s; benign lesions, 1.67±0.54 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s; normal tissues, 2.09±0.27 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The mean ADC value of the malignant lesions was statistically lower than that of the benign lesions and normal breast tissues. The ADC value of IDC was statistically lower than that of NIDC. The sensitivity of the ADC value for malignant lesions with a threshold of less than 1.6 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s was 95% and the specificity was 46%. A full 75% of all malignant cases exhibited a near precise distribution of low ADC values on ADC maps to describe malignant lesions. The main causes of false negative and underestimation of cancer spread were susceptibility artifact because of bleeding and tumor structure. Major histologic types of false-positive lesions were intraductal papilloma and fibrocystic diseases. Fibrocystic diseases also resulted in overestimation of cancer extension. DWI has the potential in clinical appreciation to detect malignant breast tumors and support the evaluation of tumor extension. However, the benign proliferative change remains to be studied as it mimics the malignant phenomenon on the ADC map. (author)

  13. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukker, Karen; Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V ® ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation

  14. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data.

  15. Alpha-v Integrin Targeted PET Imaging of Breast Cancer Angiogenesis and Low-Dose Metronomic Anti-Angiogenic Chemotherapy Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2006-01-01

    ...) To demonstrate the feasibility of PET/18F-RGD to image breast tumor growth spread and angiogenesis as well as quantifying alpha-v integrin expression level during breast tumor neovascularization over time. (3...

  16. Alpha-v Integrin Targeted PET Imaging of Breast Cancer Angiogenesis and Low-Dose Metronomic Anti-Angiogenic Chemotherapy Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2007-01-01

    ...) To demonstrate the feasibility of PET/18F-RGD to image breast tumor growth spread and angiogenesis as well as quantifying alpha v-integrin expression level during breast tumor neovascularization over time. (3...

  17. Semi-automated delineation of breast cancer tumors and subsequent materialization using three-dimensional printing (rapid prototyping).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Harz, Markus; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Brehm, Barbara; Wacker, Till; Hahn, Horst K; Wagner, Florian; Wittenberg, Thomas; Beckmann, Matthias W; Uder, Michael; Fasching, Peter A; Emons, Julius

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has become widely available, and a few cases of its use in clinical practice have been described. The aim of this study was to explore facilities for the semi-automated delineation of breast cancer tumors and to assess the feasibility of 3D printing of breast cancer tumors. In a case series of five patients, different 3D imaging methods-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), and 3D ultrasound-were used to capture 3D data for breast cancer tumors. The volumes of the breast tumors were calculated to assess the comparability of the breast tumor models, and the MRI information was used to render models on a commercially available 3D printer to materialize the tumors. The tumor volumes calculated from the different 3D methods appeared to be comparable. Tumor models with volumes between 325 mm 3 and 7,770 mm 3 were printed and compared with the models rendered from MRI. The materialization of the tumors reflected the computer models of them. 3D printing (rapid prototyping) appears to be feasible. Scenarios for the clinical use of the technology might include presenting the model to the surgeon to provide a better understanding of the tumor's spatial characteristics in the breast, in order to improve decision-making in relation to neoadjuvant chemotherapy or surgical approaches. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:238-242. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Semiautomated Multimodal Breast Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Curtis

    2012-01-01

    However, due to the highly deformable nature of breast tissues, comparison of 3D and 2D modalities is a challenge. To enable this comparison, a registration technique was developed to map features from 2D mammograms to locations in the 3D image space. This technique was developed and tested using magnetic resonance (MR images as a reference 3D modality, as MR breast imaging is an established technique in clinical practice. The algorithm was validated using a numerical phantom then successfully tested on twenty-four image pairs. Dice's coefficient was used to measure the external goodness of fit, resulting in an excellent overall average of 0.94. Internal agreement was evaluated by examining internal features in consultation with a radiologist, and subjective assessment concludes that reasonable alignment was achieved.

  19. Confocal fluorescence microscopy for rapid evaluation of invasive tumor cellularity of inflammatory breast carcinoma core needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Jessica; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Kyrish, Matthew; Benveniste, Ana Paula; Yang, Wei; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Tissue sampling is a problematic issue for inflammatory breast carcinoma, and immediate evaluation following core needle biopsy is needed to evaluate specimen adequacy. We sought to determine if confocal fluorescence microscopy provides sufficient resolution to evaluate specimen adequacy by comparing invasive tumor cellularity estimated from standard histologic images to invasive tumor cellularity estimated from confocal images of breast core needle biopsy specimens. Grayscale confocal fluorescence images of breast core needle biopsy specimens were acquired following proflavine application. A breast-dedicated pathologist evaluated invasive tumor cellularity in histologic images with hematoxylin and eosin staining and in grayscale and false-colored confocal images of cores. Agreement between cellularity estimates was quantified using a kappa coefficient. 23 cores from 23 patients with suspected inflammatory breast carcinoma were imaged. Confocal images were acquired in an average of less than 2 min per core. Invasive tumor cellularity estimated from histologic and grayscale confocal images showed moderate agreement by kappa coefficient: κ = 0.48 ± 0.09 (p confocal images require less than 2 min for acquisition and allow for evaluation of invasive tumor cellularity in breast core needle biopsy specimens with moderate agreement to histologic images. We show that confocal fluorescence microscopy can be performed immediately following specimen acquisition and could indicate the need for additional biopsies at the initial visit.

  20. Cone-beam volume CT breast imaging: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Biao; Ning Ruola

    2002-01-01

    X-ray projection mammography, using a film/screen combination, or digital techniques, has proven to be the most effective imaging modality currently available for early detection of breast cancer. However, the inherent superimposition of structures makes a small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size) difficult to detect when it is occult or in dense breasts, leading to a high false-positive biopsy rate. Cone-beam x-ray-projection-based volume imaging using flat panel detectors (FPDs) may allow obtaining three-dimensional breast images, resulting in more accurate diagnosis of structures and patterns of lesions while eliminating the hard compression of breasts. This article presents a novel cone-beam volume computed tomographic breast imaging (CBVCTBI) technique based on the above techniques. Through a variety of computer simulations, the key issues of the system and imaging techniques were addressed, including the x-ray imaging geometry and corresponding reconstruction algorithms, x-ray characteristics of breast tissue and lesions, x-ray setting techniques, the absorbed dose estimation, and the quantitative effect of x-ray scattering on image quality. The preliminary simulation results support the proposed CVBCTBI modality for breast imaging in respect to its feasibility and practicability. The absorbed dose level is comparable to that of current mammography and will not be a prominent problem for this imaging technique. Compared to conventional mammography, the proposed imaging technique with isotropic spatial resolution will potentially provide significantly better low-contrast detectability of breast tumors and more accurate location of breast lesions

  1. Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Khalil, Michael A.; Al Abdi, Rabah; Kim, Hyun K.; Fong, Christopher J.; Desperito, Elise; Hershman, Dawn L.; Barbour, Randall L.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold.

  2. Robust linearized image reconstruction for multifrequency EIT of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverman, Gregory; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Kulkarni, Rujuta; Kim, Bong Seok; Isaacson, David; Saulnier, Gary J; Newell, Jonathan C

    2008-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a developing imaging modality that is beginning to show promise for detecting and characterizing tumors in the breast. At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, we have developed a combined EIT-tomosynthesis system that allows for the coregistered and simultaneous analysis of the breast using EIT and X-ray imaging. A significant challenge in EIT is the design of computationally efficient image reconstruction algorithms which are robust to various forms of model mismatch. Specifically, we have implemented a scaling procedure that is robust to the presence of a thin highly-resistive layer of skin at the boundary of the breast and we have developed an algorithm to detect and exclude from the image reconstruction electrodes that are in poor contact with the breast. In our initial clinical studies, it has been difficult to ensure that all electrodes make adequate contact with the breast, and thus procedures for the use of data sets containing poorly contacting electrodes are particularly important. We also present a novel, efficient method to compute the Jacobian matrix for our linearized image reconstruction algorithm by reducing the computation of the sensitivity for each voxel to a quadratic form. Initial clinical results are presented, showing the potential of our algorithms to detect and localize breast tumors.

  3. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ~5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 +/- 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.

  4. Dynamic MRI study for breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Tsuneaki

    1990-01-01

    Application of MRI for diagnosis of breast tumors was retrospectively examined in 103 consecutive cases. Contrast enhancement, mostly by dynamic study, was performed in 83 cases using Gd-DTPA and 0.5 T superconductive apparatus. Results were compared to those of mammography and sonography. On dynamic study, carcinoma showed abrupt rise of signal intensity with clear-cut peak formation in early phase, while benign fibroadenoma showed slow rise of signal intensity and prolonged enhancement without peak formation. In 12 of 33 carcinomas (33%), peripheral ring enhancement was noted reflecting vascular stroma of histologic sections. All fibroadenomas showed homogenous enhancement without peripheral ring. In MRI, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 96%, 91%. In mammography 82%, 95%, 87% and in ultrasonography 91%, 95%, 93%. Although MRI should not be regarded as routine diagnostic procedure because of expense and limited availability, it may afford useful additional information when standard mammographic findings are not conclusive. (author)

  5. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, E., E-mail: emmanuel.brun@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000, France and Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748 (Germany); Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Barbone, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mittone, A.; Coan, P. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748, Germany and Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000 (France)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  6. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, E; Grandl, S; Sztrókay-Gaul, A; Barbone, G; Mittone, A; Gasilov, S; Bravin, A; Coan, P

    2014-11-01

    Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure's possible applications. A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  7. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Sherman, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtype...... stratification might help in the identification and characterization of novel risk factors for breast cancer subtypes. This may eventually result in further improvements in prevention, early detection and treatment.......Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes...... were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations...

  8. Giant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a clinical observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Volchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a case of giant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Phyllodes tumor is a rare type of fibroepithelial tumor composed of epithelial and connective tissue with the predominant development of a connective tissue component. Surgery is the only radical treatment.

  9. Giant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a clinical observation

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Volchenko; D. D. Pak; F. N. Usov; E. Yu. Fetisova

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes a case of giant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Phyllodes tumor is a rare type of fibroepithelial tumor composed of epithelial and connective tissue with the predominant development of a connective tissue component. Surgery is the only radical treatment.

  10. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  11. Highly-sensitive and large-dynamic diffuse optical tomography system for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenwen; Zhang, Limin; Yin, Guoyan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) as a new functional imaging has important clinical applications in many aspects such as benign and malignant breast tumor detection, tumor staging and so on. For quantitative detection of breast tumor, a three-wavelength continuous-wave DOT prototype system combined the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique was developed to provide high temporal resolution, high sensitivity, large dynamic detection range and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, a CT-analogous scanning mode was proposed to cost-effectively increase the detection data. To evaluate the feasibility of the system, a series of assessments were conducted. The results demonstrate that the system can obtain high linearity, stability and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. The preliminary phantom experiments show the absorption coefficient is able to be successfully reconstructed, indicating that the system is one of the ideal platforms for optical breast tumor detection.

  12. Characterization of human breast disease using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis provides the fundamental characterization and differentiation of breast tissues using in vivo and ex vivo MR techniques in the hope that these techniques and experimental findings will be used on a larger scale and in a predictive manner in order to improve the specificity of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this dissertation, clinical studies were performed using proton magnetic resonance imaging and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectro-scopy ( 31 P MRS) to characterize and differentiate malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues in vivo. These studies were carried out following the methodical characterization of chemical extracts of malignant breast tumor, benign breast tumor and normal breast parenchymal surgical tissue specimens using high resolution 31 P MRS. Alterations in breast tissue metabolism, as a result of pathological processes, were postulated to be responsible for measurable differences between malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues using magnetic resonance techniques. (author). 365 refs.; 37 figs.; 25 tabs

  13. MR imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, D P

    1994-11-01

    MR imaging has proved to be an excellent imaging modality in locating free silicone and evaluating an implant for rupture, with a sensitivity of approximately 94% and specificity of 97%. Silicone has a unique MR resonance frequency and long T1 and T2 relaxation times, which allows several MR sequences to provide excellent diagnostic images. The most commonly used sequences include T2-weighted, STIR, and chemical shift imaging (Figs. 3, 13, and 14). The T2-weighted and STIR sequences are often used in conjunction with chemical water suppression. The most reliable findings on MR images for detection of implant rupture include identification of the collapsed implant shell (linguine sign) and free silicone within the breast parenchyma.

  14. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2011-01-01

    that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 appears to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we demonstrate that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence......Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...... hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, based on the fact that TGF-ß1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-ß1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12...

  15. Local curvature analysis for classifying breast tumors: Preliminary analysis in dedicated breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Juhun; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Reiser, Ingrid; Boone, John M.; Lindfors, Karen K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to measure the effectiveness of local curvature measures as novel image features for classifying breast tumors. Methods: A total of 119 breast lesions from 104 noncontrast dedicated breast computed tomography images of women were used in this study. Volumetric segmentation was done using a seed-based segmentation algorithm and then a triangulated surface was extracted from the resulting segmentation. Total, mean, and Gaussian curvatures were then computed. Normalized curvatures were used as classification features. In addition, traditional image features were also extracted and a forward feature selection scheme was used to select the optimal feature set. Logistic regression was used as a classifier and leave-one-out cross-validation was utilized to evaluate the classification performances of the features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, area under curve) was used as a figure of merit. Results: Among curvature measures, the normalized total curvature (C_T) showed the best classification performance (AUC of 0.74), while the others showed no classification power individually. Five traditional image features (two shape, two margin, and one texture descriptors) were selected via the feature selection scheme and its resulting classifier achieved an AUC of 0.83. Among those five features, the radial gradient index (RGI), which is a margin descriptor, showed the best classification performance (AUC of 0.73). A classifier combining RGI and C_T yielded an AUC of 0.81, which showed similar performance (i.e., no statistically significant difference) to the classifier with the above five traditional image features. Additional comparisons in AUC values between classifiers using different combinations of traditional image features and C_T were conducted. The results showed that C_T was able to replace the other four image features for the classification task. Conclusions: The normalized curvature measure

  16. Innovative biomagnetic imaging sensors for breast cancer: A model-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Y.; Golkowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious potential health problem for all women and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The current screening procedures and imaging techniques, including x-ray mammography, clinical biopsy, ultrasound imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging, provide only 73% accuracy in detecting breast cancer. This gives the impetus to explore alternate techniques for imaging the breast and detecting early stage tumors. Among the complementary methods, the noninvasive biomagnetic breast imaging is attractive and promising, because both ionizing radiation and breast compressions that the prevalent x-ray mammography suffers from are avoided. It furthermore offers very high contrast because of the significant electromagnetic properties' differences between the cancerous, benign, and normal breast tissues. In this paper, a hybrid and accurate modeling tool for biomagnetic breast imaging is developed, which couples the electromagnetic and ultrasonic energies, and initial validations between the model predication and experimental findings are conducted.

  17. Avoiding preoperative breast MRI when conventional imaging is sufficient to stage patients eligible for breast conserving therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pengel, Kenneth E., E-mail: k.pengel@nki.nl [Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Loo, Claudette E. [Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wesseling, Jelle [Department of Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pijnappel, Ruud M. [Department of Radiology/Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Rutgers, Emiel J.Th. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A. [Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology/Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Aim: To determine when preoperative breast MRI will not be more informative than available breast imaging and can be omitted in patients eligible for breast conserving therapy (BCT). Methods: We performed an MRI in 685 consecutive patients with 692 invasive breast tumors and eligible for BCT based on conventional imaging and clinical examination. We explored associations between patient, tumor, and conventional imaging characteristics and similarity with MRI findings. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to compute the area under the curve (AUC). Results: MRI and conventional breast imaging were similar in 585 of the 692 tumors (85%). At univariate analysis, age (p < 0.001), negative preoperative lymph node status (p = 0.011), comparable tumor diameter at mammography and at ultrasound (p = 0.001), negative HER2 status (p = 0.044), and absence of invasive lobular cancer (p = 0.005) were significantly associated with this similarity. At multivariate analysis, these factors, except HER2 status, retained significant associations. The AUC was 0.68. Conclusions: It is feasible to identify a subgroup of patients prior to preoperative breast MRI, who will most likely show similar results on conventional imaging as on MRI. These findings enable formulation of a practical consensus guideline to determine in which patients a preoperative breast MRI can be omitted.

  18. Avoiding preoperative breast MRI when conventional imaging is sufficient to stage patients eligible for breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pengel, Kenneth E.; Loo, Claudette E.; Wesseling, Jelle; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Rutgers, Emiel J.Th.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine when preoperative breast MRI will not be more informative than available breast imaging and can be omitted in patients eligible for breast conserving therapy (BCT). Methods: We performed an MRI in 685 consecutive patients with 692 invasive breast tumors and eligible for BCT based on conventional imaging and clinical examination. We explored associations between patient, tumor, and conventional imaging characteristics and similarity with MRI findings. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to compute the area under the curve (AUC). Results: MRI and conventional breast imaging were similar in 585 of the 692 tumors (85%). At univariate analysis, age (p < 0.001), negative preoperative lymph node status (p = 0.011), comparable tumor diameter at mammography and at ultrasound (p = 0.001), negative HER2 status (p = 0.044), and absence of invasive lobular cancer (p = 0.005) were significantly associated with this similarity. At multivariate analysis, these factors, except HER2 status, retained significant associations. The AUC was 0.68. Conclusions: It is feasible to identify a subgroup of patients prior to preoperative breast MRI, who will most likely show similar results on conventional imaging as on MRI. These findings enable formulation of a practical consensus guideline to determine in which patients a preoperative breast MRI can be omitted

  19. The quality of tumor size assessment by contrast-enhanced spectral mammography and the benefit of additional breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbes, Marc B I; Lalji, Ulrich C; Nelemans, Patty J; Houben, Ivo; Smidt, Marjolein L; Heuts, Esther; de Vries, Bart; Wildberger, Joachim E; Beets-Tan, Regina G

    2015-01-01

    Background - Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a promising new breast imaging modality that is superior to conventional mammography for breast cancer detection. We aimed to evaluate correlation and agreement of tumor size measurements using CESM. As additional analysis, we evaluated whether measurements using an additional breast MRI exam would yield more accurate results. Methods - Between January 1(st) 2013 and April 1(st) 2014, 87 consecutive breast cancer cases that underwent CESM were collected and data on maximum tumor size measurements were gathered. In 57 cases, tumor size measurements were also available for breast MRI. Histopathological results of the surgical specimen served as gold standard in all cases. Results - The Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC) of CESM versus histopathology and breast MRI versus histopathology were all >0.9, p1 cm between the two imaging modalities and histopathological results, we did not observe any advantage of performing an additional breast MRI after CESM in any of the cases. Conclusion - Quality of tumor size measurement using CESM is good and matches the quality of these measurement assessed by breast MRI. Additional measurements using breast MRI did not improve the quality of tumor size measurements.

  20. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regine Choe

    Full Text Available Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS, a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63; tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66, and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70. Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography.

  1. Cancer-associated adipocytes promotes breast tumor radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochet, Ludivine; Meulle, Aline [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Imbert, Sandrine [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Salles, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Valet, Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Muller, Catherine, E-mail: muller@ipbs.fr [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Tumor-surrounding adipocytes contribute to breast cancer progression. {yields} Breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance. {yields} Increased in Chk1 phosphorylation is observed in irradiated co-cultivated tumor cells. {yields} IL-6 is over-expressed in tumor cells co-cultivated with adipocytes. {yields} IL-6 exposure confers increased Chk1 phosphorylation and radioresistance in tumor cells. -- Abstract: Mature adipocytes are excellent candidates to influence tumor behavior through heterotypic signaling processes since these cells produce hormones, growth factors, cytokines and other molecules, a heterogeneous group of molecules named adipokines. Using a 2D coculture system, we demonstrate that breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance and an earlier and higher increase in the effector kinase Chk1, a phenotype that was associated with decreased cell death as compared to tumor cells grown alone. Interestingly, the adipocytes-induced tumor changes taking place during the coculture time preceding the exposure to IR were sufficient to confer the radioresistant effect. Notorious among the changes brought by adipocytes was the significant increase of IL-6 expression in tumor cells, whose activity may well account for the observed tumor cell protection from IR toxicity. Indeed, our data confirmed the protective role of this cytokine as tumor cells incubated after irradiation with recombinant IL-6 exhibit an increased in Chk1 phosphorylation and a radioresistant phenotype, thus far recapitulating the effects observed in the presence of adipocytes. Our current study sheds light on a new role of tumor-surrounding adipocytes in fostering a radioresistant phenotype in breast tumors, a finding that might have important clinical implications in obese patients that frequently exhibit aggressive diseases.

  2. Subtraction and dynamic MR images of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Yoshitaka; Aoki, Manabu; Harada, Junta (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic effectiveness of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging in patients with breast masses. In 23 breast cancers and six fibroadenomas, spin echo T1 images were obtained at 0.2 Tesla before and every minute after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 or 0.2 mmol/kg). Subtraction images were obtained sequentially on the CRT monitor. All breast masses were enhanced after gadolinium and stood out as bright lesions on subtraction images. The tumor margin and its extension were more precisely evaluated on subtraction MR images than on conventional postcontrast MR images. Breast cancer showed a characteristic time-intensity curve with an early peak, in contrast to fibroadenoma, which showed a gradual increase in signal intensity. Subtraction MR imaging is a simple method for the evaluation of breast masses, and further, the time-intensity curve obtained by dynamic study is helpful in the differential diagnosis of lesions. (author).

  3. Contrast-enhanced color Doppler ultrasound characteristics in hypervascular breast tumors: comparison with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, L.; Fischer, U.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced color Doppler ultrasound (CE-US) in comparison with contrast-enhanced MR imaging (CE-MRI) in the discrimination of hypervascularized breast tumors. An additional CE-US of the breast was preoperatively performed in 40 patients with a hypervascular breast lesion detected on CE-MRI. The presence of blood flow signals and the morphological characteristics of the vessels in the breast lesions were evaluated pre- and post-contrast administration, as well as the dynamic aspects of the Doppler signal, including time interval to maximum signal enhancement and persistence of the signal enhancement. Twenty-three carcinomas and 17 fibroadenomas were explored. Considering initial signal enhancement > 100 % after the administration of contrast material as a criterion suggesting malignancy, CE-MRI showed a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 76.5 % in the detection of malignant breast tumors. Color Doppler signals were consistently demonstrated in all carcinomas and in 68.7 % of fibroadenomas after the administration of Levovist, with CE-US showing a sensitivity of 95.6 % and a specificity of 5.9 %. Neither the mean number of vessels per tumor, nor the location of vessels, the time to maximum increase of the Doppler signal or the persistence of signal enhancement showed significant differences between benign and malignant lesions. Additional CE-US does not increase the low specificity of MRI in patients with hypervascularized breast tumors. (orig.)

  4. Breast imaging: a surgeon's prospective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Anne M.; Comstock, Christopher; Hoh, Carl K.; Vera, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, gamma camera and intraoperative gamma detection, and computed tomography are employed in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. This paper summarizes the role of each modality from the perspective of the physician responsible for management of the patient's care. An understanding of an imaging modality's current role can provide insights into the design of new applications and diagnostic agents. Moreover, knowledge of the mechanism by which each modality provides clinical information can guide the design of new imaging methods that complement and add certainty to the patient's management. The reader should note the lack of molecular information provided by the current imaging methods. The perspective concludes with a request for an imaging technique that can measure the biologic aggressiveness of a woman's cancer. The surgeon notes that basing the formation of an image on a molecular process would be compatible with current medical practice, which utilizes molecular concepts to base medical decisions. In addition, molecular imaging will enable rapid translation between basic science and medical practice

  5. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Wallace

    Full Text Available Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies.

  6. The Royal College of Radiologists Breast Group breast imaging classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, A.J.; Ridley, N.T.; Rubin, G.; Wallis, M.G.; Gilbert, F.J.; Michell, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Standardisation of the classification of breast imaging reports will improve communication between the referrer and the radiologist and avoid ambiguity, which may otherwise lead to mismanagement of patients. Following wide consultation, Royal College of Radiologists Breast Group has produced a scoring system for the classification of breast imaging. This will facilitate audit and the development of nationally agreed standards for the investigation of women with breast disease. This five-point system is as follows: 1, normal; 2, benign findings; 3, indeterminate/probably benign findings; 4, findings suspicious of malignancy; 5, findings highly suspicious of malignancy. It is recommended that this be used in the reporting of all breast imaging examinations in the UK.

  7. The tumor macroenvironment and systemic regulation of breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, Zafira; Tracy, Kristin; McAllister, Sandra S

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women worldwide and is the most common cause of death for women between 35 and 50 years of age. Women with breast cancer are at risk of developing metastases for their entire lifetime and, despite local and systemic therapies, approximately 30% of breast cancer patients will relapse (Jemal et al., 2010). Nearly all breast cancer related deaths are due to metastatic disease, even though metastasis is considered to be an inefficient process. In some cases, tumor cells disseminate from primary sites at an early stage, but remain indolent for protracted periods of time before becoming overt, life-threatening tumors. Little is known about the mechanisms that cause these indolent tumors to grow into malignant disease. Because of this gap in our understanding, we are unable to predict which breast cancer patients are likely to experience disease relapse or develop metastases years after treatment of their primary tumor. A better understanding of the mechanisms and signals involved in the exit of tumor cells from dormancy would not only allow for more accurate selection of patients that would benefit from systemic therapy, but could also lead to the development of more targeted therapies to inhibit the signals that promote disease progression. In this review, we address the systemic, or "macroenvironmental", contribution to tumor initiation and progression and what is known about how a pro-tumorigenic systemic environment is established.

  8. Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, Z.I.; Sang, Q.A.; Sahab, Z.J.

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Tumors are heterogenous cellular entities composed of cancer cells and cells of the microenvironment in which they reside. A reciprocal dynamic interaction occurs between the tumor cells and their surrounding stroma under physiological and pathological conditions. This tumor-host communication interface mediates the escape of tumor cells at the primary site, survival of circulating cancer cells in the vasculature, and growth of metastatic cancer at secondary site. Each step of the metastatic process is accompanied by recruitment of stromal cells from the microenvironment and production of unique array of growth factors and chemokines. Stromal microenvironment may play active roles in breast cancer metastasis. Elucidating the types of cells recruited and signal pathways involved in the crosstalk between tumor cells and stromal cells will help identify novel strategies for cotargeting cancer cells and tumor stromal cells to suppress metastasis and improve patient outcome

  9. Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa I. Khamis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Tumors are heterogenous cellular entities composed of cancer cells and cells of the microenvironment in which they reside. A reciprocal dynamic interaction occurs between the tumor cells and their surrounding stroma under physiological and pathological conditions. This tumor-host communication interface mediates the escape of tumor cells at the primary site, survival of circulating cancer cells in the vasculature, and growth of metastatic cancer at secondary site. Each step of the metastatic process is accompanied by recruitment of stromal cells from the microenvironment and production of unique array of growth factors and chemokines. Stromal microenvironment may play active roles in breast cancer metastasis. Elucidating the types of cells recruited and signal pathways involved in the crosstalk between tumor cells and stromal cells will help identify novel strategies for cotargeting cancer cells and tumor stromal cells to suppress metastasis and improve patient outcome.

  10. Computer-aided prognosis on breast cancer with hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Mei; Li, Yan; Xu, Jun; Gong, Lei; Wang, Lin-Wei; Liu, Wen-Lou; Liu, Juan

    2017-03-01

    With the advance of digital pathology, image analysis has begun to show its advantages in information analysis of hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images. Generally, histological features in hematoxylin and eosin images are measured to evaluate tumor grade and prognosis for breast cancer. This review summarized recent works in image analysis of hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images for breast cancer prognosis. First, prognostic factors for breast cancer based on hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images were summarized. Then, usual procedures of image analysis for breast cancer prognosis were systematically reviewed, including image acquisition, image preprocessing, image detection and segmentation, and feature extraction. Finally, the prognostic value of image features and image feature-based prognostic models was evaluated. Moreover, we discussed the issues of current analysis, and some directions for future research.

  11. Adjuvant radiotherapy for phyllodes tumor of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, Arthur W.; Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of radiotherapy for the treatment of phyllodes tumors of the breast remains controversial. Adjuvant radiotherapy is often cited in the existing literature as not providing any benefit over surgical treatment alone. The data supporting this belief are anecdotal. There are also anecdotal reports that radiotherapy may have a role in cases wherein the risk of local failure is high. As with breast carcinomas, conservative surgery (wide local excision) for phyllodes tumors is associated with about a 50% local recurrence rate; diffuse or bulky disease and/or malignant histology are also associated with high local failure rates. We are unaware of any series that examines the role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the management of phyllodes tumor of the breast. We present here a retrospective study of eight patients so treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Materials and Methods: Eight patients have been treated with radiotherapy for non-metastatic phyllodes tumor of the breast at MD Anderson Cancer Center between December 1988 and August 1993. All patients were female; the median age was 43 years, with a range of 19 to 62 years. All patients presented with a breast mass, which was associated with pain in one patient, and was ulcerative in three. Results: Tumor size ranged from 3.5 to 16 cm, with a median diameter of 10.4 cm. Six patients had tumors in the upper outer quadrant, and two patients had upper inner tumors. Five patients had malignant tumors, two patients were classified as benign, and one was of indeterminate malignant potential. All five of the malignant tumors displayed stromal overgrowth on pathologic review. The remaining benign and indeterminate tumors lacked this feature. One patient with a benign tumor had a history of two prior recurrences. Primary surgery consisted of either lumpectomy in two patients or mastectomy in six patients. Axillary level I/II lymph node dissections were performed in 5 patients and no involvement was seen

  12. Enhancement and denoising of mammographic images for breast disease detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdani, S.; Yusof, R.; Karimian, A.; Hematian, A.; Yousefi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In these two decades breast cancer is one of the leading cause of death among women. In breast cancer research, Mammographic Image is being assessed as a potential tool for detecting breast disease and investigating response to chemotherapy. In first stage of breast disease discovery, the density measurement of the breast in mammographic images provides very useful information. Because of the importance of the role of mammographic images the need for accurate and robust automated image enhancement techniques is becoming clear. Mammographic images have some disadvantages such as, the high dependence of contrast upon the way the image is acquired, weak distinction in splitting cyst from tumor, intensity non uniformity, the existence of noise, etc. These limitations make problem to detect the typical signs such as masses and microcalcifications. For this reason, denoising and enhancing the quality of mammographic images is very important. The method which is used in this paper is in spatial domain which its input includes high, intermediate and even very low contrast mammographic images based on specialist physician's view, while its output is processed images that show the input images with higher quality, more contrast and more details. In this research, 38 mammographic images have been used. The result of purposed method shows details of abnormal zones and the areas with defects so that specialist could explore these zones more accurately and it could be deemed as an index for cancer diagnosis. In this study, mammographic images are initially converted into digital images and then to increase spatial resolution power, their noise is reduced and consequently their contrast is improved. The results demonstrate effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed methods. (authors)

  13. Usefulness and biological background of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images in patients with primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yutaka; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Sonoo, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images were obtained between September 1998 and May 2000 from 44 primary breast cancer patients who were scheduled to undergo breast-conserving surgery. The MR images and clinico-pathological findings were analyzed to investigate the risk factors for histologically positive margins and histologically positive lymph node metastases. We elucidated the relationship between MR images and the biological background of breast cancer. The following interesting findings were made from these analyses. An irregular shape and unclear border of the tumor mass and the coexistence of daughter nodule(s) were significant risk factors for positive-surgical margins; an irregularly shaped tumor mass and spiculated tumor mass were significant risk factors for positive lymph node metastases; breast tumors with a strand-like appearance had a significantly lower histological grade; breast tumors with high contrast enhancement ratios had a significantly higher nuclear grade and progesterone receptor negativity; and breast tumors showing a ring-like enhancement expressed a low level of VEGF. These findings suggest that preoperative MR images of primary breast cancer provide not only useful information on the extent of breast tumors and the possibility of lymph node metastasis but also on the malignant potency and hormone responsiveness of breast tumors. (author)

  14. Digital Breast Imaging Warehouse for Research and Clinical Decision Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Hong

    2001-01-01

    Breast imaging is used intensively for breast cancer detection. As routine screening examination becomes more popular for women over 40, tremendous amount of breast imaging data has been accumulated...

  15. Morphologic classification of ductal breast tumors on ultrasound : differential diagnosis of benign and malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Mi Sook; Chung, Soo Young; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Myoung Hwan; Yoon, In Sook; Koh, Mi Gyoung

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the morphologic differential diagnosis of benign and malignant ductal breast tumors, as seen on US US findings in 29 pathologically proven cases of ductal breast tumor were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were female and their mean age was 42 years. Nineteen tumors were benign and ten were malignant, and all ductal or cystic lesions showed solid masses. According to the location of the mural nodule, we classified the sonographic appearance of these tumors into three types:intraductal, intracystic and amorphic. The intraductal type was divided into three subtypes:incompletely obstructive, completely obstructive and multiple mural nodules. For the intracystic type, too, three subtypes were designated:the intracystic mural nodule (mural cyst), intracystic mural nodule with the duct (mural cyst+duct) and intracystic multiple mural nodules. The amorphic type is defined as an atypical ductal tumor with the mural nodule extending into adjacent parenchyma. The margin of the duct or cyst was smooth in 68.4% of benign, and irregular in 90% of malignant ductal tumors. Internal echogeneity of the duct or cyst usually showed homogeneity in both benign and malignant tumors. 73.7% of tumors connecting the duct were benign and 50% were malignant. In benign tumors, 52.6% of mural nodule had an irregular margin, while in malignant tumors, the corresponding proportion was 100%;both types usually showed heterogeneous hypoechogeneity. Among benign tumors, the most common morphologic type was the intraductal incompletely obstructive subtype (36.8%);among those that were malignant, the amorphic type was most common, accounting for 40% of tumors. No amorphic type was benign and no incompletely obstructive subtype was malignant. When ductal breast tumors are morphologically classified on the basis of sonographic findings, the intraductal incompletely obstructive subtype suggests benignancy, and the amorphic type, malignancy. The morphologic classification of ductal

  16. [Diagnostic imaging of breast cancer : An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, M

    2016-10-01

    Advances in imaging of the female breast have substantially influenced the diagnosis and probably also the therapy and prognosis of breast cancer in the past few years. This article gives an overview of the most important imaging modalities in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Digital mammography is considered to be the gold standard for the early detection of breast cancer. Digital breast tomosynthesis can increase the diagnostic accuracy of mammography and is used for the assessment of equivocal or suspicious mammography findings. Other modalities, such as ultrasound and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in the diagnostics, staging and follow-up of breast cancer. Percutaneous needle biopsy is a rapid and minimally invasive method for the histological verification of breast cancer. New breast imaging modalities, such as contrast-enhanced spectral mammography, diffusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopy can possibly further improve breast cancer diagnostics; however, further studies are necessary to prove the advantages of these methods so that they cannot yet be recommended for routine clinical use.

  17. Imaging Breast Density: Established and Emerging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mammographic density has been proven as an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Women with dense breast tissue visible on a mammogram have a much higher cancer risk than women with little density. A great research effort has been devoted to incorporate breast density into risk prediction models to better estimate each individual’s cancer risk. In recent years, the passage of breast density notification legislation in many states in USA requires that every mammography report should provide information regarding the patient’s breast density. Accurate definition and measurement of breast density are thus important, which may allow all the potential clinical applications of breast density to be implemented. Because the two-dimensional mammography-based measurement is subject to tissue overlapping and thus not able to provide volumetric information, there is an urgent need to develop reliable quantitative measurements of breast density. Various new imaging technologies are being developed. Among these new modalities, volumetric mammographic density methods and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging are the most well studied. Besides, emerging modalities, including different x-ray–based, optical imaging, and ultrasound-based methods, have also been investigated. All these modalities may either overcome some fundamental problems related to mammographic density or provide additional density and/or compositional information. The present review article aimed to summarize the current established and emerging imaging techniques for the measurement of breast density and the evidence of the clinical use of these density methods from the literature.

  18. Primary cardiac and pericardial tumors, imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M D [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Radiology, Fu Wai Hospital and Cardiovascular Inst.

    1996-12-31

    The incidence of cardiac tumor and its classification was discussed. Imaging study i.e. conventional radiology, echocardiagoaphy (echo), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and computed tomography (CT) used also discussed briefly. (8 refs.).

  19. Primary cardiac and pericardial tumors, imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of cardiac tumor and its classification was discussed. Imaging study i.e. conventional radiology, echocardiagoaphy (echo), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and computed tomography (CT) used also discussed briefly. (8 refs.)

  20. Brain's tumor image processing using shearlet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Luis; Espinosa, Nikolai; Cadena, Franklin; Korneeva, Anna; Kruglyakov, Alexey; Legalov, Alexander; Romanenko, Alexey; Zotin, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Brain tumor detection is well known research area for medical and computer scientists. In last decades there has been much research done on tumor detection, segmentation, and classification. Medical imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of brain tumors and nowadays uses methods non-invasive, high-resolution techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans. Edge detection is a fundamental tool in image processing, particularly in the areas of feature detection and feature extraction, which aim at identifying points in a digital image at which the image has discontinuities. Shearlets is the most successful frameworks for the efficient representation of multidimensional data, capturing edges and other anisotropic features which frequently dominate multidimensional phenomena. The paper proposes an improved brain tumor detection method by automatically detecting tumor location in MR images, its features are extracted by new shearlet transform.

  1. Usefulness of breast-specific gamma imaging as an adjunct modality in breast cancer patients with dense breast. A comparative study with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bom Sahn

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adjunctive benefits of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) versus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in breast cancer patients with dense breasts. This study included a total of 66 patients (44.1±8.2 years) with dense breasts (breast density >50%) and already biopsy-confirmed breast cancer. All of the patients underwent BSGI and MRI as part of an adjunct modality before the initial therapy. Of 66 patients, the 97 undetermined breast lesions were newly detected and correlated with the biopsy results. Twenty-six of the 97 breast lesions proved to be malignant tumors (invasive ductal cancer, n=16; ductal carcinoma in situ, n=6; mixed or other malignancies, n=4); the remaining 71 lesions were diagnosed as benign tumors. The sensitivity and specificity of BSGI were 88.8% (confidence interval (CI), 69.8-97.6%) and 90.1% (CI, 80.7-95.9%), respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 92.3% (CI, 74.9-99.1%) and 39.4% (CI, 28.0-51.7%), respectively (p<0.0001). MRI detected 43 false-positive breast lesions, 37 (86.0%) of which were correctly diagnosed as benign lesions using BSGI. In 12 malignant lesions <1 cm, the sensitivities of BSGI and MR imaging were 83.3% (CI, 51.6-97.9%) and 91.7% (CI, 61.5-99.8%), respectively. BSGI showed an equivocal sensitivity and a high specificity compared to MRI in the diagnosis of breast lesions. In addition, BSGI had a good sensitivity in discriminating breast cancers ≤1 cm. The results of this study suggest that BSGI could play a crucial role as an adjunctive imaging modality which can be used to evaluate breast cancer patients with dense breasts. (author)

  2. Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment on Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes: Focus on Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan J Cohen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is revolutionizing cancer care across disciplines. The original success of immune checkpoint blockade in melanoma has already been translated to Food and Drug Administration–approved therapies in a number of other cancers, and a large number of clinical trials are underway in many other disease types, including breast cancer. Here, we review the basic requirements for a successful antitumor immune response, with a focus on the metabolic and physical barriers encountered by lymphocytes entering breast tumors. We also review recent clinical trials of immunotherapy in breast cancer and provide a number of interesting questions that will need to be answered for successful breast cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Early prediction of the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative MRI and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Subramani; Chen, Yukun; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Li, Xia; Chakravarthy, A Bapsi; Bhave, Sandeep R; Welch, E Brian; Levy, Mia A; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    The ability to predict early in the course of treatment the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy can stratify patients based on response for patient-specific treatment strategies. Currently response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is evaluated based on physical exam or breast imaging (mammogram, ultrasound or conventional breast MRI). There is a poor correlation among these measurements and with the actual tumor size when measured by the pathologist during definitive surgery. We tested the feasibility of using quantitative MRI as a tool for early prediction of tumor response. Between 2007 and 2010 twenty consecutive patients diagnosed with Stage II/III breast cancer and receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled on a prospective imaging study. Our study showed that quantitative MRI parameters along with routine clinical measures can predict responders from non-responders to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The best predictive model had an accuracy of 0.9, a positive predictive value of 0.91 and an AUC of 0.96.

  4. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  5. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  6. Interobserver variability in identification of breast tumors in MRI and its implications for prognostic biomarkers and radiogenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Ashirbani, E-mail: as698@duke.edu; Grimm, Lars J., E-mail: lars.grimm@duke.edu; Harowicz, Michael, E-mail: michael.harowicz@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V., E-mail: sujata.ghate@duke.edu; Kim, Connie, E-mail: connie.kim@duke.edu; Walsh, Ruth, E-mail: ruth.walsh@duke.edu; Mazurowski, Maciej A., E-mail: maciej.mazurowski@duke.edu [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the interobserver variability of readers when outlining breast tumors in MRI, study the reasons behind the variability, and quantify the effect of the variability on algorithmic imaging features extracted from breast MRI. Methods: Four readers annotated breast tumors from the MRI examinations of 50 patients from one institution using a bounding box to indicate a tumor. All of the annotated tumors were biopsy proven cancers. The similarity of bounding boxes was analyzed using Dice coefficients. An automatic tumor segmentation algorithm was used to segment tumors from the readers’ annotations. The segmented tumors were then compared between readers using Dice coefficients as the similarity metric. Cases showing high interobserver variability (average Dice coefficient <0.8) after segmentation were analyzed by a panel of radiologists to identify the reasons causing the low level of agreement. Furthermore, an imaging feature, quantifying tumor and breast tissue enhancement dynamics, was extracted from each segmented tumor for a patient. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were computed between the features for each pair of readers to assess the effect of the annotation on the feature values. Finally, the authors quantified the extent of variation in feature values caused by each of the individual reasons for low agreement. Results: The average agreement between readers in terms of the overlap (Dice coefficient) of the bounding box was 0.60. Automatic segmentation of tumor improved the average Dice coefficient for 92% of the cases to the average value of 0.77. The mean agreement between readers expressed by the correlation coefficient for the imaging feature was 0.96. Conclusions: There is a moderate variability between readers when identifying the rectangular outline of breast tumors on MRI. This variability is alleviated by the automatic segmentation of the tumors. Furthermore, the moderate interobserver variability in terms of the bounding box

  7. NMR imaging of soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval-Jeantet, M.; Tobolsk, F.; Delepine, N.; Delepine, G.; Roger, B.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary findings on NMR imaging of 30 soft tissue tumors demonstrated the indispensable value of this examination (particularly when a surface antenna is used) for preoperative investigation and diagnosis of tumoral recurrence when compared with other radiologic techniques. The possible potential of NMR imaging for characterization of tissues, apart from lipoma or liposarcoma, cannot be evaluated at the present time [fr

  8. Breast tumor copy number aberration phenotypes and genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridlyand, Jane; Jain, Ajay N; McLennan, Jane; Ziegler, John; Chin, Koei; Devries, Sandy; Feiler, Heidi; Gray, Joe W; Waldman, Frederic; Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G; Snijders, Antoine M; Ylstra, Bauke; Li, Hua; Olshen, Adam; Segraves, Richard; Dairkee, Shanaz; Tokuyasu, Taku; Ljung, Britt Marie

    2006-01-01

    Genomic DNA copy number aberrations are frequent in solid tumors, although the underlying causes of chromosomal instability in tumors remain obscure. Genes likely to have genomic instability phenotypes when mutated (e.g. those involved in mitosis, replication, repair, and telomeres) are rarely mutated in chromosomally unstable sporadic tumors, even though such mutations are associated with some heritable cancer prone syndromes. We applied array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to the analysis of breast tumors. The variation in the levels of genomic instability amongst tumors prompted us to investigate whether alterations in processes/genes involved in maintenance and/or manipulation of the genome were associated with particular types of genomic instability. We discriminated three breast tumor subtypes based on genomic DNA copy number alterations. The subtypes varied with respect to level of genomic instability. We find that shorter telomeres and altered telomere related gene expression are associated with amplification, implicating telomere attrition as a promoter of this type of aberration in breast cancer. On the other hand, the numbers of chromosomal alterations, particularly low level changes, are associated with altered expression of genes in other functional classes (mitosis, cell cycle, DNA replication and repair). Further, although loss of function instability phenotypes have been demonstrated for many of the genes in model systems, we observed enhanced expression of most genes in tumors, indicating that over expression, rather than deficiency underlies instability. Many of the genes associated with higher frequency of copy number aberrations are direct targets of E2F, supporting the hypothesis that deregulation of the Rb pathway is a major contributor to chromosomal instability in breast tumors. These observations are consistent with failure to find mutations in sporadic tumors in genes that have roles in maintenance or manipulation of the genome

  9. Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Fhager, Andreas; Jensen, Peter Damsgaard

    2011-01-01

    Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity and condu......Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity...... and conductivity in the breast. In this paper two nonlinear tomographic algorithms are compared – one is a single-frequency algorithm and the other is a time-domain algorithm....

  10. Potential Impact of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast on Patient Selection for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühr, Marietta; Wolfgarten, Matthias; Stölzle, Marco; Leutner, Claudia; Höller, Tobias; Schrading, Simone; Kuhl, Christiane; Schild, Hans; Kuhn, Walther; Braun, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) after breast-conserving therapy is currently under investigation in prospective randomized studies. Multifocality and multicentricity are exclusion criteria for APBI. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect ipsilateral and contralateral invasive tumor foci or ductal carcinoma in situ in addition to conventional diagnostic methods (clinical examination, mammography, and ultrasonography). The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative MRI on patient selection for APBI. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2007, a total of 579 consecutive, nonselected patients with newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer received preoperative breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging studies at the Bonn University Breast Cancer Center. In retrospect, 113 patients would have met the criteria for APBI using conventional imaging workup (clinical tumor size ≤3 cm; negative axillary lymph node status; unifocal disease; no evidence of distant metastases; no invasive lobular carcinoma, ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ, or Paget’s disease). We analyzed the amount of additional ipsilateral and contralateral tumor foci detected by MRI. Results: MRI detected additional tumor foci in 8.8% of patients eligible for APBI (11 tumor foci in 10 of 113 patients), either ipsilateral (n = 7, 6.2%) or contralateral (n = 4, 3.5%). In 1 patient, MRI helped detect additional tumor focus both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Conclusions: Preoperative breast MRI is able to identify additional tumor foci in a clinically relevant number of cases in this highly selected group of patients with low-risk disease and may be useful in selecting patients for APBI.

  11. Potential Impact of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast on Patient Selection for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehr, Marietta, E-mail: marietta.kuehr@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Wolfgarten, Matthias; Stoelzle, Marco [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Leutner, Claudia [Department of Radiology, Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Hoeller, Tobias [Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Schrading, Simone; Kuhl, Christiane; Schild, Hans [Department of Radiology, Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Kuhn, Walther; Braun, Michael [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) after breast-conserving therapy is currently under investigation in prospective randomized studies. Multifocality and multicentricity are exclusion criteria for APBI. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect ipsilateral and contralateral invasive tumor foci or ductal carcinoma in situ in addition to conventional diagnostic methods (clinical examination, mammography, and ultrasonography). The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative MRI on patient selection for APBI. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2007, a total of 579 consecutive, nonselected patients with newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer received preoperative breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging studies at the Bonn University Breast Cancer Center. In retrospect, 113 patients would have met the criteria for APBI using conventional imaging workup (clinical tumor size {<=}3 cm; negative axillary lymph node status; unifocal disease; no evidence of distant metastases; no invasive lobular carcinoma, ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ, or Paget's disease). We analyzed the amount of additional ipsilateral and contralateral tumor foci detected by MRI. Results: MRI detected additional tumor foci in 8.8% of patients eligible for APBI (11 tumor foci in 10 of 113 patients), either ipsilateral (n = 7, 6.2%) or contralateral (n = 4, 3.5%). In 1 patient, MRI helped detect additional tumor focus both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Conclusions: Preoperative breast MRI is able to identify additional tumor foci in a clinically relevant number of cases in this highly selected group of patients with low-risk disease and may be useful in selecting patients for APBI.

  12. Tumor-suppressor activity of RRIG1 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guihong; Brewster, Abenaa; Guan, Baoxiang; Fan, Zhen; Brown, Powel H; Xu, Xiao-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Retinoid receptor-induced gene-1 (RRIG1) is a novel gene that has been lost in several types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to determine whether RRIG1 plays a role in breast cancer, such as in the suppression of breast cancer cell growth and invasion. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect RRIG1 expression in breast tissue specimens. Gene transfection was used to restore or knock down RRIG1 expression in breast cancer cell lines for analysis of cell viability, colony formation, and migration/invasion potential. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays were used to detect the changes in gene expression. The RhoA activation assay was used to assess RRIG1-induced inhibition of RhoA activity. The immunohistochemical data showed that RRIG1 expression was reduced in breast cancer tissues compared with normal and atypical hyperplastic breast tissues. RRIG1 expression was inversely correlated with lymph node metastasis of breast cancer but was not associated with the status of hormone receptors, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or HER2. Furthermore, restoration of RRIG1 expression inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells. Expression of RRIG1 also reduced phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Akt levels; c-Jun, MMP9, and Akt expressions; and RhoA activity. In contrast, knockdown of RRIG1 expression promoted breast cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion potential. The data from the current study indicated that RRIG1 expression was reduced or lost in breast cancer and that restoration of RRIG1 expression suppressed breast cancer cell growth and invasion capacity. Future studies will determine the underlying molecular mechanisms and define RRIG1 as a tumor-suppressor gene in breast cancer

  13. Breast Imaging Utilizing Dedicated Gamma Camera and (99m)Tc-MIBI: Experience at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and Review of the Literature Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Sapir, Einat; Golan, Orit; Menes, Tehillah; Weinstein, Yuliana; Lerman, Hedva

    2016-07-01

    The scope of the current article is the clinical role of gamma cameras dedicated for breast imaging and (99m)Tc-MIBI tumor-seeking tracer, as both a screening modality among a healthy population and as a diagnostic modality in patients with breast cancer. Such cameras are now commercially available. The technology utilizing a camera composed of a NaI (Tl) detector is termed breast-specific gamma imaging. The technology of dual-headed camera composed of semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride detectors that directly converts gamma-ray energy into electronic signals is termed molecular breast imaging. Molecular breast imaging system has been installed at the Department of Nuclear medicine at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv in 2009. The article reviews the literature well as our own experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Glutathione Transferase GSTπ In Breast Tumors Evaluated By Three Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Molina

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferases are involved in intracellular detoxification reactions. One of these, GSTπ, is elevated in some breast cancer cells, particularly cells selected for resistance to anticancer agents. We evaluated GSTπ expression in 60 human breast tumors by three techniques, immunohistochemistry, Northern hybridization, and Western blot analysis. There was a significant positive correlation between the three methods, with complete concordance seen in 64% of the tumors. There was strong, inverse relationship between GSTπ expression and steroid receptor status with all of the techniques utili zed. [n addition, there was a trend toward higher GSTπ expression in poorly differentiated tumors, but no correlation was found between tumor GSTπ content and DNA ploidy or %S-phase. GSTπ expression was also detected in adjacent benign breast tissue as well as infiltrating lymphocytes; this expression may contribute to GSTπ measurements using either Northern hybridization or Western blot analysis. These re sults suggest that immunohistochemistry is the method of choice for measuring GSTπ in breast tumors.

  15. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  16. MR imaging of the brain: tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, K.

    1999-01-01

    The radiologic modality that most likely provides the imaging information needed in a patient suspected of having a brain tumor is MR imaging. A brain tumor can be reliably ruled out if the MR examination is performed properly and experts interpret the results as negative. If there is a tumor, however, its exact location and topography must be determined. Important for therapy and prognosis are also tumor properties such as histologic type and grade, as well as effects on adjacent brain structures. Although potentially a noninvasive method of in vivo neuropathology, MR is still far from being sufficiently specific, as dissimilar lesions may look the same despite the use of refined imaging protocols. The evolution of MR imaging continues, however, making further methodologic improvement likely. Presently, advanced methods, such as diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MR imaging, functional MR imaging, neuronavigation based on MR imaging data, and the use of MR imaging during surgery (intraoperative MR imaging), influence the way patients are treated. Likewise, follow-up imaging (monitoring) of tumor patients by MR has become more effective, and experience has shown how to distinguish reactive changes from recurrent tumor. In the future, MR imaging may gain importance in the development of novel therapeutic concepts. (orig.)

  17. Causes of breast lumps (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast lumps are benign (non-cancerous), as in fibroadenoma, a condition that mostly affects women under age ... with the menstrual cycle, whereas a lump from fibroadenoma does not. While most breast lumps are benign, ...

  18. Parametric imaging of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology using ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    A new image processing strategy is detailed for the simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. A technique for locally mapping tumor perfusion parameters using skeletonized neovascular data is also introduced. Simulated images were used to test the neovascular skeletonization technique and variance (error) of relevant parametric estimates. Preliminary DCE-US image datasets were collected in 6 female patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 MHz transducer and Definity contrast agent. Simulation data demonstrates that neovascular morphology parametric estimation is reproducible albeit measurement error can occur at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Experimental results indicate the feasibility of our approach to performing both tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology measurements from DCE-US images. Future work will expand on our initial clinical findings and also extent our image processing strategy to 3-dimensional space to allow whole tumor characterization.

  19. Investigating the KLF4 Gene Expression as a New Molecular Marker in Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Hosseinpour Feizi

    2013-12-01

    Results: The results showed that: 1 KLF4 is over expressed in Breast tumors rather than adjacent normal tissues. 2 KLF4 is an oncogene in breast tumors (at least in IDC type. 3 The KLF4 expression levels are related significantly with nature of malignant breast tumors. Conclusion: Findings do not confirm KLF4 as a diagnostic marker in classification and identification of tumoral tissues from non-tumoral ones in breast, but we can use this marker to identify at least 50% of invasive Ductal Carcinoma in breast and utilize it as a potential predictive factor to demonstrate severity degree in various tumors.

  20. The use of image morphing to improve the detection of tumors in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykstra, C.; Greer, K.; Jaszczak, R.; Celler, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two of the limitations on the utility of SPECT and planar scintigraphy for the non-invasive detection of carcinoma are the small sizes of many tumors and the possible low contrast between tumor uptake and background. This is particularly true for breast imaging. Use of some form of image processing can improve the visibility of tumors which are at the limit of hardware resolution. Smoothing, by some form of image averaging, either during or post-reconstruction, is widely used to reduce noise and thereby improve the detectability of regions of elevated activity. However, smoothing degrades resolution and, by averaging together closely spaced noise, may make noise look like a valid region of increased uptake. Image morphing by erosion and dilation does not average together image values; it instead selectively removes small features and irregularities from an image without changing the larger features. Application of morphing to emission images has shown that it does not, therefore, degrade resolution and does not always degrade contrast. For these reasons it may be a better method of image processing for noise removal in some images. In this paper the authors present a comparison of the effects of smoothing and morphing using breast and liver studies

  1. FGFR2 promotes breast tumorigenicity through maintenance of breast tumor-initiating cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungeun Kim

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that some cancers contain a population of stem-like TICs (tumor-initiating cells and eliminating TICs may offer a new strategy to develop successful anti-cancer therapies. As molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of the TIC pool are poorly understood, the development of TIC-specific therapeutics remains a major challenge. We first identified and characterized TICs and non-TICs isolated from a mouse breast cancer model. TICs displayed increased tumorigenic potential, self-renewal, heterogeneous differentiation, and bipotency. Gene expression analysis and immunostaining of TICs and non-TICs revealed that FGFR2 was preferentially expressed in TICs. Loss of FGFR2 impaired self-renewal of TICs, thus resulting in marked decreases in the TIC population and tumorigenic potential. Restoration of FGFR2 rescued the defects in TIC pool maintenance, bipotency, and breast tumor growth driven by FGFR2 knockdown. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of FGFR2 kinase activity led to a decrease in the TIC population which resulted in suppression of breast tumor growth. Moreover, human breast TICs isolated from patient tumor samples were found enriched in a FGFR2+ population that was sufficient to initiate tumor growth. Our data suggest that FGFR2 is essential in sustaining the breast TIC pool through promotion of self-renewal and maintenance of bipotent TICs, and raise the possibility of FGFR2 inhibition as a strategy for anti-cancer therapy by eradicating breast TICs.

  2. MR imaging of the breast with Gd-DTPA enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachiya, Junichi; Seki, Tsuneaki; Okada, Minoru; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Korenaga, Tateo; Furuya, Yoshiro

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of MR imaging with Gd-DTPA enhancement was compared with mammography and ultrasonography in 52 patients with clinically palpable benign and malignant breast masses (36 carcinomas, 2 malignant phyllodes tumors, 7 fibroadenomas, 7 cysts). On dynamic MR imaging, carcinomas and fibroadenomas were discriminated by their different dynamic enhancement profiles. In carcinomas, signal intensity increased rapidly, reaching a peak or plateau within 2 min after the injection of contrast medium. In fibroadenomas, signal intensity showed a much slower continuous increase without ceasing until about 8 min after injection. Malignant phyllodes tumors showed a dynamic enhancement profile identical to that of benign fibroadenomas. MR imaging correctly identified 84% of malignant tumors, 86% of fibroadenomas, and 100% of cysts, and was substantially more accurate in tissue characterization than mammography. The results of ultrasonography were highly similar to those of MR imaging. However, no single modality was infallible, and the three modalities were complementary rather than competitive. Considering the high cost and long examination time of MR imaging, mammography supplemented by ultrasonography seems to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of breast lesions. Nevertheless, MR imaging can add important information when the results of mammography and ultrasonography are insufficient or contradictory. (author)

  3. Nuclear medicine in breast cancer diagnostics: Primary tumor and lymphatic metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinilkin, I.; Medvedeva, A.; Chernov, V.; Slonimskaya, E.; Zelchan, R.; Bragina, O.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the study: to assess the possibility of using nuclear medicine techniques at the stages of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: The study included 290 patients with breast cancer and 70 patients with benign breast tumors. The study was used as a radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-MIBI, 199Tl for imaging tumors and colloid 99mTc-Aloteh for visualization sentinel lymph nodes (SLN), colloid was injected peritumoral in four points to 80 MBq one day prior to the planned operation. Results: The sensitivity of SPECT using both 99mTc-MIBI and 199Tl for breast cancer detection was shown to be rather high, being 98.5% and 98%, respectively. It should be noted that the sensitivity of SPECT in detection of small tumors (less than 1 cm in diameter) and multicentric tumors was not high irrespective of the radioisotope used (60% and 65% with 99mTc-MIBI and 65% and 59% with 199Tl, respectively). The difference in the sensitivity was found between 99mTc-MIBI and 199T for the detection of regional lymph node metastasis (91% vs 70%). SLN were detected in 31 patients. The most commonly SLN were defined in the axillary region of 96.7%. In 22 (70.9%) patients there was no metastasis SLN. The sensitivity of the method was 91.2%, specificity of 100%. Conclusion: The specificity of SPECT with 199Tl was higher than that with 99mTc-MIBI. The data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl can be recommended for its use as an additional breast cancer detection method in cases when other imaging techniques and histological findings are not accurate enough. The clinical study of 99mTc-Aloteh, a new radiopharmaceutical agent, has shown that the studied colloid has high uptake level in SLN and can be successfully used for visualization of SLN in patients with breast cancer.

  4. Diagnostic Performance of Mammographic Texture Analysis in the Differential Diagnosis of Benign and Malignant Breast Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiming; Yu, Lan; Wang, Xin; Yu, Haiyang; Gao, Yuanxiang; Ren, Yande; Wang, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2017-11-09

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of mammographic texture analysis in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors. Digital mammography images were obtained from the Picture Archiving and Communication System at our institute. Texture features of mammographic images were calculated. Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify differences between the benign and malignant group. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the diagnostic performance of texture features. Significant differences of texture features of histogram, gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and run length matrix (RLM) were found between the benign and malignant breast group (P  .05). The AUROCs of imaging-based diagnosis, texture analysis, and imaging-based diagnosis combined with texture analysis were 0.873, 0.863, and 0.961, respectively. When imaging-based diagnosis was combined with texture analysis, the AUROC was higher than that of imaging-based diagnosis or texture analysis (P benign and malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, the combination of imaging-based diagnosis and texture analysis can significantly improve diagnostic performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging for cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Okajima, Yoshitomo; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Terai, Masaru; Nakajima, Hironori; Harada, Tsutomu; Ishida, Yoshikazu.

    1988-01-01

    We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 4 patients with cardiac tumor (1 with rhabdomyoma, 1 with left atrial myxoma, and 2 with tumor of the left ventricular wall) for morphological evaluation of the tumor. ECG-gated MRI was performed by the spin echo imaging technique using a superconducting MRI system operating at 0.5 tesla. Spatial extension of the tumor was clearly demonstrated in all the patients. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA), was used in the 2 patients with tumor of the left ventricular myocardium to enhance the contrast, and allowed clear visualization of the tumor. These findings show the usefulness of MRI and MRI with Gd-DTPA for morphological evaluation of cardiac tumor. (author)

  6. Classification of breast masses by ultrasonic Nakagami imaging: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Liao, Yin-Yin

    2008-11-01

    Ultrasound is an important clinical tool in noninvasive diagnoses of breast cancer. The Nakagami statistical parameter estimated from the ultrasonic backscattered envelope has been demonstrated to be useful in complementing conventional B-mode scans when classifying breast masses. However, the shadowing effect caused by certain high-attenuation tumors in the B-mode image makes the tumor contour unclear, and thus it is more difficult to choose an appropriate region of interest from which to collect tumor data for estimating the Nakagami parameter. This study explored the feasibility of using the Nakagami parametric image to overcome the shadowing effect for visualizing the properties of breast masses. Experiments were performed on a breast-mimicking phantom and on some typical clinical cases for cysts, fat and tumors (fibroadenoma) (n = 18) in order to explore the performance of the Nakagami image under ideal and practical conditions. The experimental results showed that the Nakagami image pixels (i.e. the local Nakagami parameter) in the cyst, tumor and fat are 0.21 ± 0.01, 0.65 ± 0.05 and 0.98 ± 0.07, respectively, for six independent phantom measurements, and 0.14 ± 0.03, 0.67 ± 0.11 and 0.89 ± 0.08, respectively, for clinical experiments. This suggests that the Nakagami image is able to classify various breast masses (p < 0.005) although the clinical results from tumors of different cases have a larger variance that may be caused by the complexity of real breast tissues. In particular, unlike the B-mode image, the Nakagami image is not subject to significant shadowing effects, making it useful to complement the B-mode image to describe the tumor contour for identifying the tumor-related region when the shadowing effect is stronger or a low system gain is used.

  7. Classification of breast masses by ultrasonic Nakagami imaging: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, P-H; Chang, C-C [Division of Mechanics, Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, 128, Section 2, Academia Road, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yeh, C-K; Liao, Y-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: mechang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: ckyeh@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2008-11-07

    Ultrasound is an important clinical tool in noninvasive diagnoses of breast cancer. The Nakagami statistical parameter estimated from the ultrasonic backscattered envelope has been demonstrated to be useful in complementing conventional B-mode scans when classifying breast masses. However, the shadowing effect caused by certain high-attenuation tumors in the B-mode image makes the tumor contour unclear, and thus it is more difficult to choose an appropriate region of interest from which to collect tumor data for estimating the Nakagami parameter. This study explored the feasibility of using the Nakagami parametric image to overcome the shadowing effect for visualizing the properties of breast masses. Experiments were performed on a breast-mimicking phantom and on some typical clinical cases for cysts, fat and tumors (fibroadenoma) (n = 18) in order to explore the performance of the Nakagami image under ideal and practical conditions. The experimental results showed that the Nakagami image pixels (i.e. the local Nakagami parameter) in the cyst, tumor and fat are 0.21 {+-} 0.01, 0.65 {+-} 0.05 and 0.98 {+-} 0.07, respectively, for six independent phantom measurements, and 0.14 {+-} 0.03, 0.67 {+-} 0.11 and 0.89 {+-} 0.08, respectively, for clinical experiments. This suggests that the Nakagami image is able to classify various breast masses (p < 0.005) although the clinical results from tumors of different cases have a larger variance that may be caused by the complexity of real breast tissues. In particular, unlike the B-mode image, the Nakagami image is not subject to significant shadowing effects, making it useful to complement the B-mode image to describe the tumor contour for identifying the tumor-related region when the shadowing effect is stronger or a low system gain is used.

  8. Characterization of adjacent breast tumors using oligonucleotide microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, Meredith A; Rishi, Mazhar; Clemmer, Virginia B; Hartman, Jennifer L; Keiper, Elizabeth A; Greshock, Joel D; Chodosh, Lewis A; Liebman, Michael N; Weber, Barbara L

    2001-01-01

    Current methodology often cannot distinguish second primary breast cancers from multifocal disease, a potentially important distinction for clinical management. In the present study we evaluated the use of oligonucleotide-based microarray analysis in determining the clonality of tumors by comparing gene expression profiles. Total RNA was extracted from two tumors with no apparent physical connection that were located in the right breast of an 87-year-old woman diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The RNA was hybridized to the Affymetrix Human Genome U95A Gene Chip ® (12,500 known human genes) and analyzed using the Gene Chip Analysis Suite ® 3.3 (Affymetrix, Inc, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and JMPIN ® 3.2.6 (SAS Institute, Inc, Cary, NC, USA). Gene expression profiles of tumors from five additional patients were compared in order to evaluate the heterogeneity in gene expression between tumors with similar clinical characteristics. The adjacent breast tumors had a pairwise correlation coefficient of 0.987, and were essentially indistinguishable by microarray analysis. Analysis of gene expression profiles from different individuals, however, generated a pairwise correlation coefficient of 0.710. Transcriptional profiling may be a useful diagnostic tool for determining tumor clonality and heterogeneity, and may ultimately impact on therapeutic decision making

  9. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forghani, Parvin; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  10. Towards intraoperative assessment of tumor margins in breast surgery using optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Brendan F.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Surgical excision of tumor is a critical factor in the management of breast cancer. The most common surgical procedure is breast-conserving surgery. The surgeon's goal is to remove the tumor and a rim of healthy tissue surrounding the tumor: the surgical margin. A major issue in breast-conserving surgery is the absence of a reliable tool to guide the surgeon in intraoperatively assessing the margin. A number of techniques have been proposed; however, the re-excision rate remains high and has been reported to be in the range 30-60%. New tools are needed to address this issue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) shows promise as a tool for intraoperative tumor margin assessment in breast-conserving surgery. Further advances towards clinical translation are limited by long scan times and small fields of view. In particular, scanning over sufficient areas to assess the entire margin in an intraoperative timeframe has not been shown to be feasible. Here, we present a protocol allowing ~75% of the surgical margins to be assessed within 30 minutes. To achieve this, we have incorporated a 65 mm-diameter (internal), wide-aperture annular piezoelectric transducer, allowing the entire surface of the excised tumor mass to be automatically imaged in an OCT mosaic comprised of 10 × 10 mm tiles. As OCT is effective in identifying adipose tissue, our protocol uses the wide-field OCT to selectively guide subsequent local OCE scanning to regions of solid tissue which often present low contrast in OCT images. We present promising examples from freshly excised human breast tissue.

  11. Tumor bed delineation for external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Tao, Randa; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Li, Guang; Powell, Simon N.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been considered an alternative to whole breast irradiation for patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy. APBI delivers higher doses of radiation in fewer fractions to the post-lumpectomy tumor bed with a 1–2 cm margin, targeting the area at the highest risk of local recurrence while sparing normal breast tissue. However, there are inherent challenges in defining accurate target volumes for APBI. Studies have shown that significant interobserver variation exists among radiation oncologists defining the lumpectomy cavity, which raises the question of how to improve the accuracy and consistency in the delineation of tumor bed volumes. The combination of standardized guidelines and surgical clips significantly improves an observer’s ability in delineation, and it is the standard in multiple ongoing external-beam APBI trials. However, questions about the accuracy of the clips to mark the lumpectomy cavity remain, as clips only define a few points at the margin of the cavity. This paper reviews the techniques that have been developed so far to improve target delineation in APBI delivered by conformal external beam radiation therapy, including the use of standardized guidelines, surgical clips or fiducial markers, pre-operative computed tomography imaging, and additional imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Alternatives to post-operative APBI, future directions, and clinical recommendations were also discussed

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Velichko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of breast imaging for 47200 women. Breast cancer was detected in 862 (1.9% patients, fibroadenoma in 1267 (2.7% patients and isolated breast cysts in 1162 (2.4% patients. Different types of fibrocystic breast disease (adenosis, diffuse fibrocystic changes, local fibrosis and others were observed in 60.1% of women. Problems of breast cancer visualization during mammography, characterized by the appearance of fibrocystic mastopathy (sclerosing adenosis, fibrous bands along the ducts have been analyzed. Data on the development of diagnostic algorithms including the modern techniques for ultrasound and interventional radiology aimed at detecting early breast cancer have been presented.  

  13. Requirements for effective functional breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, I.N.; Zawarzin, V.; Adler, L.P.; Pani, R.; DeVincentis, G.; Khalkhali, I.; Vargas, H.; Venegas, R.; Kim, S.C.; Bakale, G.; Levine, E.; Perrier, N.; Freimanis, R.I.; Lesko, N.M.; Newman, D.P.; Geisinger, K.R.; Berg, W.A.; Masood, S.

    2003-01-01

    Most nuclear medicine physicists were trained on devices aimed at functional neuroimaging. The clinical goals of brain-centered devices differ dramatically from the parameters needed to be useful in the breast clinic. We will discuss similarities and differences that impact on design considerations, and describe our latest generation of positron emission mammography and intraoperative products. - Source of physiologic contrast: Clinical neuroimaging depends on flow agents to detect the presence of breaks in the blood-brain barrier. Breast flow agents are nonspecific, and may miss preinvasive lesions. - Resolution: Brain cancers are generally diagnosed at late stages, so resolution is not so critical. Detecting early breast cancers, and specifying margins for surgery requires 3 mm spatial resolution or better. - Prevalence: Primary brain cancer is uncommon, and lesions mimicking brain cancer are rare. Primary breast cancer is common, and benign lesions are even more common, so specificity and biopsy capability are very important. - Anatomic references: Brain structure is standard, while breast structure is highly variable, requiring immobilization/compression for physiologic imaging and biopsy. - Surgery: Complete cancer resections for brain are very rare, but are possible for breast with appropriate imaging guidance, implying the need for rapid and reliable imaging. To summarize, the breast clinic needs a rapid and highly sensitive method of assessing breast physiology, compatible with biopsy and surgery. Positron emission mammography devices, in handheld and X-ray platform based configurations, are ideal for this mission

  14. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast with heterologous high-grade angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan Tranesh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Phyllodes tumors (PTs account for <3% of fibroepithelial breast lesions and for 0.3% to 1.0% of primary breast tumors. They occur predominantly in middle-aged women (mean age range, 40–50 years. PTs can be categorized into benign, borderline, and malignant; the first 2 categories are distinguished only by degree of cellular atypia and mitotic activity. Malignant PTs are more frequent among persons of Hispanic ethnicity, especially those born in Central America or South America. Heterologous sarcomatous elements may be present in malignant PTs, predominantly liposarcoma and rarely fibrosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Breast angiosarcoma (BA is a rare heterologous, sarcomatous element that may arise secondary to malignant PT. We report a 47-year-old woman with no history of previous surgery or radiation therapy who presented to the emergency department with a painful right breast mass. She admittedly noticed the right breast mass for many years; however, recently it increased in size. Mammography and ultrasonography identified a partially cystic mass. Core needle biopsy showed dense hyalinized fibrous tissue with old blood clots, suggestive of infarcted fibroadenoma. The patient received antibiotics and analgesics; however, she reported intractable pain and a worsening skin rash of her right breast. Chest computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a doubling in mass size, with pectoralis major muscle involvement. Incisional biopsy showed malignant PT with heterologous high-grade angiosarcoma. The diagnosis of angiosarcoma was confirmed through immunoreactivity for CD31, FLI1, and ERG immunostains.

  15. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Woo Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE- based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard tumor and surrounding tissue (soft. The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression.

  16. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Woo

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard) tumor and surrounding tissue (soft). The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise.In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in breast cancer management.

  18. Expression profiling of circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lang, J.; Scott, J.H.; Wolf, D.M.; Novák, Petr; Punj, V.; Magbanua, M.J.M.; Zhu, W.Z.; Mineyev, N.; Haqq, CH.; Crothers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 1 (2015), s. 121-131 ISSN 0167-6806 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Circulating tumor cells * Micrometastases * Breast cancer * EpCAM Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 4.085, year: 2015

  19. Molecular profiles of progesterone receptor loss in human breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creighton, Chad J.; Kent Osborne, C.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Foekens, John A.; Klijn, Jan G.; Horlings, Hugo M.; Nuyten, Dimitry; Wang, Yixin; Zhang, Yi; Chamness, Gary C.; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Lee, Adrian V.; Schiff, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient prognosis and response to endocrine therapy in breast cancer correlate with protein expression of both estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR), with poorer outcome in patients with ER+/PR- compared to ER+/PR+ tumors. Methods To better understand the underlying

  20. Oestrogen receptors in tumors of breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, J; Kay, G; Da Fonseca, M [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Department of Nuclear Medicine; Lange, M [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Surgery; De Moor, N G [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Department of Radiation Therapy; Savage, N [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Department of Physiological Chemistry

    1978-04-15

    Oestrogen receptors were measured in the cytoplasmic fraction of tumors from patients with breast cancer. Receptors were detected in 48% of patients, and 52% showed no receptors. A follow-up study of a small group of patients on hormone therapy is reported.

  1. Standardized assessment of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramm, Trine; Di Caterino, Tina; Jylling, Anne-Marie B

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In breast cancer, there is a growing body of evidence that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) may have clinical utility and may be able to direct clinical decisions for subgroups of patients. Clinical utility is, however, not sufficient for warranting the implementation of a new...

  2. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2017-05-11

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.

  3. Functional Imaging of Proteolysis: Stromal and Inflammatory Cells Increase Tumor Proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The underlying basement membrane is degraded during progression of breast and colon carcinoma. Thus, we imaged degradation of a quenched fluorescent derivative of basement membrane type IV collagen (DQ-collagen IV by living human breast and colon tumor spheroids. Proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by HCT 116 and HKh-2 human colon tumor spheroids was both intracellular and pericellular. In contrast, proteolysis of DQ-collagen IV by BT20 human breast tumor spheroids was pericellular. As stromal elements can contribute to proteolytic activities associated with tumors, we also examined degradation of DQ-collagen IV by human monocytes/macrophages and colon and breast fibroblasts. Fibroblasts themselves exhibited a modest amount of pericellular degradation. Degradation was increased 4–17-fold in cocultures of fibroblasts and tumor cells as compared to either cell type alone. Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, plasmin, and the cysteine protease, cathepsin B, all reduced degradation in the cocultures. Monocytes did not degrade DQ-collagen IV; however, macrophages degraded DQ-collagen IV intracellularly. In coculture of tumor cells, fibroblasts, and macrophages, degradation of DQ-collagen IV was further increased. Imaging of living tumor and stromal cells has, thus, allowed us to establish that tumor proteolysis occurs pericellularly and intracellularly and that tumor, stromal, and inflammatory cells all contribute to degradative processes.

  4. Adenosis tumor of the breast: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Oh, Ki Keun; Jung, Mi Kyeong; Jung, Woo Hee; Shim, Jung Yeon

    1995-01-01

    Adenosis tumor is a rare tumor of the breast and primarily consists of adenosis. Authors report a case of surgically proved adenosis tumor in a 31-year-old woman. Mammogram showed a lobulated, well-circumscribed mass with several surrounding radiolucent halos. In the center of the mass several linear radiolucent densities were seen with the appearance of a conglomerated well-circumscribed mass such as fibroadenoma. These linear radiolucent densities were consistent with the fat between the fibrous sclerosis in pathologic specimen. Ultrasonogram showed a well-circumscribed mass with homogeneous low echogenicity, partial posterior enhancement, and bilateral acoustic shadowings

  5. Adenosis tumor of the breast: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Oh, Ki Keun; Jung, Mi Kyeong; Jung, Woo Hee; Shim, Jung Yeon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-15

    Adenosis tumor is a rare tumor of the breast and primarily consists of adenosis. Authors report a case of surgically proved adenosis tumor in a 31-year-old woman. Mammogram showed a lobulated, well-circumscribed mass with several surrounding radiolucent halos. In the center of the mass several linear radiolucent densities were seen with the appearance of a conglomerated well-circumscribed mass such as fibroadenoma. These linear radiolucent densities were consistent with the fat between the fibrous sclerosis in pathologic specimen. Ultrasonogram showed a well-circumscribed mass with homogeneous low echogenicity, partial posterior enhancement, and bilateral acoustic shadowings.

  6. Second harmonic generation reveals matrix alterations during breast tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen; Tang, Ping; Brown, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Alteration of the extracellular matrix in tumor stroma influences efficiency of cell locomotion away from the primary tumor into surrounding tissues and vasculature, thereby affecting metastatic potential. We study matrix changes in breast cancer through the use of second harmonic generation (SHG) of collagen in order to improve the current understanding of breast tumor stromal development. Specifically, we utilize a quantitative analysis of the ratio of forward to backward propagating SHG signal (F/B ratio) to monitor collagen throughout ductal and lobular carcinoma development. After detection of a significant decrease in the F/B ratio of invasive but not in situ ductal carcinoma compared with healthy tissue, the collagen F/B ratio is investigated to determine the evolution of fibrillar collagen changes throughout tumor progression. Results are compared with the progression of lobular carcinoma, whose F/B signature also underwent significant evolution during progression, albeit in a different manner, which offers insight into varying methods of tissue penetration and collagen manipulation between the carcinomas. This research provides insights into trends of stromal reorganization throughout breast tumor development.

  7. Breast cancer staging with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smathers, R.L.; D'Amelio, F.; Stockdale, F.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-three patients with biopsy-proved breast cancer underwent MR staging of the cervicothoracic spine, lumbosacral spine, liver, and thorax. In all cases, these findings have been compared with the results of clinical staging, laboratory tests, chest radiography, and radionuclide bone scanning. MR imaging was a valuable staging tool for patients with more than minimal breast cancer and indications for radionuclide bone scanning. MR imaging had the greatest clinical importance when it identified thoracic soft-tissue abnormalities, including axillary., lateral thoracic, supraclavicular, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The coronal and sagittal views were very valuable for detection of chest wall invasion, sternal involvement, and internal mammary adenopathy. Negative MR staging clinically reassured patients that aggressive local therapy bad curative potential. Positive MR staging avoided inappropriate aggressive local therapy and mastectomy. MR imaging can be recommended for improved breast cancer staging in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who have more than minimal disease

  8. Angiogenic Signaling in Living Breast Tumor Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Edward

    2006-01-01

    .... Progress to date includes the recruitment of personnel to the new laboratory, the development and testing of a novel method for the measurement of convective flow in tumors in vivo, the investigation...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro

    1991-01-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T 1 -weighted image (T 1 WI) and the T 2 -weighted image (T 2 WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T 1 WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T[sub 1]-weighted image (T[sub 1]WI) and the T[sub 2]-weighted image (T[sub 2]WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T[sub 1]WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T[sub 1]WI and the T[sub 2]WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T[sub 1]WI and the T[sub 2]WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author).

  11. Characterization of benign and malignant solid breast masses in harmonic 3D power Doppler imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Y.-H.; Huang, Y.-L.; Kuo, S.-J.; Liang, W.-M.; Chen, S.-T.; Chen, D.-R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors assessed the characteristics of benign and malignant solid breast tumors in harmonic three-dimensional (3D) power Doppler imaging and proposed decision models to classify benign and malignant breast tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 86 malignant and 97 benign harmonic 3D power Doppler US images were analyzed. All the harmonic 3D power Doppler images were obtained using a Voluson730 US system (GE, Zipf, Austria) equipped with a RSP 6-12 transducer and tissue harmonic imaging modalities. Imaging analysis was performed using the Virtual Organ Computer-aided Analysis (VOCAL)-imaging program. Histogram indices, the vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI) and vascularization-flow index (VFI), were calculated for the intra-tumor and for shells with an outside thickness of 3 mm surrounding the breast tumors. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to estimate the diagnostic performances. Results: The results revealed that the choice of decision model comprised the parameters of patient age, intra-tumor VI, and tumor volume to classify benign and malignant breast tumors. The area under the ROC curve (Az) was 0.910, accuracy was 81.4%, and sensitivity and specificity were 81.4% and 81.4%, respectively. The parameter intra-tumor VI was the choice for all of the histogram indices in differentiating between malignant and benign lesions. Conclusion: The decision model, which was composed of patient age, tumor volume and intra-tumor VI, and a cut-off value for intra-tumor VI at the upper end of patient age and tumor volume, was recommended in clinical application.

  12. Expression of most matrix metalloproteinase family members in breast cancer represents a tumor-induced host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, K. J.; Matrisian, L. M.; Jensen, R. A.; Rodgers, W. H.

    1996-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family members have been associated with advanced-stage cancer and contribute to tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis as determined by inhibitor studies. In situ hybridization was performed to analyze the expression and localization of all known MMPs in a series of human breast cancer biopsy specimens. Most MMPs were localized to tumor stroma, and all MMPs had very distinct expression patterns. Matrilysin was expressed by morphologically normal epithelial ducts within tumors and in tissue from reduction mammoplasties, and by epithelial-derived tumor cells. Many family members, including stromelysin-3, gelatinase A, MT-MMP, interstitial collagenase, and stromelysin-1 were localized to fibroblasts of tumor stroma of invasive cancers but in quite distinct, and generally widespread, patterns. Gelatinase B, collagenase-3, and metalloelastase expression were more focal; gelatinase B was primarily localized to endothelial cells, collagenase-3 to isolated tumor cells, and metalloelastase to cytokeratin-negative, macrophage-like cells. The MMP inhibitor, TIMP-1, was expressed in both stromal and tumor components in most tumors, and neither stromelysin-2 nor neutrophil collagenase were detected in any of the tumors. These results indicate that there is very tight and complex regulation in the expression of MMP family members in breast cancer that generally represents a host response to the tumor and emphasize the need to further evaluate differential functions for MMP family members in breast tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8686751

  13. Noninvasive enhanced mid-IR imaging of breast cancer development in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jason R.; Young, Madison A.; Dréau, D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2015-11-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy is commonly used to treat breast cancer patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that has the potential to provide real-time imaging to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy by delineating tumor margins. This enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8 to 10 μm) and selective heating of blood (˜0.5°C) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Postacquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent, standard thermal, and enhanced thermal imaging modalities, as well as physical caliper measurements, were used to monitor breast cancer tumor volumes over a 30-day study period in 19 mice implanted with 4T1-RFP tumor cells. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging, standard thermal imaging, and caliper measurements all show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging, standard IR imaging, and caliper measurements with enhanced thermal imaging, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging monitors tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses associated with the tumor margin. In the future, this IR technique might be used to estimate tumor margins in real time during surgical procedures.

  14. Needle-based polarization-sensitive OCT of breast tumor (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Quirk, Bryden C.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    OCT imaging through miniature needle probes has extended the range of OCT and enabled structural imaging deep inside breast tissue, with the potential to assist in the intraoperative assessment of tumor margins. However, in many situations, scattering contrast alone is insufficient to clearly identify and delineate malignant areas. Here, we present a portable, depth-encoded polarization-sensitive OCT system, connected to a miniature needle probe. From the measured polarization states we constructed the tissue Mueller matrix at each sample location and improved the accuracy of the measured polarization states through incoherent averaging before retrieving the depth-resolved tissue birefringence. With the Mueller matrix at hand, additional polarization properties such as depolarization are readily available. We then imaged freshly excised breast tissue from a patient undergoing lumpectomy. The reconstructed local retardation highlighted regions of connective tissue, which exhibited birefringence due to the abundance of collagen fibers, and offered excellent contrast to areas of malignant tissue, which exhibited less birefringence due to their different tissue composition. Results were validated against co-located histology sections. The combination of needle-based imaging with the complementary contrast provided by polarization-sensitive analysis offers a powerful instrument for advanced tissue imaging and has potential to aid in the assessment of tumor margins during the resection of breast cancer.

  15. Imaging diagnosis of breast tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Oh, Ki Keun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of breast tuberculosis. The authors evaluated the radiologic findings of five cases of surgically confirmed tuberculosis of the breast. Patients were examined with mammography (n=5), ultrasonography (n=3), and MRI (n=2). All patients were female. Four patients had unilateral lesion and the remaining one patient had bilateral breast tuberculosis. Mammographic findings were mainly radiopaque mass density without secondary signs. Two patients showed secondary signs such as skin thickening, parenchymal distortion, and nipple retraction. Ultrasonographic findings were variable but helpful in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesion, MRI findings were more helpful in differentiating abscess from malignant lesions. Radiologic findings were useful to diagnose tuberculosis of the breast, but fine needle aspiration biopsy and culture were needed for suspicious radiologic findings.

  16. Imaging diagnosis of breast tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Oh, Ki Keun

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of breast tuberculosis. The authors evaluated the radiologic findings of five cases of surgically confirmed tuberculosis of the breast. Patients were examined with mammography (n=5), ultrasonography (n=3), and MRI (n=2). All patients were female. Four patients had unilateral lesion and the remaining one patient had bilateral breast tuberculosis. Mammographic findings were mainly radiopaque mass density without secondary signs. Two patients showed secondary signs such as skin thickening, parenchymal distortion, and nipple retraction. Ultrasonographic findings were variable but helpful in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesion, MRI findings were more helpful in differentiating abscess from malignant lesions. Radiologic findings were useful to diagnose tuberculosis of the breast, but fine needle aspiration biopsy and culture were needed for suspicious radiologic findings

  17. MR imaging manifestations of skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong-hyon; Kim, Jee Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Chun, Kyung Ah [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary Hospital, Uijeongbu, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Sung, Mi-Sook [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Holy family Hospital, Bucheon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    In this study, we evaluated MR imaging findings of skin tumors and categorized them into four types: (1) discrete mass lesions of the dermis and epidermis, (2) mass lesions of the subcutis with or without abutment to the skin, (3) diffuse or localized skin thickening without a true mass, and (4) a skin mass with bone destruction. The categorization of MR images may be useful in the differential diagnosis of skin tumors. (orig.)

  18. Predicting local recurrence following breast-conserving treatment: parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) around the tumor on preoperative MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Nariya; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Yun, Bo La; Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung; Chie, Eui Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Background: The level of background parenchymal enhancement around tumor is known to be associated with breast cancer risk. However, there is no study investigating predictive power of parenchymal signal enhancement ratio (SER) around tumor for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Purpose: To investigate whether the breast parenchymal SER around the tumor on preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is associated with subsequent IBTR in breast cancer patients who had undergone breast-conserving treatment. Material and Methods: Nineteen consecutive women (mean age, 44 years; range, 34-63 years) with breast cancer who developed IBTR following breast-conserving treatment and 114 control women matched for age, as well as T and N stages were included. We compared the clinicopathologic features of the two groups including nuclear grade, histologic grade, hormonal receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) status, lymphovascular invasion, negative margin width, use of adjuvant therapy, and parenchymal SER around the tumor on preoperative DCE-MRI. The SER was measured on a slice showing the largest dimension of the tumor. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with IBTR. Results: In univariate analysis, ER negativity (odds ratio [OR] = 4.7; P = 0.040), PR negativity (OR = 4.0; P = 0.013), HER-2 positivity (OR = 3.6; P = 0.026), and a parenchymal SER greater than 0.53 (OR = 23.3; P = 0.011) were associated with IBTR. In multivariate analysis, ER negativity (OR = 3.8; P = 0.015) and a parenchymal SER greater than 0.53 (OR = 13.2; P = 0.040) on preoperative MRI were independent factors associated with IBTR. Conclusion: In addition to ER negativity, a higher parenchymal SER on preoperative MRI was an independent factor associated with subsequent IBTR in patients with breast cancer who had undergone breast-conserving treatment

  19. A portable thermal imaging device as a feedback system for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Oshrit A.; Ben-David, Merav A.; Katz, Eyal; Sholomov, Meny; Kelson, Itzhak; Gannot, Israel

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among women in the Western world. Currently, no imaging technique assesses tumor heat generation and vasculature changes during radiotherapy in viable tumor and as adjuvant therapy. Thermography is a non-ionizing, non-invasive, portable and low-cost imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of thermography in cancer treatment monitoring for feedback purposes. Six stage-IV breast cancer patients with viable breast tumor and 8 patients (9 breasts) who underwent tumor resection were monitored by a thermal camera prior to radiotherapy sessions over several weeks of radiation treatment. The thermal changes over the treated breast were calculated and analyzed for comparison with healthy surrounded breast tissue or contralateral breast. A model of a breast with a tumor was created. The COMSOL FEM software was used to carry out the analysis. The effects of tumor metabolism and breast tissue perfusion on the temperature difference were analyzed. All patients with active tumors exhibited drops in maximal temperature of the tumor during radiation therapy. The patients who underwent radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment exhibited a rise in maximal temperature over the treated breast in correlation with skin erythema during radiation. This difference between the groups was statistically significant (P=0.001). The simulated human breast cancer models analysis showed that tumor aggressiveness reduction causes decrease in the tumor temperature. Inflammation causes vasodilatation and increases tissue perfusion, resulted in an increase in breast tissue temperature. A correlation was demonstrated between the clinical outcome and the simulation. We report a method for monitoring cancer response to radiation therapy, which measures the physiological response along with clinical response. These anticipatory efficacy evaluations of radiotherapy during treatment may further promote changes in treatment regimen

  20. Breast Hypertrophy, Reduction Mammaplasty, and Body Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Cristiane Costa; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Garcia, Edgard da Silva; Cabral, Isaías Vieira; de Carvalho, Monique Maçais; de Brito, Maria José Azevedo; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2018-02-07

    Body image dissatisfaction is one of the major factors that motivate patients to undergo plastic surgery. However, few studies have associated body satisfaction with reduction mammaplasty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of breast hypertrophy and reduction mammaplasty on body image. Breast hypertrophy patients, with reduction mammaplasty already scheduled between June 2013 and December 2015 (mammaplasty group, MG), were prospectively evaluated through the body dysmorphic disorder examination (BDDE), body investment scale (BIS), and breast evaluation questionnaire (BEQ55) tools. Women with normal-sized breasts were also evaluated as study controls (normal-sized breast group, NSBG). All the participants were interviewed at the initial assessment and after six months. Data were analyzed before and after six months. Each group consisted of 103 women. The MG group had a significant improvement in BDDE, BIS, and BEQ55 scores six months postoperatively (P ≤ 0.001 for the three instruments), whereas the NSBG group showed no alteration in results over time (P = 0.876; P = 0.442; and P = 0.184, respectively). In the intergroup comparison it was observed that the MG group began to invest more in the body, similarly to the NSBG group, and surpassed the level of satisfaction and body image that the women of the NSBG group had after the surgery. Reduction mammaplasty promoted improvement in body image of women with breast hypertrophy. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Investigating Mechanisms of Alkalinization for Reducing Primary Breast Tumor Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian F. Robey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular pH (pHe of many solid tumors is acidic as a result of glycolytic metabolism and poor perfusion. Acidity promotes invasion and enhances metastatic potential. Tumor acidity can be buffered by systemic administration of an alkaline agent such as sodium bicarbonate. Tumor-bearing mice maintained on sodium bicarbonate drinking water exhibit fewer metastases and survive longer than untreated controls. We predict this effect is due to inhibition of tumor invasion. Reducing tumor invasion should result in fewer circulating tumor cells (CTCs. We report that bicarbonate-treated MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice exhibited significantly lower numbers of CTCs than untreated mice (. Tumor pHe buffering may reduce optimal conditions for enzymes involved in tumor invasion such as cathepsins and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs. To address this, we tested the effect of transient alkalinization on cathepsin and MMP activity using enzyme activatable fluorescence agents in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 mammary xenografts. Transient alkalinization significantly reduced the fluorescent signal of protease-specific activatable agents in vivo (. Alkalinization, however, did not affect expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX. The findings suggest a possible mechanism in a live model system for breast cancer where systemic alkalinization slows the rate of invasion.

  2. Differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast tumors by high frequency molybdenum-target X-ray photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Yuanqi; Wang Maosheng; Huang Jian; Cui Guoru; Liang Zhicong; Lu Yingying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the X-ray Image of benign and malignant breast lesions (tumors) in order to improve their differcatial diagnostic level. Methods: X-ray image changes of 63 malignant breast neoplasms were described by the mammography and in comparision with those of 43 benign masses. Results: The accordance percentages between the X-ray and histological examinations for the benign and malignant neoplasms were shown as 85% and 90.6% respectively. Spiculated mass, calcification granules in clusters and other images were found to be indication of benign or malignant breast lesion. Conclusion: The High Frequency Molybdenum-target X-ray Photography can provide effective imaging data for diagnosis and distinguish between the benign and malignant breast lesions. (authors)

  3. Dosimetric investigation depending on tumor location in patient breast in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Joo; Park, So Hyun; Jung, Joo Young; Woong, Cho; Suh, Tae Suk

    2012-01-01

    The Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) technique, which involves radiation beam delivery techniques that use a limited range of treatment volumes, has been a challenging approach that is worthy of consideration compared to whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Because of a small target volumes used in the PBI technique, the radiation dose can be safely delivered to the targeted tissue without the unwanted delivery of radiation to normal breast tissues and organ at risk (OAR), such as contralateral breast, lung and heart.Through PBI technique, better cosmetic outcomes and minimizing damages to OARs could be expected and also the daily dose can be increased with smaller number of fractionation in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effects according to tumor locations in patient's breast for Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) technique using three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT), Electron Beam Radiation therapy (EBRT) and Helical-tomotherapy (H-TOMO). Dosimetric comparisons of PBI technique for 3DCRT, EBRT, and H-TOMO depending on the classified tumor locations were performed. H-TOMO delivered the low dose to lager volume to surrounding normal tissue, such as the heart and lungs compared to 3DCRT and EBRT although it had the same degree of target coverage as the other methods (3DCRT, EBRT). EBRT had a curative effect for early-stage breast cancers located in the lower and inner sections (LIQ-S, LIQ-D)

  4. Image Denoising And Segmentation Approchto Detect Tumor From BRAINMRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanta Rangaswamy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the Brain Tumor is a challenging problem, due to the structure of the Tumor cells in the brain. This project presents a systematic method that enhances the detection of brain tumor cells and to analyze functional structures by training and classification of the samples in SVM and tumor cell segmentation of the sample using DWT algorithm. From the input MRI Images collected, first noise is removed from MRI images by applying wiener filtering technique. In image enhancement phase, all the color components of MRI Images will be converted into gray scale image and make the edges clear in the image to get better identification and improvised quality of the image. In the segmentation phase, DWT on MRI Image to segment the grey-scale image is performed. During the post-processing, classification of tumor is performed by using SVM classifier. Wiener Filter, DWT, SVM Segmentation strategies were used to find and group the tumor position in the MRI filtered picture respectively. An essential perception in this work is that multi arrange approach utilizes various leveled classification strategy which supports execution altogether. This technique diminishes the computational complexity quality in time and memory. This classification strategy works accurately on all images and have achieved the accuracy of 93%.

  5. Influence of mammographic density on the diagnostic accuracy of tumor size assessment and association with breast cancer tumor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasching, Peter A.; Heusinger, Katharina; Loehberg, Christian R.; Wenkel, Evelyn; Lux, Michael P.; Schrauder, Michael; Koscheck, Thomas; Bautz, Werner; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bani, Mayada R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of breast cancer staging involves the estimation of the tumor size for the initial decision-making in the treatment. We investigated the accuracy of tumor size estimation and the association between tumor characteristics and breast density (BD). Materials and methods: A total of 434 women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer were included in this prospective study at a specialist breast unit. Estimated tumor characteristics included tumor size, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, Ki-67, HER2/neu, vascular invasion. Radiomorphological data included tumor size as assessed by mammography, breast ultrasonography, and clinical examination, and American College of Radiology (ACR) categories for BD. Results: BD did not have a significant impact on the assessment of tumor size using breast ultrasound (deviation from ACR categories 1-4: 0.55-0.68 cm; P = 0.331). The deviation in mammography was significantly different dependent on BD (0.42-0.9 cm; P 2 cm). Conclusion: Breast ultrasonography is more accurate than mammography for assessing tumor size in breasts with a higher BD. The difference in tumor size assessment needs to be taken into consideration in the design of clinical trials and treatment decisions

  6. TH-A-18A-01: Innovation in Clinical Breast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, B; Yang, K; Yaffe, M; Chen, J

    2014-01-01

    Several novel modalities have been or are on the verge of being introduced into the breast imaging clinic. These include tomosynthesis imaging, dedicated breast CT, contrast-enhanced digital mammography, and automated breast ultrasound, all of which are covered in this course. Tomosynthesis and dedicated breast CT address the problem of tissue superimposition that limits mammography screening performance, by improved or full resolution of the 3D breast morphology. Contrast-enhanced digital mammography provides functional information that allows for visualization of tumor angiogenesis. 3D breast ultrasound has high sensitivity for tumor detection in dense breasts, but the imaging exam was traditionally performed by radiologists. In automated breast ultrasound, the scan is performed in an automated fashion, making for a more practical imaging tool, that is now used as an adjunct to digital mammography in breast cancer screening. This course will provide medical physicists with an in-depth understanding of the imaging physics of each of these four novel imaging techniques, as well as the rationale and implementation of QC procedures. Further, basic clinical applications and work flow issues will be discussed. Learning Objectives: To be able to describe the underlying physical and physiological principles of each imaging technique, and to understand the corresponding imaging acquisition process. To be able to describe the critical system components and their performance requirements. To understand the rationale and implementation of quality control procedures, as well as regulatory requirements for systems with FDA approval. To learn about clinical applications and understand risks and benefits/strength and weakness of each modality in terms of clinical breast imaging

  7. Contrast-enhanced color Doppler US in breast cancer: Tumoral vascularity correlated with angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun A; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Yun, Ki Jung; Lee, Kwang Man; Park, Ki Han; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    To evaluate the effects of contrast-enhanced color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) on the depiction of vascularity and flow pattern in breast cancer and to determine the relationship between tumoral vascularity and angiogenesis. Twenty-one patients with breast cancer were prospectively evaluated with CDUS before and after injection of the contrast agent (SH U 508A, 2.5g, 300 mg/ml ). The tumoral vascularity was expressed as percentage of color Doppler area, which was measured quantitatively by a computerized program (Ultrasonic Imaging Tool; Soongsil University, Seoul, Korea). The flow pattern (four-patterns; spotty, linear, branching, marginal) of the vascularity was analyzed. After surgery, tumor angiogenesis was assessed by microvessel density. The relationship between the vascularity on CDUS and microvessel density was statistically analyzed. At unenhanced CDUS, tumoral flow signals were detected in 12 lesions (48%); at contrast-enhanced CDUS, 18 lesions (86%). All These 18 lesions showed increased signals, compared with those at unenhanced CDUS. The percentage color Doppler area was 1.86 {+-} 0.48% at unenhanced CDUS and 5.23 {+-} 1.18% at contrast-enhanced CDUS. The flow patterns before contrast injection were spotty pattern in 11 tumors and linear pattern in one; after contrast injection, spotty in 8, linear in 4, branching in 5, and marginal in one. The tumoral vascularity at contrast-enhanced CDUS showed no significant correlation with microvessel density. Contrast-enhanced CDUS seems to be a valuable tool in the depiction of vascularity and characterization of flow pattern in breast cancer. However, tumoral vascularity on CDUS may not reflect tumoral angiogenesis.

  8. Breast cancer histopathology image analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veta, Mitko; Pluim, Josien P W; van Diest, Paul J; Viergever, Max A

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of methods that have been proposed for the analysis of breast cancer histopathology images. This research area has become particularly relevant with the advent of whole slide imaging (WSI) scanners, which can perform cost-effective and high-throughput histopathology slide digitization, and which aim at replacing the optical microscope as the primary tool used by pathologist. Breast cancer is the most prevalent form of cancers among women, and image analysis methods that target this disease have a huge potential to reduce the workload in a typical pathology lab and to improve the quality of the interpretation. This paper is meant as an introduction for nonexperts. It starts with an overview of the tissue preparation, staining and slide digitization processes followed by a discussion of the different image processing techniques and applications, ranging from analysis of tissue staining to computer-aided diagnosis, and prognosis of breast cancer patients.

  9. Dissecting Tumor-Stromal Interactions in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in breast cancer, affecting more than 70% of late stage cancer patients with severe complications such as fracture, bone pain, and hypercalcemia. The pathogenesis of osteolytic bone metastasis depends on cross-communications between tumor cells and various stromal cells residing in the bone microenvironment. Several growth factor signaling pathways, secreted micro RNAs (miRNAs and exosomes are functional mediators of tumor-stromal interactions in bone metastasis. We developed a functional genomic approach to systemically identified molecular pathways utilized by breast cancer cells to engage the bone stroma in order to generate osteolytic bone metastasis. We showed that elevated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1 in disseminated breast tumor cells mediates the recruitment of pre-osteoclasts and promotes their differentiation to mature osteoclasts during the bone metastasis formation. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β is released from bone matrix upon bone destruction, and signals to breast cancer to further enhance their malignancy in developing bone metastasis. We furthered identified Jagged1 as a TGF-β target genes in tumor cells that engaged bone stromal cells through the activation of Notch signaling to provide a positive feedback to promote tumor growth and to activate osteoclast differentiation. Substantially change in miRNA expression was observed in osteoclasts during their differentiation and maturation, which can be exploited as circulating biomarkers of emerging bone metastasis and therapeutic targets for the treatment of bone metastasis. Further research in this direction may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment strategies for bone metastasis.

  10. Enhanced tumor imaging with pokeweed mitogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitner, D.M.; Mann, P.L.; D'Souza, P.; Wenk, R.; Baughman, D.G.; Quesada, S.M.; Purvis, R.; Born, J.L.; Matwiyoff, N.A.; Eshima, D.

    1993-01-01

    Traditional tumor imaging with biotracer techniques relies solely on the target specificity of the biomolecule. We hypothesize that specific imaging is possible by altering the rate of tissue clearance of any given radiotracer. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) as a biomodulator, represents a class of molecules which regulate cellular differentiation and cell-cell interactions and, as part of these mechanisms alter tissue clearance rates. Utilizing the B-16/C57BL/6 model, 7 days post-transplantation, 10 animals were imaged following an i.v. injection of 1-2 mCi 99m Tc-PWM in order to visualize the tumors and determine the optimal imaging kinetics. A specific tumor image is achieved between 120 and 240 min post-injection. In addition, tumor imaging studies using a non-tumor-specific biomolecule were conducted by injecting 19 animals i.v. with 1-2 mCi of 99m Tc-human serum albumin (HSA). Twelve of these animals were given 10 μg of PWM i.p. at various intervals prior to the 99m Tc-HAS administration. Imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at various intervals up to 2 h post- 99m Tc-HSA injection. A 32-59% increase in the tumor-to-muscle ratio was observed in the PWM-treated animals relative to the non-treated controls. To further investigate the PWM-induced tissue clearance alteration hypothesis, tissue clearance studies using 99m Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) were conducted in non-tumor bearing ICR mice and the B-16/C57BL/6 tumor bearing animals. 99m Tc-DTPA normal tissue clearance rates were significantly increased in the PWM treated animals relative to the non-treated controls. (author)

  11. In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B; Qin, Mingde; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sugahara, Kazuki N

    2017-08-24

    In vivo tumor imaging with nanoprobes suffers from poor tumor specificity. Here, we introduce a nanosystem, which allows selective background quenching to gain exceptionally tumor-specific signals. The system uses near-infrared quantum dots and a membrane-impermeable etchant, which serves as a cation donor. The etchant rapidly quenches the quantum dots through cation exchange (ionic etching), and facilitates renal clearance of metal ions released from the quantum dots. The quantum dots are intravenously delivered into orthotopic breast and pancreas tumors in mice by using the tumor-penetrating iRGD peptide. Subsequent etching quenches excess quantum dots, leaving a highly tumor-specific signal provided by the intact quantum dots remaining in the extravascular tumor cells and fibroblasts. No toxicity is noted. The system also facilitates the detection of peritoneal tumors with high specificity upon intraperitoneal tumor targeting and selective etching of excess untargeted quantum dots. In vivo cation exchange may be a promising strategy to enhance specificity of tumor imaging.The imaging of tumors in vivo using nanoprobes has been challenging due to the lack of sufficient tumor specificity. Here, the authors develop a tumor-specific quantum dot system that permits in vivo cation exchange to achieve selective background quenching and high tumor-specific imaging.

  12. Breast cancer histopathology image analysis : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veta, M.; Pluim, J.P.W.; Diest, van P.J.; Viergever, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of methods that have been proposed for the analysis of breast cancer histopathology images. This research area has become particularly relevant with the advent of whole slide imaging (WSI) scanners, which can perform cost-effective and high-throughput histopathology

  13. Hypofractionated Image Guided Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Central Nervous System Metastases; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma With Predominant in Situ Component; Liver Metastases; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  14. Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging for breast cancer analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Polarized light has many applications in biomedical imaging. The interaction of a biological sample with polarized light reveals information about its biological composition, both structural and functional. The most comprehensive type of polarimetry analysis is to measure the Mueller matrix, a polarization transfer function that completely describes how a sample interacts with polarized light. However, determination of the Mueller matrix requires tissue analysis under many different states of polarized light; a time consuming and measurement intensive process. Here we address this limitation with a new rapid polarimetry system, and use this polarimetry platform to investigate a variety of tissue changes associated with breast cancer. We have recently developed a rapid polarimetry imaging platform based on four photoelastic modulators (PEMs). The PEMs generate fast polarization modulations that allow the complete sample Mueller matrix to be imaged over a large field of view, with no moving parts. This polarimetry system is then demonstrated to be sensitive to a variety of tissue changes that are relevant to breast cancer. Specifically, we show that changes in depolarization can reveal tumor margins, and can differentiate between viable and necrotic breast cancer metastasized to the lymph nodes. Furthermore, the polarimetric property of linear retardance (related to birefringence) is dependent on collagen organization in the extracellular matrix. These findings indicate that our polarimetry platform may have future applications in fields such as breast cancer diagnosis, improving the speed and efficacy of intraoperative pathology, and providing prognostic information that may be beneficial for guiding treatment.

  15. Imaging of pancreatic tumors with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanzi, I.; Robeson, W.; Vinciquerra, V.; Chaly, T.; Kroop, S.; Dahl, R.; Schulman, P.; Goldman, S.; Margouleff, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies pancreatic tumors with positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). PET studies were performed in 13 patients with pancreatic tumors (11 adenocarcinomas; two islet cell tumors) using FDG. Data were acquired for 1 hour and in 14 contiguous 7-mm sections after attenuation correction. Suspicious areas were evaluated using quantitative techniques. In seven of 11 patients with adenocarcinomas, focal increase in FDG uptake correlated with pancreatic tumor shown on CT scans or MR images. Of the remaining four, one had a previous Whipple procedure, another had completed chemotherapy, and in two the tumor was out of the limited region imaged; in these four patients, liver metastases were identified in three

  16. A full Monte Carlo simulation of the YAP-PEM prototype for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, A.; Righi, S.; Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Vaiano, A.; De Domenico, G.; Zavattini, G.; Campanini, R.; Lanconelli, N.; Riccardi, A.

    2004-07-01

    A prototype for Positron Emission Mammography, the YAP-PEM, is under development within a collaboration of the Italian Universities of Pisa, Ferrara, and Bologna. The aim is to detect breast lesions, with dimensions of 5 mm in diameter, and with a specific activity ratio of 10:1 between the cancer and breast tissue. The YAP-PEM is composed of two stationary detection heads of 6×6 cm 2, composed of a matrix of 30×30 YAP:Ce finger crystals of 2×2×30 mm 3 each. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate several characteristics of the prototype. A fast EM algorithm has been adapted to reconstruct all of the collected lines of flight, also at large incidence angles, by achieving 3D positioning capability of the lesion in the FOV. The role of the breast compression has been studied. The performed study shows that a 5 mm diameter tumor of 37 kBq/cm 3 (1 μCi/cm 3), embedded in active breast tissue with 10:1 tumor/background specific activity ratio, is detected in 10 min with a Signal-to-Noise Ratio of 8.7±1.0. Two hot lesions in the active breast phantom are clearly visible in the reconstructed image.

  17. Imaging of childhood inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, Berna; Ozcan, Hatice Nursun; Omay, Burak; Ozgen, Burce; Haliloglu, Mithat [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Altindag / Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm and most commonly involves the lung but occurs in extrapulmonary locations. To present imaging findings in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in children based on a single-centre experience. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MRI findings of children diagnosed with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a single institution. We identified 15 children (range: 1-17 years) with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The tumor was localized to the lung (n = 5), mediastinum (n = 3), trachea (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), abdomen (n = 2) and orbit (n = 3). All the extraorbital tumors were solid masses with homogeneous or heterogeneous enhancement. Four lung tumors and one posterior mediastinal tumor contained calcification. Local recurrence following surgical removal occurred in two children with invasion of the esophagus and of the left atrium in one. Localized masses were seen in all children with orbital tumour. Two of these had episcleritis and perineuritis; one had episcleritis, tendonitis, perineuritis, myositis and dacryoadenitis. The locations and imaging features of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are variable. (orig.)

  18. Scintimammography: The new role of Technetium-99 m Sestamibi imaging for the diagnosis of breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalkhali, I.; Diggles, L. E.; Cutrone, J. A.; Mishkin, F. S. [Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Iraniha, S. [Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance (United States). Surgery

    1997-09-01

    Technetium-99-Sestamibi scintimammography has emerged as a new procedure for the imaging of breast tumors, Currently, a large clinical experience has been developed and the results published. At the present time, the major drawback of this procedure appears to be its low sensitivity for the detection of breast carcinomas smaller than 1 cm in diameter. There are other biologic and technical issues that remain to be overcome to optimally image the breasts. Some of these include: development of a dedicated breast imager using nuclear medicine techniques, development of stereotactic needle localization of the abnormalities that demonstrate focal increase uptake in women with normal mammogram and breast physical examination, manufacturing of a breast compression device so that they can immobilize the breast in place for more adequate imaging, overcoming the issue of unilateral or bilateral diffuse breast uptake that is noted in 7 - 10 percent of the cases and finally determination of optimal dose and imaging factors. This review includes their experience at Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center with the use of this agent for breast imaging since 1992.

  19. Scintimammography: The new role of Technetium-99 m Sestamibi imaging for the diagnosis of breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalkhali, I.; Diggles, L. E.; Cutrone, J. A.; Mishkin, F. S.; Iraniha, S.

    1997-01-01

    Technetium-99-Sestamibi scintimammography has emerged as a new procedure for the imaging of breast tumors, Currently, a large clinical experience has been developed and the results published. At the present time, the major drawback of this procedure appears to be its low sensitivity for the detection of breast carcinomas smaller than 1 cm in diameter. There are other biologic and technical issues that remain to be overcome to optimally image the breasts. Some of these include: development of a dedicated breast imager using nuclear medicine techniques, development of stereotactic needle localization of the abnormalities that demonstrate focal increase uptake in women with normal mammogram and breast physical examination, manufacturing of a breast compression device so that they can immobilize the breast in place for more adequate imaging, overcoming the issue of unilateral or bilateral diffuse breast uptake that is noted in 7 - 10 percent of the cases and finally determination of optimal dose and imaging factors. This review includes their experience at Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center with the use of this agent for breast imaging since 1992

  20. Breast imaging and reporting data system (BIRADS): Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardivon, Anne A.; Athanasiou, Alexandra; Thibault, Fabienne; El Khoury, Carl

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the technical aspects and interpretation criteria in breast MR imaging based on the first edition of breast imaging and reporting data system (BIRADS) published by the American College of Radiology (ACR) in 2003. In a second article, practical cases will be proposed for training the readers. The major aims of using this lexicon are: first to use a logical and standardized description of MR lesions, secondly to obtain a structured MR report with a clear final impression (BIRADS assessment categories), and thirdly to help comparison between different clinical studies based on similar breast MRI terminology

  1. Clear cell hidradenocarcinoma of the breast: a very rare breast skin tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzabotta, Maurizio; Declich, Paolo; Cardarelli, Mery; Bellone, Stefano; Pacilli, Paolo; Riggio, Eliana; Pallino, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignant intradermal tumor of sweat gland origin with a predilection for the face and extremities. It is encountered equally in males and females, usually in the second half of life. These tumors tend to be locally aggressive. In our case, the tumor was located relatively superficially but without any apparent connection to the overlying skin. The typical disease course includes local and sometimes multiple recurrences, and some patients develop regional lymph node and distant metastases. These type of tumors in the parenchyma of the breast are extremely rare. We report a case of hidradenocarcinoma in a 77-year-old woman who presented with a palpable inflammatory nodule in the right breast.

  2. Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast: multimodality imaging and histopathologic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Bae; Shu, Kwang Sun

    2012-01-01

    Background Metaplastic carcinomas are ductal carcinomas that display metaplastic transformation of the glandular epithelium to non-glandular mesenchymal tissue. Metaplastic carcinoma has a poorer prognosis than most other breast cancers, so the differential diagnosis is important. Although many clinical and pathologic findings have been reported, to our knowledge, few imaging findings related to metaplastic carcinoma have been reported. Purpose To investigate whole-breast imaging findings, including mammography, sonography, MRI, and pathologic findings, including immunohistochemical studies of metaplastic carcinomas of the breast. Material and Methods We analyzed 33 cases of metaplastic carcinoma between January 2001 and January 2011. Mammography, ultrasonography, and MRI were recorded retrospectively using the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon. Immunohistochemical studies of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), p53, and C-erbB-2 were performed. Results The most common mammographic findings were oval shape (37%), circumscribed margin (59%), and high density (74%). The most common sonogfindings were irregular shape (59.4%), microlobulated margin (41%), complex echogenicity (81%), parallel orientation (97%), and posterior acoustic enhancement (50%). Axillary lymph node metastases were noted for 25% of the sonographic examinations. On MRI, the most common findings of margin and shape were irregularity (57% and 52.4%, respectively). High signal intensity was the most common finding on T2-weighted images (57%). Immunohistochemical profile was negative for ER (91%, 29/32) and PR (81%, 26/32). Conclusion Metaplastic carcinomas might display more benign features and less axillary lymph node metastasis than IDC. High signal intensity on T2 MRI images and hormone receptor negativity would be helpful in differentiating this tumor from other breast cancers

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise. In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in beast cancer management.

  4. Role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MR spectroscopy (MRS) and other imaging modalities in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Uma; Virendra Kumar; Jagannathan, N.R.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer among women world over and the diagnosis continues to generate fear and turmoil in the life of patients and their families. This article describes the currently available techniques used for screening primary and recurrent breast cancers and the evaluation of therapeutic response of breast cancer with special emphasis on MRI and MRS techniques. MRI, a noninvasive technique, provides anatomic images in multiple planes enabling tissue characterization. Contrast enhanced MR studies have been found to be useful in the diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast benign diseases from malignant ones. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is another useful technique for diagnosis and for assessing the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Being noninvasive, MR techniques can be used repetitively for assessment of response of the tumor to various therapeutic regimens and for evaluating the efficacy of drugs at both the structural and molecular level. An overview of the various aspects of different imaging modalities used in breast cancer research including various in vivo MR methodologies with clinical examples is presented in this review. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance characterization of tumor microvessels in experimental breast tumors using a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent (carboxymethyldextran-A2-Gd-DOTA) with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Anda; Novikov, Viktor; Moeglich, Martina; Turetschek, Karl; Shames, David M.; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Brasch, Robert C.; Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O.; Corot, Claire

    2005-01-01

    Carboxymethyldextran (CMD)-A2-Gd-DOTA, a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent with a molecular weight of 52.1 kDa, designed to have intravascular residence for more than 1 h, was evaluated for its potential to characterize and differentiate the microvessels of malignant and benign breast tumors. Precontrast single-slice inversion-recovery snapshot FLASH and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using an axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled sequence was performed in 30 Sprague-Dawley rats with chemically induced breast tumors. Endothelial transfer coefficient and fractional plasma volume of the breast tumors were estimated from MRI data acquired with CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA enhancement injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight using a two-compartment bidirectional model of the tumor tissue. The correlation between MRI microvessel characteristics and histopathological tumor grade was determined using the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson method. Using CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA, no significant correlations were found between the MR-estimated endothelial transfer coefficient or plasma volumes with histological tumor grade. Analysis of CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA-enhanced MR kinetic data failed to demonstrate feasibility for the differentiation of benign from malignant tumors or for image-based tumor grading. (orig.)

  6. Breast Imaging: The Face of Imaging 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ray Cody; Parikh, Jay R

    2016-08-01

    In preparation for impending changes to the health care delivery and reimbursement models, the ACR has provided a roadmap for success via the Imaging 3.0 (®)platform. The authors illustrate how the field of breast imaging demonstrates the following Imaging 3.0 concepts: value, patient-centered care, clinical integration, structured reporting, outcome metrics, and radiology's role in the accountable care organization environment. Much of breast imaging's success may be adapted and adopted by other fields in radiology to ensure that all radiologists become more visible and provide the value sought by patients and payers. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nuclear Medicine Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabander, Tessa; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.; Feelders, Richard A.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Teunissen, Jaap J. M.; Papotti, M; DeHerder, WW

    2015-01-01

    An important role is reserved for nuclear imaging techniques in the imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with In-111-DTPA-octreotide is currently the most important tracer in the diagnosis, staging and selection for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

  8. Can We Predict Phyllodes Tumor among Fibroepithelial Lesions with Cellular Stroma Diagnosed at Breast Core Needle Biopsy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hae Kyoung; Ko, Kyung Hee; Rho, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, CHA University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Byeong Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To evaluate the surgical outcomes of fibroepithelial lesion with cellular stroma (FELCS) diagnosed at sonography guided core needle biopsy of breast masses, and to determine whether the clinical and imaging features of this lesion could predict the presence of a phyllodes tumor. We retrospectively reviewed the pathologic results of sonography guided core needle biopsy of solid breast masses. A total of 55 FELCS diagnosed with this procedure that underwent subsequent surgical excision were included in this study; their medical records and radiologic images were retrospectively reviewed. The results of the surgical excision revealed 22 (40%) phyllodes tumors and 33 (60%) non-phyllodes tumors: 30 (54.6%) fibroadenomas, 1 (1.8%) adenosis, 1 (1.8%) fibrocystic changes and 1 (1.8%) fibroadenomatous hyperplasia. Lesion size and patient age were significantly different between phyllodes tumors and nonphyllodes tumors groups (32.2 {+-} 14.07 mm/22.4 {+-} 13.64 mm, p=0.0078, 43.5 {+-} 11.60 years/36.5 {+-} 10.25 years, p=0.0207). Among the sonographic features, only cleft was significantly more visible in phyllodes tumors than in non-phyllodes tumors (n=14 (70%)/n=6 (30%), p=0.0016). The size of the lesions, the age of the patients, and the sonographic features of cleft were the significant helpful variables to predict phyllodes tumors among FELCS diagnosed at breast core biopsy.

  9. Can We Predict Phyllodes Tumor among Fibroepithelial Lesions with Cellular Stroma Diagnosed at Breast Core Needle Biopsy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hae Kyoung; Ko, Kyung Hee; Rho, Ji Young; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Byeong Woo

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the surgical outcomes of fibroepithelial lesion with cellular stroma (FELCS) diagnosed at sonography guided core needle biopsy of breast masses, and to determine whether the clinical and imaging features of this lesion could predict the presence of a phyllodes tumor. We retrospectively reviewed the pathologic results of sonography guided core needle biopsy of solid breast masses. A total of 55 FELCS diagnosed with this procedure that underwent subsequent surgical excision were included in this study; their medical records and radiologic images were retrospectively reviewed. The results of the surgical excision revealed 22 (40%) phyllodes tumors and 33 (60%) non-phyllodes tumors: 30 (54.6%) fibroadenomas, 1 (1.8%) adenosis, 1 (1.8%) fibrocystic changes and 1 (1.8%) fibroadenomatous hyperplasia. Lesion size and patient age were significantly different between phyllodes tumors and nonphyllodes tumors groups (32.2 ± 14.07 mm/22.4 ± 13.64 mm, p=0.0078, 43.5 ± 11.60 years/36.5 ± 10.25 years, p=0.0207). Among the sonographic features, only cleft was significantly more visible in phyllodes tumors than in non-phyllodes tumors (n=14 (70%)/n=6 (30%), p=0.0016). The size of the lesions, the age of the patients, and the sonographic features of cleft were the significant helpful variables to predict phyllodes tumors among FELCS diagnosed at breast core biopsy.

  10. Breast cancer imaging: Mammography among women of up to 45 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnejder-Wilk, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Among women under the age of 40, screening mammography examinations are not performed routinely. An ultrasonography scan is considered to be a basic breast imaging examination among younger women. The purpose of this study was to analyze mammography images, as well as to evaluate the usefulness and role of mammography in breast cancer diagnostic processes in women of up to 45 years, based on own experience. Material/Methods: A retrospective analysis of mammography images, including 144 cases of breast cancer diagnosed in the group of 140 women of 45 years of age. All the patients underwent pre-treatment mammography and surgery procedure. The images were evaluated in accordance to BIRADS criteria. Lesions detectable in mammography were grouped as follows: spiculated mass; nonmicrocalcified oval/round mass; microcalcified mass (regardless of shape); microcalcifications; architectural distortion; breast tissue asymmetry. Results: The most common mammographic symptom was solid tumor (41%), followed by microcalcified tumors (20.8%). Clusters of microcalcifications constituted 17.4% of mammography findings. In 4.9% of mammography scans, examination did not reveal any pathological lesions. Conclusions: Breast cancer mammograms of women aged up to 45 years do not differ from diagnostic pictures of breast cancer in older women. The diagnostic appearance of breast cancer in 1/3 of the patients involved microcalcifications detectable only on mammograms. All the women with suspicion of breast cancer should have their mammography examinations performed, irrespective of ultrasonography scans. (author)

  11. Clinical experiences with photoacoustic breast imaging: the appearance of suspicious lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes photoacoustic (PA) imaging of suspicious breast lesions. In PA imaging, the tissue of interest is illuminated by short pulses of laser light, usually in the near infrared (NIR) regime. Upon absorption by primarily the tumor vasculature, the light causes a small temperature

  12. MR imaging and histopathology of cartilage tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Hirokazu; Ohba, Satoru; Ohtsuka, Takanobu; Matui, Norio; Nakamura, Takaaki (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    The MR imaging-pathologic correlation of cartilaginous bone tumors and the value of intravenously administered Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging was studied. The MR studies were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-seven cases were examined with 0.5 T and 1.0 T scanner and all cases were pathologically proved. We discussed the following MR findings: signal intensities of tumors, Gd-DTPA features, morphological findings, and associated findings. Hyaline cartilage tumors showed low signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images and very high signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images. Lobulated marginal enhancements were recognized in chondrosarcomas. This may be an important finding to suspect chondrosarcoma. (author).

  13. How to Boost the Breast Tumor Bed? A Multidisciplinary Approach in Eight Steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Servois, Vincent; Laki, Fatima; Pollet, Guillaume A.; Salmon, Remy; Thomas, Alexandra; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Campana, Francois M.D.; Fourquet, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a new procedure for breast radiotherapy that will improve tumor bed localization and radiotherapy treatment using a multidisciplinary approach. Patients and Methods: This pilot study was conducted by departments of radiation oncology, surgery, and radiology. A new procedure has been implemented, summarized as eight steps: from pre-surgery contrast CT to surgery, tumor bed planning target volume (PTV) determination, and finally breast and tumor bed irradiation. Results: Twenty patients presenting with T1N0M0 tumors were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent lumpectomy with the placement of surgical clips in the tumor bed region. During surgery, 1 to 5 clips were placed in the lumpectomy cavity before the plastic procedure. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative CT scans in the treatment position. The two sets of images were registered with a match-point registration. All volumes were contoured and the results evaluated. The PTV included the clips region, the gross tumor volume, and the surgical scar, with an overall margin of 5-10 mm in all directions, corresponding to localization and setup uncertainties. For each patient the boost PTV was discussed and compared with our standard forward-planned PTV. Conclusions: We demonstrate the feasibility of a tumor bed localization and treatment procedure that seems adaptable to routine practice. Our study shows the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach for tumor bed localization and treatment. The use of more than 1 clip associated with pre- to postoperative CT image registration allows better definition of the PTV boost volume

  14. Performance evaluation of breast image compression techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastassopoulos, G; Lymberopoulos, D [Wire Communications Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Patras, Greece (Greece); Panayiotakis, G; Bezerianos, A [Medical Physics Department, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece (Greece)

    1994-12-31

    Novel diagnosis orienting tele working systems manipulate, store, and process medical data through real time communication - conferencing schemes. One of the most important factors affecting the performance of these systems is image handling. Compression algorithms can be applied to the medical images, in order to minimize : a) the volume of data to be stored in the database, b) the demanded bandwidth from the network, c) the transmission costs, and to minimize the speed of the transmitted data. In this paper an estimation of all the factors of the process that affect the presentation of breast images is made, from the time the images are produced from a modality, till the compressed images are stored, or transmitted in a Broadband network (e.g. B-ISDN). The images used were scanned images of the TOR(MAX) Leeds breast phantom, as well as typical breast images. A comparison of seven compression techniques has been done, based on objective criteria such as Mean Square Error (MSE), resolution, contrast, etc. The user can choose the appropriate compression ratio in order to achieve the desired image quality. (authors). 12 refs, 4 figs.

  15. Performance evaluation of breast image compression techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassopoulos, G.; Lymberopoulos, D.; Panayiotakis, G.; Bezerianos, A.

    1994-01-01

    Novel diagnosis orienting tele working systems manipulate, store, and process medical data through real time communication - conferencing schemes. One of the most important factors affecting the performance of these systems is image handling. Compression algorithms can be applied to the medical images, in order to minimize : a) the volume of data to be stored in the database, b) the demanded bandwidth from the network, c) the transmission costs, and to minimize the speed of the transmitted data. In this paper an estimation of all the factors of the process that affect the presentation of breast images is made, from the time the images are produced from a modality, till the compressed images are stored, or transmitted in a Broadband network (e.g. B-ISDN). The images used were scanned images of the TOR(MAX) Leeds breast phantom, as well as typical breast images. A comparison of seven compression techniques has been done, based on objective criteria such as Mean Square Error (MSE), resolution, contrast, etc. The user can choose the appropriate compression ratio in order to achieve the desired image quality. (authors)

  16. PET tracer for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a radiolabelled peptide-based compound for diagnostic imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). The compound may thus be used for diagnosis of malignant diseases. The compound is particularly useful for imaging of somatostatin overexpression in tumors, wherein the compound...... is capable of being imaged by PET when administered with a target dose in the range of 150-350 MBq, such as 150-250 MBq, preferable in the range of 191-210 MBq....

  17. Clinical evaluation of fat suppressed fast-SPGR sequence of the breast MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mitsuyuki; Hasegawa, Makoto; Matsubara, Tadashi [Yokohama Sakae Kyosai Hospital (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    MR-mammography by fat suppressed Fast-SPGR was evaluated for diagnosis and determination of invasion of tumor. Dynamic MRIs were performed in 12 phases, such as, before infusion of contrast media, right after and one to ten minutes after infusion with interval of one minute. In 15 patients (breast cancer, fibroadenoma, lymphocytic lobulitits and cystic intraductal papilloma), underwent MRI, the images were compared with pathological findings. Ten cases were confirmed as malignancy among 11 cases of breast cancer (sensitivity 91%). Eleven cases were confirmed as breast cancer among 12 cases diagnosed as breast cancer by MRI (specificity 92%). In 12 of all 15 cases, benignity or malignancy was checked correctly (accuracy 80%). Invasion of breast cancer was defined as the deep color dyeing area which was neighbored with the tumor in early stage of cystography. Eight of 11 cases were diagnosed precisely with fat suppression image, and nine were by subtraction image. Diagnosis was possible only by subtraction image in a case of scirrhous carcinoma accompanied with intradutal invasion. The area of invasion was not defined correctly in the case accompanied by mastopathy. It is difficult to evaluate benignity or malignancy of mammary gland tumor only by dynamic MRI, it is necessary to diagnose the shape and deep color image of tumor generally. (K.H.)

  18. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  19. Breast MR imaging in women at high-risk of breast cancer. Is something changing in early breast cancer detection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Podo, Franca

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, several papers have addressed the introduction of contrast-enhanced MR imaging for screening women at high risk for breast cancer. Taking in consideration five prospective studies, on 3,571 screened women with hereditary predisposition to the disease and 9,652 rounds, we found that 168 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer (155 screen-detected, eight interval, and five cancers excluded from analysis) with a detection rate per year of 1.7%. These cancers were small (49% equal to or less than 10 mm in diameter) but aggressive, 82% being invasive and 49% with histologic grade 3; however, only 19% of these invasive cancers were associated with nodal involvement. The pooled sensitivity was 16% for clinical breast examination, 40% for mammography, 43% for ultrasound, and 81% for MR. The positive predictive value (calculated on the basis of the number of invasive diagnostic procedures due to false positives) was 33%, 47%, 18%, and 53%, respectively. Aim of the present article is to present the historical development of MR imaging of breast tumors that made this application theoretically and technically possible, to explain what strategic problems we face in the presence of a hereditary predisposition to the disease, to review the main results of the published studies, and to outline open problems and future perspectives. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of nasopharyngeal malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakihara, Junji; Kanoh, Naoyuki; Hayakawa, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used in the examination of three patients with nasopharyngeal malignant tumor and cranial nerve symptoms. Coronal and saggital sections were very useful for determining skull base invasion. Its high contrast resolution enabled us to visualize several cranial nerves directly. Differentiation between tumor and effusion in the paranasal sinuses was easy especially in T2 weighted images. Bone destruction could also be detected as bone marrow replacement by tumor or as interruption of the black line of compact bone. Local relationships of tumor and large blood vessels were visualized by MRI without invasive contrast enhancing methods. Despite such advantages, in one patient whose symptoms were highly suggestive of cranial invasion, no cranial invasion was detected by CT or MRI. (author)

  1. Iatrogenic displacement of tumor cells to the sentinel node after surgical excision in primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Tove F; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Kroman, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Isolated tumor cells (ITC) are more common in the sentinel node (SN) after needle biopsy of a breast cancer, indicating iatrogenic displacement of tumor cells. We here investigate whether similar iatrogenic displacement occurs after surgical excision of a breast tumor. We compared the incidence...

  2. Childhood kidney tumors - the relevance of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, J.-P.; Schrader, C.; Ley, S.; Troeger, J.; Guenther, P.; Furtwaengler, R.; Graf, N.; Leuschner, I.; Edelhaeuser, M.

    2005-01-01

    Kidney tumors represent 6.2% of malignant tumors in children. History, clinical course and radiological findings are necessary elements in the differential diagnosis of the different renal tumors. In the case of nephroblastoma, chemotherapy is based solely on the radiological diagnosis without prior histology. In therapy-optimizing studies of the Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, preoperative chemotherapy is performed. Therapy monitoring is performed in the course of and after preoperative chemotherapy to verify tumor response. Radiological staging plays a significant role in deciding on further treatment and in operative planning. Three-dimensional visualization of the abdominal situs can assist preoperative planning. In summary, diagnostic imaging in renal tumors in children plays a role in differential diagnosis, staging, monitoring of therapy, and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  3. Tumor scintigraphy using 123I-labelled estradiol in breast cancer - receptor scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidhauer, K.; Mueller, S.; Smolarz, K.; Braeutigam, P.; Briele, B.

    1991-01-01

    16-α- 123 I-Iodestradiol-17β ( 123 I-E 2 ) as a receptor-specific radiopharmacon was used for scintigraphic tumor detection in 62 patients suspected of breast cancer. The studies were performed as a multicenter trial to validate the method and to overcome methodical problems. A fast tracer elimination from the blood pool into the liver was seen, followed by biliary excretion allowing early imaging of the thorax due to low background activity but resulting in difficult imaging conditions of the abdomen. In 42 patients (30 carcinomas, 12 benign lesions) are overall sensitivity was 66%. Some patients with breast cancer showed focal or diffuse uptake in the area of primary lymph drainage without any clinical correlation. There was only one false-positive result in a receptor-negative primary carcinoma. The sensitivity of 123 I-E 2 in the detection of primary breast cancer or metastases and recurrences is low compared to mammography and other methods. Differentiation of malignant and benign tissue is difficult as both may have a positive ER status, in. Nevertheless, 123 I-E 2 scintigraphy is an in vivo imaging technique for the detection of breast cancer depending on the ER status and provides information about tumor localisation. It may become a specific method for the non-invasive diagnosis of the ER status and may be helpful in follow-up studies. As a receptor-specific agent 123 I-E 2 may give answers to questions of tumor heterogeneity and changes of the ER status during therapy. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the breast in patients with breast implants after cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, B.; Aspelin, P.; Isberg, B.; Perbeck, L.; Veress, B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced MR imaging in the assessment of local recurrence in breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy and breast reconstruction with an implant. Eighty-three patients have been evaluated by semidynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. The T1-weighted FLASH 3-D sequence was repeated twice postcontrast for evaluation of the entire breast bilaterally. The findings were compared to physical examination, mammography and histopathology. Recurrence verified by histopathology occurred in 14 of 83 patients (17%). Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was superior to palpation and mammography in revealing recurrences, especially when these were located close to the chest wall. MR was also more sensitive in detecting multiple foci of cancers. Our study revealed that MR imaging was influenced by size, type and composition of the tumor, as illustrated by the false-negative results. Therefore, the use of all 3 investigation methods is necessary for detecting recurrence at an early stage during the postoperative follow-up. (orig.)

  5. Application of lectins to tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro binding of 125 I-lectins to Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells and in vivo uptake of 125 I-lectins in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) bearing mice. In in vitro binding assays, phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA), pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and concanavalia agglutinin (Con A) showed a high affinity for EAT cells. The in vivo biodistribution of 125 I-lectins showed 125 I-PSA to be significantly taken up into EST tissues 24 h postinjection. After IV injection of 125 I-PSA, uptake of the radioactivity into the tumor tissues reached a maximum at 6 h, and thereafter decreased. Rapid disappearance of the radioactivity from blood and its excretion into kidney soon after injection of 125 I-PSA were observed. When compared with the biodistribution of 67 Ga-citrate in EST bearing mice 24 h postinjection, tumor to liver (T/B), tumor to muscle (T/M), and tumor to blood (T/B) ratios were superior for 125 I-PSA. At 6 h postinjection, the T/B-ratio of 125 I-PSA was 2.5, and this value may be sufficient to enable discernable diagnostic images. Our results suggest that PSA might be a useful tumor imaging radiopharmaceutical. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of parotid tumors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akihiko; Yamashita, Toshio; Inoue, Toshiya; Kumazawa, Tadami; Kato, Tsutomu; Sawada, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1987-01-01

    We compared the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with that of X-ray computed tomography in the preoperative diagnosis of parotid tumors. We performed in 13 patients with parotid tumors and 10 of them were operated. The MRI equipment had a magnetic fild of 0.15 Tesla. We used the spine echo acquisition technique and a repetition time of 600, 1000 and 2000 milli-seconds, and echo time of 40 and 80 milli-seconds. We found that the T 1 weighted image well visualized the duct of the parotid gland, the T 2 weighted image provided fine pictures of the parotid tumor. The facial nerve of normal parotid glands could not be visualized by MRI. (author)

  7. Angiogenesis - a crucial step in breast cancer growth, progression and dissemination by Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Monika; Abramczyk, Halina

    2018-06-01

    Combined micro-Raman imaging and AFM imaging are efficient methods for analyzing human tissue due to their high spatial and spectral resolution as well as sensitivity to subtle chemical, structural and topographical changes. The aim of this study was to determine biochemical composition and mechanical topography around blood vessels in the tumor mass of human breast tissue. Significant alterations of the chemical composition and structural architecture around the blood vessel were found compared to the normal breast tissue. A pronounced increase of collagen-fibroblast-glycocalyx network, as well as enhanced lactic acid, and glycogen activity in patients affected by breast cancer were reported.

  8. A Therapeutic and Diagnostic Dilemma: Granular Cell Tumor of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Pergel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six to eight percent of granular cell tumors are seen in the breast. Although mostly benign, they rarely have malignant features clinically and radiologically reminding of breast cancer. This may lead to a potential misdiagnosis of breast carcinoma and overtreatment of patients. The final diagnosis is made by immunohistochemical examination. We performed excisional biopsy on a patient who was diagnosed to have a breast mass. The histopathological examination of the mass revealed granular cell tumor.

  9. A therapeutic and diagnostic dilemma: granular cell tumor of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergel, Ahmet; Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Karaca, A Serdar; Aydin, Ibrahim; Sahin, Dursun Ali; Demirbag, Nilgun

    2011-01-01

    Six to eight percent of granular cell tumors are seen in the breast. Although mostly benign, they rarely have malignant features clinically and radiologically reminding of breast cancer. This may lead to a potential misdiagnosis of breast carcinoma and overtreatment of patients. The final diagnosis is made by immunohistochemical examination. We performed excisional biopsy on a patient who was diagnosed to have a breast mass. The histopathological examination of the mass revealed granular cell tumor.

  10. Early skin tumor detection from microscopic images through image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, A.A.; Narejo, G.B.; Khan, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The research is done to provide appropriate detection technique for skin tumor detection. The work is done by using the image processing toolbox of MATLAB. Skin tumors are unwanted skin growth with different causes and varying extent of malignant cells. It is a syndrome in which skin cells mislay the ability to divide and grow normally. Early detection of tumor is the most important factor affecting the endurance of a patient. Studying the pattern of the skin cells is the fundamental problem in medical image analysis. The study of skin tumor has been of great interest to the researchers. DIP (Digital Image Processing) allows the use of much more complex algorithms for image processing, and hence, can offer both more sophisticated performance at simple task, and the implementation of methods which would be impossibly by analog means. It allows much wider range of algorithms to be applied to the input data and can avoid problems such as build up of noise and signal distortion during processing. The study shows that few works has been done on cellular scale for the images of skin. This research allows few checks for the early detection of skin tumor using microscopic images after testing and observing various algorithms. After analytical evaluation the result has been observed that the proposed checks are time efficient techniques and appropriate for the tumor detection. The algorithm applied provides promising results in lesser time with accuracy. The GUI (Graphical User Interface) that is generated for the algorithm makes the system user friendly. (author)

  11. Radiologic images of an aggressive implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast and chest wall: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Alanis, MD, MPH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromatosis of the breast is a rare benign disease compromising <0.2% of all primary breast tumors. Although the chest wall is a common location, occurrences of implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast are extremely rare; only 33 cases have been reported. We present a case of a 42-year-old female who underwent breast augmentation with silicone breast implants, and 2 years later developed an aggressive implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast and chest wall. On imaging studies, the tumor mimicked breast carcinoma, and despite chemotherapy, the fibromatosis rapidly enlarged and was locally invasive requiring wide surgical excision. Unlike previously reported imaging findings, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an oval circumscribed mass with fringe-like internal architecture. We provide a review of the literature and discuss the imaging features of implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast.

  12. Full-view 3D imaging system for functional and anatomical screening of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraevsky, Alexander; Su, Richard; Nguyen, Ha; Moore, James; Lou, Yang; Bhadra, Sayantan; Forte, Luca; Anastasio, Mark; Yang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Laser Optoacoustic Ultrasonic Imaging System Assembly (LOUISA-3D) was developed in response to demand of diagnostic radiologists for an advanced screening system for the breast to improve on low sensitivity of x-ray based modalities of mammography and tomosynthesis in the dense and heterogeneous breast and low specificity magnetic resonance imaging. It is our working hypothesis that co-registration of quantitatively accurate functional images of the breast vasculature and microvasculature, and anatomical images of breast morphological structures will provide a clinically viable solution for the breast cancer care. Functional imaging is LOUISA-3D is enabled by the full view 3D optoacoustic images acquired at two rapidly toggling laser wavelengths in the near-infrared spectral range. 3D images of the breast anatomical background is enabled in LOUISA-3D by a sequence of B-mode ultrasound slices acquired with a transducer array rotating around the breast. This creates the possibility to visualize distributions of the total hemoglobin and blood oxygen saturation within specific morphological structures such as tumor angiogenesis microvasculature and larger vasculature in proximity of the tumor. The system has four major components: (i) a pulsed dual wavelength laser with fiberoptic light delivery system, (ii) an imaging module with two arc shaped probes (optoacoustic and ultrasonic) placed in a transparent bowl that rotates around the breast, (iii) a multichannel electronic system with analog preamplifiers and digital data acquisition boards, and (iv) computer for the system control, data processing and image reconstruction. The most important advancement of this latest system design compared with previously reported systems is the full breast illumination accomplished for each rotational step of the optoacoustic transducer array using fiberoptic illuminator rotating around the breast independently from rotation of the detector probe. We report here a pilot case studies

  13. Cross sectional imaging of cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovic, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Primary cardiac tumors are a rare entity whose incidence, according to surgery and autopsy reports, is 0.3% to 0.7% of all cardiac tumors. Metastasis to the heart from other primary cancers is 30 times more common. Only 25% of primary cardiac tumors are malignant, and, of these, 75% are sarcomas. Malignant primary cardiac sarcomas are usually located in the right atrium and are most commonly angiosarcoma. In the left atrium, the most common malignant tumors are pleomorphic sarcoma and leiomyosarcoma. Symptom presentation for cardiac tumors is quite varied, but it is dependent upon tumor location and size, rather than upon histologic characteristics. Presentation includes congestive heart failure from intracardiac obstruction, systemic embolization, constitutional symptoms, and arrhythmias. Left atrial sarcomas tend to be more solid and less infiltrative than right-sided sarcomas; consequently, they tend to metastasize later. They usually present with symptoms of blood-flow obstruction and substantial, life-threatening congestive heart failure. Right-sided cardiac tumors are usually malignant and appear as bulky, infiltrative masses that grow in an outward pattern. These are usually fast-growing tumors that metastasize early and do not present with congestive heart failure until late in the disease. The diagnosis of cardiac tumors relies heavily on the use of multiple imaging techniques, including cardiac computed tomography (CT), cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), and echocardiography. Important imaging data to collect include information on the size of the intracardiac mass, the mobility of the mass (an important predictor of prognosis and embolic potential), myocardial invasion, and cardiac chamber location. These factors will provide the means to diagnosis and prognosis. Other important data to collect include the mechanism of tumor implantation, the relationship of the tumor with adjacent structures, the surgeon route of access to the heart

  14. Deep learning based classification of breast tumors with shear-wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Wei; Suo, Jingfeng; Wang, Congzhi; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to build a deep learning (DL) architecture for automated extraction of learned-from-data image features from the shear-wave elastography (SWE), and to evaluate the DL architecture in differentiation between benign and malignant breast tumors. We construct a two-layer DL architecture for SWE feature extraction, comprised of the point-wise gated Boltzmann machine (PGBM) and the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). The PGBM contains task-relevant and task-irrelevant hidden units, and the task-relevant units are connected to the RBM. Experimental evaluation was performed with five-fold cross validation on a set of 227 SWE images, 135 of benign tumors and 92 of malignant tumors, from 121 patients. The features learned with our DL architecture were compared with the statistical features quantifying image intensity and texture. Results showed that the DL features achieved better classification performance with an accuracy of 93.4%, a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 97.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.947. The DL-based method integrates feature learning with feature selection on SWE. It may be potentially used in clinical computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of a Hanging-Breast PET System for Primary Tumor Visualization in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer: Comparison With Standard PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Suzana C; Rebolleda, José Ferrér; Koolen, Bas B; Wesseling, Jelle; Jurado, Raúl Sánchez; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Del Puig Cózar Santiago, María; van der Noort, Vincent; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the performance of a mammography with molecular imaging PET (MAMMI-PET) system for breast imaging in the hanging-breast position for the visualization of primary breast cancer lesions and to compare this method with whole-body PET/CT. Between March 2011 and March 2014, a prospective evaluation included women with one or more histologically confirmed primary breast cancer lesions (index lesions). After injection of 180-240 MBq of (18)F-FDG, whole-body PET/CT and MAMMI-PET acquisitions were performed, index lesions were scored 0, 1, or 2 for FDG uptake relative to background. Detection and FDG uptake were compared by breast length, maximal tumor diameter, affected breast quadrants, tumor grade, and histologic and immunologic sub-types. Finally, the two PET modalities were compared for detection of index lesions. For 234 index lesions (diameter, 5-170 mm), the overall sensitivity was 88.9% for MAMMI-PET and 91% for PET/CT (p = 0.61). Twenty-three (9.8%) index lesions located too close to the pectoral muscle were missed with MAMMI-PET, and 20 index lesions were missed with PET/CT. Lesion visibility on MAMMI-PET images was influenced by tumor grade (p = 0.034) but not by cancer subtype (p = 0.65). Although in an overall evaluation MAMMI-PET was not superior to PET/CT, MAMMI-PET does have higher sensitivity for primary breast cancer lesions within the scanning range of the device. Optimization of the positioning device may increase visualization of the most dorsal lesions.

  16. CAR T cell therapy for breast cancer: harnessing the tumor milieu to drive T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajgain, Pradip; Tawinwung, Supannikar; D'Elia, Lindsey; Sukumaran, Sujita; Watanabe, Norihiro; Hoyos, Valentina; Lulla, Premal; Brenner, Malcolm K; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F

    2018-05-10

    The adoptive transfer of T cells redirected to tumor via chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has produced clinical benefits for the treatment of hematologic diseases. To extend this approach to breast cancer, we generated CAR T cells directed against mucin1 (MUC1), an aberrantly glycosylated neoantigen that is overexpressed by malignant cells and whose expression has been correlated with poor prognosis. Furthermore, to protect our tumor-targeted cells from the elevated levels of immune-inhibitory cytokines present in the tumor milieu, we co-expressed an inverted cytokine receptor linking the IL4 receptor exodomain with the IL7 receptor endodomain (4/7ICR) in order to transform the suppressive IL4 signal into one that would enhance the anti-tumor effects of our CAR T cells at the tumor site. First (1G - CD3ζ) and second generation (2G - 41BB.CD3ζ) MUC1-specific CARs were constructed using the HMFG2 scFv. Following retroviral transduction transgenic expression of the CAR±ICR was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro CAR/ICR T cell function was measured by assessing cell proliferation and short- and long-term cytotoxic activity using MUC1+ MDA MB 468 cells as targets. In vivo anti-tumor activity was assessed using IL4-producing MDA MB 468 tumor-bearing mice using calipers to assess tumor volume and bioluminescence imaging to track T cells. In the IL4-rich tumor milieu, 1G CAR.MUC1 T cells failed to expand or kill MUC1+ tumors and while co-expression of the 4/7ICR promoted T cell expansion, in the absence of co-stimulatory signals the outgrowing cells exhibited an exhausted phenotype characterized by PD-1 and TIM3 upregulation and failed to control tumor growth. However, by co-expressing 2G CAR.MUC1 (signal 1 - activation + signal 2 - co-stimulation) and 4/7ICR (signal 3 - cytokine), transgenic T cells selectively expanded at the tumor site and produced potent and durable tumor control in vitro and in vivo. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of targeting breast

  17. Ultrasound Imaging Methods for Breast Cancer Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozmen, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on modeling acoustic wavefield propagation and implementing imaging algorithms for breast cancer detection using ultrasound. As a starting point, we use an integral equation formulation, which can be used to solve both the forward and inverse problems. This thesis

  18. Adipose progenitor cells increase fibronectin matrix strain and unfolding in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, E. M.; Saunders, M. P.; Yoon, C. J.; Gourdon, D.; Fischbach, C.

    2011-02-01

    Increased stiffness represents a hallmark of breast cancer that has been attributed to the altered physicochemical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the role of fibronectin (Fn) in modulating the composition and mechanical properties of the tumor-associated ECM remains unclear. We have utilized a combination of biochemical and physical science tools to evaluate whether paracrine signaling between breast cancer cells and adipose progenitor cells regulates Fn matrix assembly and stiffness enhancement in the tumor stroma. In particular, we utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging to map the molecular conformation and stiffness of Fn that has been assembled by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in response to conditioned media from MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Our results reveal that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote Fn expression, unfolding, and stiffening by adipose progenitor cells and that transforming growth factor-β serves as a soluble cue underlying these changes. In vivo experiments using orthotopic co-transplantation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells and MDA-MB231 into SCID mice support the pathological relevance of our results. Insights gained by these studies advance our understanding of the role of Fn in mammary tumorigenesis and may ultimately lead to improved anti-cancer therapies.

  19. Adipose progenitor cells increase fibronectin matrix strain and unfolding in breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, E M; Saunders, M P; Yoon, C J; Fischbach, C; Gourdon, D

    2011-01-01

    Increased stiffness represents a hallmark of breast cancer that has been attributed to the altered physicochemical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the role of fibronectin (Fn) in modulating the composition and mechanical properties of the tumor-associated ECM remains unclear. We have utilized a combination of biochemical and physical science tools to evaluate whether paracrine signaling between breast cancer cells and adipose progenitor cells regulates Fn matrix assembly and stiffness enhancement in the tumor stroma. In particular, we utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging to map the molecular conformation and stiffness of Fn that has been assembled by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in response to conditioned media from MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Our results reveal that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote Fn expression, unfolding, and stiffening by adipose progenitor cells and that transforming growth factor-β serves as a soluble cue underlying these changes. In vivo experiments using orthotopic co-transplantation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells and MDA-MB231 into SCID mice support the pathological relevance of our results. Insights gained by these studies advance our understanding of the role of Fn in mammary tumorigenesis and may ultimately lead to improved anti-cancer therapies

  20. Ewing’s sarcoma: an uncommon breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsen Meddeb

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ewing’s sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors (EWS/PNET are rare malignant and aggressive tumors, usually seen in the trunk and lower limbs of children and young adults. They are uncommon in the breast. We report a case of a 43-year-old woman who developed a painless breast mass. An initial core needle biopsy concluded to a fibrocystic dystrophy contrasting with a rapidly growing mass; thus a large lumpectomy was done. Diagnosis of primary PNET of the breast was established, based on both histopathological examination and immunohistochemical findings. Surgical margins were positive, therefore, left modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph nodes dissection was performed. The patient was given 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy containing cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and vincristine. Twenty months later, she is in life without recurrence or metastasis. EWS/PNET may impose a diagnostic challenge. Indeed, mammography and ultrasonography features are non specific. The histopathological pattern is variable depending on the degree of neuroectodermal differentiation. Immuno-phenotyping is necessary and genetic study is the only confirmatory tool of diagnosis showing a characteristic cytogenetic anomaly; t (11; 22 translocation.

  1. Breast Imaging Second Opinions Impact Surgical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Tara Lynn; Carlson, Kjirsten Ayn; Janssen, Imke; Witt, Thomas R; Jokich, Peter; Madrigrano, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Breast surgeons often see women for second opinions for abnormalities found on breast imaging. For second opinions, these images are submitted for review and interpretation by dedicated breast imagers. This study evaluated the conformity of results among interpretation of imaging submitted from outside hospitals both from tertiary care centers, as well as community programs, in an attempt to evaluate the utility of this practice for the sake of clinical management and resource utilization. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all breast patients that submitted outside imaging films for the years 2011 to 2013 at Rush University Medical Center (RUMC). The radiologic diagnosis and each patient's proposed management plan was collected and evaluated for concordance between the outside institutions and RUMC. A total of 380 patients who presented for second opinions with an interpretation of outside exams were evaluated. In 47.4 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 42.4-52.4] of cases there was distinct variance in radiologic impression. For 53.5 % (95 % CI 48.4-58.5) of patients, there was a change in recommended management plan, which included recommendations for either additional imaging or need for additional biopsy. In total, this changed the overall surgical management in 27.1 % (95 % CI 22.8-31.9) of cases. In six patients, the reinterpretation of outside imaging detected new malignancies not previously identified. Overall, 83.7 % (95 % CI 79.7-87.1) of patients who submitted imaging from outside institutions chose to complete the remainder of their treatment at RUMC. The practice of second opinion review changed overall definitive management at our specialty center in more than one in four cases. In addition, the review identified six previously unrecognized malignancies. Given this data, the practice of second opinions and interpretation of outside exams should continue despite the additional resources required.

  2. MR imaging of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    Among a total of 361 MR breast examinations made since March 1984, there were 205 dynamic gradient-echo sequences after injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mM/kg). Of 38 histologically proved carcinomas, 37 showed a sudden increase of signal intensity of > 90% within the first minutes after the injection and nearly a plateau level afterwards. Benign lesions showed a lower, slower, and progressive increase. One 6-mm carcinoma was not detected, and one fibroadenoma was misdiagnosed as a carcinoma. The author discusses a standardized examination technique is essential (infusion technique, injection place, stretched arm, section selection, transmitter and receiver adjustment, storage reservation, phase encoding direction, double breast coil, etc.)

  3. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalchik, Kristin V.; Vallow, Laura A.; McDonough, Michelle; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G.; Peterson, Jennifer L.; Adkisson, Cameron D.; Serago, Christopher; McLaughlin, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  4. Breast cancer imaging using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalm, Simone U.; Melis, Marleen; Emmering, Jasper; Kwekkeboom, Dik J.; Jong, Marion de

    2016-01-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues are methods successfully used in patients with somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-expressing neuroendocrine tumours. Since these techniques were first introduced, many improvements have been made. SSTR expression has also been reported on breast cancer (BC). Currently mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are the most frequent methods used for BC imaging. Since SSTR expression on BC was demonstrated, clinical studies examining the feasibility of visualizing primary BC using SSTR radioligands have been performed. However, to date SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging is not used clinically in BC patients. The aim of this review is to assess whether recent improvements made within nuclear medicine may enable SSTR-mediated imaging to play a role in BC management. For this we critically analysed results of past studies and discussed the potential of the improvements made within nuclear medicine on SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging of BC. Seven databases were searched for publications on BC imaging with SSTR radioligands. The papers found were analysed by 3 individual observers to identify whether the studies met the pre-set inclusion criteria defined as studies in which nuclear imaging using radiolabelled SST analogues was performed in patients with breast lesions. Twenty-four papers were selected for this review including studies on SSTR-mediated nuclear imaging in BC, neuroendocrine BC and other breast lesions. The analysed studies were heterogeneous with respect to the imaging method, imaging protocol, patient groups and the radiolabelled SST analogues used. Despite the fact that the analysed studies were heterogeneous, sensitivity for primary BC ranged from 36–100%. In a subset of the studies LN lesions were visualized, but sensitivity was lower compared to that for primary tumours. A part of the studies included benign lesions and specificity ranged from 22–100%. Furthermore, false negatives and

  5. Fluorescence Imaging/Agents in Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stummer, Walter; Suero Molina, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging allows real-time identification of diseased tissue during surgery without being influenced by brain shift and surgery interruption. 5-Aminolevulinic acid, useful for malignant gliomas and other tumors, is the most broadly explored compound approved for fluorescence-guided resection. Intravenous fluorescein sodium has recently received attention, highlighting tumor tissue based on extravasation at the blood-brain barrier (defective in many brain tumors). Fluorescein in perfused brain, unselective extravasation in brain perturbed by surgery, and propagation with edema are concerns. Fluorescein is not approved but targeted fluorochromes with affinity to brain tumor cells, in development, may offer future advantages. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumor RNA disruption predicts survival benefit from breast cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parissenti, Amadeo M; Guo, Baoqing; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Kenneth P H; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhu, Mu; Shepherd, Lois E; Trudeau, Maureen E

    2015-08-01

    In a prior substudy of the CAN-NCIC-MA.22 clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00066443), we observed that neoadjuvant chemotherapy reduced tumor RNA integrity in breast cancer patients, a phenomenon we term "RNA disruption." The purpose of the current study was to assess in the full patient cohort the relationship between mid-treatment tumor RNA disruption and both pCR post-treatment and, subsequently, disease-free survival (DFS) up to 108 months post-treatment. To meet these objectives, we developed the RNA disruption assay (RDA) to quantify RNA disruption and stratify it into 3 response zones of clinical importance. Zone 1 is a level of RNA disruption inadequate for pathologic complete response (pCR); Zone 2 is an intermediate level, while Zone 3 has high RNA disruption. The same RNA disruption cut points developed for pCR response were then utilized for DFS. Tumor RDA identified >fourfold more chemotherapy non-responders than did clinical response by calipers. pCR responders were clustered in RDA Zone 3, irrespective of tumor subtype. DFS was about 2-fold greater for patients with tumors in Zone 3 compared to Zone 1 patients. Kaplan-Meier survival curves corroborated these findings that high tumor RNA disruption was associated with increased DFS. DFS values for patients in zone 3 that did not achieve a pCR were similar to that of pCR recipients across tumor subtypes, including patients with hormone receptor positive tumors that seldom achieve a pCR. RDA appears superior to pCR as a chemotherapy response biomarker, supporting the prospect of its use in response-guided chemotherapy.

  7. Proton MRS imaging in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarifi, Maria [Aghia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Tzika, A.A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shriners Burn Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques offer a noninvasive, non-irradiating yet sensitive approach to diagnosing and monitoring pediatric brain tumors. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), as an adjunct to MRI, is being more widely applied to monitor the metabolic aspects of brain cancer. In vivo MRS biomarkers represent a promising advance and may influence treatment choice at both initial diagnosis and follow-up, given the inherent difficulties of sequential biopsies to monitor therapeutic response. When combined with anatomical or other types of imaging, MRS provides unique information regarding biochemistry in inoperable brain tumors and can complement neuropathological data, guide biopsies and enhance insight into therapeutic options. The combination of noninvasively acquired prognostic information and the high-resolution anatomical imaging provided by conventional MRI is expected to surpass molecular analysis and DNA microarray gene profiling, both of which, although promising, depend on invasive biopsy. This review focuses on recent data in the field of MRS in children with brain tumors. (orig.)

  8. Growth Factors and Breast Tumors, Comparison of Selected Growth Factors with Traditional Tumor Markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, R.; Černá, M.; Ňaršanská, A.; Svobodová, Š.; Straková, M.; Vrzalová, J.; Fuchsová, R.; Třešková, I.; Kydlíček, T.; Třeška, V.; Pecen, Ladislav; Topolčan, O.; Padziora, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 12 (2011), s. 4653-4656 ISSN 0250-7005 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS9727; GA MZd(CZ) NS10238; GA MZd(CZ) NS10253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : growth factor * breast cancer * tumor markers * CA 15-3 * CEA * IGF1 * EGF * HGF Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.725, year: 2011

  9. In vivo measurement of tumor estradiol and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, Stina; Dabrosin, Charlotta

    2008-01-01

    Angiogenesis, crucial for tumor progression, is a process regulated in the tissue micro-environment. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent stimulatory factor of angiogenesis and a negative prognostic indicator of breast cancer. VEGF is biologically active in the extracellular space and hitherto, there has been a lack of techniques enabling sampling of angiogenic molecules such as VEGF in situ. The majority of breast cancers are estrogen-dependent, and estrogen has been shown to regulate VEGF in normal breast tissue and experimental breast cancer. We investigated if microdialysis may be applicable in human breast cancer for sampling of extracellular VEGF in situ and to explore if there is an association with local estradiol and VEGF levels in normal and cancerous breast tissue. Microdialysis was used to sample VEGF and estradiol in tumors and adjacent normal breast tissue in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. VEGF and estradiol were also measured in plasma, and immunohistochemical staining for VEGF was performed on tumor sections. We show that in vivo levels of extracellular VEGF were significantly higher in breast cancer tumors than in normal adjacent breast tissue. There was a significant positive correlation between estradiol and extracellular VEGF in normal breast tissue. However, no correlation was detected between estradiol and VEGF in tumors or between tumor VEGF and plasma VEGF. We conclude that VEGF and estradiol correlates significantly in normal breast tissue. Microdialysis may be used to provide novel insight in breast tumor biology and the regulation of molecules in the extracellular space of human breast tumors in vivo

  10. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. AZU-1: A Candidate Breast Tumor Suppressor and Biomarker for Tumor Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Schmeichel, Karen L; Mian, I. Saira; Lelie`vre, Sophie; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2000-02-04

    To identify genes misregulated in the final stages of breast carcinogenesis, we performed differential display to compare the gene expression patterns of the human tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, HMT-3522-T4-2, with those of their immediate premalignant progenitors, HMT-3522-S2. We identified a novel gene, called anti-zuai-1 (AZU-1), that was abundantly expressed in non- and premalignant cells and tissues but was appreciably reduced in breast tumor cell types and in primary tumors. The AZU-1 gene encodes an acidic 571-amino-acid protein containing at least two structurally distinct domains with potential protein-binding functions: an N-terminal serine and proline-rich domain with a predicted immunoglobulin-like fold and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. In HMT-3522 cells, the bulk of AZU-1 protein resided in a detergent-extractable cytoplasmic pool and was present at much lower levels in tumorigenic T4-2 cells than in their nonmalignant counterparts. Reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of T4-2 cells, by means described previously, was accompanied by the up-regulation of AZU-1. In addition, reexpression of AZU-1 in T4-2 cells, using viral vectors, was sufficient to reduce their malignant phenotype substantially, both in culture and in vivo. These results indicate that AZU-1 is a candidate breast tumor suppressor that may exert its effects by promoting correct tissue morphogenesis.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong He

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and changes in lipid synthesis and oxidation occur. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has been used to study tumor metabolism in preclinical animal models and in clinical research on human breast, brain, and prostate cancers. This technique can identify specific genetic and metabolic changes that occur in malignant tumors. Therefore, the metabolic markers, detectable by MRS, not only provide information on biochemical changes but also define different metabolic tumor phenotypes. When combined with the contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, which has a high sensitivity for cancer diagnosis, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI improves the diagnostic specificity of malignant human cancers and is becoming an important clinical tool for cancer management and care. This article reviews the MRSI techniques as molecular imaging methods to detect and quantify metabolic changes in various tumor tissue types, especially in extracranial tumor tissues that contain high concentrations of fat. MRI/MRSI methods have been used to characterize tumor microenvironments in terms of blood volume and vessel permeability. Measurements of tissue oxygenation and glycolytic rates by MRS also are described to illustrate the capability of the MR technology in probing molecular information non-invasively in tumor tissues and its important potential for studying molecular mechanisms of human cancers in physiological conditions.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mala; Tanna, Neil; Margolies, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have significantly evolved since their introduction half a century ago, yet implant rupture remains a common and expected complication, especially in patients with earlier-generation implants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary modality for assessing the integrity of silicone implants and has excellent sensitivity and specificity, and the Food and Drug Administration currently recommends periodic magnetic resonance imaging screening for silent silicone breast implant rupture. Familiarity with the types of silicone implants and potential complications is essential for the radiologist. Signs of intracapsular rupture include the noose, droplet, subcapsular line, and linguine signs. Signs of extracapsular rupture include herniation of silicone with a capsular defect and extruded silicone material. Specific sequences including water and silicone suppression are essential for distinguishing rupture from other pathologies and artifacts. Magnetic resonance imaging provides valuable information about the integrity of silicone implants and associated complications.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of invasive breast cancer | Corr | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... mammographic findings, and screening for breast cancer in younger women with familial breast cancer. Interpretation of MR images requires a meticulous imaging technique including the use of contrast enhancement and fat suppression MR sequences using a good breast coil. South African Journal of Radiology Vol.

  15. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-Y. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nuclear Medicine Department, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pang Fei [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both {sup 131}I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  16. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-Y.; Wang, H.-E.; Liu, R.-S.; Pang Fei; Hwang, J.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both 131 I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis

  17. Breast cancer MRI radiomics: An overview of algorithmic features and impact of inter-reader variability in annotating tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ashirbani; Harowicz, Michael R; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2018-04-16

    To review features used in MRI radiomics of breast cancer and study the inter-reader stability of the features METHODS: We implemented 529 algorithmic features that can be extracted from tumor and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) in breast MRIs. The features were identified based on a review of the existing literature with consideration of their usage, prognostic ability, and uniqueness. The set was then extended so that it comprehensively describes breast cancer imaging characteristics. The features were classified into 10 groups based on the type of data used to extract them and the type of calculation being performed. For the assessment of inter-reader variability, 4 fellowship-trained readers annotated tumors on pre-operative dynamic contrast enhanced MRIs for 50 breast cancer patients. Based on the annotations, an algorithm automatically segmented the image and extracted all features resulting in one set of features for each reader. For a given feature, the inter-reader stability was defined as the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) computed using the feature values obtained through all readers for all cases. The average inter-reader stability for all features was 0.8474 (95% CI: 0.8068-0.8858). The mean inter-reader stability was lower for tumor-based features (0.6348, 95% CI: 0.5391-0.7257) than FGT-based features (0.9984, 95% CI: 0.9970-0.9992). The feature group with the highest inter-reader stability quantifies breast and FGT volume. The feature group with the lowest inter-reader stability quantifies variations in tumor enhancement. Breast MRI radiomics features widely vary in terms of their stability in the presence of inter-reader variability. Appropriate measures need to be taken for reducing this variability in tumor-based radiomics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Breast Tumor Oxygenation: A Key to Tumor Therapy Planning and Tumor Prognosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Hanli

    2004-01-01

    .... The aims have included (1) to evaluate a single-channel, dual wavelength, NIR, frequency-domain oximeter and the algorithms for obtaining tumor HbO2 against tumor PO2 measured by 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), (2...

  19. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  20. New developments in medical imaging to detect breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    been the 'gold standard' for imaging the breast since the mid-1960s.2 In ... Breast cancer is still one of the most common cancers in women. ... Engineering, and his qualifications include a BSc (Hons) in applied mathematics and physics.

  1. Breast tumor targeting with {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-PR81 complex as a new biologic radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salouti, Mojtaba [Department of Medical Physics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajabi, Hossein [Department of Medical Physics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: hrajabi@modares.ac.ir; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein [Department of Radioisotope, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasaee, Mohammad Javad [Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Human epithelial mucin, MUC1, is commonly overexpressed in adenocarcinoma that includes more than 80% of breast cancers. The PR81 is a murine anti-MUC1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) that was prepared against the human breast cancer. We developed an indirect method for labeling of this antibody with {sup 99m}Tc in order to use the new preparation in immunoscintigraphy studies of BALB/c mice bearing breast tumors. The {sup 99m}Tc-PR81 complex was prepared using the HYNIC as a chelator and tricine as a coligand. The labeling efficiency determined by instant thin-layer chromatography (ITLC) was 89.2%{+-}4.7%, and radiocolloides measured by cellulose nitrate electrophoresis were 3.4%{+-}0.9%. The in vitro stability of labeled product was determined at room temperature by ITLC and in human serum by gel filtration chromatography - 88.3%{+-}4.6% and 79.8%{+-}5.7% over 24 h, respectively. The integrity of labeled MAb was checked by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and no significant fragmentation was seen. The results of cell binding studies showed that both labeled and unlabeled PR81 were able to compete for binding to MCF 7 cells. Biodistribution studies performed in female BALB/c mice with breast tumor xenografts at 4, 16 and 24 h after the {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-PR81 injection demonstrated a specific localization of the compound at the site of tumors and minimum accumulation in non target organs. The tumor imaging was performed in BALB/c mice with breast xenograft tumors at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36 h after the complex injection. The tumors were visualized with high sensitivity after 8 h. The findings showed that the new radiopharmaceutical is a promising candidate for radioimmunoscintigraphy of the human breast cancer.

  2. Breast tumor targeting with 99mTc-HYNIC-PR81 complex as a new biologic radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salouti, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2008-01-01

    Human epithelial mucin, MUC1, is commonly overexpressed in adenocarcinoma that includes more than 80% of breast cancers. The PR81 is a murine anti-MUC1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) that was prepared against the human breast cancer. We developed an indirect method for labeling of this antibody with 99m Tc in order to use the new preparation in immunoscintigraphy studies of BALB/c mice bearing breast tumors. The 99m Tc-PR81 complex was prepared using the HYNIC as a chelator and tricine as a coligand. The labeling efficiency determined by instant thin-layer chromatography (ITLC) was 89.2%±4.7%, and radiocolloides measured by cellulose nitrate electrophoresis were 3.4%±0.9%. The in vitro stability of labeled product was determined at room temperature by ITLC and in human serum by gel filtration chromatography - 88.3%±4.6% and 79.8%±5.7% over 24 h, respectively. The integrity of labeled MAb was checked by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and no significant fragmentation was seen. The results of cell binding studies showed that both labeled and unlabeled PR81 were able to compete for binding to MCF 7 cells. Biodistribution studies performed in female BALB/c mice with breast tumor xenografts at 4, 16 and 24 h after the 99m Tc-HYNIC-PR81 injection demonstrated a specific localization of the compound at the site of tumors and minimum accumulation in non target organs. The tumor imaging was performed in BALB/c mice with breast xenograft tumors at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36 h after the complex injection. The tumors were visualized with high sensitivity after 8 h. The findings showed that the new radiopharmaceutical is a promising candidate for radioimmunoscintigraphy of the human breast cancer

  3. Effect of background parenchymal enhancement on breast cancer detection with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, M; Rella, L; Stabile Ianora, A A; Angelelli, G; Moschetta, M

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) may influence the sensitivity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging in breast cancer detection. A total of 180 consecutive women with 194 breast cancers underwent MR imaging examination. Women were assigned to two different groups depending on the degree of BPE. Group 1 consisted of women with minimal or mild BPE and group 2 of women with moderate or marked BPE. The distributions of histotypes of tumors within the two groups were compared using the χ(2) test. Difference in sensitivities of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between the two groups was searched for using the Student t-test. No differences in terms of distributions of histotypes of tumors between the two groups of women were found (P=0.5). The 11% difference in sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between group 1 (91/92; 99%; 95% CI: 94-100%) and group 2 (90/102; 88%; 95% CI: 80-94%) was statistically significant (P=0.0058). The sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging is significantly lower in women with moderate and marked BPE as compared with women with minimal and mild BPE regardless of cancer histotype. BPE could represent a limitation for breast MR imaging interpretation and should be indicated in MR imaging reports. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Imaging Management of Breast Density, a Controversial Risk Factor for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Shannon; Williams, Angela; Weinfurtner, Jared; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-04-01

    Breast density is well recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of breast cancer. However, the magnitude of risk is controversial. As the public becomes increasingly aware of breast density as a risk factor, legislation and notification laws in relation to breast density have become common throughout the United States. Awareness of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer presents new challenges for the clinician in the approach to the management and screening of women with dense breasts. The evidence and controversy surrounding breast density as a risk factor for the development of breast cancer are discussed. Common supplemental screening modalities for breast cancer are also discussed, including tomosynthesis, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A management strategy for screening women with dense breasts is also presented. The American College of Radiology recognizes breast density as a controversial risk factor for breast cancer, whereas the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recognizes breast density as a modest risk factor. Neither organization recommends the routine use of supplemental screening in women with dense breasts without considering additional patient-related risk factors. Breast density is a poorly understood and controversial risk factor for the development of breast cancer. Mammography is a screening modality proven to reduce breast cancer-related mortality rates and is the single most appropriate tool for population-based screening. Use of supplemental screening modalities should be tailored to individual risk assessment.

  5. TIE-2 and VEGFR kinase activities drive immunosuppressive function of TIE-2-expressing monocytes in human breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibberson, Mark; Bron, Sylvian; Guex, Nicolas; Faes-van't Hull, Eveline; Ifticene-Treboux, Assia; Henry, Luc; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Delaloye, Jean-François; Coukos, George; Xenarios, Ioannis; Doucey, Marie-Agnès

    2013-07-01

    Tumor-associated TIE-2-expressing monocytes (TEM) are highly proangiogenic cells critical for tumor vascularization. We previously showed that, in human breast cancer, TIE-2 and VEGFR pathways control proangiogenic activity of TEMs. Here, we examine the contribution of these pathways to immunosuppressive activity of TEMs. We investigated the changes in immunosuppressive activity of TEMs and gene expression in response to specific kinase inhibitors of TIE-2 and VEGFR. The ability of tumor TEMs to suppress tumor-specific T-cell response mediated by tumor dendritic cells (DC) was measured in vitro. Characterization of TEM and DC phenotype in addition to their interaction with T cells was done using confocal microscopic images analysis of breast carcinomas. TEMs from breast tumors are able to suppress tumor-specific immune responses. Importantly, proangiogenic and suppressive functions of TEMs are similarly driven by TIE-2 and VEGFR kinase activity. Furthermore, we show that tumor TEMs can function as antigen-presenting cells and elicit a weak proliferation of T cells. Blocking TIE-2 and VEGFR kinase activity induced TEMs to change their phenotype into cells with features of myeloid dendritic cells. We show that immunosuppressive activity of TEMs is associated with high CD86 surface expression and extensive engagement of T regulatory cells in breast tumors. TIE-2 and VEGFR kinase activity was also necessary to maintain high CD86 surface expression levels and to convert T cells into regulatory cells. These results suggest that TEMs are plastic cells that can be reverted from suppressive, proangiogenic cells into cells that are able to mediate an antitumoral immune response. ©2013 AACR.

  6. 3D volume reconstruction from serial breast specimen radiographs for mapping between histology and 3D whole specimen imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertzanidou, T.; Hipwell, J.H.; Reis, S.; Hawkes, D.J.; Ehteshami Bejnordi, B.; Dalmis, M.U.; Vreemann, S.; Platel, B.; Laak, J.A. van der; Karssemeijer, N.; Hermsen, M.; Bult, P.; Mann, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: In breast imaging, radiological in vivo images, such as x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are used for tumor detection, diagnosis, and size determination. After excision, the specimen is typically sliced into slabs and a small subset is sampled. Histopathological

  7. MR images of rupture and leakage of breast implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Ling; Liu Pengcheng; Huang Rong; Hu Huaxin; Chen Zaizhong; Du Duanming; Liu Hanqiao; Feng Fei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging in detecting rupture and leakage of breast implants. Methods: Seventeen cases with breast implants were imaged by MR scanner. 1 normal silicone breast implant outside the body was scanned by MR as an consultative standard. MR images of silicone implants and polypropylene acyl amine implants were classified and analyzed. Results: In 7 cases, 12 single lumen silicone implants were intact, among them 8 were silicone gel-filled implants, 4 were physiological saline-filled implants. 2 physiological saline-filled implants ruptured, among them 1 belonged to intracapsular silicone implant rupture with subsided silicone gel capsule which presented as long T 1 signal and short T 2 signal on MR images; The other belonged to extracapsular silicone implant rapture with physiological saline granule outside breast on MR images. 20 breast implants in 10 cases were injected by polypropylene acyl amine, among them 2 breast implants were intact, 16 breast implants ruptured completely with pieces and nodes of long T 1 signal and long T 2 signal on MR images, 14 of 16 also presented polypropylene acyl amine granule outside breast; 2 breast implants splited inside with linguine sign. Conclusion: The magnetic resonance imaging can make clear the type and the seat of breast implants, the type of rupture of breast implants, and the distribution of leakage material. Therefore magnetic resonance imaging can be an effective guidance for clinical operation and can be an consultative standard for follow-up

  8. Audit of fibroepithelial tumors of the breast in a Nigerian tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-15

    Jan 15, 2016 ... Dr. AO Daramola,. Department of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, ... accounts for the vast majority of benign breast tumor especially in the young.[1] .... subtypes except in very few ambiguous conditions where ... and prognosis of patients with phyllodes tumor of the breast: An analysis of. 170 cases.

  9. Optical computed tomography for imaging the breast: first look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grable, Richard J.; Ponder, Steven L.; Gkanatsios, Nikolaos A.; Dieckmann, William; Olivier, Patrick F.; Wake, Robert H.; Zeng, Yueping

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare computed tomography optical imaging with traditional breast imaging techniques. Images produced by computed tomography laser mammography (CTLMTM) scanner are compared with images obtained from mammography, and in some cases ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During the CTLM procedure, a near infrared laser irradiates the breast and an array of photodiodes detectors records light scattered through the breast tissue. The laser and detectors rotate synchronously around the breast to acquire a series of slice data along the coronal place. The procedure is performed without any breast compression or optical matching fluid. Cross-sectional slices of the breast are produced using a reconstruction algorithm. Reconstruction based on the diffusion theory is used to produce cross-sectional slices of the breast. Multiple slice images are combined to produce a three dimensional volumetric array of the imaged breast. This array is used to derive axial and sagittal images of the breast corresponding to cranio-caudal and medio-lateral images used in mammography. Over 200 women and 3 men have been scanned in clinical trials. The most obvious features seen in images produced by the optical tomography scanner are vascularization and significant lesions. Breast features caused by fibrocystic changes and cysts are less obvious. Breast density does not appear to be a significant factor in the quality of the image. We see correlation of the optical image structure with that seen with traditional breast imaging techniques. Further testing is being conducted to explore the sensitivity and specificity of optical tomography of the breast.

  10. LCP nanoparticle for tumor and lymph node metastasis imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Cheng

    A lipid/calcium/phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle formulation (particle diameter ˜25 nm) has previously been developed to delivery siRNA with superior efficiency. In this work, 111In was formulated into LCP nanoparticles to form 111In-LCP for SPECT/CT imaging. With necessary modifications and improvements of the LCP core-washing and surface-coating methods, 111In-LCP grafted with polyethylene glycol exhibited reduced uptake by the mononuclear phagocytic system. SPECT/CT imaging supported performed biodistribution studies, showing clear tumor images with accumulation of 8% or higher injected dose per gram tissue (ID/g) in subcutaneous, human-H460, lung-cancer xenograft and mouse-4T1, breast cancer metastasis models. Both the liver and the spleen accumulated ˜20% ID/g. Accumulation in the tumor was limited by the enhanced permeation and retention effect and was independent of the presence of a targeting ligand. A surprisingly high accumulation in the lymph nodes (˜70% ID/g) was observed. In the 4T1 lymph node metastasis model, the capability of intravenously injected 111In-LCP to visualize the size-enlarged and tumor-loaded sentinel lymph node was demonstrated. By analyzing the SPECT/CT images taken at different time points, the PK profiles of 111In-LCP in the blood and major organs were determined. The results indicated that the decrement of 111In-LCP blood concentration was not due to excretion, but to tissue penetration, leading to lymphatic accumulation. Larger LCP (diameter ˜65 nm) nanoparticles were also prepared for the purpose of comparison. Results indicated that larger LCP achieved slightly lower accumulation in the tumor and lymph nodes, but much higher accumulation in the liver and spleen; thus, larger nanoparticles might not be favorable for imaging purposes. We also demonstrated that LCP with a diameter of ˜25 nm were better able to penetrate into tissues, travel in the lymphatic system and preferentially accumulate in the lymph nodes due to 1) small

  11. Differential diagnosis of breast tumors on the basis of radiothermometric findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Vidyukov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method for the differential diagnosis of breast tumors in accordance with radiothermometric findings, which is based on the authors’ developed diagnostic technique (Patent No. 2532372 dated 5 September 2014. The radiometric method was used to examine 119 patients with malignant breast tumors, 53 patients with benign breast tumors, and 60 women without breast involvement. The data were obtained in 3 institutions: the Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, the N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, and Moscow Oncology Dispensary Five. A microwave radiothermometer was used to measure core and skin temperatures in 9 symmetrical points of each breast. Using the findings as a basis, the authors proposed quantitative criteria that ensured that breast tumors should be differentially diagnosed with high specificity.

  12. Radiation-associated breast tumors display a distinct gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Women who received irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma have a strong increased risk for developing breast cancer. Approximately 90% of the breast cancers in these patients can be attributed to their radiation treatment, rendering such series extremely useful to determine whether a common...... radiation-associated cause underlies the carcinogenic process. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this study we used gene expression profiling technology to assess gene expression changes in radiation-associated breast tumors compared with a set of control breast tumors of women unexposed to radiation, diagnosed...... at the same age. RNA was obtained from fresh frozen tissue samples from 22 patients who developed breast cancer after Hodgkin's lymphoma (BfHL) and from 20 control breast tumors. RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the profile data resulted in a clustering of the radiation-associated tumors...

  13. Radiologic findings of mucocele-Iike tumor of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Doo Kyung; Cho, Jae Hyun; Jung, Yong Sik; Yim, Hyunee

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of mucocele-like tumors. Twelve breast lesions from 1994 through 2004, coded as mucocele or mucocele-like tumors, were retrieved from the surgical pathology database files at our institution. Eleven of the patients had undergone mammography, and sonography had been performed in all 12 patients. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic, sonographic and pathologic findings. The mammographies showed calcifications alone (n=6), calcification with mass or asymmetric density (n=3), and normal mammogram (n=2). The shapes of the calcifications were pIeomorphic (n=4, 44.4%), amorphous (n=3, 33.3%) and round (n=2, 22.2%). Sonography was performed in all patients (n=12) and showed cysts (n=8), cystic mass (n=2), tubular hypoechoic structure (n=1) and hypoechoic mass (n=1). Pathologic examination revealed 5 cases of benign mucocele-Iike tumor that included epithelial hyperplasia without atypia (n=2) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (n=4), and 3 cases of associated intraductal carcinoma. Calcification was more frequently detected in the mucocele-like tumors with atypical ductal hyperplasia or intraductal carcinoma than in the benign tumors. Pleomorphic calcification was only visualized in those cases involving atypical hyperplasia or intraductal carcinoma. Of the 9 cases of calcification seen in the mammograms, 7 cases (77.8%) were detected in the associated sonograms and all were located within the lesion. The most common mammographic finding of mucocele-like tumors was segmentally distributed pIeomorphic or amorphous calcifications, and the most common sonographic finding was cyst or cystic mass

  14. Radiologic findings of mucocele-Iike tumor of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Doo Kyung; Cho, Jae Hyun; Jung, Yong Sik; Yim, Hyunee [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    To evaluate the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of mucocele-like tumors. Twelve breast lesions from 1994 through 2004, coded as mucocele or mucocele-like tumors, were retrieved from the surgical pathology database files at our institution. Eleven of the patients had undergone mammography, and sonography had been performed in all 12 patients. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic, sonographic and pathologic findings. The mammographies showed calcifications alone (n=6), calcification with mass or asymmetric density (n=3), and normal mammogram (n=2). The shapes of the calcifications were pIeomorphic (n=4, 44.4%), amorphous (n=3, 33.3%) and round (n=2, 22.2%). Sonography was performed in all patients (n=12) and showed cysts (n=8), cystic mass (n=2), tubular hypoechoic structure (n=1) and hypoechoic mass (n=1). Pathologic examination revealed 5 cases of benign mucocele-Iike tumor that included epithelial hyperplasia without atypia (n=2) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (n=4), and 3 cases of associated intraductal carcinoma. Calcification was more frequently detected in the mucocele-like tumors with atypical ductal hyperplasia or intraductal carcinoma than in the benign tumors. Pleomorphic calcification was only visualized in those cases involving atypical hyperplasia or intraductal carcinoma. Of the 9 cases of calcification seen in the mammograms, 7 cases (77.8%) were detected in the associated sonograms and all were located within the lesion. The most common mammographic finding of mucocele-like tumors was segmentally distributed pIeomorphic or amorphous calcifications, and the most common sonographic finding was cyst or cystic mass.

  15. An introduction to microwave imaging for breast cancer detection

    CERN Document Server

    Conceição, Raquel Cruz; O'Halloran, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book collates past and current research on one of the most promising emerging modalities for breast cancer detection. Readers will discover how, as a standalone technology or in conjunction with another modality, microwave imaging has the potential to provide reliable, safe and comfortable breast exams at low cost. Current breast imaging modalities include X- ray, Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Positron Emission Tomography. Each of these methods suffers from limitations, including poor sensitivity or specificity, high cost, patient discomfort, and exposure to potentially harmful ionising radiation. Microwave breast imaging is based on a contrast in the dielectric properties of breast tissue that exists at microwave frequencies. The book begins by considering the anatomy and dielectric properties of the breast, contrasting historical and recent studies. Next, radar-based breast imaging algorithms are discussed, encompassing both early-stage artefact removal, and data independent and adaptive ...

  16. Genetic and Clinical Characteristics of Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeon Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Phyllodes tumors (PTs of the breast are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all breast tumors. Among PTs, malignant PTs (MPTs have malignant characteristics and distant metastases occur in about 20% to 30% of MPTs. However, there is no effective treatment for MPTs with distant metastasis, resulting in an abject prognosis. We performed targeted deep sequencing on PTs to identify the associations between genetic alterations and clinical prognosis. METHODS: We performed targeted deep sequencing to evaluate the genetic characteristics of PTs and analyzed the relationships between clinical and genetic characteristics. RESULTS: A total of 17 PTs were collected between 2001 and 2012. Histologic review was performed by pathologists. The samples included three benign PTs, one borderline PT, and 13 MPTs. The most frequently detected genetic alteration occurred in the TERT promoter region (70.6%, followed by MED12 (64.7%. EGFR amplification and TP53 alteration were detected in four MPTs without genetic alterations in MED12 and TERT promoter regions. Genetic alterations of RARA and ZNF703 were repeatedly found in PTs with local recurrence, and genetic alterations of SETD2, BRCA2, and TSC1 were detected in PTs with distant metastasis. Especially, MPT harboring PTEN and RB1 copy number deletion showed rapid disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we provide genetic characterization and potential therapeutic target for this rare, potentially lethal disease. Further large-scale comprehensive genetic study and functional validation are warranted.

  17. Challenges in the Design of Microwave Imaging Systems for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2011-01-01

    community. This paper presents the survey of the ongoing research in the field of microwave imaging of biological tissues, with major focus on the breast tumor detection application. The existing microwave imaging systems are categorized on the basis of the employed measurement concepts. The advantages......Among the various breast imaging modalities for breast cancer detection, microwave imaging is attractive due to the high contrast in dielectric properties between the cancerous and normal tissue. Due to this reason, this modality has received a significant interest and attention from the microwave...... and disadvantages of the implemented imaging techniques are discussed. The fundamental tradeoffs between the various system requirements are indicated. Some strategies to overcome these limitations are outlined....

  18. The presence of tumor associated macrophages in tumor stroma as a prognostic marker for breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrek, Catharina; Pontén, Fredrik; Jirström, Karin; Leandersson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are alternatively activated macrophages that enhance tumor progression by promoting tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis. TAMs have an anti-inflammatory function resembling M2 macrophages. CD163 is regarded as a highly specific monocyte/macrophage marker for M2 macrophages. In this study we evaluated the specificity of using the M2 macrophage marker CD163 as a TAM marker and compared its prognostic value with the more frequently used pan-macrophage marker CD68. We also analyzed the prognostic value of the localization of CD163 + and CD68 + myeloid cells in human breast cancer. The extent of infiltrating CD163 + or CD68 + myeloid cells in tumor nest versus tumor stroma was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays with tumors from 144 breast cancer cases. Spearman’s Rho and χ 2 tests were used to examine the correlations between CD163 + or CD68 + myeloid cells and clinicopathological parameters. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to assess the impact of CD163 + and CD68 + myeloid cells in tumor stroma and tumor nest, respectively, on recurrence free survival, breast cancer specific and overall survival. We found that infiltration of CD163 + and CD68 + macrophages into tumor stroma, but not into tumor nest, were of clinical relevance. CD163 + macrophages in tumor stroma positively correlated with higher grade, larger tumor size, Ki67 positivity, estrogen receptor negativity, progesterone receptor negativity, triple-negative/basal-like breast cancer and inversely correlated with luminal A breast cancer. Some CD163 + areas lacked CD68 expression, suggesting that CD163 could be used as a general anti-inflammatory myeloid marker with prognostic impact. CD68 + macrophages in tumor stroma positively correlated to tumor size and inversely correlated to luminal A breast cancer. More importantly, CD68 in tumor stroma was an independent prognostic factor for reduced breast cancer

  19. Longitudinal optical monitoring of blood flow in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. M.; Chung, S. H.; Leproux, A.; Baker, W. B.; Busch, D. R.; DeMichele, A. M.; Tchou, J.; Tromberg, B. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2017-06-01

    We measure tissue blood flow markers in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy and investigate their correlation to pathologic complete response in a pilot longitudinal patient study (n  =  4). Tumor blood flow is quantified optically by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and tissue optical properties, blood oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration are derived from concurrent diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI). The study represents the first longitudinal DCS measurement of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in humans over the entire course of treatment; it therefore offers a first correlation between DCS flow indices and pathologic complete response. The use of absolute optical properties measured by DOSI facilitates significant improvement of DCS blood flow calculation, which typically assumes optical properties based on literature values. Additionally, the combination of the DCS blood flow index and the tissue oxygen saturation from DOSI permits investigation of tissue oxygen metabolism. Pilot results from four patients suggest that lower blood flow in the lesion-bearing breast is correlated with pathologic complete response. Both absolute lesion blood flow and lesion flow relative to the contralateral breast exhibit potential for characterization of pathological response. This initial demonstration of the combined optical approach for chemotherapy monitoring provides incentive for more comprehensive studies in the future and can help power those investigations.

  20. Intracranial solitary fibrous tumor: Imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarencon, Frederic, E-mail: fredclare5@msn.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France); Bonneville, Fabrice [Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Rangueil, Toulouse University Hospital, 31000 Toulouse (France); Rousseau, Audrey [Department of Neuropathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Galanaud, Damien [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France); Kujas, Michele [Department of Neuropathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Naggara, Olivier [Department of Neuroradiology, St Anne Hospital, 75014 Paris (France); Cornu, Philippe [Department of Neurosurgery, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (France); Chiras, Jacques [Department of Neuroradiology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, APHP, 75013 Paris (France)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To study the neuroimaging features of intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (ISFTs). Materials and methods: Retrospective study of neuroimaging features of 9 consecutive histopathologically proven ISFT cases. Location, size, shape, density, signal intensity and gadolinium uptake were studied at CT and MRI. Data collected from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (3 patients), perfusion imaging and MR spectroscopy (2 patients), and DSA (4 patients) were also analyzed. Results: The tumors most frequently arose from the intracranial meninges (7/9), while the other lesions were intraventricular. Tumor size ranged from 2.5 to 10 cm (mean = 6.6 cm). They presented multilobular shape in 6/9 patients. Most ISFTs were heterogeneous (7/9) with areas of low T2 signal intensity that strongly enhanced after gadolinium administration (6/8). Erosion of the skull was present in about half of the cases (4/9). Components with decreased apparent diffusion coefficient were seen in 2/3 ISFTs on DWI. Spectroscopy revealed elevated peaks of choline and myo-inositol. MR perfusion showed features of hyperperfusion. Conclusion: ISFT should be considered in cases of extra-axial, supratentorial, heterogeneous, hypervascular tumor. Areas of low T2 signal intensity that strongly enhance after gadolinium injection are suggestive of this diagnosis. Restricted diffusion and elevated peak of myo-inositol may be additional valuable features.

  1. Amplexicaule A exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Meixian; Su, Hanwen; Shu, Guangwen; Wan, Dingrong; He, Feng; Loaec, Morgann; Ding, Yali; Li, Jun; Dovat, Sinisa; Yang, Gaungzhong; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with breast cancer metastases, but natural alternatives have been receiving attention for their potential as novel anti-tumor reagents. Amplexicaule A (APA) is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from rhizomes of Polygonum amplexicaule D. Don var. sinense Forb (PADF). We found that APA has anti-tumor effects in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. APA increased levels of cleaved caspase-3,-8,-9 and ...

  2. Association Between Imaging Characteristics and Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingxiang; Ma, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer can be divided into four major molecular subtypes based on the expression of hormone receptor (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, HER2 status, and molecular proliferation rate (Ki67). In this study, we sought to investigate the association between breast cancer subtype and radiological findings in the Chinese population. Medical records of 300 consecutive invasive breast cancer patients were reviewed from the database: the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The imaging characteristics of the lesions were evaluated. The molecular subtypes of breast cancer were classified into four types: luminal A, luminal B, HER2 overexpressed (HER2), and basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between the subtype (dependent variable) and mammography or 15 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators (independent variables). Luminal A and B subtypes were commonly associated with "clustered calcification distribution," "nipple invasion," or "skin invasion" (P cancers showed association with persistent enhancement in the delayed phase on MRI and "clustered calcification distribution" on mammography (P breast tumor, which are potentially useful tools in the diagnosis and subtyping of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental research for tumor VIP receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qianwei; Tan Tianzhi

    1998-01-01

    To study the possibility of radioactive labelled vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) for tumor VIP receptor imaging. 125 I-VIP was prepared by chloramine-T method, and purified by Sephadex G-50 column chromatography. The bioactivity and stability of 125 I-VIP were measured by silica 60 F 254 TLC and competition test to SGC7901 cell in vitro. The biodistribution of 125 I-VIP was studied in the nude mice bearing tumor. The results showed that labelled rate of 125 I was 73.8%, the specific activity was 18.2 PBq/mol, the radiochemical purity (RCP) was over 98% and remained 96.3% after 48 days stored at -80 degree C. The specific binding of 125 I-VIP to the SGC7901 cell was inhibited by VIP in dose dependence in the competition experiment. The radioactivity of tumor was higher than that of muscles in all phases (P<0.05-0.01), the peak activity of tumor occurred at 30 min (3.58 +- 0.48ID%/g) and the peak ratio of T/N occurred at 60 min after the injection. The activity of lungs was obviously higher than that of blood, the intestine was always in low level. Most of the activity in the body was mainly eliminated from kidney. The present study demonstrated that the radioactive labelled VIP is a promising agent for tumor VIP receptor scintigraphy

  4. Differentiating cancerous from normal breast tissue by redox imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism can be a hallmark of cancer occurring early before detectable histological changes and may serve as an early detection biomarker. The current gold standard to establish breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is histological examination of biopsy. Previously we have found that pre-cancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. Our technique of quantitatively measuring the mitochondrial redox state has the potential to be implemented as an early detection tool for cancer and may provide prognostic value. We therefore in this present study, investigated the feasibility of quantifying the redox state of tumor samples from 16 BC patients. Tumor tissue aliquots were collected from both normal and cancerous tissue from the affected cancer-bearing breasts of 16 female patients (5 TNBC, 9 ER+, 2 ER+/Her2+) shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen with liquid nitrogen on site and scanned later with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the 3D cryogenic NADH/oxidized flavoprotein (Fp) fluorescence imager. Our preliminary results showed that both NADH and Fp (including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide) signals in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled to quadrupled those in the normal tissues (pcancerous tissues than in the normal ones (pcancer and non-cancer breast tissues in human patients and this novel redox scanning procedure may assist in tissue diagnosis in freshly procured biopsy samples prior to tissue fixation. We are in the process of evaluating the prognostic value of the redox imaging indices for BC.

  5. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nariya

    2016-01-01

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics

  6. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariya Cho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  7. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  8. Prevalence of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, and herpesviruses in triple-negative and inflammatory breast tumors from algeria compared with other types of breast cancer tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilys Corbex

    Full Text Available The possible role of viruses in breast cancer etiology remains an unresolved question. We hypothesized that if some viruses are involved, it may be in a subgroup of breast cancers only. Epidemiological arguments drove our interest in breast cancer subgroups that are more frequent in Africa, namely inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and triple-negative breast cancer. We tested whether viral prevalence was significantly higher in these subgroups.One hundred fifty-five paraffin-embedded malignant breast tumors were randomly selected at the pathology laboratory of the University Hospital of Annaba (Algeria to include one third of IBC and two thirds of non-IBC. They were tested for the presence of DNA from 61 viral agents (46 human papillomaviruses, 10 polyomaviruses, and 5 herpesviruses using type-specific multiplex genotyping assays, which combine multiplex PCR and bead-based Luminex technology.Viral DNA was found in 22 (17.9% of 123 tumors. The most prevalent viruses were EBV1 and HPV16. IBC tumors carried significantly more viruses (any type than non-IBC tumors (30% vs. 13%, p<0.04. Similarly, triple-negative tumors displayed higher virus-positivity than non-triple-negative tumors (44% vs. 14%, p<0.009.Our results suggest an association between the presence of viral DNA and aggressive breast cancer phenotypes (IBC, triple-negative. While preliminary, they underline the importance of focusing on subgroups when studying viral etiology in breast cancer. Further studies on viruses in breast cancer should be conducted in much larger samples to confirm these initial findings.

  9. Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Relapse: Local Recurrence Versus New Primary Tumor and the Effect of Whole-Breast Radiotherapy on the Rate of New Primaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujral, Dorothy M.; Sumo, Georges; Owen, John R.; Ashton, Anita; Bliss, Judith M.; Haviland, Joanne; Yarnold, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The justification for partial breast radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery assumes that ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) outside the index quadrant are mostly new primary (NP) tumors that develop despite radiotherapy. We tested the hypothesis that whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is ineffective in preventing NP by comparing development rates in irradiated and contralateral breasts after tumor excision and WBRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,410 women with breast cancer who were entered into a prospective randomized trial of radiotherapy fractionation and monitored annually for ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) and contralateral breast cancer (CLBC). Cases of IBTR were classified into local recurrence (LR) or NP tumors based on location and histology and were subdivided as definite or likely depending on clinical data. Rates of ipsilateral NP and CLBC were compared over a 15-year period of follow-up. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.1 years, there were 150 documented cases of IBTR: 118 (79%) cases were definite or likely LR; 27 (18%) cases were definite or likely NP; and 5 (3%) cases could not be classified. There were 71 cases of CLBC. The crude proportion of definite-plus-likely NP was 1.9% (27/1,410) patients compared with 5% (71/1,410) CLBC patients. Cumulative incidence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 0.8%, 2.0%, and 3.5%, respectively, for definite-plus-likely NP and 2.4%, 5.8%, and 7.9%, respectively for CLBC, suggesting a difference in the rates of NP and CLBC. Conclusions: This analysis suggests that WBRT reduces the rate of ipsilateral NP tumors. The late presentation of NP has implications for the reporting of trials that are testing partial breast radiotherapy.

  10. Real-time intraoperative detection of breast cancer using near-infrared fluorescence imaging and Methylene Blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Q R J G; Verbeek, F P R; Schaafsma, B E; Boonstra, M C; van der Vorst, J R; Liefers, G-J; van de Velde, C J H; Frangioni, J V; Vahrmeijer, A L

    2014-07-01

    Despite recent developments in preoperative breast cancer imaging, intraoperative localization of tumor tissue can be challenging, resulting in tumor-positive resection margins during breast conserving surgery. Based on certain physicochemical similarities between Technetium((99m)Tc)-sestamibi (MIBI), an SPECT radiodiagnostic with a sensitivity of 83-90% to detect breast cancer preoperatively, and the near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore Methylene Blue (MB), we hypothesized that MB might detect breast cancer intraoperatively using NIR fluorescence imaging. Twenty-four patients with breast cancer, planned for surgical resection, were included. Patients were divided in 2 administration groups, which differed with respect to the timing of MB administration. N = 12 patients per group were administered 1.0 mg/kg MB intravenously either immediately or 3 h before surgery. The mini-FLARE imaging system was used to identify the NIR fluorescent signal during surgery and on post-resected specimens transferred to the pathology department. Results were confirmed by NIR fluorescence microscopy. 20/24 (83%) of breast tumors (carcinoma in N = 21 and ductal carcinoma in situ in N = 3) were identified in the resected specimen using NIR fluorescence imaging. Patients with non-detectable tumors were significantly older. No significant relation to receptor status or tumor grade was seen. Overall tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) was 2.4 ± 0.8. There was no significant difference between TBR and background signal between administration groups. In 2/4 patients with positive resection margins, breast cancer tissue identified in the wound bed during surgery would have changed surgical management. Histology confirmed the concordance of fluorescence signal and tumor tissue. This feasibility study demonstrated an overall breast cancer identification rate using MB of 83%, with real-time intraoperative guidance having the potential to alter patient management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  11. Optimizing the dosing schedule of l-asparaginase improves its anti-tumor activity in breast tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoya Shiromizu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells is nutritionally dependent on the external supply of asparagine. l-asparaginase, an enzyme hydrolyzing l-asparagine in blood, is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemic and other related blood cancers. Although previous studies demonstrated that l-asparaginase suppresses the proliferation of cultured solid tumor cells, it remains unclear whether this enzyme prevents the growth of solid tumors in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated the importance of optimizing dosing schedules for the anti-tumor activity of l-asparaginase in 4T1 breast tumor-bearing mice. Cultures of several types of murine solid tumor cells were dependent on the external supply of asparagine. Among them, we selected murine 4T1 breast cancer cells and implanted them into BALB/c female mice kept under standardized light/dark cycle conditions. The growth of 4T1 tumor cells implanted in mice was significantly suppressed by intravenous administration of l-asparaginase during the light phase, whereas its administration during the dark phase failed to show significant anti-tumor activity. Decreases in plasma asparagine levels due to the administration of l-asparaginase were closely related to the dosing time-dependency of its anti-tumor effects. These results suggest that the anti-tumor efficacy of l-asparaginase in breast tumor-bearing mice is improved by optimizing the dosing schedule. Keywords: l-asparaginase, Asparagine, Solid tumor, Chrono-pharmacotherapy

  12. Correlation of MRI apparent diffusion coefficient of invasive breast cancer with tumor tissue growth and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Hong Fu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC value of invasive breast cancer with tumor tissue growth and angiogenesis. Methods: Patients with breast mass who were treated in Wuhan No. 6 Hospital between March 2014 and May 2017 were selected as the research subjects and divided into group A with invasive ductal carcinoma, group B with intraductal carcinoma and group C with benign lesion according to the biopsy results, magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging was conducted to determine ADC values, and biopsy tissue was taken to determine the expression of proliferation genes and angiogenesis genes. Results: USP39, CyclinD1, VEGF, bFGF, Angplt-2, Angplt-3 and Angplt-4 protein expression levels in lesions of group A and group B were significantly higher than those of group C while ADC value as well as ALEX1 and Bax protein expression levels were significantly lower than those of group C; USP39, CyclinD1, VEGF, bFGF, Angplt-2, Angplt-3 and Angplt-4 protein expression levels in lesions of group A were significantly higher than those of group B while ADC value as well as ALEX1 and Bax protein expression levels was significantly lower than those of group B; USP39, CyclinD1, VEGF, bFGF, Angplt-2, Angplt-3 and Angplt-4 protein expression levels in invasive breast cancer tissue with high ADC value were significantly lower than those in invasive breast cancer tissue with low ADC value while ALEX1 and Bax protein expression levels were significantly higher than those in invasive breast cancer tissue with low ADC value. Conclusion: The decrease of ADC value of invasive breast cancer is closely related to cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  13. The application of surgical navigation system using optical molecular imaging technology in orthotopic breast cancer and metastasis studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chongwei; Zhang, Qian; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Du, Yang; Tian, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Currently, it has been an international focus on intraoperative precise positioning and accurate resection of tumor and metastases. The methods such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role in preoperative accurate diagnosis. However, most of them are inapplicable for intraoperative surgery. We have proposed a surgical navigation system based on optical molecular imaging technology for intraoperative detection of tumors and metastasis. This system collects images from two CCD cameras for real-time fluorescent and color imaging. For image processing, the template matching algorithm is used for multispectral image fusion. For the application of tumor detection, the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1-luc, which shows highly metastasis, was used for tumor model establishment and a model of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expressing breast cancer. The tumor-bearing nude mice were given tail vein injection of MMP 750FAST (PerkinElmer, Inc. USA) probe and imaged with both bioluminescence and fluorescence to assess in vivo binding of the probe to the tumor and metastases sites. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumor and metastasis. As a result, one tumor can be observed visually in vivo. However liver metastasis has been detected under surgical navigation system and all were confirmed by histology. This approach helps surgeons to find orthotopic tumors and metastasis during intraoperative resection and visualize tumor borders for precise positioning. Further investigation is needed for future application in clinics.

  14. Integrated radiomic framework for breast cancer and tumor biology using advanced machine learning and multiparametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Vishwa S; Jacobs, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Radiomics deals with the high throughput extraction of quantitative textural information from radiological images that not visually perceivable by radiologists. However, the biological correlation between radiomic features and different tissues of interest has not been established. To that end, we present the radiomic feature mapping framework to generate radiomic MRI texture image representations called the radiomic feature maps (RFM) and correlate the RFMs with quantitative texture values, breast tissue biology using quantitative MRI and classify benign from malignant tumors. We tested our radiomic feature mapping framework on a retrospective cohort of 124 patients (26 benign and 98 malignant) who underwent multiparametric breast MR imaging at 3 T. The MRI parameters used were T1-weighted imaging, T2-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). The RFMs were computed by convolving MRI images with statistical filters based on first order statistics and gray level co-occurrence matrix features. Malignant lesions demonstrated significantly higher entropy on both post contrast DCE-MRI (Benign-DCE entropy: 5.72 ± 0.12, Malignant-DCE entropy: 6.29 ± 0.06, p  = 0.0002) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps as compared to benign lesions (Benign-ADC entropy: 5.65 ± 0.15, Malignant ADC entropy: 6.20 ± 0.07, p  = 0.002). There was no significant difference between glandular tissue entropy values in the two groups. Furthermore, the RFMs from DCE-MRI and DWI demonstrated significantly different RFM curves for benign and malignant lesions indicating their correlation to tumor vascular and cellular heterogeneity respectively. There were significant differences in the quantitative MRI metrics of ADC and perfusion. The multiview IsoSVM model classified benign and malignant breast tumors with sensitivity and specificity of 93 and 85%, respectively, with an AUC of 0.91.

  15. Differentiation of recurrent breast cancer from radiation fibrosis with dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.H.; Campana, F.; Fourquet, A.; Rahmouni, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the ability of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging to differentiate radiation fibrosis from tumor recurrence of breast cancer after conservative treatment. Twenty-five women with previous breast cancer treated with radiation therapy underwent MR imaging examination. Tumor recurrence was suspected on palpation of masses (18 cases) or at mammography (7 cases). The MR imaging protocol was performed on a 0.5-T imager with a breast coil and included T1 and T2 spin-echo, short To inversion recovery (STIR), and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted sequenced to evaluate the hemokinetics of the lesion. Ratios of signal intensity of suspected lesions to that of fat, surrounding breast gland, and background noise were calculated. Percutaneous biopsies were performed in all cases after MR imaging. Curves of signal-to-noise ratio of recurrences (5 cases) showed an early enhancement within the first minutes after injection, although localized fibrosis (20 cases) was not significantly enhanced. T2 and STIR sequences were not contributive in differentiating fibrosis from tumor recurrence

  16. FIBROMATOSIS (DESMOID TUMOR OF THE BREAST. Fibromatosis (tumor desmoide de mama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaneta P Boceska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available El tumor desmoide (fibromatosis es una entidad patológica extremadamente rara que se desarrolla de la fascia muscular y la aponeusorsis. Aunque sin potencial metastático, estos tumores son localmente muy agresivos y tienden a infiltrarse en los tejidos circundantes. Nosotros presentamos un caso de tumour desmoide de mama, que tuvo apariencias clínicas sugestivas a carcinoma. La paciente, de 56 años presentó una masa palpable de mama derecho. La citología por aspiracion con aguja fina (AGF no detectó ninguna célula maligna, por lo que se hizo una escisión local conservadora. La paciente no recibió ningun tratamiento postoperatorio adicional, y continúa viva y sana en los siguientes 18 meses. Desmoid tumor (fibromatosis is extremely rare benign pathological entity that develops from muscular fasciae and aponeuroses. Although without metastatic potential, these tumors are locally very aggressive and tend to infiltrate the surrounding tissues. We present a case of a desmoid tumor of the breast that had clinical appearance suggestive of carcinoma. The patient was 56 years old female with a previous history of surgical trauma who presented with a palpable mass in the right breast. A fine needle aspiration (FNA cytology did not reveal any malignant cells, thus conservative local excision was performed. The patient did not receive any additional postoperative treatment and was alive and free of disease after 18 months of follow-up. 

  17. Segmentation of liver tumors on CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescia, D.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to 3D segmentation of liver tumors in CT images. This is a task of great clinical interest since it allows physicians benefiting from reproducible and reliable methods for segmenting such lesions. Accurate segmentation would indeed help them during the evaluation of the lesions, the choice of treatment and treatment planning. Such a complex segmentation task should cope with three main scientific challenges: (i) the highly variable shape of the structures being sought, (ii) their similarity of appearance compared with their surrounding medium and finally (iii) the low signal to noise ratio being observed in these images. This problem is addressed in a clinical context through a two step approach, consisting of the segmentation of the entire liver envelope, before segmenting the tumors which are present within the envelope. We begin by proposing an atlas-based approach for computing pathological liver envelopes. Initially images are pre-processed to compute the envelopes that wrap around binary masks in an attempt to obtain liver envelopes from estimated segmentation of healthy liver parenchyma. A new statistical atlas is then introduced and used to segmentation through its diffeomorphic registration to the new image. This segmentation is achieved through the combination of image matching costs as well as spatial and appearance prior using a multi-scale approach with MRF. The second step of our approach is dedicated to lesions segmentation contained within the envelopes using a combination of machine learning techniques and graph based methods. First, an appropriate feature space is considered that involves texture descriptors being determined through filtering using various scales and orientations. Then, state of the art machine learning techniques are used to determine the most relevant features, as well as the hyper plane that separates the feature space of tumoral voxels to the ones corresponding to healthy tissues. Segmentation is then

  18. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Blickman, J.G.; Boetes, C.; Kok, T.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control group of 29 sporadic breast cancer cases. Detection rates on both modalities were evaluated. Tumors were analyzed on morphology, density (mammography), enhancement pattern and kinetics (MRI). Overall detection was significantly better with MRI than with mammography (55/58 vs 44/57, P = 0.021). On mammography, lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (12//19 vs 3/13, P = 0.036) and with sharp margins (9/19 vs 1/13, P 0.024). On MRI lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (16/27 vs 7/28, P = 0.010), with sharp margins (20/27 vs 7/28, P < 0.001) and with rim enhancement (7/27 vs 1/28, P = 0.025). No significant difference was found for enhancement kinetics (P = 0.667). Malignant lesions in BRCA-MC frequently have morphological characteristics commonly seen in benign lesions, like a rounded shape or sharp margins. This applies for both mammography and MRI. However the possibility of MRI to evaluate the enhancement pattern and kinetics enables the detection of characteristics suggestive for a malignancy. (orig.)

  19. Feasibility of spatial frequency-domain imaging for monitoring palpable breast lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Constance M.; Raghavan, Guruprasad; Antaki, James F.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.

    2017-12-01

    In breast cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring, there is a need for frequent, noninvasive disease progression evaluation. Breast tumors differ from healthy tissue in mechanical stiffness as well as optical properties, which allows optical methods to detect and monitor breast lesions noninvasively. Spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) is a reflectance-based diffuse optical method that can yield two-dimensional images of absolute optical properties of tissue with an inexpensive and portable system, although depth penetration is limited. Since the absorption coefficient of breast tissue is relatively low and the tissue is quite flexible, there is an opportunity for compression of tissue to bring stiff, palpable breast lesions within the detection range of SFDI. Sixteen breast tissue-mimicking phantoms were fabricated containing stiffer, more highly absorbing tumor-mimicking inclusions of varying absorption contrast and depth. These phantoms were imaged with an SFDI system at five levels of compression. An increase in absorption contrast was observed with compression, and reliable detection of each inclusion was achieved when compression was sufficient to bring the inclusion center within ˜12 mm of the phantom surface. At highest compression level, contrasts achieved with this system were comparable to those measured with single source-detector near-infrared spectroscopy.

  20. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  1. [Common benign breast tumors including fibroadenoma, phyllodes tumors, and papillary lesions: Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendifallah, S; Canlorbe, G

    2015-12-01

    To provide guidelines for clinical practice from the French College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (CNGOF), based on the best evidence available, concerning common benign breast tumors: fibroadenoma (FA), phyllodes breast tumors (PBT), and papillary lesions (BPL). Bibliographical search in French and English languages by consultation of PubMed, Cochrane and international databases. In case of percutaneous biopsy diagnosis of FA, clinico-radiologic and pathologic discordance or complex FA or proliferative lesions or atypia with FA, a family history of cancer, it seems legitimate to discuss management in a multidisciplinary meeting. When surgery is proposed for FA, periareolar compared to direct incision is associated with more insensitive nipple but better aesthetic results (LE4). When surgery is proposed for FA, indirect incision is preferable for better cosmetic results (Grade C). Techniques of percutaneous destruction or resection can be used (Grade C). The WHO classification distinguishes three categories of phyllodes tumors (PBT): benign (grade 1), borderline (grade 2) and malignant (grade 3). For grade 1 PBT, the risk of local recurrence after surgical excision increases when PBT lesion is in contact with surgical limits (not in sano). After in sano resection, there is no correlation between margin size and the risk of recurrence (LE4). For grade 2 PBT, local recurrence after surgical excision increases for margins under 10mm margins (LE4). For grade 1-2 PBT, in sano excision is recommended. For grade 2 PBT, 10-mm margins are recommended (Grade C). No lymph node evaluation or neither systematic mastectomy is recommended (Grade C). Breast papillary lesion (BPL) without atypia, complete resection of radiologic signal is recommended (Grade C). For BPL with atypia, complete excisional surgery is recommended (Grade C). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer has limited impact on transcriptomic-based molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Rantalainen, Mattias; Stålhammar, Gustav; Lövrot, John; Ullah, Ikram; Alkodsi, Amjad; Ma, Ran; Wedlund, Lena; Lindberg, Johan; Frisell, Jan; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2017-11-29

    Transcriptomic profiling of breast tumors provides opportunity for subtyping and molecular-based patient stratification. In diagnostic applications the specimen profiled should be representative of the expression profile of the whole tumor and ideally capture properties of the most aggressive part of the tumor. However, breast cancers commonly exhibit intra-tumor heterogeneity at molecular, genomic and in phenotypic level, which can arise during tumor evolution. Currently it is not established to what extent a random sampling approach may influence molecular breast cancer diagnostics. In this study we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify gene expression in 43 pieces (2-5 pieces per tumor) from 12 breast tumors (Cohort 1). We determined molecular subtype and transcriptomic grade for all tumor pieces and analysed to what extent pieces originating from the same tumors are concordant or discordant with each other. Additionally, we validated our finding in an independent cohort consisting of 19 pieces (2-6 pieces per tumor) from 6 breast tumors (Cohort 2) profiled using microarray technique. Exome sequencing was also performed on this cohort, to investigate the extent of intra-tumor genomic heterogeneity versus the intra-tumor molecular subtype classifications. Molecular subtyping was consistent in 11 out of 12 tumors and transcriptomic grade assignments were consistent in 11 out of 12 tumors as well. Molecular subtype predictions revealed consistent subtypes in four out of six patients in this cohort 2. Interestingly, we observed extensive intra-tumor genomic heterogeneity in these tumor pieces but not in their molecular subtype classifications. Our results suggest that macroscopic intra-tumoral transcriptomic heterogeneity is limited and unlikely to have an impact on molecular diagnostics for most patients.

  3. LOXL4 knockdown enhances tumor growth and lung metastasis through collagen-dependent extracellular matrix changes in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sul Ki; Kim, Hoe Suk; Jin, Tiefeng; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-02-14

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) family genes catalyze collagen cross-link formation. To determine the effects of lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4) expression on breast tumor formation and metastasis, we evaluated primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in mice injected with LOXL4-knockdown MDA-MB-231 triple-negative human breast cancer cells. In addition, we analyzed overall survival in breast cancer patients based on LOXL4 expression using a public online database. In the mouse xenograft model, LOXL4 knockdown increased primary tumor growth and lung colonization as well as collagen I and IV, lysine hydroxylase 1 and 2, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase subunit alpha 1 and 2 levels. Second harmonic generation imaging revealed that LOXL4 knockdown resulted in the thickening of collagen bundles within tumors. In addition, weak LOXL4 expression was associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients from the BreastMark dataset, and this association was strongest in triple-negative breast cancer patients. These results demonstrate that weak LOXL4 expression leads to remodeling of the extracellular matrix through induction of collagen synthesis, deposition, and structural changes. These alterations in turn promote tumor growth and metastasis and are associated with poor clinical outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer.

  4. MR imaging of multiple fibroadenoma in breast: comparison with color doppler images and histologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Soo Young; Yang, Ik; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Yul; Chung, Bong Wha; Ahn, Hye Kyung [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-10-01

    To understand the different signal intensities seen on contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in multiple fibroadenoma of the breast, and to compare these with color Doppler ultrasonographic (CDUS) and histologic findings. MRI (1.0 Tesla, TIWI, T2WI, 3D-gradient echo dynamic contrast enhancement study) findings of 24 histologically proven cases of fibroadenoma in five patients were evaluated and compared with the histologic components (myxoid, adenomatous, fibrous). In addition, vascular flow, as seen on CDUS and histologic section, was compared. The observed degree of signal intensity waw classified into three groups, as follows: negative, 8.3%, mild to moderate, 54.2%; marked, 37.5%. On histologic section, the greater the fibrotic component, the higher the intensity of MRI enhancement, the greater the glandular component, and the intensity. CDUS showed vascular flow in only one tumor larger than 3cm in diameter. Vascular patterns of tumors on CDUS were dots in mass and detouring pattern, but in this case and in strongly enhanced cases, tumor vascularity-as seen on histologic section-showed no significant increase. Different signal intensities seen on contrast enhanced MRI in multiple fibroadenoma of the breast may be related more to the amount of glandular and fibrotic component than to increased tumor vascularity.

  5. MR imaging of multiple fibroadenoma in breast: comparison with color doppler images and histologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Soo Young; Yang, Ik; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Yul; Chung, Bong Wha; Ahn, Hye Kyung

    1997-01-01

    To understand the different signal intensities seen on contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in multiple fibroadenoma of the breast, and to compare these with color Doppler ultrasonographic (CDUS) and histologic findings. MRI (1.0 Tesla, TIWI, T2WI, 3D-gradient echo dynamic contrast enhancement study) findings of 24 histologically proven cases of fibroadenoma in five patients were evaluated and compared with the histologic components (myxoid, adenomatous, fibrous). In addition, vascular flow, as seen on CDUS and histologic section, was compared. The observed degree of signal intensity waw classified into three groups, as follows: negative, 8.3%, mild to moderate, 54.2%; marked, 37.5%. On histologic section, the greater the fibrotic component, the higher the intensity of MRI enhancement, the greater the glandular component, and the intensity. CDUS showed vascular flow in only one tumor larger than 3cm in diameter. Vascular patterns of tumors on CDUS were dots in mass and detouring pattern, but in this case and in strongly enhanced cases, tumor vascularity-as seen on histologic section-showed no significant increase. Different signal intensities seen on contrast enhanced MRI in multiple fibroadenoma of the breast may be related more to the amount of glandular and fibrotic component than to increased tumor vascularity

  6. Imaging features of breast echinococcus granulosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Li; Liu Fanming; Gong Yue; Ge Jinmei; Li Xianjun; Shi Minxin; Guo Yongzhong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the X-ray and CT features of breast hydatid disease. Methods: Of 11 patients with pathologically confirmed breast Echinococcus hydatid disease were collected and the X-ray and CT image data were analyzed. Results: Of 11 patients with hydatid cysts,single cyst was found in 9 patients which one cyst was ruptured due to trauma, multiple cyst in 2 patients. Mammography showed small or large shadow in different size, with low or high density and smooth margin. Calcification was found in 5 and 2 patients with egg shell-like calcification along the wall of cyst, 3 patients with spotted calcification within cyst. One case had cavity-like change (annular solar eclipse sign). Cystic lesion with a complete capsule was demonstrated on CT scan in 1 patient. Conclusion: Molybdenum target mammography can accurately display the imaging characteristics of hydatid cyst and improve the diagnostic ability of breast hydatid cyst in combination with clinical and epidemiological data. (authors)

  7. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio

    1989-10-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author).

  8. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author)

  9. Acousto-Mechanical Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2002-01-01

    The underlying hypothesis of our study is that quantitative breast elasticity imaging is possible and provides unique information, which could increase the detection, characterization and monitoring...

  10. Acousto-Mechanical Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2003-01-01

    The underlying hypothesis of our study is that quantitative breast elasticity imaging is possible and provides unique information, which could increase the detection, characterization and monitoring...

  11. Issues to consider before implementing digital breast tomosynthesis into a breast imaging practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Lara A

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to discuss issues surrounding the implementation of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) into a clinical breast imaging practice and assist radiologists, technologists, and administrators who are considering the addition of this new technology to their practices. CONCLUSION. When appropriate attention is given to image acquisition, interpretation, storage, technologist and radiologist training, patient selection, billing, radiation dose, and marketing, implementation of DBT into a breast imaging practice can be successful.

  12. Optimizing the dosing schedule of l-asparaginase improves its anti-tumor activity in breast tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiromizu, Shoya; Kusunose, Naoki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2018-04-01

    Proliferation of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells is nutritionally dependent on the external supply of asparagine. l-asparaginase, an enzyme hydrolyzing l-asparagine in blood, is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemic and other related blood cancers. Although previous studies demonstrated that l-asparaginase suppresses the proliferation of cultured solid tumor cells, it remains unclear whether this enzyme prevents the growth of solid tumors in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated the importance of optimizing dosing schedules for the anti-tumor activity of l-asparaginase in 4T1 breast tumor-bearing mice. Cultures of several types of murine solid tumor cells were dependent on the external supply of asparagine. Among them, we selected murine 4T1 breast cancer cells and implanted them into BALB/c female mice kept under standardized light/dark cycle conditions. The growth of 4T1 tumor cells implanted in mice was significantly suppressed by intravenous administration of l-asparaginase during the light phase, whereas its administration during the dark phase failed to show significant anti-tumor activity. Decreases in plasma asparagine levels due to the administration of l-asparaginase were closely related to the dosing time-dependency of its anti-tumor effects. These results suggest that the anti-tumor efficacy of l-asparaginase in breast tumor-bearing mice is improved by optimizing the dosing schedule. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Medico-legal issues in breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purushothaman, H.N., E-mail: hema.purushothaman@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Wilson, R. [Department of Radiology, The Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Michell, M.J. [Department of Radiology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To identify medico-legal issues that occur in the diagnosis and radiological management of breast disease and to propose measures to reduce the risk of patient complaints and legal action in breast radiology and diagnosis. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval was not applicable for this study. A retrospective study was undertaken and records of 120 medico-legal investigations over a 10 year period were examined. The reports were compiled by two consultant breast radiologists. Results: The mean age of the patients represented in this study was 48.3 years. The main complaint in this series was a delay in diagnosis (92%) followed by inappropriate or inadequate treatment (8%). 81% of cases were patients who had presented to the symptomatic clinic. The main presenting symptom was a palpable lump (65%). Substandard care was cited in 49/120 cases (41%). The mean average delay in diagnosis was 15.6 months. Of the cases cited as substandard care, 61% were considered the fault of the radiologist and 14% considered the fault of the breast surgeon. Of the cases where the radiologist was considered to be at fault, microcalcification was the most common mammographic sign to be missed or misinterpreted (12/26 cases, 46%). Conclusion: The most common complaint in this series was delay in diagnosis with microcalcification being the main mammographic sign that was either not seen or misinterpreted by the radiologist. Clear and precise written protocols are recommended for all breast imaging practice to ensure that medico-legal investigations will be greatly reduced.

  14. Medico-legal issues in breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purushothaman, H.N.; Wilson, R.; Michell, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To identify medico-legal issues that occur in the diagnosis and radiological management of breast disease and to propose measures to reduce the risk of patient complaints and legal action in breast radiology and diagnosis. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval was not applicable for this study. A retrospective study was undertaken and records of 120 medico-legal investigations over a 10 year period were examined. The reports were compiled by two consultant breast radiologists. Results: The mean age of the patients represented in this study was 48.3 years. The main complaint in this series was a delay in diagnosis (92%) followed by inappropriate or inadequate treatment (8%). 81% of cases were patients who had presented to the symptomatic clinic. The main presenting symptom was a palpable lump (65%). Substandard care was cited in 49/120 cases (41%). The mean average delay in diagnosis was 15.6 months. Of the cases cited as substandard care, 61% were considered the fault of the radiologist and 14% considered the fault of the breast surgeon. Of the cases where the radiologist was considered to be at fault, microcalcification was the most common mammographic sign to be missed or misinterpreted (12/26 cases, 46%). Conclusion: The most common complaint in this series was delay in diagnosis with microcalcification being the main mammographic sign that was either not seen or misinterpreted by the radiologist. Clear and precise written protocols are recommended for all breast imaging practice to ensure that medico-legal investigations will be greatly reduced.

  15. Department of Defense Era of Hope Scholar Award Nanotechnology-Enabled Optical Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    detection, and management of breast cancer today. A variety of imaging methods including screening and diagnostic x- ray mammography and resonance...profile of a tumor. In addition, techniques such as x- ray imaging and MRI are not able to detect small early cancers or pre-cancerous breast...227 (2007). 18. S. Oldenburg , J. Jackson, S. Westcott, and N. Halas, “Infrared extinction properties of gold nanoshells,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 75, 2897

  16. Malignant gastroduodenal stromal tumor imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qiang; Wen Feng; Zhao Zhenguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the imaging features of malignant gastroduodenal stromal tumor (mGDST)as an aid to its diagnosis. Methods: The unenhanced and multi-phasic contrast-enhanced CT scans of 24 patients with pathologically proven mGDST and air-contrast upper gastrointestinal studies(15 patients) were reviewed by two radiologists. The tumor location, size, contour, margin, growth type, contrast enhancement pattern and presence of ulcer were recorded. Results: The mGDST was located in the gastric fundus (15), gastric body(3), pylorus(2) and duodenum(4). The pathological types were submucosal(9), intramuscular(9) and subserosal(6). CT findings of mGDST included lobular shape(17), tumor size>5cm(14), central necrosis(15), large and deep ulcer(6), heterogeneous contrast enhancement(1), metastasis(1). The diagnostic accuracy of air-contrast upper gastrointestinal studies and CT for location of mGDST was 93.3% and 100% respectively, for malignant features was both 75.0%. Conclusion: Most mGDST have some characteristic appearances including large tumor size greater than 5 cm, lobular shape, central necrosis, large and deep ulcer, heterogeneous contrast enhancement and metastasis. Lymph node enlargement was uncommon. The diagnostic accuracy can be improved by CT scan combined with upper gastrointestinal barium examination. (authors)

  17. Overexpression of prostate tumor overexpressed 1 correlates with tumor progression and predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Fangyong; Zhang, Longjuan; Li, Xinghua; Lin, Xi; Wu, Shu; Li, Fengyan; Liu, Junling

    2014-01-01

    Prostate tumor overexpressed 1 (PTOV1) was demonstrated to play an important role in cancer progression and was correlated with unfavorable clinical outcome. However, the clinical role of PTOV1 in cancer remains largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the expression and clinicopathological significance of PTOV1 in breast cancer. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PTOV1 were analyzed in 12 breast cancer cell lines and eight paired breast cancer tumors by semi-quantitative real time-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess PTOV1 protein expression in 169 paraffin-embedded, archived breast cancer samples. Survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were performed to investigate the clinicopathological significance of PTOV1 expression. Our data revealed that PTOV1 was frequently overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines compared to normal human breast epithelial cells and in primary breast cancer samples compared to adjacent noncancerous breast tissues, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, high expression of PTOV1 in breast cancer is strongly associated with clinicopathological characteristics and estrogen receptor expression status (P = 0.003). Breast cancer patients with higher PTOV1 expression had substantially shorter survival times than patients with lower PTOV1 expression (P < 0.001). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that PTOV1 might be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer patients (P = 0.005). Our study showed that PTOV1 is upregulated in breast cancer cell lines and clinical samples, and its expression was positively associated with progression and aggressiveness of breast cancer, suggesting that PTOV1 could serve as an independent prognostic marker

  18. (Re) Imaging the breast: An analysis of a cultural obsession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domshy, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    This article is a brief resume of the work done for an academic thesis to explore any possible relationship between historical images of the female breast, and the subsequent development of positive or negative self-imaging for modern women. Using historical images of the breast from pre-Christian times to the pre ent, the many uses of breast imaging are explored. The research was conducted by the use of eleven interviews, as well as survey forms that targeted two different groups of women. One survey was given to the general female population, and the other targeted mammographic technologists. The findings were varied and provided an interesting examination of the ambiguity inherent in women's perception of their breasts and the breasts of other women. The research clearly indicated a need for farther study involving mammographic technologists. Radiographers combine the requirements of the job with their personal viewpoints, which have been impacted by both past and present breast imaging. (author)

  19. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  20. Amplexicaule A exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Guangwen; Wan, Dingrong; He, Feng; Loaec, Morgann; Ding, Yali; Li, Jun; Dovat, Sinisa; Yang, Gaungzhong; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with breast cancer metastases, but natural alternatives have been receiving attention for their potential as novel anti-tumor reagents. Amplexicaule A (APA) is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from rhizomes of Polygonum amplexicaule D. Don var. sinense Forb (PADF). We found that APA has anti-tumor effects in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. APA increased levels of cleaved caspase-3,-8,-9 and PARP, which resulted from suppression of MCL-1 and BCL-2 expression in the cells. APA also inactivated the Akt/mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells. Thus, APA exerts a strong anti-tumor effect on breast cancer cells, most likely through induction of apoptosis. Our study is the first to identify this novel anti-tumor compound and provides a new strategy for isolation and separation of single compounds from herbs. PMID:26943775

  1. Altered expression of estrogen receptor-α variant messenger RNAs between adjacent normal breast and breast tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leygue, Etienne; Dotzlaw, Helmut; Watson, Peter H; Murphy, Leigh C

    2000-01-01

    Using semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays, we investigated the expression of variant messenger RNAs relative to wild-type estrogen receptor (ER)-α messenger RNA in normal breast tissues and their adjacent matched breast tumor tissues. Higher ER variant truncated after sequences encoding exon 2 of the wild-type ER-α (ERC4) messenger RNA and a lower exon 3 deleted ER-α variant (ERD3) messenger RNA relative expression in the tumor compartment were observed in the ER-positive/PR-positive and the ER-positive subsets, respectively. A significantly higher relative expression of exon 5 deleted ER-α varient (ERD5) messenger RNA was observed in tumor components overall. These data demonstrate that changes in the relative expression of ER-α variant messenger RNAs occur between adjacent normal and neoplastic breast tissues. We suggest that these changes might be involved in the mechanisms that underlie breast tumorigenesis. Estrogen receptor (ER)-α and ER-β are believed to mediate the action of estradiol in target tissues. Several ER-α and ER-β variant messenger RNAs have been identified in both normal and neoplastic human tissues. Most of these variants contain a deletion of one or more exons of the wild-type (WT) ER messenger RNAs. The putative proteins that are encoded by these variant messenger RNAs would therefore be missing some functional domains of the WT receptors, and might interfere with WT-ER signaling pathways. The detection of ER-α variants in both normal and neoplastic human breast tissues raised the question of their possible role in breast tumorigenesis. We have previously reported an increased relative expression of exon 5 deleted ER-α variant (ERD5) messenger RNA and of another ER-α variant truncated of all sequences following the exon 2 of the WT ER-α (ERC4) messenger RNA in breast tumor samples versus independent normal breast tissues. In contrast, a decreased relative expression of exon 3 deleted ER

  2. Photothermal ablation of inflammatory breast cancer tumor emboli using plasmonic gold nanostars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford BM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bridget M Crawford,1,2,* Ronnie L Shammas,3,* Andrew M Fales,1,2 David A Brown,4 Scott T Hollenbeck,4 Tuan Vo-Dinh,1,2,5 Gayathri R Devi6,7 1Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Duke University, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 3Duke University School of Medicine, 4Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, 5Department of Chemistry, Duke University, 6Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Sciences, 7Duke Cancer Institute, Women’s Cancer Program, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is rare, but it is the most aggressive subtype of breast cancer. IBC has a unique presentation of diffuse tumor cell clusters called tumor emboli in the dermis of the chest wall that block lymph vessels causing a painful, erythematous, and edematous breast. Lack of effective therapeutic treatments has caused mortality rates of this cancer to reach 20%–30% in case of women with stage III–IV disease. Plasmonic nanoparticles, via photothermal ablation, are emerging as lead candidates in next-generation cancer treatment for site-specific cell death. Plasmonic gold nanostars (GNS have an extremely large two-photon luminescence cross-section that allows real-time imaging through multiphoton microscopy, as well as superior photothermal conversion efficiency with highly concentrated heating due to its tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. To effectively study the use of GNS as a clinically plausible treatment of IBC, accurate three-dimensional (3D preclinical models are needed. Here, we demonstrate a unique in vitro preclinical model that mimics the tumor emboli structures assumed by IBC in vivo using IBC cell lines SUM149 and SUM190. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GNS are endocytosed into multiple cancer cell lines irrespective of receptor status or drug resistance and that

  3. Dual Energy Tomosynthesis breast phantom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Fountos, G.; Messaris, G.; Michail, C.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.

    2017-12-01

    Dual energy (DE) imaging technique has been applied to many theoretical and experimental studies. The aim of the current study is to evaluate dual energy in breast tomosynthesis using commercial tomosynthesis system in terms of its potential to better visualize microcalcifications (μCs). The system uses a tungsten target X-ray tube and a selenium direct conversion detector. Low-energy (LE) images were acquired at different tube voltages (28, 30, 32 kV), while high-energy images at 49 kV. Fifteen projections, for the low- and high-energy respectively, were acquired without grid while tube scanned continuously. Log-subtraction algorithm was used in order to obtain the DE images with the weighting factor, w, derived empirically. The subtraction was applied to each pair of LE and HE slices after reconstruction. The TORMAM phantom was imaged with the different settings. Four regions-of-interest including μCs were identified in the inhomogeneous part of the phantom. The μCs in DE images were more clearly visible compared to the low-energy images. Initial results showed that DE tomosynthesis imaging is a promising modality, however more work is required.

  4. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  5. Prognostic value of androgen receptor level in breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershtejn, E.S.; Smirnova, K.D.; Vishnyakova, V.V.; Ermilova, V.D.

    1988-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) level was studied in 254 untreated cases of breast cancer. The occurrence and mean level of AR did not depend upon stage of disease or reproductive status. Increase in degree of anaplasia of ductal-invasive carcinoma was matched by decrease in its AR-positive fraction from 75 to 20 %. Recurence-free survival in surgically treated p T 1-2 No Mo patients did not depend upon AR status of tumor. In cases of p T 1-2 Nd Mo AR-positive malignancy, recurrences or metastases occurred 2.2 times as rarely when surgery was followed by the best results were obtained with postoperative chemo- and chemoradiation treatment

  6. Correlation of breast image alignment using biomechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Angela; Rajagopal, Vijay; Bier, Peter; Nielsen, Poul M. F.; Nash, Martyn P.

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death among women around the world. Researchers have found that a combination of imaging modalities (such as x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound) leads to more effective diagnosis and management of breast cancers because each imaging modality displays different information about the breast tissues. In order to aid clinicians in interpreting the breast images from different modalities, we have developed a computational framework for generating individual-specific, 3D, finite element (FE) models of the breast. Medical images are embedded into this model, which is subsequently used to simulate the large deformations that the breasts undergo during different imaging procedures, thus warping the medical images to the deformed views of the breast in the different modalities. In this way, medical images of the breast taken in different geometric configurations (compression, gravity, etc.) can be aligned according to physically feasible transformations. In order to analyse the accuracy of the biomechanical model predictions, squared normalised cross correlation (NCC2) was used to provide both local and global comparisons of the model-warped images with clinical images of the breast subject to different gravity loaded states. The local comparison results were helpful in indicating the areas for improvement in the biomechanical model. To improve the modelling accuracy, we will need to investigate the incorporation of breast tissue heterogeneity into the model and altering the boundary conditions for the breast model. A biomechanical image registration tool of this kind will help radiologists to provide more reliable diagnosis and localisation of breast cancer.

  7. Automated detection of breast cancer in resected specimens with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Unger, Jakob; Darrow, Morgan; Bold, Richard J.; Marcu, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Re-excision rates for breast cancer lumpectomy procedures are currently nearly 25% due to surgeons relying on inaccurate or incomplete methods of evaluating specimen margins. The objective of this study was to determine if cancer could be automatically detected in breast specimens from mastectomy and lumpectomy procedures by a classification algorithm that incorporated parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm). This study generated a database of co-registered histologic sections and FLIm data from breast cancer specimens (N  =  20) and a support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm able to automatically detect cancerous, fibrous, and adipose breast tissue. Classification accuracies were greater than 97% for automated detection of cancerous, fibrous, and adipose tissue from breast cancer specimens. The classification worked equally well for specimens scanned by hand or with a mechanical stage, demonstrating that the system could be used during surgery or on excised specimens. The ability of this technique to simply discriminate between cancerous and normal breast tissue, in particular to distinguish fibrous breast tissue from tumor, which is notoriously challenging for optical techniques, leads to the conclusion that FLIm has great potential to assess breast cancer margins. Identification of positive margins before waiting for complete histologic analysis could significantly reduce breast cancer re-excision rates.

  8. Imaging Findings of Scrotal Tumors in Children: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hee [Kang-Dong Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Eun [Gachon University, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye [Sungkyunkwan University, Samsung Medical Center, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dal Mo [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The diagnosis of scrotal tumors in children can be challenging because of the rarity, vague symptoms, and varied imaging features of the tumors. The pathology and frequency of scrotal tumors that occur in children are different from tumors that arise in adults. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate the imaging findings of scrotal tumors in children with pathological correlations. In addition, we present the clinical manifestations that are valuable for a differential diagnosis. Familiarity with the imaging findings and clinical manifestations of pediatric scrotal tumors may be helpful in making an accurate diagnosis and providing proper patient management

  9. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    .... and whether depletion of tumor-associated macrophages has any effect on the tumor growth. The breast cancer model was established in BALB/c mice by subcutaneous injection of estrogen receptor-positive murine mammary tumor cells (4T1...

  10. Real-Time MRI Navigated Ultrasound for Preoperative Tumor Evaluation in Breast Cancer Patients: Technique and Clinical Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ah Young; Seo, Bo Kyoung [Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan 15355 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigated ultrasound is an image fusion technique to display the results of both MRI and ultrasonography on the same monitor. This system is a promising technique to improve lesion detection and analysis, to maximize advantages of each imaging modality, and to compensate the disadvantages of both MRI and ultrasound. In evaluating breast cancer stage preoperatively, MRI and ultrasound are the most representative imaging modalities. However, sometimes difficulties arise in interpreting and correlating the radiological features between these two different modalities. This pictorial essay demonstrates the technical principles of the real-time MRI navigated ultrasound, and clinical implementation of the system in preoperative evaluation of tumor extent, multiplicity, and nodal status in breast cancer patients.

  11. Real-time MRI navigated ultrasound for preoperative tumor evaluation in breast cancer patients: Technique and clinical implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ah Young; Seo, Bo Kyoung [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigated ultrasound is an image fusion technique to display the results of both MRI and ultrasonography on the same monitor. This system is a promising technique to improve lesion detection and analysis, to maximize advantages of each imaging modality, and to compensate the disadvantages of both MRI and ultrasound. In evaluating breast cancer stage preoperatively, MRI and ultrasound are the most representative imaging modalities. However, sometimes difficulties arise in interpreting and correlating the radiological features between these two different modalities. This pictorial essay demonstrates the technical principles of the real-time MRI navigated ultrasound, and clinical implementation of the system in preoperative evaluation of tumor extent, multiplicity, and nodal status in breast cancer patients.

  12. Granular cell tumor of the breast: a report of the three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellado, M.; Pina, L.; Cojo, R.; Arias-Camison, I.

    2000-01-01

    Granular cell tumors (GCT) of the breast are uncommon benign neoplasms that are usually indistinguishable from breast cancer with respect to their clinical and radiological presentation. FNAB can be a usefull diagnostic tool, but histological examination is essential for the correct diagnosis. This benign tumor should be considered among the diagnostic possibilities in the presence of a lesion with mammographic and ultrasonographic indications of highly probable malignancy. We present three cases of breast GCT that mimicked primary breast cancer. Benign neoplasm was diagnosed and local excision was carried out rather than mastectomy and lymphadenectomy. (Author) 9 refs

  13. Cellular Interaction and Tumoral Penetration Properties of Cyclodextrin Nanoparticles on 3D Breast Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Varan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic cyclodextrins are biocompatible oligosaccharides that can be used for drug delivery especially for the delivery of drugs with solubility problems thanks to their unique molecular structures. In this paper, Paclitaxel was used as a model anticancer drug to determine the inclusion complex properties of amphiphilic cyclodextrins with different surface charge. Paclitaxel-loaded cyclodextrin nanoparticles were characterized in terms of mean particle diameter, zeta potential, encapsulation efficacy, drug release profile and cell culture studies. It was determined that the nanoparticles prepared from the inclusion complex according to characterization studies have a longer release profile than the conventionally prepared nanoparticles. In order to mimic the tumor microenvironment, breast cancer cells and healthy fibroblast cells were used in 3-dimensional (3D cell culture studies. It was determined that the activities of nanoparticles prepared by conventional methods behave differently in 2-dimensional (2D and 3D cell cultures. In addition, it was observed that the nanoparticles prepared from the inclusion complex have a stronger anti-tumoral activity in the 3D multicellular tumor model than the drug solution. Furthermore, polycationic amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles can diffuse and penetrate through multilayer cells in a 3D tumor model, which is crucial for an eventual antitumor effect.

  14. The usefulness of mammography and scintimammography in differential diagnosis of breast tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Bong Joo; Chung, Young An; Jung, Hyun Seok; Jung, Jung Im; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Chung, Soo Kyo; Hahn, Seong Tai; Lee, Jae Mun

    2004-01-01

    lt is very important to differentiate breast cancer from benign mass. There are many reports to evaluate the differential diagnosis under the several diagnostic tools. We evaluated the usefulness of mammography and Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography in the differential diagnosis of breast mass and correlated with pathologic findings. This study included 80 patients (age: 24-72, mean: 48.4) who underwent mammography and Tc-99m MlBI scintimammography for breast masses. Scintimammographies (anterior-posterior and lateral projections) were acquired in 10 minutes and 2 hours after intravenous injection of Tc-99m MlBl. Four specialists in diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine evaluated the findings of breast masses under the mammography and Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography, and calculated the tumor to background (T/B) ratio. The pathologic results were obtained and we statistically analyzed the correlations between pathologic results and imaging findings under the mammography and Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography by chi-square and correlation test. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of mammography for detection of breast cancer were 87.5%, 56.3%, 75.0%, and 75.0% respectively. 45 cases of 80 patients were suspicious for breast cancer under the Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography. 41 cases of 45 patients were confirmed as breast cancer and the remaining 4 cases were confirmed as benign masses. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography for detection of breast cancer were 85.4%, 87.5%, 91.1%, and 80.8% respectively. The sensitivity of scintimammography was lower than that of mammography for detection of breast cancer, however the specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were higher. In the benign mass, the mean T/B ratio in 10 minutes was 1.409±0.30, and that in 2 hours was 1.267±0.42. The maximal T/B ratio of benign mass in 10

  15. Immunohistochemical analysis of breast tissue microarray images using contextual classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J McKenna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tissue microarrays (TMAs are an important tool in translational research for examining multiple cancers for molecular and protein markers. Automatic immunohistochemical (IHC scoring of breast TMA images remains a challenging problem. Methods: A two-stage approach that involves localization of regions of invasive and in-situ carcinoma followed by ordinal IHC scoring of nuclei in these regions is proposed. The localization stage classifies locations on a grid as tumor or non-tumor based on local image features. These classifications are then refined using an auto-context algorithm called spin-context. Spin-context uses a series of classifiers to integrate image feature information with spatial context information in the form of estimated class probabilities. This is achieved in a rotationally-invariant manner. The second stage estimates ordinal IHC scores in terms of the strength of staining and the proportion of nuclei stained. These estimates take the form of posterior probabilities, enabling images with uncertain scores to be referred for pathologist review. Results: The method was validated against manual pathologist scoring on two nuclear markers, progesterone receptor (PR and estrogen receptor (ER. Errors for PR data were consistently lower than those achieved with ER data. Scoring was in terms of estimated proportion of cells that were positively stained (scored on an ordinal scale of 0-6 and perceived strength of staining (scored on an ordinal scale of 0-3. Average absolute differences between predicted scores and pathologist-assigned scores were 0.74 for proportion of cells and 0.35 for strength of staining (PR. Conclusions: The use of context information via spin-context improved the precision and recall of tumor localization. The combination of the spin-context localization method with the automated scoring method resulted in reduced IHC scoring errors.

  16. Usefulness of 3D-VIBE method in breast dynamic MRI. Imaging parameters and contrasting effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikoshi, Masato; Ueda, Takashi; Nishiki, Shigeo; Satou, Kouichi; Wada, Akihiko; Imaoka, Izumi; Matsuo, Michimasa

    2003-01-01

    MR imaging (MRI) has been reported to be a useful modality to characterize breast tumors and to evaluate disease extent. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI, in particular, allows breast lesions to be characterized with high sensitivity and specificity. Our study was designed to develop three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (3D-VIBE) techniques for the evaluation of breast tumors. First, agarose/Gd-DTPA phantoms with various concentrations of Gd-DTPA were imaged using 3D-VIBE and turbo spin echo (TSE). Second, one of the phantoms was imaged with 3D-VIBE using different flip angles. Finally, water excitation (WE) and a chemical shift-selective (CHESS) pulse were applied to the images. Each image was analyzed for signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio (1.25*Ms/Mb) (SNR), and contrast ratio [(Ms1-Ms2)/{(Ms1+Ms2)/2}]. The results showed that 3D-VIBE provided better contrast ratios with a linear fit than TSE, although 3D-VIBE showed a lower SNR. To reach the best contrast ratio, the optimized flip angle was found to be 30 deg for contrast-enhanced dynamic study. Both WE and CHESS pulses were reliable for obtaining fat- suppressed images. In conclusion, the 3D-VIBE technique can image the entire breast area with high resolution and provide better contrast than TSE. Our phantom study suggests that optimized 3D-VIBE may be useful for the assessment of breast tumors. (author)

  17. MRI monitoring of tumor response following angiogenesis inhibition in an experimental human breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, Karl; Preda, Anda; Shames, David M.; Novikov, Viktor; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Fu, Yanjun; Brasch, Robert C.; Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O.; Wood, Jeanette M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by macromolecular contrast agents to monitor noninvasively the therapeutic effect of an anti-angiogenesis VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor in an experimental cancer model. MDA-MB-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was implanted into the mammary fat pad in 20 female homozygous athymic rats. Animals were assigned randomly to a control (n=10) or drug treatment group (n=10). Baseline dynamic MRI was performed on sequential days using albumin-(GdDTPA) 30 (6.0 nm diameter) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles (30 nm diameter). Subjects were treated either with PTK787/ZK 222584, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or saline given orally twice daily for 1 week followed by repeat MRI examinations serially using each contrast agent. Employing a unidirectional kinetic model comprising the plasma and interstitial water compartments, tumor microvessel characteristics including fractional plasma volume and transendothelial permeability (K PS ) were estimated for each contrast medium. Tumor growth and the microvascular density, a histologic surrogate of angiogenesis, were also measured. Control tumors significantly increased (P PS ) based on MRI assays using both macromolecular contrast media. In contrast, tumor growth was significantly reduced (P PS values declined slightly. Estimated values for the fractional plasma volume did not differ significantly between treatment groups or contrast agents. Microvascular density counts correlated fairly with the tumor growth rate (r=0.64) and were statistically significant higher (P PS ), using either of two macromolecular contrast media, were able to detect effects of treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor on tumor vascular permeability. In a clinical setting such quantitative MRI measurements could be used to monitor tumor anti-angiogenesis therapy. (orig.)

  18. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of ‘image registration paths’ to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10-9).

  19. Phantom experiments using soft-prior regularization EIT for breast cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ethan K; Mahara, Aditya; Wu, Xiaotian; Halter, Ryan J

    2017-06-01

    A soft-prior regularization (SR) electrical impedance tomography (EIT) technique for breast cancer imaging is described, which shows an ability to accurately reconstruct tumor/inclusion conductivity values within a dense breast model investigated using a cylindrical and a breast-shaped tank. The SR-EIT method relies on knowing the spatial location of a suspicious lesion initially detected from a second imaging modality. Standard approaches (using Laplace smoothing and total variation regularization) without prior structural information are unable to accurately reconstruct or detect the tumors. The soft-prior approach represents a very significant improvement to these standard approaches, and has the potential to improve conventional imaging techniques, such as automated whole breast ultrasound (AWB-US), by providing electrical property information of suspicious lesions to improve AWB-US's ability to discriminate benign from cancerous lesions. Specifically, the best soft-regularization technique found average absolute tumor/inclusion errors of 0.015 S m -1 for the cylindrical test and 0.055 S m -1 and 0.080 S m -1 for the breast-shaped tank for 1.8 cm and 2.5 cm inclusions, respectively. The standard approaches were statistically unable to distinguish the tumor from the mammary gland tissue. An analysis of false tumors (benign suspicious lesions) provides extra insight into the potential and challenges EIT has for providing clinically relevant information. The ability to obtain accurate conductivity values of a suspicious lesion (>1.8 cm) detected from another modality (e.g. AWB-US) could significantly reduce false positives and result in a clinically important technology.

  20. Carbon-11 and Fluorine-18 Labeled Amino Acid Tracers for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aixia; Liu, Xiang; Tang, Ganghua

    2017-12-01

    Tumor cells have an increased nutritional demand for amino acids(AAs) to satisfy their rapid proliferation. Positron-emitting nuclide labeled AAs are interesting probes and are of great importance for imaging tumors using positron emission tomography (PET). Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled AAs include the [1-11C] amino acids, labeling alpha-C- amino acids, the branched-chain of amino acids and N-substituted carbon-11 labeled amino acids. These tracers target protein synthesis or amino acid(AA) transport, and their uptake mechanism mainly involves AA transport. AA PET tracers have been widely used in clinical settings to image brain tumors, neuroendocrine tumors, prostate cancer, breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and hepatocellular carcinoma. This review focuses on the fundamental concepts and the uptake mechanism of AAs, AA PET tracers and their clinical applications.

  1. Clinical impact of [18F]FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer based on asymptomatically elevated tumor marker serum levels. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Kao, Chia-Hung; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the impact of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on the detection of recurrent breast cancer based on asymptomatically elevated tumor markers levels. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed in 30 patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer and asymptomatic tumor marker increase but negative or equivocal other imaging modality results. A blood sample was drawn in each case for marker assay (CA 15-3 and CEA) on the same day as the FDG-PET. All of these 30 asymptomatic patients had either CA 15-3>32 U/ml or CEA>5 ng/ml. The final diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer was established by operation/biopsy histopathological findings or clinical follow-up for >1 year by additional morphological imaging techniques. Among the 30 patients, the final diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer was established in 38 sites in 28 patients. FDG-PET accurately detected 35/38 sites in 25/28 patients with recurrence. The diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy of FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer and asymptomatically elevated tumor markers were 96 and 90%, respectively. FDG-PET is a useful technique for detecting recurrent breast cancer suspected from asymptomatically elevated tumor markers levels and has an important clinical impact on the management of these patients. (author)

  2. Clinical impact of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer based on asymptomatically elevated tumor marker serum levels. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Kao, Chia-Hung [China Medical Coll., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Hospital; Shen, Yeh-You [Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yen, Ruoh-Fang [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Hospital

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the impact of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on the detection of recurrent breast cancer based on asymptomatically elevated tumor markers levels. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed in 30 patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer and asymptomatic tumor marker increase but negative or equivocal other imaging modality results. A blood sample was drawn in each case for marker assay (CA 15-3 and CEA) on the same day as the FDG-PET. All of these 30 asymptomatic patients had either CA 15-3>32 U/ml or CEA>5 ng/ml. The final diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer was established by operation/biopsy histopathological findings or clinical follow-up for >1 year by additional morphological imaging techniques. Among the 30 patients, the final diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer was established in 38 sites in 28 patients. FDG-PET accurately detected 35/38 sites in 25/28 patients with recurrence. The diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy of FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer and asymptomatically elevated tumor markers were 96 and 90%, respectively. FDG-PET is a useful technique for detecting recurrent breast cancer suspected from asymptomatically elevated tumor markers levels and has an important clinical impact on the management of these patients. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses | Corr | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast MR imaging is the most accurate imaging investigation to detect breast prosthesis rupture. Rupture is common in older prostheses (> 10 years post implantation) and is often asymptomatic. The radiological signs of rupture are due to collapse of the elastomer shell which is eneveloped by silicone gel and when the ...

  4. MR imaging assisted radiation therapy planning of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, M.; Roesler, H.P.; Higer, H.P.; Kutzner, J.; Thelen, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the improvement of the accuracy of treatment portals in radiation therapy of brain tumors with use of MR imaging. After proper processing, the parasagittal MR image showing the largest tumor size and the midline sagittal image were superimposed. With common anatomic landmarks of midline tomogram and lateral simulation radiograph, commensurate reference grids were laid over both images in identical positions. Tumor coordinates were then transferred from the synthesized MR image to the lateral radiograph. Rectangular fields or individual shielding blocks encompassing the tumor could be drawn directly. This new method was used in 17 patients, and results were compared with CT-assisted results

  5. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in brain-stem tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Mikio; Saito, Hisazumi; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Four patients with brain-stem tumors underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after radiotherapy. The brain-stem tumors were seen as a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and as a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. A tumor and its anatomic involvement were more clearly visualized on MRI than on cuncurrently performed CT. Changes in tumor before and after radiotherapy could be determined by measuring the diameter of tumor on sagittal and coronal images. This allowed quantitative evaluation of the reduction of tumor in association with improvement of symptoms. The mean T1 value in the central part of tumors was shortened in all patients after radiotherapy. The results indicate that MRI may assist in determining the effect of radiotherapy for brain-stem tumors. (Namekawa, K)

  7. Imaging-Assisted Large-Format Breast Pathology: Program Rationale and Development in a Nonprofit Health System in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lee Tucker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern breast imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, provides an increasingly clear depiction of breast cancer extent, often with suboptimal pathologic confirmation. Pathologic findings guide management decisions, and small increments in reported tumor characteristics may rationalize significant changes in therapy and staging. Pathologic techniques to grossly examine resected breast tissue have changed little during this era of improved breast imaging and still rely primarily on the techniques of gross inspection and specimen palpation. Only limited imaging information is typically conveyed to pathologists, typically in the form of wire-localization images from breast-conserving procedures. Conventional techniques of specimen dissection and section submission destroy the three-dimensional integrity of the breast anatomy and tumor distribution. These traditional methods of breast specimen examination impose unnecessary limitations on correlation with imaging studies, measurement of cancer extent, multifocality, and margin distance. Improvements in pathologic diagnosis, reporting, and correlation of breast cancer characteristics can be achieved by integrating breast imagers into the specimen examination process and the use of large-format sections which preserve local anatomy. This paper describes the successful creation of a large-format pathology program to routinely serve all patients in a busy interdisciplinary breast center associated with a community-based nonprofit health system in the United States.

  8. One-Step 18F-Labeling of Estradiol Derivative for PET Imaging of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET imaging is a useful method to evaluate in situ estrogen receptor (ER status for the early diagnosis of breast cancer and optimization of the appropriate treatment strategy. The 18F-labeled estradiol derivative has been successfully used to clinically assess the ER level of breast cancer. In order to simplify the radiosynthesis process, one-step 18F-19F isotope exchange reaction was employed for the 18F-fluorination of the tracer of [18F]AmBF3-TEG-ES. The radiotracer was obtained with the radiochemical yield (RCY of ~61% and the radiochemical purity (RCP of >98% within 40 min. Cell uptake and blocking assays indicated that the tracer could selectively accumulate in the ER-positive human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D. In vivo PET imaging on the MCF-7 tumor-bearing mice showed relatively high tumor uptake (1.4~2.3 %D/g and tumor/muscle uptake ratio (4~6. These results indicated that the tracer is a promising PET imaging agent for ER-positive breast cancers.

  9. Sensitivity of imaging for multifocal-multicentric breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viale Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    .5%. Re-reviewed Mx detected only 3 additional lesions. The sensitivity of Mx was affected by the presence of dense breast tissue which obscured lesions or by an incorrect interpretation of suspicious findings. US detected 73/80 index cancers (sensitivity of 91.2%, US missed 117 malignant foci with a mean tumor diameter of 6.5 mm; the sensitivity was 52.9% Undetected lesions by US were those smallest in size and present in fatty breast or in the presence of microcalcifications without a visible mass. US sensitivity was affected by the presence of fatty tissue or by the extent of calcification. Conclusion Mx missed MMBC malignant foci more often in dense or fibroglandular breasts. US missed small lesions in mainly fatty breasts or when there were only microcalcifications. The combined sensitivity of both techniques to assess MMBC was 58%. We suggest larger studies on multimodality imaging.

  10. MR diffusion weighted imaging with background signal suppression in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Zhang Bing; Zhou Zhengyang; Yu Haiping; Yuan Lei; Zhu Bin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of echo planar imaging with short time inversion recovery (STIR-EPI) diffusion weighted imaging with background signal (DWIBS) suppression in breast cancer. Methods: The diffusion weighted imaging (DWI)with background suppression (b=800 mm 2 /s) was performed in 26 patients with breast cancer. Apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC) of all lesions were measured and compared. 3D maximum intensity projection (3D-MIP)and reverse black and white technique were used to show the lesions. DWI and DWIBS were performed and compared for the detection of breast cancer. Randomized blocks analysis of variance was used for the ADC values in different breast tissues, the ADC values in breast cancer and benign lesion were compared using t test. The paired chi square test was used for the detection rate of breast cancer in two different imaging methods. Results: Most of the breast cancers were hyperintense on DWI (b=800 mm 2 /s). The ADC value of cancer tissue was (0.93±0.25) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, tumor necrosis was (2.06±0.17) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, normal breast tissue was (1.92±0.23) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and metastatic lymph node was (1.10±0.14) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and the differences were statistically significant between two structures (P 2 =8.307, P 2 = 12.235, P -3 mm 2 /s and benign lesion (2.15±0.53) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s had significant statistical differences (t=8.626,P<0.05). Conclusion: Diffusion weighted MRI with background suppression can detect more lesions than DWI and can be potentially applied for the detection of the breast cancer combining the ADC value. (authors)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast. Actual technique and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardivon, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Optimal breast MRI protocols are required using dedicated breast coils, high spatial resolution dynamic sequences (morphologic criteria are significantly more accurate than kinetic criteria) and bolus injection of contrast medium. Any abnormal MR enhancement must be described using BI-RADSMRI lexicon. Main indications of breast MRI are: suspicion of intra-capsular rupture (silicone implants), local relapse in a treated breast, search for breast cancer (metastatic axillary lymph nodes), locals staging of a breast cancer (dense breasts), follow-up of cancer under neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and screening in high-risk patients (gene mutation background). MRI is also useful for patients with unresolved problems at standard imaging (high negative predictive value of MRI). In patients with breast cancer, it is important to underline the need for radiologists to work with the multidisciplinary team and the ability to perform MR-guided biopsies for additional suspicious enhancements. (author) [es

  12. Imaging Spectrums of the Male Breast Diseases: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Choi, Seon Hyeong; Ahn, Hye Kyung; Chung, Soo Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Scred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ah young [Dept. of Pathology, Kangnam Scred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Most described male breast lesions, such as gynecomastia, are benign. The overall incidence of male breast cancer is less than 3%. Like women, common presentations of male breast diseases are palpable lumps or tenderness. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasound are generally used for work-up of breast diseases in both women and men. However, men do not undergo screening mammograms; all male patients are examined in symptomatic cases only. Therefore, all male breast examinations are diagnostic, whereas the majority of the examinations for women are for screening purpose. The differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions is important, especially for men, because the reported prognosis of male breast cancer is poor due to delayed diagnosis. In this article, we review the spectrum of male breast diseases, from benign to malignant, and illustrate their ultrasonographic and mammographic imaging features.

  13. Imaging Spectrums of the Male Breast Diseases: A Pictorial Essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Choi, Seon Hyeong; Ahn, Hye Kyung; Chung, Soo Young; Yang Ik; Jung, Ah young

    2011-01-01

    Most described male breast lesions, such as gynecomastia, are benign. The overall incidence of male breast cancer is less than 3%. Like women, common presentations of male breast diseases are palpable lumps or tenderness. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasound are generally used for work-up of breast diseases in both women and men. However, men do not undergo screening mammograms; all male patients are examined in symptomatic cases only. Therefore, all male breast examinations are diagnostic, whereas the majority of the examinations for women are for screening purpose. The differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions is important, especially for men, because the reported prognosis of male breast cancer is poor due to delayed diagnosis. In this article, we review the spectrum of male breast diseases, from benign to malignant, and illustrate their ultrasonographic and mammographic imaging features.

  14. Optimizing fluorescently tethered Hsp90 inhibitor dose for maximal specific uptake by breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Brian T.; Duer, Joy; Wang, Roujia; Gallagher, Jennifer; Hall, Allison; Soo, Mary Scott; Hughes, Philip; Haystead, Timothy A. J.; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2018-03-01

    Despite improvements in surgical resection, 20-40% of patients undergoing breast conserving surgery require at least one additional re-excision. Leveraging the unique surface expression of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone protein involved in several key hallmarks of cancer, in breast cancer provides an exciting opportunity to identify residual disease during surgery. We developed a completely non-destructive strategy using HS-27, a fluorescently-tethered Hsp90 inhibitor, to assay surface Hsp90 expression on intact tissue specimens using a fluorescence microendoscope with a field of view of 750 μm and subcellular resolution of 4 μm. HS-27 consists of an FDA approved Hsp90 inhibitor tethered to fluorescein isothiocyanate (EX 488nm, EM 525nm). Here, we optimized ex vivo HS-27 administration in pre-clinical breast cancer models and validated our approach on 21 patients undergoing standard of care ultrasound guided core needle biopsy. HS-27 administration time was fixed at 1- minute to minimize imaging impact on clinical workflow. HS-27 and HS-217 (non-specific control) doses were modulated from 1 μM up to 100 μM to identify the dose maximizing the ratio of specific uptake (HS-27 fluorescence) to non-specific uptake (HS-217 fluorescence). The specificity ratio was maximized at 100 μM and was significantly greater than all other doses (pcancer makes this technology attractive for assessing tumor margins, as one agent can be used for all subtypes.

  15. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobsen, Jan; Palen, Job van der; Riemersma, Sietske; Heijmans, Harald; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors

  16. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobsen, Jan, E-mail: j.jobsen@mst.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Palen, Job van der [Department of Epidemiology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Research Methodology, Measurement, and Data Analysis, Faculty of Behavioral Science, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Riemersma, Sietske [Laboratory for Pathology Oost Nederland, Hengelo (Netherlands); Heijmans, Harald [Department of Surgery, Ziekenhuis Groep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Ong, Francisca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Struikmans, Henk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Radiotherapy Centre West, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors.

  17. Pharmacokinetic Tumor Heterogeneity as a Prognostic Biomarker for Classifying Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Ashraf, Ahmed B; Daye, Dania; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Rosen, Mark; Mies, Carolyn; Feldman, Michael; Kontos, Despina

    2015-06-01

    Heterogeneity in cancer can affect response to therapy and patient prognosis. Histologic measures have classically been used to measure heterogeneity, although a reliable noninvasive measurement is needed both to establish baseline risk of recurrence and monitor response to treatment. Here, we propose using spatiotemporal wavelet kinetic features from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to quantify intratumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. Tumor pixels are first partitioned into homogeneous subregions using pharmacokinetic measures. Heterogeneity wavelet kinetic (HetWave) features are then extracted from these partitions to obtain spatiotemporal patterns of the wavelet coefficients and the contrast agent uptake. The HetWave features are evaluated in terms of their prognostic value using a logistic regression classifier with genetic algorithm wrapper-based feature selection to classify breast cancer recurrence risk as determined by a validated gene expression assay. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and area under the curve (AUC) are computed to assess classifier performance using leave-one-out cross validation. The HetWave features outperform other commonly used features (AUC = 0.88 HetWave versus 0.70 standard features). The combination of HetWave and standard features further increases classifier performance (AUCs 0.94). The rate of the spatial frequency pattern over the pharmacokinetic partitions can provide valuable prognostic information. HetWave could be a powerful feature extraction approach for characterizing tumor heterogeneity, providing valuable prognostic information.

  18. Thick tissue diffusion model with binding to optimize topical staining in fluorescence breast cancer margin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Kang, Soyoung; Navarro-Comes, Eric; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2018-03-01

    Intraoperative tumor/surgical margin assessment is required to achieve higher tumor resection rate in breast-conserving surgery. Though current histology provides incomparable accuracy in margin assessment, thin tissue sectioning and the limited field of view of microscopy makes histology too time-consuming for intraoperative applications. If thick tissue, wide-field imaging can provide an acceptable assessment of tumor cells at the surface of resected tissues, an intraoperative protocol can be developed to guide the surgery and provide immediate feedback for surgeons. Topical staining of margins with cancer-targeted molecular imaging agents has the potential to provide the sensitivity needed to see microscopic cancer on a wide-field image; however, diffusion and nonspecific retention of imaging agents in thick tissue can significantly diminish tumor contrast with conventional methods. Here, we present a mathematical model to accurately simulate nonspecific retention, binding, and diffusion of imaging agents in thick tissue topical staining to guide and optimize future thick tissue staining and imaging protocol. In order to verify the accuracy and applicability of the model, diffusion profiles of cancer targeted and untargeted (control) nanoparticles at different staining times in A431 tumor xenografts were acquired for model comparison and tuning. The initial findings suggest the existence of nonspecific retention in the tissue, especially at the tissue surface. The simulator can be used to compare the effect of nonspecific retention, receptor binding and diffusion under various conditions (tissue type, imaging agent) and provides optimal staining and imaging protocols for targeted and control imaging agent.

  19. MRI evaluation of residual breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: influence of patient, tumor and chemotherapy characteristics on the correlation with pathological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diguisto, Caroline; Ouldamer, Lobna; Arbion, Flavie; Vildé, Anne; Body, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the residual tumor measured on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological results and to assess whether this correlation varies according to patient, tumor or chemotherapy characteristics. The study population included women treated for breast cancer with indication of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our tertiary breast cancer Unit between January 2008 and December 2011. Factors related to patients, tumor and chemotherapy were studied. Pearson's correlation coefficient between the size of the tumor on MRI and pathological response was calculated for the entire population. It was also calculated according to patient, tumor and chemotherapy characteristics. During the study period, 107 consecutive women were included. The size of residual tumor on the MRI significantly correlated with the size on pathological result with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.52 (pcorrelation was stronger for women aged 50 years and older (r=0.64, pcorrelation was stronger for those with triple-negative tumors (r=0.69, p=0.002) but weaker for those with tumors with a ductal carcinoma in situ component (r =0.18, p=0.42). The size of breast cancer obtained by MRI is significantly correlated to the pathological size of the tumor. This correlation was stronger among women aged 50 years and more, among post-menopausal women, and among women who had triple-negative tumors. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic imaging for breast cancer detection and treatment: a role for mitochondrial Complex I function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2018-02-01

    Cancer cells are known to display a variety of metabolic reprogramming strategies to fulfill their own growth and proliferative agenda. With the advent of high resolution imaging strategies, metabolomics techniques etc., there is an increasing appreciation of critical role that tumor cell metabolism plays in the overall breast cancer (BC) growth. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated that the development of invasive cancers could be causally connected to deficits in mitochondrial function. Using this study as a rationale, we hypothesize that the widely accepted multistep tumor growth model might have a strong metabolic component as well. In this study, we explore the possibility of targeting mitochondrial Complex I enzyme system for not only metabolic detection of cancer-associated redox changes but also for modulating breast cancer cell growth characteristics. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two approaches (pharmacological and genetic) for modulating mitochondrial Complex I function so as to achieve breast cancer control.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: current indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalonde, L.; David, J.; Trop, I.

    2005-01-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasing role in the management of selecting breast cancer patients. MRI is recognized as the most sensitive modality for the detection of invasive breast cancer. Several valuable clinical applications of MRI have emerged for breast cancer detection and diagnosis from clinical investigations. Breast MRI is helpful for women diagnosed with breast cancer who contemplate breast conserving surgery; it provides valuable information on the extent of the disease. MRI can also help assess for residual invasive cancer in patients who have undergone lumpectomy with positive margins at pathology. It is very reliable in differentiating scar tissue from recurrence at the lumpectomy site. MRI is also reliable in finding a breast cancer in women with axillary nodal metastases and unknown primary tumour. MRI can help to monitor the response to chemotherapy. Breast MRI could be a better screening tool than mammography in women with very high risks of developing breast cancer, such as breast cancer gene carriers and patients treated with chest radiation. Other potential uses of MRI include evaluation of the integrity of silicone breast implants and evaluation of the parenchyma in women with silicone gel implants or free injection of silicone gel. However, like any other technique, breast MRI has some drawbacks, including low-to-moderate specificity, high costs, and variability in technique and interpretation. Radiologists must have a clear understanding of valid indications and selection criteria to use this technique appropriately. (author)

  2. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Bird , L. Yan, K. M. Vrotsos, K. W. Eliceiri, E. M. Vaughan, P. J. Keely, J. G. White, N. Ramanujam, Metabolic mapping of MCF10A human breast cells...1   Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0025 TITLE: Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary... Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER BC112240 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  3. New Approaches for Early Detection of Breast Tumor Invasion or Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Man, Yan-Gao

    2003-01-01

    To assess interactions between epithelial (EP) and myoepithelial (ME) cells in association with breast tumor progression and invasion, a double immunostaining technique with antibodies to smooth muscle actin (SMA...

  4. Gene expression profiling of circulating tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hensler, M.; Vancurova, I.; Becht, E.; Palata, O.; Strnad, P.; Tesarova, P.; Cabinakova, M.; Švec, David; Kubista, Mikael; Bartunkova, J.; Spisek, R.; Sojka, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), e1102827 ISSN 2162-402X Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Breast cancer * gene expression profiling * circulating tumor cells Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 7.719, year: 2016

  5. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu

    2004-01-01

    ...-encapsulated clodronate had no effect on the growth of subcutaneous breast cancer (4T1) model in mice. Whether liposome-encapsulated cloronate depletes tumor-assocaited macrophages in this model is currently under investigation.

  6. Modulation of Breast Tumor Cell Response to Retinoids by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2003-01-01

    .... One form of RA-resistance in breast cancer can be traced to loss of expression of the tumor suppressor RAR beta, due to epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in one...

  7. Molecular Biology In Young Women With Breast Cancer: From Tumor Gene Expression To DNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Flores-Ramos, Liliana; Castro-Sánchez, Andrea; Peña-Curiel, Omar; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Young women with breast cancer (YWBC) represent roughly 15% of breast cancer (BC) cases in Latin America and other developing regions. Breast tumors occurring at an early age are more aggressive and have an overall worse prognosis compared to breast tumors in postmenopausal women. The expression of relevant proliferation biomarkers such as endocrine receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 appears to be unique in YWBC. Moreover, histopathological, molecular, genetic, and genomic studies have shown that YWBC exhibit a higher frequency of aggressive subtypes, differential tumor gene expression, increased genetic susceptibility, and specific genomic signatures, compared to older women with BC. This article reviews the current knowledge on tumor biology and genomic signatures in YWBC.

  8. Homocysteine Is an Oncometabolite in Breast Cancer, Which Promotes Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    increase in breast cancer, which results in changes in gene expression in tumor cells helping the tumors to grow and metastasize. The molecular basis...in changes in gene expression in tumor cells helping the tumors to grow and metastasize. The molecular basis for the increase in the levels of this...diseases and also a pregnancy disorder known as preeclampsia . Polymorphisms in MTHFR that decrease the catalytic activity of the enzyme are common in the

  9. The current status of imaging diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fang; Tang Guangcai

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence and the mortality rate of female breast cancer in our country is increasing, Early diagnosis of breast cancer is particularly important. Precious preoperative staging in the breast cancer is advantageous for the treatment planning. Evaluating the efficacy of chemotherapy is beneficial for adjusting the follow-up plan. Imaging examination has become an important role in breast cancer management. At present, commonly used equipment include mammography, ultrasound, CT, and MRI, etc. This article reviews the present study status of these tools in diagnosis of breast cancer. A reasonable and effective choice of those tools can facilitate clinic diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  10. The impact of breast cancer biological subtyping on tumor size assessment by ultrasound and mammography - a retrospective multicenter cohort study of 6543 primary breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Roland Gregor; Wollschläger, Daniel; Kreienberg, Rolf; Janni, Wolfgang; Wischnewsky, Manfred; Diessner, Joachim; Stüber, Tanja; Bartmann, Catharina; Krockenberger, Mathias; Wischhusen, Jörg; Wöckel, Achim; Blettner, Maria; Schwentner, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Mammography and ultrasound are the gold standard imaging techniques for preoperative assessment and for monitoring the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. Maximum accuracy in predicting pathological tumor size non-invasively is critical for individualized therapy and surgical planning. We therefore aimed to assess the accuracy of tumor size measurement by ultrasound and mammography in a multicentered health services research study. We retrospectively analyzed data from 6543 patients with unifocal, unilateral primary breast cancer. The maximum tumor diameter was measured by ultrasound and/or mammographic imaging. All measurements were compared to final tumor diameter determined by postoperative histopathological examination. We compared the precision of each imaging method across different patient subgroups as well as the method-specific accuracy in each patient subgroup. Overall, the correlation with histology was 0.61 for mammography and 0.60 for ultrasound. Both correlations were higher in pT2 cancers than in pT1 and pT3. Ultrasound as well as mammography revealed a significantly higher correlation with histology in invasive ductal compared to lobular cancers (p < 0.01). For invasive lobular cancers, the mammography showed better correlation with histology than ultrasound (p = 0.01), whereas there was no such advantage for invasive ductal cancers. Ultrasound was significantly superior for HR negative cancers (p < 0.001). HER2/neu positive cancers were also more precisely assessed by ultrasound (p < 0.001). The size of HER2/neu negative cancers could be more accurately predicted by mammography (p < 0.001). This multicentered health services research approach demonstrates that predicting tumor size by mammography and ultrasound provides accurate results. Biological tumor features do, however, affect the diagnostic precision

  11. Assessment and Development of Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Damsgaard

    At the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), a 3D tomographic microwave imaging system is currently being developed with the aim of using nonlinear microwave imaging for breast-cancer detection. The imaging algorithm used in the system is based on an iterative Newton-type scheme. In this algorithm...... used in the microwave tomographic imaging system is presented. Non-linear microwave tomographic imaging of the breast is a challenging computational problem. The breast is heterogeneous and contains several high-contrast and lossy regions, resulting in large differences in the measured signal levels....... This implies that special care must be taken when the imaging problem is formulated. Under such conditions, microwave imaging systems will most often be considerably more sensitive to changes in the electromagnetic properties in certain regions of the breast. The result is that the parameters might...

  12. Post-mastectomy radiation in large node-negative breast tumors: Does size really matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, Scott R.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment decisions regarding local control can be particularly challenging for T3N0 breast tumors because of difficulty in estimating rates of local failure after mastectomy. Reports in the literature detailing the rates of local failure vary widely, likely owing to the uncommon incidence of this clinical situation. The literature regarding this clinical scenario is reviewed, including recent reports that specifically address the issue of local failure rates after mastectomy in the absence of radiation for large node-negative breast tumors.

  13. Clinicopathological study of rare invasive epithelial tumors of breast: An institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Kasireddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Invasive breast cancer (BC is the most common carcinoma in women. It accounts for 22% of all female cancers. Most tumors are derived from mammary duct epithelium, and up to 75% of BCs are ductal carcinomas. The second most common tumor is invasive lobular carcinoma. However, there are many variants which are less common but well defined by the World Health Organization classification. They comprise <10% of breast tumors. Their clinical behavior differs greatly. Hence, it is important to know their main histomorphological features to make the best treatment of choice and to foresee prognosis. Aims and Objectives: To study the histomorphological features, incidence, and clinical features of rare invasive epithelial tumors of the breast. Materials and Methods: This study was done in the department of pathology, Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Kolar. All the neoplastic breast lesions over a period of 5 years (July 2010-September 2015 are included in the study. Clinical features and other details (estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor, human epidermal receptor-2, lymph nodes are obtained from the department (surgery records. Specimens are received and preserved in 10% formalin and are subjected to routine histopathological processing. Hematoxylin and eosin sections are studied, and a morphological diagnosis is given. All rare invasive epithelial breast tumors will be reviewed meticulously. Results and Conclusion: A total number of invasive epithelial tumors of breast were 105. The most common presenting symptom was breast lump. Rare invasive epithelial breast tumors account to 28.5%. The age range from 15 to 70 years. Most common, rare invasive epithelial tumor in our study is medullary carcinoma. Hence, it is imperative to always maintain a Hawks vigil during microscopic diagnosis to know prognosis of the condition and to facilitate early and prompt treatment to the patient.

  14. A Rare Case of Breast Malignant Phyllodes Tumor With Metastases to the Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Bukala, Agnieszka; Syrek-Kaplita, Karolina; Ksiazek, Mariusz; Filipowska, Justyna; Gradalska-Lampart, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Phyllodes tumors are rare breast neoplasms. Surgery is the treatment of choice. The role of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is still under dispute, as there are no equivocal prognostic factors. Treatment failure results in the occurrence of distant metastasis—mainly to the lungs, bones, liver, and brain. We have described the case of a woman with a malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast that was surgically treated. She did not receive adjuvant therapy because there is no...

  15. Circulating tumor cells, disease recurrence and survival in newly diagnosed breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Bas; De Groot, Marco R.; Mastboom, Walter J.B.; Vermes, I.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Tibbe, Arjan G.J.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) is an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival and breast cancer-related death (BRD) for patients with metastatic breast cancer beginning a new line of systemic therapy. The current study was undertaken to explore whether

  16. The use of breast conserving surgery: linking insurance claims with tumor registry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Dhakal, Sanjaya; Yamashiro, Gladys; Issell, Brian F

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use insurance claims and tumor registry data to examine determinants of breast conserving surgery (BCS) in women with early stage breast cancer. Breast cancer cases registered in the Hawaii Tumor Registry (HTR) from 1995 to 1998 were linked with insurance claims from a local health plan. We identified 722 breast cancer cases with stage I and II disease. Surgical treatment patterns and comorbidities were identified using diagnostic and procedural codes in the claims data. The HTR database provided information on demographics and disease characteristics. We used logistic regression to assess determinants of BCS vs. mastectomy. The linked data set represented 32.8% of all early stage breast cancer cases recorded in the HTR during the study period. Due to the nature of the health plan, 79% of the cases were younger than 65 years. Women with early stage breast cancer living on Oahu were 70% more likely to receive BCS than women living on the outer islands. In the univariate analysis, older age at diagnosis, lower tumor stage, smaller tumor size, and well-differentiated tumor grade were related to receiving BCS. Ethnicity, comorbidity count, menopausal and marital status were not associated with treatment type. In addition to developing solutions that facilitate access to radiation facilities for breast cancer patients residing in remote locations, future qualitative research may help to elucidate how women and oncologists choose between BCS and mastectomy

  17. Breast cancer imaging: A perspective for the next decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Breast imaging is largely indicated for detection, diagnosis, and clinical management of breast cancer and for evaluation of the integrity of breast implants. In this work, a prospective view of techniques for