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Sample records for images saturne revisitee

  1. Hubble Provides Clear Images of Saturn's Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This is the first image of Saturn's ultraviolet aurora taken by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope in October 1997, when Saturn was a distance of 810 million miles (1.3 billion kilometers) from Earth. The new instrument, used as a camera, provides more than ten times the sensitivity of previous Hubble instruments in the ultraviolet. STIS images reveal exquisite detail never before seen in the spectacular auroral curtains of light that encircle Saturn's north and south poles and rise more than a thousand miles above the cloud tops.Saturn's auroral displays are caused by an energetic wind from the Sun that sweeps over the planet, much like the Earths aurora that is occasionally seen in the nighttime sky and similar to the phenomenon that causes fluorescent lamps to glow. But unlike the Earth, Saturn's aurora is only seen in ultraviolet light that is invisible from the Earths surface, hence the aurora can only be observed from space. New Hubble images reveal ripples and overall patterns that evolve slowly, appearing generally fixed in our view and independent of planet rotation. At the same time, the curtains show local brightening that often follow the rotation of the planet and exhibit rapid variations on time scales of minutes. These variations and regularities indicate that the aurora is primarily shaped and powered by a continual tug-of-war between Saturn's magnetic field and the flow of charged particles from the Sun.Study of the aurora on Saturn had its beginnings just seventeen years ago. The Pioneer 11 spacecraft observed a far-ultraviolet brightening on Saturn's poles in 1979. The Saturn flybys of the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in the early 1980s provided a basic description of the aurora and mapped for the first time planets enormous magnetic field that guides energetic electrons into the atmosphere near the north and south poles.The first images of Saturn's aurora were provided in 1994-5 by the Hubble Space

  2. Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Vescia, Monique

    2017-01-01

    Saturn is one of the most surreal of all the planets in our solar system. With this intriguing curriculum-correlated book, young readers can learn just why. Saturn has many unusual features, such as rings made of ice, ammonia storms, and methane rain. Its density is less than that of water so theoretically it could float on water. The features of its many moons are sometimes even stranger. The Pioneer and Voyager missions in 1970s and 1980s offered stunning images included in the book, which will allow readers to have an armchair experience of exploring this fascinating planet.

  3. Compositional maps of Saturn's moon Phoebe from imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Brown, R.H.; Jaumann, R.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Nelson, R.M.; Buratti, B.J.; McCord, T.B.; Lunine, J.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Formisano, V.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Hoefen, T.M.; Curchin, J.M.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Matz, K.-D.

    2005-01-01

    The origin of Phoebe, which is the outermost large satellite of Saturn, is of particular interest because its inclined, retrograde orbit suggests that it was gravitationally captured by Saturn, having accreted outside the region of the solar nebula in which Saturn formed. By contrast, Saturn's regular satellites (with prograde, low-inclination, circular orbits) probably accreted within the sub-nebula in which Saturn itself formed. Here we report imaging spectroscopy of Phoebe resulting from the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft encounter on 11 June 2004. We mapped ferrous-iron-bearing minerals, bound water, trapped CO2, probable phyllosilicates, organics, nitriles and cyanide compounds. Detection of these compounds on Phoebe makes it one of the most compositionally diverse objects yet observed in our Solar System. It is likely that Phoebe's surface contains primitive materials from the outer Solar System, indicating a surface of cometary origin.

  4. Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, R.

    1993-01-01

    Some experiments in progress at Saturne and measuring spin observables in pp inelastic scattering are presented. The large values of the polarization of protons and deuterons made possible an extended program of measurement of spin observables, in the associated strangeness production of hyperons. Future perspectives are also discussed. (R.P.) 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. UV Imaging Spectroscopy of the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Highlights of the UVIS investigation on Cassini include the discovery of a neutral oxygen cloud surrounding Saturn and the determination that Saturn's magnetosphere is dominated by neutrals. Later, UVIS observed and measured the cause of these phenomena: that the icy moon Enceladus is erupting water molecules at about 200kg/sec from fissures in its south polar terrain. These eruptions also carry a fraction of small solid ice grains that are sufficient to produce Saturn's ethereal E ring. The morphology of the jets of vapor in the Enceladus plume imply supersonic flow velocities that loft the grains carried in the jets, consistent with theoretical models. UV occultations and spectroscopy define the constituents of Titan's upper atmosphere and explain its dayside and nightside emissions. UVIS sees Saturn's auroral oval evolve and has detected Enceladus' footprint. Self-Gravity Wakes in Saturn's rings were detected by comparing ring occultations with Voyager results and with multiple Cassini UVIS occultations at a range of viewing aspects. We developed a simple 'granola-bar model' to explain our observations and the azimuthal brightness asymmetry observed from the Earth and previous space missions. UVIS has detected numerous small structures in the rings: kittens, propellers and other embedded objects. Some are as small as meters across from UVIS 'tracking' occultations. Features preferentially form where the rings are stirred by resonances and nearby passing moons. This more active ring system seen by Cassini may explain bright haloes in the rings; how the ring system can recycle ring material so that the rings are much older than inferred from Voyager; and provide implications of how planets may form. Future observations will provide the best resolution on active features like edges of the rings, ring haloes and propeller bands.

  6. Encounter with Saturn: Voyager 1 imaging science results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.; Beebe, R.; Boyce, J.; Briggs, G.; Bunker, A.; Collins, S.A.; Hansen, C.J.; Johnson, T.V.; Mitchell, J.L.; Terrile, R.J.; Carr, M.; Cook, A.F.; Cuzzi, J.; Pollack, James B.; Danielson, G. Edward; Ingersoll, A.; Davies, M.E.; Hunt, G.E.; Masursky, H.; Shoemaker, E.; Morrison, D.; Owen, Timothy W.; Sagan, C.; Veverka, J.; Strom, R.; Suomi, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    As Voyager 1 flew through the Saturn system it returned photographs revealing many new and surprising characteristics of this complicated community of bodies. Saturn's atmosphere has numerous, low-contrast, discrete cloud features and a pattern of circulation significantly different from that of Jupiter. Titan is shrouded in a haze layer that varies in thickness and appearance. Among the icy satellites there is considerable variety in density, albedo, and surface morphology and substantial evidence for endogenic surface modification. Trends in density and crater characteristics are quite unlike those of the Galilean satellites. Small inner satellites, three of which were discovered in Voyager images, interact gravitationally with one another and with the ring particles in ways not observed elsewhere in the solar system. Saturn's broad A, B, and C rings contain hundreds of "ringlets," and in the densest portion of the B ring there are numerous nonaxisymmetric features. The narrow F ring has three components which, in at least one instance, are kinked and crisscrossed. Two rings are observed beyond the F ring, and material is seen between the C ring and the planet. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  7. Constraints on Saturn's Tropospheric General Circulation from Cassini ISS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelGenio, Anthony D.; Barbara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    An automated cloud tracking algorithm is applied to Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem high-resolution apoapsis images of Saturn from 2005 and 2007 and moderate resolution images from 2011 and 2012 to define the near-global distribution of zonal winds and eddy momentum fluxes at the middle troposphere cloud level and in the upper troposphere haze. Improvements in the tracking algorithm combined with the greater feature contrast in the northern hemisphere during the approach to spring equinox allow for better rejection of erroneous wind vectors, a more objective assessment at any latitude of the quality of the mean zonal wind, and a population of winds comparable in size to that available for the much higher contrast atmosphere of Jupiter. Zonal winds at cloud level changed little between 2005 and 2007 at all latitudes sampled. Upper troposphere zonal winds derived from methane band images are approx. 10 m/s weaker than cloud level winds in the cores of eastward jets and approx. 5 m/s stronger on either side of the jet core, i.e., eastward jets appear to broaden with increasing altitude. In westward jet regions winds are approximately the same at both altitudes. Lateral eddy momentum fluxes are directed into eastward jet cores, including the strong equatorial jet, and away from westward jet cores and weaken with increasing altitude on the flanks of the eastward jets, consistent with the upward broadening of these jets. The conversion rate of eddy to mean zonal kinetic energy at the visible cloud level is larger in eastward jet regions (5.2x10(exp -5) sq m/s) and smaller in westward jet regions (1.6x10(exp -5) sqm/s) than the global mean value (4.1x10(ep -5) sq m/s). Overall the results are consistent with theories that suggest that the jets and the overturning meridional circulation at cloud level on Saturn are maintained at least in part by eddies due to instabilities of the large-scale flow near and/or below the cloud level.

  8. An Objective Classification of Saturn Cloud Features from Cassini ISS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Genio, Anthony D.; Barbara, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A k -means clustering algorithm is applied to Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem continuum and methane band images of Saturn's northern hemisphere to objectively classify regional albedo features and aid in their dynamical interpretation. The procedure is based on a technique applied previously to visible- infrared images of Earth. It provides a new perspective on giant planet cloud morphology and its relationship to the dynamics and a meteorological context for the analysis of other types of simultaneous Saturn observations. The method identifies 6 clusters that exhibit distinct morphology, vertical structure, and preferred latitudes of occurrence. These correspond to areas dominated by deep convective cells; low contrast areas, some including thinner and thicker clouds possibly associated with baroclinic instability; regions with possible isolated thin cirrus clouds; darker areas due to thinner low level clouds or clearer skies due to downwelling, or due to absorbing particles; and fields of relatively shallow cumulus clouds. The spatial associations among these cloud types suggest that dynamically, there are three distinct types of latitude bands on Saturn: deep convectively disturbed latitudes in cyclonic shear regions poleward of the eastward jets; convectively suppressed regions near and surrounding the westward jets; and baro-clinically unstable latitudes near eastward jet cores and in the anti-cyclonic regions equatorward of them. These are roughly analogous to some of the features of Earth's tropics, subtropics, and midlatitudes, respectively. This classification may be more useful for dynamics purposes than the traditional belt-zone partitioning. Temporal variations of feature contrast and cluster occurrence suggest that the upper tropospheric haze in the northern hemisphere may have thickened by 2014. The results suggest that routine use of clustering may be a worthwhile complement to many different types of planetary atmospheric data analysis.

  9. Haze and cloud structure of Saturn's North Pole and Hexagon Wave from Cassini/ISS imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Requena, J. F.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Antuñano, A.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we present a study of the vertical haze and cloud structure in the upper two bars of Saturn's Northern Polar atmosphere using the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft. We focus on the characterization of latitudes from 53° to 90° N. The observations were taken during June 2013 with five different filters (VIO, BL1, MT2, CB2 and MT3) covering spectral range from the 420 nm to 890 nm (in a deep methane absorption band). Absolute reflectivity measurements of seven selected regions at all wavelengths and several illumination and observation geometries are compared with the values produced by a radiative transfer model. The changes in reflectivity at these latitudes are mostly attributed to changes in the tropospheric haze. This includes the haze base height (from 600 ± 200 mbar at the lowest latitudes to 1000 ± 300 mbar in the pole), its particle number density (from 20 ± 2 particles/cm3 to 2 ± 0.5 particles/cm3 at the haze base) and its scale height (from 18 ± 0.1 km to 50 ± 0.1 km). We also report variability in the retrieved particle size distribution and refractive indices. We find that the Hexagonal Wave dichotomizes the studied stratospheric and tropospheric hazes between the outer, equatorward regions and the inner, Polar Regions. This suggests that the wave or the jet isolates the particle distribution at least at tropospheric levels.

  10. Auroral Morphologies of Jupiter and Saturn

    OpenAIRE

    Grodent, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We review the principal differences and similarities of the morphologies of Jupiter and Saturn's auroral emissions. We then show some examples of UV images that are expected to be acquired with Cassini UVIS at Saturn and Juno UVS at Jupiter.

  11. A new look at the Saturn system: The Voyager 2 images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.; Batson, R.; Bridges, P.; Inge, J.; Masursky, H.; Shoemaker, E.; Beebe, R.; Boyce, J.; Briggs, G.; Bunker, A.; Collins, S.A.; Hansen, C.J.; Johnson, T.V.; Mitchell, J.L.; Terrile, R.J.; Cook, A.F.; Cuzzi, J.; Pollack, James B.; Danielson, G.E.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Davies, M.E.; Hunt, G.E.; Morrison, D.; Owen, Timothy W.; Sagan, C.; Veverka, J.; Strom, R.; Suomi, V.E.

    1982-01-01

    Voyager 2 photography has complemented that of Voyager 1 in revealing many additional characteristics of Saturn and its satellites and rings. Saturn's atmosphere contains persistent oval cloud features reminiscent of features on Jupiter. Smaller irregular features track out a pattern of zonal winds that is symmetric about Saturn's equator and appears to extend to great depth. Winds are predominantly eastward and reach 500 meters per second at the equator. Titan has several haze layers with significantly varying optical properties and a northern polar "collar" that is dark at short wavelengths. Several satellites have been photographed at substantially improved resolution. Enceladus' surface ranges from old, densely cratered terrain to relatively young, uncratered plains crossed by grooves and faults. Tethys has a crater 400 kilometers in diameter whose floor has domed to match Tethys' surface curvature and a deep trench that extends at least 270?? around Tethys' circumference. Hyperion is cratered and irregular in shape. Iapetus' bright, trailing hemisphere includes several dark-floored craters, and Phoebe has a very low albedo and rotates in the direction opposite to that of its orbital revolution with a period of 9 hours. Within Saturn's rings, the "birth" of a spoke has been observed, and surprising azimuthal and time variability is found in the ringlet structure of the outer B ring. These observations lead to speculations about Saturn's internal structure and about the collisional and thermal history of the rings and satellites. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  12. High-resolution imaging of Saturn's main rings during the Cassini Ring-Grazing Orbits and Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscareno, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Cassini is ending its spectacular 13-year mission at Saturn with a two-part farewell, during which it has obtained the sharpest and highest-fidelity images ever taken of Saturn's rings. From December 2016 to April 2017, the spacecraft executed 20 near-polar orbits that passed just outside the outer edge of the main rings; these "Ring-Grazing Orbits" provided the mission's best viewing of the A and F rings and the outer B ring. From April to September 2017, the spacecraft is executing 22 near-polar orbits that pass between the innermost D ring and the planet's clouds; this "Grand Finale" provides the mission's best viewing of the C and D rings and the inner B ring. 1) Clumpy BeltsClumpy structure called "straw" was previously observed in parts of the main rings [Porco et al. 2005, Science]. New images show this structure with greater clarity. More surprisingly, new images reveal strong radial variations in the degree and character of clumpiness, which are probably an index for particle properties and interactions. Belts with different clumpiness characteristics are often adjacent to each other and not easily correlated with other ring characteristics. 2) PropellersA "propeller" is a local disturbance in the ring created by an embedded moon [Tiscareno et al. 2006, Nature; 2010, ApJL]. Cassini has observed two classes of propellers: small propellers that swarm in the "Propeller Belts" of the mid-A ring, and "Giant Propellers" whose individual orbits can be tracked in the outer A ring. Both are shown in unprecedented detail in new images. Targeted flybys of Giant Propellers were executed on both the lit and unlit sides of the ring (see figure), yielding enhanced ability to convert brightness to optical depth and surface density. 3) Impact Ejecta CloudsBeing a large and delicate system, Saturn's rings function as a detector of their planetary environment. Cassini images of impact ejecta clouds in the rings previously constrained the population of decimeter

  13. Moons Around Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This series of 10 Hubble Space Telescope images captures several small moons orbiting Saturn. Hubble snapped the five pairs of images while the Earth was just above the ring plane and the Sun below it. The telescope captured a pair of images every 97 minutes as it circled the Earth. Moving out from Saturn, the visible rings are: the broad C Ring, the Cassini Division, and the narrow F Ring.The first pair of images shows the large, bright moon Dione, near the middle of the frames. Two smaller moons, Pandora (the brighter one closer to Saturn) and Prometheus, appear as if they're touching the F Ring. In the second frame, Mimas emerges from Saturn's shadow and appears to be chasing Prometheus.In the second image pair, Mimas has moved towards the tip of the F Ring. Rhea, another bright moon, has just emerged from behind Saturn. Prometheus, the closest moon to Saturn, has rounded the F Ring's tip and is approaching the planet. The slightly larger moon Epimetheus has appeared.The third image pair shows Epimetheus, as a tiny dot just beyond the tip of the F Ring. Prometheus is in the lower right corner. An elongated clump or arc of debris in the F ring is seen as a slight brightening on the far side of this thin ring.In the fourth image pair, Epimetheus, in the lower right corner, streaks towards Saturn. The long ring arc can be seen in both frames.The fifth image pair again captures Mimas, beyond the tip of the F Ring. The same ring arc is still visible.In addition to the satellites, a pair of stars can be seen passing behind the rings, appearing to move towards the lower left due to Saturn's motion across the sky.The images were taken Nov. 21, 1995 with Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space

  14. Saturn satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskol, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of the Saturn satellites are discussed. The satellites close to Saturn - Janus, Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea - rotate along the circular orbits. High reflectivity is attributed to them, and the density of the satellites is 1 g/cm 3 . Titan is one of the biggest Saturn satellites. Titan has atmosphere many times more powerful than that of Mars. The Titan atmosphere is a peculiar medium with a unique methane and hydrogen distribution in the whole Solar system. The external satellites - Hyperion, Japetus and Phoebe - are poorly investigated. Neither satellite substance density, nor their composition are known. The experimental data on the Saturn rings obtained on the ''Pioneer-11'' and ''Voyager-1'' satellites are presented [ru

  15. Saturns Thermal Emission at 2.2-cm Wavelength as Imaged by the Cassini RADAR Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M. A.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Allison, M. D.; Gulkis, S.; Laraia, A. L.; Baines, K. H.; Edgington, S. G.; Anderson, Y. Z.; Kelleher, K.; Oyafuso, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present well-calibrated, high-resolution maps of Saturn's thermal emission at 2.2-cm wavelength obtained by the Cassini RADAR radiometer through the Prime and Equinox Cassini missions, a period covering approximately 6 years. The absolute brightness temperature calibration of 2% achieved is more than twice better than for all previous microwave observations reported for Saturn, and the spatial resolution and sensitivity achieved each represent nearly an order of magnitude improvement. The brightness temperature of Saturn in the microwave region depends on the distribution of ammonia, which our radiative transfer modeling shows is the only significant source of absorption in Saturn's atmosphere at 2.2-cm wavelength. At this wavelength the thermal emission comes from just below and within the ammonia cloud-forming region, and yields information about atmospheric circulations and ammonia cloud-forming processes. The maps are presented as residuals compared to a fully saturated model atmosphere in hydrostatic equilibrium. Bright regions in these maps are readily interpreted as due to depletion of ammonia vapor in, and, for very bright regions, below the ammonia saturation region. Features seen include the following: a narrow equatorial band near full saturation surrounded by bands out to about 10deg planetographic latitude that demonstrate highly variable ammonia depletion in longitude; narrow bands of depletion at -35deg latitude; occasional large oval features with depleted ammonia around -45deg latitude; and the 2010-2011 storm, with extensive saturated and depleted areas as it stretched halfway around the planet in the northern hemisphere. Comparison of the maps over time indicates a high degree of stability outside a few latitudes that contain active regions.

  16. The Faces of Saturn: Images and Texts from Augustus through Dürer to Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, M. H.

    2013-04-01

    This paper follows the thread(s) of Saturn in astrology and art from the Babylonians to Galileo, paying special attention to the planet's political importance from Augustus to the Medici and to its medical/psychological significance from Ficino through Dürer. In passing, I extend David Pingree's astrological interpretation of Dürer's Melencholia I and propose a very personal rationale for the engraving, namely as a memorial to his mother.

  17. Statistical study of Saturn's auroral electron properties with Cassini/UVIS FUV spectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, J.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.; Pryor, W.; Lamy, L.; Ajello, J.

    2017-03-01

    About 2000 FUV spectra of different regions of Saturn's aurora, obtained with Cassini/UVIS from December 2007 to October 2014 have been examined. Two methods have been employed to determine the mean energy of the precipitating electrons. The first is based on the absorption of the auroral emission by hydrocarbons and the second uses the ratio between the brightness of the Lyman-α line and the H2 total UV emission (Lyα/H2), which is directly related to via a radiative transfer formalism. In addition, two atmospheric models obtained recently from UVIS polar occultations have been employed for the first time. It is found that the atmospheric model related to North observations near 70° latitude provides the results most consistent with constraints previously published. On a global point of view, the two methods provide comparable results, with mostly in the 7-17 keV range with the hydrocarbon method and in the 1-11 keV range with the Lyα/H2 method. Since hydrocarbons have been detected on ∼20% of the auroral spectra, the Lyα/H2 technique is more effective to describe the primary auroral electrons, as it is applicable to all spectra and allows an access to the lowest range of energies (≤5 keV), unreachable by the hydrocarbon method. The distribution of is found fully compatible with independent HST/ACS constraints (emission peak in the 840-1450 km range) and FUSE findings (emission peaking at pressure level ≤0.2 μbar). In addition, exhibits enhancements in the 3 LT-10 LT sector, consistent with SKR intensity measurements. An energy flux-electron energy diagram built from all the data points strongly suggests that acceleration by field-aligned potentials as described by Knight's theory is a main mechanism responsible for electron precipitation creating the aurora. Assuming a fixed electron temperature of 0.1 keV, a best-fit equatorial electron source population density of 3 × 103 m-3 is derived, which matches very well to the plasma properties observed with

  18. Cassini at Saturn Huygens results

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David M

    2007-01-01

    "Cassini At Saturn - Huygens Results" will bring the story of the Cassini-Huygens mission and their joint exploration of the Saturnian system right up to date. Cassini is due to enter orbit around Saturn on the 1 July 2004 and the author will have 8 months of scientific data available for review, including the most spectacular images of Saturn, its rings and satellites ever obtained by a space mission. As the Cassini spacecraft approached its destination in spring 2004, the quality of the images already being returned by the spacecraft clearly demonstrate the spectacular nature of the close-range views that will be obtained. The book will contain a 16-page colour section, comprising a carefully chosen selection of the most stunning images to be released during the spacecraft's initial period of operation. The Huygens craft will be released by Cassini in December 2004 and is due to parachute through the clouds of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, in January 2005.

  19. Edge-on View of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    TOP - This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshot of Saturn with its rings barely visible. Normally, astronomers see Saturn with its rings tilted. Earth was almost in the plane of Saturn's rings, thus the rings appear edge-on.In this view, Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is casting a shadow on Saturn. Titan's atmosphere is a dark brown haze. The other moons appear white because of their bright, icy surfaces. Four moons - from left to right, Mimas, Tethys, Janus, and Enceladus - are clustered around the edge of Saturn's rings on the right. Two other moons appear in front of the ring plane. Prometheus is on the right edge; Pandora, on the left. The rings also are casting a shadow on Saturn because the Sun was above the ring plane.BOTTOM - This photograph shows Saturn with its rings slightly tilted. The moon called Dione, on the lower right, is casting a long, thin shadow across the whole ring system due to the setting Sun on the ring plane. The moon on the upper left of Saturn is Tethys.Astronomers also are studying the unusual appearance of Saturn's rings. The bottom image displays a faint, narrow ring, the F-ring just outside the main ring, which normally is invisible from Earth. Close to the edge of Saturn's disk, the front section of rings seem brighter and more yellow than the back due to the additional lumination by yellowish Saturn.The color images were assembled from separate exposures taken August 6 (top) and November 17 (bottom), 1995 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  20. Saturn Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U Rehman, Habib; McKee, Nida A; McKee, Michael L

    2016-01-15

    Several ring systems (Saturn systems) have been studied using DFT methods that include dispersion effects. Comparison with X-ray structures are made with three systems, and the agreement is quite good. Binding enthalpies and binding free energies in dichloromethane and toluene have been computed. The effect of an encapsulated lithium cation is accessed by comparing C60 @(C6 H4 )10 and [Li@C60 @(C6 H4 )10 ](+). The [Li@C60 ](+) cation is a much better acceptor than C60 which leads to greater donor-acceptor interactions and larger charge transfer from the ring to [Li@C60 ](+). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.This image and other images and

  2. Imaging the interaction of the heliosphere with the interstellar medium from Saturn with Cassini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S M; Mitchell, D G; Roelof, E C; Hsieh, K C; McComas, D J

    2009-11-13

    We report an all-sky image of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) >6 kilo-electron volts produced by energetic protons occupying the region (heliosheath) between the boundary of the extended solar atmosphere and the local interstellar medium (LISM). The map obtained by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) onboard Cassini reveals a broad belt of energetic protons whose nonthermal pressure is comparable to that of the local interstellar magnetic field. The belt, centered at approximately 260 degrees ecliptic longitude extending from north to south and looping back through approximately 80 degrees, appears to be ordered by the local interstellar magnetic field. The shape revealed by the ENA image does not conform to current models, wherein the heliosphere resembles a cometlike figure aligned in the direction of Sun's travel through the LISM.

  3. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  4. Multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging of wire array and gas puff Z pinches on the Z and Saturn pulsed power generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B; Coverdale, C A; Nielsen, D S; Jones, M C; Deeney, C; Serrano, J D; Nielsen-Weber, L B; Meyer, C J; Apruzese, J P; Clark, R W; Coleman, P L

    2008-10-01

    A multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging instrument is fielded as part of the core diagnostic set on the 25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage et al., in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. 979] for studying intense wire array and gas puff Z-pinch soft x-ray sources. Pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror, passing 277 eV photons with Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., and A. I. P. Conf, Proc. 195, 3 (1989)] for imaging a bright Li-like Ar L-shell line. Ar gas puff Z pinches show an intense K-shell emission from a zippering stagnation front with L-shell emission dominating as the plasma cools.

  5. Magnetospheric mapping of the dayside UV auroral oval at Saturn using simultaneous HST images, Cassini IMF data, and a global magnetic field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We determine the field-aligned mapping of Saturn's auroras into the magnetosphere by combining UV images of the southern dayside oval obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST with a global model of the magnetospheric magnetic field. The model is tailored to simulate prevailing conditions in the interplanetary medium, corresponding to high solar wind dynamic pressure and variable interplanetary magnetic field (IMF strength and direction determined from suitably lagged field data observed just upstream of Saturn's dayside bow shock by the Cassini spacecraft. Two out of four images obtained in February 2008 when such simultaneous data are available are examined in detail, exemplifying conditions for northward and southward IMF. The model field structure in the outer magnetosphere and tail is found to be very different in these cases. Nevertheless, the dayside UV oval is found to have a consistent location relative to the field structure in each case. The poleward boundary of the oval is located close to the open-closed field boundary and thus maps to the vicinity of the magnetopause, consistent with previous results. The equatorward boundary of the oval then maps typically near the outer boundary of the equatorial ring current appropriate to the compressed conditions prevailing. Similar results are also found for related images from the January 2004 HST data set. These new results thus show that the mapped dayside UV oval typically spans the outer magnetosphere between the outer part of the ring current and the magnetopause. It does not encompass the region of primary corotation flow breakdown within the inner Enceladus torus.

  6. Mysterious Saturn--Some Ancient and Modern Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    The familiar image of Saturn and its rings has come to symbolise our idea of a planet but there is still much about Saturn and its system that we do not understand. The history of our beliefs and knowledge about it, one of the most distant planets visible to the naked eye, is described, from the early myths, such as the Indian village that…

  7. Horsing around on Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbei, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    On the basis of simple statistical mechanical models, the prevailing view of the rings of Saturn is that they are unstable and must therefore have been formed rather recently. In this paper, we argue that the Saturn rings and inner moons are in much more stable orbits than previously thought and, therefore, that they likely formed together as part of the initial formation of the solar system. To make this argument, we give a detailed description of so-called horseshoe orbits and show that this horseshoeing phenomenon greatly stabilizes the rings of Saturn. This paper is part of a collaborative effort with E. Belbruno and J.R. Gott III. For a description of their part of the work, see their papers in these proceedings.

  8. 7. Saturne study meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This Saturne workshop has welcomed 120 scientists. 3 sessions have been organized: accelerators, physics and miscellaneous. The most recent experiments realized or scheduled at Saturne have been presented and the discussions which followed showed the high scientific interest taken in that equipment and made the participants regret its definitive closing down. Presentations by european teams about existent equipment, machines under construction or new projects opened the way to new perspectives. A lot of contributions were dedicated to the realization of high intensity particle beams and to the applications of accelerators. (A.C.)

  9. "Saturn" remains in orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glushechenko E. N.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to scientific and production enterprise "Saturn" — since its foundation up to the present day. The authors describe the determining stages of its development and its team’s scientific and technological achievements over the 45-year history of the enterprise.

  10. Rings around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preskill, Hallie; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes difficulties of Saint Paul's Saturn School of Tomorrow from planner, implementor, and evaluator viewpoints. The plan for a citywide, ungraded, downtown middle school called for an extended school year and the latest technology in a completely redesigned building with 4 teachers, 4 interns, and 162 students. Teachers were overworked, test…

  11. Collage of Saturn's smaller satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This family portrait shows the smaller satellites of Saturn as viewed by Voyager 2 during its swing through the Saturnian system. The following chart corresponds to this composite photograph (distance from the planet increases from left to right) and lists names, standard numerical designations and approximate dimensions (radii where indicated) in kilometers: 1980S26Outer F-ringshepherd120 X 100 1980S1Leadingco-orbital220 X 160 1980S25TrailingTethys trojanradii: 25 1980S28Outer Ashepherdradii: 20 1980S27Inner F-ringco-orbital145 X 70 1980S3TrailingTethys trojan140 X 100 1980S13LeadingTethys trojanradii: 30 1980S6LeadingDione trojanradii: 30 These images have been scaled to show the satellites in true relative sizes. This set of small objects ranges in size from small asteroidal scales to nearly the size of Saturn's moon Mimas. They are probably fragments of somewhat larger bodies broken up during the bombardment period that followed accretion of the Saturnian system. Scientists believe they may be mostly icy bodies with a mixture of meteorite rock. They are somewhat less reflective than the larger satellites, suggesting that thermal evolution of the larger moons 'cleaned up' their icy surfaces. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  12. A dynamic, rotating ring current around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S M; Sergis, N; Mitchell, D G; Hamilton, D C; Krupp, N

    2007-12-13

    The concept of an electrical current encircling the Earth at high altitudes was first proposed in 1917 to explain the depression of the horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field during geomagnetic storms. In situ measurements of the extent and composition of this current were made some 50 years later and an image was obtained in 2001 (ref. 6). Ring currents of a different nature were observed at Jupiter and their presence inferred at Saturn. Here we report images of the ring current at Saturn, together with a day-night pressure asymmetry and tilt of the planet's plasma sheet, based on measurements using the magnetospheric imaging instrument (MIMI) on board Cassini. The ring current can be highly variable with strong longitudinal asymmetries that corotate nearly rigidly with the planet. This contrasts with the Earth's ring current, where there is no rotational modulation and initial asymmetries are organized by local time effects.

  13. Saturn's inner satellites: Orbits, masses, and the chaotic motion of atlas from new Cassini imaging observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N. J.; Murray, C. D. [Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Renner, S. [Université Lille 1, Laboratoire d' Astronomie de Lille (LAL), 1 impasse de l' Observatoire, F-59000 Lille (France); Evans, M. W. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present numerically derived orbits and mass estimates for the inner Saturnian satellites, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus from a fit to 2580 new Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem astrometric observations spanning 2004 February to 2013 August. The observations are provided as machine-readable and Virtual Observatory tables. We estimate GM{sub Atlas} = (0.384 ± 0.001) × 10{sup −3} km{sup 3} s{sup −2}, a value 13% smaller than the previously published estimate but with an order of magnitude reduction in the uncertainty. We also find GM{sub Prometheus} = (10.677 ± 0.006) × 10{sup −3} km{sup 3} s{sup −2}, GM{sub Pandora} = (9.133 ± 0.009) × 10{sup −3} km{sup 3} s{sup −2}, GM{sub Janus} = (126.51 ± 0.03) × 10{sup −3} km{sup 3} s{sup −2}, and GM{sub Epimetheus} = (35.110 ± 0.009) × 10{sup −3} km{sup 3} s{sup −2}, consistent with previously published values, but also with significant reductions in uncertainties. We show that Atlas is currently librating in both the 54:53 co-rotation-eccentricity resonance (CER) and the 54:53 inner Lindblad (ILR) resonance with Prometheus, making it the latest example of a coupled CER-ILR system, in common with the Saturnian satellites Anthe, Aegaeon, and Methone, and possibly Neptune's ring arcs. We further demonstrate that Atlas's orbit is chaotic, with a Lyapunov time of ∼10 years, and show that its chaotic behavior is a direct consequence of the coupled resonant interaction with Prometheus, rather than being an indirect effect of the known chaotic interaction between Prometheus and Pandora. We provide an updated analysis of the second-order resonant perturbations involving Prometheus, Pandora, and Epimetheus based on the new observations, showing that these resonant arguments are librating only when Epimetheus is the innermost of the co-orbital pair, Janus and Epimetheus. We also find evidence that the known chaotic changes in the orbits of Prometheus and Pandora are not

  14. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Spallation studies at Saturne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frehaut, J. [Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)

    1995-10-01

    SATURNE is a synchrotron accelerator which can deliver particles of momentum P and charge Z up to P/Z = 4 GeV/c. Monokinetic neutron beams of momentum up to 2 GeV/c can be produced. The spallation studies deal with measurements of: (i) differential neutron production cross sections from thin targets, (ii) neutron multiplicity distribution for proton and {sup 3}He induced reactions, and (iii) nuclide production in thin target. Measurements on thick or composite targets are under consideration.

  16. Size and shape of Saturn's moon Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Stiles, Bryan; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lunine, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Cassini observations show that Saturn's moon Titan is slightly oblate. A fourth-order spherical harmonic expansion yields north polar, south polar, and mean equatorial radii of 2574.32 ± 0.05 kilometers (km), 2574.36 ± 0.03 km, and 2574.91 ± 0.11 km, respectively; its mean radius is 2574.73 ± 0.09 km. Titan's shape approximates a hydrostatic, synchronously rotating triaxial ellipsoid but is best fit by such a body orbiting closer to Saturn than Titan presently does. Titan's lack of high relief implies that most—but not all—of the surface features observed with the Cassini imaging subsystem and synthetic aperture radar are uncorrelated with topography and elevation. Titan's depressed polar radii suggest that a constant geopotential hydrocarbon table could explain the confinement of the hydrocarbon lakes to high latitudes.

  17. Cassini-Huygens Science Highlights: Surprises in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Altobelli, Nicolas; Edgington, Scott

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has greatly enhanced our understanding of the Saturn system. Fundamental discoveries have altered our views of Saturn, its retinue of icy moons including Titan, the dynamic rings, and the system's complex magnetosphere. Launched in 1997, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft spent seven years traveling to Saturn, arriving in July 2004, roughly two years after the northern winter solstice. Cassini has orbited Saturn for 9.5 years, delivering the Huygens probe to its Titan landing in 2005, crossing northern equinox in August 2009, and completing its Prime and Equinox Missions. It is now three years into its 7-year Solstice mission, returning science in a previously unobserved seasonal phase between equinox and solstice. As it watches the approach of northern summer, long-dark regions throughout the system become sunlit, allowing Cassini's science instruments to probe as-yet unsolved mysteries. Key Cassini-Huygens discoveries include icy jets of material streaming from tiny Enceladus' south pole, lakes of liquid hydrocarbons and methane rain on giant Titan, three-dimensional structures in Saturn's rings, and curtain-like aurorae flickering over Saturn's poles. The Huygens probe sent back amazing images of Titan's surface, and made detailed measurements of the atmospheric composition, structure and winds. Key Cassini-Huygens science highlights will be presented. The Solstice Mission continues to provide new science. First, the Cassini spacecraft observes seasonally and temporally dependent processes on Saturn, Titan, Enceladus and other icy satellites, and within the rings and magnetosphere. Second, it addresses new questions that have arisen during the mission thus far, for example providing qualitatively new measurements of Enceladus and Titan that could not be accommodated in the earlier mission phases. Third, it will conduct a close-in mission at Saturn yielding fundamental knowledge about the interior of Saturn. This grand finale of the

  18. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere?

  19. Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, G.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. The ring resides in the Roche zone, where tidal disruption competes with self-gravity, which allows us to observe the lifecycle of moonlets. Just as nearby moons create structure at the B ring edge (Esposito et al. 2012) and the Keeler gap (Murray 2007), the F ring "shepherding" moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In fact, Beurle et al (2010) show that Prometheus makes it possible for "distended, yet gravitationally coherent clumps" to form in the F ring, and Barbara and Esposito (2002) predicted a population of ~1 km bodies in the ring. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Seventeen of those 27 features are associated with clumps of ring material. Two features are opaque in occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects, which we refer to as Moonlets. The 15 other features partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. Upon visual inspection of the occultation profile, these features resemble Icicles, thus we will refer to them as such here. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, while Moonlets are possible solid objects. Optical depth is an indicator of clumping because more-densely aggregated material blocks more light; therefore, it is natural to imagine moonlets as later evolutionary stage of icicle, when looser clumps of material compact to form a feature that appears

  20. Saturn's Irregular Moon Ymir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.

    2012-10-01

    Ymir (diameter 18 km), Saturn's second largest retrograde outer or irregular moon, has been observed six times by the Cassini narrow-angle camera (NAC) during the first 7 months in 2012. The observations span phase angles from 2° up to 102° and were taken at ranges between 15 and 18 million kilometers. From such a distance, Ymir is smaller than a pixel in the Cassini NAC. The data reveal a sidereal rotation period of 11.93 hrs, which is 1.6x longer than the previously reported value (Denk et al. 2011, EPSC/DPS #1452). Reason for this discrepancy is that the rotational light curve shows a rather uncommon 3-maxima and 3-minima shape at least in the phase angle range 50° to 100°, which was not recognizable in earlier data. The data cover several rotations from different viewing and illumination geometries and allow for a convex shape inversion with possibly a unique solution for the pole direction. The model reproduces the observed light curves to a very good accuracy without requiring albedo variegation, thereby suggesting that the lightcurve is dominated by the shape of Ymir. Among Saturn's irregular moons, the phenomenon of more than two maxima and minima at moderate to high phase angles is not unique to Ymir. At least Siarnaq and Paaliaq also show light curves with a strong deviation from a double-sine curve. Their rotation periods, however, remain unknown until more data can be taken. The light curve of Phoebe is fundamentally different to Ymir's because it is mainly shaped by local albedo differences and not by shape. Other reliable rotation periods of irregular satellites measured by Cassini include: Mundilfari 6.74 h; Kari 7.70 h; Albiorix 13.32 h; Kiviuq 21.82 h. More uncertain values are: Skathi 12 h; Bebhionn 16 h; Thrymr 27 h; Erriapus 28 h.

  1. Pioneer 11's New Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    New findings about the planet, Saturn and its environs, as collected by Pioneer 11 are detailed. Topics discussed include: the composition of the planet's interior, the search for new satellites, and the planet's magnetic field. (BT)

  2. SACLAY: Eta mesons at Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Using a nuclear reaction, the new tagged eta meson facility now operating at the French Saturne National Laboratory in Saclay produces eta mesons (together with recoil helium-3 nuclei) by proton bombardment of a deuterium target. The proton beam is extracted from the Saturne synchrotron at 893 MeV, stabilized to 80 keV. This is a scant 1.5 MeV above the reaction threshold and close to the energy where eta production peaks

  3. 7. Saturne study meeting; Septiemes journees d`etudes saturne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This Saturne workshop has welcomed 120 scientists. 3 sessions have been organized: accelerators, physics and miscellaneous. The most recent experiments realized or scheduled at Saturne have been presented and the discussions which followed showed the high scientific interest taken in that equipment and made the participants regret its definitive closing down. Presentations by european teams about existent equipment, machines under construction or new projects opened the way to new perspectives. A lot of contributions were dedicated to the realization of high intensity particle beams and to the applications of accelerators. (A.C.)

  4. Planetary science: Shepherds of Saturn's ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-09-01

    Saturn's F ring is chaperoned on both sides by the tiny moons Prometheus and Pandora. Numerical simulations show that this celestial ballet can result from the collision of two aggregates that evolved out of Saturn's main rings.

  5. HST SATURN WFPC2 3 RING PLANE CROSSING V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains images of the Saturn system taken by the Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) through November 1995....

  6. Saturn's north polar cyclone and hexagon at depth revealed by Cassini/VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Fletcher, L.N.; Showman, A.P.; Roos-Serote, M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    A high-speed cyclonic vortex centered on the north pole of Saturn has been revealed by the visual-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter, thus showing that the tropospheres of both poles of Saturn are occupied by cyclonic vortices with winds exceeding 135 m/s. High-spatial-resolution (~200 km per pixel) images acquired predominantly under night-time conditions during Saturn's polar winter-using a thermal wavelength of 5.1 ??m to obtain time-lapsed imagery of discrete, deep-seated (>2.1-bar) cloud features viewed in silhouette against Saturn's internally generated thermal glow-show a classic cyclonic structure, with prograde winds exceeding 135 m/s at its maximum near 88.3?? (planetocentric) latitude, and decreasing to Saturn indicates that cyclonic circulation may be an important dynamical style in planets with significant atmospheres. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cassini UVIS Observations of Saturn during the Grand Finale Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, W. R.; Esposito, L. W.; West, R. A.; Jouchoux, A.; Radioti, A.; Grodent, D. C.; Gerard, J. C. M. C.; Gustin, J.; Lamy, L.; Badman, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn orbiter executed a final series of high inclination, low-periapsis orbits ideal for studies of Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained an extensive set of auroral images, some at the highest spatial resolution obtained during Cassini's long orbital mission (2004-2017). In some cases, two or three spacecraft slews at right angles to the long slit of the spectrograph were required to cover the entire auroral region to form auroral images. We will present selected images from this set showing narrow arcs of emission, more diffuse auroral emissions, multiple auroral arcs in a single image, discrete spots of emission, small scale vortices, large-scale spiral forms, and parallel linear features that appear to cross in places like twisted wires. Some shorter features are transverse to the main auroral arcs, like barbs on a wire. UVIS observations were in some cases simultaneous with auroral observations from the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) that will also be presented. UVIS polar images also contain spectral information suitable for studies of the auroral electron energy distribution. The long wavelength part of the UVIS polar images contains a signal from reflected sunlight containing absorption signatures of acetylene and other Saturn hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon spatial distribution will also be examined.

  8. IR spectra of Saturn's ring spokes and multiple shines in the Saturn-rings system

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aversa, Emiliano; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Filacchione, Gianrico; Cerroni, Priscilla; Nicholson, Phil D.; Carrozzo, Filippo G.; Altieri, Francesca; Oliva, Fabrizio; Geminale, Anna; Sindoni, Giuseppe; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2017-04-01

    During the last Saturn equinox, in 2009 August, spokes on the Saturn's B ring have been observed for the first time spectroscopically, at visible and infrared wavelengths. Measurements were obtained by Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instrument in the 0.35-5.1 micron range. Spokes are either dark or bright features appearing on the B ring straddling the equinoxes, round to elongated in shape, lasting for minutes to hours, and moving partially pushed by Saturn's magnetic field. Previous spokes observations date back to the Voyager (1980 equinox,[1]), followed by a HST campaign (1995 equinox,[2]), and more recently Cassini-ISS images (2009 equinox,[3]). Theoretical models of spoke formation and evolution have been developed based on those observations, but there is not unanimous consensus on them. The most spread model considers the spoke as a cloud of very fine particles electrostatically levitating from the regolith of ring's boulders, and hovering on the ring plane while interacting with the ambient plasma until complete charge neutralization. The process triggering the grain charging is not yet clear (meteoroid bombardment, impacts of Saturn's lightnings electrons, etc.) but in any case a very small grain mass (high charge-to-mass ratio) is needed to allow electrostatic repulsion. From the observational point of view, small grain sizes (0.3-0.5 micron) have been retrieved by modeling the spoke reflectance in the visible spectral range (both Voyager, HST, and Cassini were equipped with multispectral imaging cameras). However, a first VIMS spoke observation ([4]) inferred a more spread size distribution (0.3 to 2.5 microns) to explain the high spoke contrast measured in the infrared. Here we will report about an analysis of two selected sets of spokes observed by VIMS. This selection aimed to include both high and low phase angle observations, and to take advantage from the highest spatial resolution data achieved in the infrared. We will

  9. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  10. DISCOVERY OF A DARK AURORAL OVAL ON SATURN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The ultraviolet image was obtained by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope with the European Faint Object Camera (FOC) on June 1992. It represents the sunlight reflected by the planet in the near UV (220 nm). * The image reveals a dark oval encircling the north magnetic pole of Saturn. This auroral oval is the first ever observed for Saturn, and its darkness is unique in the solar system (L. Ben-Jaffel, V. Leers, B. Sandel, Science, Vol. 269, p. 951, August 18, 1995). The structure represents an excess of absorption of the sunlight at 220 nm by atmospheric particles that are the product of the auroral activity itself. The large tilt of the northern pole of Saturn at the time of observation, and the almost perfect symmetry of the planet's magnetic field, made this observation unique as even the far side of the dark oval across the pole is visible! * Auroral activity is usually characterized by light emitted around the poles. The dark oval observed for Saturn is a STUNNING VISUAL PROOF that transport of energy and charged particles from the magnetosphere to the atmosphere of the planet at high latitudes induces an auroral activity that not only produces auroral LIGHT but also UV-DARK material near the poles: auroral electrons are probably initiating hydrocarbon polymer formation in these regions. Credits: L. Ben Jaffel, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris-CNRS, France, B. Sandel (Univ. of Arizona), NASA/ESA, and Science (magazine).

  11. Positional Catalogues of Saturn's and Jupiter's Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhakevych, O.; Andruk, V.; Pakuliak, L.; Lukianchuk, V.; Shatokhina, S.

    In the framework of the UkrVO national project (http://ukr-vo.org/) we have started the processing of photographic observations of Saturn's (S1-S8) and Jupiter's (J6-J8) moons. Observations were conducted during 1961-1993 with three astrographs DLFA, DWA, DAZ and Z600 reflector. Plate images were digitized as tif-files with commercial scanners. Image processing was carried out by specific software package in the LINUX-MIDAS-ROMAFOT environment with Tycho2 as reference. The software was developed at the MAO NASU. Obtained positions of objects were compared with theoretically predicted ones in IMCCE (Paris) (www.imcce.fr/sat) online. Rms error of divergence between observed and calculated positions is of 0.20' - 0.35'.

  12. Spallation neutron experiment at SATURNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    The double differential cross sections for (p,xn) reactions and the spectra of neutrons produced from the thick target have been measured at SATURNE in SACLAY from 1994 to 1997. The status of the experiment and the preliminary experimental results are presented. (author)

  13. A giant thunderstorm on Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G; Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Zarka, P; Dyudina, U A; Ingersoll, A P; Ewald, S P; Porco, C C; Wesley, A; Go, C; Delcroix, M

    2011-07-06

    Lightning discharges in Saturn's atmosphere emit radio waves with intensities about 10,000 times stronger than those of their terrestrial counterparts. These radio waves are the characteristic features of lightning from thunderstorms on Saturn, which last for days to months. Convective storms about 2,000 kilometres in size have been observed in recent years at planetocentric latitude 35° south (corresponding to a planetographic latitude of 41° south). Here we report observations of a giant thunderstorm at planetocentric latitude 35° north that reached a latitudinal extension of 10,000 kilometres-comparable in size to a 'Great White Spot'-about three weeks after it started in early December 2010. The visible plume consists of high-altitude clouds that overshoot the outermost ammonia cloud layer owing to strong vertical convection, as is typical for thunderstorms. The flash rates of this storm are about an order of magnitude higher than previous ones, and peak rates larger than ten per second were recorded. This main storm developed an elongated eastward tail with additional but weaker storm cells that wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011. Unlike storms on Earth, the total power of this storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power. The appearance of such storms in the northern hemisphere could be related to the change of seasons, given that Saturn experienced vernal equinox in August 2009. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  14. Atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper the current knowledge of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are reviewed making use of the extensive telescopic studies, International Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite observations and the measurements made during the recent Pioneer and Voyager flybys which have been supported by detailed theoretical studies. A detailed discussion is given of the composition of these atmospheres and the abundance ratios which provide insight into their original state and their evolution. The Voyager observations indicate a surprisingly close similarity between the weather systems of the Earth and the giant planets. Although both Jupiter and Saturn have internal heat sources, and are therefore star-like in their interiors, they appear to produce terrestrial-style weather systems. A detailed discussion is given of this work, which forms a major study of the Laboratory for Planetary Atmospheres at University College London. (author)

  15. Unraveling the strands of Saturn's F ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C.D.; Gordon, M.K.; Giuliatti, Winter S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Several high-resolution Voyager 2 images of Saturn's F ring show that it is composed of at least four separate, non-intersecting strands extending ~45?? in longitude. Voyager 1 images show that the two brightest strands appear to intersect, giving rise to a "braided" morphology. From a study of all available Voyager images the detectable radial structure is cataloged and reviewed. Previous indications that there is fine material interior to the orbit of the F ring are confirmed. Evidence is presented that a model of four strands with comparable eccentricities and nearly aligned perichrones is consistent with all the Voyager observations. The observed perichrone offset of the two brightest strands suggests a minimum radial separation of ~20 km, which implies intersection of these strands when their finite radial widths are taken into account. The longitude range of such an intersection includes that observed in the Voyager 1 "braid" images. The proximity of these two strands at some longitudes may account for the apparent differences in the ring between the Voyager encounters, as well as provide a source for the short-lived features detected in the Hubble Space Telescope images of the F ring. There is no evidence that the locations of the individual strands are determined by resonant perturbations with known satellites. It is proposed that the radial structure is formed by the localized action of small satellites orbiting within the strand region. ?? 1997 Academic Press.

  16. Detection of arsine in Saturn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezard, B.; Drossart, P.; Lellouch, E.; Tarrago, G.; Maillard, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of arsine (AsH3) in Saturn's atmosphere using high-resolution observations near 4.7 microns is reported. A strong broad absorption at the position of the nu3 Q-branch of AsH3 and weaker features where the R(1) lines of the nu1 and nu3 bands occur are noted in this high-resolution spectral range. Comparison with synthetic spectra derived from a model atmosphere indicates the following: both the thermal emission and the reflected solar radiation contribute to Saturn's 5 micron flux; the mole fraction of arsine is (2.4 + 1.4 or - 1.2) x 10 to the -9th in the approx. 4 bar region (T about 200 K) from which the thermal emission originates; AsH3 is 2.5 to 10 times less abundant in the upper troposphere (0.2-0.4 bar), a possible consequence of UV photolysis. The current observation of arsine implies upward transport from the 360 K region that is sufficiently rapid to inhibit conversion reactions. A reanalysis of 5-micron spectroscopic observations of Jupiter by Bjoraker, Larson, and Kunde (1986) indicated that arsine is much less abundant on Jupiter (AsH3/H2 less than or roughly equal to 3 x 10 to the -10th) than on Saturn. 27 refs

  17. Photometric changes on Saturn's Titan: Evidence for active cryovolcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.M.; Kamp, L.W.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Matson, D.L.; Kirk, R.L.; Hapke, B.W.; Wall, S.D.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Mitchell, K.L.; Baines, K.H.; Jaumann, R.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Lunine, J.I.; Combes, M.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Formisano, V.; Filacchione, G.; Langevin, Y.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Irwin, P.G.J.; Pearl, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    We report infrared spectrophotometric variability on the surface of Saturn's moon Titan detected in images returned by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini Saturn Orbiter. The changes were observed at 7??S, 138??W and occurred between October 27, 2005 and January 15, 2006. After that date the surface was unchanged until the most recent observation, March 18, 2006. We previously reported spectrophotometric variability at another location (26??S, 78??W). Cassini Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) images find that the surface morphology at both locations is consistent with surface flows possibly resulting from cryovolcanic activity (Wall et al., companion paper, this issue). The VIMS-reported time variability and SAR morphology results suggest that Titan currently exhibits intermittent surface changes consistent with present ongoing surface processes. We suggest that these processes involve material from Titan's interior being extruded or effiised and deposited on the surface, as might be expected from cryovolcanism. ?? 2009.

  18. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Composition of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J.; Filacchione, G.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Curchin, J. M.; Hoefen, T. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Nelson, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has obtained a unique collection of data about Saturn's rings, as it has observed the rings from 0 to 180 degrees in phase angle, and on both lit and unlit sides. Identification of trace contaminants, especially organic compounds, requires that spectra of the rings be uncontaminated by light from Saturn. The Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has acquired 0.35 to 5.1 micron, high spatial resolution spectroscopic data near the shadow of Saturn on the rings where scattered light is at a minimum. At low phase angles, the ring spectra show classic crystalline-ice spectral features except for a contaminant causing a UV absorption. VIMS spectra at 180-degree phase angle are generally flat, with only a weak positive feature at 2.86 microns in spectra of the F-ring. The general transmission decrease is due to large ring particles completely blocking light. The 2.86-micron feature indicates the presence of fine ice dust, where the ice's index of refraction is near 1.0, and light is not refracted or diffracted. There are no indications of interparticle scattering in the VIMS data at any phase angle. The lack of interparticle scattering indicates that the dense A and B rings must be very thin, approaching a monolayer, but rigorous constraints have yet to be modeled. Previous studies used tholins and amorphous carbon for the contaminant causing the UV absorption, but these models display additional absorptions and spectral structure in the near infrared not seen in VIMS data. Clark et al. (Icarus, v193, p372, 2008) modeled the changing blue peak and UV absorber observed on Phoebe, Iapetus, Hyperion, and Dione with amorphous carbon and nano-sized hematite. Nanohematite has muted spectral features compared to larger grained hematite, due to crystal field effects at the surfaces of small grains. Nanohematite has a strong UV absorber that matches the steep UV slope observed in spectra of Saturn's rings and has no strong IR absorptions

  20. The Irregular Moons of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, Stefano; Tosi, Federico; Bottke, William; Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2017-10-01

    The 38 irregular moons of Saturn, all but Phoebe discovered between 2000 and 2007, outnumber the planet's classical satellites. Observations from the ground and from near-Earth space have revealed orbits, sizes, and colors and have hinted at the existence of dynamical families, indicative of collisional evolution and common progenitors. More recently, remote observations of many irregular satellites with the Cassini spacecraft produced lightcurves that helped determine rotational periods, coarse shape models, potential hemispheric color heterogeneities, and other basic properties.From Cassini, a total of 25 Saturnian irregulars have been observed with the ISS camera. Their rotational periods range from 5.45 h to 76.13 h. The absence of fast rotators is evident. Among main-belt asteroids of the same size range (~4 to ~45 km), one third of the objects have faster rotations, indicating that many irregulars should be low-density objects.While the origin of the irregulars is still debated, capture of comets via three-body interactions during giant planets encounters does the best job thus far at reproducing the observed prograde/retrograde orbits. Data from the ground, near-Earth spacecraft, and Cassini as well as modeling results suggest the population visible today has experienced substantial collisional evolution. It may be that only Phoebe has survived relatively intact. The small particle debris drifts toward Saturn by P-R drag, with most of it swept up by Titan. Only remnants of this process are visible today.Our current knowledge on the Saturnian irregulars will be summarized in a chapter [1] in the book "Enceladus and the Icy Moons of Saturn" [2]. The talk will give an overview on the chapter's content, which covers the following topics: Orbital "architecture" (a,e,i), sizes and colors, Cassini observations and results, Phoebe, origin, an outlook.[1] Denk, T., Mottola, S., Tosi, F., Bottke, W.F., Hamilton, D.P. (2018): The Irregular Satellites of Saturn. In

  1. Artists's Conception of Cassini Saturn Orbit Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This is an artists concept of Cassini during the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) maneuver, just after the main engine has begun firing. The spacecraft is moving out of the plane of the page and to the right (firing to reduce its spacecraft velocity with respect to Saturn) and has just crossed the ring plane.The SOI maneuver, which is approximately 90 minutes long, will allow Cassini to be captured by Saturn's gravity into a five-month orbit.Cassini's close proximity to the planet after the maneuver offers a unique opportunity to observe Saturn and its rings at extremely high resolution.

  2. Success of Saturn: A Case Study of the Saturn Automobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Vehicles," The Wall Street Journal , May 13, 1991, p. B8. 127. Ibid, p. B8. 128. Ibid, p. B8. 129. Ibid, p. B8. 130. Treece, p. 34. 131. Joseph B. White...34GM’s Saturn Unit to Boost Output 33% This Month," The Wall Street Journal , August 9, 1991, P. A2:4. 47 132. "GM Unit May Need More Time to Hit Full...Production," The Wall Street Journal , October 11, 1991, p. B4:4. 133. Ibid, p. B4:4. 134. Ray Seraf in and Laura Clark, "Dealer and UAW to Help Pick

  3. Cassini UVIS Observations Show Active Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L.; Colwell, J. E.; UVIS Team

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) is part of the remote sensing payload of the NASA/ESA Cassini spacecraft. This spectrograph includes channels for extreme UV and far UV spectroscopic imaging, high speed photometry of stellar occultations, solar EUV occultation, and a hydrogen/deuterium absorption cell. We report our initial results from UVIS observations of Saturn's rings. Dynamic interactions between neutrals, ions, rings, moons and meteoroids produce a highly structured and time variable Saturn system Oxygen in the Saturn system dominates the magnetosphere. Observed fluctuations indicate close interactions with plasma sources. Stochastic events in the E ring may be the ultimate source. The spectral signature of water ice is seen on Phoebe and in Saturn's rings. Water ice is mixed non-uniformly with darker constituents. The high structure of the UV ring reflectance argues that collisional transport dominates ballistic transport in darkening the rings. Our preliminary results support the idea that rings are recycled fragments of moons: the current processes are more important than history and initial conditions. The spectra along the UVIS SOI radial scan indicate varying amounts of water ice. In the A ring, the ice fraction increases outward to a maximum at the outer edge. This large-scale variation is consistent with initially pure ice that has suffered meteoritic bombardment over the age of the Solar system (Cuzzi and Estrada 1998). We also see variations over scales of 1000 - 3000 km, which cannot be explained by this mechanism. Ballistic transport of spectrally neutral extrinsic pollutants from meteoroids striking the rings has a typical throw distance of 6000 km (Durisen et al 1989), too long to explain this finer structure. We propose a class of smaller renewal events, in which a small moon residing within the rings is shattered by an external impactor (Colwell and Esposito 1993, Barbara and Esposito 2002, Esposito and Colwell 2003). The

  4. The Saturn School: Technology's Cutting Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Challenged by General Motors' creation of the Saturn automobile, St. Paul (Minnesota) educators created a new school by blending the best practices of existing schools with the most powerful and useful emerging technologies. In the Saturn School's learner-centered environment, each student develops a personal growth plan including academic,…

  5. Hubble again views Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Saturn's magnificent ring system is seen tilted edge-on -- for the second time this year -- in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope picture taken on August 10, 1995, when the planet was 895 million miles (1,440 million kilometers) away. Hubble snapped the image as Earth sped back across Saturn's ring plane to the sunlit side of the rings. Last May 22, Earth dipped below the ring plane, giving observers a brief look at the backlit side of the rings. Ring-plane crossing events occur approximately every 15 years. Earthbound observers won't have as good a view until the year 2038. Several of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are from left to right, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Mimas. 'The Hubble data shows numerous faint satellites close to the bright rings, but it will take a couple of months to precisely identify them,' according to Steve Larson (University of Arizona). During the May ring plane crossing, Hubble detected two, and possibly four, new moons orbiting Saturn. These new observations also provide a better view of the faint E ring, 'to help determine the size of particles and whether they will pose a collision hazard to the Cassini spacecraft,' said Larson. The picture was taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in wide field mode. This image is a composite view, where a long exposure of the faint rings has been combined with a shorter exposure of Saturn's disk to bring out more detail. When viewed edge-on, the rings are so dim they almost disappear because they are very thin -- probably less than a mile thick.The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  6. Does Enceladus govern magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, Margaret Galland

    2006-03-10

    Instruments on the Cassini spacecraft reveal that a heat source within Saturn's moon Enceladus powers a great plume of water ice particles and dust grains, a geyser that jets outward from the south polar regions and most likely serves as the dominant source of Saturn's E ring. The interaction of flowing magnetospheric plasma with the plume modifies the particle and field environment of Enceladus. The structure of Saturn's magnetosphere, the extended region of space threaded by magnetic-field lines linked to the planet, is shaped by the ion source at Enceladus, and magnetospheric dynamics may be affected by the rate at which fresh ions are created.

  7. On thickness of Saturn rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahic, Andre; Laques, Pierre; Lecacheux, Jean; Servan, Bernard; Despiau, Raymond; Michet, Daniel; Renard, Leopold

    1980-01-01

    Electronographic plates of Saturn were taken during the transit of the Earth through the ring plane. Observing conditions were more favorable than those prevailing in 1966. Thanks to the quality of the detectors and the telescopes, it has been possible to make a more precise photometric determination of the brightness of the ring seen edge on and to measure the brightness variation with respect to the distance to the center of the planet. Extrapolating to the case where the elevation of the Earth above the ring plane is strictly zero, we deduce an apparent photometric ring thickness equal to 1.5+-0.3 km. For an homogeneous layer of small particles colliding inelastically, theory predicts a thickness of the order of a few particles radii, i.e. a few tens of meters. The observed brightness could be explained by the E ring, the brightness of large chunks, condensations and warping of the ring [fr

  8. IMF dependence of Saturn's auroras: modelling study of HST and Cassini data from 12–15 February 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To gain better understanding of auroral processes in Saturn's magnetosphere, we compare ultraviolet (UV auroral images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST with the position of the open-closed field line boundary in the ionosphere calculated using a magnetic field model that employs Cassini measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF as input. Following earlier related studies of pre-orbit insertion data from January 2004 when Cassini was located ~ 1300 Saturn radii away from the planet, here we investigate the interval 12–15 February 2008, when UV images of Saturn's southern dayside aurora were obtained by the HST while the Cassini spacecraft measured the IMF in the solar wind just upstream of the dayside bow shock. This configuration thus provides an opportunity, unique to date, to determine the IMF impinging on Saturn's magnetosphere during imaging observations, without the need to take account of extended and uncertain interplanetary propagation delays. The paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere is then employed to calculate the magnetospheric magnetic field structure and ionospheric open-closed field line boundary for averaged IMF vectors that correspond, with appropriate response delays, to four HST images. We show that the IMF-dependent open field region calculated from the model agrees reasonably well with the area lying poleward of the UV emissions, thus supporting the view that the poleward boundary of Saturn's auroral oval in the dayside ionosphere lies adjacent to the open-closed field line boundary.

  9. Planetary science: Saturn's bared mini-moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Frank; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    Propeller-shaped structures seem to reveal the presence of moonlets, about 100 metres in diameter, embedded in Saturn's rings. This discovery adds to our picture of how the rings formed and are evolving.

  10. SATURN. Studying Atmospheric Pollution in Urban Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moussiopoulos, N.; Hout, K. D. van den; Mestayer, P.

    SATURN is a subproject under EUROTRAC-2. (EUROTRAC-2 is the EUREKA Project on the Transport and Chemical Transformation of Environmentally Relevant Trace Constituents in the Troposphere over Europe; Second Phase)....

  11. Saturn Probe: Revealing Solar System Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative studies of the gas giant and ice giant planets are needed to reliably discriminate among competing theories of the origin and evolution of giant planets and the solar system, but we lack critical measurements. A Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission would fill a vital part of that gap, allowing comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn, providing the basis for later comparisons with the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, and informing studies of extrasolar planetary systems now being characterized. The Galileo Probe mission provided the first in situ studies of Jupiter's atmosphere. Similar measurements at Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would provide an important comparative planetology context for the Galileo results. Cassini's "Proximal Orbits" in 2017 will reveal Saturn's internal structure to complement the Juno mission's similar measurements at Jupiter. A Saturn entry probe, complementing the Galileo Probe investigations at Jupiter, would complete a solid basis for improved understanding of both Jupiter and Saturn, an important stepping stone to understanding Uranus and Neptune and solar system formation and evolution. The 2012 Decadal Survey ("DS") added Saturn Probe science objectives to NASA's New Frontiers Program: highest-priority Tier 1 objectives any New Frontiers implementation must achieve, and Tier 2, high priority but lower than Tier 1. A DS mission concept study using extremely conservative assumptions concluded that a Saturn Probe project could fit within New Frontiers resource constraints, giving a PI confidence that they could pursue some Tier 2 objectives, customizing for the proper balance of science return, science team composition, procured or contributed instruments, etc. Contributed instruments could significantly enhance the payload and the science team for greater science return. They also provide international collaboration opportunities, with science benefits well demonstrated by missions such as Cassini-Huygens and Rosetta.

  12. Enceladus' varying imprint on the magnetosphere of Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G H; Roussos, E; Krupp, N; Paranicas, C; Woch, J; Lagg, A; Mitchell, D G; Krimigis, S M; Dougherty, M K

    2006-03-10

    The bombardment of Saturn's moon Enceladus by >20-kiloelectron volt magnetospheric particles causes particle flux depletions in regions magnetically connected to its orbit. Irrespective of magnetospheric activity, proton depletions are persistent, whereas electron depletions are quickly erased by magnetospheric processes. Observations of these signatures by Cassini's Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument allow remote monitoring of Enceladus' gas and dust environments. This reveals substantial outgassing variability at the moon and suggests increased dust concentrations at its Lagrange points. The characteristics of the particle depletions additionally provide key radial diffusion coefficients for energetic electrons and an independent measure of the inner magnetosphere's rotation velocity.

  13. Starting up the Saturne synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvat, M.

    1958-02-01

    Illustrated by many drawings and graphs, this report describes and comments all operations and measurements to be performed for starting up the Saturne synchrotron until particle acceleration exclusively. The author reports the study of beam as it goes out of the Van de Graaff: experiment of position and stability of the beam axis, study of beam current and geometric characteristics (calibration of the induction probe), experiment of mass separation and proton percentage, and adjustment of regulation and Van de Graaff fall law. In a second part, he reports the optics alignment and the study of optics property (installation of the different sectors, study of inflector end voltage, and influence of inflector position in the chamber). The third part addresses the examination of phenomena associated with injection: injection method and definition of the initial instant, search for injection optimum conditions, study of particle lifetime and of phenomena on the inner probe. The fourth part proposes theoretical additional elements regarding the movement of particles at the injection in the useful area, and phenomena occurring on targets and on the inner probe

  14. Charged dust in saturn's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendis, D.A.; Hill, J.R.; Houpis, H.L.F.

    1983-01-01

    Gravito-electrodynamic theory of charged dust grains is used to explain a variety of phenomena in those portions of the Saturnian ring system that are known to be dominated by fine (micron- and submicron-sized) dust, and in which collisional forces and Coulomb drag can be neglected. Among the phenomena discussed are the formation and evolution of the rotating near-radial spokes in the B-ring, the formation of waves in the F-ring, the cause of eccentricities of certain isolated ringlets, and the origin and morphology of the broad diffuse E-ring. Several novel processes predicted by the gravitoelectrodynamic theory, including 'magneto-gravitational capture' of exogenic dust by the magnetosphere, '1:1 magneto-gravitational orbital resonances' of charged dust with nearby satellites, and 'gyro-orbital resonances,' are used to explain individual observations. The effect of a ring current associated with this charged dust is also evaluated. Finally, the cosmogonic implications of the magneto-gravitational theory are briefly discussed. While several (although not all) of these processes have been discussed by one or more of the present authors elsewhere, the purpose of this paper is to synthesize all these processes within the framework of gravito-electrodynamics, and also to show its range of applicability within Saturn's ring system

  15. Freak waves in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, R.

    2015-01-01

    Properties of planar as well as nonplanar ion acoustic freak waves that propagate in a plasma composed of warm ions and two-temperature electron plasma having kappa-distribution are reported. The dynamics of the nonlinear freak waves is governed by a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The possible region for the freak waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of Saturn's magnetosphere. For planar case, stability/instability analyses reveals that there is a critical value ( f cr ) of f (i.e., the equilibrium density ratio of the hot-to-cold electron species) exists for low wave number k. For large wave number k, the stability domain is always a decreasing function in f. Low κ values, which indicate that an excess of suprathermal particles in the tail of the distribution, shifts f cr to higher values. Also, there exists a modulation instability period for the cylindrical and spherical envelope excitations, which does not exist in the one-dimensional case. Furthermore, cylindrical and spherical freak waves are investigated numerically. Spherical ion-acoustic freak waves are found to grow faster than the cylindrical waves.

  16. Polar heating in Saturn's thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D numerical global circulation model of the Kronian thermosphere has been used to investigate the influence of polar heating. The distributions of temperature and winds resulting from a general heat source in the polar regions are described. We show that both the total energy input and its vertical distribution are important to the resulting thermal structure. We find that the form of the topside heating profile is particularly important in determining exospheric temperatures. We compare our results to exospheric temperatures from Voyager occultation measurements (Smith et al., 1983; Festou and Atreya, 1982 and auroral H3+ temperatures from ground-based spectroscopic observations (e.g. Miller et al., 2000. We find that a polar heat source is consistent with both the Smith et al. determination of T∞~400 K at ~30° N and auroral temperatures. The required heat source is also consistent with recent estimates of the Joule heating rate at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004. However, our results show that a polar heat source can probably not explain the Festou and Atreya determination of T∞~800 K at ~4° N and the auroral temperatures simultaneously. Keywords. Ionosphere (Planetary ionosphere – Magnetospherica physics (Planetary magnetospheres – Meterology and atmospheric dynamics (Thermospheric dynamics

  17. What's Up? Use the night sky to engage the public through amateur astronomy in IYA; What's Up monthly astronomy themed podcasts; Annual Saturn Observation Night worldwide celebration of Saturn Opposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston Jones, Jane

    2008-09-01

    Abstract What's Up video podcasts: connecting "astronomy for everyone" monthly astronomical views with related NASA missions, science, images and handson education. Background: What's Up Podcasts are 2 minute video podcasts available through RSS feed, You tube, and NASA websites every month. They feature an astronomy related viewing target in the sky each month, targets visible to everyone, from city or country, just by looking up! No telescope is required to view these objects. Summary: Expand and broaden the scope of the existing "What's Up" public astronomy themed video podcasts. NASA builds partnerships and linkages between Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics formal and informal education providers. What's Up podcasts provides a link between astronomical views and events, or "what's up in the night sky this month" with current NASA missions, mission milestones and events, space telescope images or press releases. These podcasts, plus supporting star charts, hands-on activities, standards-based educational lessons and mission links will be used by museums, planetariums, astronomy clubs, civic and youth groups, as well as by classrooms and the general public. They can be translated to other languages, too. Providing the podcasts in high definition, through the NASA websites, You Tube, iTunes and other web video sharing sites reaches wide audiences of all ages. Third Saturn Observation Night - May 18, 2008 Centered on Saturn Opposition, when the Sun and Saturn are on opposite sides of the Earth, all IYA participants - in all countries around the world - will be encouraged to take their telescopes out and share the planet Saturn with their communities. NASA's International Saturn Observation Campaign network of astronomy enthusiasts has now conducted a Saturn Observation Night event for the past 2 years, and it succeeds by building an international community all sharing Saturn. This celebration has been successfully conducted in hundreds of locations

  18. Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn from Cassini's Approach and First Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Haspodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 k 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  19. Equatorial Oscillations in Jupiter's and Saturn's Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Schinder, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Equatorial oscillations in the zonal-mean temperatures and zonal winds have been well documented in Earth's middle atmosphere. A growing body of evidence from ground-based and Cassini spacecraft observations indicates that such phenomena also occur in the stratospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Earth-based midinfrared measurements spanning several decades have established that the equatorial stratospheric temperatures on Jupiter vary with a cycle of 4-5 years and on Saturn with a cycle of approximately 15 years. Spectra obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) during the Cassini swingby at the end of 2000, with much better vertical resolution than the ground-based data, indicated a series of vertically stacked warm and cold anomalics at Jupiter's equator; a similar structurc was seen at Saturn's equator in CIRS limb measurements made in 2005, in the early phase of Cassini's orbital tour. The thermal wind equation implied similar patterns of mean zonal winds increasing and decreasing with altitude. On Saturn the peak-to-pcak amplitude of this variation was nearly 200 meters per second. The alternating vertical pattern of wanner and colder cquatorial tcmperatures and easterly and westerly tendencies of the zonal winds is seen in Earth's equatorial oscillations, where the pattern descends with time, The Cassini Jupiter and early Saturn observations were snapshots within a limited time interval, and they did not show the temporal evolution of the spatial patterns. However, more recent Saturn observations by CIRS (2010) and Cassini radio-occultation soundings (2009-2010) have provided an opportunity to follow the change of the temperature-zonal wind pattern, and they suggest there is descent, at a rate of roughly one scale height over four years. On Earth, the observed descent in the zonal-mean structure is associated with the absorption of a combination of vertically propagating waves with easlerly and westerly phase velocities. The peak-to-peak zonal wind

  20. Managing Cassini Safe Mode Attitude at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. In the event safe mode interrupts normal orbital operations, Cassini has flight software fault protection algorithms to detect, isolate, and recover to a thermally safe and commandable attitude and then wait for further instructions from the ground. But the Saturn environment is complex, and safety hazards change depending on where Cassini is in its orbital trajectory around Saturn. Selecting an appropriate safe mode attitude that insures safe operation in the Saturn environment, including keeping the star tracker field of view clear of bright bodies, while maintaining a quiescent, commandable attitude, is a significant challenge. This paper discusses the Cassini safe table management strategy and the key criteria that must be considered, especially during low altitude flybys of Titan, in deciding what spacecraft attitude should be used in the event of safe mode.

  1. Wideband Photometry of Saturn: 1995-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmude, Richard W.

    2007-10-01

    The writer has measured the brightness of Saturn + rings at four wavelengths (0.44 to 0.86 microns) every year since 1995 using a single channel photometer. Filters transformed to the Johnson B, V, R and I system were used in all measurements. The main conclusions of this 12 year study are: 1) The color of Saturn + rings does not change in visible light as the solar phase angle drops from 6 to 2 degrees. 2) The color of Saturn + rings becomes a few percent bluer in visible light as the solar phase angle drops below 1.0 degree due to the opposition surge. 3) In visible wavelengths, the color of Saturn + rings does not change as the ring tilt changes from 4 to 27 degrees. 4) The R-I color index value increases by about 0.1 magnitudes as the ring tilt angle rises from 4 to 27 degrees. The opening of the rings is probably the cause of this change. 5) The solar phase angle coefficient of Saturn + rings is 0.027 magnitude/degree for a ring tilt angle of 14 degrees and it rises by about 0.0005 magnitude/degree for each 1 degree increase in ring tilt angle and it drops by about the same amount for each 1 degree drop in ring tilt angle. The writer would like to thank Gordon College for providing financial support for attending this meeting.

  2. Saturn facility oil transfer automation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Nathan R.; Thomas, Rayburn Dean; Lewis, Barbara Ann; Malagon, Hector Ricardo.

    2014-02-01

    The Saturn accelerator, owned by Sandia National Laboratories, has been in operation since the early 1980s and still has many of the original systems. A critical legacy system is the oil transfer system which transfers 250,000 gallons of transformer oil from outside storage tanks to the Saturn facility. The oil transfer system was iden- ti ed for upgrade to current technology standards. Using the existing valves, pumps, and relay controls, the system was automated using the National Instruments cRIO FGPA platform. Engineered safety practices, including a failure mode e ects analysis, were used to develop error handling requirements. The uniqueness of the Saturn Oil Automated Transfer System (SOATS) is in the graphical user interface. The SOATS uses an HTML interface to communicate to the cRIO, creating a platform independent control system. The SOATS was commissioned in April 2013.

  3. An evolving view of Saturn's dynamic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J N; Burns, J A; Charnoz, S; Clark, R N; Colwell, J E; Dones, L; Esposito, L W; Filacchione, G; French, R G; Hedman, M M; Kempf, S; Marouf, E A; Murray, C D; Nicholson, P D; Porco, C C; Schmidt, J; Showalter, M R; Spilker, L J; Spitale, J N; Srama, R; Sremcević, M; Tiscareno, M S; Weiss, J

    2010-03-19

    We review our understanding of Saturn's rings after nearly 6 years of observations by the Cassini spacecraft. Saturn's rings are composed mostly of water ice but also contain an undetermined reddish contaminant. The rings exhibit a range of structure across many spatial scales; some of this involves the interplay of the fluid nature and the self-gravity of innumerable orbiting centimeter- to meter-sized particles, and the effects of several peripheral and embedded moonlets, but much remains unexplained. A few aspects of ring structure change on time scales as short as days. It remains unclear whether the vigorous evolutionary processes to which the rings are subject imply a much younger age than that of the solar system. Processes on view at Saturn have parallels in circumstellar disks.

  4. Origin and Evolution of Saturn's Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Salmon, J.; Crida, A.; Brahic, A.

    2009-09-01

    All Saturn’ small satellites, orbiting below Mimas'orbit, share some common physical and dynamical properties : they have strong water absorption bands (Poulet & Cuzzi, 2002 Icarus 160, 350-358, Cuzzi et al., in press) , they have strange and elongated shapes and are under dense (Charnoz et al, 2007 Science 318, 1622, Porco et al. 2007 Science 318, 1602). They are also dynamically coupled with Saturn rings. In addition, due to their small size, they should not be primordial because of the meteoroid bombardment. They dynamically evolve under the tidal torque of the planet and the rings, in addition to satellite's perturbations. A theory of their origin still needs to be done. We show in the present work that these small satellites may be the natural result of the viscous spreading of Saturn's rings. Using a new 1D coupled hydrodynamic + dynamical evolution code, we compute that the rings viscous spreading may naturally form a population of 10-50 km size satellites, with and orbital organisation similar to the today population of small satellites. Self-regulation processes are at work limiting the maximum mass of small satellite to about the mass of Janus, consistently with observations. This satellite formation scenario of a new kind (due to the viscous spreading of a disk) seems to explain the composition, the shape, the total mass, and the low density of Saturn's small satellites. It would give also an interesting explanation to the origin of the F ring. In conclusion, Saturn's small satellites may be considered as a specific category of satellites whose origin is very different either from Saturn's main satellites of Saturn's captured satellites. They could be the "children” of the rings.

  5. From the Jupiter to the Saturn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hroch, A.

    2004-01-01

    Early in July 2004 the probe Cassini became the first manmade satellite of the Saturn planet. The Saturn planet became the sixth body in the Solar system after the Earth, the Moon, the Mars, the Venus and the Jupiter, which have manmade satellite. The Cassini is the last of big planetary probe of the U.S.A. launched in last century. Characteristics of the main objects watched by the Cassini are reviewed. On the board of the Cassini is used thermoelectric element with plutonium with the power 3 x 885 W, which was decreased to 3 x 700 W after 7 years of the voyage to the target planet

  6. Saturn - Jewel of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1989-08-01

    The phenomena of the Saturn system discovered by the Voyager missions are addressed. The characteristics of the rings, including grooves, spikes, and warps, are described, and the discovery of bombarded rings and young rings is discussed. The unique and unexplained properties of Enceladus are summarized, and the possibility that some moons of Saturn have been reassembled is addressed. The interaction of moons with the rings is examined, and the possibility that Titan's atmosphere may contain complex molecules that are the precursors of life is considered.

  7. Cassini ISS Observation of Saturn from Grand Finale Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, J. J.; Sayanagi, K. M.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Dyudina, U.; Ewald, S. P.; McCabe, R. M.; Garland, J.; Gunnarson, J.; Gallego, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present images captured during Cassini's Grand Finale orbits, and their preliminary analyses. During the final 22 orbits of the mission, the spacecraft is in orbits that have 6.5 day period at an inclination of 62 degrees, apoapsis altitude of about 1,272,000 km, and periapsis altitudes of about 2,500 km. Images captured during periapsis passes show Saturn's atmosphere at unprecedented spatial resolution. We present preliminary analyses of these images, including the final images captured before the end of the mission when the spacecraft enters Saturn's atmosphere on September 15th, 2017. Prominent features captured during the final orbits include the north polar vortex and other vortices as well as very detailed views of the "popcorn clouds" that reside between the Hexagon and the north pole. In the cloud field between zonal jets, clouds either resemble linear streaks suggestive of cirrus-like clouds or round shapes suggestive of vortices or cumulus anvil. The presence of linear streaks that follow lines of constant latitudes suggests that meridional mixing is inhibited at those latitudes. The size of vortices may reflect latitudinal variation in the atmospheric deformation radius. We also compare the new images to those captured earlier in the Cassini mission to characterize the temporal evolution such as changes in the zonal jet speeds, and prevalence and colors of vortices. A particular focus of our interest is the long-term change in the color of the hexagon, the evolution of the wind speeds in the jetstream that blows eastward at the boundary of the hexagon, and the morphology of the north polar vortex. Our work has been supported by NASA PATM NNX14AK07G, NSF AAG 1212216, and NASA NESSF NNX15AQ70H.

  8. Apollo Image Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Apollo Image Atlas is a comprehensive collection of Apollo-Saturn mission photography. Included are almost 25,000 lunar images, both from orbit and from the...

  9. Self-gravitation in Saturn's rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, H.; Lukkari, J.

    1982-01-01

    In a ring-shaped collisional system self-gravitation reduces the equilibrium values of the geometric and optical thickness. In Saturn's rings both effects are appreciable. The previously found discrepancy between the calculated profile and the observed profile of the rings is chiefly caused by the omission of self-gravitation. (Auth.)

  10. Is Saturn Coming down to Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1991-01-01

    Despite White House accolades and some real strides, St. Paul, Minnesota's experimental Saturn School is at a major juncture. Students of all abilities work together amid sophisticated supplies and equipment without required textbooks, grade levels, or lengthy summer vacations. However, lower standardized test scores and faculty dissatisfaction…

  11. Cassini MIMI Close-Up of Saturn Energetic Particles: Low Altitude Trapped Radiation, Auroral Ion Acceleration, and Interchange Flow Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Roussos, E.; Kollmann, P.

    2017-12-01

    We present observations from the final orbits of the Cassini Mission at Saturn by the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI). Crossing inside the D-Ring at the equator and just above Saturn's atmosphere, these orbits covered regions never visited previously in the mission. Highlights include the confirmation of an inner radiation belt analogous to the inner radiation belt at Earth by the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System (LEMMS), with surprising twists—Saturn's D-ring material appears to be a source for these particles. Details will be presented in another session. The Grand Finale orbits also afforded a close-up view of the auroral ion acceleration regions by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA). Ionospheric ions at the base of auroral field lines are accelerated perpendicular to the magnetic field to 10's and 100's of keV, and charge exchange with exospheric neutrals to be emitted as energetic neutral atoms and images by INCA. We show that this acceleration region lies at about 0.1 Rs. Another feature seen previously in the mission but imaged with greater resolution is a flow channel associated with interchange motion in the middle magnetosphere. We show this feature to extend over several Saturn radii in the radial direction, and over about 2 Saturn radii azimuthally. Additional data have been received since the writing of this abstract and before Cassini's plunge into the atmosphere on September 15, so additional features may be presented.

  12. Compositional mapping of Saturn's satellite Dione with Cassini VIMS and implications of dark material in the Saturn system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Jaumann, R.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Brown, R.H.; Hoefen, T.M.; Stephan, K.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Nelson, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini VIMS has obtained spatially resolved imaging spectroscopy data on numerous satellites of Saturn. A very close fly-by of Dione provided key information for solving the riddle of the origin of the dark material in the Saturn system. The Dione VIMS data show a pattern of bombardment of fine, sub-0.5-??m diameter particles impacting the satellite from the trailing side direction. Multiple lines of evidence point to an external origin for the dark material on Dione, including the global spatial pattern of dark material, local patterns including crater and cliff walls shielding implantation on slopes facing away from the trailing side, exposing clean ice, and slopes facing the trailing direction which show higher abundances of dark material. Multiple spectral features of the dark material match those seen on Phoebe, Iapetus, Hyperion, Epimetheus and the F-ring, implying the material has a common composition throughout the Saturn system. However, the exact composition of the dark material remains a mystery, except that bound water and, tentatively, ammonia are detected, and there is evidence both for and against cyanide compounds. Exact identification of composition requires additional laboratory work. A blue scattering peak with a strong UV-visible absorption is observed in spectra of all satellites which contain dark material, and the cause is Rayleigh scattering, again pointing to a common origin. The Rayleigh scattering effect is confirmed with laboratory experiments using ice and 0.2-??m diameter carbon grains when the carbon abundance is less than about 2% by weight. Rayleigh scattering in solids is also confirmed in naturally occurring terrestrial rocks, and in previously published reflectance studies. The spatial pattern, Rayleigh scattering effect, and spectral properties argue that the dark material is only a thin coating on Dione's surface, and by extension is only a thin coating on Phoebe, Hyperion, and Iapetus, although the dark material abundance

  13. Saturn Ring Seismology: Interpreting the Seismogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark Scott

    2013-01-01

    Marley (1990) and Marley and Porco (1993) proposed that f-mode oscillations of Saturn could excite resonant density and bending waves in the inner C-ring. They hypothesized that certain wave features discovered by Rosen et al. (1991) that were not associated with known satellite resonances could be the result of such resonant interactions with the planetary oscillation modes. They also predicted that if this was the case the waves would be found to be density (and not bending) waves by Cassini and predicted the azimuthal wave number of the C-ring waves m. Employing Cassini VIMS stellar occultation data Hedman and Nicholson (2013) have now confirmed the predictions and demonstrated that at least some of the C-ring features identified by Rosen et al. are indeed likely caused by resonant oscillation modes of Saturn. Given this context we have taken a fresh look at the Saturn ring seismology. First we propose that an apparent bending wave denoted 'j' by Rosen may be a second order outer vertical resonance with the l=3, m=2 f-mode of Saturn and discuss the locations of other plausible second order resonances in the rings. Since only a handful of ring resonances have been identified, measuring even one or two additional planetary mode frequencies would substantially assist the process of inverting mode frequencies to constrain Saturn interior's structure. Using the available mode frequencies, modern inversion technique employed in stellar seismology, and a recent set of Saturn interior models we provide an initial estimation of what available mode frequencies are telling us about the interior structure of the planet. Since the f-modes are confined relatively closely to the planetary surface, most of the observed modes probe only the outermost layers of the planet that are already comparatively well understood. However the l = 2 mode does probe relatively deeply into the planet and we will discuss the potential the measurement of this mode frequency has for placing new

  14. Intense Harmonic Emissions Observed in Saturn's Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Kurth, W. S.; Persoon, A. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Ye, S.-Y.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Hadid, L. Z.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's first Grand Finale orbit was carried out in April 2017. This set of 22 orbits had an inclination of 63° with a periapsis grazing Saturn's ionosphere, thus providing unprecedented coverage and proximity to the planet. Cassini's Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument repeatedly detected intense electrostatic waves and their harmonics near closest approach in the dayside equatorial topside ionosphere. The fundamental modes were found to both scale and trend best with the H+ plasma or lower hybrid frequencies, depending on the plasma composition considered. The fine-structured harmonics are unlike previous observations, which scale with cyclotron frequencies. We explore their generation mechanism and show strong evidence of their association with whistler mode waves, consistent with theory. The possibility of Cassini's presence in the ionosphere influencing the resonance and harmonics is discussed. Given their link to the lower hybrid frequency, these emissions may offer clues to constraining Saturn's ionospheric properties.

  15. Comparison of the Cloud Morphology Spatial Structure Between Jupiter and Saturn Using JunoCam and Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Justin; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Blalock, John J.; Gunnarson, Jacob; McCabe, Ryan M.; Gallego, Angelina; Hansen, Candice; Orton, Glenn S.

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial-scales contained in the cloud morphology of Jupiter’s southern high latitudes using images captured by JunoCam in 2016 and 2017, and compare them to those on Saturn using images captured using the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on board the Cassini orbiter. For Jupiter, the characteristic spatial scale of cloud morphology as a function of latitude is calculated from images taken in three visual (600-800, 500-600, 420-520 nm) bands and a near-infrared (880- 900 nm) band. In particular, we analyze the transition from the banded structure characteristic of Jupiter’s mid-latitudes to the chaotic structure of the polar region. We apply similar analysis to Saturn using images captured using Cassini ISS. In contrast to Jupiter, Saturn maintains its zonally organized cloud morphology from low latitudes up to the poles, culminating in the cyclonic polar vortices centered at each of the poles. By quantifying the differences in the spatial scales contained in the cloud morphology, our analysis will shed light on the processes that control the banded structures on Jupiter and Saturn. Our work has been supported by the following grants: NASA PATM NNX14AK07G, NASA MUREP NNX15AQ03A, and NSF AAG 1212216.

  16. Fate of Ice Grains in Saturn's Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamil, O.; Cravens, T. E.; Reedy, N. L.; Sakai, S.

    2018-02-01

    It has been proposed that the rings of Saturn can contribute both material (i.e., water) and energy to its upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Ionospheric models require the presence of molecular species such as water that can chemically remove ionospheric protons, which otherwise are associated with electron densities that greatly exceed those from observation. These models adopt topside fluxes of water molecules. Other models have shown that ice grains from Saturn's rings can impact the atmosphere, but the effects of these grains have not been previously studied. In the current paper, we model how ice grains deposit both material and energy in Saturn's upper atmosphere as a function of grain size, initial velocity (at the "top" of the atmosphere, defined at an altitude above the cloud tops of 3,000 km), and incident angle. Typical grain speeds are expected to be roughly 15-25 km/s. Grains with radii on the order of 1-10 nm deposit most of their energy in the altitude range of 1,700-1,900 km, and can vaporize, depending on initial velocity and impact angle, contributing water mass to the upper atmosphere. We show that grains in this radius range do not significantly vaporize in our model at initial velocities lower than about 20 km/s.

  17. Jovian-like aurorae on Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, Tom; Miller, Steve; Melin, Henrik; Lystrup, Makenzie; Cowley, Stan W H; Bunce, Emma J; Achilleos, Nicholas; Dougherty, Michele

    2008-06-19

    Planetary aurorae are formed by energetic charged particles streaming along the planet's magnetic field lines into the upper atmosphere from the surrounding space environment. Earth's main auroral oval is formed through interactions with the solar wind, whereas that at Jupiter is formed through interactions with plasma from the moon Io inside its magnetic field (although other processes form aurorae at both planets). At Saturn, only the main auroral oval has previously been observed and there remains much debate over its origin. Here we report the discovery of a secondary oval at Saturn that is approximately 25 per cent as bright as the main oval, and we show this to be caused by interaction with the middle magnetosphere around the planet. This is a weak equivalent of Jupiter's main oval, its relative dimness being due to the lack of as large a source of ions as Jupiter's volcanic moon Io. This result suggests that differences seen in the auroral emissions from Saturn and Jupiter are due to scaling differences in the conditions at each of these two planets, whereas the underlying formation processes are the same.

  18. The auroral footprint of Enceladus on Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Wayne R; Rymer, Abigail M; Mitchell, Donald G; Hill, Thomas W; Young, David T; Saur, Joachim; Jones, Geraint H; Jacobsen, Sven; Cowley, Stan W H; Mauk, Barry H; Coates, Andrew J; Gustin, Jacques; Grodent, Denis; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Lamy, Laurent; Nichols, Jonathan D; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Esposito, Larry W; Dougherty, Michele K; Jouchoux, Alain J; Stewart, A Ian F; McClintock, William E; Holsclaw, Gregory M; Ajello, Joseph M; Colwell, Joshua E; Hendrix, Amanda R; Crary, Frank J; Clarke, John T; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2011-04-21

    Although there are substantial differences between the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, it has been suggested that cryovolcanic activity at Enceladus could lead to electrodynamic coupling between Enceladus and Saturn like that which links Jupiter with Io, Europa and Ganymede. Powerful field-aligned electron beams associated with the Io-Jupiter coupling, for example, create an auroral footprint in Jupiter's ionosphere. Auroral ultraviolet emission associated with Enceladus-Saturn coupling is anticipated to be just a few tenths of a kilorayleigh (ref. 12), about an order of magnitude dimmer than Io's footprint and below the observable threshold, consistent with its non-detection. Here we report the detection of magnetic-field-aligned ion and electron beams (offset several moon radii downstream from Enceladus) with sufficient power to stimulate detectable aurora, and the subsequent discovery of Enceladus-associated aurora in a few per cent of the scans of the moon's footprint. The footprint varies in emission magnitude more than can plausibly be explained by changes in magnetospheric parameters--and as such is probably indicative of variable plume activity.

  19. Developments and new performance of Saturne II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciret, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The development of Saturne II aims to improve the quality, diversity and reliability of the beams which are or will be delivered to physicists. The significant development projects (polarized ions, heavy ions, Mimas, SPES II, etc.) are dealt with separately and specifically by other authors. Only the new performance and qualities of the beam delivered to physicists in the future are described here. The purpose of these developments is to meet the short and long term requirements expressed by the physicists and concern the Machine and the Areas [fr

  20. Cassini at Saturn: The Final Two Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Edgington, S.; Altobelli, N.

    2015-10-01

    After 11 years in orbit, the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn, a collaboration of NASA, ESA, and ASI, continues to wow the imagination and reveal unprecedented findings. Every year Cassini produces answers to questions raised by the Voyager flybys, while at the same time posing new questions that can only be answered with a long duration mission using a flagship-class spacecraft. Here we sample a few of Cassini's discoveries from the past year and give an overview of Cassini's final two years.

  1. Spallation neutron spectra measured at Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyard, J.L.; Bouyer, P.; Brochard, F.; Duchazeaubeneix, J.C.; Durand, J.M.; Leray, S.; Milleret, G.; Plouin, F.; Uematsu, M.; Whittal, D.M.; Martinez, E.; Beau, M.; Boue, F.; Crespin, S.; Drake, D.; Frehaut, J.; Lochard, J.P.; Patin, Y.; Petibon, E.; Legrain, R.; Terrien, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Good knowledge of spallation reactions is necessary to design accelerator-based transmutation systems. An extensive program has begun at Saturne to measure energy and angular distributions of neutrons produced by incident protons or deuterons of up to 2 GeV on several thin targets. Our measurements will extend the available data to higher energies than the present limit of 800 MeV enabling improvements to the codes which are sometimes in poor agreement with the data. (Authors). 7 refs., 7 figs

  2. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Saturn and Titan from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Brasunas, J. C.; Carlson, R. C.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Nixon, A.; Pearl, J. C.; Romani, P. N.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; hide

    2009-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft completed its nominal mission at Saturn in 2008 and began its extended mission. Cassini carries the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the composition, thermal structure and dynamics of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan, and also the temperatures of other moons and the rings.

  3. Saturn PRobe Interior and aTmosphere Explorer (SPRITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amy; Banfield, D.; Atkinson, D.; Atreya, S.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Fletcher, L.; Guillot, T.; Hofstadter, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Vision and Voyages Planetary Decadal Survey identified a Saturn Probe mission as one of the high priority New Frontiers mission targets[1]. Many aspects of the Saturn system will not have been fully investigated at the end of the Cassini mission, because of limitations in its implementation and science instrumentation. Fundamental measurements of the interior structure and noble gas abundances of Saturn are needed to better constrain models of Solar System formation, as well as to provide an improved context for exoplanet systems. The SPRITE mission will fulfill the scientific goals of the Decadal Survey Saturn probe mission. It will also provide ground truth for quantities constrained by Cassini and conduct new investigations that improve our understanding of Saturn's interior structure and composition, and by proxy, those of extrasolar giant planets.

  4. Saturn's dayside ultraviolet auroras: Evidence for morphological dependence on the direction of the upstream interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, C J; Alexeev, I I; Badman, S V; Belenkaya, E S; Cowley, S W H; Dougherty, M K; Kalegaev, V V; Lewis, G R; Nichols, J D

    2014-01-01

    We examine a unique data set from seven Hubble Space Telescope (HST) “visits” that imaged Saturn's northern dayside ultraviolet emissions exhibiting usual circumpolar “auroral oval” morphologies, during which Cassini measured the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) upstream of Saturn's bow shock over intervals of several hours. The auroras generally consist of a dawn arc extending toward noon centered near ∼15° colatitude, together with intermittent patchy forms at ∼10° colatitude and poleward thereof, located between noon and dusk. The dawn arc is a persistent feature, but exhibits variations in position, width, and intensity, which have no clear relationship with the concurrent IMF. However, the patchy postnoon auroras are found to relate to the (suitably lagged and averaged) IMF Bz, being present during all four visits with positive Bz and absent during all three visits with negative Bz. The most continuous such forms occur in the case of strongest positive Bz. These results suggest that the postnoon forms are associated with reconnection and open flux production at Saturn's magnetopause, related to the similarly interpreted bifurcated auroral arc structures previously observed in this local time sector in Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph data, whose details remain unresolved in these HST images. One of the intervals with negative IMF Bz however exhibits a prenoon patch of very high latitude emission extending poleward of the dawn arc to the magnetic/spin pole, suggestive of the occurrence of lobe reconnection. Overall, these data provide evidence of significant IMF dependence in the morphology of Saturn's dayside auroras. Key Points We examine seven cases of joint HST Saturn auroral images and Cassini IMF data The persistent but variable dawn arc shows no obvious IMF dependence Patchy postnoon auroras are present for northward IMF but not for southward IMF PMID:26167441

  5. Overview of Key Saturn Probe Mission Trades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Kowalkowski, Theresa; Folkner, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Ongoing studies, performed at NASA/JPL over the past two years in support of NASA's SSE Roadmap activities, proved the feasibility of a NF class Saturn probe mission. I. This proposed mission could also provide a good opportunity for international collaboration with the proposed Cosmic Vision KRONOS mission: a) With ESA contributed probes (descent modules) on a NASA lead mission; b) Early 2017 launch could be a good programmatic option for ESA-CV/NASA-NF. II. A number of mission architectures could be suitable for this mission: a) Probe Relay based architecture with short flight time (approx. 6.3-7 years); b) DTE probe telecom based architecture with long flight time (-11 years), and low probe data rate, but with the probes decoupled from the carrier, allowing for polar trajectories I orbiter. This option may need technology development for telecom; c) Orbiter would likely impact mission cost over flyby, but would provide significantly higher science return. The Saturn probes mission is expected to be identified in NASA's New Frontiers AO. Thus, further studies are recommended to refine the most suitable architecture. International collaboration is started through the KRONOS proposal work; further collaborated studies will follow once KRONOS is selected in October under ESA's Cosmic Vision Program.

  6. Source mechanism of Saturn narrowband emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Narrowband emission (NB is observed at Saturn centered near 5 kHz and 20 kHz and harmonics. This emission appears similar in many ways to Jovian kilometric narrowband emission observed at higher frequencies, and therefore may have a similar source mechanism. Source regions of NB near 20 kHz are believed to be located near density gradients in the inner magnetosphere and the emission appears to be correlated with the occurrence of large neutral plasma clouds observed in the Saturn magnetotail. In this work we present the results of a growth rate analysis of NB emission (~20 kHz near or within a probable source region. This is made possible by the sampling of in-situ wave and particle data. The results indicate waves are likely to be generated by the mode-conversion of directly generated Z-mode emission to O-mode near a density gradient. When the local hybrid frequency is close n fce (n is an integer and fce is the electron cyclotron frequency with n=4, 5 or 6 in our case, electromagnetic Z-mode and weak ordinary (O-mode emission can be directly generated by the cyclotron maser instability.

  7. Doppler effects on periodicities in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere of Saturn exhibits a wide variety of periodic phenomena in magnetic fields, charged particles, and radio emissions. The periodicities are observed from a moving spacecraft, so an issue arises about the periodicities being influenced by the Doppler effects. Doppler effects can be investigated using models of the periodicities and then flying the spacecraft through the model, effectively measuring any Doppler phenomena with the simulation. Using 200 days of typical elliptical orbits from the Cassini mission at Saturn, three models were tested: an azimuthal wave (or "searchlight") model, a radial wave (or "pond ripple") model, and a model of an outwardly traveling spiral wave. The azimuthal wave model produced virtually no Doppler effects in the periodicities because its wave vector is nearly perpendicular to the spacecraft trajectory. The radial wave model generated strong Doppler effects of an upshifted and a downshifted signal (a dual period) on either side of the true period, because the wave vector is either parallel or antiparallel to the spacecraft trajectory. Being intermediate to the searchlight and radial waves, the spiral wave produced Doppler effects but only for low wave speeds (<10 RS/h). For higher wave speeds the Doppler effects were not as clear. The Doppler effects can be mitigated by employing only observations beyond ~15 RS where the spacecraft speed is low compared to the wave speed. The observed periodicities over the same 200 day interval do not show evidence of Doppler effects but generally display a single feature at the expected ~10.7 h period.

  8. New `Moons' of Saturn May Be Transient Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    ring plane crossings (RPX) . At the corresponding times, the Sun illuminates the thin Saturnian rings exactly from the side. Due to its own orbital motion around the Sun, the Earth will cross the ring plane either once or three times, just before and/or after a solar RPX event. In 1995, this happened on May 22 and August 10, and there will be a third Earth RPX event on February 11, 1996. RPX Events Offer Improved Possibilities to Discover Faint Moons The apparent brightness of Saturn's rings decreases dramatically around the time of a solar RPX event. It is then much easier to detect faint moons which would otherwise be lost in the strong glare of Saturn's ring system. Also, the edge-on view improves the chances of detecting faint and dilute rings [3]. Moreover, numerous `mutual events' (eclipses and occultations) occur between the moons during this period; exact timing of these events allows highly improved determination of the motions and orbits around Saturn of these objects. The most recent Earth RPX event took place on August 10, 1995. At this time, Saturn was situated nearly opposite the Sun (in `opposition'), as seen from the Earth, and conditions were very favourable for astronomical observations from both hemispheres. However, because of the longer nights during the southern winter, observing possibilities were particularly good in the south and thus at the ESO La Silla Observatory. The ADONIS Observations Here, a team of astronomers (Jean-Luc Beuzit, Bruno Sicardy and Francois Poulet of the Paris Observatory; Pablo Prado from ESO) followed this rare event during 6 half-nights around August 10, 1995, with the advanced ADONIS adaptive optics camera at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. This instrument neutralizes the image-smearing effects of the atmospheric turbulence and records very sharp images on an infrared-sensitive 256 x 256 pixel detector with a scale of 0.05 arcsec/pixel. Most of the Saturn images were taken through the `short K' filter with a central

  9. A statistical analysis of the location and width of Saturn's southern auroras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Badman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A selection of twenty-two Hubble Space Telescope images of Saturn's ultraviolet auroras obtained during 1997–2004 has been analysed to determine the median location and width of the auroral oval, and their variability. Limitations of coverage restrict the analysis to the southern hemisphere, and to local times from the post-midnight sector to just past dusk, via dawn and noon. It is found that the overall median location of the poleward and equatorward boundaries of the oval with respect to the southern pole are at ~14° and ~16° co-latitude, respectively, with a median latitudinal width of ~2°. These median values vary only modestly with local time around the oval, though the poleward boundary moves closer to the pole near noon (~12.5° such that the oval is wider in that sector (median width ~3.5° than it is at both dawn and dusk (~1.5°. It is also shown that the position of the auroral boundaries at Saturn are extremely variable, the poleward boundary being located between 2° and 20° co-latitude, and the equatorward boundary between 6° and 23°, this variability contrasting sharply with the essentially fixed location of the main oval at Jupiter. Comparison with Voyager plasma angular velocity data mapped magnetically from the equatorial magnetosphere into the southern ionosphere indicates that the dayside aurora lie poleward of the main upward-directed field-aligned current region associated with corotation enforcement, which maps to ~20°–24° co-latitude, while agreeing reasonably with the position of the open-closed field line boundary based on estimates of the open flux in Saturn's tail, located between ~11° and ~15°. In this case, the variability in location can be understood in terms of changes in the open flux present in the system, the changes implied by the Saturn data then matching those observed at Earth as fractions of the total planetary flux. We infer that the broad (few degrees diffuse auroral emissions

  10. How Prometheus creates structure in Saturn's F ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Carl D; Chavez, Carlos; Beurle, Kevin; Cooper, Nick; Evans, Michael W; Burns, Joseph A; Porco, Carolyn C

    2005-10-27

    Images of Saturn's narrow and contorted F ring returned by the Cassini spacecraft have revealed phenomena not previously detected in any planetary ring system. The perturbing effect of the inner shepherding satellite, Prometheus, seems to introduce channels through the F ring and a 'streamer'--a line of particles that link the ring to the satellite. The detailed mechanism for the formation of these features has been lacking an explanation. Here we show that these phenomena can be understood in terms of a simple gravitational interaction as Prometheus approaches and recedes from the F ring every 14.7 hours. Our numerical models show that as Prometheus recedes from its closest approach to the F ring, it draws out ring material; one orbital period later, this affected region has undergone keplerian shear and is visible as a channel, in excellent agreement with structures seen in the Cassini images. Prometheus' periodic disruption of the F ring will become more pronounced as the two orbits approach their minimum separation in 2009. The model predicts that the appearance of streamers and the associated channels will vary in a regular fashion on a timescale of one orbital period.

  11. Optical properties and the structure of the Saturn atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejfel', V.G.

    1980-01-01

    The recent state of the chemical composition and structure of the atmosphere of Saturn is analyzed taking into account the observational and theoretical data received mainly during 1973-1977. One of the major problems of the study of the atmosphere of Saturn is the physical nature of the aerosol component (condensated particles and dust) and its distribution in height and different latitudes. Optical properties of the observable cloud cover of Saturn and their influence on spectral estimates of the content of absorbing gases are discussed. Data on the atmosphere reflecting power, polarization measurements, photometry composition in the atmosphere are presented. Scheme of a possible atmosphere structure is given

  12. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourhassan, Behnam, E-mail: b.pourhassan@du.ac.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: f2mir@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  13. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Pourhassan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  14. The Saturn System Through the Eyes of Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James

    2017-01-01

    More than 400 years ago, Galileo Galilei trained his homemade telescope on the night sky and observed that Saturn had two objects closely related to the planet extending on either side. At the time, in 1610, Galileo declared them to be moons. A few decades later, Saturn moon science accelerated at a dizzying pace. Christiaan Huygens first observed Saturn's largest moon Titan in 1655 and was the first to describe the extended moon-like features at Saturn as a disk of material sounding the planet. From 1671 to 1674, Giovanni Cassini discovered the moons lapetus, Rhea, Dione and Tethys. In 1675, Cassini discovered the gap in Saturn's rings that we now know as the Cassini Division. In the space age, before the Cassini-Huygens mission, we had only hints of the discoveries awaiting us at Saturn. Pioneer 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 conducted flybys decades ago. But these quick encounters didn't allow time for more extensive research. NASA and the European Space Agency created a partnership to orbit a Saturn orbiter (Cassini) and a lander (Huygens) on Titan. Like its namesakes, the Cassini-Huygens mission not only discovered previously unknown moons, but it also helped us understand the science behind their formation, their interactions with the rings, and how truly diverse they are. The Cassini-Huygens mission revolutionized what we know about the Saturn system. The rings of Saturn, the moons, and the planet itself offer irresistible and inexhaustible subjects for intense study, and Cassini-Huygens did not disappoint. The Saturnian system proved to be a rich ground for science exploration and discoveries, and Cassini has been nothing short of a discovery machine. At the time Cassini plunged into Saturn at the end of its mission, it had observed the planet for a little less than half of a Saturn year. But it also orbited the gas giant 293 times, forever changing our understanding of the Saturn system and yielding tremendous insight for understanding the entire Solar System.

  15. The Saturn Probe Interior and aTmosphere Explorer (SPRITE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amy; Banfield, Donald; Atkinson, David; SPRITE Science Team

    2018-01-01

    A key question in planetary science is how the planets formed in our Solar System, and, by extension, in exoplanet systems. The abundances of the noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), heavy elements (C, N, O, S), and their isotopes provide important forensic clues as to location and time of formation in the early Solar System. Jupiter and Saturn contain most of the planetary mass in our solar system, and their chemical fingerprints will distinguish between competing models of the formation of all the planets. After the end of the Cassini mission, some of these elements have only ambiguous values above the cloud tops, while others (particularly the noble gases) have not been measured at all. Resolving this requires direct in situ measurements. The proposed NASA New Frontiers Saturn PRobe Interior and aTmosphere Explorer (SPRITE) mission delivers an instrumented entry probe from a carrier relay spacecraft that also provides context imaging. The powerful probe instrument suite is comprised of a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, a Tunable Laser Spectrometer, and an Atmospheric Structure Instrument including a Doppler Wind Experiment and a simple backscatter nephelometer. These instruments measure the elemental and isotopic abundances of helium, the heavier noble gases, and the major elements, as well as constraining cloud properties, 3-D atmospheric dynamics, and disequilibrium chemistry to at least 10 bars in Saturn's troposphere. In situ measurements of Saturn's atmosphere by SPRITE will provide a significantly improved context for interpreting the results from the Galileo probe, Juno, and Cassini missions. SPRITE will revolutionize our understanding of the formation and evolution of the gas giant planets, and ultimately the present-day structure of the Solar System.

  16. Pickering Membranes Stabilized by Saturn Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejca, Matthias M; Wüstner, Cornell; Goedel, Werner A

    2017-10-17

    We report on a novel method to synthesize particles-called by us Saturn particles-having two hydrophobic caps that oppose each other and are separated from each other by a hydrophilic belt that encircles the particle. Mixtures of these particles with water and air, without the usage of low molar mass surfactants, easily form Pickering foams and Pickering membranes that are stable for days. These Pickering membranes are composed of a thin film of water into which the particles are embedded in such a way that the belt is surrounded by the water and the caps protrude out of the water into the air at the top and bottom side of the water film. As expected for a liquid membrane, these Pickering membranes are permeable for gases, with the permeance being proportional to the solubility and diffusion coefficient of the gas considered. Experimentally obtained permeance values agree reasonably well with theoretical calculations.

  17. Noncircular features in Saturn's rings IV: Absolute radius scale and Saturn's pole direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Richard G.; McGhee-French, Colleen A.; Lonergan, Katherine; Sepersky, Talia; Jacobson, Robert A.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Mathew M.; Marouf, Essam A.; Colwell, Joshua E.

    2017-07-01

    We present a comprehensive solution for the geometry of Saturn's ring system, based on orbital fits to an extensive set of occultation observations of 122 individual ring edges and gaps. We begin with a restricted set of very high quality Cassini VIMS, UVIS, and RSS measurements for quasi-circular features in the C and B rings and the Cassini Division, and then successively add suitably weighted additional Cassini and historical occultation measurements (from Voyager, HST and the widely-observed 28 Sgr occultation of 3 Jul 1989) for additional non-circular features, to derive an absolute radius scale applicable across the entire classical ring system. As part of our adopted solution, we determine first-order corrections to the spacecraft trajectories used to determine the geometry of individual occultation chords. We adopt a simple linear model for Saturn's precession, and our favored solution yields a precession rate on the sky n^˙P = 0.207 ± 0 .006‧‧yr-1 , equivalent to an angular rate of polar motion ΩP = 0.451 ± 0 .014‧‧yr-1 . The 3% formal uncertainty in the fitted precession rate is approaching the point where it can provide a useful constraint on models of Saturn's interior, although realistic errors are likely to be larger, given the linear approximation of the precession model and possible unmodeled systematic errors in the spacecraft ephemerides. Our results are largely consistent with independent estimates of the precession rate based on historical RPX times (Nicholson et al., 1999 AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #31 31, 44.01) and from theoretical expectations that account for Titan's 700-yr precession period (Vienne and Duriez 1992, Astronomy and Astrophysics 257, 331-352). The fitted precession rate based on Cassini data only is somewhat lower, which may be an indication of unmodeled shorter term contributions to Saturn's polar motion from other satellites, or perhaps the result of inconsistencies in the assumed

  18. VOYAGER 2 SATURN PLASMA DERIVED ELECTRON BROWSE 96 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONTAINS THE THERMAL ELECTRON DENSITY AND TEMPERATURE IN THE PLS ENERGY RANGE (10-5950 EV) FROM VOYAGER 2 AT SATURN DERIVED BY FITTING THE LOW ENERGY...

  19. VOYAGER 1 SATURN POSITION RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SECONDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter position data that have been generated at a 48.0 second sample rate using the NAIF SPICE kernals. The data set is...

  20. VOYAGER 2 SATURN POSITION RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SECONDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter position data that have been generated at a 48.0 second sample rate using the NAIF SPICE kernals. The data set is...

  1. VOYAGER 1 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 9.60 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 9.6 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  2. VOYAGER 2 SATURN PLASMA DERIVED ELECTRON PARAMETERS 96 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONTAINS ELECTRON PARAMETERS IN THE PLS ENERGY RANGE (10-5950 EV) AT SATURN DURING THE VOYAGER 2 ENCOUNTER. PARAMETERS ARE CALCULATED IN SEVERAL WAYS....

  3. VOYAGER 1 SATURN PLASMA DERIVED ELECTRON PARAMETERS 96 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONTAINS ELECTRON PARAMETERS IN THE PLS ENERGY RANGE (10-5950 EV) AT SATURN DURING THE VOYAGER 1 ENCOUNTER. PARAMETERS ARE CALCULATED IN SEVERAL WAYS....

  4. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desch, M.D.; Rucker, H.O.; Observatorium Lustbuhel, Graz, Austria)

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field. 10 references

  5. VOYAGER 2 SATURN PLASMA DERIVED ION MOMENTS 96 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONTAINS ESTIMATES OF THE ION MOMENT DENSITY IN THE PLS VOLTAGE RANGE (10-5950 EV/Q) AT SATURN DURING THE VOYAGER 2 ENCOUNTER. RIGID COROTATION IS...

  6. VOYAGER 1 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  7. VOYAGER 1 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 48.0 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  8. VOYAGER 2 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 1.92 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 1.92 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  9. VOYAGER 2 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 48.0 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  10. VOYAGER 2 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 9.60 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 9.6 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  11. VOYAGER 1 SATURN PLASMA DERIVED ION FITS BROWSE 96 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONTAINS THE ION DENSITIES, TEMPERATURES, AND VELOCITIES OBTAINED FROM VOYAGER 1 PLS DATA (VOLTAGE RANGE 10-5950 EV/Q) AT SATURN BY FITTING THE...

  12. VOYAGER 2 SATURN PLASMA DERIVED ION FITS BROWSE 96 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONTAINS THE ION DENSITIES, TEMPERATURES, AND VELOCITIES OBTAINED FROM VOYAGER 2 PLS DATA (VOLTAGE RANGE 10-5950 EV/Q) AT SATURN BY FITTING THE...

  13. VOYAGER 1 SATURN PLASMA DERIVED ION FITS 96 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONTAINS THE ION PARAMETERS IN THE PLS VOLTAGE RANGE (10-5950 EV/Q) WITH FORMAL 1 SIGMA ERRORS OBTAINED FROM VOYAGER 1 DATA AT SATURN BY FITTING THE...

  14. VOYAGER 2 SATURN PLASMA DERIVED ION FITS 96 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONTAINS THE ION PARAMETERS IN THE PLS VOLTAGE RANGE (10-5950 EV/Q) WITH FORMAL 1 SIGMA ERRORS OBTAINED FROM VOYAGER 2 DATA AT SATURN BY FITTING THE...

  15. Cassini discovers a kinematic spiral ring around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, S; Porco, C C; Déau, E; Brahic, A; Spitale, J N; Bacques, G; Baillie, K

    2005-11-25

    Since the time of the Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981, Saturn's eccentric F ring has been known to be accompanied on either side by faint strands of material. New Cassini observations show that these strands, initially interpreted as concentric ring segments, are in fact connected and form a single one-arm trailing spiral winding at least three times around Saturn. The spiral rotates around Saturn with the orbital motion of its constituent particles. This structure is likely the result of differential orbital motion stretching an initial cloud of particles scattered from the dense core of the F ring. Different scenarios of formation, implying ringlet-satellite interactions, are explored. A recently discovered moon candidate, S/2004 S6, is on an orbit that crosses the F-ring core at the intersection of the spiral with the ring, which suggests a dynamical connection between S/2004 S6 and the spiral.

  16. One last look from the dark side: Cassini's final views of Saturn's rings from with the planet's shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Matthew M.; Burns, Joseph A.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Evans, Michael W.; Baker, Emily

    2017-10-01

    Around the start of Cassini's Grand Finale, the spacecraft passed a dozen times through Saturn's shadow, enabling its cameras and spectrometers to observe the ring system at extremely high phase angles. These opportunities yielded the best combination of signal-to-noise and resolution for many parts of Saturn's fainter dusty rings, and allowed the main rings to be viewed from previously inaccessible lighting geometries. We will highlight some of the surprising features found in the data obtained by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) during these time periods, and discuss what they might be able to tell us about the structure and dynamics of Saturn's various ring systems. For example, ISS captured global views of the entire ring system that reveal previously unseen structures in dust-filled regions like the D ring and the zone between Saturn's F and G rings, as well as novel fine-scale structures in the core of the E ring near Enceladus' orbit. These structures provide new insights into the forces that sculpt these tenuous rings. ISS and VIMS also detected an unexpected brightening and highly unusual spectra of the main rings at extremely high phase angles. These data may provide novel information about the distribution of small grains and particles in these denser rings.

  17. Cloud morphology and dynamics in Saturn's northern polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antuñano, Arrate; del Río-Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Rodríguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of the cloud morphology and motions in the north polar region of Saturn, from latitude ∼ 70°N to the pole based on Cassini ISS images obtained between January 2009 and November 2014. This region shows a variety of dynamical structures: the permanent hexagon wave and its intense eastward jet, a large field of permanent ;puffy; clouds with scales from 10 - 500 km, probably of convective origin, local cyclone and anticyclones vortices with sizes of ∼1,000 km embedded in this field, and finally the intense cyclonic polar vortex. We report changes in the albedo of the clouds that delineate rings of circulation around the polar vortex and the presence of ;plume-like; activity in the hexagon jet, in both cases not accompanied with significant variations in the corresponding jets. No meridional migration is observed in the clouds forming and merging in the field of puffy clouds, suggesting that their mergers do not contribute to the maintenance of the polar vortex. Finally, we analyze the dominant growing modes for barotropic and baroclinic instabilities in the hexagon jet, showing that a mode 6 barotropic instability is dominant at the latitude of the hexagon.

  18. SATURN-S - a program system for the description of the thermomechanical behaviour of reactor fuel pins under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesl, R.; Freund, D.; Gaertner, H.; Steiner, H.

    1987-07-01

    On the basis of post irradiation examination results of various irradiation experiments with different fuel types real case calculations showed many of the existing models to be applicable to a restricted extent only. Therefore a re- and partially new formulation of models was necessary. Furthermore, the data base had been actualized and numerical procedures had been improved. This, together with the capabilities of modern computer systems, conducted the development of the program system SATURN-S with a strictly modular structure, specified by the requirements of the determination of the superposition of effects. In the present report the program SATURN-S as well as some analysis results are presented. (orig./HP) [de

  19. In Situ Probe Science at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D.H.; Lunine, J.I.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Guillot, T.; Lebreton, J.-P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar sys-tem, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation pro-cess was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Several theories have been put forward to explain the process of solar system formation, and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Each theory offers quantifiable predictions of the abundances of noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and abundances of key isotopic ratios 4He3He, DH, 15N14N, 18O16O, and 13C12C. Detection of certain dis-equilibrium species, diagnostic of deeper internal pro-cesses and dynamics of the atmosphere, would also help discriminate between competing theories. Measurements of the critical abundance profiles of these key constituents into the deeper well-mixed at-mosphere must be complemented by measurements of the profiles of atmospheric structure and dynamics at high vertical resolution and also require in situ explora-tion. The atmospheres of the giant planets can also serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chem-istries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets including Earth, and offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems. Additionally, Giant planets have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Sat-urn, a small, relatively shallow Saturn probe capable of measuring abundances and isotopic ratios of key at-mospheric constituents, and atmospheric structure in-cluding pressures, temperatures, dynamics, and cloud

  20. The atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the near-infrared: First results of Cassini/Vims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Buratti, B.J.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Drossart, P.; Sicardy, B.; Formisano, V.; Bellucci, G.; Coradini, A.; Griffith, C.; Brown, R.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Jaumann, R.; McCordt, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    The wide spectral coverage and extensive spatial, temporal, and phase-angle mapping capabilities of the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter are producing fundamental new insights into the nature of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan. For both bodies, VIMS maps over time and solar phase angles provide information for a multitude of atmospheric constituents and aerosol layers, providing new insights into atmospheric structure and dynamical and chemical processes. For Saturn, salient early results include evidence for phosphine depletion in relatively dark and less cloudy belts at temperate and mid-latitudes compared to the relatively bright and cloudier Equatorial Region, consistent with traditional theories of belts being regions of relative downwelling. Additional Saturn results include (1) the mapping of enhanced trace gas absorptions at the south pole, and (2) the first high phase-angle, high-spatial-resolution imagery of CH4 fluorescence. An additional fundamental new result is the first nighttime near-infrared mapping of Saturn, clearly showing discrete meteorological features relatively deep in the atmosphere beneath the planet's sunlit haze and cloud layers, thus revealing a new dynamical regime at depth where vertical dynamics is relatively more important than zonal dynamics in determining cloud morphology. Zonal wind measurements at deeper levels than previously available are achieved by tracking these features over multiple days, thereby providing measurements of zonal wind shears within Saturn's troposphere when compared to cloudtop movements measured in reflected sunlight. For Titan, initial results include (1) the first detection and mapping of thermal emission spectra of CO, CO2, and CH3D on Titan's nightside limb, (2) the mapping of CH4 fluorescence over the dayside bright limb, extending to ??? 750 km altitude, (3) wind measurements of ???0.5 ms-1, favoring prograde, from the movement of a persistent

  1. [Biochemical principles of early saturnism recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimakuridze, M P; Mansuradze, E A; Zurashvili, D G; Tsimakuridze, M P

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the work is to determine the major sensitive criteria of biochemical indicators that allow timely discovery of negative influence of lead on organism and assist in early diagnosis of primary stages of saturnism. The workers of Georgian typographies, performing technological processes of letterpress printing were observed. Professional groups having contact with lead aerosols (main group of 66 people) and the workers of the same typography not being in touch with the poison (control group of 24 people) were studied. It was distinguished that, protracted professional contact with lead causes moderate increase of lead, coproporphyrin and DALA in daily urine in most cases; it is more clearly evidenced in the professional groups of lead smelters and lino operators and less clearly among typesetter and printers. Upon the checkup of people, having a direct contact with lead, biochemical analysis of urine should be given a preference, especially the determination of quantitative content of lead and coproporphyrin in urine with the aim of revealing the lead carrier, which is one of the first signals for occupational lookout and medical monitoring of the similar contingent.

  2. Interaction of Saturn's dual rotation periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. G. A.

    2018-03-01

    We develop models of the interaction of Rossby wave disturbances in the northern and southern ionospheres of Saturn. We show that interhemispheric field-aligned currents allow the exchange of vorticity, modifying the background Rossby wave propagation speed. This leads to interaction of the northern and southern Rossby wave periods. In a very simple symmetric model without a plasma disk the periods merge when the overall conductivity is sufficiently high. A more complex model taking account of the inertia of the plasma disk and the asymmetry of the two hemispheres predicts a rich variety of possible wave modes. We find that merging of the northern and southern periods can only occur when (i) the conductivities of both hemispheres are sufficiently low (a criterion that is fulfilled for realistic parameters) and (ii) the background Rossby wave periods in the two hemispheres are identical. We reconcile the second criterion with the observations of a merged period that also drifts by noting that ranges of Rossby wave propagation speeds are possible in each hemisphere. We suggest that a merged disturbance in the plasma disk may act as an 'anchor' and drive Rossby waves in each hemisphere within the range of possible propagation speeds. This suggestion predicts behaviour that qualitatively matches the observed merging and splitting of the northern and southern rotation periods that occurred in 2013 and 2014. Low conductivity modes also show long damping timescales that are consistent with the persistence of the periodic signals.

  3. REFLECTED LIGHT CURVES, SPHERICAL AND BOND ALBEDOS OF JUPITER- AND SATURN-LIKE EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyudina, Ulyana; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Yung, Yuk L. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 150-21 California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zhang, Xi [University of California Santa Cruz 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Li, Liming [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Dones, Luke [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder CO 80302 (United States); Verbiscer, Anne, E-mail: ulyana@gps.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2016-05-10

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet’s phase. These observations cover broadbands at 0.59–0.72 and 0.39–0.5 μ m, and narrowbands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24–0.28 μ m. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ∼1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating.

  4. Cyclonic circulation of Saturn's atmosphere due to tilted convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyev, Y. D.; Zhang, Y.

    2018-02-01

    Saturn displays cyclonic vortices at its poles and the general atmospheric circulation at other latitudes is dominated by embedded zonal jets that display cyclonic circulation. The abundance of small-scale convective storms suggests that convection plays a role in producing and maintaining Saturn's atmospheric circulation. However, the dynamical influence of small-scale convection on Saturn's general circulation is not well understood. Here we present laboratory analogue experiments and propose that Saturn's cyclonic circulation can be explained by tilted convection in which buoyancy forces do not align with the planet's rotation axis. In our experiments—conducted with a cylindrical water tank that is heated at the bottom, cooled at the top and spun on a rotating table—warm rising plumes and cold sinking water generate small anticyclonic and cyclonic vortices that are qualitatively similar to Saturn's convective storms. Numerical simulations complement the experiments and show that this small-scale convection leads to large-scale cyclonic flow at the surface and anticyclonic circulation at the base of the fluid layer, with a polar vortex forming from the merging of smaller cyclonic storms that are driven polewards.

  5. Saturn's aurora in the January 2004 events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere of Saturn relative to the Earth result from the decrease in the solar wind plasma density and magnetic field strength with distance from the Sun, and from the change in the average angle of the IMF at Saturn's orbit. Other reasons are related to Saturn's rapid rotation and internal magnetospheric plasma sources. Moreover, the IMF structure observed by Cassini in 2003–2004 during the approach to Saturn is consistent with corotating interaction regions (CIRs existing during the declining phase of the solar cycle. Two cases on 16 and 26 January 2004 are considered when disturbances in the solar wind passed Cassini and then Saturn. After the solar wind shock encountered the kronian magnetosphere, the auroral oval became brighter (especially at dawn with a reduced radius. In these cases the auroral power was anti-correlated with the radius of the oval. Possible mechanisms responsible for such unexpected behavior are presented and discussed in detail.

  6. Examining the Combined Saturn and Ring Exosphere/Ionosphere using Cassini's Proximal orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, O. J.; Tseng, W. L.; Johnson, R. E.; Perry, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Neutral molecules that are emitted from Saturn's exobase (i.e., H2) and the main rings (i.e., H2, O2, H) are a source of material for both the Saturn and ring ionospheres as well as Saturn's magnetosphere (Tseng et al., 2013 [PSS 85 164 - 167]). However, the density gradient of H2 produced from the main rings is very different than that produced by Saturn's exospheric flux due to its emission from the ring plane and distance from Saturn. Cassini measurements obtained during the proximal orbits can likely be used to identify contributions from Saturn and the rings. Here we present results obtained from Monte Carlo models of the Saturn and ring exosphere used to analyze INMS data of neutrals and ions measured along the trajectories of the Proximal orbits. Understanding the sources of neutrals and the concomitant ions can help provide insight about the dynamics occurring in the Saturn system.

  7. Exploration of the Saturn System by the Cassini Mission: Observations with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Outline: Introduction to the Cassini mission, and Cassini mission Objectives; Cassini spacecraft, instruments, launch, and orbit insertion; Saturn, Rings, and Satellite, Titan; Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); and Infrared observations of Saturn and titan.

  8. Improved Radio Emissivities for Satellites of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Paul

    2010-10-01

    The size distribution of TNOs is one of the most important constraints on the history of the early solar system. However, while TNOs are most detectable in the visible and near-IR wavelengths, their albedos vary substantially, thus creating uncertainty in their sizes when determined from reflected light alone. One way of determining the size distribution for a large number of TNOs is to measure their thermal emission, such as has been done with Spitzer and Herschel. However, in just a few year's time, ALMA will be coming online, and will be able to detect thermal emission from even more TNOs. However, thermal emission from Solar System bodies in the millimeter and submillimeter, such as that which ALMA will detect, is not that of a pure blackbody. Pluto, the Gallillean satellites, and Vesta have all shown deviations from unity emissivity. However, the cause of this variation is not well understood. Here we re-analayze data from the Cassini RADAR instrument at 2.5 cm. Cassini RADAR measured the brightness temperature and emissivity of several of Saturn's icy satellites, at least one of which, Phoebe, is thought to be a captured TNO. Previous emissivity determinations relied on relatively simple thermal models. We recalculate emissivities using thermal models based on recent data obtained with the CIRS (infrared) instrument on Cassini which account for, among other things, diurnal effects and the rotation during the RADAR observations. For one important result, we demonstrate that deviation from unity emissivity on Iapetus is due solely to surface depth effects at long wavelengths when RADAR data at 2.5 cm is combined with data obtained at 3.3 mm on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This research is supported by a grant under the NRAO Student Observing Support program.

  9. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-11-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order 20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  10. Hydrocarbons on Saturn's satellites Iapetus and Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D.P.; Wegryn, E.; Dalle, Ore C.M.; Brown, R.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Pendleton, Y.J.; Owen, T.C.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Capaccioni, F.; Jaumann, R.; Nelson, R.M.; Baines, K.H.; Sotin, Christophe; Bellucci, G.; Combes, M.; Langevin, Y.; Sicardy, B.; Matson, D.L.; Formisano, V.; Drossart, P.; Mennella, V.

    2008-01-01

    Material of low geometric albedo (pV ??? 0.1) is found on many objects in the outer Solar System, but its distribution in the saturnian satellite system is of special interest because of its juxtaposition with high-albedo ice. In the absence of clear, diagnostic spectral features, the composition of this low-albedo (or "dark") material is generally inferred to be carbon-rich, but the form(s) of the carbon is unknown. Near-infrared spectra of the low-albedo hemisphere of Saturn's satellite Iapetus were obtained with the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft at the fly-by of that satellite of 31 December 2004, yielding a maximum spatial resolution on the satellite's surface of ???65 km. The spectral region 3-3.6 ??m reveals a broad absorption band, centered at 3.29 ??m, and concentrated in a region comprising about 15% of the low-albedo surface area. This is identified as the C{single bond}H stretching mode vibration in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Two weaker bands attributed to {single bond}CH2{single bond} stretching modes in aliphatic hydrocarbons are found in association with the aromatic band. The bands most likely arise from aromatic and aliphatic units in complex macromolecular carbonaceous material with a kerogen- or coal-like structure, similar to that in carbonaceous meteorites. VIMS spectra of Phoebe, encountered by Cassini on 11 June 2004, also show the aromatic hydrocarbon band, although somewhat weaker than on Iapetus. The origin of the PAH molecular material on these two satellites is unknown, but PAHs are found in carbonaceous meteorites, cometary dust particles, circumstellar dust, and interstellar dust. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Possible origin of Saturn's newly discovered outer ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlmann, D.

    1986-01-01

    Within a planetogonic model the self-gravitationally caused formation of pre-planetary and pre-satellite rings from an earlier thin disk is reported. The theoretically derived orbital radii of these rings are compared with the orbital levels in the planetary system and the satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. From this comparison it is concluded that at the radial position of Saturn's newly discovered outer ring an early pre-satellite ring of more or less evolved satellites could have existed. These satellites should have been disturbed in their evolution by the gravitation of the neighbouring massive satellite Titan. The comparison also may indicate similarities between the asteroidal belt and the newly discovered outer ring of Saturn

  12. Tungsten Z-Pinch Long Implosions on the Saturn Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS, MELISSA R.; DEENEY, Christopher; SPIELMAN, RICK B.; COVERDALE, CHRISTINE A.; RODERICK, N.F.; HAINES, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    Recent success on the Saturn and Z accelerators at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the ability to scale z-pinch parameters to increasingly larger current pulsed power facilities. Next generation machines will require even larger currents (>20 MA), placing further demands on pulsed power technology. To this end, experiments have been carried out on Saturn operating in a long pulse mode, investigating the potential of lower voltages and longer implosion times while still maintaining pinch fidelity. High wire number, 25 mm diameter tungsten arrays were imploded with implosion times ranging from 130 to 240 ns. The results were comparable to those observed in the Saturn short pulse mode, with risetimes on the order of 4.5 to 6.5 ns. Experimental data will be presented, along with two dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations used to explain and reproduce the experiment

  13. How Cassini can constrain tidal dissipation in Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jing; Fuller, Jim; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-02-01

    Tidal dissipation inside giant planets is important for the orbital evolution of their natural satellites. It is conventionally treated by parametrized equilibrium tidal theory, in which the tidal torque declines rapidly with distance, and orbital expansion was faster in the past. However, some Saturnian satellites are currently migrating outward faster than predicted by equilibrium tidal theory. Resonance locking between satellites and internal oscillations of Saturn naturally matches the observed migration rates. Here, we show that the resonance locking theory predicts dynamical tidal perturbations to Saturn's gravitational field in addition to those produced by equilibrium tidal bulges. We show that these perturbations can likely be detected during Cassini's proximal orbits if migration of satellites results from resonant gravity modes, but will likely be undetectable if migration results from inertial wave attractors or dissipation of the equilibrium tide. Additionally, we show that the detection of gravity modes would place constraints on the size of the hypothetical stably stratified region in Saturn.

  14. A Single Deformed Bow Shock for Titan-Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Omidi, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Madanian, H.; Cravens, T.; Sergis, N.; Dougherty, M. K.; Edberg, N. J. T.

    2017-12-01

    During periods of high solar wind pressure, Saturn's bow shock is pushed inside Titan's orbit exposing the moon and its ionosphere to the supersonic solar wind. The Cassini spacecraft's T96 encounter with Titan occurred during such a period and is the subject of this presentation. The observations during this encounter show evidence for the presence of outbound and inbound shock crossings associated with Saturn and Titan. They also reveal the presence of two foreshocks: one between the outbound Kronian and inbound Titan bow shocks (foreshock-1) and the other between the outbound Titan and inbound Kronian bow shocks (foreshock-2). Using electromagnetic hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations and Cassini observations we show that the origin of foreshock-1 is tied to the formation of a single deformed bow shock for the Titan-Saturn system. We also report for the first time, the observations of spontaneous hot flow anomalies (SHFAs) in foreshock-1 making Saturn the fourth planet this phenomenon has been observed and indicating its universal nature. The results of hybrid simulations also show the generation of oblique fast magnetosonic waves upstream of the outbound Titan bow shock in agreement with the observations of large amplitude magnetosonic pulsations in foreshock-2. The formation of a single deformed bow shock results in unique foreshock-bow shock or foreshock-foreshock geometries. For example, the presence of Saturn's foreshock upstream of Titan's quasi-perpendicular bow shock result in ion acceleration through a combination of shock drift and Fermi processes. We also discuss the implications of a single deformed bow shock for Saturn's magnetopause and magnetosphere.

  15. Exploration of the magnetodisk of Saturn around equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szego, K.; Nemeth, Z.; Bebesi, Z.; Foldy, L.; Erdos, G.; Thomsen, M.; Delapp, D.

    2012-04-01

    In 2009 eleven consecutive orbits of the Cassini spacecraft (from Rev 108 to Rev 119, with the exception of Rev 118) were constructed in such a way, that each of them intersected the equatorial plane of Saturn at about 22:00 LT, and approached the equator at decreasing inclination. Along all of these orbits Cassini flew by Titan, starting with T52 (2009-094T01:47:48 on 4 April), and finishing with T62 (2009-285T08:36:25 on 12 October). The equinox of Saturn was in August 2009, therefore this set of orbits is of particular interest for studying the nightside plasmadisk of Saturn. One of the most striking features of the Kronian magnetosphere is that it displays rotational modulation effects and the periodicity of these effects is determined by the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) - a radio emission originating from the planet. This (variable) periodicity modulates the plasma environment of the Kronian satellites, and strongly influences the moon-magnetosphere interactions, but its properties and origin are not completely understood yet. The SKR periodicity was observed in magnetic field, as well as in particle data, even in the outer magnetosphere. In this contribution we analyze plasma features observed along Rev 108 - Rev 119, and we compare the periodicity of the features with a simple structural model (SSM) describing the flapping motion of Saturn's plasma sheet [Arridge et al. 2011]. We also investigate deviations from the simple model. Arridge, C. S., et al. (2011), Periodic motion of Saturn's nightside plasma sheet, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A11205, doi:10.1029/2011JA016827

  16. What confines the rings of Saturn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeddine, Radwan; Nicholson, Philip D.; El Moutamid, Maryame; Longaretti, Pierre-Yves; Burns, Joseph A.

    2017-10-01

    The viscous spreading of planetary rings is believed to be counteracted by satellite torques, either through an individual resonance or through overlapping resonances (when the satellite is close to the ring edge). For the A ring of Saturn, it has been commonly believed that the satellite Janus alone can prevent the ring from spreading via its 7:6 Lindblad resonance. We discuss this common misconception and show that, in reality, the A ring is confined by the contributions from the group of satellites Pan, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, and Mimas, whose resonances gradually decrease the angular momentum flux transported outward through the ring via density and bending waves. We further argue that this decrease in angular momentum flux occurs through the mechanism of ‘flux reversal’.We find that the Janus 7:6 torque is relatively feeble, as is the comparable torque of the nearby small satellite Atlas, each amounting to less than one-tenth of the angular momentum transport carried by the A ring. But the cumulative torques of the many other satellite resonances in the A ring sufficiently reduce the angular momentum flux through the rings so that the torques due to Janus and Atlas are effective in confining the outer edge of the ring.Furthermore, we use the magnitude of the satellites’ resonance torques to estimate the effective viscosity profile across the A ring, showing that it decreases from ~50 cm2 s-1 at the inner edge to less than ~11 cm2 s-1 at the outer edge. The gradual estimated decrease of the angular momentum flux and effective viscosity are roughly consistent with results obtained by balancing the shepherding torques from Pan and Daphnis with the viscous torque at the edges of the Encke and Keeler gaps, as well as the edge of the A ring.On the other hand, the Mimas 2:1 Lindblad resonance alone seems to be capable of confining the edge of the B ring, and contrary to the situation in the A ring, we show that the effective viscosity

  17. Saturn B and C ring studies at multiple wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd; Pilorz, Stu

    2015-04-01

    We can learn a great deal about the characteristics of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize higher optical depth regions in faint rings such as the outer C ring, where albedo differences may be present. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as

  18. Analysis of narrowband emission observed in the Saturn magnetosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menietti, J. D.; Ye, S.; Y.; Yoon, P. H.; Santolík, Ondřej; Rymer, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 114, - (2009), A06206/1-A06206/13 ISSN 0148-0227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : narrowband emission * Saturn magnetosphere * Cassini Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2009

  19. Cassini at Saturn Proximal Orbits - Attitude Control Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Cassini mission at Saturn will come to an end in the spring and summer of 2017 with a series of 22 orbits that will dip inside the rings of Saturn. These are called proximal orbits and will conclude with spacecraft disposal into the atmosphere of the ringed world on September 15, 2017. These unique orbits that cross the ring plane only a few thousand kilometers above the cloud tops of the planet present new attitude control challenges for the Cassini operations team. Crossing the ring plane so close to the inner edge of the rings means that the Cassini orientation during the crossing will be tailored to protect the sensitive electronics bus of the spacecraft. This orientation will put the sun sensors at some extra risk so this paper discusses how the team prepares for dust hazards. Periapsis is so close to the planet that spacecraft controllability with RCS thrusters needs to be evaluated because of the predicted atmospheric torque near closest approach to Saturn. Radiation during the ring plane crossings will likely trigger single event transients in some attitude control sensors. This paper discusses how the attitude control team deals with radiation hazards. The angular size and unique geometry of the rings and Saturn near periapsis means that star identification will be interrupted and this paper discusses how the safe mode attitude is selected to best deal with these large bright bodies during the proximal orbits.

  20. Distribution of neutral gas and dust near Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Scudder, J. D.; Bridge, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of neutral gas and dust within the magnetosphere of Saturn has been inferred from the electron velocity distribution functions measured by the Voyager 1 plasma science experiment. Substantial enhancements of neutral material near Titan and in the vicinity of Enceladus are found. The E ring is also shown to be larger than previously thought.

  1. Heavy meson production at Saturne: the role of baryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bornec, Y.

    1991-01-01

    A selection of experiments performed at SATURNE which demonstrate the role played by N* resonances is presented. Nucleon-nucleon and proton-deuteron reactions are discussed and analyzed. Recent theoretical interpretations are also briefly described. (R.P.) 27 refs., 20 figs

  2. First Results of ISO-SWS Grating Observations of Saturn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graauw, Th.; Encrenaz, Th.; Schaeidt, S.; Lellouch, E.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Beintema, D. A.; Bezard, B.; Drossart, P.; Griffin, M.; Heras, A.; Kessler, M.; Leech, K.; Morris, A.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Roos-Serote, M.; Salama, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Valentijn, E. A.; Davies, G. R.; Naylor, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The spectrum of Saturn has been recorded between 2.3 and 15 mu m, on June 13, 1996, with the grating mode of the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer of ISO (Infrared Space Observatory). The resolving power is about 1500 and the sensitivity is better than 1 Jy. As compared to Jupiter, the spectrum of

  3. High-velocity streams of dust originating from Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Horányi, Mihaly; Burton, Marcia; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Roy, Mou; Grün, Eberhard

    2005-01-20

    High-velocity submicrometre-sized dust particles expelled from the jovian system have been identified by dust detectors on board several spacecraft. On the basis of periodicities in the dust impact rate, Jupiter's moon Io was found to be the dominant source of the streams. The grains become positively charged within the plasma environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and gain energy from its co-rotational electric field. Outside the magnetosphere, the dynamics of the grains are governed by the interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field that eventually forms the streams. A similar process was suggested for Saturn. Here we report the discovery by the Cassini spacecraft of bursts of high-velocity dust particles (> or = 100 km s(-1)) within approximately 70 million kilometres of Saturn. Most of the particles detected at large distances appear to originate from the outskirts of Saturn's outermost main ring. All bursts of dust impacts detected within 150 Saturn radii are characterized by impact directions markedly different from those measured between the bursts, and they clearly coincide with the spacecraft's traversals through streams of compressed solar wind.

  4. An Enduring Rapidly Moving Storm as a Guide to Saturn's Equatorial Jet's Complex Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia-Melendo, E.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.; Wong, M. H.; Simon, A.; Sanz-Requena, J. F.; Antunano, A.; Barrado-Izagirre, N.; Garate-Lopez, I.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Saturn has an intense and broad eastward equatorial jet with a complex three-dimensional structure mixed with time variability. The equatorial region experiences strong seasonal insolation variations enhanced by ring shadowing, and three of the six known giant planetary-scale storms have developed in it. These factors make Saturn's equator a natural laboratory to test models of jets in giant planets. Here we report on a bright equatorial atmospheric feature imaged in 2015 that moved steadily at a high speed of 450/ms not measured since 1980-1981 with other equatorial clouds moving within an ample range of velocities. Radiative transfer models show that these motions occur at three altitude levels within the upper haze and clouds. We find that the peak of the jet (latitudes 10degN to 10degS) suffers intense vertical shears reaching + 2.5/ms/km, two orders of magnitude higher than meridional shears, and temporal variability above 1 bar altitude level.

  5. The Periodic Flapping and Breathing of Saturn's Magnetodisk During Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorba, A. M.; Achilleos, N.; Guio, P.; Arridge, C. S.; Dougherty, M. K.; Sergis, N.

    2017-12-01

    Periodic variations have been observed in many field and particle properties in Saturn's magnetosphere, modulated at a period close to the planetary rotation rate. Magnetic field observations by Cassini's magnetometer instrument suggest that in the outer magnetosphere (beyond 12 Saturn radii) Saturn's current sheet is periodically displaced with respect to the rotational equator, to a first approximation acting as a rotating, tilted disk. This manifests as a `flapping' mode when observed by the spacecraft. Recent studies suggest the magnetosphere also has a `breathing' mode, expanding and contracting with a period close to the planetary rotation rate. We model these two modes in tandem by combining a global, geometrical model of a tilted and rippled current sheet with a local, force-balance model of Saturn's magnetodisk, accounting for the magnetospheric size and hot plasma content. We simulate the breathing behavior by introducing an azimuthal dependence of the system size. We fit Cassini magnetometer data acquired on equatorial orbits from 23 Oct - 17 Dec 2009 (Revs 120-122), close to Saturn equinox, in order that seasonal effects on the current sheet are minimised. We find that our model characterises well the amplitude and phase of the oscillations in the data, for those passes that show clear periodic signatures in the field. In particular, the Bθ (meridional) component can only be characterised when the breathing mode is included. This study introduces calculations for an oscillating boundary under conditions of constant solar wind dynamic pressure, which provide a good basis for understanding the complex relationship between current sheet dynamics and the periodic field perturbations.

  6. INMS measures an influx of molecules from Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    In 1984, Connerney and Waite proposed water influx from Saturn's rings to explain the low electron densities measured during Pioneer and Voyager radio occultation experiments. Charge exchange with this minor species depleted the H+ ions and provided a faster path to electron recombination. With ice the primary constituent of the rings, water was the most likely in-falling molecule. During the Grand Finale orbits, Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) detected and quantified an influx from the rings. Unexpectedly, the primary influx molecules are CH4 and a heavier carbon-bearing species. Water was detected, but quantities were factors of ten lower than these other species. Distribution in both altitude and latitude are consistent with a ring influx. The concentration of the minor species in Saturn's atmosphere shows that they enter Saturn's atmosphere from the top. Both molecules have their highest concentrations at the highest altitudes, with concentrations >0.4% at 3,500 km altitude and only 0.02% at 2,700 km. Molecules from the rings deorbit to Saturn's atmosphere at altitudes near 4,000 km, consistent with the INMS measurements. The latitudinal dependence of the minor species indicates that their source is near the equatorial plane. At high altitudes, the minor species were observed primarily at zero latitude, where the 28u species was six times more concentrated than at 5° latitude. At lower altitudes, the peaking ratio was 1, indicating that the species had diffused and was fully mixed into Saturn's H2 atmosphere. The lighter molecule, CH4, diffuses more rapidly than the 28u species. INMS also detected both of these species during the earlier F-ring passes, finding that the neutrals were centered at the ring plane and extended 3,000 km (half width, half max) north and south.

  7. Particle Sizes and Self Gravity Wakes in Saturn's A Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerousek, R. G.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have measured normal optical depths throughout Saturn's rings by stellar occultations covering a wide range of viewing geometries. The UVIS photometer has an effective wavelength of 0.15 µm and a relatively wide (6.0 mrad × 6.4 mrad) field-of-view. VIMS, in occultation mode, measures at an effective wavelength of 2.9 µm and over a single pixel of angular dimensions 0.25 mrad × 0.5 mrad. Occultations measured by VIMS at the same viewing geometry as UVIS occultations overstate the optical depth if particles smaller than 1.22λVIMS/2θ ~ 8.36 mm are present because light diffracted out of the VIMS pixel by those particles is not replaced by neighboring particles. By measuring differential optical depths one can probe the parameters of the ring particle size distribution (i.e. Zebker et al. 1985, Icarus, 64, 531-548). The technique is complicated, however, by the geometric dependence of the optical depth imposed by the non-axisymmetric self-gravity wakes, which are ephemeral elongated aggregates, deformed by Keplerian shear. Beginning with the granola bar wake model of Colwell et al. (2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L07201), we introduce a free parameter τsmall which represents the excess normal optical depth measured by VIMS due to sub-cm particles between the opaque wakes and combine VIMS and UVIS occultations for particle size analysis while simultaneously determining the properties of the wakes. We find that throughout the A Ring the wake properties generally agree with previously published results (Colwell et al. 2006, Hedman et al. 2007, Astron. J., 133, 2624-2629). We find a significant fraction of sub-cm particles in the inner and outer A Ring and in the troughs of density waves near strong Lindblad resonances. While wake properties vary in the halo regions surrounding these resonances, the abundance of sub-cm particles varies little from 124

  8. Spectroscopic diagnosis of foam z-pinch plasmas on SATURN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.; Deeney, C.; Jobe, D.; McGurn, J.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.

    1996-01-01

    Solid and annular silicon aerogel and agar foams were shot on the accelerator SATURN to study plasma initiation, acceleration, and stagnation. SATURN delivers 7 MA with a 50 nsec rise time to these foam loads. We fielded several spectroscopic diagnostics to measure plasma parameters throughout the z-pinch discharge. A spatially resolved single frame time-gated EUV spectrometer measured the extent of plasma ablation off the surface foam. A time integrated crystal spectrometer showed that characteristic K shell radiation of silicon in the aerogel and of S and Na impurities in the agar were all attenuated when the foam loads were coated with a conductive layer of gold. The time resolved pinhole camera showed that in general the quality of the pinch implosions was poor but improved with increasing efforts to improve current continuity such as prepulse and conductive coatings

  9. Observations of ejecta clouds produced by impacts onto Saturn's rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S; Mitchell, Colin J; Murray, Carl D; Di Nino, Daiana; Hedman, Matthew M; Schmidt, Jürgen; Burns, Joseph A; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; Porco, Carolyn C; Beurle, Kevin; Evans, Michael W

    2013-04-26

    We report observations of dusty clouds in Saturn's rings, which we interpret as resulting from impacts onto the rings that occurred between 1 and 50 hours before the clouds were observed. The largest of these clouds was observed twice; its brightness and cant angle evolved in a manner consistent with this hypothesis. Several arguments suggest that these clouds cannot be due to the primary impact of one solid meteoroid onto the rings, but rather are due to the impact of a compact stream of Saturn-orbiting material derived from previous breakup of a meteoroid. The responsible interplanetary meteoroids were initially between 1 centimeter and several meters in size, and their influx rate is consistent with the sparse prior knowledge of smaller meteoroids in the outer solar system.

  10. Possible concepts for an in situ Saturn probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, Athena; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Mousis, Olivier; Atkinson, David H.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Reh, Kim R.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Atreya, Sushil; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cavalie, Thibault; Colaprete, Anthony; Gautier, Daniel; Guillot, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Marty, Bernard; Morse, Andy; Sims, Jon; Spilker, Tom; Spilker, Linda

    2014-05-01

    In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere would bring insights in two broad themes: the formation history of our solar system and the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. The science case for in situ measurements at Saturn are developed in [1] and two companion abstracts (see Mousis et al., and Atkinson et al.). They are summarized here. Measurements of Saturn's bulk chemical and isotopic composition would place important constraints on the volatile reservoirs in the protosolar nebula and hence on the formation mechanisms. An in situ probe, penetrating from the upper atmosphere (μbar level) into the convective weather layer to a minimum depth of 10 bar, would also contribute to our knowledge of Saturn's atmospheric structure, dynamics, composition, chemistry and cloud-forming processes. Different mission architectures are envisaged, all based on an entry probe that would descend through Saturn's stratosphere and troposphere under parachute down to a minimum of 10 bars [1]. Future studies will focus on the trade-offs between science return and the added design complexity of a probe that could operate at pressures larger than 10 bars. Accelerometry measurements may also be performed during the entry phase in the higher part of the stratosphere prior to starting measurements under parachute. A carrier system would be required to deliver the probe along its interplanetary trajectory to the desired atmospheric entry point at Saturn. The entry site would be carefully selected. Three possible mission configurations are currently under study (with different risk/cost trades): • Configuration 1: Probe + Carrier. After probe delivery, the carrier would follow its path and be destroyed during atmospheric entry, but could perform pre-entry science. The carrier would not be used as a radio relay, but the probe would transmit its data to the ground system via a direct-to-Earth (DTE) RF link; • Configuration 2: Probe + Carrier/Relay. The probe would detach from the

  11. Saturn: a software application of tensor utilities for research in neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenes, Rubén; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Tristan-Vega, Antonio; Martin-Fernandez, Marcos

    2010-03-01

    We present an advanced software tool designed for visualization and quantitative analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) called Saturn. The software is specially developed to help clinicians and researchers in neuroimaging, and includes a complete set of visualization capabilities to browse and analyze efficiently DTI data, making this application a powerful tool also for diagnosis purposes. The software includes a robust quantification method for DTI data, using an atlas-based method to automatically obtain equivalent anatomical fiber bundles and regions of interest among different DTI data sets. Consequently, a set of measurements is also implemented to perform robust group studies among subjects affected by neurological disorders and control groups in order to look for significant differences. Finally, a comparison study with five similar DTI applications is presented, showing the advantages offered by this tool. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of plasma waves observed in the inner Saturn magnetosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menietti, J. D.; Santolík, Ondřej; Rymer, A. M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 9 (2008), s. 2631-2644 ISSN 0992-7689 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA301120601 Grant - others:Jet Propulsion Laboratory(US) 1279973; NSF award(US) 030719 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Saturn magnetosphere * plasma waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.660, year: 2008 http://www.ann-geophys.net/26/2631/2008/

  13. Resistive Heating and Ion Drag in Saturn's Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriesema, Jess William; Koskinen, Tommi; Yelle, Roger V.

    2017-10-01

    One of the most puzzling observations of the jovian planets is that the thermospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are all several times hotter than solar heating can account for (Strobel and Smith 1973; Yelle and Miller 2004; Muller-Wodarg et al. 2006). On Saturn, resistive heating appears sufficient to explain these temperatures in auroral regions, but the particular mechanism(s) responsible for heating the lower latitudes remains unclear. The most commonly proposed heating mechanisms are breaking gravity waves and auroral heating at the poles followed by redistribution of energy to mid-and low latitudes. Both of these energy sources are potentially important but also come with significant problems. Wave heating would have to be continuous and global to produce consistently elevated temperatures and the strong Coriolis forces coupled with polar ion drag appear to hinder redistribution of auroral energy (see Strobel et al. 2016 for review). Here we explore an alternative: wind-driven electrodynamics that can alter circulation and produce substantial heating outside of the auroral region. Smith (2013) showed this in-situ mechanism to be potentially significant in Jupiter’s thermosphere. We present new results from an axisymmetric, steady-state model that calculates resistive (Joule) heating rates through rigorous solutions of the electrodynamic equations for the coupled neutral atmosphere and ionosphere of Saturn. At present, we assume a dipole magnetic field and neglect any contributions from the magnetosphere. We use ion mixing ratios from the model of Kim et al. (2014) and the observed temperature-pressure profile from Koskinen et al. (2015) to calculate the generalized conductivity tensor as described by Koskinen et al. (2014). We calculate the current density under the assumption that it has no divergence and use it to calculate the resistive heating rates and ion drag. Our results suggest that resistive heating and ion drag at low latitudes likely

  14. 10 Years at Saturn, and More Excitement to Come!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, S. G.; Spilker, L. J.; Altobelli, N.

    2014-04-01

    After 10 years in orbit, the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn, a collaboration of NASA, ESA, and ASI, continues to wow the imagination. Every year Cassini produces answers to questions raised by the Voyager flybys, while at the same time posing new questions that can only be answered with a long duration mission using a flagship-class spacecraft. In this talk, we sample a few of Cassini's discoveries from the past decade and give an overview of what comes next.

  15. Tilting Saturn without Tilting Jupiter: Constraints on Giant Planet Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasser, R.; Lee, Man Hoi

    2015-11-01

    The migration and encounter histories of the giant planets in our solar system can be constrained by the obliquities of Jupiter and Saturn. We have performed secular simulations with imposed migration and N-body simulations with planetesimals to study the expected obliquity distribution of migrating planets with initial conditions resembling those of the smooth migration model, the resonant Nice model and two models with five giant planets initially in resonance (one compact and one loose configuration). For smooth migration, the secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism can tilt Saturn’s spin axis to the current obliquity if the product of the migration timescale and the orbital inclinations is sufficiently large (exceeding 30 Myr deg). For the resonant Nice model with imposed migration, it is difficult to reproduce today’s obliquity values, because the compactness of the initial system raises the frequency that tilts Saturn above the spin precession frequency of Jupiter, causing a Jupiter spin-orbit resonance crossing. Migration timescales sufficiently long to tilt Saturn generally suffice to tilt Jupiter more than is observed. The full N-body simulations tell a somewhat different story, with Jupiter generally being tilted as often as Saturn, but on average having a higher obliquity. The main obstacle is the final orbital spacing of the giant planets, coupled with the tail of Neptune’s migration. The resonant Nice case is barely able to simultaneously reproduce the orbital and spin properties of the giant planets, with a probability ˜ 0.15%. The loose five planet model is unable to match all our constraints (probability <0.08%). The compact five planet model has the highest chance of matching the orbital and obliquity constraints simultaneously (probability ˜0.3%).

  16. Extracted-beam-detection system around synchrotron saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anne, Remy; Milleret, Gerard; Giuliani, Arlette; Lefol, Andre; Perret, Robert; Poupard, Joseph; Trogno, Andre; Van den Bossche, Maurice; N'Guyen Sieu Viet.

    1977-07-01

    The extracted-beam-detection system working around the synchrotron Saturne is presented. The whole system is composed of about forty multiwire chambers used for beam tuning and providing beams profiles. Optic beam parameters such as position, divergence, dimension, emittance can be easily measured, or calculated with a program running on a computer. They are working in large range intensity beams (10 2 to 5.10 11 p/cm 2 /s of protons, alpha particles, deutons, pions, tritons and electrons [fr

  17. Dust Transport from Enceladus to the moons of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, A.; Hsu, H. W.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Saturn's vast E-ring engulfs the satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rea, reaching even beyond Titan, while its inner edge is adjacent with the outskirts of the A-ring. The E-ring is comprised of characteristically micron and submicron sized particles, originating mainly from the active plumes of Enceladus, and possibly the other moons as well due to their continual bombardment by interplanetary dust particles. The dynamics of the E-ring grains can be surprising as in addition to the gravity of Saturn and its moons, their motion is governed by radiation pressure, plasma drag, and electromagnetic forces as they collect charges interacting with the magnetospheric plasma environment of Saturn. Due to sputtering, their mass is diminishing and, hence, their charge-to-mass ratio is increasing in time. A "young" gravitationally dominated micron-sized particle will "mature" into a nanometer-sized grain whose motion resembles that of a heavy ion. Simultaneously with their mass loss, the dust particles are pushed outwards by plasma drag. Time to time, their evolving orbits intersect the orbits of the Saturnian moons and the E-ring particles can be deposited onto their surfaces, possibly altering their makeup and spectral properties. Using the Cassini magnetospheric observations, we have followed the orbital evolution of E-ring particles, through their entire life, starting at Enceladus, ending in: a) a collision with the A-ring or any of the satellites; or b) losing all their mass due to sputtering; or c) leave the magnetosphere of Saturn. This presentation will focus on the deposition rates and maps of E-ring particles to the surfaces of the moons.

  18. Sensitivity of Saturn's orbit to a hypothetical distant planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ryan; Folkner, William; Jacobson, Robert; Williams, James

    2017-04-01

    Several distant scattered Kuiper belt objects have similar perihelion directions that might be aligned due to the influence an unknown planet well outside the orbit of Neptune (Batygin & Brown, 2016 Astronomical J. 151:22). Such a planet, with a mass up to an order of magnitude larger than the Earth, would affect the rest of the solar system. Saturn, which is well observed from radio range and VLBI observations of the Cassini spacecraft, provides an opportunity to look for these perturbations. An unknown large planet would be expected to affect the orbit of Saturn, but the effect might be partially absorbed in the estimation of parameters used to fit the planetary ephemerides. Ephemeris parameters include the planetary orbital elements, the mass of the Sun and the masses of asteroids that perturb the orbit of Mars. Earlier analysis of the Cassini data showed no effect as suggested by the Modified Newtonian Dynamics theory (Hees et al., 2014 Phys. Rev. D 89:102002). We present an updated Cassini data set, with the accuracy of ranges to Saturn improved through updated estimates of the Cassini spacecraft orbit, and an analysis of the largest possible perturbing distant planet mass consistent with the ranging.

  19. A model of Saturn inferred from its measured gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, John D.

    2018-04-01

    We present an interior model of Saturn with an ice-rock core, a metallic region, an outer molecular envelope and a thin transition layer between the metallic and molecular regions. The shape of Saturn’s 1 bar surface is irregular and determined fully self-consistently by the required equilibrium condition. While the ice-rock core is assumed to have a uniform density, three different equations of state are adopted for the metallic, molecular and transition regions. The Saturnian model is constrained by its known mass, its known equatorial and polar radii, and its known zonal gravitational coefficients, J 2n , n = 1, 2, 3. The model produces an ice-rock core with equatorial radius 0.203 R S, where R S is the equatorial radius of Saturn at the 1-bar pressure surface; the core density ρ c = 10388.1 kgm‑3 corresponding to 13.06 Earth masses; and an analytical expression describing the Saturnian irregular shape of the 1-bar pressure level. The model also predicts the values of the higher-order gravitational coefficients, J 8, J 10 and J 12, for the hydrostatic Saturn and suggests that Saturn’s convective dynamo operates in the metallic region approximately defined by 0.2 R S < r e < 0.7 R S, where r e denotes the equatorial radial distance from the Saturnian center of figure.

  20. Magnetotail Reconnection and Flux Circulation: Jupiter and Saturn Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. M.; Vogt, M. F.; Slavin, J. A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Boardsen, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Jovian magnetosphere has been visited by eight spacecraft, and the magnetometer data have been used to identify dozens of plasmoids and 250 field dipolarizations associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail [e.g. Vogt et al., 2010]. Since the arrival of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn in 2004, the magnetometer instrument has also been used to identify reconnection signatures. The deepest magnetotail orbits were in 2006, and during this time 34 signatures of plasmoids were identified. In this study we compare the statistical properties of plasmoids at Jupiter and Saturn such as duration, size, location, and recurrence period. Such parameters can be influenced by many factors, including the different Dungey cycle timescales and cross-magnetospheric potential drops at the two planets. We present superposed epoch analyses of plasmoids at the two planets to determine their average properties and to infer their role in the reconfiguration of the nightside of the magnetosphere. We examine the contributions of plasmoids to the magnetic flux transfer cycle at both planets. At Jupiter, there is evidence of an extended interval after reconnection where the field remains northward (analogous to the terrestrial post-plasmoid plasma sheet). At Saturn we see a similar feature, and calculate the amount of flux closed on average in reconnection events, leading us to an estimation of the recurrence rate of plasmoid release.

  1. Quasiperiodic ULF-pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kleindienst

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent magnetic field investigations made onboard the Cassini spacecraft in the magnetosphere of Saturn show the existence of a variety of ultra low frequency plasma waves. Their frequencies suggest that they are presumably not eigenoscillations of the entire magnetospheric system, but excitations confined to selected regions of the magnetosphere. While the main magnetic field of Saturn shows a distinct large scale modulation of approximately 2 nT with a periodicity close to Saturn's rotation period, these ULF pulsations are less obvious superimposed oscillations with an amplitude generally not larger than 3 nT and show a package-like structure. We have analyzed these wave packages and found that they are correlated to a certain extent with the large scale modulation of the main magnetic field. The spatial localization of the ULF wave activity is represented with respect to local time and Kronographic coordinates. For this purpose we introduce a method to correct the Kronographic longitude with respect to a rotation period different from its IAU definition. The observed wave packages occur in all magnetospheric regions independent of local time, elevation, or radial distance. Independent of the longitude correction applied the wave packages do not occur in an accentuated Kronographic longitude range, which implies that the waves are not excited or confined in the same selected longitude ranges at all times or that their lifetime leads to a variable phase with respect to the longitudes where they have been exited.

  2. Catalog of Astronomical Positions of Saturn's Moons Obtained by Photographic Observations at the Mao Nasu in 1961-1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhakevych, O. M.; Andruk, V. M.; Pakuliak, L. K.

    In the framework of UkrVO national project the new methods of plate digital image processing are developed. The photographic material of the UkrVO Joint Digital Archive (JDA, http://194.44.35.19/vo-mao/DB/ archivespecial.php) is used for the solution of classic astrometric problem - positional and photometric determinations of objects registered on the plates including Saturn's moons. The results of tested methods show that the positional RMS errors are better than ±150 mas for both coordinates and photometric ones are better than ±0.20m with the Tycho-2 catalogue as reference.

  3. Theory, measurements, and models of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, S. K.; Donahue, T. M.; Nagy, A. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Mcconnell, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and composition of the thermosphere, exosphere, and ionosphere of saturn have been determined from observations at optical and radio wavelengths mainly by instruments aboard Voyager spacecraft. Techniques for determining the vertical profiles of temperature and density and the atmospheric vertical mixing in the upper Saturn atmosphere are discussed. Radio occultation measurements and theoretical models of Saturn's ionosphere are reviewed, and attempts to interpret the measurements using the models are discussed. Finally, mechanisms of thermospheric heating are examined.

  4. The Case for Massive and Ancient Rings of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of Voyager and Pioneer 11 results give a mass for Saturn's rings, M = 5 x 10-8 Msat. This is about the mass of Saturn's small moon Mimas. This has been interpreted as a lower limit to the ring mass (Esposito et al 1983), since the thickest parts of the rings were not penetrated by the stellar occultstion, and this calculation assumes an unvarying particle size throughout the rings. Because the rings are constantly bombarded by micrometeroids, their current composition of nearly pure water ice implies such low mass rings must have formed recently. The case is particularly strong for Saturn's A ring, where the data are the best, implying the A ring is less than 10% of the age of the Saturn (Esposito 1986). Cassini results compound this problem. UVIS spectra are consistent with either young rings or rings about 10x as massive as the Voyager estimate (Elliott and Esposito (2011). CDA confirms the impacting mass flux is similar to that assumed for the pollution calculations (Kempf etal 2015). VIMS analysis of density wave signatures in the B ring gives a value of about 1/3 the Voyager value (Hedmann etal 2016). This VIMS result implies the rings are even younger! The problem is that young rings are very unlikely to be formed recently, meaning that we live in a very special epoch, following some unlikely recent origin… like disruption of a medium sized moon or capture of the fragments of a disrupted comet (Charnoz etal 2009).To take the VIMS results at face value, Saturn's low mass rings must be very young. The optically thick B ring must be made of small, porous or fractal particles. An alternative is that we accept the higher mass interpretation of the Pioneer 11 results (Esposito etal 2008) using the granola bar model of Colwell etal 2007. This would imply that the density wave structure seen by VIMS is not sensing all the mass in the rings, where structure near strong resonances is dominted by temporary aggregates, and where non-linear effects cause the

  5. VOYAGER 1&2 SATURN IRIS DERIVED NORTH/SOUTH PARAMETERS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The data set contains Saturn atmospheric parameters derived from spectra obtained with the Voyager infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS). The data set is...

  6. Magnetospheric magnetic field modelling for the 2011 and 2012 HST Saturn aurora campaigns – implications for auroral source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A unique set of images of Saturn's northern polar UV aurora was obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2011 and 2012 at times when the Cassini spacecraft was located in the solar wind just upstream of Saturn's bow shock. This rare situation provides an opportunity to use the Kronian paraboloid magnetic field model to examine source locations of the bright auroral features by mapping them along field lines into the magnetosphere, taking account of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF measured near simultaneously by Cassini. It is found that the persistent dawn arc maps to closed field lines in the dawn to noon sector, with an equatorward edge generally located in the inner part of the ring current, typically at ~ 7 Saturn radii (RS near dawn, and a poleward edge that maps variously between the centre of the ring current and beyond its outer edge at ~ 15 RS, depending on the latitudinal width of the arc. This location, together with a lack of response in properties to the concurrent IMF, suggests a principal connection with ring-current and nightside processes. The higher-latitude patchy auroras observed intermittently near to noon and at later local times extending towards dusk are instead found to straddle the model open–closed field boundary, thus mapping along field lines to the dayside outer magnetosphere and magnetopause. These emissions, which occur preferentially for northward IMF directions, are thus likely associated with reconnection and open-flux production at the magnetopause. One image for southward IMF also exhibits a prominent patch of very high latitude emissions extending poleward of patchy dawn arc emissions in the pre-noon sector. This is found to lie centrally within the region of open model field lines, suggesting an origin in the current system associated with lobe reconnection, similar to that observed in the terrestrial magnetosphere for northward IMF.

  7. Impact of lightning on the lower ionosphere of Saturn and possible generation of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2013-04-01

    Radio observations [1] and, more recently, optical images from the Cassini spacecraft [2] have clearly established the existence of electrical storms in Saturn and constrained the possible altitude range and total dissipated energy of lightning strokes. Based on these observations, we here investigate the physical effects of lightning on the upper layers of Saturn's atmosphere. We first study the relevance of the conductivity profile of the lower Saturnian ionosphere and how the Maxwell relaxation time limits the amplitude and duration of the reduced electric fields. We implemented a simple, zero-dimensional model [3] that considers only the most relevant ionization reactions; we then applied this model to two conductivity profiles proposed in the literature [4, 5] and a range of possible amplitudes and durations of the driving stroke. Then we investigate the possibility that the lightning-induced ionization results in a field that is locally strong enough to ignite streamer discharges and thus form a sprite. A sprite would lead to localized but very intense fields potentially resulting in detectable optical emissions [6]. We model the possible sprite inception with a self-consistent, cylindrically symmetrical 3d transport code [7]. Finally we discuss the chemical impact of lightning-induced electric fields in the upper Saturnian atmosphere. We use a kinetic model where we implemented the most important reactions induced by energized electrons in a H2/He atmosphere. We thus investigate what species densities are significantly enhanced and what are the expected spectroscopical signatures of upper-atmospheric electricity in Saturn. [1] G. Fischer, M.D. Desch, P. Zarka, M.L. Kaiser, D.A. Gurnett, W.S. Kurth, W. Macher, HO Rucker, A. Lecacheux, W.M. Farrell, et al., Saturn lightning recorded by cassini/rpws in 2004. Icarus, 183(1):135, 2006. [2] U.A. Dyudina, A.P. Ingersoll, S.P. Ewald, C.C. Porco, G. Fischer, W.S. Kurth, and R.A. West, Detection of visible lightning

  8. The Evolution and Fate of Saturn's Stratospheric Vortex: Infrared Spectroscopy from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Hesman, B. E.; Arhterberg, R. K.; Bjoraker, G.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Hurley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Gorius, N.; Orton, G. S.; Read, P. L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The planet-encircling springtime storm in Saturn's troposphere (December 2010-July 2011) produced dramatic perturbations to stratospheric temperatures, winds and composition at mbar pressures that persisted long after the tropospheric disturbance had abated. Observations from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), supported by ground-based imaging from the VISIR instrument on the Very Large Telescope,is used to track the evolution of a large, hot stratospheric anticyclone between January 2011 and the present day. The evolutionary sequence can be divided into three phases: (I) the formation and intensification of two distinct warm airmasses near 0.5 mbar between 25 and 35N (one residing directly above the convective storm head) between January-April 2011, moving westward with different zonal velocities; (II) the merging of the warm airmasses to form the large single 'stratospheric beacon' near 40N between April and June 2011, dissociated from the storm head and at a higher pressure (2 mbar) than the original beacons; and (III) the mature phase characterized by slow cooling and longitudinal shrinkage of the anticyclone since July 2011, moving west with a near-constant velocity of 2.70+/-0.04 deg/day (-24.5+/-0.4 m/s at 40N). Peak temperatures of 220 K at 2 mbar were measured on May 5th 2011 immediately after the merger, some 80 K warmer than the quiescent surroundings. Thermal winds hear calculations in August 2011 suggest clockwise peripheral velocities of 200400 mls at 2 mbar, defining a peripheral collar with a width of 65 degrees longitude (50,000 km in diameter) and 25 degrees latitude. Stratospheric acetylene (C2H2) was uniformly enhanced by a factor of three within the vortex, whereas ethane (C2H6) remained unaffected. We will discuss the thermal and chemical characteristics of Saturn's beacon in its mature phase, and implications for stratospheric vortices on other giant planets.

  9. The near-surface electron radiation environment of Saturn's moon Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, T. A.; Hand, K. P.; Paranicas, C.; Howett, C. J. A.; Hendrix, A. R.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2017-04-01

    Saturn's inner mid-size moons are exposed to a number of external weathering processes, including charged particle bombardment and UV photolysis, as well as deposition of E-ring grains and interplanetary dust. While optical remote sensing observations by several instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft have revealed a number of weathering patterns across the surfaces of these moons, it is not entirely clear which external process is responsible for which observed weathering pattern. Here we focus on Saturn's moon Mimas and model the effect of energetic electron bombardment across its surface. By using a combination of a guiding center, bounce-averaged charged particle tracing approach and a particle physics code, we investigate how the radiation dose due to energetic electrons is deposited with depth at different locations. We predict a lens-shaped electron energy deposition pattern that extends down to ∼cm depths at low latitudes centered around the apex of the leading hemisphere (90° W). These results are consistent with previous remote sensing observations of a lens-shaped color anomaly observed by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument as well as a thermal inertia anomaly observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Our results confirm that these features are produced by MeV electrons that have a penetration depth into the surface comparable to the effective sampling depths of these instruments. On the trailing hemisphere we predict a similar lens-shaped electron energy deposition pattern, whose effects have to date not been observed by the Cassini remote sensing instruments. We suggest that no corresponding lens-shaped weathering pattern has been observed on the trailing hemisphere because of the comparatively short range of lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons into surface ice, as well as competing effects from cold plasma, neutral, and dust bombardment.

  10. A close look at Saturn's rings with Cassini VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, P.D.; Hedman, M.M.; Clark, R.N.; Showalter, M.R.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Hansen, G.B.; Sicardy, B.; Drossart, P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Coradini, A.

    2008-01-01

    Soon after the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft entered orbit about Saturn on 1 July 2004, its Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer obtained two continuous spectral scans across the rings, covering the wavelength range 0.35-5.1 ??m, at a spatial resolution of 15-25 km. The first scan covers the outer C and inner B rings, while the second covers the Cassini Division and the entire A ring. Comparisons of the VIMS radial reflectance profile at 1.08 ??m with similar profiles at a wavelength of 0.45 ??m assembled from Voyager images show very little change in ring structure over the intervening 24 years, with the exception of a few features already known to be noncircular. A model for single-scattering by a classical, many-particle-thick slab of material with normal optical depths derived from the Voyager photopolarimeter stellar occultation is found to provide an excellent fit to the observed VIMS reflectance profiles for the C ring and Cassini Division, and an acceptable fit for the inner B ring. The A ring deviates significantly from such a model, consistent with previous suggestions that this region may be closer to a monolayer. An additional complication here is the azimuthally-variable average optical depth associated with "self-gravity wakes" in this region and the fact that much of the A ring may be a mixture of almost opaque wakes and relatively transparent interwake zones. Consistently with previous studies, we find that the near-infrared spectra of all main ring regions are dominated by water ice, with a typical regolith grain radius of 5-20 ??m, while the steep decrease in visual reflectance shortward of 0.6 ??m is suggestive of an organic contaminant, perhaps tholin-like. Although no materials other than H2O ice have been identified with any certainty in the VIMS spectra of the rings, significant radial variations are seen in the strength of the water-ice absorption bands. Across the boundary between the C and B rings, over a radial range of ???7000 km, the

  11. The Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Matson, D. L.

    2008-09-01

    The Cassini-Huygens exploration of Saturn has completed its prime mission and is now entering a two-year phase called the Equinox Mission. During its four-year tour of Saturn, the Cassini Orbiter found intricate dynamical structures hidden below the haze of Saturn's atmosphere, a previously unseen inner radiation belt, unexpected "channel" structures in the B-ring where opacity changes dramatically over just a few kilometers, an active Enceladus with plumes that are the source of the E-ring and the engine supplying particles to the Saturnian magnetosphere, and a methane hydrologic cycle on Titan that is a remarkable analog of the Earth's. The epic descent of the Huygens probe to a landing on Titan's surface in 2005 provided vistas of dendritic channels presumably carved by methane in ice hills, and key data on nitrogen and noble gases that bespeak an active past in which ammonia was converted to the molecular nitrogen we see today. Cassini's two year Equinox mission will allow for key scientific objectives to be pursued that follow from discoveries made during the prime mission. For example, the source of the Enceladus plumes may be either liquid water or warm ice, given what is known at present. Liquid water has important implications for the potential for life under Enceladus' surface, since both water and organic molecules are present in the plumes. Seven flybys will provide an opportunity to address this problem. For Titan, being able to observe the northern hemisphere lakes in sunlight affords the possibility of detecting ethane in the lakes, as has recently been done in the south, and of observing changes as the seasons proceed. An opportunity to see the rings at low solar incidence angle will allow the three-dimensional structure to be inferred. Seasonal and solar cycle changes in the Saturnian aurora are expected and will be tracked.

  12. SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS AT SATURN'S BOW SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Sulaiman, A. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Sergis, N. [Office of Space Research and Technology, Academy of Athens, Soranou Efesiou 4, 11527 Athens (Greece); Stawarz, L. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, 30-244 Krakow (Poland); Fujimoto, M. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Coates, A. J., E-mail: a.masters@imperial.ac.uk [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Department of Space and Climate Physics, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-20

    The leading explanation for the origin of galactic cosmic rays is particle acceleration at the shocks surrounding young supernova remnants (SNRs), although crucial aspects of the acceleration process are unclear. The similar collisionless plasma shocks frequently encountered by spacecraft in the solar wind are generally far weaker (lower Mach number) than these SNR shocks. However, the Cassini spacecraft has shown that the shock standing in the solar wind sunward of Saturn (Saturn's bow shock) can occasionally reach this high-Mach number astrophysical regime. In this regime Cassini has provided the first in situ evidence for electron acceleration under quasi-parallel upstream magnetic conditions. Here we present the full picture of suprathermal electrons at Saturn's bow shock revealed by Cassini . The downstream thermal electron distribution is resolved in all data taken by the low-energy electron detector (CAPS-ELS, <28 keV) during shock crossings, but the higher energy channels were at (or close to) background. The high-energy electron detector (MIMI-LEMMS, >18 keV) measured a suprathermal electron signature at 31 of 508 crossings, where typically only the lowest energy channels (<100 keV) were above background. We show that these results are consistent with the theory in which the “injection” of thermal electrons into an acceleration process involves interaction with whistler waves at the shock front, and becomes possible for all upstream magnetic field orientations at high Mach numbers like those of the strong shocks around young SNRs. A future dedicated study will analyze the rare crossings with evidence for relativistic electrons (up to ∼1 MeV).

  13. Seasonal variation of the radial brightness contrast of Saturn's rings viewed in mid-infrared by Subaru/COMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Morishima, Ryuji; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Yamashita, Takuya

    2017-03-01

    Aims: This paper investigates the mid-infrared (MIR) characteristics of Saturn's rings. Methods: We collected and analyzed MIR high spatial resolution images of Saturn's rings obtained in January 2008 and April 2005 with the COoled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope, and investigated the spatial variation in the surface brightness of the rings in multiple bands in the MIR. We also composed the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the C, B, and A rings and the Cassini Division, and estimated the temperatures of the rings from the SEDs assuming the optical depths. Results: We found that the C ring and the Cassini Division were warmer than the B and A rings in 2008, which could be accounted for by their lower albedos, lower optical depths, and smaller self-shadowing effect. We also fonud that the C ring and the Cassini Division were considerably brighter than the B and A rings in the MIR in 2008 and the radial contrast of the ring brightness is the inverse of that in 2005, which is interpreted as a result of a seasonal effect with changing elevations of the Sun and observer above the ring plane. The reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A29

  14. First Observation of Lion Roar Emission in Saturn's Magnetosheath

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píša, David; Sulaiman, A. H.; Santolík, Ondřej; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2018), s. 486-492 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-08772S; GA ČR GJ16-16050Y Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Cassini spacecraft * Magnetosheath * Saturn * lion roar emissions * bow shock * propagation * particle * plasma * waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 4.253, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL075919/abstract

  15. Fast amplifier associated with the Saturne II detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtlehner, Jean Pierre

    1976-01-01

    This research thesis concerns the nuclear spectroscopy station which is beside the Saturne synchrotron in Saclay, and more particularly the design of the large bandwidth amplifier which aims at bringing the anode signal to a sufficient value to trigger an amplitude discriminator or a coincidence circuit. This amplifier must have a very short rise time in order not to introduce a hold, and its output base line must be as little sensitive as possible to the counting frequency, which implies a continuous link. The author describes in detail the rationale for the use of such an amplifier, and reports the calculated and measured assessment of its different characteristics [fr

  16. Hydrogen-Helium shock Radiation tests for Saturn Entry Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of shock layer radiation in Hydrogen/Helium mixtures representative of that encountered by probes entering the Saturn atmosphere. Normal shock waves are measured in Hydrogen-Helium mixtures (89:11% by volume) at freestream pressures between 13-66 Pa (0.1-0.5 Torr) and velocities from 20-30 km/s. Radiance is quantified from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Near Infrared. An induction time of several centimeters is observed where electron density and radiance remain well below equilibrium. Radiance is observed in front of the shock layer, the characteristics of which match the expected diffusion length of Hydrogen.

  17. Ring currents at Earth, Jupiter and Saturn: Similarities and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S.

    2007-08-01

    A ring current at Earth was proposed by Chapman and Ferraro in the 1930s to explain the decrease in the equatorial magnetic field during geomagnetic storms; the detailed nature in terms of composition and energy content was not determined until the mid-eighties by the AMPTE mission (Krimigis et al, 1985). It was measured in the L-range ≈3 to ≈5, with most of the pressure in the energy range ≈20 to ≈300 keV, and to consist of both H+ and O+, with the oxygen accounting for the development and early decay of the storm main phase while H+ persisted for longer time periods. Jupiter's ring current was first measured partially by Voyager, with heavier ions (O+, S+) playing a dominant role. Galileo's survey (Mauk et al, 2004) showed that it extended from ≈6 to ≈20 RJ , the main contribution coming from heavy ions with E > 50 keV and plasma beta in the range ≈0.1 to ≈100. Recent Cassini/MIMI measurements of Saturn's ring current (Sergis et al, 2006) revealed a region in the L range ≈9 to ≈18, most of the pressure in the range ≈10 to ≈200 keV, and consisting of both H+ and O+ ions with the O+ providing most of the pressure during active periods when beta exceeds ≈1. Recent Saturn results have also revealed a strong day-night asymmetry, with the plasma sheet extending much farther from the equatorial plane on the dayside and lifted above that plane at larger distances on the nightside At all three planets the ring current is maintained by particle injections within the parent magnetosphere. In the case of Earth, ionospheric sources dominate; at Jupiter, Io's volcanoes provide the gas that is subsequently ionized and accelerated; at Saturn the gas is provided by the icy satellites (Enceladus) /rings and ionization and acceleration ensues. It is possible that similar physical processes underlie the formation of the ring current at each planet.. A description of the findings at each planet will be presented with emphasis at the latest results from

  18. Interstellar Organics, the Solar Nebula, and Saturn's Satellite Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar medium inventory of organic material (Pendleton et al. 1994, Pendleton & Allamandola 2002) was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed. This provided the feedstock for the formation of the Sun, major planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Saturn's satellites Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn. Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saurn. VIMS spaectral maps of PHoebe's surface reveal a complex organic spectral signature consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and alophatic hydrocarbon (CH2, CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 micrometers). Phoebe is the source of a huge debris ring encircling Saturn, and from which particles (approximately 5-20 micrometer size) spiral inward toward Saturn. They encounter Iapetus and Hperion where they mix with and blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aromatic CH is approximately 10 times as abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, comet particles, ad in carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2013). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis of Hyperion and Phoebe itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 approximately 4, which is larger than the value found in the diffuse ISM (approximately 2-2.5). In so far as Phoebe is a primitive body that formed in the outer regions of the solar nebula and has preserved some of the original nebula inventory, it can be key to understanding the content and degree of procesing of the nebular material. There are other Phoebe-like TNOs that are presently

  19. Predicted radiation environment of the Saturn baseline diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A.; Lee, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport was used to predict the radiation environment of the Saturn accelerator for the baseline diode design. The x-ray output has been calculated, as well as energy deposition in CaF 2 thermoluminescent dosimetry and silicon. It is found that the design criteria for the radiation environment will be met and that approximately 10 kJ of x rays will be available for simulation experiments, if the diode provides a nominal beam of 2.0-MeV electrons for 20 ns with a peak current of 12.5 MA. The penalty in dose and x-ray output for operating below the nominal energy in order to obtain a softer spectrum is quantified. The penalty for using excessive electron equilibration in the standard packaging of the thermoluminescent dosimeters is shown to be negligible. An intrinsic lack of electron equilibration for silicon elements of components and subsystems is verified for Saturn environments, demonstrating the ambiguity of design criteria based on silicon deposition. Validation of an efficient next-event-estimator method for predicting energy deposition in equilibrated detectors/dosimetry is confirmed. Finally, direct-electron depositions in excess of 1 kJ/g are shown to be easily achievable. 34 refs., 30 figs

  20. Analysis of plasma waves observed in the inner Saturn magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma waves observed in the Saturn magnetosphere provide an indication of the plasma population present in the rotationally dominated inner magnetosphere. Electrostatic cyclotron emissions often with harmonics and whistler mode emission are a common feature of Saturn's inner magnetosphere. The electron observations for a region near 5 RS outside and near a plasma injection region indicate a cooler low-energy (<100 eV, nearly isotropic plasma, and a much warmer (E>1000 eV more pancake or butterfly distribution. We model the electron plasma distributions to conduct a linear dispersion analysis of the wave modes. The results suggest that the electrostatic electron cyclotron emissions can be generated by phase space density gradients associated with a loss cone that may be up to 20° wide. This loss cone is sometimes, but not always, observed because the field of view of the electron detectors does not include the magnetic field line at the time of the observations. The whistler mode emission can be generated by the pancake-like distribution and temperature anisotropy (T⊥/T||>1 of the warmer plasma population.

  1. Analysis of plasma waves observed in the inner Saturn magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma waves observed in the Saturn magnetosphere provide an indication of the plasma population present in the rotationally dominated inner magnetosphere. Electrostatic cyclotron emissions often with harmonics and whistler mode emission are a common feature of Saturn's inner magnetosphere. The electron observations for a region near 5 RS outside and near a plasma injection region indicate a cooler low-energy (<100 eV, nearly isotropic plasma, and a much warmer (E>1000 eV more pancake or butterfly distribution. We model the electron plasma distributions to conduct a linear dispersion analysis of the wave modes. The results suggest that the electrostatic electron cyclotron emissions can be generated by phase space density gradients associated with a loss cone that may be up to 20° wide. This loss cone is sometimes, but not always, observed because the field of view of the electron detectors does not include the magnetic field line at the time of the observations. The whistler mode emission can be generated by the pancake-like distribution and temperature anisotropy (T/T||>1 of the warmer plasma population.

  2. DSMC Shock Simulation of Saturn Entry Probe Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Kyle J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Liechty, Derek S.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) investigation of Saturn entry probe scenarios and the influence of non-equilibrium phenomena on Saturn entry conditions. The DSMC simulations coincide with rarefied hypersonic shock tube experiments of a hydrogen-helium mixture performed in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at the NASA Ames Research Center. The DSMC simulations are post-processed through the NEQAIR line-by-line radiation code to compare directly to the experimental results. Improved collision cross-sections, inelastic collision parameters, and reaction rates are determined for a high temperature DSMC simulation of a 7-species H2-He mixture and an electronic excitation model is implemented in the DSMC code. Simulation results for 27.8 and 27.4 km/s shock waves are obtained at 0.2 and 0.1 Torr, respectively, and compared to measured spectra in the VUV, UV, visible, and IR ranges. These results confirm the persistence of non-equilibrium for several centimeters behind the shock and the diffusion of atomic hydrogen upstream of the shock wave. Although the magnitude of the radiance did not match experiments and an ionization inductance period was not observed in the simulations, the discrepancies indicated where improvements are needed in the DSMC and NEQAIR models.

  3. Shock Radiation Tests for Saturn and Uranus Entry Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a test series in the Electric Arc Shock Tube at NASA Ames Research Center with the objective of quantifying shock-layer radiative heating magnitudes for future probe entries into Saturn and Uranus atmospheres. Normal shock waves are measured in Hydrogen-Helium mixtures (89:11 by volume) at freestream pressures between 13-66 Pa (0.1-0.5 Torr) and velocities from 20-30 kms. No shock layer radiation is detected within measurement limits below 25 kms, a finding consistent with predictions for Uranus entries. Between 25-30 kms, radiance is quantified from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Near Infrared, with focus on the Lyman-a and Balmer series lines of Hydrogen. Shock profiles are analyzed for electron number density and electronic state distribution. The shocks do not equilibrate over several cm, and in many cases the state distributions are non-Boltzmann. Radiation data are compared to simulations of Decadal Survey entries for Saturn and shown to be as much as 8x lower than predicted with the Boltzmann radiation model. Radiance is observed in front of the shock layer, the characteristics of which match the expected diffusion length.

  4. Surface Composition of the Non-Ice Component on Icy Satellites and Ring Particles in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Pearson, N.; Perlman, Z. S.; Bradley, E. T.; Hendrix, A.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Filacchione, G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Nelson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's icy satellites and ring particle surfaces have long been known to be composed mostly of frozen water. However, all surfaces show an absorption due to a non-water-ice component whose identity has not been well understood. In the near infrared, water ice has strong absorptions which limit detectability of other trace components. Similarly, at wavelengths less than about 0.18 microns, water is very absorbing. However, in the ~0.2 to ~1 micron range, water ice has low absorption and trace components are readily detected. Classical interpretations of the UV absorber and dark material on outer Solar System satellites have been varying amounts of tholins and carbon. However, tholins have spectral structure not seen in the icy spectra in the Saturn System. Many silicates also have UV spectral structure that reject them from contributing significantly to the observed spectral signatures. We have constructed a new UV spectrometer and a new environment chamber for studying the spectral properties of materials from 0.1 to 15 microns. In our survey of the spectral properties of materials so far, we find that small amounts of metallic iron and iron oxides in the icy surfaces are compatible with and can explain the UV, visible and near-infrared spectra of icy surfaces in the Saturn system (0.12 to 5.1 microns) using data from the Cassini UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The wide range of observed UV-NIR (0.1-5 micron) spectral signatures provide strong constraints on composition and grain size distribution, including grain sizes of the ice. Spectra of the Saturnian rings and icy satellites indicate they have a large range of ice grain sizes, from tens of microns to sub-micron. Sub-micron ice grains create unusual spectral properties, which are seen in the spectra of the rings and satellites of Saturn and on satellites further out in the Solar System. Clark et al. (2012, Icarus v218, p831) showed that VIMS

  5. Local variability in the orbit of Saturn's F ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N. J.; Murray, C. D.; Williams, G. A., E-mail: n.cooper@qmul.ac.uk [Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01

    We present an analysis of the orbit of Saturn's F ring using images recorded by the Imaging Science Subsystem of the Cassini spacecraft. A total of 9805 observations have been made from 10 image sequences obtained between 2006 November 23 and 2009 July 28. Each sequence of up to 240 images spans a single orbit of the F ring, allowing 10 independent high-precision estimates of the ring orbit to be made over this ∼3 year period. The ring has been modeled as an inclined uniformly precessing ellipse. The results show a variability in the orbital elements with, for example, the semi-major axis scattered between 140211.2 ± 0.1 km and 140232.9 ± 0.4 km and the fitted periapses locked to the value obtained from a combined fit using the entire three-year span of observations. We show that the observed scatter between the individual estimates of the ring orbit reflect the differing past histories of the particular segments of ring being fitted and that the values are scattered within the limits expected from a single gravitational encounter with the nearby moon, Prometheus. In the combined fit, the scatter averages out to reveal a small systematic bias with respect to the results of Bosh et al. and Albers et al. We believe this is a consequence of the proximity of Prometheus to the ring in the image sequences chosen for this analysis. Finally, we note a close empirical commensurability between the apsidal precession rate, ϖ-dot , of the F ring and the synodic period between Prometheus and the F ring, such that n {sub Prom} – n {sub Fring} ≈ 2 ϖ-dot {sub Fring}, where n {sub Prom} and n {sub Fring} are the mean motions, and discuss its implications.

  6. IMF dependence of the open-closed field line boundary in Saturn's ionosphere, and its relation to the UV auroral oval observed by the Hubble Space Telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the dependence of Saturn's magnetospheric magnetic field structure on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, together with the corresponding variations of the open-closed field line boundary in the ionosphere. Specifically we investigate the interval from 8 to 30 January 2004, when UV images of Saturn's southern aurora were obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST, and simultaneous interplanetary measurements were provided by the Cassini spacecraft located near the ecliptic ~0.2 AU upstream of Saturn and ~0.5 AU off the planet-Sun line towards dawn. Using the paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere, we calculate the magnetospheric magnetic field structure for several values of the IMF vector representative of interplanetary compression regions. Variations in the magnetic structure lead to different shapes and areas of the open field line region in the ionosphere. Comparison with the HST auroral images shows that the area of the computed open flux region is generally comparable to that enclosed by the auroral oval, and sometimes agrees in detail with its poleward boundary, though more typically being displaced by a few degrees in the tailward direction.

  7. Measurements of C02 Distribution in Saturn's Atmosphere by Cassini-Infrared Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A.; Woodard, E.; Young, M.; Stanbro, M.; Flasar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer aboard the Cassini spacecraft, inserted in Saturn s orbit in July 2004, has been providing high resolution/high sensitivity infrared (IR) spectra of the Saturnian system. The measurements cover the spectral range of 10-1400/cm with variable spectral resolutions of 0.53 to 15/cm, exhibiting spectral features of a series of trace gases including CO2 and H2O. The observed spectra may be analyzed for retrieval of global P/T and gas density profiles of Saturn. The infrared measurements of Saturn by ISO(SWS) have indicated unexpected large abundances of CO2 in Saturn's atmosphere. The rigorous photochemical models of Saturn's atmosphere that have been developed indicate exogenic oxygen influx of icy dust grains that lead to the production of CO2. The distribution of CO2 in Saturn's atmosphere needs to be confirmed, and the nature of exogenic sources remains to be investigated. This paper presents comprehensive measurements of the CO2 distribution in Saturn's atmosphere by Cassini IR observations.

  8. The evolution of Saturn's radiation belts modulated by changes in radial diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, P.; Roussos, E.; Kotova, A.; Paranicas, C.; Krupp, N.

    2017-12-01

    Globally magnetized planets, such as the Earth1 and Saturn2, are surrounded by radiation belts of protons and electrons with kinetic energies well into the million electronvolt range. The Earth's proton belt is supplied locally from galactic cosmic rays interacting with the atmosphere3, as well as from slow inward radial transport4. Its intensity shows a relationship with the solar cycle4,5 and abrupt dropouts due to geomagnetic storms6,7. Saturn's proton belts are simpler than the Earth's because cosmic rays are the principal source of energetic protons8 with virtually no contribution from inward transport, and these belts can therefore act as a prototype to understand more complex radiation belts. However, the time dependence of Saturn's proton belts had not been observed over sufficiently long timescales to test the driving mechanisms unambiguously. Here we analyse the evolution of Saturn's proton belts over a solar cycle using in-situ measurements from the Cassini Saturn orbiter and a numerical model. We find that the intensity in Saturn's proton radiation belts usually rises over time, interrupted by periods that last over a year for which the intensity is gradually dropping. These observations are inconsistent with predictions based on a modulation in the cosmic-ray source, as could be expected4,9 based on the evolution of the Earth's proton belts. We demonstrate that Saturn's intensity dropouts result instead from losses due to abrupt changes in magnetospheric radial diffusion.

  9. Electron acceleration in Titan's ionosphere and Saturn's kilometric radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Rucker, H.

    2008-09-01

    Prior to Cassini flights the solar wind was considered as the only source of electrons responsible for Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR). Detected correlation of the SKR occurrence and Titan position at its orbit points out the energy source of SKR associated with Titan [1], [2]. The observed correlation is not the only indication of acceleration mechanism in the satellite ionosphere. Spacecrafts Voyager I and II discovered ultraviolet airglow from excited molecules in Titan's atmosphere. Estimations showed that the observed radiation intensity corresponded to energy input (3-5)x109W into Titan's atmosphere. It was also shown that solar photons and photo-electrons are not able to provide the necessary energy input, and energetic magnetosphere electrons can give not more than [3]. The presence of acceleration mechanism in Titan' ionosphere is also confirmed by the results of Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiments during Cassini flyby through Titan's atmosphere tail: energetic electrons and ions with parameters different from those for particles coming from Saturn's magnetosphere have been discovered there [4]. ~ 2×109 W In this contribution we consider electron acceleration mechanism in Titan's ionosphere which was successfully used for explanation of observed Io influence on decametric radio emission from Jupiter [5], [6]. According to suggested mechanism electron acceleration in the ionosphere occurs due to electric field of charge separation. This field is of the order of induced electric field, but has a field-aligned component. Under Titan's conditions the accelerated electron energy can reach 10 keV that is sufficient for SKR generation. Acceleration mechanism power is enough also for explanation of ultraviolet airglow from Titan. References [1] Farrell, W. M. Et al. (2005) Geophys. Res.Lett., 32, L18107, doi:10.1029/2005GL023449. [2] Menietti, J. D. et al. (2007) JGR, 112, A08211, doi:10.1029/2007JA012331. [3] Hunten, D. M.et al. (1984) Titan, in

  10. The Hera Saturn Entry Probe Mission: a Proposal in Response to the ESA M5 Call

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousis, Olivier; Atkinson, David; Amato, Michael; Aslam, Shahid; Atreya, Sushil; Blanc, Michel; Bolton, Scott; Brugger, Bastien; Calcutt, Simon; Cavalié, Thibault; Charnoz, Sébastien; Coustenis, Athena; Deleuil, Magali; Dobrijevic, Michel; Ferri, Francesca; Fletcher, Leigh; Gautier, Daniel; Guillot, Tristan; Hartogh, Paul; Holland, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The Hera Saturn entry probe mission is proposed as an ESA M-class mission to be piggybacked on a NASA spacecraft sent to or past the Saturn system. Hera consists of an atmospheric probe built by ESA and released into the atmosphere of Saturn by its NASA companion Saturn Carrier-Relay spacecraft. Hera will perform in situ measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition as well as the structure and dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere using a single probe, with the goal of improving our understanding of the origin, formation, and evolution of Saturn, the giant planets and their satellite systems, with extrapolation to extrasolar planets. Hera will probe well into and possibly beneath the cloud-forming region of the troposphere, below the region accessible to remote sensing, to locations where certain cosmogenically abundant species are expected to be well mixed. The Hera probe will be designed from ESA elements with possible contributions from NASA, and the Saturn/Carrier-Relay Spacecraft will be supplied by NASA through its selection via the New Frontier 2016 call or in the form of a flagship mission selected by the NASA "Roadmaps to Ocean Worlds" (ROW) program. The Hera probe will be powered by batteries, and we therefore anticipate only one major subsystems to be possibly supplied by the United States, either by direct procurement by ESA or by contribution from NASA: the thermal protection system of the probe. Following the highly successful example of the Cassini-Huygens mission, Hera will carry European and American instruments, with scientists and engineers from both agencies and many affiliates participating in all aspects of mission development and implementation. A Saturn probe is one of the six identified desired themes by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey committee on the NASA New Frontier's list, providing additional indication that a Saturn probe is of extremely high interest and a very high priority for the international community.

  11. Study and realisation of cabled interfaces for the control and command of the Saturne cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devailly, Jean

    1975-01-01

    This research thesis addressed the assessment of needs, design and realisation of some hardware used by the Saturne cyclotron to solve problems of command and control while using connections developed for the Saturne's computer. After some generalities (description of Saturne, requirements and constraints, general statements about acquisitions and commands, selection of the acquisition and command system, codes), the author presents the different hardware for analog acquisitions, digital acquisitions, analog commands, digital commands, all-or-none control, simulators, amplifiers and memories. He reports some examples: magnetic measurements, control of ejection currents, programs. He finally presents the developed hardware

  12. Saturn's polar ionospheric flows and their relation to the main auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2004-04-01

    current bounding the region of open and closed field lines. Estimates indicate that auroras of brightness from a few kR to a few tens of kR can be produced by precipitating accelerated magnetospheric electrons of a few keV to a few tens of keV energy, if the current flows in a region which is sufficiently narrow, of the order of or less than ~1000 km (~1° latitude wide. Arguments are also given which indicate that the auroras should typically be significantly brighter on the dawn side of the oval than at dusk, by roughly an order of magnitude, and should be displaced somewhat towards dawn by the down-tail outflow at dusk associated with the Vasyliunas cycle. Model estimates are found to be in good agreement with data derived from high quality images newly obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, both in regard to physical parameters, as well as local time effects. The implication of this picture is that the form, position, and brightness of Saturn's main auroral oval provide remote diagnostics of the magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind, including dynamics associated with magnetopause and tail plasma interaction processes. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena, magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions, solar windmagnetosphere interactions

  13. Saturn's polar ionospheric flows and their relation to the main auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2004-04-01

    upward current bounding the region of open and closed field lines. Estimates indicate that auroras of brightness from a few kR to a few tens of kR can be produced by precipitating accelerated magnetospheric electrons of a few keV to a few tens of keV energy, if the current flows in a region which is sufficiently narrow, of the order of or less than ~1000 km (~1° latitude wide. Arguments are also given which indicate that the auroras should typically be significantly brighter on the dawn side of the oval than at dusk, by roughly an order of magnitude, and should be displaced somewhat towards dawn by the down-tail outflow at dusk associated with the Vasyliunas cycle. Model estimates are found to be in good agreement with data derived from high quality images newly obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, both in regard to physical parameters, as well as local time effects. The implication of this picture is that the form, position, and brightness of Saturn's main auroral oval provide remote diagnostics of the magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind, including dynamics associated with magnetopause and tail plasma interaction processes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena, magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions, solar windmagnetosphere interactions

  14. Analysis of Electric Propulsion System for Exploration of Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Huaura Solórzano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of the outer planets has experienced new interest with the launch of the Cassini and the New Horizons Missions. At the present time, new technologies are under study for the better use of electric propulsion system in deep space missions. In the present paper, the method of the transporting trajectory is used to study this problem. This approximated method for the flight optimization with power-limited low thrust is based on the linearization of the motion of a spacecraft near a keplerian orbit that is close to the transfer trajectory. With the goal of maximizing the mass to be delivered in Saturn, several transfers were studied using nuclear, radioisotopic and solar electric propulsion systems.

  15. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudi, B; Bennett, D; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M; Tristram, P; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; DePoy, D; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R; Park, B; Abe, F; Bond, I; Botzler, C; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A; Kilmartin, P; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Sako, T; Saito, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Yock, P; Albrow, M; Beaulieu, J; Burgdorf, M; Cook, K; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2007-11-08

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the first detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of {approx} 0.71 and {approx} 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of {approx} 2.3 and {approx} 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary of mass {approx} 0.50 solar masses. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only 6 confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  16. The influence of Titan on Saturn kilometric radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the occurrence probability of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR appears to be influenced by the local time of Titan. Using a more extensive set of data than the original study, we confirm the correlation of higher occurrence probability of SKR when Titan is located near local midnight. In addition, the direction finding capability of the Cassini Radio Plasma Wave instrument (RPWS is used to determine if this radio emission emanates from particular source regions. We find that most source regions of SKR are located in the mid-morning sector of local time even when Titan is located near midnight. However, some emission does appear to have a source in the Saturnian nightside, consistent with electron precipitation from field lines that have recently mapped to near Titan.

  17. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  18. Saturn ring temperature variations with approaching ring equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Leyrat, C.; Flandes, A.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S.

    2009-04-01

    Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has acquired a wide-ranging set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at solar elevations ranging from less than one degree to 24 degrees. At Saturn equinox in August the solar elevation angle will reach zero as the sun traverses from the south to north side of the rings. For the data acquired to date, temperatures were retrieved for the lit and unlit rings over a variety of ring geometries that include solar elevation, as well as spacecraft elevation, phase angle and local hour angle. To first order, the largest temperature changes on the lit face of the rings are driven by variations in phase angle while differences in temperature with changing spacecraft elevation and local time are a secondary effect. Decreasing ring temperature with decreasing solar elevation are observed for both the lit and unlit faces of the rings after phase angle and local time effects are taken into account. As the solar elevation continues to decrease, the ring temperatures are decreasing in a non-linear fashion. The difference in temperature between the lit and unlit sides of the rings is decreasing also with decreasing solar elevation. Using ring thermal models developed by Leyrat we extrapolate to the expected minimum ring temperatures at equinox for our planned CIRS ring observations. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie". Copyright 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  19. Planetary imaging with amateur astronomical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasopoulos, k.; Giannaris, G.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary imaging can be varied by the types and size of instruments and processing. With basic amateur telescopes and software, can be captured images of our planetary system, mainly Jupiter, Saturn and Mars, but also solar eclipses, solar flares, and many more. Planetary photos can be useful for professional astronomers, and how amateur astronomers can play a role on that field.

  20. The Saturn PRobe Interior and aTmosphere Explorer (SPRITE) Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David H.; Simon, Amy; Banfield, Don

    2017-04-01

    The proposed NASA New Frontiers Saturn PRobe Interior and aTmosphere Explorer (SPRITE) mission would measure the abundance of helium and the other noble gases, elemental and isotopic abundances, the clouds, dynamics, and processes within Saturn's troposphere. In situ measurements of Saturn's atmosphere by SPRITE would provide a significantly improved context for understanding the results from the Galileo Jupiter probe, and the formation and evolution of the gas giant planets, resulting in a paradigm shift in our understanding of the formation, evolution, and ultimately the present day structure of the solar system. The proposed SPRITE concept carries an instrument payload to measure Saturn's atmospheric structure, dynamics, composition, chemistry, and clouds to at least 10 bars. A Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer measures noble gases and noble gas isotopes to accuracies that exceed the Galileo probe measurements at Jupiter and allows for discrimination between competing theories of giant planet formation, evolution, and possible migration. Of particular importance are measurements of helium, key to understanding Saturn's thermal evolution. A Tunable Laser Spectrometer measures molecular abundances and isotope ratios to determine the chemical structure of Saturn's atmosphere, and disequilibrium species such as PH3 and CO which can be used to predict Saturn's deep water abundance. An Atmospheric Structure Instrument provides the pressure/temperature profile of Saturn's atmosphere to determine the altitude profile of static stability, and when combined with cloud measurements from the SPRITE Nephelometer, would elucidate processes that determine the location and structure of Saturn's multiple cloud layers. Coupled with the measurement of atmospheric vertical velocities from the Atmospheric Structure Instrument, a Doppler Wind Experiment provides a measure of the 3-dimensional dynamics of the Saturn atmosphere, including the profile of zonal winds with depth and vertical

  1. Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem Fault Protection Challenges During Saturn Proximal Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. As part of the final extended mission, Cassini will begin an aggressive and exciting campaign of high inclination low altitude flybys within the inner most rings of Saturn, skimming Saturn's outer atmosphere, until the spacecraft is finally disposed of via planned impact with the planet. This final campaign, known as the proximal orbits, presents unique fault protection related challenges, the details of which are discussed in this paper.

  2. Dependence of the open-closed field line boundary in Saturn's ionosphere on both the IMF and solar wind dynamic pressure: comparison with the UV auroral oval observed by the HST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We model the open magnetic field region in Saturn's southern polar ionosphere during two compression regions observed by the Cassini spacecraft upstream of Saturn in January 2004, and compare these with the auroral ovals observed simultaneously in ultraviolet images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope. The modelling employs the paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetospheric magnetic field, whose parameters are varied according to the observed values of both the solar wind dynamic pressure and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF vector. It is shown that the open field area responds strongly to the IMF vector for both expanded and compressed magnetic models, corresponding to low and high dynamic pressure, respectively. It is also shown that the computed open field region agrees with the poleward boundary of the auroras as well as or better than those derived previously from a model in which only the variation of the IMF vector was taken into account. The results again support the hypothesis that the auroral oval at Saturn is associated with the open-closed field line boundary and hence with the solar wind interaction.

  3. Production and fate of the G ring arc particles due to Aegaeon (Saturn LIII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Gustavo; Sfair, R.; Mourão, D. C.; Giuliatti Winter, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    The G ring arc hosts the smallest satellite of Saturn, Aegaeon, observed with a set of images sent by Cassini spacecraft. Along with Aegaeon, the arc particles are trapped in a 7:6 corotation eccentric resonance with the satellite Mimas. Due to this resonance, both Aegaeon and the arc material are confined to within 60° of corotating longitudes. The arc particles are dust grains which can have their orbital motions severely disturbed by the solar radiation force. Our numerical simulations showed that Aegaeon is responsible for depleting the arc dust population by removing them through collisions. The solar radiation force hastens these collisions by removing most of the 10 μm sized grains in less than 40 yr. Some debris released from Aegaeon's surface by meteoroid impacts can populate the arc. However, it would take 30 000 yr for Aegaeon to supply the observed amount of arc material, and so it is unlikely that Aegaeon alone is the source of dust in the arc.

  4. Space Mission Concept for a Nuclear-Powered Airplane for Saturn's Moon Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jason W.

    2010-10-01

    Saturn's large moon Titan is one of the most interesting places in the solar system. It's the only moon with a significant atmosphere. With a temperature of around 90K, the methane in that atmosphere plays the same role that water does in Earth's atmosphere. Titan has methane clouds, methane rainfall, methane rivers, and methane lakes and seas as seen by the Cassini spacecraft. Future Titan exploration will require a more aggressive vehicle in order to follow up on Cassini's discoveries. I will present the motivation and design for a robotic `drone' aircraft mission to Titan: AVIATR, the Aerial Vehicle for In situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance. This platform makes sense because with 4 x Earth's air density and only 17 its gravity, flying at Titan is easier than any place else in the solar system. From AVIATR we could acquire images and near-infrared spectroscopy of the surface, search for waves in liquids, and measure winds and atmospheric properties directly, which would dramatically advance our understanding of this enigmatic, frigid moon.

  5. Spatially and temporally resolved EUV emissions from SATURN z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.J.; Breeze, S.; Mock, R.; Jobe, D.

    1995-01-01

    EUV emissions can be used to measure several z-pinch parameters. The authors have measured implosion velocity from Doppler splitting of lines and estimated electron temperature during run-in from the mean ionization state of line emissions. In an argon pinch they measure an electron temperature of 100 eV before stagnation. To date Doppler split lines have measured implosion velocities less than 40 cm/microsecond. They are presently attempting to measure magnetic field or load current from Zeeman splitting and it may be possible to measure electron density from a Stark-broadened line. Opacity and ion thermal broadening may also contribute to line width information. The spectrometer utilizes a variable line space grating to give a flat focal field. Spectral resolution with a 60 micron detector resolution is up to 3,000 and generally increases with wavelength. This is sufficient to detect several plasma line broadening mechanisms. The spectrometer may detect lines above 100 angstrom and below 1,400 angstrom. Spectral range across a microchannel plate stripline detector decreases with increasing wavelength setting. The authors may gate two striplines with 1 to 12 nsec gates at any time during the pinch discharge. Each stripline spatially images the pinch diameter perpendicular to the direction of dispersion. Spatial resolution in the pinch diameter is 1 mm. Spatial acquisition along the z axis is also 1 mm. Data are presented from argon, krypton, and aluminum z-pinch discharges on the SATURN accelerator

  6. Production and fate of the G ring arc particles due to Aegaeon (Saturn LIII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Gustavo; Sfair, R.; Mourão, DC; Giuliatti Winter, SM

    2018-01-01

    The G ring arc hosts the smallest satellite of Saturn, Aegaeon, observed with a set of images sent by Cassini spacecraft. Along with Aegaeon, the arc particles are trapped in a 7:6 corotation eccentric resonance with the satellite Mimas. Due to this resonance, both Aegaeon and the arc material are confined to within sixty degrees of corotating longitudes. The arc particles are dust grains which can have their orbital motions severely disturbed by the solar radiation force. Our numerical simulations showed that Aegaeon is responsible for depleting the arc dust population by removing them through collisions. The solar radiation force hastens these collisions by removing most of the 10 μm sized grains in less than 40 years. Some debris released from Aegaeon's surface by meteoroid impacts can populate the arc. However, it would take 30,000 years for Aegaeon to supply the observed amount of arc material, and so it is unlikely that Aegaeon alone is the source of dust in the arc.

  7. Cusp observation at Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere by the Cassini spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, J M; Arridge, C S; Lamy, L; Leisner, J S; Thomsen, M F; Mitchell, D G; Coates, A J; Radioti, A; Jones, G H; Roussos, E; Krupp, N; Grodent, D; Dougherty, M K; Waite, J H

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first analysis of magnetospheric cusp observations at Saturn by multiple in situ instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Using this we infer the process of reconnection was occurring at Saturn's magnetopause. This agrees with remote observations that showed the associated auroral signatures of reconnection. Cassini crossed the northern cusp around noon local time along a poleward trajectory. The spacecraft observed ion energy-latitude dispersions—a characteristic signature of the terrestrial cusp. This ion dispersion is “stepped,” which shows that the reconnection is pulsed. The ion energy-pitch angle dispersions suggest that the field-aligned distance from the cusp to the reconnection site varies between ∼27 and 51 RS. An intensification of lower frequencies of the Saturn kilometric radiation emissions suggests the prior arrival of a solar wind shock front, compressing the magnetosphere and providing more favorable conditions for magnetopause reconnection. Key Points We observe evidence for reconnection in the cusp plasma at Saturn We present evidence that the reconnection process can be pulsed at Saturn Saturn's cusp shows similar characteristics to the terrestrial cusp PMID:25821276

  8. The beam-kicker system of the synchrotron Saturne. Magnetic field and particle orbit computations. Experimental results (1963); Le percuteur de faisceau de Saturne. Calcul du champ magnetique et des trajectoires. Verifications experimentales (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouttefangeas, M.; Katz, A.; Rastoix, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    In this report is briefly described the beam-kicker system of the synchrotron Saturne. An analysis of its operation based on the sampling method is given, as well as two methods for computing toe magnetic field produced by a set of endless conductors in the neighbourhood of a conducting shield where eddy currents are circulating. The first method leads to the resolution of a bi-dimensional Laplace equation with first kind boundary conditions (Dirichlet problem); the second one translates to electromagnetism the electrical images method currently used in electrostatics and yields the magnetic field as the sum of a triple series expansion in the general case of a set of conductors located in a parallelepipedal box. Finally are given the results obtained in computing on IBM 7090 the perturbation of the particle motion due to the beam-kicker. These results are compared with the experimental data. (authors) [French] Ce rapport decrit brievement le dispositif percuteur de faisceau mis en place sur le synchrotron Saturne. On y trouvera une analyse de se fonctionnement a partir de la theorie des echantillonnages. On indique egalment deux methodes de calcul du champ magnetique produit par un system de conducteurs indefinis en presence d'un blindage conducteur parcouru par des courants de Foucault: la premiere se ramene a la resolution d'une equation de Laplace a deux dimensions avec des conditions aux limites de premiere espece (probleme de Dirichlet), la seconde transpose en electromagnetisme la methode des images electriques classique en electrostatique et permet d'exprimer le champ magnetique sous la forme de la somme d'une serie triple dans le cas general d'un systeme de conducteurs contenus dans un blindage parallelepipedique. Pour terminer, on mentionne les resultats du calcul numerique de la perturbation de la trajectoire des particules sous l'effet du percuteur et on compare ces resultats aux resultats experimentaux. (auteurs)

  9. The beam-kicker system of the synchrotron Saturne. Magnetic field and particle orbit computations. Experimental results (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouttefangeas, M.; Katz, A.; Rastoix, G.

    1963-01-01

    In this report is briefly described the beam-kicker system of the synchrotron Saturne. An analysis of its operation based on the sampling method is given, as well as two methods for computing toe magnetic field produced by a set of endless conductors in the neighbourhood of a conducting shield where eddy currents are circulating. The first method leads to the resolution of a bi-dimensional Laplace equation with first kind boundary conditions (Dirichlet problem); the second one translates to electromagnetism the electrical images method currently used in electrostatics and yields the magnetic field as the sum of a triple series expansion in the general case of a set of conductors located in a parallelepipedal box. Finally are given the results obtained in computing on IBM 7090 the perturbation of the particle motion due to the beam-kicker. These results are compared with the experimental data. (authors) [fr

  10. H/He demixing and the cooling behavior of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püstow, Robert; Nettelmann, Nadine; Lorenzen, Winfried; Redmer, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    The description of the interior structure and evolution of the Solar System giant planets continues to be a serious challenge. The most prominent example is Saturn for which simple homogeneous evolution models yield ages between 2 and 3 billion years (Gyr), i.e. much shorter than the age of the Solar System of τ⊙ = 4.56 Gyr. It has long been suggested that H/He demixing might occur in the interior of Saturn after the planet has cooled off sufficiently. This incident would mark the begin of an inhomogeneous evolution period in which He droplets sink down and accumulate above the planetary core. The corresponding release of gravitational energy contributes to the intrinsic luminosity of the planet, thereby prolonging its cooling time, perhaps towards the correct value. Such scenarios have been studied in the past on the basis of rather approximate assumptions for the H-He phase diagram. Recently, various ab initio simulations have revealed details of the H-He phase diagram but also of remaining uncertainties (Morales, M.A. et al. [2009]. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 1324; Morales, M.A. et al. [2013a]. Phys. Rev. B 87, 174105; Lorenzen, W. et al. [2011]. Phys. Rev. B 84, 235109). In this paper we use the new predictions by Lorenzen et al. and modifications thereof to study the inhomogeneous evolution period of Saturn, with resulting values for the onset of H/He phase separation ts , the cooling time τ , and the atmospheric helium abundance y1 . For the planetary interior during the inhomogeneous evolution we assume adiabatic, convective envelopes. We find ts = 1 Gyr, τ = 5.8 Gyr, and y1 = 0.18 , while ts ≊ 2 Gyr for the Morales et al. data, for which we also estimate τ ≈ 5.1 Gyr. On the other hand, reasonable cooling times τ ≈τ⊙ are obtained for shifts of the Lorenzen et al. phase diagram by respectively -1300 K and +500 K, yielding y1 = 0.22 and y1 = 0.06 . More accurate knowledge of H-He phase diagram is necessary to understand cool gas giant

  11. South Polar Ammonia Clouds on Saturn°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; Baines, Kevin H.; Fry, Patrick M.

    2017-10-01

    Most of Saturn is covered by a thick cloud layer of unknown composition. Evidence of the underlying NH3 ice cloud (its strong 3-μm absorption signature) had so far been seen only in association with lightning storms, including the Great Storm of 2010-2011 (Sromovsky et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 402-418), near 35° N planetocentric latitude, and much smaller storms located near 36° S in the Storm Alley region (Baines et al. 2009, Planet. & Space Sci. 57, 1650-1658). In the Great Storm, NH3 ice reached the visible cloud tops. The Storm Alley clouds have more subtle 3-μm signatures, which is consistent with ammonia ice reaching into but not fully penetrating the upper cloud (Sromovsky et al. 2017, Icarus submitted). The presence of 3-μm absorption features in the south polar region is surprising because there is no associated lighting that would indicate deep convection. Radiation transfer modeling of October 2006 VIMS spectra of these features yields good fits with a stacked structure of a thin stratospheric haze, a physically thin and optically thin (~0.2 optical depths at 2 μm) layer of non-absorbing particles, a moderate layer of NH3 ice particles (r=2 μm, ~2 optical depths) near 550 mbar, then a clear region down to about 2 bars, which marks the top of a very optically thick layer of NH4SH particles, which provides a needed strong reduction in thermal emission in the 5-μm window. The structure of neighboring clouds differs dramatically in the NH4SH layer, which has a much lower optical depth and has a cloud top 1 bar deeper. But the ammonia layer is the main modulator of pseudo continuum I/F in reflected sunlight. That layer has an optical depth of about 1.3 in background clouds, but almost double that in the brightest clouds. What makes the 3-μm absorption of the NH3 ice layer more apparent in these polar clouds is the reduced optical depth of the upper cloud layer, which is an order of magnitude less than in other regions on Saturn, perhaps because of polar

  12. Evaluation of Data Used for Modelling the Stratosphere of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Eleanor Sophie; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Moses, Julianne I.

    2015-11-01

    Planetary atmospheres are modeled through the use of a photochemical and kinetic reaction scheme constructed from experimentally and theoretically determined rate coefficients, photoabsorption cross sections and branching ratios for the molecules described within them. The KINETICS architecture has previously been developed to model planetary atmospheres and is applied here to Saturn’s stratosphere. We consider the pathways that comprise the reaction scheme of a current model, and update the reaction scheme according the to findings in a literature investigation. We evaluate contemporary photochemical literature, studying recent data sets of cross-sections and branching ratios for a number of hydrocarbons used in the photochemical scheme of Model C of KINETICS. In particular evaluation of new photodissociation branching ratios for CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C3H3, C3H5 and C4H2, and new cross-sectional data for C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H3, C4H2, C6H2 and C8H2 are considered. By evaluating the techniques used and data sets obtained, a new reaction scheme selection was drawn up. These data are then used within the preferred reaction scheme of the thesis and applied to the KINETICS atmospheric model to produce a model of the stratosphere of Saturn in a steady state. A total output of the preferred reaction scheme is presented, and the data is compared both with the previous reaction scheme and with data from the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn.One of the key findings of this work is that there is significant change in the model’s output as a result of temperature dependent data determination. Although only shown within the changes to the photochemical portion of the preferred reaction scheme, it is suggested that an equally important temperature dependence will be exhibited in the kinetic section of the reaction scheme. The photochemical model output is shown to be highly dependent on the preferred reaction scheme used within it by this thesis. The importance of correct

  13. Variations in Self-Gravity Wake Structures Across Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2012-12-01

    Optical depths measured in stellar occultations by Saturn's rings depend on viewing geometry due to the presence of aligned, trailing, elongated ephemeral clumps of particles known as self-gravity wakes. Combining observations from multiple viewing geometries makes it possible to untangle the properties of the self-gravity wakes, such as their orientation, aspect ratio, mutual spacing, and inter-wake optical depth. Simple geometric models (Colwell et al. 2006, Geophys. Res. Lett. 33, L07201; Hedman et al. 2007, Astron. J. 133, 2624-2629) have explained most of the variation in optical depths as a function of viewing geometry. Many more occultations have been observed since those initial models were published: more than 100 have been observed by Cassini UVIS, while the initial model results were based on only ~10 measurements. In particular, some measurements made by UVIS at high elevation angle did not agree with predictions from the initial self-gravity wake "granola bar" model of Colwell et al. (2006). Here we present results of a systematic re-analysis of the self-gravity wakes in Saturn's rings taking advantage of more than 80 UVIS occultations with a strong signal and including different geometric models. We find no evidence for self-gravity wakes in the C ring or in the Cassini Division. While we cannot rule out the presence of some preferential orientation of particle structures from these data alone, the theoretically expected wavelength for self-gravity wakes in these regions is comparable to a particle size (~ 1 m), consistent with our non-detection of aligned clumps. We use three different geometric models of self-gravity wakes: an elliptical cross-section (Hedman et al. 2007), a rectangular cross-section (Colwell et al. 2006), and a rectangular cross-section with Gaussian "wings" in optical depth on the self-gravity wakes. The model with wings on the wakes, despite having an extra free parameter, does not provide a better overall fit to the data outside

  14. The electron density of Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Morooka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated statistically the electron density below 5 cm−3 in the magnetosphere of Saturn (7–80 RS, Saturn radii using 44 orbits of the floating potential data from the RPWS Langmuir probe (LP onboard Cassini. The density distribution shows a clear dependence on the distance from the Saturnian rotation axis (√X2+Y2 as well as on the distance from the equatorial plane (|Z|, indicating a disc-like structure. From the characteristics of the density distribution, we have identified three regions: the extension of the plasma disc, the magnetodisc region, and the lobe regions. The plasma disc region is at L<15, where L is the radial distance to the equatorial crossing of the dipole magnetic field line, and confined to |Z|<5 RS. The magnetodisc is located beyond L=15, and its density has a large variability. The variability has quasi-periodic characteristics with a periodicity corresponding to the planetary rotation. For Z>15 RS, the magnetospheric density distribution becomes constant in Z. However, the density still varies quasi-periodically with the planetary rotation also in this region. In fact, the quasi-periodic variation has been observed all over the magnetosphere beyond L=15. The region above Z=15 RS is identified as the lobe region. We also found that the magnetosphere can occasionally move latitudinally under the control of the density in the magnetosphere and the solar wind. From the empirical distributions of the electron densities obtained in this study, we have constructed an electron density model of the Saturnian nightside magnetosphere beyond 7 RS. The obtained model can well reproduce the observed density distribution, and can thus be useful for magnetospheric modelling studies.

  15. NASA Helps Keep the Light Burning for the Saturn Car Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Saturn Electronics & Engineering, Inc. (Saturn) facility in Marks, Miss., that produces lamp assemblies was experiencing itermittent problems with its automotive under the hood lamps. After numerous testing and engineering efforts, technicians could not pin down the root of the problem. So Saturn contacted the NASA Technology Assistance Program (TAP) at Stennis Space Center. The Marks production facility had been experiencing intermittent problems with under the hood lamp assemblies for some time. The failure rate, at 2 percent, was unacceptable. Every effort was made to identify the problem so that corrective action could be put in place. The problem was investigated and researched by Saturn's engineering department. In addition, Saturn brought in several independent testing laboratories. Other measures included examining the switch component suppliers and auditing them for compliance to the design specifications and for surface contaminants. All attempts to identify the factors responsible for the failures were inconclusive. In an effort to get to the root of the problem, and at the recommendation of the Mississippi Department of Economic Development, Saturn contacted the NASA TAP at Stennis. The NASA Materials and Contamination Laboratory, with assistance from the Stennis Prototype Laboratory, conducted a materials evaluation study on the switch components. The laboratory findings showed the failures were caused by a build-up of carbon-based contaminants on the switch components. Saturn Electronics & Engineering, Inc., is a minority-owned provider of contract manufacturing services to a diverse global marketplace. Saturn operates manufacturing facilities globally serving the North American, European, and Asian markets. Saturn's production facility in Marks, Mississippi, produces more than 1,000,000 lamps and switches monthly. "Since the NASA recommendations were implemented, our internal failure rate for intermittency has dropped to less than .02 percent

  16. First Observation of Lion Roar Emission in Saturn's Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Píša, D.; Sulaiman, A. H.; Santolík, O.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    We present an observation of intense emissions in Saturn's magnetosheath as detected by the Cassini spacecraft. The emissions are observed in the dawn sector (magnetic local time ˜06:45) of the magnetosheath over a time period of 11 h before the spacecraft crossed the bow shock and entered the unshocked solar wind. They are found to be narrow-banded with a peak frequency of about 0.16 fce, where fce is the local electron gyrofrequency. Using plane wave propagation analysis, we show that the waves are right hand circularly polarized in the spacecraft frame and propagate at small wave normal angles (field. Electromagnetic waves with the same properties known as "lion roars" have been reported by numerous missions in the terrestrial magnetosheath. Here we show the first evidence such emission outside the terrestrial environment. Our observations suggest that lion roars are a solar-system-wide phenomenon and capable of existing in a broad range of parameter space. This also includes 1 order of magnitude difference in frequencies. We anticipate our result to provide new insight into such emissions in a new parameter regime characterized by a higher plasma beta (owing to the substantially higher Mach number bow shock) compared to Earth.

  17. Cassini radar and radiometry observations of Saturn's airless icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A. A.; West, R.; Janssen, M. A.; Leyrat, C.; Bonnefoy, L.; Lellouch, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini Radar is a multimode microwave sensor operating in the Ku-band, at a wavelength of 2.2 cm. While it was initially designed to examine the surface of Titan through the veil of its optically-opaque atmosphere, it is occasionally used to observe airless Saturn's moons from long ranges (>50 000 km) and, less frequently, during targeted flybys. In its active mode, the instrument measures the surface reflectivity in the backscattering direction. In its passive mode - or radiometry mode - it records the microwave thermal emission from the near-surface (typically few meters). Doing so, it provides insights into the degree of purity and maturity of the water-ice regolith of the investigated objects. In particular, it can reveal hemispheric dichotomies or regional anomalies and satellite-to-satellite variabilities which give clues into what is common and what is specific to the history of each satellite and to the processes that have shaped their surface/subsurface. In this paper, we will give an overview of the Cassini radar/radiometry observations of Saturnian icy moons, most of which have not been published yet. Now that the mission has come to an end, we will describe how the radio investigation of these objects can be pursued from Earth-based radiotelescopes.

  18. Five years of Cassini CIRS Thermal Observations of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Altobelli, N.; Flandes, J. A.; Morishima, R.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S.; Brooks, S.

    2009-09-01

    An extensive set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini division) has been returned by the Cassini Composite Infrared spectrometer over the past five years. Data on the lit and unlit rings have been acquired over a variety of solar phase angles, spacecraft elevations and local hour angles. The solar elevation angle has varied from 24 degrees at the start of the mission through zero at equinox. Phase angle and solar elevation angle are two of the strongest determinants of ring temperature; the lit face of the main rings cooled by over 30 K with approaching equinox. Thermal phase curves of the main rings exhibit a nonlinear variation in temperature with phase angle, with pronounced surges at phase angles less than 50 degrees. The larger optical depth regions, such as regions in the A and B rings, also show slight changes in this surge with changing solar elevation. This effect may be related to interparticle shadowing within the rings. The temperature of the main rings decreases as the solar elevation angle declines. The temperature in the optically thin C ring and Cassini division decreases by only a few degrees over a broad range of solar elevation, decreasing more rapidly at smaller solar elevation. Detailed thermal modeling is under way to fit these data. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  19. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn analog with gravitational microlensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Christie, G W; Maoz, D; Dong, S; McCormick, J; Szymanski, M K; Tristram, P J; Nikolaev, S; Paczynski, B; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Depoy, D L; Han, C; Kaspi, S; Lee, C-U; Mallia, F; Natusch, T; Pogge, R W; Park, B-G; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Okumura, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Sako, T; Saito, To; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W L; Yock, P C M; Albrow, M D; Allan, A; Beaulieu, J-P; Burgdorf, M J; Cook, K H; Coutures, C; Dominik, M; Dieters, S; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Horne, K; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Chaboyer, B; Crocker, A; Frank, S; Macintosh, B

    2008-02-15

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of approximately 0.71 and approximately 0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of approximately 2.3 and approximately 4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass approximately 0.50 solar mass at a distance of approximately 1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  20. Cassini’s Discoveries at Saturn and the Proposed Cassini Solstice Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Spilker, L. J.; Mitchell, R. T.; Cuzzi, J.; Gombosi, T. I.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Lunine, J. I.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding of the Saturn system has been greatly enhanced by the Cassini-Huygens mission. Fundamental discoveries have altered our views of Saturn, Titan and the other icy satellites, the rings, and magnetosphere of the system. Key discoveries include: water-rich plumes emanating from the south pole of Enceladus; hints of possible activity on Dione and of rings around Rhea; a methane hydrological cycle on Titan complete with fluvial erosion, lakes, and seas of liquid methane and ethane; non-axisymmetric ring microstructure in all moderate optical depth rings; south polar vortices on Saturn; and a unique magnetosphere that shares characteristics with both Earth’s and Jupiter’s magnetospheres. These new discoveries are directly relevant to current Solar System science goals including: planet and satellite formation processes, formation of gas giants, the nature of organic material, the history of volatiles, habitable zones and processes for life, processes that shape planetary bodies, and evolution of exoplanets. The proposed 7-year Cassini Solstice Mission would address new questions that have arisen during the Cassini Prime and Equinox Missions, and would observe seasonal and temporal change in the Saturn system to prepare for future missions to Saturn, Titan, and Enceladus. The proposed Cassini Solstice Mission would provide new science in three ways. First, it would observe seasonally and temporally dependent processes on Saturn, Titan and other icy satellites, and within the rings and magnetosphere, in a hitherto unobserved seasonal phase from equinox to solstice. Second, it would address new questions that have arisen during the mission thus far, providing qualitatively new measurements (e.g. of Enceladus and Titan) which could not be accommodated in the earlier mission phases. Tthird, it would conduct a close-in mission phase at Saturn that would provide unique science including comparison to the Juno observations at Jupiter.

  1. NEW INSIGHTS ON SATURN'S FORMATION FROM ITS NITROGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Fletcher, Leigh N. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Mandt, Kathleen E. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Ali-Dib, Mohamad [Université de Franche-Comté, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, Observatoire des Sciences de l' Univers de Besançon (France); Gautier, Daniel [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Univ. Paris-Diderot, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Atreya, Sushil, E-mail: olivier.mousis@obs-besancon.fr [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The recent derivation of a lower limit for the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in Saturn's ammonia, which is found to be consistent with the Jovian value, prompted us to revise models of Saturn's formation using as constraints the supersolar abundances of heavy elements measured in its atmosphere. Here we find that it is possible to account for both Saturn's chemical and isotopic compositions if one assumes the formation of its building blocks at ∼45 K in the protosolar nebula, provided that the O abundance was ∼2.6 times protosolar in its feeding zone. To do so, we used a statistical thermodynamic model to investigate the composition of the clathrate phase that formed during the cooling of the protosolar nebula and from which the building blocks of Saturn were agglomerated. We find that Saturn's O/H is at least ∼34.9 times protosolar and that the corresponding mass of heavy elements (∼43.1 M {sub ⊕}) is within the range predicted by semi-convective interior models.

  2. Periods, poles, and shapes of Saturn's irregular moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    We report rotational-lightcurve observations of irregular moons of Saturn based on disk-integrated observations with the Narrow-Angle Camera of the Cassini spacecraft. From 24 measured rotation periods, 20 are now known with an accuracy of ~2% or better. The numbers are as follows (in hours; an '*' marks the less reliable periods): Hati 5.42; Mundilfari 6.74; Loge 6.94*; Skoll 7.26; Kari 7.70; Suttungr 7.82*, Bergelmir 8.13; Phoebe 9.274; Siarnaq 10.188; Narvi 10.21; Tarvos 10.69; Skathi 11.30; Ymir 11.922; Hyrrokkin 12.76; Greip 12.79*; Ijiraq 13.03; Albiorix 13.32; Bestla 14.624; Bebhionn 16.40; Paaliaq 18.75; Kiviuq 21.96; Erriapus 28.15; Thrymr 35 or >45* Tarqeq 76.8.More recent data strengthen the notion that objects in orbits with an inclination supplemental angle i' > 27° have significantly slower spin rates than those at i' 27°, Siarnaq, stands opposed to at least eight objects with faster spins and i' 27° bin contains all nine known prograde moons and four retrograde objects.A total of 25 out of 38 known outer moons has been observed with Cassini, and there is no chance to observe the 13 missing objects until end-of-mission. However, all unobserved objects are part of the i' 27° are known, and none of them is a fast rotator, with no exception.Several objects were observed repeatedly to determine pole directions, sidereal periods, and convex shapes. A few lightcurves have been observed to show three maxima and three minima even at low phase angles, suggesting objects with a triangular equatorial cross-section. Some objects with 2 maxima/ 2 minima are probably quite elongated. One moon even shows lightcurves with 4 maxima/ 4 minima.

  3. Energy Flow in Saturn's Ion Cyclotron Wave Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, J. S.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.; Persoon, A. M.; Blanco-Cano, X.; McAndrews, H. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    When molecules in Saturn's water-group neutral cloud are ionized, they are accelerated by the electric field associated with the motion of the magnetospheric plasma. This acceleration brings the pick-up ions to the bulk plasma speed and gives them free energy that leads to the growth of ion cyclotron waves. Ion cyclotron waves propagating along the magnetic field have been observed near the equatorial plane on almost all of Cassini's orbits through the inner magnetosphere. On near-equatorial orbits, these waves are observed to peak below the gyrofrequencies of water-group (O, OH, H2O) and molecular oxygen (O2) ions. On inclined orbits, the velocity of the spacecraft along the waves' direction of propagation produced Doppler shifts in the wave frequency. Using this shift, we calculate the phase velocity of the waves through the wave belt. We find that near the magnetic equator, the waves are propagating both parallel and anti-parallel to the magnetic field and have phase velocities of 40-50 km/s, one-half to one-third of the local Alfven speed. Beyond +/- 0.04 Rs of the magnetic equator, the water-group waves are propagating away from that plane and increasing in power until about +/- 0.25 Rs. Then they quickly damp. The wave power profile is similar for molecular oxygen waves, except these waves are about one-tenth as strong. Beyond +/- 0.3 Rs of the magnetic equator the water-group waves are absent, but the molecular oxygen waves persist until higher latitudes, although with low power. We discuss the energy carried by these waves, considering both ion species and where the background plasma gains energy from their absorption.

  4. MIGRATION OF SMALL MOONS IN SATURN's RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Rm 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    The motions of small moons through Saturn's rings provide excellent tests of radial migration models. In theory, torque exchange between these moons and ring particles leads to radial drift. We predict that moons with Hill radii r {sub H} {approx} 2-24 km should migrate through the A ring in 1000 yr. In this size range, moons orbiting in an empty gap or in a full ring eventually migrate at the same rate. Smaller moons or moonlets-such as the propellers-are trapped by diffusion of disk material into corotating orbits, creating inertial drag. Larger moons-such as Pan or Atlas-do not migrate because of their own inertia. Fast migration of 2-24 km moons should eliminate intermediate-size bodies from the A ring and may be responsible for the observed large-radius cutoff of r {sub H} {approx} 1-2 km in the size distribution of the A ring's propeller moonlets. Although the presence of Daphnis (r {sub H} Almost-Equal-To 5 km) inside the Keeler gap challenges this scenario, numerical simulations demonstrate that orbital resonances and stirring by distant, larger moons (e.g., Mimas) may be important factors. For Daphnis, stirring by distant moons seems the most promising mechanism to halt fast migration. Alternatively, Daphnis may be a recent addition to the ring that is settling into a low inclination orbit in {approx}10{sup 3} yr prior to a phase of rapid migration. We provide predictions of observational constraints required to discriminate among possible scenarios for Daphnis.

  5. HST HOT-JUPITER TRANSMISSION SPECTRAL SURVEY: CLEAR SKIES FOR COOL SATURN WASP-39b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Patrick D.; Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sing, David K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Nikolov, Nikolay [Astrophysics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Burrows, Adam S. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Showman, Adam P.; Ballester, Gilda E. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Désert, Jean-Michel [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Aigrain, Suzanne [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Etangs, Alain Lecavelier des; Vidal-Madjar, Alfred [CNRS, Institut dAstrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2016-08-10

    We present the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) optical transmission spectroscopy of the cool Saturn-mass exoplanet WASP-39b from 0.29-1.025 μ m, along with complementary transit observations from Spitzer IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μ m. The low density and large atmospheric pressure scale height of WASP-39b make it particularly amenable to atmospheric characterization using this technique. We detect a Rayleigh scattering slope as well as sodium and potassium absorption features; this is the first exoplanet in which both alkali features are clearly detected with the extended wings predicted by cloud-free atmosphere models. The full transmission spectrum is well matched by a clear H{sub 2}-dominated atmosphere, or one containing a weak contribution from haze, in good agreement with the preliminary reduction of these data presented in Sing et al. WASP-39b is predicted to have a pressure-temperature profile comparable to that of HD 189733b and WASP-6b, making it one of the coolest transiting gas giants observed in our HST STIS survey. Despite this similarity, WASP-39b appears to be largely cloud-free, while the transmission spectra of HD 189733b and WASP-6b both indicate the presence of high altitude clouds or hazes. These observations further emphasize the surprising diversity of cloudy and cloud-free gas giant planets in short-period orbits and the corresponding challenges associated with developing predictive cloud models for these atmospheres.

  6. Ogle-2012-blg-0724lb: A Saturn Mass Planet Around an M-dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Y.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Rattenbury, N.; Suzuki, D.; Koshimoto, N.; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a planet by the microlensing method, OGLE-2012-BLG-0724Lb. Although the duration of the planetary signal for this event was one of the shortest seen for a planetary event, the anomaly was well covered thanks to high-cadence observations taken by the survey groups OGLE and MOA. By analyzing the light curve, this planetary system is found to have a mass ratio q = (1.58 +/- 0.15) x 10(exp -3). By conducting a Bayesian analysis, we estimate that the host star is an M dwarf with a mass of M(sub L) = 0.29(+0.33/-0.16) solar mass located at D(sub L) = 6.7(+1.1/-1.2) kpc away from the Earth and the companion's mass is m(sub P) = 0.47(+0.54/-0.26) M(Jup). The projected planet- host separation is a falsum = 1.6(+0.4/-0.3) AU. Because the lens-source relative proper motion is relatively high, future highresolution images would detect the lens host star and determine the lens properties uniquely. This system is likely a Saturn-mass exoplanet around an M dwarf, and such systems are commonly detected by gravitational microlensing. This adds another example of a possible pileup of sub-Jupiters (0.2 less than m(sub P)/M(sub Jup) less than 1) in contrast to a lack of Jupiters (approximately 1-2 M(sub Jup)) around M dwarfs, supporting the prediction by core accretion models that Jupiter-mass or more massive planets are unlikely to form around M dwarfs.

  7. Cassini Operational Sun Sensor Risk Management During Proximal Orbit Saturn Ring Plane Crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 which arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004–08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. As part of the final extended missions, Cassini will begin an aggressive and exciting campaign of high inclination, low altitude flybys within the inner most rings of Saturn, skimming Saturn’s outer atmosphere, until the spacecraft is finally disposed of via planned impact with the planet. This final campaign, known as the proximal orbits, requires a strategy for managing the Sun Sensor Assembly (SSA) health, the details of which are presented in this paper.

  8. Skirting Saturn's Rings and Skimming Its Cloud Tops: Planning Cassini's End of Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor-Chapman, Emily; Magee, Kari; Brooks, Shawn; Edgington, Scott; Heventhal, William; Sturm, Erick

    2014-01-01

    In October 2010, the Cassini spacecraft embarked on the seven-year Solstice Mission. The mission will culminate with a spectacular series of orbits that bring Cassini between Saturn's innermost ring, the D ring, and the cloud tops of the planet. The spacecraft will make its closest passages ever to the planet allowing for unprecedented science to be collected on Saturn and its rings. These final orbits will expose the spacecraft to new environments, which presents a number of challenges to planning the final mission phase. While these challenges will require adaptations to planning processes and operations, they are not insurmountable. This paper describes the challenges identified and the steps taken to mitigate them to enable collection of unique Saturn system science.

  9. Light-induced rewiring and winding of Saturn ring defects in photosensitive chiral nematic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdovskyy, I; Jampani, V S R; Skarabot, M; Muševič, I

    2013-09-01

    We study the winding and unwinding of Saturn ring defects around silica microspheres with homeotropic surface anchoring in a cholesteric liquid crystal with a variable pitch. We use mixtures of a nematic liquid crystal 5CB and various photoresponsive chiral dopants to vary the helical pitch and sense of the helical winding by illuminating the mixtures with UV or visible light. Upon illumination, we observe motion of the Grandjean-Cano disclination lines in wedge-like cells. When the line touches the colloidal particle, we observe topological reconstruction of the Grandjean-Cano line and the Saturn ring. The result of this topological reconstruction is either an increase or decrease of the degree of winding of the Saturn ring around the colloidal particle. This phenomenon is similar to topological rewiring of -1/2 disclination lines, observed recently in chiral nematic colloids.

  10. On Radiative Factors in Planetary Rings: New Insight Derived from Cassini CIRS Observations at Saturn Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. M.; Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S.; Edgington, S. G.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.

    2012-12-01

    Since arriving at Saturn in 2004, Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded tens of millions of spectra of Saturn's rings (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation (16.7-1000 microns) at focal plane 1 (FP1). Thermal emission from Saturn's rings peaks at FP1 wavelengths. CIRS spectra are well characterized as blackbody emission at an effective temperature Te, multiplied by a scalar factor related to ring emissivity (Spilker et al. [2005, 2006]). CIRS can therefore characterize the rings' temperature and study the thermal environment to which the ring particles are subject. We focus on CIRS data from the 2009 Saturnian equinox. As the Sun's disk crossed the ring plane, CIRS obtained several radial scans of the rings at a variety of phase angles, local hour angles and distances. With the Sun's rays striking the rings at an incidence angle of zero, solar heating is virtually absent, and thermal radiation from Saturn and sunlight reflected by Saturn dominate the thermal environment. These observations appear to present a paradox. Equinox data show that the flux of thermal energy radiated by the rings can even exceed the energy incident upon them as prescribed by thermal models, particularly in the C ring and Cassini Division (Ferrari and Leyrat [2006], Morishima et al. [2009, 2010]). Conservation principles suggest that such models underestimate heating of the rings in these cases, as it is clearly unphysical for the rings to radiate significantly more energy than is incident upon them. In this presentation, we will describe our efforts to resolve this paradox and determine what doing so can teach us about Saturn's rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2012 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  11. Looking Forward to Cassini's Proximal Orbits: the Innermost Radiation Belt of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hedman, M. M.; Edgington, S. G.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, R. E.; Sturner, S. J.; Cassini Proximal Hazard Working Group

    2013-10-01

    The Cassini mission to Saturn will conclude with over twenty flybys of the equatorial gap region between Saturn's upper atmosphere and the inner D ring. This region at 62,000 - 65,000 kilometers from the center of Saturn is of comparable width to the inner Van Allen radiation belt of Earth and could contain Saturn's innermost belt of presently uncertain intensity and impact on the Cassini spacecraft. As first proposed by Cooper [BAAS 40(3), 460, 2008] this innermost belt could be populated to potentially very high intensities by protons and electrons from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay. The primary neutron source at high energies above 10 MeV would be from galactic cosmic ray interactions with the main rings of Saturn, but more recent work suggests a secondary source at lower energies from similar interactions with Saturn's upper atmosphere. At keV energies a third source from magnetospheric energetic neutral atom interactions with the exospheric gas extending through the gap region could be effective as observed earlier by Cassini. A fourth source includes eV - keV ions from low-energy neutral atom ejection out of the ring atmosphere. Ions from the ring ionosphere were also observed by Cassini. Since trapping lifetimes of keV - GeV protons due to radial diffusion in the gap region are projected to be extremely long, correspondingly high intensities could arise unless there was sufficient exospheric gas and ring material to reduce lifetimes far below the diffusion limit. Limits from new modeling are presented for the potential range of trapped particle intensities at MeV - GeV energies. Apart from the potential radiation and other hazards, this first exploration of the gap region will provide a fascinating conclusion to the Cassini mission.

  12. Memory testing with Saturne synchrotron beams. Experiments with protons and deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buisson, J.

    1989-01-01

    For simulate light ions of the cosmic rays CEA will use facilities used in fundamental physic research. SATURNE is a synchrotron especially designed to accelerate light particles, for example protons with energy up to 2.9 GeV. Two experiments are made on SATURNE to specify the beam characteristics (energy and intensity) and to adapt the beam for irradiation of electronic components. During these preliminary experimentation memories and microprocessors was tested. The results of the tests (cross-section) are given in this paper [fr

  13. Density waves in Saturn's rings probed by radio and optical occultation - Observational tests of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Thomas G.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A parallel examination is conducted of Voyager radio and photopolarimeter occultation observations of the Saturn A ring's density waves. The radio instrument waves exhibit an average -90 deg offset from the dynamical phase. A warping height of about 100-m amplitude can qualtitatively reproduce this phase shift, while preserving the overall model wave shape. These results may be profoundly relevant for satellite-ring torque calculations in Saturn's rings, given the deposition of all of the net torque of the standard model in the first wavelength.

  14. Cassini spectra and photometry 0.25–5.1 μm of the small inner satellites of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B.J.; Bauer, J.M.; Hicks, M.D.; Mosher, J.A.; Filacchione, G.; Momary, T.; Baines, K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2010-01-01

    The nominal tour of the Cassini mission enabled the first spectra and solar phase curves of the small inner satellites of Saturn. We present spectra from the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) that span the 0.25-5.1 ??m spectral range. The composition of Atlas, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Calypso, and Telesto is primarily water ice, with a small amount (???5%) of contaminant, which most likely consists of hydrocarbons. The optical properties of the "shepherd" satellites and the coorbitals are tied to the A-ring, while those of the Tethys Lagrangians are tied to the E-ring of Saturn. The color of the satellites becomes progressively bluer with distance from Saturn, presumably from the increased influence of the E-ring; Telesto is as blue as Enceladus. Janus and Epimetheus have very similar spectra, although the latter appears to have a thicker coating of ring material. For at least four of the satellites, we find evidence for the spectral line at 0.68 ??m that Vilas et al. [Vilas, F., Larsen, S.M., Stockstill, K.R., Gaffley, M.J., 1996. Icarus 124, 262-267] attributed to hydrated iron minerals on Iapetus and Hyperion. However, it is difficult to produce a spectral mixing model that includes this component. We find no evidence for CO2 on any of the small satellites. There was a sufficient excursion in solar phase angle to create solar phase curves for Janus and Telesto. They bear a close similarity to the solar phase curves of the medium-sized inner icy satellites. Preliminary spectral modeling suggests that the contaminant on these bodies is not the same as the exogenously placed low-albedo material on Iapetus, but is rather a native material. The lack of CO2 on the small inner satellites also suggests that their low-albedo material is distinct from that on Iapetus, Phoebe, and Hyperion. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  15. The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem: Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument was designed for long-range, high resolution imaging of Saturn and its system of rings and moons. It consists of two cameras, a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC, 2000 mm focal length) and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC, 200 mm focal length). The NAC has sensitivity from 200 nm to 1100 nm. The WAC is sensitive from 350 nm to 1100 nm. Among the mission highlights thus far for ISS have been discoveries of particulate plumes from Enceladus, details of surface topography along the 'tiger stripes', the discovery of an equatorial ridge on Iapetus, detailed images of small inner moons and distant moons Phoebe and Hyperion, features in Saturn's rings including perturbed edges near embedded moons, 'propellers', ephemeral clumps, and evidence for impacts in the rings and free-oscillation modes in Saturn's interior. The camera documented the aftermath of a methane/ethane 'rain' storm on Titan as well as seasonal behavior in the detached haze and visible airglow generated by magnetospheric plasma. The cameras documented the formation and evolution of a giant storm on Saturn, lightning from storms on Saturn, and determined that eddies are powering Saturn's zonal jets. In the F-ring and Proximal orbits ISS will obtain even better resolution on the rings, planet and inner moons.

  16. Multi-wavelength studies of Saturn's rings to constrain ring particle properties and ring structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.; Filacchione, G.; Hedman, M.; Nicholson, P.; Colwell, J.; Bradley, T.

    2012-04-01

    A great deal can be learned about the nature of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly being studied using scans of the lit and unlit main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize regions such as the C ring plateaus and ringlets, where albedo differences may be present. In the CIRS data, over a range of solar elevations from -23 degrees to -8 degrees, the bulk of the temperature variations are confined primarily to phase angle. Only small temperature differences are observed with changing spacecraft elevation. Similar behavior is seen in the ISS color data. Color and temperature dependence with changing solar elevation angle are also observed. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are (almost) independent of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces

  17. CONVECTIVE BURSTS AND THE COUPLING OF SATURN'S EQUATORIAL STORMS AND INTERIOR ROTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal variations of Saturn's equatorial jet and magnetic field hint at rich dynamics coupling the atmosphere and the deep interior. However, it has been assumed that rotation of the interior dynamo must be steady over tens of years of modern observations. Here we use a numerical convection model and scaling estimates to show how equatorial convective bursts can transfer angular momentum to the deeper interior. The numerical model allows angular momentum transfer between a fluid outer spherical shell and a rigid inner sphere. Convection drives a prograde equatorial jet exhibiting quasiperiodic bursts that fill the equatorial volume outside the tangent cylinder. For each burst strong changes in the equatorial surface velocity are associated with retrograde torque on the inner sphere. Our results suggest that Saturn's Great White Spot, a giant storm that was observed to fill the equatorial region in 1990, could mobilize a volume of fluid carrying roughly 15% of Saturn's moment of inertia. Conservation of angular momentum then implies that a 20% change in the equatorial jet angular velocity could change the average interior rotation rate by about 0.1%—roughly an order of magnitude less than the apparent rotation rate changes associated with Saturn's kilometric radio (SKR) signal. However, if the SKR signal originates outside the liquid metal core in a 'planetary tachocline' that separates the layer of fast zonal flow from the magnetically controlled and slowly convecting deep interior, then convective bursts can provide a possible mechanism for the observed ∼1% SKR changes.

  18. Observations of chorus at Saturn using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science Instrument

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Santolík, Ondřej; Dougherty, M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 12 (2008), A12206/1-A12206/13 ISSN 0148-0227 Grant - others:National Aeronautics and Space Administration(US) 1279973 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Saturn * chorus Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.147, year: 2008

  19. VG2 LECP 6.4 MINUTE SATURN FAR ENCOUNTER STEP DATA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Voyager 2 Energetic Particle (LECP) data from the Saturn far encounter period between 1981-08-23T06:34:23 and 1981-08-29T06:30:54. The data set provides 6.4 minute...

  20. VG2 LECP 3.2 MINUTE SATURN FAR ENCOUNTER STEP DATA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Voyager 2 Energetic Particle (LECP) data from the Saturn far encounter period between 1981-08-29T06:30:47 and 1981-09-01T06:30:54. The data set provides 3.2 minute...

  1. Saturne II: characteristics of the proton beam, field qualities and corrections, acceleration of the polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laclare, J.-L.

    1978-01-01

    Indicated specifications of Saturne II are summed up: performance of the injection system, quality of the guidance field (magnetic measurements and multipolar corrections), transverse and longitudinal instabilities, characteristics of the beam stored in the machine and of the extracted beam. The problem of depolarization along the acceleration cycle is briefly discussed (1 or 2% between injection and 3 GeV) [fr

  2. Formation of fine dust on Saturn's rings as suggested by the presence of spokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1983-01-01

    The common interpretation of spokes on the B ring of Saturn is that they are the result of light scattered by electrostatically levitated micrometer- and submicrometer-size dust particles. The origin of this dust in terms of radiation-induced thermal fatigue and collisions between the particles of the ring as well as meteoritic bombardment is investigated.

  3. Analysis of Saturn's Thermal Emission at 2.2-cm Wavelength: Spatial Distribution of Ammonia Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraia, A. L.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Janssen, Michael A.; Gulkis, Samuel; Oyafuso, Fabiano A.; Allison, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on determining the latitudinal structure of ammonia vapor in Saturn's cloud layer near 1.5 bars using the brightness temperature maps derived from the Cassini RADAR (Elachi et al., 2004) instrument, which works in a passive mode to measure thermal emission from Saturn at 2.2-cm wavelength. We perform an analysis of five brightness temperature maps that span epochs from 2005 to 2011, which are presented in a companion paper by Janssen et al. (2013a, this issue). The brightness temperature maps are representative of the spatial distribution of ammonia vapor, since ammonia gas is the only effective opacity source in Saturn's atmosphere at 2.2-cm wavelength. Relatively high brightness temperatures indicate relatively low ammonia relative humidity (RH), and vice versa. We compare the observed brightness temperatures to brightness temperatures computed using the Juno atmospheric microwave radiative transfer (JAMRT) program which includes both the means to calculate a tropospheric atmosphere model for Saturn and the means to carry out radiative transfer calculations at microwave frequencies. The reference atmosphere to which we compare has a 3x solar deep mixing ratio of ammonia (we use 1.352x10(exp -4) for the solar mixing ratio of ammonia vapor relative to H2; see Atreya, 2010) and is fully saturated above its cloud base. The maps are comprised of residual brightness temperatures-observed brightness temperature minus the model brightness temperature of the saturated atmosphere.

  4. The End of Cassini: Final VLBA Astrometry Epochs to Improve the Saturn Ephemeris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton; Folkner, William M.; Romney, Jonathan D.; Dhawan, Vivek

    2018-01-01

    During the past dozen years we have used the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to measure the position of the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. These data, combined with fits of Cassini’s orbit with respect to Saturn from Deep Space Network tracking, have provided a time series of positions for the Saturn system barycenter in the inertial International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). We we report results from the final observing epochs of this program obtained prior to Cassini’s intentional destruction in the atmosphere of Saturn in September 2017. We now know Saturn’s orbit to approximately 0.2 mas (1 nrad), nearly two orders of magnitude better than it was know before the Cassini mission. Our VLBA positions provide the best constraints on the orientation of Saturn’s orbit (inclination and longitude of ascending node), while ranging data provide the best constraints on the orbit semi-major axis and eccentricity. This work has been partially supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Astronomy program to the Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO. Part of this work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. The Long Baseline Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  5. Electrostatic solitary waves observed at Saturn by Cassini inside 10 Rs and near Enceladus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pickett, J. S.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Huff, R. L.; Faden, J. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Píša, David; Jones, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 8 (2015), s. 6569-6580 ISSN 2169-9380 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : electrostatic solitary waves * Saturn * Enceladus * plasma instabilities Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015JA021305/full

  6. Gaseous toroid around Saturn. [Saturnian ring system for atomic hydrogen trapping in Titan atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The trapping of Titan's escaping atmosphere in the Saturnian system by a toroidal ring is discussed. The radius of the toroid is comparable to Titan's orbit, or about ten times larger than the visible rings. Theoretical atmospheric models are formulated that consider Saturn's gravitational attraction and magnetospheric properties in forming this toroid and in protecting toroid particles from direct ionization by solar wind particles.

  7. Preliminar modelling of the chemical impact of possible TLEs on the lower ionosphere of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F. J.; Luque, A.; Dubrovin, D.; Yair, Y.; Price, C.

    2013-09-01

    Lightning on Saturn has been confirmed by radio [1] and optical signal observations [2]. On Earth, lightning activity is accompanied by a diversity of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) above the thunder clouds in the stratosphere, where crawlers and blue jets take place, and in the mesosphere where elves, sprites, halos and giant blue jets occur. Optical emissions from TLEs are produced by electric breakdown in the mesosphere (50 - 90 km) due to the field generated by the electric charges accumulated in the trophospheric thunder clouds. The existence of powerful lightning on Saturn might produce, as on Earth, elves and other TLE phenomena in the lower ionosphere of Saturn [3]. We have developed a preliminar time-dependent kinetic model to account for the possible chemical disturbances of halo-like TLEs in the night-time mid-latitude H2/He atmosphere of Saturn. In particular, we have quantified the variation of electron and ion densities at different altitudes (650 - 1000 km) above the 1 bar level together with an estimation of the photon emissions associated to the radiative decays of some excited electronic levels of H2 like H2(d3Πu) responsible for the Fulcher bands in the blue optical range and H2(a3Σ+g) that radiatively decays producing ultraviolet blue continuum emission.

  8. Solar System Exploration Augmented by In-Situ Resource Utilization: Mercury and Saturn Propulsion Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Human and robotic missions to Mercury and Saturn are presented and analyzed with a range of propulsion options. Historical studies of space exploration, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and industrialization all point to the vastness of natural resources in the solar system. Advanced propulsion benefitted from these resources in many ways. While advanced propulsion systems were proposed in these historical studies, further investigation of nuclear options using high power nuclear thermal and nuclear pulse propulsion as well as advanced chemical propulsion can significantly enhance these scenarios. Updated analyses based on these historical visions will be presented. Nuclear thermal propulsion and ISRU enhanced chemical propulsion landers are assessed for Mercury missions. At Saturn, nuclear pulse propulsion with alternate propellant feed systems and Titan exploration with chemical propulsion options are discussed. In-situ resource utilization was found to be critical in making Mercury missions more amenable for human visits. At Saturn, refueling using local atmospheric mining was found to be difficult to impractical, while refueling the Saturn missions from Uranus was more practical and less complex.

  9. The deuterium abundance in Jupiter and Saturn from ISO-SWS observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lellouch, E; Bezard, B; Fouchet, T; Feuchtgruber, H; Encrenaz, T; de Graauw, T

    Observations with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) are used to determine the D/H ratio in Jupiter's and Saturn's atmospheres. The D/H ratio is measured independently in hydrogen (i.e. from the HD/H-2 ratio) and methane (from CH3D/CH4). Observations

  10. STRONG TIDAL DISSIPATION IN SATURN AND CONSTRAINTS ON ENCELADUS' THERMAL STATE FROM ASTROMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lainey, Valéry; Desmars, Josselin; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Emelyanov, Nicolai; Remus, Françoise; Karatekin, Özgür; Charnoz, Sébastien; Mathis, Stéphane; Le Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe; Tobie, Gabriel; Zahn, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Tidal interactions between Saturn and its satellites play a crucial role in both the orbital migration of the satellites and the heating of their interiors. Therefore, constraining the tidal dissipation of Saturn (here the ratio k 2 /Q) opens the door to the past evolution of the whole system. If Saturn's tidal ratio can be determined at different frequencies, it may also be possible to constrain the giant planet's interior structure, which is still uncertain. Here, we try to determine Saturn's tidal ratio through its current effect on the orbits of the main moons, using astrometric data spanning more than a century. We find an intense tidal dissipation (k 2 /Q = (2.3 ± 0.7) × 10 –4 ), which is about 10 times higher than the usual value estimated from theoretical arguments. As a consequence, eccentricity equilibrium for Enceladus can now account for the huge heat emitted from Enceladus' south pole. Moreover, the measured k 2 /Q is found to be poorly sensitive to the tidal frequency, on the short frequency interval considered. This suggests that Saturn's dissipation may not be controlled by turbulent friction in the fluid envelope as commonly believed. If correct, the large tidal expansion of the moon orbits due to this strong Saturnian dissipation would be inconsistent with the moon formations 4.5 Byr ago above the synchronous orbit in the Saturnian subnebulae. But it would be compatible with a new model of satellite formation in which the Saturnian satellites formed possibly over a longer timescale at the outer edge of the main rings. In an attempt to take into account possible significant torques exerted by the rings on Mimas, we fitted a constant rate da/dt on Mimas' semi-major axis as well. We obtained an unexpected large acceleration related to a negative value of da/dt = –(15.7 ± 4.4) × 10 –15 AU day –1 . Such acceleration is about an order of magnitude larger than the tidal deceleration rates observed for the other moons. If not coming from an

  11. "Storm Alley" on Saturn and "Roaring Forties" on Earth: two bright phenomena of the same origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    "Storm Alley" on Saturn and "Roaring Forties' on Earth: two bright phenomena of the same origin. G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, kochem.36@mail.ru Persisting swirling storms around 35 parallel of the southern latitude in the Saturnian atmosphere and famous "Roaring Forties" of the terrestrial hydro- and atmosphere are two bright phenomena that should be explained by the same physical law. The saturnian "Storm Alley" (as it is called by the Cassini scientists) is a stable feature observed also by "Voyager". The Earth's "Roaring Forties" are well known to navigators from very remote times. The wave planetology [1-3 & others] explains this similarity by a fact that both atmospheres belong to rotating globular planets. This means that the tropic and extra-tropic belts of these bodies have differing angular momenta. Belonging to one body these belts, naturally, tend to equilibrate their angular momenta mainly by redistribution of masses and densities [4]. But a perfect equilibration is impossible as long as a rotating body (Saturn or Earth or any other) keeps its globular shape due to mighty gravity. So, a contradiction of tropics and extra-tropics will be forever and the zone mainly between 30 to 50 degrees in both hemispheres always will be a zone of friction, turbulence and strong winds. Some echoes of these events will be felt farther poleward up to 70 degrees. On Earth the Roaring Forties (40˚-50˚) have a continuation in Furious Fifties (50˚-60˚) and Shrieking (Screaming) Sixties (below 60˚, close to Antarctica). Below are some examples of excited atmosphere of Saturn imaged by Cassini. PIA09734 - storms within 46˚ south; PIA09778 - monitoring the Maelstrom, 44˚ north; PIA09787 - northern storms, 59˚ north; PIA09796 - cloud details, 44˚ north; PIA10413 - storms of the high north, 70˚ north; PIA10411 - swirling storms, "Storm Alley", 35˚ south; PIA10457 - keep it rolling, "Storm Alley", 35˚ south; PIA10439 - dance

  12. Explorer of Enceladus and Titan (E2T): Investigating the habitability and evolution of ocean worlds in the Saturn system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Giuseppe; Postberg, Frank; Soderblom, Jason M.; Tobie, Gabriel; Tortora, Paolo; Wurz, Peter; Barnes, Jason W.; Coustenis, Athena; Ferri, Francesca; Hayes, Alexander; Hayne, Paul O.; Hillier, Jon; Kempf, Sascha; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Lorenz, Ralph; Orosei, Roberto; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Yen, Chen-wan; Reh, Kim R.; Schmidt, Jürgen; Sims, Jon; Sotin, Christophe; Srama, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The NASA-ESA-ASI Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed Titan and Enceladus to be two of the most enigmatic worlds in the Solar System. Titan, with its organically rich and dynamic atmosphere and geology, and Enceladus, with its active plume of water vapor and ice laced with organics, salts, and silica nano-particles, both harbouring subsurface oceans, are prime environments in which to investigate the conditions for the emergence of life and the habitability potential of ocean worlds as well as the origin and evolution of unique complex planetary systems. Explorer of Enceladus and Titan (E2T) is a space mission concept dedicated to investigating the evolution and habitability of these Saturnian satellites and is proposed as a medium-class mission led by ESA in collaboration with NASA in response to ESA's M5 Cosmic Vision Call. E2T has a focused state-of-the-art adapted payload that will provide in-situ sampling, high-resolution imaging and radio science measurements from multiple flybys of Enceladus and Titan using a solar-electric powered spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. With significant improvements in mass range and resolution, as compared with Cassini, the Ion and Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and the Enceladus Icy Jet Analyzer (ENIJA) time of flight mass spectrometers will provide the data needed to decipher the subtle details of the aqueous environment of Enceladus from plume sampling and of the complex pre-biotic chemistry occurring in Titan's atmosphere. The Titan Imaging and Geology, Enceladus Reconnaissance (TIGER) mid-wave infrared camera will map thermal emission from Enceladus' tiger stripes at meter scales and investigate Titan's geology and compositional variability at decameter scales. The Radio Science Experiment (RSE) measurements will provide constraints on the ice shell structure and the properties of the internal oceans of Enceladus and Titan. We will present the concept and discuss the major improvements to our understanding of these

  13. A possible influence of the Great White Spot on Saturn kilometric radiation periodicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fischer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The periodicity of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR varies with time, and its two periods during the first 5 years of the Cassini mission have been attributed to SKR from the northern and southern hemisphere. After Saturn equinox in August 2009, there were long intervals of time (March 2010 to February 2011 and September 2011 to June 2012 with similar northern and southern SKR periods and locked SKR phases. However, from March to August 2011 the SKR periods were split up again, and the phases were unlocked. In this time interval, the southern SKR period slowed down by ~ 0.5% on average, and there was a large jump back to a faster period in August 2011. The northern SKR period speeded up and coalesced again with the southern period in September 2011. We argue that this unusual behavior could be related to the so-called Great White Spot (GWS, a giant thunderstorm that raged in Saturn's atmosphere around that time. For several months in 2011, the visible head of the GWS had the same period of ~ 10.69 h as the main southern SKR modulation signal. The GWS was most likely a source of intense gravity waves that may have caused a global change in Saturn's thermospheric winds via energy and momentum deposition. This would support the theory that Saturn's magnetospheric periodicities are driven by the upper atmosphere. Since the GWS with simultaneous SKR periodicity measurements have only been made once, it is difficult to prove a physical connection between these two phenomena, but we provide plausible mechanisms by which the GWS might modify the SKR periods.

  14. Synergism of Saturn, Enceladus and Titan and Formation of HCNO Exobiological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward C., Jr.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Saturn as a system has two very exotic moons Titan and Enceladus. Titan with energy input from Saturn's magnetosphere, solar UV irradiation, and cosmic rays can make HCN based molecules as discussed in earlier paper by [1]. Space radiation effects at both moons, and as coupled by the Saturn magnetosphere could cause an unexpected series of events leading to the evolution of biological models at Titan composed of HCNO with oxygen as the new ingredient. The "Old Faithful" model by [2] suggests that Enceladus, highly irradiated by Saturn magnetospheric electrons, has episodic ejections of water vapor driven by radiolytic oxidation gas products into Saturn's magnetosphere. At Titan Cassini discovered 1) that keV oxygen ions, evidently from Enceladus, are bombarding Titan's upper atmosphere [3] and 2) the discovery of heavy positive and negative ions within Titan's upper atmosphere [4]. Initial models of heavy ion formation in Titan's upper atmosphere invoked polymerization of aromatics such as Benzenes and their radicals to make PAHs [5], while a more recent model by [6] has raised the possibility of carbon chains forming from the polymerization of acetylene and its radicals to eventually make fullerenes. Laboratory measurements indicate that fullerenes, which are hollow carbon shells, can trap the keV oxygen and with the clustering of fullerenes and possible mixture with PAHs, some with nitrogen molecules, can make the larger aerosols with oxygen within them. Then with further ionizing irradiation from cosmic rays deep in the atmosphere "tholin" molecules are produced with all the molecular components present from which organic molecules can form. Among the molecular components are amino acids, the fundamental building blocks of life as we know it. This process maybe a common chemical pathway, both at the system level and at the molecular level, to form prebiotic and perhaps even biotic molecules. Such processes can be occurring throughout our universe, such as

  15. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  16. Effect of hot injections on electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves in inner magnetosphere of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Jyoti; Kaur, Rajbir; Pandey, R. S.

    2018-02-01

    Encounter of Voyager with Saturn's environment revealed the presence of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves (EMIC) in Saturnian magnetosphere. Cassini provided the evidence of dynamic particle injections in inner magnetosphere of Saturn. Also inner magnetosphere of Saturn has highest rotational flow shear as compared to any other planet in our solar system. Hence during these injections, electrons and ions are transported to regions of stronger magnetic field, thus gaining energy. The dynamics of the inner magnetosphere of Saturn are governed by wave-particle interaction. In present paper we have investigated those EMIC waves pertaining in background plasma which propagates obliquely with respect to the magnetic field of Saturn. Applying kinetic approach, the expression for dispersion relation and growth rate has been derived. Magnetic field model has been used to incorporate magnetic field strength at different latitudes for radial distance of 6.18 R_{{s}} (1 R_{{s}}= 60{,}268 km). Various parameters affecting the growth of EMIC waves in cold bi-Maxwellian background and after the hot injections has been studied. Parametric analysis inferred that after hot injections, growth rate of EMIC waves increases till 10° and decreases eventually with increase in latitude due to ion density distribution in near-equatorial region. Also, growth rate of EMIC waves increases with increasing value of temperature anisotropy and AC frequency, but the growth rate decreases as the angle of propagation with respect to B0 (Magnetic field at equator) increases. The injection events which assume the Loss-cone distribution of particles, affect the lower wave numbers of the spectra.

  17. Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  18. The dynamics of the outer edge of Saturn's A ring disturbed by Janus-Epimetheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Stéfan; Santos Araujo, Nilton Carlos; Cooper, Nicholas; El Moutamid, Maryame; Murray, Carl; Sicardy, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    We developed an analytical model to study the dynamics of the outer edge of Saturn's A ring. The latter is influenced by 7:6 mean motion resonances with Janus and Epimetheus. Because of the horseshoe motion of the two co-orbital moons, the location of the resonances shift inwards or outwards every four years, making the ring edge particles alternately trapped in a corotation eccentricity resonance (CER) or a Lindblad eccentricity resonance (LER). However, the oscillation periods of the resonances are longer than the four-year interval between the switches in the orbits of Janus and Epimetheus.Averaged equations of motion are used, and our model is numerically integrated to describe the effects of the periodic sweeping of the 7:6 CER and LER over the ring edge region.We show that four radial zones (ranges 136715-136723, 136738-136749, 136756-136768, 136783-136791 km) are chaotic on decadal timescales, within which particle semimajor axes have periodic changes due to partial libration motions around the CER fixed points. After a few decades, the maximum variation of semimajor axis is about eleven (resp. three) kilometers in the case of the CER with Janus (resp. Epimetheus).Similarly, particle eccentricities have partial oscillations forced by the LERs every four years, and are in good agreement with the observed eccentricities (Spitale and Porco 2009, El Moutamid et al. 2015). For initially circular orbits, the maximum eccentricity reached (~0.001) corresponds to the value obtained from the classical theory of resonance (proportional to the cube root of the satellite-to-planet mass ratio).We notice that the fitted semimajor axes for the object recently discovered at the ring edge (Murray et al. 2014) are just outside the chaotic zone of radial range 136756-136768 km.We compare our results to Cassini observations, and discuss how the periodic LER/CER perturbations by Janus/Epimetheus may help to aggregate ring edge particles into clumps, as seen in high

  19. Sizes of the Smallest Particles at Saturn Ring Edges from Diffraction in UVIS Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Becker, T. M.; Esposito, L. W.

    2017-12-01

    Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed more than 150 ring stellar occultations since its arrival at Saturn in 2004. We use stellar occultation data from the UVIS High Speed Photometer (HSP) to identify diffraction signals at ring edges caused by small particles diffracting light into the detector and consequently increasing the signal above that of the unocculted star. The shape of a diffraction signal is indicative of the particle size distribution at the ring edge, which may be a dynamically perturbed region. Becker et al. (2015 Icarus doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.11.001) analyzed diffraction signals at the outer edge of the A Ring and the edges of the Encke Gap. We apply the Becker et al. (2015) model to the outer edge of the B Ring as well as the edges of ringlets within the C Ring and Cassini Division. In addition, we analyze diffraction signatures at the A Ring outer edge in 2 new occultations. The best-fit model signals to these occultations are consistent with the findings of Becker et al. (2015) who found an average minimum particle size amin =4.5 mm and average power law slope q=3.2. At the B Ring outer edge, we detect a diffraction signal in 10 of 28 occultations in which the diffraction signal would be observable according to our criteria for star brightness and observation geometry. We find a mean amin =11 mm and a mean q=3.0. At both edges of the so-called "Strange" ringlet (R6) we find a mean amin = 20 mm and mean q values of 3.0 and 2.8 at the inner and outer edges, respectively. In contrast, we do not observe any clear diffraction signals at either edge of the wider Huygens ringlet. This could imply an absence of cm-scale or smaller particles and indicates that collisions here may be less vigorous than at the other ring edges analyzed in this study. We detect diffraction in a small fraction ( 10%) of occultations at 3 ringlets within the Cassini Division: the Herschel ringlet, the Laplace ringlet, and the Barnard ringlet. We

  20. Earth-based and Cassini-spacecraft Observations of Irregular Moons of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.; Roatsch, T.; Rosenberg, H.; Neukum, G.

    2010-10-01

    We observed irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn with the ISS camera of the Cassini spacecraft [1] and with the 1.23-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory in Spain [2]. Scientific goals are the determination of rotation periods, rotation-axis orientations, spin directions, size parameters, color properties, phase curves, and searches for binaries. Himalia (J6), the largest of the irregular jovian moons, has been imaged by Cassini on 18 Dec 2000; a body size of 120±5 km x 150±10 km and an albedo of 0.05±0.01 have been measured [3,4]. Earth-based observations revealed that Himalia's rotation period is probably 9.3 h, which is in agreement with the 9.2 to 9.8 h suggested by [5], although periods of 7.8 or 11.7 h cannot be ruled out yet. In the saturnian system, 10 irregular moons were scheduled for Cassini ISS observations over time spans >9 hrs until end-of-August, 2010. Observation distances vary between 5.6 and 22 million km, corresponding to ISS pixel scales of 34 to 130 km. For the objects measured so far, the rotation periods vary significantly. For instance, Siarnaq (S/2000 S3; size 40 km) and Ymir (S/2000 S1; 18 km) exhibit rotation periods of 6.7 h and 7.3 h, respectively, while Kiviuq (S/2000 S5; 16 km) might take about 22 h for one rotation. First results from the observation campaigns will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Porco, C.C., et al. (2004), Space Sci. Rev. 115, 363; [2] http://www.caha.es/CAHA/Telescopes/1.2m.html; [3] Denk, T. et al. (2001), Conference on Jupiter (Planet, Satellites & Magnetosphere), Boulder, CO, 25-30 June 2001, abstracts book p. 30-31; [4] Porco, C.C., et al. (2003), Science 299, 1541; [5] Degewij, J., et al. (1980), Icarus 44, 520. We gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Space Agency (DLR) Bonn through grant no. 50 OH 0305.

  1. Particle sizes in Saturn's rings from UVIS stellar occultations 1. Variations with ring region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Cooney, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) includes a high speed photometer (HSP) that has observed stellar occultations by Saturn's rings with a radial resolution of ∼10 m. In the absence of intervening ring material, the time series of measurements by the HSP is described by Poisson statistics in which the variance equals the mean. The finite sizes of the ring particles occulting the star lead to a variance that is larger than the mean due to correlations in the blocking of photons due to finite particle size and due to random variations in the number of individual particles in each measurement area. This effect was first exploited by Showalter and Nicholson (1990) with the stellar occultation observed by Voyager 2. At a given optical depth, a larger excess variance corresponds to larger particles or clumps that results in greater variation of the signal from measurement to measurement. Here we present analysis of the excess variance in occultations observed by Cassini UVIS. We observe differences in the best-fitting particle size in different ring regions. The C ring plateaus show a distinctly smaller effective particle size, R, than the background C ring, while the background C ring itself shows a positive correlation between R and optical depth. The innermost 700 km of the B ring has a distribution of excess variance with optical depth that is consistent with the C ring ramp and C ring but not with the remainder of the B1 region. The Cassini Division, while similar to the C ring in spectral and structural properties, has different trends in effective particle size with optical depth. There are discrete jumps in R on either side of the Cassini Division ramp, while the C ring ramp shows a smooth transition in R from the C ring to the B ring. The A ring is dominated by self-gravity wakes whose shadow size depends on the occultation geometry. The spectral ;halo; regions around the strongest density waves in the A ring correspond to

  2. PAHs in the Ices of Saturn's Satellites: Connections to the Solar Nebula and the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2015-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons and PAHs have been observed in the interstellar medium (e.g., Allamandola et al. 1985, Pendleton et al. 1994, Pendleton & Allamandola 2002, Tielens 2013, Kwok 2008, Chiar & Pendleton 2008) The inventory of organic material in the ISM was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed, contributing to the feedstock for the formation of the Sun, major planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Additional organic synthesis occurred in the solar nebula (Ciesla & Sandford 2012). Saturn's satellites Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn. Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saturn (Johnson & Lunine 2005). VIMS spectral maps of Phoebe's surface reveal a complex organic spectral signature consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and aliphatic hydrocarbon (=CH2, -CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 micrometers). Phoebe is the source of a huge debris ring encircling Saturn, and from which particles ((is) approximately 5-20 micrometers size) spiral inward toward Saturn (Verbiscer et al. 2009). They encounter Iapetus and Hyperion where they mix with and blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aromatic CH is approximately 10 times as abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, comet particles, and in carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2014). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis of Hyperion and Phoebe itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 (is) approximately 4, which is larger than the value found in the diffuse ISM ((is) approximately 2

  3. Synergism of Saturn, Enceladus and Titan and Formation of HCNO Prebiotic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward C.; Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Saturn as a system has two very exotic moons Titan and Enceladus. Titan, taking in energy from Saturn's magnetosphere, solar UV irradiation, and cosmic rays, can make HCN based molecules as discussed in earlier paper by Raulin and Owen. Space radiation effects at both moons, and as coupled by the Saturn magnetosphere, could cause an unexpected series of events potentially leading to prebiotic chemical evolution at Titan with HCNO from magnetospheric oxygen as the new ingredient. The "Old Faithful" model suggests that Enceladus, highly irradiated by Saturn magnetospheric electrons and thus having a source of chemical energy from radiolytic gas production, has episodic ejections of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and various hydrocarbons into Saturn's magnetosphere. The hydrocarbons do not survive transport through the plasma environment, but oxygen ions from Enceladus water molecules become the dominant ion species in the outer magnetosphere. At Titan, Cassini discovered that 1) keV oxygen ions, evidently from Enceladus, are bombarding Titan's upper atmosphere and 2) heavy positive and negative ions exist in significant abundances within Titan's upper atmosphere. Initial models of heavy ion formation in Titan's upper atmosphere invoked polymerization of aromatics such as benzenes and their radicals to make polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) , while a more recent model by Sittler et al., has raised the possibility of carbon chains forming from the polymerization of acetylene and its radicals to make fullerenes. Laboratory measurements indicate that fullerenes, which are hollow carbon shells, can trap keV oxygen ions. Clustering of the fullerenes with aerosol mixtures from PAHs and the dominant nitrogen molecules could form larger aerosols enriched in trapped oxygen. Aerosol precipitation could then convey these chemically complex structures deeper into the atmosphere and to the moon surface. Ionizing solar UV, magnetospheric electron, and galactic cosmic ray

  4. Auroral current systems in Saturn's magnetosphere: comparison of theoretical models with Cassini and HST observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The first simultaneous observations of fields and plasmas in Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere and UV images of the conjugate auroral oval were obtained by the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST in January 2007. These data have shown that the southern auroral oval near noon maps to the dayside cusp boundary between open and closed field lines, associated with a major layer of upward-directed field-aligned current (Bunce et al., 2008. The results thus support earlier theoretical discussion and quantitative modelling of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004, that suggests the oval is produced by electron acceleration in the field-aligned current layer required by rotational flow shear between strongly sub-corotating flow on open field lines and near-corotating flow on closed field lines. Here we quantitatively compare these modelling results (the "CBO" model with the Cassini-HST data set. The comparison shows good qualitative agreement between model and data, the principal difference being that the model currents are too small by factors of about five, as determined from the magnetic perturbations observed by Cassini. This is suggested to be principally indicative of a more highly conducting summer southern ionosphere than was assumed in the CBO model. A revised model is therefore proposed in which the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen conductivity is increased by a factor of four from 1 to 4 mho, together with more minor adjustments to the co-latitude of the boundary, the flow shear across it, the width of the current layer, and the properties of the source electrons. It is shown that the revised model agrees well with the combined Cassini-HST data, requiring downward acceleration of outer magnetosphere electrons through a ~10 kV potential in the current layer at the open-closed field line boundary to produce an auroral oval of ~1° width with UV emission intensities of a few tens of kR.

  5. Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellum, C.D.; Fisher, L.M.; Tegtmeyer, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the advantages of the use of excretory urography for diagnosis. According to the authors, excretory urography remains the basic radiologic examination of the urinary tract and is the foundation for the evaluation of suspected urologic disease. Despite development of the newer diagnostic modalities such as isotope scanning, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonsance imaging (MRI), excretory urography has maintained a prominent role in ruorradiology. Some indications have been altered and will continue to change with the newer imaging modalities, but the initial evaluation of suspected urinary tract structural abnormalities; hematuria, pyuria, and calculus disease is best performed with excretory urography. The examination is relatively inexpensive and simple to perform, with few contraindictions. Excretory urography, when properly performed, can provide valuable information about the renal parenchyma, pelvicalyceal system, ureters, and urinary bladder

  6. Cassini Returns to Saturn's Poles: Seasonal Change in the Polar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, G. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Sinclair, J. A.; Hesman, B. E.; Hurley, J.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    High inclination orbits during Cassini's solstice mission (2012) are providing us with our first observations of Saturn's high latitudes since the prime mission (2007). Since that time, the northern spring pole has emerged into sunlight and the southern autumn pole has disappeared into winter darkness, allowing us to study the seasonal changes occurring within the polar vortices in response to these dramatic insolation changes. Observations from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer] have revealed (i) the continued presence of small, cyclonic polar hotspots at both spring and autumn poles; and (ii) the emergence of an infrared-bright polar vortex at the north pole, consistent with the historical record of Saturn observations from the 1980s (previous northern spring).

  7. First observation of lion roar-like emissions in Saturn's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisa, David; Sulaiman, Ali H.; Santolik, Ondrej; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kurth, William S.; Gurnett, Donald A.

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic whistler mode waves known as "lion roars" have been reported by many missions inside the terrestrial magnetosheath. We show the observation of similar intense emissions in Saturn's magnetosheath as detected by the Cassini spacecraft. The emissions were observed inside the dawn sector (MLT˜0730) of the magnetosheath over a time period of nine hours before the satellite crossed the bow shock and entered the solar wind. The emissions were narrow-banded with a typical frequency of about 15 Hz well below the local electron cyclotron frequency (fce ˜100 Hz). Using the minimum variance analysis method, we show that the waves are right hand circularly polarized and propagate at small wave normal angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field. Here, for the first time, we report the evidence of lion roar-like emissions in Saturn's magnetosheath which represents a new and unique parameter regime.

  8. Gravitational Vortices And Clump Formation In Saturn's F ring During An Encounter With Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2013-02-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet.

  9. Astrometry of Cassini With the Vlba to Improve the Saturn Ephemeris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Folkner, William M.; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Dhawan, Vivek; Romney, Jon; Fomalont, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Planetary ephemerides have been developed and improved over centuries. They are a fundamental tool for understanding solar system dynamics, and essential for planetary and small body mass determinations, occultation predictions, high-precision tests of general relativity, pulsar timing, and interplanetary spacecraft navigation. This paper presents recent results from a continuing program of high-precision astrometric very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We have previously shown that VLBA measurements can be combined with spacecraft orbit determinations from Doppler and range tracking and VLBI links to the inertial extragalactic reference frame to provide the most accurate barycentric positions currently available for Saturn. Here we report an additional five years of VLBA observations along with improved phase reference source positions, resulting in an improvement in residuals with respect to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's dynamical ephemeris.

  10. Photochemistry Saturn's Atmosphere. 2; Effects of an Influx of External Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Bezard, Bruno; Gladstone, G. Randall; Allen, Mark

    2000-01-01

    We use a one-dimensional diurnally averaged model of photochemistry and diffusion in Saturn's stratosphere to investigate the influence of extraplanetary debris on atmospheric chemistry. In particular, we consider the effects of an influx of oxygen from micrometeoroid ablation or from ring-particle diffusion; the contribution from cometary impacts, satellite debris, or ring vapor is deemed to be less important. The photochemical model results are compared directly with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) observations to constrain the influx of extraplanetary oxygen to Saturn. From the ISO observations, we determine that the column densities of CO2 and H2O above 10 mbar in Saturn's atmosphere are (6.3 +/- 1) x 10(exp 14) and (1.4 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp 15)/ square cm, respectively; our models indicate that a globally averaged oxygen influx of (4+/-2) x 10(exp 6) O atoms /sq cm/s is required to explain these observations. Models with a locally enhanced influx of H20 operating over a small fraction of the projected area do not provide as good a fit to the ISO H2O observations. If volatile oxygen compounds comprise one-third to one-half of the exogenic source by mass, then Saturn is currently being bombarded with (3 +/- 2) x 10(exp -16) g/square cm/s of extraplanetary material. To reproduce the observed CO2/H2O ratio in Saturn's stratosphere, some of the exogenic oxygen must arrive in the form of a carbon-oxygen bonded species such as CO or CO2. An influx consistent with the composition of cometary ices fails to reproduce the high observed CO2/H2O ratio, suggesting that (i) the material has ices that are slightly more carbon-rich than is typical for comets, (ii) a contribution from an organic-rich component is required, or (iii) some of the hydrogen-oxygen bonded material is converted to carbon-oxygen bonded material without photochemistry (e.g., during the ablation process). We have also reanalyzed the 5-micron CO observations of Noll and Larson and determine that the CO

  11. Solar System Exploration Augmented by In-Situ Resource Utilization: Human Mercury and Saturn Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Human and robotic missions to Mercury and Saturn are presented and analyzed. Unique elements of the local planetary environments are discussed and included in the analyses and assessments. Using historical studies of space exploration, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and industrialization all point to the vastness of natural resources in the solar system. Advanced propulsion benefitted from these resources in many way. While advanced propulsion systems were proposed in these historical studies, further investigation of nuclear options using high power nuclear thermal and nuclear pulse propulsion as well as advanced chemical propulsion can significantly enhance these scenarios. Updated analyses based on these historical visions will be presented. Nuclear thermal propulsion and ISRU enhanced chemical propulsion landers are assessed for Mercury missions. At Saturn, nuclear pulse propulsion with alternate propellant feed systems and Titan exploration with chemical propulsion options are discussed.

  12. Dynamic auroral storms on Saturn as observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J D; Badman, S V; Baines, K H; Brown, R H; Bunce, E J; Clarke, J T; Cowley, S W H; Crary, F J; Dougherty, M K; Gérard, J-C; Grocott, A; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Melin, H; Mitchell, D G; Pryor, W R; Stallard, T S

    2014-05-28

    We present observations of significant dynamics within two UV auroral storms observed on Saturn using the Hubble Space Telescope in April/May 2013. Specifically, we discuss bursts of auroral emission observed at the poleward boundary of a solar wind-induced auroral storm, propagating at ∼330% rigid corotation from near ∼01 h LT toward ∼08 h LT. We suggest that these are indicative of ongoing, bursty reconnection of lobe flux in the magnetotail, providing strong evidence that Saturn's auroral storms are caused by large-scale flux closure. We also discuss the later evolution of a similar storm and show that the emission maps to the trailing region of an energetic neutral atom enhancement. We thus identify the auroral form with the upward field-aligned continuity currents flowing into the associated partial ring current.

  13. Gravitational Vortices And Clump Formation In Saturn's F ring During An Encounter With Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2013-01-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet. PMID:23429480

  14. Sex-related differences of coronary atherosclerosis regression following maximally intensive statin therapy: insights from SATURN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rishi; Nissen, Steven E; Shao, Mingyuan; Ballantyne, Christie M; Barter, Phillip J; Chapman, M John; Erbel, Raimund; Libby, Peter; Raichlen, Joel S; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    The study sought to explore sex-related differences in coronary atheroma regression following high-intensity statin therapy. Guidelines now recommend high-intensity statins in all individuals with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. SATURN (Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin) employed serial intravascular ultrasound measures of coronary atheroma volume in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. The treatment groups did not differ significantly in change from baseline of percent atheroma volume (PAV) or total atheroma volume (TAV) on intravascular ultrasound, nor in safety or clinical outcomes. Compared with men (n = 765), women (n = 274) were older (p SATURN]; NCT000620542). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative magnetotail flapping: an overview of selected events at Earth, Jupiter and Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Volwerk

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of magnetotail flapping (the up-and-down wavy motion between the Earth and the two giant planets Jupiter and Saturn has been performed through investigation of the current sheet normal of the magnetotail. Magnetotail flapping is commonly observed in the Earth's magnetotail. Due to single spacecraft missions at the giant planets, the normal is determined through minimum variance analysis of magnetometer data during multiple intervals when the spacecraft crossed through the current sheet. It is shown that indeed a case can be made that magnetotail flapping also occurs at Jupiter and Saturn. Calculations of the wave period using generic magnetotail models show that the observed periods are much shorter than their theoretical estimates, and that this discrepancy can be caused by unknown input parameters for the tail models (e.g., current sheet thickness and by possible Doppler shifting of the waves in the spacecraft frame through the fast rotation of the giant planets.

  16. Perturbations to Saturn's F-ring strands at their closest approach to Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliatti, Winter S.M.; Murray, C.D.; Gordon, M.

    2000-01-01

    The strange morphology of the F ring of Saturn is thought to be caused by the perturbing effects of two close satellites, Prometheus and Pandora. The F ring and the satellites also experience periodic close encounters as a result of differential precession arising from Saturn's oblateness. Using the orbits of the F-ring strands derived by Murray et al. (1997, Icarus 129, 304-316) the behaviour of the ring particles at their closest approach to Prometheus is analysed using numerical simulations. The results show that a gap and a wave are formed in the ring at each encounter with the satellite. However, the gap is expected to have a short lifetime due to keplerian shear. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Statistics of Langmuir wave amplitudes observed inside Saturn's foreshock by the Cassini spacecraft

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píša, David; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Santolík, Ondřej; Souček, Jan; Gurnett, D. A.; Masters, A.; Hill, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2015), s. 2531-2542 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Langmuir waves * foreshock * Saturn * Cassini Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020560/abstract

  18. Definition of Saturn's magnetospheric model parameters for the Pioneer 11 flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of a method for selection parameters for a global paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere. The model is based on the preexisting paraboloid terrestrial and Jovian models of the magnetospheric field. Interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere, i.e. the magnetotail current system, and the magnetopause currents screening all magnetospheric field sources, is taken into account. The input model parameters are determined from observations of the Pioneer 11 inbound flyby.

  19. Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) for Missions to Saturn and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, D.; Blosser, M.; Chinnapongse, R.; Fowler, M.; Gasch, M.; Hamm, K.; Kazemba, C.; Ma, J.; Milos, F.; Nishioka, O.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This poster provides an overview of the requirements, design, development and testing of the 3D Woven TPS being developed under NASAs Heatshield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) project. Under this current program, NASA is working to develop a Thermal Protection System (TPS) capable of surviving entry into Saturn. A primary goal of the project is to build and test an Engineering Test Unit (ETU) to establish a Technical Readiness Level (TRL) of 6 for this technology by 2017.

  20. Selection of K+ mesons in a secondary beam of Saturne (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rossum, L.

    1961-01-01

    The electronic device is described which permitted the determination of the number of K + mesons produced in a secondary beam of the 'Saturne' proton synchrotron. The selective criteria and the tests which allowed the identification of the K + mesons, are analysed in detail. For the ratio π + / K + = 400, and with a momentum of 600 MeV/c, less than 5 p. 100 of the detected particles corresponded to spurious events. (authors) [fr

  1. Precise Pointing for Radio Science Occultations and Radar Mapping During the Cassini Mission at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation challenges and lessons learned from radar and radio science pointing observations during the Cassini mission at Saturn. Implementation of the precise desired pointing reveals key issues in the ground system, the flight system, and the pointing paradigm itself. To achieve accurate pointing on some observations, specific workarounds had to be implemented and folded into the sequence development process. Underlying Cassini's pointing system is a remarkable construct known as Inertial Vector Propagation.

  2. Spatial distribution of Langmuir waves observed upstream of Saturn's bow shock by Cassini

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píša, David; Santolík, Ondřej; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Souček, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 8 (2016), s. 7771-7784 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-16050Y; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Langmuir waves * Cassini * foreshock * Saturn Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022912/abstract

  3. An Ionosphere/Magnetosphere Coupling Current System Located in the Gap Between Saturn and its Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, K. K.; Dougherty, M. K.; Cao, H.; Hunt, G. J.; Provan, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Grand Finale Orbits of the Cassini spacecraft traversed through Saturn's D ring and brought the spacecraft to within 3000 km of Saturn's cloud tops. The closest approaches (CA) were near the equatorial plane of Saturn and were distributed narrowly around the local noon. The difference field (observations - internal field - magnetospheric ring current field) obtained from the Grand Finale orbits show persistent residual fields centered around the CA which diminish at higher latitudes on field lines that connect to the ring. Modeling of this perturbation in terms of internal harmonics shows that the perturbation is not of internal origin but is produced by external currents that couple the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. The sense of the current system suggests that the southern feet of the field lines in the ionosphere lead their northern footprints. We show that the observed field perturbations are consistent with a meridional Pedersen current whose strength is 1 MA/radian, i.e. comparable in strength to the Planetary-period-oscillation related current systems observed in the auroral zone. We show that the implied Lorentz force in the ionosphere extracts momentum from the faster moving southern ionosphere and passes it on to the northern ionosphere. We discuss several ideas for generating this current system. In particular, we highlight a mechanism that involves shears in the neutral winds in the thermospheric region to generate the observed magnetic field.

  4. Lit and unlit side temperatures of the Main Rings of Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Garcia, A.; Deau, E.; Spilker, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    The differences in the temperatures of both the lit and unlit sides of the main rings of Saturn can reveal important information about their structure. In general, the temperature of the main rings strongly depends upon the distribution and the general structure of the ensembles of particles that compose them, mainly due to shadowing effects that modulate how much energy reaches the individual particles -granted that the direct solar energy is the main driver of the rings' temperature-. In order to reproduce the temperatures of both sides of the rings, we use a semi-analytical energy balance model (considering solar direct and Saturn reflected energy, Saturn thermal energy and particles' thermal energies), where the shadowed fractional areas of the rings are removed through a shadowing function. We obtain this function (dependent on the solar elevation angle) for 13 different regions (for the A, CD, B and C rings) along the radial direction that are simulated using arrays of lambertian spherical particles based on the average properties of the structure of these regions derived from the Cassini UVIS observations. The obtained synthetic temperatures are compared to the Cassini CIRS measured temperatures (from -22º to equinox) with good agreement.

  5. SATURN-FS 1: A computer code for thermo-mechanical fuel rod analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzhaupt-Kleissl, H.J.; Heck, M.

    1993-09-01

    The SATURN-FS code was written as a general revision of the SATURN-2 code. SATURN-FS is capable to perform a complete thermomechanical analysis of a fuel pin, with all thermal, mechanical and irradiation-based effects. Analysis is possible for LWR and for LMFBR fuel pins. The thermal analysis consists of calculations of the temperature profile in fuel, gap and in the cladding. Pore migration, stoichiometry change of oxide fuel, gas release and diffusion effects are taken into account. The mechanical modeling allows the non steady-state analysis of elastic and nonelastic fuel pin behaviour, such as creep, strain hardening, recovery and stress relaxation. Fuel cracking and healing is taken into account as well as contact and friction between fuel and cladding. The modeling of the irradiation effects comprises swelling and fission gas production, Pu-migration and irradiation induced creep. The code structure, the models and the requirements for running the code are described in the report. Recommendations for the application are given. Program runs for verification and typical examples of application are given in the last part of this report. (orig.) [de

  6. Comparing Jupiter and Saturn: dimensionless input rates from plasma sources within the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Vasyliūnas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative significance for a planetary magnetosphere of plasma sources associated with a moon of the planet can be assessed only by expressing the plasma mass input rate in dimensionless form, as the ratio of the actual mass input to some reference value. Traditionally, the solar wind mass flux through an area equal to the cross-section of the magnetosphere has been used. Here I identify another reference value of mass input, independent of the solar wind and constructed from planetary parameters alone, which can be shown to represent a mass input sufficiently large to prevent corotation already at the source location. The source rate from Enceladus at Saturn has been reported to be an order of magnitude smaller (in absolute numbers than that from Io at Jupiter. Both reference values, however, are also smaller at Saturn than at Jupiter, by factors ~40 to 60; expressed in dimensionless form, the estimated mass input from Enceladus may be larger than that from Io by factors ~4 to 6. The magnetosphere of Saturn may thus, despite a lower mass input in kg s−1, intrinsically be more heavily mass-loaded than the magnetosphere of Jupiter.

  7. Comparing Jupiter and Saturn: dimensionless input rates from plasma sources within the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Vasyliūnas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative significance for a planetary magnetosphere of plasma sources associated with a moon of the planet can be assessed only by expressing the plasma mass input rate in dimensionless form, as the ratio of the actual mass input to some reference value. Traditionally, the solar wind mass flux through an area equal to the cross-section of the magnetosphere has been used. Here I identify another reference value of mass input, independent of the solar wind and constructed from planetary parameters alone, which can be shown to represent a mass input sufficiently large to prevent corotation already at the source location. The source rate from Enceladus at Saturn has been reported to be an order of magnitude smaller (in absolute numbers than that from Io at Jupiter. Both reference values, however, are also smaller at Saturn than at Jupiter, by factors ~40 to 60; expressed in dimensionless form, the estimated mass input from Enceladus may be larger than that from Io by factors ~4 to 6. The magnetosphere of Saturn may thus, despite a lower mass input in kg s−1, intrinsically be more heavily mass-loaded than the magnetosphere of Jupiter.

  8. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Beam Measurements and the Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Uranus and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselfield, Matthew; Moodley, Kavilan; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gallardo, Patricio; Gralla, Megan B.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilopixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final cosmic microwave background (CMB) survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Uranus and Saturn disks at effective frequencies of 149 and 219 GHz. For Uranus we obtain thermodynamic brightness temperatures T(149/U) = 106.7 +/- 2.2 K and T(219/U) = 100.1 +/- 3.1 K. For Saturn, we model the effects of the ring opacity and emission using a simple model and obtain resulting (unobscured) disk temperatures of T(149/S) = 137.3 +/- 3.2 K and T(219/S) = 137.3 +/- 4.7 K.

  9. Velocity shear Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with inhomogeneous DC electric field in the magnetosphere of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandpal, Praveen; Kaur, Rajbir; Pandey, R. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper parallel flow velocity shear Kelvin-Helmholtz instability has been studied in two different extended regions of the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. The method of the characteristic solution and kinetic approach has been used in the mathematical calculation of dispersion relation and growth rate of K-H waves. Effect of magnetic field (B), inhomogeneity (P/a), velocity shear scale length (Ai), temperature anisotropy (T⊥ /T||), electric field (E), ratio of electron to ion temperature (Te /Ti), density gradient (εnρi) and angle of propagation (θ) on the dimensionless growth rate of K-H waves in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn has been observed with respect to k⊥ρi . Calculations of this theoretical analysis have been done taking the data from the Cassini in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn in the two extended regions of Rs ∼4.60-4.01 and Rs ∼4.82-5.0. In our study velocity shear, temperature anisotropy and magnitude of the electric field are observed to be the major sources of free energy for the K-H instability in both the regions considered. The inhomogeneity of electric field, electron-ion temperature ratio, and density gradient have been observed playing stabilizing effect on K-H instability. This study also indicates the effect of the vicinity of icy moon Enceladus on the growth of K-H instability.

  10. New Magnetic Field Model for Saturn From Cassini Radio and Magnetometers Observations: The Birotor Dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galopeau, P. H. M.

    2017-12-01

    Since the insertion of Cassini in the Saturnian system in July 2004, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) experiment on board the spacecraft revealed the presence of two distinct and variable rotation periods in the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR) which were attributed to the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. The present study is based on the hypothesis that the periodic time modulations present in the SKR are mainly due to the rotation of Saturn's inner magnetic field. The existence of a double period implies that the inner field is not only limited to a simple rotation dipole but displays more complex structures having the same time periodicities than the radio emission. In order to build a model of this complex magnetic field, it is absolutely necessary to know the accurate phases of rotation linked with the two periods. The radio observations from the RPWS experiment allow a continuous and accurate follow-up of these rotation phases, since the SKR emission is permanently observable and produced very close to the planetary surface. A continuous wavelet transform analysis of the intensity of the SKR signal received at 290 kHz between July 2004 and June 2012 was performed in order to calculate in the same time the different periodicities and phases. The rotation phases associated to the main two periods allow us to define a North and South longitude system essential for such a study. In this context, a dipole model ("birotor dipole") was proposed for Saturn's inner magnetic field: this dipole presents the particularity to have North and South poles rotating around Saturn's axis at two different angular velocities; this dipole is tilted and not centered. 57 Cassini's revolutions, the periapsis of which is less than 5 Saturnian radii, have been selected for this study. For each of these chosen orbits, it is possible to fit with high precision the measurements of the MAG data experiment given by the magnetometers embarked on board Cassini. A

  11. Hera - an ESA M-class Saturn Entry Probe Mission Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Mousis, O.; Spilker, T. R.; Venkatapathy, E.; Poncy, J.; Coustenis, A.; Reh, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar system, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation process was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Additionally, the atmospheres of the giant planets serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets in the solar system including Earth, offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems, and have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. Remote sensing observations are limited when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the value of in situ measurements is provided by measurements of Jupiter's noble gas abundances and helium mixing ratio by the Galileo probe. In situ measurements provide direct access to atmospheric regions that are beyond the reach of remote sensing, enabling the dynamical, chemical and aerosol-forming processes at work from the thermosphere to the troposphere below the cloud decks to be studied. Studies for a newly proposed Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission named Hera is being prepared for the upcoming European Space Agency Medium Class (M5) mission announcement of opportunity. A solar powered mission, Hera will take approximately 8 years to reach Saturn and will carry instruments to measure the composition, structure, and dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Saturn, the Hera Saturn probe will provide critical measurements of composition

  12. Explorer of Enceladus and Titan (E2T): Investigating Ocean Worlds' Evolution and Habitability in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, G.; Postberg, F.; Soderblom, J. M.; Tobie, G.; Tortora, P.; Wurz, P.; Barnes, J. W.; Carrasco, N.; Coustenis, A.; Ferri, F.; Hayes, A.; Hillier, J.; Kempf, S.; Lebreton, J. P.; Lorenz, R. D.; Orosei, R.; Petropoulos, A. E. E.; Reh, K. R.; Schmidt, J.; Sotin, C.; Srama, R.; Vuitton, V.; Yen, C. W.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA-ESA-ASI Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed Titan and Enceladus to be two of the most enigmatic worlds in the Solar System. Titan, with its organically rich and dynamic atmosphere and geology, and Enceladus, with its active plume of water vapor and ice including trace amounts of organics, salts, and silica nano-particles, both harboring subsurface oceans, are prime environments to investigate the conditions for the emergence of life and the habitability potential of ocean worlds, as well as the origin and evolution of complex planetary systems. The Explorer of Enceladus and Titan (E2T) is a space mission concept dedicated to investigating the evolution and habitability of these Saturnian satellites and is proposed in response to ESA's M5 Cosmic Vision Call, as a medium-class mission led by ESA in collaboration with NASA. E2T has a focused state-of-the-art payload that will provide in-situ chemical analysis, and high-resolution imaging from multiple flybys of Enceladus and Titan using a solar-electric powered spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. With significant improvements in mass range and resolution, as compared with Cassini instrumentation, the Ion and Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and the Enceladus Icy Jet Analyzer (ENIJA) time-of-flight mass spectrometers will provide the data needed to decipher the subtle details of the aqueous environment of Enceladus from plume sampling and of the complex pre-biotic chemistry occurring in Titan's atmosphere. The Titan Imaging and Geology, Enceladus Reconnaissance (TIGER) mid-wave infrared camera will map thermal emission from Enceladus' tiger stripes at meter scales and investigate Titan's geology and compositional variability at decameter scales.

  13. Ground-Based Observations of the Aftermath of the 2010-2011 Great Northern Springtime Storm in Saturn (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, G. S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Fouchet, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Momary, T.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, a suite of ground-based and spacecraft instruments were available to detect and characterize one of the rare giant convective storms erupting in Saturn's atmosphere. The storm that erupted on 2010 December 5 created an immense thermal and chemical perturbation of the atmosphere. Most of the perturbation of the visible cloud system had abated within a year of the initial eruption, but changes to the atmosphere were evident at thermal infrared wavelengths, and they continue to the present. Here we review the observations from ground-based stations that include NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and the Subaru Telescope, both at the summit of Mauna Kea, as well as observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope. Evident in the 5-μm spectral window was the clearing of nearly all clouds around and above the 3-bar level of the atmosphere at the latitude of the primary storm. In the intervening two years, imaging in the same window by the IRTF NSFCam2 instrument shows that the cleared region remains prominent and is filling in with a pre-storm cloud cover only very slowly. Most unexpected was the generation of a stratospheric vortex of high temperatures, 'the beacon' (Fletcher et al. 2011 Science 332, 1413). This phenomenon also continues more than two years later and has been tracked using several mid-infrared imaging instruments: VISIR at the VLT, COMICS at Subaru, and MIRSI at the IRTF using moderate-band filters. More precise determination of its vertical distribution was made using the University of Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) at the IRTF, targeting specific lines of CH4 and the H2 quadrupole. All of these measurements, taken in concert, show that the heated region of the stratosphere is diminishing in amplitude, expanding in longitude and slowly sinking in altitude.

  14. The Hera Entry Probe Mission to Saturn, an ESA M-class mission proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousis, O.; Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T.; Venkatapathy, E.; Poncy, J.; Coustenis, A.; Reh, K.

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar system, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation process was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Additionally, the atmospheres of the giant planets serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chemistries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets in the solar system including Earth, offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems,and have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. Remote sensing observations are limited when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the value of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as noble gases abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. Representing the only method providing ground-truth to connect the remote sensing inferences with physical reality, in situ measurements have only been accomplished twice in the history of outer solar system exploration, via the Galileo probe for Jupiter and the Huygens probe for Titan. In situ measurements provide access to atmospheric regions that are beyond the reach of remote sensing, enabling the dynamical, chemical and aerosol-forming processes at work from the thermosphere to the troposphere below the cloud decks to be studied. A proposal for a Saturn entry probe mission named Hera was recently submitted to the European Space Agency Medium Class mission announcement of

  15. Revolutionary Climatology: Rings of Saturn, Ringed by Red Lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Stanley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Walter Benjamin’s concept of historical materialism is considered as a practice of media archaeology invented through literary montage and photo philosophy. The Arcades Project that facilitated this new research methodology involving a mobile archive. The main case involving architectural theory considers how Benjamin redeployed Sigfried Giedion and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy’s Building in France as a media environment, drawing upon its layout design, photo illustrations and textual systems. In terms of his urban writing, a reading of ‘A Berlin Chronicle’ considers how the diagram contributes to Benjamin’s archaeological methods, as a theory to generate site writing. Benjamin’s mode of media archaeology is then employed to map the arcades architecture onto the train stations and libraries in Berlin and Paris, sites that informed The Arcades Project. The final section assembles a set of citations as ‘Revolutionary Climatology’, thought-images as flashes of red lightning.

  16. Solar System Exploration Augmented by In-Situ Resource Utilization: Human Planetary Base Issues for Mercury and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2017-01-01

    Human and robotic missions to Mercury and Saturn are presented and analyzed with a range of propulsion options. Historical studies of space exploration, planetary spacecraft, and astronomy, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and industrialization all point to the vastness of natural resources in the solar system. Advanced propulsion benefitted from these resources in many ways. While advanced propulsion systems were proposed in these historical studies, further investigation of nuclear options using high power nuclear thermal and nuclear pulse propulsion as well as advanced chemical propulsion can significantly enhance these scenarios. Updated analyses based on these historical visions are presented. Nuclear thermal propulsion and ISRU enhanced chemical propulsion landers are assessed for Mercury missions. At Saturn, nuclear pulse propulsion with alternate propellant feed systems and Saturn moon exploration with chemical propulsion and nuclear electric propulsion options are discussed. Issues with using in-situ resource utilization on Mercury missions are discussed. At Saturn, the best locations for exploration and the use of the moons Titan and Enceladus as central locations for Saturn moon exploration is assessed.

  17. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Saturn's Icy Moon Rhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elowitz, Mark; Hendrix, Amanda; Mason, Nigel J.; Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan

    2018-01-01

    We present an analysis of spatially resolved, far-UV reflectance spectra of Saturn’s icy satellite Rhea, collected by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS). In recent years ultraviolet spectroscopy has become an important tool for analysing the icy satellites of the outer solar system (1Hendrix & Hansen, 2008). Far-UV spectroscopy provides unique information about the molecular structure and electronic transitions of chemical species. Many molecules that are suspected to be present in the icy surfaces of moons in the outer solar system have broad absorption features due to electronic transitions that occur in the far-UV portion of the spectrum. The studies show that Rhea, like the other icy satellites of the Saturnian system are dominated by water-ice as evident by the 165-nm absorption edge, with minor UV absorbing contaminants. Far-UV spectra of several Saturnian icy satellites, including Rhea and Dione, show an unexplained weak absorption feature centered near 184 nm. To carry out the geochemical survey of Rhea’s surface, the UVIS observations are compared with vacuum-UV spectra of thin-ice samples measured in laboratory experiments. Thin film laboratory spectra of water-ice and other molecular compounds in the solid phase were collected at near-vacuum conditions and temperatures identical to those at the surface of Rhea. Comparison between the observed far-UV spectra of Rhea’s surface ice and modelled spectra based on laboratory absorption measurements of different non-water-ice compounds show that two possible chemical compounds could explain the 184-nm absorption feature. The two molecular compounds include simple chlorine molecules and hydrazine monohydrate. Attempts to explain the source(s) of these compounds on Rhea and the scientific implications of their possible discovery will be summarized.[1] Hendrix, A. R. & Hansen, C. J. (2008). Icarus, 193, pp. 323-333.

  18. Explorer of Enceladus and Titan (E2T): Investigating Ocean Worlds' Evolution and Habitability in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed Titan and Enceladus to be two of the most interesting worlds in the Solar System. Titan, with its organically rich and dynamic atmosphere and geology, and Enceladus, with its active plumes, both harboring subsurface oceans, are prime environments in which to investigate the conditions for the emergence of life and the habitability of ocean worlds. Explorer of Enceladus and Titan (E2T) is dedicated to investigating the evolution and habitability of these Saturnian satellites and is proposed in response to ESA's M5 Call as a medium-class mission led by ESA in collaboration with NASA. E2T has a focused payload that will provide in-situ composition investigations and high-resolution imaging during multiple flybys of Enceladus and Titan using a solar-electric powered spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. The E2T mission will provide high-resolution mass spectroscopy of the plumes currently emanating from Enceladus's south polar terrain (SPT) and of Titan's changing upper atmosphere. In addition, high-resolution IR imaging will detail Titan's geomorphology at 50-100 m resolution and the source fractures on Enceladus's SPT at meter resolution. These combined measurements of both Titan and Enceladus will permit to achieve the two major scientific goals of the E2T mission: 1) Study the origin and evolution of volatile-rich ocean worlds; and 2) Explore the habitability and potential for life in ocean worlds. More in detail, these goals will be achieved by measuring the nature, abundance and isotopic properties of solid- and vapor-phase species in Enceladus's plume and Titan's upper atmosphere, and determining the processes that are transporting and transforming organic materials on the surface of Titan and the mechanisms controlling, and the energy dissipated by, Enceladus's plumes. E2T's two high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometers will enable us to resolve the ambiguities left by Cassini regarding the identification

  19. The effect of the equatorially symmetric zonal winds of Saturn on its gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, John D.

    2018-04-01

    The penetration depth of Saturn’s cloud-level winds into its interior is unknown. A possible way of estimating the depth is through measurement of the effect of the winds on the planet’s gravitational field. We use a self-consistent perturbation approach to study how the equatorially symmetric zonal winds of Saturn contribute to its gravitational field. An important advantage of this approach is that the variation of its gravitational field solely caused by the winds can be isolated and identified because the leading-order problem accounts exactly for rotational distortion, thereby determining the irregular shape and internal structure of the hydrostatic Saturn. We assume that (i) the zonal winds are maintained by thermal convection in the form of non-axisymmetric columnar rolls and (ii) the internal structure of the winds, because of the Taylor-Proundman theorem, can be uniquely determined by the observed cloud-level winds. We calculate both the variation ΔJn , n = 2, 4, 6 … of the axisymmetric gravitational coefficients Jn caused by the zonal winds and the non-axisymmetric gravitational coefficients ΔJnm produced by the columnar rolls, where m is the azimuthal wavenumber of the rolls. We consider three different cases characterized by the penetration depth 0.36, R S, 0.2, R S and 0.1, R S, where R S is the equatorial radius of Saturn at the 1-bar pressure level. We find that the high-degree gravitational coefficient (J 12 + ΔJ 12) is dominated, in all the three cases, by the effect of the zonal flow with |ΔJ 12/J 12| > 100% and that the size of the non-axisymmetric coefficients ΔJ mn directly reflects the depth and scale of the flow taking place in the Saturnian interior.

  20. Five Fabulous Flybys of the Small Inner Moons of Saturn by the Cassini Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Momary, T.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; Filacchione, G.; Mosher, J. A.; Baines, K. H.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Saturn system possesses a number of small unique moons, including the coorbitals Janus and Epimetheus; the ring moons Pan and Daphnis; and Prometheus, Pandora, and Atlas, which orbit near the edge of the main ring system. During the last phases of the Cassini mission, when the spacecraft executed close passes to the F-ring of Saturn, five "best-ever" flybys of these moons occurred. Pan, Daphnis, Atlas, Pandora, and Epimetheus were approached at distances ranging from 6000-40,000 km. The Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) captured data from the spectral range spanning 0.35-5.1 microns, as well as capturing solar phase angles not observed before. When combined with spectra from different regions of the moons obtained throughout the mission, the VIMS observations reveal substantial changes in the depth of water-ice absorption bands and color over the moons' surfaces. These measurements show the accretion of main-ring material onto the moons, with leading sides exhibiting stronger water-ice signatures in general. Atlas and Pandora have red visible spectra similar to the A-ring and unlike other icy moons, which are blue, further revealing accretion of main ring material onto the small inner moons. In general the visible spectra of the moons gets bluer with distance from Saturn until the surface of the moons is dominated by contamination from the E-ring, which is composed of fresh ice. There is a weak correlation between color and albedo, with lower-albedo moons being redder, suggesting the existence of a dark reddish contaminant from the main ring system. The solar phase curves of the moons are similar to those of larger icy moons (unfortunately no opposition surge data was gathered). 2017 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  1. Long-Term and Seasonal Variation of Suprathermal O2+ and Mass-28+ Ions at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; DiFabio, R. D.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Two suprathermal singly-charged molecular ion species exhibit long-term temporal variations in Saturn's near-equatorial magnetosphere at ~4-20 Rs from 2004 to 2012. These ~83-167 keV/e minor heavy ions measured by the Cassini Charge-Energy-Mass Spectrometer, CHEMS, at ~32 and ~28 amu/e are identified as O2+ and 28M+ (Mass-28+, possibly C2H5+, HCNH+, N2+, CO+, and/or Si+), respectively. Their partial density temporal profiles differ from each other and differ relative to the dominant water group ions, W+ (O+, OH+, H2O+, and H3O+). O2+, initially the second most abundant heavy ion species relative to W+, has decreased to much lower values. The relative O2+ and 28M+ partial densities declined as ring plane illumination decreased approaching Saturn's equinox in mid-2009. O2+/W+, initially ~4-5%, steadily declined by a factor of ~6 until near equinox. 28M+/W+, initially ~6 times lower than O2+/W+, declined by a factor of ~2 in a manner similar to O2+/W+ until early-2007, over 2 years before equinox. After decline, both ratios remained at consistently low levels until mid-2011, about 2 years after equinox, when O2+/W+ began recovering and 28M+/W+ did not. The main ring atmosphere/ionosphere is the most likely primary source for the O2+. Titan, Enceladus, Rhea, and the E-ring are possible candidate sources for the 28M+. To our knowledge, no temporal/seasonal 28M+ source variation in Saturn's magnetosphere has been anticipated or predicted. Transition from higher/declining to lower/persistent levels may indicate multiple competing components for both ion groups, that is, one component, probably ring-insolation related, is initially dominant and decreases gradually to be subsequently masked by another lower-level component.

  2. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND THE MICROWAVE BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURES OF URANUS AND SATURN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Moodley, Kavilan [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Nolta, Michael R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Das, Sudeep [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Marsden, Danica; Schmitt, Benjamin L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dunkley, Joanna [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Dünner, Rolando; Gallardo, Patricio [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificía Universidad Católica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Fowler, Joseph W.; Niemack, Michael D. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Gralla, Megan B.; Marriage, Tobias A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Page, Lyman A. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Partridge, Bruce [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilopixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final cosmic microwave background (CMB) survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Uranus and Saturn disks at effective frequencies of 149 and 219 GHz. For Uranus we obtain thermodynamic brightness temperatures T{sub U}{sup 149}= 106.7 ± 2.2 K and T{sub U}{sup 219}= 100.1 ± 3.1 K. For Saturn, we model the effects of the ring opacity and emission using a simple model and obtain resulting (unobscured) disk temperatures of T{sub S}{sup 149}= 137.3 ± 3.2 K and T{sub S}{sup 219}= 137.3 ± 4.7 K.

  3. A planetary-scale disturbance in a long living three vortex coupled system in Saturn's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río-Gaztelurrutia, T.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Antuñano, A.; Legarreta, J.; García-Melendo, E.; Sayanagi, K. M.; Hueso, R.; Wong, M. H.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Rojas, J. F.; Simon, A. A.; de Pater, I.; Blalock, J.; Barry, T.

    2018-03-01

    The zonal wind profile of Saturn has a unique structure at 60°N with a double-peaked jet that reaches maximum zonal velocities close to 100 ms-1. In this region, a singular group of vortices consisting of a cyclone surrounded by two anticyclones was active since 2012 until the time of this report. Our observation demonstrates that vortices in Saturn can be long-lived. The three-vortex system drifts at u = 69.0 ± 1.6 ms-1, similar to the speed of the local wind. Local motions reveal that the relative vorticity of the vortices comprising the system is ∼2-3 times the ambient zonal vorticity. In May 2015, a disturbance developed at the location of the triple vortex system, and expanded eastwards covering in two months a third of the latitudinal circle, but leaving the vortices essentially unchanged. At the time of the onset of the disturbance, a fourth vortex was present at 55°N, south of the three vortices and the evolution of the disturbance proved to be linked to the motion of this vortex. Measurements of local motions of the disturbed region show that cloud features moved essentially at the local wind speeds, suggesting that the disturbance consisted of passively advecting clouds generated by the interaction of the triple vortex system with the fourth vortex to the south. Nonlinear simulations are able to reproduce the stability and longevity of the triple vortex system under low vertical wind shear and high static stability in the upper troposphere of Saturn.

  4. Definition of Saturn's magnetospheric model parameters for the Pioneer 11 flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of a method for selection parameters for a global paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere. The model is based on the preexisting paraboloid terrestrial and Jovian models of the magnetospheric field. Interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere, i.e. the magnetotail current system, and the magnetopause currents screening all magnetospheric field sources, is taken into account. The input model parameters are determined from observations of the Pioneer 11 inbound flyby.

  5. Saturn's rings through a microscope - Particle size constraints from the Voyager PPS scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    1990-01-01

    The Voyager-2 photopolarimeter PPS experiment obtained the highest resolution of any ring observation of Saturn, profiling the variation of optical depth in radial steps of about 100 meters. A detailed treatment of the PPS statistics is presented here, and it is shown how these statistics can be related to the particle size distribution. An expression for the excess noise in the scan due to large particles is obtained, and the observed noise is used to constrain the upper end of the size distribution through the rings. It is shown that the Cassini Division and the C Ring have the smallest proportion of large particles, while the A ring has the largest proportion.

  6. Structure of the Mimas 5:3 Bending Wave in Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Daniel D.; Colwell, Josh E.

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's moon Mimas is on an inclined orbit with several strong vertical orbital resonances in Saturn's rings. The 5:3 inner vertical resonance with Mimas lies in the outer A ring and produces a prominent spiral bending wave (BW) that propagates away from Mimas. While dozens of density waves in Saturn's rings have been analyzed to determine local surface mass densities and viscosities, the number of bending waves is limited by the requirement for a moon on an inclined orbit and because, unlike the Lindblad resonances that excite density waves, there can be no first order vertical resonances. The Mimas 5:3 BW is the most prominent in the ring system. Bending wave theory was initially developed by Shu et al. (1983, Icarus, 53, 185-206) following the Voyager encounters with Saturn. Later, Gresh et al. (1986, Icarus, 68, 481-502) modeled radio science occultation data of the Mimas 5:3 BW with an imperfect fit to the theory. The multitude of high resolution stellar occultations observed by Cassini UVIS provides an opportunity to reconstruct the full three-dimensional structure of this wave and learn more about local ring properties. Occultations at high elevation angles out of the ring plane are insensitive to the wave structure due to the small angles of the vertical warping of the rings in the wave. They thus reveal the underlying structure in the wave region. There is a symmetric increase in optical depth throughout the Mimas 5:3 BW region. This may be due to an increase in the abundance of small particles without a corresponding increase in surface mass density. We include this feature in a ray-tracing model of the vertical structure of the wave and fit it to multiple UVIS occultations. The observed amplitude of the wave and its damping behavior of are not well-described by the Shu et al. model, which assumes a fluid-like damping mechanism. A different damping behavior of the ring, perhaps radially varying across the wave region due to differences in the particle

  7. Saturn's stratospheric temperature and composition at the epoch of the 2017 summer solstice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Martin-Lagarde, Marine; Fletcher, Leigh; Fouchet, Thierry

    2017-10-01

    Over the course of its 29.5-years orbit, Saturn undergoes significant seasonal changes, owing to its 26.7° axial tilt. 2017 marks the end of the 13-year exploration of the Saturnian system by the Cassini spacecraft and coincides with summer solstice in Saturn's northern hemisphere. Monitoring changes in temperature and composition in Saturn's stratosphere through seasons can teach us about dynamical, radiative and chemical processes governing its atmospheric structure and evolution. Here we report on thermal infrared spectroscopic observations of Saturn's stratosphere in March 2017 obtained with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) mounted on the Gemini telescope. We retrieve vertical profiles of the temperature between latitudes 15°S and 87°N from the analysis of methane emission lines near 1245 cm-1. The inferred zonally average thermal structure is validated against Cassini/CIRS measurements acquired in January and February 2017. These datasets (ground-based and space-based) are in excellent agreement. The 1-mbar temperature is found to increase moderately from 140K at 20°N to 145K at 60°N, then increases more sharply to reach 155K at 85°N. The overall meridional temperature gradient observed in 2017 resembles the one observed in 2004 in the southern summer hemisphere, where a warm “polar hood” was observed poleward of 70°S [Fletcher et al., 2008]. In contrast, a seasonal radiative-equilibrium model [Guerlet et al., 2014] predicts much smaller and smoother meridional temperature gradients with latitude. We further analysed Cassini/CIRS data acquired in 2014 over the northern hemisphere to study seasonal changes between 2014 and 2017. Surprisingly, the 1-mbar temperature has slightly cooled down in the region 25N-55N between these two dates, at odds with the moderate warming predicted by our radiative-equilibrium model. We will discuss several hypotheses to account for these model-observation mismatches. In addition, we also retrieve

  8. CIRS High-Resolution Thermal Scans and the Structure of Saturn's B Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. M.; Spilker, L. J.; Showalter, M.; Pilorz, S.; Edgington, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The flyby of Titan on November 29, 2016, sent the Cassini spacecraft on a trajectory that would take it within 10,000 kilometers of Saturn's F ring multiple times before a subsequent Titan encounter on April 22, 2017, would send it on ballistic trajectory carrying it between Saturn's cloud tops and the planet's D ring for several flybys. This geometry has proven beneficial for high-resolution studies of the rings, not just because of Cassini's proximity to the rings, but also because of the spacecraft's high elevation angle above the rings, which reduces the foreshortening that tends to degrade resolution in the ring plane. We will report on several observations of Saturn's main rings at the high spatial resolutions enabled by the end-of-mission geometry, particulary the B ring, with the Composite Infrared Spectrometer onboard Cassini during the F-ring and proximal orbits. CIRS' three infrared detectors cover a combined spectral range of 10 to 1400 cm-1 (1 mm down to 7 microns). We focus on data from Focal Plane 1, which covers the 10 to 600 cm-1 range (1 mm to 16 microns). The apodized spectral resolution of the instrument can be varied from 15 cm-1 to 0.5 cm-1 (Flasar et al. 2004). FP1's wavelength range makes it well-suited to sensing thermal emission from objects at temperatures typical of Saturn's rings. Correlating ring optical depth with temperatures retrieved from scans of the face of the rings exposed to direct solar illumination (the lit face) and the opposite (unlit) face suggests differences in ring structure or particle transport between the lit and unlit sides of the rings in different regions of the B ring. Lit side temperatures in the core of the B ring range between 82 and 87 K; temperatures on the unlit side of the core vary from 66 K up to 74 K. Ferrari and Reffet (2013) and Pilorz et al. (2015) published thorough analyses of the thermal throughput across this optically thick ring. We will discuss these recent CIRS rings observations and their

  9. New-particle formation events in a continental boundary layer: first results from the SATURN experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stratmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During the SATURN experiment, which took place from 27 May to 14 June 2002, new particle formation in the continental boundary layer was investigated. Simultaneous ground-based and tethered-balloon-borne measurements were performed, including meteorological parameters, particle number concentrations and size distributions, gaseous precursor concentrations and SODAR and LIDAR observations. Newly formed particles were observed inside the residual layer, before the break-up process of the nocturnal inversion, and inside the mixing layer throughout the break-up of the nocturnal inversion and during the evolution of the planetary boundary layer.

  10. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (CA-TPS) for Venus and Saturn Backshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Gasch, M.; Stackpoole, M.; Wilder, M.; Boghozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J.; Prabhu, Dinesh; Kazemba, Cole D.; Venkatapathy, E.

    2016-01-01

    This poster provides an overview of the work performed to date on the Conformal Ablative TPS (CA-TPS) element of the TPSM project out of GCDP. Under this element, NASA is developing improved ablative TPS materials based on flexible felt for reinforcement rather than rigid reinforcements. By replacing the reinforcements with felt, the resulting materials have much higher strain-to-failure and are much lower in thermal conductivity than their rigid counterparts. These characteristics should allow for larger tile sizes, direct bonding to aeroshells and even lower weight TPS. The conformal phenolic impregnated carbon felt (C-PICA) is a candidate for backshell TPS for both Venus and Saturn entry vehicles.

  11. Combined flux compression and plasma opening switch on the Saturn pulsed power generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, Franklin S; Waisman, Eduardo M; Mazarakis, Michael G

    2010-05-07

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 micros. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  12. Analytical description of the Saturn-ring defect in nematic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alama, Stan; Bronsard, Lia; Lamy, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We derive an analytical formula for the Saturn-ring configuration around a small colloidal particle suspended in nematic liquid crystal. In particular we obtain an explicit expression for the ring radius and its dependence on the anchoring energy. We work within Landau-de Gennes theory: Nematic alignment is described by a tensorial order parameter. For nematic colloids this model had previously been used exclusively to perform numerical computations. Our method demonstrates that the tensorial theory can also be used to obtain analytical results, suggesting a different approach to the understanding of nematic colloidal interactions.

  13. Impact of statins on progression of atherosclerosis: rationale and design of SATURN (Study of Coronary Atheroma by InTravascular Ultrasound: effect of Rosuvastatin versus AtorvastatiN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen J; Borgman, Marilyn; Nissen, Steven E; Raichlen, Joel S; Ballantyne, Christie; Barter, Philip; Chapman, M John; Erbel, Raimund; Libby, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Previous imaging studies have demonstrated that the beneficial impact of high-dose statins on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis associates with their ability to lower levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The Study of Coronary Atheroma by InTravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin versus AtorvastatiN (SATURN, NCT00620542) aims to compare the effects of high-dose atorvastatin and rosuvastatin on disease progression. A total of 1385 subjects with established coronary artery disease (CAD) on angiography were randomized to receive rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. The primary efficacy parameter will be the nominal change in percent atheroma volume (PAV), determined by analysis of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of matched coronary artery segments acquired at baseline and at 24-month follow-up. The effect of statin therapy on plasma lipids and inflammatory markers, and the incidence of clinical cardiovascular events will also be assessed. The study does not have the statistical power to directly compare the treatment groups with regard to clinical events. Serial IVUS has emerged as a sensitive imaging modality to assess the impact of treatments on arterial structure. In this study, IVUS will be used to determine whether high-dose statins have different effects on plaque progression.

  14. Saturn's Rings and Associated Ring Plasma Cavity: Evidence for Slow Ring Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We re-examine the radio and plasma wave observations obtained during the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion period, as the spacecraft flew over the northern ring surface into a radial distance of 1.3 Rs (over the C-ring). Voyager era studies suggest the rings are a source of micro-meteoroid generated plasma and dust, with theorized peak impact-created plasma outflows over the densest portion of the rings (central B-ring). In sharp contrast, the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave System (RPWS) observations identify the presence of a ring-plasma cavity located in the central portion of the B-ring, with little evidence of impact-related plasma. While previous Voyager era studies have predicted unstable ion orbits over the C- ring, leading to field-aligned plasma transport to Saturns ionosphere, the Cassini RPWS observations do not reveal evidence for such instability-created plasma fountains. Given the passive ring loss processes observed by Cassini, we find that the ring lifetimes should extend >10(exp 9) years, and that there is limited evidence for prompt destruction (loss in <100 Myrs).

  15. How Long-Lived Are the Hypothetical Trojan Populations of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, D.; Dones, L.

    2002-12-01

    We investigate the possibility that fractions of the primordial populations at the triangular Lagrangian points of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have survived to the present and form (as yet unobserved) clusters of bodies coorbiting with these planets. Such leftovers would be analogs of the numerous objects (Trojans) leading and trailing the revolutions of Jupiter around the Sun. We focus on the dynamical stability of such populations over the age of the Solar System, assuming the current configuration of planets, and also discuss effects of the early radial migration of the outer planets. Our results suggest that, while Saturn's and Uranus' primordial Trojan populations should have been depleted by a factor of 100, Neptune may retain 50% of its original population of Trojans. A population of neptunian Trojans comparable to, or even larger than, Jupiter's Trojan population cannot be ruled out by existing observations. We compute the present-day sky densities of the hypothetical Trojans of the outer planets which can be used to guide observational surveys. Finally, we propose that the long-term instabilities that cause some jovian Trojans to escape the region of the Lagrange points at the present are due to three-body resonances.

  16. Implications for Particle Rotation and Vertical Mixing from Cassini CIRS Thermal Measurements of Saturn's Main Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S.; Pearl, J.; Altobelli, N.; Wallis, B.; Brooks, S.; Ferrari, C.; Showalter, M.; Flasar, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) obtained spatially resolved thermal infrared scans of Saturn's main rings (A, B and C, and Cassini Division) for both the lit and unlit faces of the rings over a variety of phase angles. The scans show ring temperatures decreasing with increasing solar phase angle. The largest ring temperatures are at a phase angle of zero degrees. These temperature differences with phase suggest that Saturn's main rings include a population of ring particles that spin slowly, possibly with a spin period greater than a few hours, given their low thermal inertia. For the B and A rings, the temperature is correlated with optical depth when viewed from the lit face, and anti- correlated when viewed from the unlit face. On the unlit face of the B ring, not only do the lowest temperatures correlate with the largest optical depths, but these temperatures are the same at both low and high phase angles, suggesting that little sunlight is penetrating these regions. The temperature differential from the lit to the unlit side of the rings is a strong, nearly linear, function of optical depth. This is consistent with the expectation that little sunlight penetrates to the dark side of the densest rings, but also suggests that little vertical mixing of ring particles is taking place in the A and B rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie".

  17. Numerical Modeling of Normal-Mode Oscillations in Planetary Atmospheres: Application to Saturn and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, Andrew James; Ding, Leon

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a numerical model to calculate the frequencies and eigenfunctions of adiabatic, non-radial normal-mode oscillations in the gas giants and Titan. The model solves the linearized momentum, energy, and continuity equations for the perturbation displacement, pressure, and density fields and solves Poisson’s equation for the perturbation gravitational potential. The response to effects associated with planetary rotation, including the Coriolis force, centrifugal force, and deformation of the equilibrium structure, is calculated numerically. This provides the capability to accurately compute the influence of rotation on the modes, even in the limit where mode frequency approaches the rotation rate, when analytical estimates based on functional perturbation analysis become inaccurate. This aspect of the model makes it ideal for studying the potential role of low-frequency modes for driving spiral density waves in the C ring that possess relatively low pattern speeds (Hedman, M.M and P.D. Nicholson, MNRAS 444, 1369-1388). In addition, the model can be used to explore the effect of internal differential rotation on the eigenfrequencies. We will (1) present examples of applying the model to calculate the properties of normal modes in Saturn and their relationship to observed spiral density waves in the C ring, and (2) discuss how the model is used to examine the response of the superrotating atmosphere of Titan to the gravitational tide exerted by Saturn. This research was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmosphere Program.

  18. Evidence for periodic variations in the thickness of Saturn's nightside plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Jackman, C. M.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Jia, X.; Kivelson, M. G.; Provan, G.

    2017-01-01

    During certain portions of the Cassini mission to Saturn, Cassini made repeated and periodic crossings of the magnetospheric current sheet that lies near the magnetic equator and extends well down the magnetospheric tail. These repeated crossings are part of the puzzling set of planetary period variations in numerous magnetospheric properties that have been discovered at Saturn. During 2010 these periodic crossings often display asymmetries such that the northbound crossing occurs faster than the southbound crossing or vice versa, while at other times the crossings are more symmetric. The character of the crossings is well organized by the relative phase of the northern versus southern perturbation currents inferred in earlier analyses of the magnetic field observations. Further, the dependence of the character of the crossings on the relative phase is consistent with similar asymmetries predicted both by the dual rotating current systems inferred from magnetic field observations and by global MHD models that incorporate the effects of hypothesized atmospheric vortices. The two models are themselves in generally good agreement on those predictions. In both models the asymmetries are attributable to a periodic thickening and thinning of the magnetospheric current sheet, combined with a periodic vertical flapping of the sheet. The Cassini observations thus provide additional observational support to such current systems as a likely explanation for many of the known magnetospheric planetary period variations.

  19. An interplanetary shock traced by planetary auroral storms from the Sun to Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prangé, Renée; Pallier, Laurent; Hansen, Kenneth C; Howard, Russ; Vourlidas, Angelos; Courtin, Régis; Parkinson, Chris

    2004-11-04

    A relationship between solar activity and aurorae on Earth was postulated long before space probes directly detected plasma propagating outwards from the Sun. Violent solar eruption events trigger interplanetary shocks that compress Earth's magnetosphere, leading to increased energetic particle precipitation into the ionosphere and subsequent auroral storms. Monitoring shocks is now part of the 'Space Weather' forecast programme aimed at predicting solar-activity-related environmental hazards. The outer planets also experience aurorae, and here we report the discovery of a strong transient polar emission on Saturn, tentatively attributed to the passage of an interplanetary shock--and ultimately to a series of solar coronal mass ejection (CME) events. We could trace the shock-triggered events from Earth, where auroral storms were recorded, to Jupiter, where the auroral activity was strongly enhanced, and to Saturn, where it activated the unusual polar source. This establishes that shocks retain their properties and their ability to trigger planetary auroral activity throughout the Solar System. Our results also reveal differences in the planetary auroral responses on the passing shock, especially in their latitudinal and local time dependences.

  20. Uncertainty Determination for Aeroheating in Uranus and Saturn Probe Entries by the Monte Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Grant; Prabhu, Dinesh; Cruden, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The 2013-2022 Decaedal survey for planetary exploration has identified probe missions to Uranus and Saturn as high priorities. This work endeavors to examine the uncertainty for determining aeroheating in such entry environments. Representative entry trajectories are constructed using the TRAJ software. Flowfields at selected points on the trajectories are then computed using the Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) Computational Fluid Dynamics Code. A Monte Carlo study is performed on the DPLR input parameters to determine the uncertainty in the predicted aeroheating, and correlation coefficients are examined to identify which input parameters show the most influence on the uncertainty. A review of the present best practices for input parameters (e.g. transport coefficient and vibrational relaxation time) is also conducted. It is found that the 2(sigma) - uncertainty for heating on Uranus entry is no more than 2.1%, assuming an equilibrium catalytic wall, with the uncertainty being determined primarily by diffusion and H(sub 2) recombination rate within the boundary layer. However, if the wall is assumed to be partially or non-catalytic, this uncertainty may increase to as large as 18%. The catalytic wall model can contribute over 3x change in heat flux and a 20% variation in film coefficient. Therefore, coupled material response/fluid dynamic models are recommended for this problem. It was also found that much of this variability is artificially suppressed when a constant Schmidt number approach is implemented. Because the boundary layer is reacting, it is necessary to employ self-consistent effective binary diffusion to obtain a correct thermal transport solution. For Saturn entries, the 2(sigma) - uncertainty for convective heating was less than 3.7%. The major uncertainty driver was dependent on shock temperature/velocity, changing from boundary layer thermal conductivity to diffusivity and then to shock layer ionization rate as velocity increases. While

  1. Hydrocarbons on Saturns Satellites: Relationship to Interstellar Dust and the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and the basic components that led to life on Earth, we study interstellar and planetary spectroscopic signatures. The possible relationship of organic material detected in carbonaceous meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), comets and the interstellar medium have been the source of speculation over the years as the composition and processes that governed the early solar nebula have been explored to understand the extent to which primitive material survived or became processed. The Cassini VIMS has provided new data relevant to this problem. Three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion, are found to have aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons on their surfaces. The aromatic hydrocarbon signature (C-H stretching mode at 3.28 micrometers) is proportionally significantly stronger (relative to the aliphatic bands) than that seen in other Solar System bodies (e.g., comets) and materials (Stardust samples, IDPs, meteorites) and the distinctive sub-features of the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic band (CH2 and CH3 groups) are reminiscent of those widely detected throughout the diffuse ISM. Phoebe may be a captured object that originated in the region beyond the present orbit of Neptune, where the solar nebula contained a large fraction of original interstellar ice and dust that was less processed than material closer to the Sun. Debris from Phoebe now resident on Iapetus and Hyperion, as well as o Phoebe itself, thus presents a unique blend of hydrocarbons, amenable to comparisons with interstellar hydrocarbons and other Solar System materials. The dust ring surrounding Saturn, in which Phoebe is embedded, probably originated from a collision with Phoebe. Dust ring particles are the likely source of the organic-bearing materials, and perhaps the recently identified small particles of Fe detected on Saturn's satellites. Lab measurements of the absolute band strengths of representative aliphatic and

  2. Optimization of Saturn paraboloid magnetospheric field model parameters using Cassini equatorial magnetic field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere describes the magnetic field as being due to the sum of contributions from the internal field of the planet, the ring current, and the tail current, all contained by surface currents inside a magnetopause boundary which is taken to be a paraboloid of revolution about the planet-Sun line. The parameters of the model have previously been determined by comparison with data from a few passes through Saturn's magnetosphere in compressed and expanded states, depending on the prevailing dynamic pressure of the solar wind. Here we significantly expand such comparisons through examination of Cassini magnetic field data from 18 near-equatorial passes that span wide ranges of local time, focusing on modelling the co-latitudinal field component that defines the magnetic flux passing through the equatorial plane. For 12 of these passes, spanning pre-dawn, via noon, to post-midnight, the spacecraft crossed the magnetopause during the pass, thus allowing an estimate of the concurrent subsolar radial distance of the magnetopause R1 to be made, considered to be the primary parameter defining the scale size of the system. The best-fit model parameters from these passes are then employed to determine how the parameters vary with R1, using least-squares linear fits, thus providing predictive model parameters for any value of R1 within the range. We show that the fits obtained using the linear approximation parameters are of the same order as those for the individually selected parameters. We also show that the magnetic flux mapping to the tail lobes in these models is generally in good accord with observations of the location of the open-closed field line boundary in Saturn's ionosphere, and the related position of the auroral oval. We then investigate the field data on six passes through the nightside magnetosphere, for which the spacecraft did not cross the magnetopause, such that in this case we compare the

  3. Linear prediction studies for the solar wind and Saturn kilometric radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Taubenschuss

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The external control of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR by the solar wind has been investigated in the frame of the Linear Prediction Theory (LPT. The LPT establishes a linear filter function on the basis of correlations between input signals, i.e. time profiles for solar wind parameters, and output signals, i.e. time profiles for SKR intensity. Three different experiments onboard the Cassini spacecraft (RPWS, MAG and CAPS yield appropriate data sets for compiling the various input and output signals. The time period investigated ranges from DOY 202 to 326, 2004 and is only limited due to limited availability of CAPS plasma data for the solar wind. During this time Cassini was positioned mainly on the morning side on its orbit around Saturn at low southern latitudes. Four basic solar wind quantities have been found to exert a clear influence on the SKR intensity profile. These quantities are: the solar wind bulk velocity, the solar wind ram pressure, the magnetic field strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the y-component of the IMF. All four inputs exhibit nearly the same level of efficiency for the linear prediction indicating that all four inputs are possible drivers for triggering SKR. Furthermore, they act at completely different lag times ranging from ~13 h for the ram pressure to ~52 h for the bulk velocity. The lag time for the magnetic field strength is usually beyond ~40 h and the lag time for the y-component of the magnetic field is located around 30 h. Considering that all four solar wind quantities are interrelated in a corotating interaction region, only the influence of the ram pressure seems to be of reasonable relevance. An increase in ram pressure causes a substantial compression of Saturn's magnetosphere leading to tail collapse, injection of hot plasma from the tail into the outer magnetosphere and finally to an intensification of auroral dynamics and SKR emission. So, after the onset of magnetospheric

  4. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  5. KRONOSEISMOLOGY: USING DENSITY WAVES IN SATURN'S C RING TO PROBE THE PLANET'S INTERIOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D., E-mail: mmhedman@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Saturn's C ring contains multiple spiral patterns that appear to be density waves driven by periodic gravitational perturbations. In other parts of Saturn's rings, such waves are generated by Lindblad resonances with Saturn's various moons, but most of the wave-like C-ring features are not situated near any strong resonance with any known moon. Using stellar occultation data obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft, we investigate the origin of six unidentified C-ring waves located between 80,900 and 87,200 km from Saturn's center. By measuring differences in the waves' phases among the different occultations, we are able to determine both the number of arms in each spiral pattern and the speeds at which these patterns rotate around the planet. We find that all six of these waves have between two and four arms and pattern speeds between 1660 Degree-Sign day{sup -1} and 1861 Degree-Sign day{sup -1}. These speeds are too large to be attributed to any satellite resonance. Instead, they are comparable to the predicted pattern speeds of waves generated by low-order normal-mode oscillations within the planet. The precise pattern speeds associated with these waves should therefore provide strong constraints on Saturn's internal structure. Furthermore, we identify multiple waves with the same number of arms and very similar pattern speeds, indicating that multiple m = 3 and m = 2 sectoral (l = m) modes may exist within the planet.

  6. The exploitation of the Saturne synchrotron during the 4. quarter 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crussard, Jean; Kerviller, Herve de; Gouttefangeas, Marcel; Florent, Roger

    1964-03-01

    The first part of this report indicates the time distribution between various uses (operational beam, machine studies) and operational situations (failure, maintenance, start, adjustment) and a general view of duration evolutions during 1963 based on weekly reports. The second part presents the different experiments performed during the concerned quarter, and indicates how time has been distributed between the different involved research teams. The third part presents and discusses measurements and measures regarding radiation protection, and comments the global situation for 1963. The next part proposes a synthesis of various works performed on the machine: Saturne exploitation, works on various equipment (beam control devices, magnet energy supply, ejection and correction circuits, injector, vacuum), machine studies (Nakach effect, particle loss between 2 and 20 ms, injection at higher energy). The fifth part addresses works and actions related to physics equipment: beam equipment, fixed installations, magnetism, electronics, high magnetic fields, liquefier, film development, CERN hydrogen bubble chamber, DESY bubble chamber

  7. Uniform parameterized theory of convection in medium sized icy satellites of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    2009-06-01

    We develop a parameterized theory of convection driven by radiogenic and tidal heating. The tidal heating depends on eccentricity e of a satellite's orbit. Using parameterized theory we determine the intensity of convection as a function of e and satellite's properties. The theory is used for 6 medium sized satellites of Saturn. We find that endogenic activity on Tethys and Dione is possible if e exceeds some critical values e cr. For Enceladus, e was probably close to the present value for billions of years. We cannot find constrains for e of Mimas and Iapetus. The theory successfully predicts the possibility of present endogenic activity in Dione and rules out such activity in Tethys. Both these facts were recently confirmed by Cassini mission.

  8. Ionospheric disturbances caused by long period sound waves generated by Saturn-Apollo launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Wavelike disturbances were observed in the ionosphere following several nuclear explosions in early 1960's. Supersonic shock waves within the atmosphere generated by large rockets can cause ionospheric electron density perturbations. A CW phase path Doppler array in the New York area was operated during the Saturn-Apollo 12 and 13 launches and recorded Doppler frequency fluctuations due to rocket launchings. Cross correlation and power spectral analyses of the phase path-path Doppler frequency variation records showed that the phase velocities of the signal arrivals were from south of the array with 700 - 800 m/sec corresponding to periods in the range of 2 to 4 minutes. Ionograms taken every 60 seconds from Wallops Islands showed clearly ionospheric disturbances due to rockets. The group velocities were estimated to be of the order of 450 m/sec 1 obtained from the earliest visible disturbances seen on CW phase path Doppler records and ionograms together with the rocket trajectory data.

  9. A near-infrared transmission spectrum for the warm Saturn HAT-P-12b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line, Michael R.; Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee

    2013-01-01

    We present a Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera-3 (WFC3) transmission spectrum for the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-12b. This warm (1000 K) sub-Saturn-mass planet has a smaller mass and a lower temperature than the hot Jupiters that have been studied so far. We find that the planet's measured transmission spectrum lacks the expected water absorption feature for a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere and is instead best described by a model with high-altitude clouds. Using a frequentist hypothesis testing procedure, we can rule out a hydrogen-dominated cloud-free atmosphere to 4.9σ. When combined with other recent WFC3 studies, our observations suggest that clouds may be common in exoplanetary atmospheres.

  10. Effect of the tiger stripes on the deformation of Saturn's moon Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souček, Ondřej; Hron, Jaroslav; Běhounková, Marie; Čadek, Ondřej

    2016-07-01

    Enceladus is a small icy moon of Saturn with active jets of water emanating from fractures around the south pole, informally called tiger stripes, which might be connected to a subsurface water ocean. The effect of these features on periodic tidal deformation of the moon has so far been neglected because of the difficulties associated with implementation of faults in continuum mechanics models. Here we estimate the maximum possible impact of the tiger stripes on tidal deformation and heat production within Enceladus's ice shell by representing them as narrow zones with negligible frictional and bulk resistance passing vertically through the whole ice shell. Assuming a uniform ice shell thickness of 25 km, consistent with the recent estimate of libration, we demonstrate that the faults can dramatically change the distribution of stress and strain in Enceladus's south polar region, leading to a significant increase of the heat production in this area.

  11. Flux and composition of interstellar dust at Saturn from Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, N; Postberg, F; Fiege, K; Trieloff, M; Kimura, H; Sterken, V J; Hsu, H-W; Hillier, J; Khawaja, N; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G; Blum, J; Burton, M; Srama, R; Kempf, S; Gruen, E

    2016-04-15

    Interstellar dust (ISD) is the condensed phase of the interstellar medium. In situ data from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer on board the Cassini spacecraft reveal that the Saturnian system is passed by ISD grains from our immediate interstellar neighborhood, the local interstellar cloud. We determine the mass distribution of 36 interstellar grains, their elemental composition, and a lower limit for the ISD flux at Saturn. Mass spectra and grain dynamics suggest the presence of magnesium-rich grains of silicate and oxide composition, partly with iron inclusions. Major rock-forming elements (magnesium, silicon, iron, and calcium) are present in cosmic abundances, with only small grain-to-grain variations, but sulfur and carbon are depleted. The ISD grains in the solar neighborhood appear to be homogenized, likely by repeated processing in the interstellar medium. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. WASP-21b: a hot-Saturn exoplanet transiting a thick disc star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchy, F.; Hebb, L.; Skillen, I.; Collier Cameron, A.; Smalley, B.; Udry, S.; Anderson, D. R.; Boisse, I.; Enoch, B.; Haswell, C. A.; Hébrard, G.; Hellier, C.; Joshi, Y.; Kane, S. R.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Mayor, M.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Simpson, E. K.; Smith, A. M. S.; Stempels, H. C.; Street, R.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2010-09-01

    We report the discovery of WASP-21b, a new transiting exoplanet discovered by the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Consortium and established and characterized with the FIES, SOPHIE, CORALIE and HARPS fiber-fed echelle spectrographs. A 4.3-d period, 1.1% transit depth and 3.4-h duration are derived for WASP-21b using SuperWASP-North and high precision photometric observations at the Liverpool Telescope. Simultaneous fitting to the photometric and radial velocity data with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure leads to a planet in the mass regime of Saturn. With a radius of 1.07 RJup and mass of 0.30 MJup, WASP-21b has a density close to 0.24 ρJup corresponding to the distribution peak at low density of transiting gaseous giant planets. With a host star metallicity [Fe/H] of -0.46, WASP-21b strengthens the correlation between planetary density and host star metallicity for the five known Saturn-like transiting planets. Furthermore there are clear indications that WASP-21b is the first transiting planet belonging to the thick disc. Based on observations made with the SuperWASP-North camera hosted by the Isaac Newton Group on La Palma, the FIES spectrograph on the Nordic Optical Telescope, the CORALIE spectrograph on the 1.2-m Euler Swiss telescope on La Silla Observatory, the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope on Haute Provence Observatory and the HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m ESO telescope at La Silla Observatory under programs 081.C-0388, 082.C-0040, 084.C-0185.Tables of photometric data are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/519/A98

  13. GRAVITATIONAL ACCRETION OF PARTICLES ONTO MOONLETS EMBEDDED IN SATURN's RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Yuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Daisaka, Hiroshi, E-mail: y.yasui@whale.kobe-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ohtsuki@tiger.kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Commerce and Management, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo 186-8601 (Japan)

    2014-12-20

    Using a local N-body simulation, we examine gravitational accretion of ring particles onto moonlet cores in Saturn's rings. We find that gravitational accretion of particles onto moonlet cores is unlikely to occur in the C ring and probably difficult in the inner B ring as well provided that the cores are rigid water ice. Dependence of particle accretion on ring thickness changes when the radial distance from the planet and/or the density of particles is varied: the former determines the size of the core's Hill radius relative to its physical size, while the latter changes the effect of self-gravity of accreted particles. We find that particle accretion onto high-latitude regions of the core surface can occur even if the rings' vertical thickness is much smaller than the core radius, although redistribution of particles onto the high-latitude regions would not be perfectly efficient in outer regions of the rings such as the outer A ring, where the size of the core's Hill sphere in the vertical direction is significantly larger than the core's physical radius. Our results suggest that large boulders recently inferred from observations of transparent holes in the C ring are not formed locally by gravitational accretion, while propeller moonlets in the A ring would be gravitational aggregates formed by particle accretion onto dense cores. Our results also imply that the main bodies of small satellites near the outer edge of Saturn's rings may have been formed in rather thin rings.

  14. Thermal mapping of Saturn's main rings by Cassini CIRS: Temperature variations with changing viewing geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S.; Leyrat, C.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S.; Wallis, B.; Pearl, J.; Flasar, F.

    2007-08-01

    After three years in orbit around Saturn, the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has acquired an broad set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) for a number of different viewing geometries, most of which are not available from Earth. These thermal measurements include information on physical temperature as well as filling factor. Thermal mapping of both the lit and unlit faces of the rings is being performed within a multidimensional observation space that includes solar phase angle, spacecraft elevation, solar elevation and local hour angle. The largest temperature variations on the lit face of the rings are driven by variations in phase angle while differences in temperature with changing spacecraft elevation are a secondary effect. Ring temperatures decrease with increasing phase angle suggesting a population of slowly rotating ring particles [1]. The largest ring temperatures are measured at zero degrees phase angle. The lit A and B rings both show temperature decreases with decreasing solar elevation while temperature changes in the C ring and Cassini Division are more muted. Variations in the geometrical filling factor are driven primarily by changes in spacecraft elevation. For the least optically thick region of the C ring, the filling factor variations are almost exclusively driven by spacecraft elevation. Our preliminary evaluation of the data set acquired to date will be presented. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA, and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie". References [1] L. Spilker et al., PSS, 54, 1167 (2006).

  15. Equatorial Oscillation and Planetary Wave Activity in Saturn's Stratosphere Through the Cassini Epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Spiga, A.; Flasar, F. M.; Fletcher, L. N.; Hesman, B. E.; Gorius, N.

    2018-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectra acquired by Cassini/Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) in limb-viewing geometry in 2015 are used to derive 2-D latitude-pressure temperature and thermal wind maps. These maps are used to study the vertical structure and evolution of Saturn's equatorial oscillation (SEO), a dynamical phenomenon presenting similarities with the Earth's quasi-biennal oscillation (QBO) and semi-annual oscillation (SAO). We report that a new local wind maximum has appeared in 2015 in the upper stratosphere and derive the descent rates of other wind extrema through time. The phase of the oscillation observed in 2015, as compared to 2005 and 2010, remains consistent with a ˜15 year period. The SEO does not propagate downward at a regular rate but exhibits faster descent rate in the upper stratosphere, combined with a greater vertical wind shear, compared to the lower stratosphere. Within the framework of a QBO-type oscillation, we estimate the absorbed wave momentum flux in the stratosphere to be on the order of ˜7 × 10-6 N m-2. On Earth, interactions between vertically propagating waves (both planetary and mesoscale) and the mean zonal flow drive the QBO and SAO. To broaden our knowledge on waves potentially driving Saturn's equatorial oscillation, we searched for thermal signatures of planetary waves in the tropical stratosphere using CIRS nadir spectra. Temperature anomalies of amplitude 1-4 K and zonal wave numbers 1 to 9 are frequently observed, and an equatorial Rossby (n = 1) wave of zonal wave number 3 is tentatively identified in November 2009.

  16. Using the tools of the trade to understand plasma interactions at Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, Margaret G.

    2017-10-01

    For more than half a century, we have been learning how magnetospheres work. Fluid motions and electromagnetic interactions combine to produce the plasma and field environment of a planet. Kinetic responses often control the dynamics. Initial descriptions of the terrestrial magnetosphere were often theoretical (e.g., Chapman and Ferraro, Dungey) before an explosion of spacecraft data provided an atlas of the system and its temporal variations. The basic structure and dynamics of the terrestrial magnetosphere are now largely understood. A different situation exists for the magnetospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and their moons. Data acquired from spacecraft flybys or from orbit have characterized many aspects of these systems, but measurements are far more limited than at Earth both in space and in time. Even after Cassini’s mission to Saturn and Juno’s prime mission at Jupiter have ended, large regions in the plasma environments of these planets will remain unexplored. No monitors are available to characterize the upstream solar wind. Theory is challenged by the complexity introduced by dynamical effects of the planets’ rapid rotation and the unfamiliar parameter regimes governing interactions with their large moons. Simulation has come to the rescue, providing computational models designed to incorporate the effects of rotation or to describe moon-magnetosphere interactions. Yet simulations must be viewed with appropriate skepticism as they invariably require some compromise with reality. This talk will describe a symbiotic approach to understanding the dynamics of giant planet magnetospheres and the plasma interactions between magnetospheric plasma and large moons. Data acquired along a spacecraft trajectory are compared with values extracted from a virtual spacecraft moving through the same path in the simulation. If results are similar, we use the simulation to identify the processes responsible for puzzling aspects of the signatures. If results differ

  17. A model of the plasma flow and current in Saturn's polar ionosphere under conditions of strong Dungey cycle driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Jackman

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple model of the flow and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere. This model is motivated by theoretical reasoning, and guided quantitatively by in situ field and flow data from space missions, ground-based IR Doppler measurements, and Hubble Space Telescope images. The flow pattern consists of components which represent (1 plasma sub-corotation in the middle magnetosphere region resulting from plasma pick-up and radial transport from internal sources; (2 the Vasyliunas-cycle of internal plasma mass-loss down the magnetospheric tail at higher latitudes; and (3 the polar Dungey-cycle flow driven by the solar wind interaction. Upstream measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF indicate the occurrence of both extended low-field rarefaction intervals with essentially negligible Dungey-cycle flow, and few-day high-field compression regions in which the Dungey-cycle voltage peaks at a few hundred kV. Here we model the latter conditions when the Dungey-cycle is active, advancing on previous axi-symmetric models which may be more directly applicable to quiet conditions. For theoretical convenience the overall flow pattern is constructed by adding together two components - a purely rotational flow similar to previous axi-symmetric models, and a sun-aligned twin vortex representing the dawn-dusk asymmetry effects associated with the Vasyliunas-and Dungey-cycle flows. We calculate the horizontal ionospheric current associated with the flow and the field-aligned current from its divergence. These calculations show that a sheet of upward-directed field-aligned current flows at the boundary of open field lines which is strongly modulated in local-time by the Dungey-cycle flows. We then consider implications of the field-aligned current for magnetospheric electron acceleration and aurorae using two plasma source populations (hot outer magnetospheric electrons and cool dense magnetosheath electrons. Both sources display a strong dawn

  18. The Composition and Chemistry of the Deep Tropospheres of Saturn and Uranus from Ground-Based Radio Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstadter, M. D.; Adumitroaie, V.; Atreya, S. K.; Butler, B.

    2017-12-01

    Ground-based radio observations of the giant planets at wavelengths from 1 millimeter to 1 meter have long been the primary means to study the deep tropospheres of both gas- and ice-giant planets (e.g. de Pater and Massie 1985, Icarus 62; Hofstadter and Butler 2003, Icarus 165). Most recently, radiometers aboard the Cassini and Juno spacecraft at Saturn and Jupiter, respectively, have demonstrated the ability of spaceborne systems to study composition and weather beneath the visible cloud tops with high spatial resolution (Janssen et al. 2013, Icarus 226; Bolton et al. 2016, this meeting). Ground-based observations remain, however, an excellent way to study the tropospheres of the ice giants, particularly the temporal and spatial distribution of condensible species, and to study the deep troposphere of Saturn in the region of the water cloud. This presentation focuses on two ground-based data sets, one for Uranus and one for Saturn. The Uranus data were all collected near the 2007 equinox, and span wavelengths from 0.1 to 20 cm. These data provide a snapshot of atmospheric composition at a single season. The Saturn observations were recently made with the EVLA observatory at wavelengths from 3 to 90 cm, augmented by published observations at shorter and longer wavelengths. It is expected that these data will allow us to constrain conditions in the water cloud region on Saturn. At the time of this writing, both data sets are being analyzed using an optimal estimation retrieval algorithm fed with the latest published information on the chemical and electrical properties of relevant atmospheric species (primarily H2O, NH3, H2S, PH3, and free electrons). At Uranus, we find that—consistent with previously published work—ammonia in the 1 to 50-bar range is strongly depleted from solar values. The relative volume mixing ratios of the above species satisfy PH3 < NH3 < H2S < H2O, which is interesting because based on cosmic abundances one would expect H2S < NH3. At the

  19. A DETAILED MORPHO-KINEMATIC MODEL OF THE ESKIMO, NGC 2392: A UNIFYING VIEW WITH THE CAT'S EYE AND SATURN PLANETARY NEBULAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Díaz, Ma. T.; López, J. A.; Steffen, W.; Richer, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional and kinematic structure of the Eskimo nebula, NGC 2392, has been notoriously difficult to interpret in detail given its complex morphology, multiple kinematic components and its nearly pole-on orientation along the line of sight. We present a comprehensive, spatially resolved, high-resolution, long-slit spectroscopic mapping of the Eskimo planetary nebula. The data consist of 21 spatially resolved, long-slit echelle spectra tightly spaced over the Eskimo and along its bipolar jets. This data set allows us to construct a velocity-resolved [N II] channel map of the nebula with a resolution of 10 km s –1 that disentangles its different kinematic components. The spectroscopic information is combined with Hubble Space Telescope images to construct a detailed three-dimensional morpho-kinematic model of the Eskimo using the code SHAPE. With this model we demonstrate that the Eskimo is a close analog to the Saturn and the Cat's Eye nebulae, but rotated 90° to the line of sight. Furthermore, we show that the main characteristics of our model apply to the general properties of the group of elliptical planetary nebulae with ansae or FLIERS, once the orientation is considered. We conclude that this kind of nebula belongs to a class with a complex common evolutionary sequence of events.

  20. A critical review of charged particle astronomy at Saturn: The evidence for co-orbiting material in the inner satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefel, John P.; Cooper, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The charged particle observations from Pioneer and Voyager at Saturn were reassessed with a view towards providing limits on the amount of unseen dust and debris that may exist in the Saturnian system. Such estimates are crucial for planning the Cassini tour of Saturn. The data from Pioneer 11 and Voyager were reviewed, intercompared, and correlated with model predictions to set limits on the matter distribution.

  1. Texture and composition of Titan's equatorial region inferred from Cassini SAR inversion: Implications for aeolian transport at Saturn's largest moon

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Antoine; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Lemonnier, Florentin; Gall, Alice Le; Ferrari, Cécile; Paillou, Philippe; Narteau, Clément

    2017-01-01

    Sand seas on Titan may reflect the present and past climatic conditions. Understanding the morphodynamics and physico-chemical properties of Titan's dunes is therefore essential for a better comprehension of the climatic and geological history of the largest Saturn's moon. We derived quantitatively surface properties (texture, composition) from the modelling of microwave backscattered signal and Monte-Carlo inversion of despeckled Cassini/SAR data over sand sea. We show that dunes and interdu...

  2. Long-Term And/Or Seasonal Variation of Suprathermal O2+ and N2+ at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, S. P.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; DiFabio, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The suprathermal minor heavy ion groups O2+ and 28M+ (mixed N2+ and/or CO+) at~32 and ~28 amu/e, respectively, exhibit long-term spatial-temporal variations in Saturn's magnetosphere at ~3-20 Rs from 2004 to 2011. These ~83-167 keV/e ions are the second most abundant ion groups heavier than the water group W+ (O+, OH+, H2O+, and H3O+) measured by the Cassini CHEMS ion spectrometer. O2+ declines by order of ~6-7 relative to W+ from mid-2004 until equinox in mid-2009 and then remains relatively constant. 28M+, initially ~5 times less abundant than O2+, declines by order of ~2 relative to W+ until early-2007 and then remains at lower values with significant variation. After late-2009 28M+/O2+ is ~0.5. The declining O2+ and 28M+ flux occurs as ring plane illumination decreases approaching Saturn's equinox. The main ring atmosphere/ ionosphere is the most likely primary source for the O2+. Titan, Enceladus, Rhea, and the E-ring are candidate sources for the 28M+. Neither O2+ nor 28M+ has begun recovery by mid-2011, arguing for reduced levels this Saturn season. Transition from higher/declining to lower/persistent levels suggests multiple competing components for both ion groups, that is, one component, probably ring-insolation related, is initially dominant and decreases gradually to be masked later by a lower-level component. The relation of the ions' flux generation and modulation by Saturn's moons and rings is addressed.

  3. Towards an Understanding of Radiative Factors on Planetary Rings: a Perspective from Cassini CIRS Observations at Saturn Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L.; Edgington, S. G.; Déau, E.; Pilorz, S. H.

    2012-10-01

    Since arriving at Saturn in 2004, Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded tens of millions of spectra of Saturn’s rings (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation (16.7-1000 microns) at focal plane 1 (FP1). Thermal emission from Saturn’s rings peaks at FP1 wavelengths. CIRS spectra are well characterized as blackbody emission at an effective temperature Te, multiplied by a scalar factor related to ring emissivity (Spilker et al. [2005, 2006]). CIRS can therefore characterize the rings' temperature and study the thermal environment to which the ring particles are subject. We focus on CIRS data from the 2009 Saturnian equinox. As the Sun's disk crossed the ring plane, CIRS obtained several radial scans of the rings at a variety of phase angles, local hour angles and distances. With the Sun's rays striking the rings at an incidence angle of zero, solar heating is virtually absent, and thermal radiation from Saturn and sunlight reflected by Saturn dominate the thermal environment. These observations present an apparent paradox. Equinox data show that the flux of thermal energy radiated by the rings is roughly equivalent to or even exceeds the energy incident upon them as prescribed by thermal models (Froidevaux [1981], Ferrari and Leyrat [2006], Morishima et al. [2009, 2010]). This apparent energy excess is largest in the C ring and Cassini Division. Conservation principles suggest that models underestimate heating of the rings, as it is clearly unphysical for the rings to radiate significantly more energy than is incident upon them. In this presentation, we will attempt to resolve this paradox and determine what this can teach us about Saturn's rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2012 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  4. The Goddard and Saturn Genes Are Essential for Drosophila Male Fertility and May Have Arisen De Novo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubala, Anna M; Schmitz, Jonathan F; Kearns, Michael J; Vinh, Tery T; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Wolfner, Mariana F; Findlay, Geoffrey D

    2017-05-01

    New genes arise through a variety of mechanisms, including the duplication of existing genes and the de novo birth of genes from noncoding DNA sequences. While there are numerous examples of duplicated genes with important functional roles, the functions of de novo genes remain largely unexplored. Many newly evolved genes are expressed in the male reproductive tract, suggesting that these evolutionary innovations may provide advantages to males experiencing sexual selection. Using testis-specific RNA interference, we screened 11 putative de novo genes in Drosophila melanogaster for effects on male fertility and identified two, goddard and saturn, that are essential for spermatogenesis and sperm function. Goddard knockdown (KD) males fail to produce mature sperm, while saturn KD males produce few sperm, and these function inefficiently once transferred to females. Consistent with a de novo origin, both genes are identifiable only in Drosophila and are predicted to encode proteins with no sequence similarity to any annotated protein. However, since high levels of divergence prevented the unambiguous identification of the noncoding sequences from which each gene arose, we consider goddard and saturn to be putative de novo genes. Within Drosophila, both genes have been lost in certain lineages, but show conserved, male-specific patterns of expression in the species in which they are found. Goddard is consistently found in single-copy and evolves under purifying selection. In contrast, saturn has diversified through gene duplication and positive selection. These data suggest that de novo genes can acquire essential roles in male reproduction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Significance of Dungey-cycle flows in Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres, and their identification on closed equatorial field lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Badman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider the contribution of the solar wind-driven Dungey-cycle to flux transport in Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres, the associated voltages being based on estimates of the magnetopause reconnection rates recently derived from observations of the interplanetary medium in the vicinity of the corresponding planetary orbits. At Jupiter, the reconnection voltages are estimated to be ~150 kV during several-day weak-field rarefaction regions, increasing to ~1 MV during few-day strong-field compression regions. The corresponding values at Saturn are ~25 kV for rarefaction regions, increasing to ~150 kV for compressions. These values are compared with the voltages associated with the flows driven by planetary rotation. Estimates of the rotational flux transport in the "middle" and "outer" magnetosphere regions are shown to yield voltages of several MV and several hundred kV at Jupiter and Saturn respectively, thus being of the same order as the estimated peak Dungey-cycle voltages. We conclude that under such circumstances the Dungey-cycle "return" flow will make a significant contribution to the flux transport in the outer magnetospheric regions. The "return" Dungey-cycle flows are then expected to form layers which are a few planetary radii wide inside the dawn and morning magnetopause. In the absence of significant cross-field plasma diffusion, these layers will be characterized by the presence of hot light ions originating from either the planetary ionosphere or the solar wind, while the inner layers associated with the Vasyliunas-cycle and middle magnetosphere transport will be dominated by hot heavy ions originating from internal moon/ring plasma sources. The temperature of these ions is estimated to be of the order of a few keV at Saturn and a few tens of keV at Jupiter, in both layers.

  6. Relationship between solar wind corotating interaction regions and the phasing and intensity of Saturn kilometric radiation bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Badman

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Voyager spacecraft measurements of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR identified two features of these radio emissions: that they pulse at a period close to the planetary rotation period, and that the emitted intensity is correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure (Desch and Kaiser, 1981; Desch, 1982; Desch and Rucker, 1983. In this study the inter-relation between the intensity and the pulsing of the SKR is analysed using Cassini spacecraft measurements of the interplanetary medium and SKR over the interval encompassing Cassini's approach to Saturn, and the first extended orbit. Cassini Plasma Spectrometer ion data were only available for a subset of the dates of interest, so the interplanetary conditions were studied primarily using the near-continuously available magnetic field data, augmented by the ion moment data when available. Intense SKR bursts were identified when solar wind compressions arrived at Saturn. The intensity of subsequent emissions detected by Cassini during the compression intervals was variable, sometimes remaining intense for several planetary rotations, sometimes dimming and rarely disappearing. The timings of the initial intense SKR peaks were sometimes independent of the long-term pulsing behaviour identified in the SKR data. Overall, however, the pulsing of the SKR peaks during the disturbed intervals was not significantly altered relative to that during non-compression intervals.

  7. Relationship between solar wind corotating interaction regions and the phasing and intensity of Saturn kilometric radiation bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Badman

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Voyager spacecraft measurements of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR identified two features of these radio emissions: that they pulse at a period close to the planetary rotation period, and that the emitted intensity is correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure (Desch and Kaiser, 1981; Desch, 1982; Desch and Rucker, 1983. In this study the inter-relation between the intensity and the pulsing of the SKR is analysed using Cassini spacecraft measurements of the interplanetary medium and SKR over the interval encompassing Cassini's approach to Saturn, and the first extended orbit. Cassini Plasma Spectrometer ion data were only available for a subset of the dates of interest, so the interplanetary conditions were studied primarily using the near-continuously available magnetic field data, augmented by the ion moment data when available. Intense SKR bursts were identified when solar wind compressions arrived at Saturn. The intensity of subsequent emissions detected by Cassini during the compression intervals was variable, sometimes remaining intense for several planetary rotations, sometimes dimming and rarely disappearing. The timings of the initial intense SKR peaks were sometimes independent of the long-term pulsing behaviour identified in the SKR data. Overall, however, the pulsing of the SKR peaks during the disturbed intervals was not significantly altered relative to that during non-compression intervals.

  8. Constraining Saturn's interior density profile from precision gravity field measurement obtained during Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Fortney, J. J.; Helled, R.; Hubbard, W. B.; Mankovich, C.; Thorngren, D.; Wahl, S. M.; Militzer, B.; Durante, D.

    2017-12-01

    The external gravity field of a planetary body is determined by the distribution of mass in its interior. Therefore, a measurement of the external field, properlyinterpreted, tells us about the interior density profile, ρ(r), which in turn can be used to constrain the composition in the interior and thereby learn about theformation mechanism of the planet. Recently, very high precision measurements of the gravity coefficients for Saturn have been made by the radio science instrument on the Cassini spacecraft during its Grand Finale orbits. The resulting coefficients come with an associated uncertainty. The task of matching a given density profile to a given set of gravity coefficients is relatively straightforward, but the question of how to best account for the uncertainty is not. In essentially all prior work on matching models to gravity field data inferences about planetary structure have rested on assumptions regarding the imperfectly known H/He equation of state and the assumption of an adiabatic interior. Here we wish to vastly expand the phase space of such calculations. We present a framework for describing all the possible interior density structures of a Jovian planet constrained by a given set of gravity coefficients and their associated uncertainties. Our approach is statistical. We produce a random sample of ρ(a) curves drawn from the underlying (and unknown) probability distribution of all curves, where ρ is the density on an interior level surface with equatorial radius a. Since the resulting set of density curves is a random sample, that is, curves appear with frequency proportional to the likelihood of their being consistent with the measured gravity, we can compute probability distributions for any quantity that is a function of ρ, such as central pressure, oblateness, core mass and radius, etc. Our approach is also Bayesian, in that it can utilize any prior assumptions about the planet's interior, as necessary, without being overly

  9. Risk Assessment of Cassini Sun Sensor Integrity Due to Hypervelocity Impact of Saturn Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    2016-01-01

    A sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini is one of the heaviest and most sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft humans have ever built and launched. Since achieving orbit at Saturn in 2004, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for first and second extended missions through September 2017. In late 2016, the Cassini spacecraft will begin a daring set of ballistic orbits that will hop the rings and dive between the upper atmosphere of Saturn and its innermost D-ring twenty-two times. The "dusty" environment of the inner D-ring region the spacecraft must fly through is hazardous because of the possible damage that dust particles, travelling at speeds as high as 31.4 km/s, can do to spacecraft hardware. During hazardous proximal ring-plane crossings, the Cassini mission operation team plans to point the high-gain antenna to the RAM vector in order to protect most of spacecraft instruments from the incoming energetic ring dust particles. However, this particular spacecraft attitude will expose two Sun sensors (that are mounted on the antenna dish) to the incoming dust particles. High-velocity impacts on the Sun sensor cover glass might penetrate the 2.54-mm glass cover of the Sun sensor. Even without penetration damage, craters created by these impacts on the surface of the cover glass will degrade the transmissibility of light through it. Apart from being directly impacted by the dust particles, the Sun sensors are also threatened by some fraction of ricochet ejecta that are produced by dust particle impacts on the large antenna dish (made of graphite fiber epoxy composite material). Finally, the spacecraft attitude control system must cope with disturbances due to both the translational and angular impulses imparted on the large antenna dish and the long magnetometer boom by the incoming high-velocity projectiles. Analyses performed to quantify the risks the Sun sensors must contend

  10. The exploitation of the 'Saturne' synchrotron during the 2. quarter of 1964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crussard, Jean; Tardy-Joubert, Philippe; Gouttefangeas, Marcel; Florent, Roger

    1964-09-01

    In its first part, this report gives some quantitative information on the use of the Saturne synchrotron (working hours, distribution in terms of tasks) and briefly discusses the activities (beam ejection, number of accelerations and of accelerated protons, scattering experiments performed by various research teams, tests of the hydrogen bubble chamber). The second proposes an overview of physics experiments performed during the considered period by different research teams. A table indicates the distribution in time of these experiments. The third part reports measurements and measures regarding the protection against radiations in the premises of the synchrotron. The fourth part reports works performed on the machine: comments on failures, works performed on various equipment (magnet supply, beam ejection, injector, vacuum, high frequency, sources), theoretical and experimental studies (theoretical study of beam focussing, study of injection at higher energy, study of the limitation of injected intensity, study of losses between 1 and 10 minutes after injection). The fifth part addresses physics equipment: beam equipment, fixed installations, magnetism equipment, electronics, intense magnetic field equipment, liquefier, the Desy bubble chamber

  11. Diamagnetic depression observations at Saturn's magnetospheric cusp by the Cassini spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Jamie M.; Arridge, Christopher S.; Coates, Andrew J.; Jones, Geraint H.; Sergis, Nick; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Krupp, Norbert

    2017-06-01

    The magnetospheric cusp is a region where shocked solar wind plasma can enter a planetary magnetosphere, after magnetic reconnection has occurred at the dayside magnetopause or in the lobes. The dense plasma that enters the high-latitude magnetosphere creates diamagnetic effects whereby a depression is observed in the magnetic field. We present observations of the cusp events at Saturn's magnetosphere where these diamagnetic depressions are found. The data are subtracted from a magnetic field model, and the calculated magnetic pressure deficits are compared to the particle pressures. A high plasma pressure layer in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp is discovered to also depress the magnetic field, outside of the cusp. This layer is observed to contain energetic He++ (up to ˜100 keV) from the solar wind as well as heavy water group ions (W+) originating from the moon Enceladus. We also find a modest correlation of diamagnetic depression strength to solar wind dynamic pressure and velocity; however, unlike at Earth, there is no correlation found with He++ counts.

  12. The lead-poisoned genius: saturnism in famous artists across five centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Santiago, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Lead poisoning (saturnism) has been present throughout the history of mankind. In addition to possible ingestion from contaminated food, one of the most important ways in which poisoning caused morbid processes was by occupational exposure. This exposition was pandemic in the Roman Empire, and it has been claimed that it contributed to its fall, but it also caused numerous epidemics in Western countries until the nineteenth century. In the case of artists, and since the Renaissance period, this toxicity has been called painter's colic or painter's madness. The latter term is partly due to the mental disorders displayed by some of the great masters, including Michelangelo and Caravaggio, although it was long recognized that even house and industrial painters were prone to the disorder. This chapter examines the historical evidence of recognition of such toxicity and discusses the controversies raised by the possibility of professional lead poisoning in great artists. In addition to those mentioned above, many other artists across several centuries will be discussed, some being Rubens, Goya, Fortuny, Van Gogh, Renoir, Dufy, Klee, Frida Kahlo, and Portinari. This chapter also briefly mentions the possibility of lead poisoning in two famous composers: Beethoven and Handel. Whether suffering from lead poisoning or not, about which we cannot always be sure, we should still highlight and admire such geniuses fighting their disorders to bequeath us their immortals works. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Saturn Designs for Small Proton-Backlighter Targets at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Browning, L. T.; Le Pape, S.; Park, H.-S.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2017-10-01

    Small exploding-pusher capsules with D3He fill are ideal sources for high-resolution proton radiography for many high-energy-density experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). However, the laser energy that can be delivered to these capsules is currently limited by the need to minimize laser blowby-unabsorbed laser light passing by the target into opposing beam ports with the potential of damaging laser optics. This issue arises because it is logistically convenient to leave the indirect-drive phase plates in place. Saturn targets, in which the capsule is surrounded by a toroidal plastic ring, promise to remove the energy limitation by blocking blowby light, permitting a brighter proton source. A design has been developed using the 2-D hydrodynamics code SAGE for a ring that can be used to block the laser blowby for target diameters from 440 to 866 μm and drive beams from any of the NIF quads. Full-power NIF beams can be safely used. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Saturn's F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2015-09-01

    Saturn's F ring is a narrow ring of icy particles, located 3,400 km beyond the outer edge of the main ring system. Enigmatically, the F ring is accompanied on either side by two small satellites, Prometheus and Pandora, which are called shepherd satellites. The inner regular satellites of giant planets are thought to form by the accretion of particles from an ancient massive ring and subsequent outward migration. However, the origin of a system consisting of a narrow ring and shepherd satellites remains poorly understood. Here we present N-body numerical simulations to show that a collision of two of the small satellites that are thought to accumulate near the main ring's outer edge can produce a system similar to the F ring and its shepherd satellites. We find that if the two rubble-pile satellites have denser cores, such an impact results in only partial disruption of the satellites and the formation of a narrow ring of particles between two remnant satellites. Our simulations suggest that the seemingly unusual F ring system is a natural outcome at the final stage of the formation process of the ring-satellite system of giant planets.

  15. Comparative Examination of Plasmoid Ejection at Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Vogt, Marissa F.

    2011-01-01

    The onset of magnetic reconnection in the near-tail of Earth, long known to herald the fast magnetospheric convection that leads to geomagnetic storms and substorms, is very closely associated with the formation and down-tail ejection of magnetic loops or flux ropes called plasmoids. Plasmoids form as a result of the fragmentation of preexisting cross-tail current sheet as a result of magnetic reconnection. Depending upon the number, location, and intensity of the individual reconnection X-lines and how they evolve, some of these loop-like or helical magnetic structures may also be carried sunward. At the inner edge of the tail they are expected to "re-reconnect' with the planetary magnetic field and dissipate. Plasmoid ejection has now been observed in the magnetotails of Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. These magnetic field and charged particle measurements have been taken by the MESSENGER, Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, and numerous Earth missions. Here we present a comparative examination of the structure and dynamics of plasmoids observed in the magnetotails of these 5 planets. The results are used to learn more about how these magnetic structures form and to assess similarities and differences in the nature of magnetotail reconnection at these planets.

  16. Low-Frequency Extensions of the Saturn Kilometric Radiation as a Proxy for Magnetospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J. J.; Jackman, C. M.; Lamy, L.; Kurth, W. S.; Whiter, D. K.

    2018-01-01

    Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) is an auroral radio emission which can be detected quasi-continuously by the Cassini spacecraft. It has been shown to respond to magnetotail reconnection and to changes in solar wind conditions and thus offers the potential to be used as a remote proxy for magnetospheric dynamics. This work has developed criteria for the selection of low-frequency extensions (LFEs), powerful intensifications of the main SKR emission, accompanied by an expansion of the SKR to lower frequencies. Upon examination of data from the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument, we detect 282 LFE events which are further grouped into two categories. Shorter events (20 h), associated with increases in solar wind dynamic pressure, can last multiple planetary rotations, have a median waiting time of ˜20 days, and show no relationship with SKR phase. An analysis of the power emitted during LFEs suggests that tail reconnection is not always observed or detected in situ which may partially explain the low correlation between LFEs and tail reconnection. We conclude that short LFEs are a good proxy for reconnection in the tail.

  17. Image, Image, Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    With all the talk today about accountability, budget cuts, and the closing of programs in public education, teachers cannot overlook the importance of image in the field of industrial technology. It is very easy for administrators to cut ITE (industrial technology education) programs to save school money--money they might shift to teaching the…

  18. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  19. A Saturn-Like Complex Composed of Macrocyclic Oligothiophene and C60 Fullerene: Structure, Stability, and Photophysical Properties in Solution and the Solid State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Park, Kyu Hyung; Otani, Hiroyuki; Aoyagi, Shinobu; Nishinaga, Tohru; Aso, Yoshio; Kim, Dongho; Iyoda, Masahiko

    2018-03-12

    A Saturn-like 1:1 complex composed of macrocyclic oligothiophene E-8T7A and C 60 fullerene (C 60 ) was synthesized to investigate the interaction between macrocyclic oligothiophenes and C 60 in solution and the solid state. Because the Saturn-like 1:1 complex E-8T7A⋅C 60 is mainly stabilized by van der Waals interactions between C 60 and the sulfur atoms of the E-8T7A macrocycle, C 60 is rather weakly incorporated inside the macro-ring in solution. However, in the solid state the Saturn-like 1:1 complex preferentially formed single crystals or nanostructured polymorphs. Interestingly, X-ray analysis and theoretical calculations exhibited hindered rotation of C 60 in the Saturn-like complex due to interactions between C 60 and the sulfur atoms. Furthermore, the photoinduced charge transfer (CT) interaction between E-8T7A and C 60 in solution was investigated by using femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. The ultrafast TA spectral changes in the photoinduced absorption bands were attributed to the CT process in the Saturn-like structure. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. 3D modeling of lightning-induced electromagnetic pulses on Venus, Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Invernón, Francisco J.; Luque, Alejandro; Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric electricity is a common phenomenon in some planets of The Solar System. We know that atmospheric discharges exist on Earth and gaseous planets; however, some characteristics of lightning on Saturn and Jupiter as well as their relevance on the effects of lightning in the atmospheres of these planets are still unknown. In the case of Venus, there exist some radio evidences of lightning, but the lack of optical observations suggests exploring indirect methods of detection, such as searching for lightning-induced transient optical emissions from the upper atmosphere. The Akatsuki probe, currently orbiting Venus, is equipped with a camera whose temporal resolution is high enough to detect optical emissions from lightning discharges and to measure nightglow enhancements. In this work, we extend previous models [1,2] to investigate the chemical impact and transient optical emissions produced by possible lightning-emitted electromagnetic pulses (EMP) in Venus, Saturn and Jupiter. Using a 3D FDTD ("Finite Differences Time Domain") model we solve the Maxwell equations coupled with the Langevin equation for electrons [3] and with a kinetic scheme, different for each planetary atmosphere. This method is useful to investigate the temporal and spatial impact of lightning-induced electromagnetic fields in the atmosphere of each planet for different lightning characteristics (e.g. energy released, orientation). This 3D FDTD model allows us to include the saturnian and jovian background magnetic field inclination and magnitude at different latitudes, and to determine the effects of different lightning channel inclinations. Results provide useful information to interpret lightning observations on giant gaseous planets and in the search for indirect optical signals from atmospheric discharge on Venus such as fast nightglow transient enhancements related to lightning as seen on Earth. Furthermore, we underline the observation of electrical discharges characteristics as a

  1. Retrieval of Composition and Shadowing Properties of Saturn's Rings from Cassini UVIS Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E. T.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.

    2017-12-01

    The rings of Saturn consist of centimeter-to-meter sized particles that are covered by a layer of regolith whose grains consist of water ice and some small amount of contaminant that is delivered to the rings through micrometeorite impacts. The mixing of the water ice and meteoritic material is affected by inter-particle collisions and from the meteoritic impacts. Two types of mixtures considered in this investigation are 1) discrete grains of water ice and contaminant and 2) grains of water ice with inclusions of contaminant embedded within the grain. The rough regolith-covered surfaces may result in shadowing between grains that darkens the observed rings reflectance spectra. We compared reflectance spectra of the rings at far ultraviolet wavelengths taken by the Cassini UVIS to models of the rings that include a shadowing function with both types of mixtures and with different contaminant materials. One contaminant that we used was the dark material of Comet 67P, where we retrieved the single scattering albedo at UVIS wavelengths from reflectance spectra measured by the ALICE spectrograph on the Rosetta spacecraft. We compared the reflectance over a range of phase angles with a Hapke model that included macroscopic roughness in order to account for shadowing in the Comet 67P material. We retrieved the ring particle albedo at discrete radial regions in the rings using reflectance spectra over a wide range of phase angles. We corrected the retrieved ring particle albedo for roughness using the shadowing function and then compared the "smooth" ring particle albedo to compositional models. We found that a two-component discrete grain model consisting of greater than ninety percent water ice and contaminant from either Triton tholin or material spectrally similar to Comet 67P were indistinguishable when compared to the UVIS spectra. This suggests a common darkening material and/or processing between the rings and Comet 67P.

  2. Plasma in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere and the implications for global circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcandrews, Hazel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, M G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, R L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackman, C M [IMPERIAL COLLEGE; Khurana, K K [UNIV OF CAL; Sittler, E C [NASA/GSFC; Coates, A J [MSSL; Dougherty, M K [IMPERIAL COLLEGE

    2009-01-01

    We present a bulk ion flow map from the nightside equatorial region of Saturn's magnetosphere derived from the Cassini CAPS ion mass spectrometer data. The map clearly demonstrates the dominance of corotation flow over radial flow and suggests that the flux tubes sampled are still closed and attached to the planet up to distances of 50 R{sub s}. The plasma characteristics in the near-midnight region are described and indicate a transition between the region of the magnetosphere containing plasma on closed drift paths and that containing flux tubes which may not complete a full rotation around the planet. Data from the electron spectrometer reveal two plasma states of high and low density. These are attributed either to the sampling of mass-loaded and depleted flux tubes, respectively, or to the latitudinal structure of the plasma sheet Depleted, returning flux tubes are not, in general, directly observed in the ions, although the electron observations suggest that such a process must take place in order to produce the low density population. Flux tube content is conserved below a limIt defined by the mass-loading and magnetic field strength and indicates that the flux tubes sampled may survive their passage through the tail. The conditions for mass release are evaluated using measured densities, angular velocities and magnetic field strength, The results suggest that for the relatively dense ion populations detectable by IMS, the condition for flux-tube breakage has not yet been exceeded, However, the low-density regimes observed in the electron data suggest that loaded flux tubes at greater distances do exceed the threshold for mass loss and subsequently return to the inner magnetosphere significantly depleted of plasma.

  3. An Interesting Thermal Enhancement Near Zero Phase In Saturn's A Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, B. D.; Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S. H.; Pearl, J. C.; Altobelli, N.; Edgington, S. G.; Flasar, F. M.; CIRS Team

    2005-08-01

    Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations of Saturn's main rings during the first set of orbits designed for prime ring viewing geometry have shown the main rings to be thermally complex. The thermal appearance of the rings changes significantly with viewing geometry, ring local time and phase angle. During one observation near the zero phase on the rings, the CIRS data showed an unexpected thermal enhancement in the A Ring at a phase angle of 0.3 degrees and a local time of 6 hours. A similar radial scan taken one orbit later at a phase angle of 1.5 degrees showed a similar thermal enhancement. For comparison, comparable data taken in the same region, at the same ring opening and local time, but at a phase angle of ˜ 10.5 degrees, showed a lower effective temperature by about 2 degrees than the zero phase measurement. Afternoon scans of this region at phase angles of 14 to 32 degrees show derived temperatures that are comparable to those seen in the morning near zero phase. In general, the A ring appears to be 4 to 5 degrees warmer in the afternoon than in the morning, except at zero phase, where the A ring temperature is warmer than the afternoon temperature. Future observations are planned to help us understand what has been observed near zero phase. One possible explanation for this enhancement in ring temperature is the clumping of particles into larger irregular shaped structures where the inability to see into warmer chasms and craterlike features would be impaired except for viewing conditions near the zero phase point much like the Thermal Beaming effect observed on asteroids and other solar system bodies without atmospheres. This work was performed at JPL/Caltech under contract with NASA.

  4. Kappa distributions in Saturn's magnetosphere: energetic ion moments using Cassini/MIMI measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, K.; Roussos, E.; Regoli, L.; Paranicas, C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Moments of the charged particle distribution function are a compact way of characterizing some of the properties of different magnetospheric regions. Following our previous analyses (Dialynas et al. 2009) and the techniques described in Dialynas et al. (2017), in the present study we use κ-Distribution fits to combine CHEMS (3 to 236 keV/e), LEMMS (0.024 220 keV) H+ and O+ energetic ion spectra covering measurements made in 2004-2016 to calculate the >20 keV energetic ion moments inside Saturn's magnetosphere. We use the Khurana et al. [2007] magnetic field model to map the ion measurements to the equatorial plane and produce the equatorial distributions of all ion integral moments, focusing on partial density (n), integral intensity (In), partial pressure (P), integral energy intensity (IE); as well as the characteristic energy (Ec=Ie/In), Temperature and κ-index of these ions as a function of Local Time (00:00 to 24:00 hrs) and L-Shell (5-20 Rs). The Roelof and Skinner [2000] model is then utilized to retrieve the equatorial H+ and O+ P, n and T in both local time and L-shell. We find that a) although the PH+ and PO+ are nearly comparable, H+ have higher IE and In at all radial distances (L>5) and local times; b) the 12Η+, ΓΟ+), are consistent with the Arridge et al. [2009] results. Dialynas K. et al. 2009, JGR, 114, A01212 Dialynas K. et al. 2017, Elsevier, ISBN: 9780128046388 Khurana K. K. et al. 2007, AGU, abstract #P44A-01 Roelof E. & A. Skinner 2000, SSR, 91, 437-459 Arridge C. S. et al. 2009, PSS, 57, 2032-2047

  5. High-intensity statin therapy alters the natural history of diabetic coronary atherosclerosis: insights from SATURN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Brian; Puri, Rishi; Cho, Leslie; Shao, Mingyuan; Ballantyne, Christie M; Barter, Phillip J; Chapman, M John; Erbel, Raimund; Libby, Peter; Raichlen, Joel S; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Nissen, Steven E; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    Although statins can induce coronary atheroma regression, this benefit has yet to be demonstrated in diabetic individuals. We tested the hypothesis that high-intensity statin therapy may promote coronary atheroma regression in patients with diabetes. The Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin (SATURN) used serial intravascular ultrasound measures of coronary atheroma volume in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. This analysis compared changes in biochemistry and coronary percent atheroma volume (PAV) in patients with (n = 159) and without (n = 880) diabetes. At baseline, patients with diabetes had lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels but higher triglyceride and CRP levels compared with patients without diabetes. At follow-up, diabetic patients had lower levels of LDL-C (61.0 ± 20.5 vs. 66.4 ± 22.9 mg/dL, P = 0.01) and HDL-C (46.3 ± 10.6 vs. 49.9 ± 12.0 mg/dL, P 70 mg/dL (-0.31 ± 0.23 vs. -1.01 ± 0.21%, P = 0.03) but similar when LDL-C levels were ≤70 mg/dL (-1.09 ± 0.16 vs. -1.24 ± 0.16%, P = 0.50). High-intensity statin therapy alters the progressive nature of diabetic coronary atherosclerosis, yielding regression of disease in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  6. Coupled rotational dynamics of Saturn's thermosphere and magnetosphere: a thermospheric modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We use a numerical model of Saturn's thermosphere to investigate the flow of angular momentum from the atmosphere to the magnetosphere. The thermosphere model is driven by Joule heating and ion drag calculated from a simple model of the magnetospheric plasma flows and a fixed model of the ionospheric conductivity. We describe an initial study in which our plasma flow model is fixed and find that this leads to several inconsistencies in our results. We thus describe an improved model in which the plasma flows are allowed to vary in response to the structure of the thermospheric winds. Using this improved model we are able to analyse in detail the mechanism by which angular momentum extracted from the thermosphere by the magnetosphere is replaced by transport from the lower atmosphere. Previously, this transport was believed to be dominated by vertical transport due to eddy viscosity. Our results suggest that transport within the upper atmosphere by meridional winds is a much more important mechanism. As a consequence of this, we find that the rotational structures of the thermosphere and magnetosphere are related in a more complex way than the eddy viscosity model implies. Rather than the thermosphere behaving as a passive component of the system, the thermosphere-magnetosphere interaction is shown to be a two-way process in which rotational structures develop mutually. As an example of this, we are able to show that thermospheric dynamics offer an explanation of the small degree of super-corotation that has been observed in the inner magnetosphere. These results call into question the usefulness of the effective Pedersen conductivity as a parameterisation of the neutral atmosphere. We suggest that a two-parameter model employing the true Pedersen conductivity and the true thermospheric rotation velocity may be a more accurate representation of the thermospheric behaviour.

  7. Modelling of the ring current in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giampieri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a ring current inside Saturn's magnetosphere was first suggested by Smith et al. (1980 and Ness et al. (1981, 1982, in order to explain various features in the magnetic field observations from the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. Connerney et al. (1983 formalized the equatorial current model, based on previous modelling work of Jupiter's current sheet and estimated its parameters from the two Voyager data sets. Here, we investigate the model further, by reconsidering the data from the two Voyager spacecraft, as well as including the Pioneer 11 flyby data set.

    First, we obtain, in closed form, an analytic expression for the magnetic field produced by the ring current. We then fit the model to the external field, that is the difference between the observed field and the internal magnetic field, considering all the available data. In general, through our global fit we obtain more accurate parameters, compared to previous models. We point out differences between the model's parameters for the three flybys, and also investigate possible deviations from the axial and planar symmetries assumed in the model. We conclude that an accurate modelling of the Saturnian disk current will require taking into account both of the temporal variations related to the condition of the magnetosphere, as well as non-axisymmetric contributions due to local time effects.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; planetary magnetospheres; plasma sheet

  8. Lagrange L4/L5 points and the origin of our Moon and Saturn's moons and rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J Richard

    2005-12-01

    The current standard theory of the origin of the Moon is that the Earth was hit by a giant impactor the size of Mars causing ejection of debris from its mantle that coalesced to form the moon; but where did this Mars-sized impactor come from? Isotopic evidence suggests that it came from 1 AU radius in the solar nebula, and computer simulations are consistent with its approaching Earth on a zero-energy parabolic trajectory. How could such a large object form at 1 AU in a quiescent disk of planetesimals without having already collided with the Earth at an earlier epoch before having the chance to grow large? Belbruno and Gott propose that the giant impactor could have formed in a stable orbit from debris at the Earth's Lagrange point L(5) (or L(4)). It would grow quietly by accretion at L(5) (or L(4)), but eventually gravitational perturbations by other growing planetesimals would kick it out into a horseshoe orbit and finally into a chaotic creeping orbit, which Belbruno and Gott show would, with high probability, hit the Earth on a near zero-energy parabolic trajectory. We can see other examples of this phenomenon occurring in the solar system. Asteroid 2002AA29 is in a horseshoe orbit relative to the Earth that looks exactly like the horseshoe orbits that Belbruno and Gott found for objects that had been perturbed from L(4)/L(5). The regular moons of Saturn are made of ice and have the same albedo as the ring particles (ice chunks, plus some dust). We (J. R. Gott, R. Vanderbei, and E. Belbruno) propose that the regular icy moons of Saturn (out to the orbit of Titan), which are all in nearly circular orbits, formed out of a thin disk of planetesimals (ice chunks) rather like the rings of Saturn today only larger in extent. In such a situation formation of objects at L(4)/L(5) might be expected. Indeed, Saturn's moon Dione is accompanied by moons (Helene and Polydeuces) at both L(4) and L(5) Lagrange points, and Saturn's moon Tethys is also accompanied by moons

  9. The role of collective self-gravity in the nonlinear evolution of viscous overstability in Saturn's rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marius; Schmidt, Jürgen; Salo, Heikki

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the influence of collective self-gravity forces on the nonlinear evolution of the viscous overstability in Saturn's dense rings. Local N-body simulations, incorporating vertical and radial collective self-gravity are performed. Vertical self-gravity is mimicked through an increased frequency of vertical oscillations, while radial self-gravity is approximated by solving the Poisson equation for a thin disk in Fourier space. Direct particle-particle forces are omitted, while the magnitude of radial self gravity is controlled by assigning a variable surface mass density to the system's homogeneous ground state. We compare our simulations with large-scale isothermal and non-isothermal hydrodynamic model calculations, including radial self-gravity and employing transport coefficients derived in Salo et al. (2001). We concentrate on optical depths τ=1.5-2, appropriate to model Saturn's dense rings. Our isothermal and non isothermal hydrodynamic results in the limit of vanishing self-gravity compare very well with the studies of Latter&Ogilvie (2010) and Rein&latter (2013), respectively.With non-vanishing radial self-gravity we find that the wavelengths of saturated overstable wave trains are located in close vicinity of the local minimum of the nonlinear dispersion relation for a particular surface density. Good agreement is found between non-isothermal hydrodynamics and N-body simulations for disks with strong radial self-gravity, while the largest deviations occur for a weak but non-vanishing self-gravity.The resulting saturation wavelengths of the viscous overstability for moderate and strong radial self-gravity (λ~ 200-300m) agree reasonably well with the length scale of periodic micro structure in Saturn's inner A and B ring, as found by Cassini.

  10. Precession of the orbital nodes of Jupiter and Saturn triggered by the mutual perturbation: A model of two rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratyev, B. P.

    2014-09-01

    The problem of the precession of the orbital planes of Jupiter and Saturn under the influence of mutual gravitational perturbations was formulated and solved using a simple dynamical model. Using the Gauss method, the planetary orbits are modeled by material circular rings, intersecting along the diameter at a small angle α. The planet masses, semimajor axes and inclination angles of orbits correspond to the rings. What is new is that each ring has an angular momentum equal to the orbital angular momentum of the planet. Contrary to popular belief, it was proved that the orbital resonance 5: 2 does not preclude the use of the ring model. Moreover, the period of averaging of the disturbing force ( T ≈ 1332 yr) proves to be appreciably greater than a conventionally used period (≈900 yr). The mutual potential energy of rings and the torque of gravitational forces between the rings were calculated. We compiled and solved the system of differential equations for the spatial motion of rings. It was established that a perturbing torque causes the precession and simultaneous rotation of the orbital planes of Jupiter and Saturn. Moreover, the opposite orbit nodes on the Laplace plane coincide and perform a secular movement in retrograde direction with the same velocity of 25.6″/yr and the period T J = T S ≈ 50687 yr. These results are close to those obtained in the general theory (25.93″/yr), which confirms the adequacy of the developed model. It was found that the vectors of the angular velocity of orbital rings move counterclockwise over circular cones and describe circles on the celestial sphere with radii β1 ≈ 0.8403504° (Saturn) and β2 ≈ 0.3409296° (Jupiter) around the point which is located at an angular distance of 1.647607° from the ecliptic pole.

  11. ON THE MIGRATION OF JUPITER AND SATURN: CONSTRAINTS FROM LINEAR MODELS OF SECULAR RESONANT COUPLING WITH THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnor, Craig B.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the late divergent migration of Jupiter and Saturn may have perturbed the terrestrial planets. Using a modified secular model we have identified six secular resonances between the ν 5 frequency of Jupiter and Saturn and the four apsidal eigenfrequencies of the terrestrial planets (g 1-4 ). We derive analytic upper limits on the eccentricity and orbital migration timescale of Jupiter and Saturn when these resonances were encountered to avoid perturbing the eccentricities of the terrestrial planets to values larger than the observed ones. Because of the small amplitudes of the j = 2, 3 terrestrial eigenmodes the g 2 – ν 5 and g 3 – ν 5 resonances provide the strongest constraints on giant planet migration. If Jupiter and Saturn migrated with eccentricities comparable to their present-day values, smooth migration with exponential timescales characteristic of planetesimal-driven migration (τ ∼ 5-10 Myr) would have perturbed the eccentricities of the terrestrial planets to values greatly exceeding the observed ones. This excitation may be mitigated if the eccentricity of Jupiter was small during the migration epoch, migration was very rapid (e.g., τ ∼< 0.5 Myr perhaps via planet-planet scattering or instability-driven migration) or the observed small eccentricity amplitudes of the j = 2, 3 terrestrial modes result from low probability cancellation of several large amplitude contributions. Results of orbital integrations show that very short migration timescales (τ < 0.5 Myr), characteristic of instability-driven migration, may also perturb the terrestrial planets' eccentricities by amounts comparable to their observed values. We discuss the implications of these constraints for the relative timing of terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and the origin of the so-called Late Heavy Bombardment of the Moon 3.9 ± 0.1 Ga ago. We suggest that the simplest way to satisfy these dynamical constraints may be for the bulk of any giant

  12. Surface roughness of Saturn's rings and ring particles inferred from thermal phase curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Turner, Neal; Spilker, Linda

    2017-10-01

    We analyze thermal phase curves of all the main rings of Saturn (the A, B, C rings, and the Cassini division) measured by both the far-IR and mid-IR detectors of the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). All the rings show temperature increases toward zero phase angle, known as an opposition effect or thermal beaming. For the C ring and Cassini division, which have low optical depths, intra-particle shadowing is considered the dominant mechanism causing the effect. On the other hand, the phase curves of the optically thick B and A rings steepen significantly with decreasing absolute solar elevation angle from 21° to 14°, suggesting inter-particle shadowing plays an important role in these rings. We employ an analytic roughness model to estimate the degrees of surface roughness of the rings or ring particles. For optically thin rings, an isolated particle covered by spherical segment craters is employed while for the thick rings we approximate a packed particle layer as a slab covered by craters. The particles in the thin rings are found to have generally rough surfaces, except in the middle C ring. Across the C ring, the optical depth correlates with the degree of surface roughness. This may indicate that surface roughness comes mainly from particle clumping, while individual particles have rather smooth surfaces. For the optically thick rings, the surface roughness of the particle layer is found to be moderate. The modeled phase curves of optically thick rings are shallow if the phase angle change is primarily due to change of observer azimuthal angle. On the other hand, the phase curves are steep if the phase angle change is due to change of observer elevation angle, as inter-particle shadows become visible at higher observer elevation. In addition, the area of shadowed facets increases with decreasing solar elevation angle. These combined effects explain the large seasonal change of the phase curve steepness observed for the thick rings. The degrees

  13. HST-STIS Spectra of Saturn's Rings and Implications for Their Reddening Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We obtained HST-STIS spectra of Saturn's main rings in May 2011, using the G230L (and G430L) gratings, with final averaged radial resolution of 160 (and 330) km/pixel. The dataset filled a previous 200-330nm "spectral gap" between Cassini and ground-based spectra. The data provide radial profiles as a function of wavelength, but our most basic product at this point is a set of very low-noise spectra, radially averaged over broad regions of the rings (A, B, C, and Cassini Division). The raw spectra required special processing to remove artifacts due to extended-source grating scatter. We have modeled the spectra using a new particle surface model, which corrects for on-surface shadowing due to the likely very rough ring particle surfaces, and avoids overestimation of intra-mixed "neutral absorber". We correct for non-classical layer effects and finite ring optical depth, and relate our observed reflectivities to the spherical albedos of individual smooth particles. We model these smooth particle albedos using standard Hapke theory for regolith grain mixtures that are either homogeneous and "intramixed" (nonicy absorbers dispersed in water ice regolith grains) or heterogeneous "intimate" mixtures. As candidates for the nonicy contaminants we have considered amorphous carbon, aromatic-rich and aliphatic-rich organic tholins, silicates, hematite and iron metal. For the A and B rings, we find that iron metal (including a new theoretical estimate of the refractive indices of nanometer-sized grains of iron) is not spectrally steep enough in the 200-300nm range, and that aliphatic-rich tholins are either too steep at short wavelengths or too flat at long wavelengths. However, less than 1% by mass of aromatic-rich tholins provides a very good fit across the entire spectral range with no gratuitous "neutral absorber" needed, and a minimum of additional free parameters. The best fits require forward-scattering regolith grains. For the C Ring and Cassini Division, additional

  14. Noise measurements in shunted, shorted, and fully electroded quartz gauges in the saturn plasma radiation source x-ray simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, W.H.; Greenwoll, J.I.; Smith, C.W.; Johnson, D.E.; De La Cruz, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes recent work to improve the measurement of the stress response of materials to intense, short pulses of radiation. When Saturn fires, large prompt electrical noise pulses are induced in stress measurement circuits. The conventional wisdom has been that the shorted guard ring quartz gauge was the only configuration with acceptable prompt signal-to-noise characteristics for stress measurements in this pulsed radiation environment. However, because of abnormal signal distortion, the shorted guard ring gauge is restricted to a maximum stress of about 8 kbars. Below this level, the normal, quantified signal distortion is correctable with analytical deconvolution techniques. The shunted guard ring gauge is acceptable for high fidelity measurements to about 25 kbars with negligible signal distortion. Experiments were conducted on the Saturn soft x-ray source which show that higher fidelity shunted guard ring gauges can successfully measure stress with acceptable induced noise. We also found that a 50-ohm impedance matching resistor at the gauge reduced the prompt noise amplitude and improved the baseline quality of the measurement prior to shock wave arrival. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Spectrophotometric study of Saturn's main rings by means of Monte Carlo ray-tracing and Hapke's theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarniello, Mauro; Filacchione, Gianrico; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Hedman, Matthew M.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Brown, Robert H.; Cerroni, Priscilla; Spilker, Linda

    2017-10-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's rings from Cassini-VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) observations. The dataset used for this analysis is represented by ten radial spectrograms of the rings which have been derived in Filacchione et al. (2014) by radial mosaics produced by VIMS. Spectrograms report the measured radiance factor of the main Saturn's rings as a function of both radial distance (from 73.500 to 141.375 km) and wavelength (0.35-5.1 µm) for different observation geometries (phase angle ranging in the 1.9°-132.2° interval). We take advantage of a Monte Carlo ray-tracing routine to characterize the photometric behavior of the rings at each wavelength and derive the spectral Bond albedo of rings particles. This quantity is used to infer the composition of the regolith covering rings particles by applying Hapke's theory. Four different regions, characterized by different optical depths, and respectively located in the C ring, inner B ring, mid B ring and A ring, have been investigated. Results from spectral modeling indicate that rings spectrum can be described by water ice with minimal inclusion of organic materials (tholin, exogenous material, which is more effective in the less dense regions of the rings because of their lower content of pure water ice.

  16. Storm clouds on Saturn: Lightning-induced chemistry and associated materials consistent with Cassini/VIMS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, K.H.; Delitsky, M.L.; Momary, T.W.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Thunderstorm activity on Saturn is associated with optically detectable clouds that are atypically dark throughout the near-infrared. As observed by Cassini/VIMS, these clouds are ~20% less reflective than typical neighboring clouds throughout the spectral range from 0.8 ??m to at least 4.1 ??m. We propose that active thunderstorms originating in the 10-20 bar water-condensation region vertically transport dark materials at depth to the ~1 bar level where they can be observed. These materials in part may be produced by chemical processes associated with lightning, likely within the water clouds near the ~10 bar freezing level of water, as detected by the electrostatic discharge of lightning flashes observed by Cassini/RPWS (e.g., Fischer et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev., 137, 271-285). We review lightning-induced pyrolytic chemistry involving a variety of Saturnian constituents, including hydrogen, methane, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, phosphine, and water. We find that the lack of absorption in the 1-2 ??m spectral region by lightning-generated sulfuric and phosphorous condensates renders these constituents as minor players in determining the color of the dark storm clouds. Relatively small particulates of elemental carbon, formed by lightning-induced dissociation of methane and subsequently upwelled from depth - perhaps embedded within and on the surface of spectrally bright condensates such as ammonium hydrosulfide or ammonia - may be a dominant optical material within the dark thunderstorm-related clouds of Saturn. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Observations in the Saturn system during approach and orbital insertion, with Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Baugh, N.; Griffith, C.A.; Hansen, G.B.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Momary, T.W.; Showalter, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer observed Phoebe, Iapetus, Titan and Saturn's rings during Cassini's approach and orbital insertion. Phoebe's surface contains water ice, CO2, and ferrous iron. lapetus contains CO2 and organic materials. Titan's atmosphere shows methane fluorescence, and night-side atmospheric emission that may be CO2 and CH3D. As determined from cloud motions, the winds at altitude 25-30 km in the south polar region of Titan appear to be moving in a prograde direction at velocity ???1 m s-1. Circular albedo features on Titan's surface, seen at 2.02 ??m, may be palimpsests remaining from the rheological adjustment of ancient impact craters. As such, their long-term persistence is of special interest in view of the expected precipitation of liquids and solids from the atmosphere. Saturn's rings have changed little in their radial structure since the Voyager flybys in the early 1980s. Spectral absorption bands tentatively attributed to Fe2+ suggest that iron-bearing silicates are a source of contamination of the C ring and the Cassini Division. ?? ESO 2006.

  18. Recent developments at JPL in the application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.; Benton, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Several techniques of a digital image-processing nature are illustrated which have proved useful in visual analysis of astronomical pictorial data. Processed digital scans of photographic plates of Stephans Quintet and NGC 4151 are used as examples to show how faint nebulosity is enhanced by high-pass filtering, how foreground stars are suppressed by linear interpolation, and how relative color differences between two images recorded on plates with different spectral sensitivities can be revealed by generating ratio images. Analyses are outlined which are intended to compensate partially for the blurring effects of the atmosphere on images of Stephans Quintet and to obtain more detailed information about Saturn's ring structure from low- and high-resolution scans of the planet and its ring system. The employment of a correlation picture to determine the tilt angle of an average spectral line in a low-quality spectrum is demonstrated for a section of the spectrum of Uranus.

  19. WWC Quick Review of the Article "Outcomes of a Prospective Trial of Student-Athlete Drug Testing: The Student Athlete Testing Using Random Notification ('SATURN') Study"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This study examines whether the Student Athlete Testing Using Random Notification ("SATURN") program affects illicit drug and alcohol use among student athletes. The study experienced high rates of sample attrition. Seven of the 18 study schools (39%) left the study and were not included in the analysis. Some students at the remaining…

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of systems hosting sub-Saturns (Petigura+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, E. A.; Sinukoff, E.; Lopez, E. D.; Crossfield, I. J. M.; Howard, A. W.; Brewer, J. M.; Fulton, B. J.; Isaacson, H. T.; Ciardi, D. R.; Howell, S. B.; Everett, M. E.; Horch, E. P.; Hirsch, L. A.; Weiss, L. M.; Schlieder, J. E.

    2017-07-01

    We observed K2-27, K2-32, K2-39, and K2-108 using the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) on the 10 m Keck Telescope I. K2-27 hosts a single transiting sub-Saturn, K2-27b, with P=6.77 days that was first confirmed in Van Eylen et al. (2016ApJ...820...56V) using RVs. We obtained 15 spectra of K2-27 with HIRES between 2015 February 5 and 2016 July 17. Van Eylen et al. (2016ApJ...820...56V) observed this star with HARPS, HARPS-N, and FIES. We included 6 and 19 measurements from HARPS and HARPS-N, respectively in our radial velocity analysis. K2-32 hosts three planets, K2-32b, K2-32c, and K2-32d, having orbital periods of P=8.99 days, 20.66 days, and 31.7 days, respectively, which are near the 3:2:1 period commensurability. The planets were first confirmed in Sinukoff et al. (2016ApJ...827...78S) using multiplicity arguments (Lissauer et al. 2012ApJ...750..112L). We obtained 31 spectra of K2-32 with HIRES between 2015 June 06 and 2016 August 20. Dai et al. (2016ApJ...823..115D) obtained 43 spectra with HARPS and 6 with PFS, which we included in our radial velocity analysis. K2-39 hosts a single transiting planet, K2-39b, with P=4.60 days, which was first confirmed by Van Eylen et al. (2016AJ....152..143V). We obtained 42 spectra of K2-39 with HIRES between 2015 August 10 and 2016 August 21. Van Eylen et al. (2016AJ....152..143V) obtained 7 spectra with HARPS, 6 with PFS, and 17 with FIES. K2-108, listed as EPIC-211736671 in the Ecliptic Planet Input Catalog (Huber et al. 2016, Cat. J/ApJS/224/2), is a V=12.3mag star observed during K2 Campaign 5. We identified K2-108 as a likely planet according to our team's standard methodology, described in detail in Crossfield et al. 2016 (Cat. J/ApJS/226/7). In brief, we identified a set of transits having P=4.73 days and elevated K2-108 to the status of "planet candidate". We obtained 20 spectra of K2-108 with HIRES between 2015 December 23 and 2016 November 25. (2 data files).

  1. Last Looks at the Eye of Saturn by Cassini/VIMS During the Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momary, Thomas W.; Baines, Kevin H.; Badman, Sarah; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe

    2017-10-01

    A lasting remnant of the Great Storm that erupted on Saturn in late 2010 has been a massive lone anticyclone persisting to the present time in a NH3-dry 5-µm-bright “desert” zone that spans the entire Saturnian globe at 34o N. We have been observing this oval storm with Cassini/VIMS since 2011 and, in 2017, as Cassini performs its Grand Finale orbits close to the planet, have captured it at our highest resolution since January 2012 at 260 km/pixel - enough to resolve spiral structure inside the oval at 5 µm. The spot drifts latitudinally in Saturn’s zonal currents: it was at 35.9o planetocentric latitude in May 2011, wandered northward to 37.8o in 2012, hovered near 37o through 2013, meandered as far south as 36.5o in 2014, drifted northward to 37o in 2015, and then returned back to about 36.3o in 2016, where it remains presently. It has also periodically bumped up against the dark band above it, spinning off material in 2013, 2015, and 2017. We measured a prograde zonal drift speed of 22 m/s in 2012, increasing as much as 60% through 2013, then relaxing to a more moderate 15 m/s in 2014 and 2015. It slowed considerably in 2016 to 4.7 m/s and is currently drifting slightly faster at 8.5 m/s. The spot has varied in size over time as it spins, spanning 4.9o x 3.2o in 2011, elongating to 7.3o x 2.9o by 2013, contracting to 5.5o x 2.9o in 2014, enlarging again to 9o x 4o in 2015, and contracting currently to 7.0o x 3.2o (6100 x 3200 km) in 2017, symmetrically oval in shape. It has varied in terms of cloudiness, being 90% 5-µm dark (obscured) in 2011, whereas by 2013 it was mostly bright (clear) with a thin dark edge. It was 90% dark in 2015, and in 2017 is about 65% obscured, with a bright central eye. Utilizing night observations to isolate thermal flux, we have found that the mean 5-µm flux coming from the anticyclone has diminished steadily by about 75% since 2013. The entire storm latitude of ~34o N itself has remained persistently 5-µm bright since 2011

  2. CASSINI ORBITER SATURN ISSNA/ISSWA 5 MIDR VERSION 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images of the icy Saturnian satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Iapetus, and Phoebe, derived by the Voyager and Cassini cameras are used to produce new...

  3. Spherical microparticles with Saturn ring defects and their self-assembly across the nematic to smectic-A phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhail, K P; Čopar, S; Muševič, I; Dhara, Surajit

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental studies on the Saturn ring defect associated with a spherical microparticle across the nematic (N) to smectic-A (SmA) phase transition. We observe that the director distortion around the microparticle changes rapidly with temperature. The equilibrium interparticle separation and the angle between two quadrupolar particles in the N phase are larger than those of the SmA phase. They are almost independent of the temperature in both phases, except for a discontinuous jump at the transition. We assembled a few particles using a laser tweezer to form a two-dimensional colloidal crystal in the N phase. The lattice structure of the crystal dissolves irreversibly across the N-SmA phase transition. The results on the pretransitional behavior of the defect are supported by the Landau-de Gennes Q-tensor modeling.

  4. Saturn's Magnetosphere Interaction with Titan for T9 Encounter: 3D Hybrid Modeling and Comparison with CAPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Global dynamics of ionized and neutral gases in the environment of Titan plays an important role in the interaction of Saturn s magnetosphere with Titan. Several hybrid simulations of this problem have already been done (Brecht et al., 2000; Kallio et al., 2004; Modolo et al., 2007a; Simon et al., 2007a, 2007b; Modolo and Chanteur, 2008). Observational data from CAPS for the T9 encounter (Sittler et al., 2009) indicates an absence of O(+) heavy ions in the upstream that change the models of interaction which were discussed in current publications (Kallio et al., 2004; Modolo et al., 2007a; Simon et al., 2007a, 2007b; Ma et al., 2007; Szego et al., 2007). Further analysis of the CAPS data shows very low density or even an absence of H(+) ions in upstream. In this paper we discuss two models of the interaction of Saturn s magnetosphere with Titan: (A) high density of H(+) ions in the upstream flow (0.1/cu cm), and (B) low density of H(+) ions in the upstream flow (0.02/cu cm). The hybrid model employs a fluid description for electrons and neutrals, whereas a particle approach is used for ions. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes and solve self-consistently for electric and magnetic fields. The model atmosphere includes exospheric H(+), H(2+), N(2+)and CH(4+) pickup ion production as well as an immobile background ionosphere and a shell distribution for active ionospheric ions (M(sub i)=28 amu). The hybrid model allows us to account for the realistic anisotropic ion velocity distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations with isotropic temperatures. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of Alfven wing-like structures. The results of the ion dynamics in Titan s environment are compared with Cassini T9 encounter data (CAPS).

  5. Lipoprotein(a) and coronary atheroma progression rates during long-term high-intensity statin therapy: Insights from SATURN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rishi; Ballantyne, Christie M; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Shao, Mingyuan; Barter, Philip; Libby, Peter; Chapman, M John; Erbel, Raimund; Arsenault, Benoit J; Raichlen, Joel S; Nissen, Steven E; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-like particle that associates with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). We examined relationships between Lp(a) measurements and changes in coronary atheroma volume following long-term maximally-intensive statin therapy in coronary artery disease patients. Study of coronary atheroma by intravascular ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin (SATURN) used serial intravascular ultrasound measures of coronary atheroma volume in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. Baseline and follow-up Lp(a) levels were measured in 915 of the 1039 SATURN participants, and were correlated with changes in percent atheroma volume (ΔPAV). Mean age was 57.7 ± 8.6 years, 74% were men, 96% were Caucasian, with statin use prior to study enrolment occurring in 59.3% of participants. Baseline [median (IQR)] LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and measured Lp(a) levels (mg/dL) were 114 (99, 137) and 17.4 (7.6, 52.9) respectively; follow-up measures were 60 (47, 77), and 16.5 (6.7, 57.7) (change from baseline: p  50 mg/dL. In coronary artery disease patients prescribed long-term maximally intensive statin therapy with low on-treatment LDL-C levels, measured Lp(a) levels (predominantly below the 50 mg/dL threshold) do not associate with coronary atheroma progression. Alternative biomarkers may thus associate with residual cardiovascular risk in such patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A model of the plasma flow and current in Saturn's polar ionosphere under conditions of strong Dungey cycle driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Jackman

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple model of the flow and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere. This model is motivated by theoretical reasoning, and guided quantitatively by in situ field and flow data from space missions, ground-based IR Doppler measurements, and Hubble Space Telescope images. The flow pattern consists of components which represent (1 plasma sub-corotation in the middle magnetosphere region resulting from plasma pick-up and radial transport from internal sources; (2 the Vasyliunas-cycle of internal plasma mass-loss down the magnetospheric tail at higher latitudes; and (3 the polar Dungey-cycle flow driven by the solar wind interaction. Upstream measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF indicate the occurrence of both extended low-field rarefaction intervals with essentially negligible Dungey-cycle flow, and few-day high-field compression regions in which the Dungey-cycle voltage peaks at a few hundred kV. Here we model the latter conditions when the Dungey-cycle is active, advancing on previous axi-symmetric models which may be more directly applicable to quiet conditions. For theoretical convenience the overall flow pattern is constructed by adding together two components - a purely rotational flow similar to previous axi-symmetric models, and a sun-aligned twin vortex representing the dawn-dusk asymmetry effects associated with the Vasyliunas-and Dungey-cycle flows. We calculate the horizontal ionospheric current associated with the flow and the field-aligned current from its divergence. These calculations show that a sheet of upward-directed field-aligned current flows at the boundary of open field lines which is strongly modulated in local-time by the Dungey-cycle flows. We then consider implications of the field-aligned current for magnetospheric electron acceleration and aurorae using two plasma source populations (hot outer magnetospheric electrons and cool dense magnetosheath electrons. Both sources display a

  7. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. I. Full-disk properties: 350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Bellucci, G.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Formisano, V.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Hansen, G.; Hibbitts, K.; Showalter, M.; Newman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Saturn's icy satellites are among the main scientific objectives of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment. This paper contains a first systematic and comparative analysis of the full-disk spectral properties of Dione, Enceladus, Epimetheus, Hyperion, Iapetus, Mimas, Phoebe, Rhea and Tethys as observed by VIMS from July 2004 to June 2005. The disk integrated properties (350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves at 550-2232 nm) and images of satellites are reported and discussed in detail together with the observed geometry. In general, the spectra in the visible spectral range are almost featureless and can be classified according to the spectral slopes: from the bluish Enceladus and Phoebe to the redder Iapetus, Hyperion and Epimetheus. In the 1000-1300 nm range the spectra of Enceladus, Tethys, Mimas and Rhea are characterized by a negative slope, consistent with a surface largely dominated by water ice, while the spectra of Iapetus, Hyperion and Phoebe show a considerable reddening pointing out the relevant role played by darkening materials present on the surface. In between these two classes are Dione and Epimetheus, which have a flat spectrum in this range. The main absorption bands identified in the infrared are the 1520, 2020, 3000 nm H2O/OH bands (for all satellites), although Iapetus dark terrains show mostly a deep 3000 nm band while the 1520 and 2020 nm bands are very faint. In this spectral range, the Iapetus spectrum is characterized by a strong reddening. The CO2 band at 4260 nm and the Fresnel ice peak around 3100 nm are evident only on Hyperion, Phoebe and Iapetus. The phase curves at 550 and at 2232 nm are reported for all the available observations in the 0??-144?? range; Rhea shows an opposition surge at visible wavelengths in the 0.5??-1.17?? interval. The improvement on the retrieval of the full-disk reflectance spectra can be appreciated by a direct comparison with ground-based telescopic data available

  8. Fine-Scale Structures In Saturn's Rings: Waves, Wakes And Ghosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Kevin

    2011-07-01

    The Cassini mission provided wonderful tools to explore Saturn, its satellites and its rings system. The UVIS instrument allowed stellar occultation observations of structures in the rings with the best resolution available (around 10 meters depending on geometry and navigation), bringing our understanding of the physics of the rings to the next level. In particular, we have been able to observe, dissect, model and test the interactions between the satellites and the rings. We first looked at kilometer-wide structures generated by resonances with satellites orbiting outside the main rings. The observation of structures in the C ring and their association with a few new resonances allowed us to estimate some constraints on the physical characteristics of the rings. However, most of our observed structures could not be explained with simple resonances with external satellites and some other mechanism has to be involved. We located four density waves associated with the Mimas 4:1, the Atlas 2:1, the Mimas 6:2 and the Pandora 4:2 Inner Lindblad Resonances and one bending wave excited by the Titan -1:0 Inner Vertical Resonance. We could estimate a range of surface mass density from 0.22 (± 0.03) to 1.42 (± 0.21) g cm^{-2} and mass extinction coefficient from 0.13 (± 0.03) to 0.28 (± 0.06) cm^{2} g^{-1}. These mass extinction coefficient values are higher than those found in the A ring (0.01 - 0.02 cm^{2} g^{-1}) and in the Cassini Division (0.07 - 0.12 cm^{2} g^{-1} from Colwell et al. (2009), implying smaller particle sizes in the C ring. We can therefore imagine that the particles composing these different rings have either different origins or that their size distributions are not primordial and have evolved differently. We also estimate the mass of the C ring to be between 3.7 (± 0.9)× 10^{16} kg and 7.9 (± 2.0)× 10^{16} kg, equivalent to a moon of 28.0 (± 2.3) km to 36.2 (± 3.0) km radius (a little larger than Pan or Atlas) with a density comparable to

  9. A Data-Model Comparison Approach to Understand the Source and Transport Mechanisms of keV-Energy Electrons at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Costa, D.; Clark, G. B.; Paranicas, C.; Menietti, J. D.; Tseng, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a multi-instrument data analysis and interpretation of Cassini observations that is guided by a theoretical model. Through this analysis, we discuss the source and transport mechanisms of energetic electrons at Saturn and attempt to explain their spatial distributions inside 20 planetary radii (Rs). Using only data sets from equatorial orbits, a recent analysis of Cassini MIMI/LEMMS, CAPS, and MAG data sets by Clark et al. (2014; doi:10.1016/j.pss.2014.07.004) demonstrated how the angular profiles (i.e., 'pancakes', 'isotropic', 'field-aligned', and 'butterfly' PADs) of keV-energy electrons are statistically distributed at Saturn. Through a theoretical transport model, Clark et al. (2014) also demonstrated the role of Saturn's neutral gas torus with adiabatic transport to explain the spatial distribution of electrons. However, their data/model comparison was limited to a case study analysis and the data-model comparison results still do not provide the full picture in understanding the source of keV-energy electrons and their radial evolution. Here we continue to refine our understanding of the spatial distributions of keV-energy electrons at Saturn with the use of a data-model comparison approach. Using the full set of MIMI/LEMMS particle data available for the period mid-2004 to mid-2014, we carefully reexamine the role of neutrals and adiabatic transport for the region ~10 to 15 Rs. Using PAD profiles deduced from data sets at 15 Rs, we build different boundary conditions for our computational model and discuss how angular profiles radially evolve throughout the region ~10-15 Rs and which PADs at our boundary condition can explain the Cassini observations near ~10 Rs. We also present the results from our ongoing investigation of the dominant processes inside ~10 Rs and focus on the impact of chorus emission on the energetic electron distributions.

  10. Determination of the 20 MeV linear accelerator, new injector for the synchrotron Saturne. Choice of the electrical and dynamical particle parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prome, M.

    1968-12-01

    This report takes place in the general determination of the 20 MeV linear accelerator which will be the new Saturne injector; it deals with particle dynamics. Starting from beam requirements at the output of the linac, cells lengths with variable synchronous phase angle, buncher and de-buncher parameters, beam emittances at the output in several phase spaces are successively determined. (author) [fr

  11. First results of ISO-SWS observations of Saturn : Detection of CO2, CH3C2H, C4H2 and tropospheric H2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graauw, Th.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Bezard, B.; Drossart, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Beintema, D. A.; Griffin, M.; Heras, A.; Kessler, M.; Leech, K.; Lellouch, E.; Morris, P.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Roos-Serote, M.; Salama, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Valentijn, E. A.; Davis, G. R.; Naylor, D. A.

    The spectrum of Saturn has been recorded between 4.5 and 16.0 mu m with the grating mode of the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of ISO. The resolving power is 1500. The main results of this observation are (1) the detection of CO2 CH3C2H and C4H2 in the stratosphere and (2) the detection of H2O

  12. Ertel Potential Vorticity versus Bernoulli Streamfunction in Earth's Southern Ocean: Comparison with the Atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Timothy E.; Stanley, Geoff; Bradley, Mary Elizabeth; Marshall, David P.

    2017-10-01

    We are working to expand the comparative planetology of vorticity-streamfunction correlations established for the atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn to include Earth’s Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which is the only oceanic jet that encircles the planet. Interestingly, the ACC and its eddies scale like atmospheric jets and eddies on Jupiter and Saturn---the Southern Ocean is a “giant planet” with a zonal jet stream. Our input is the Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE; Mazloff et al 2010, J. Phys. Ocean. 40, 880-899), an optimal combination of observations and primitive-equation model that spans 2005-2010. Two hurdles not encountered in atmospheric work arise from the nonlinear equation of state of ocean water: non-zero helicity, which prevents the existence of truly neutral (analogous to adiabatic) surfaces, and the lack of a geostrophic streamfunction in general. We follow de Szoeke et al (2000, J. Phys. Ocean. 30, 2830-2852) to overcome these hurdles, regionally, by using orthobaric density as the vertical coordinate. In agreement with results for all atmospheres analyzed to date, scatter plots of Ertel potential vorticity, Q, versus Bernoulli streamfunction, B, on orthobaric density surfaces in the Southern Ocean are well correlated. The general shape of the correlation is like a hockey stick, with the “blade” corresponding to a broad horizontal region that spans the ACC, and the “handle” corresponding to shallow water. The same linear-regression Q versus B model employed for Mars is applied to the ACC (“blade”) signal. Results include that the deeper water on the equatorward side of the ACC is most prone to shear instability, and elsewhere the ACC is “supersonic” such that the net propagation of vorticity waves is eastward, not the usual westward. During the 6-year span of the SOSE data, there is a steady drift of the correlation to larger values at the top of the vertical profile, and to smaller values in the middle of

  13. The a 3Σg+ - b 3Σu+ Continuum Emission from Electron Impact of Molecular Hydrogen in Saturn's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. D.; Johnson, P. V.; Liu, X.; Malone, C. P.; Khakoo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Shemansky et al. (2009, Planetary and Space Science 57: 1659-1670) have reported observations of hydrogen atoms flowing out of the top of Saturn's sunlit thermosphere in a confined, distinct plume of ballistic and escaping orbits, and a continuous distribution of H atoms from the top of Saturn's atmosphere to at least 45 Saturn radii (RS) in the satellite orbital plane and to 25 RS azimuthally above and below the plane. These observations have revealed the importance of the excitation of H2 by low energy electrons. H2 is efficiently excited to the triplet states by low energy electrons, and all triplet excitations result in the dissociation of H2 and the production of hot H atoms. Because of this, the electron impact excitation of H2 is an important energy deposition mechanism in the upper atmospheres of Saturn and other giant planets. The a 3Σg+ - b 3Σu continuum transition, which dominates all other H2 transitions in the 168-190 nm region, provides a unique spectral window through which the triplet transition can be observed with the Cassini spacecraft. The excitation and emission cross sections of the a 3Σg+ state and other triplet states are required for the extraction of the triplet emission and excitation rates from the apparent emission rate measured by the spacecraft. These emission and excitation rates, in turn, help to determine the energy deposition rate by electron impact excitation. Unfortunately, large discrepancies exist between published measurements of the a 3Σg+ - b 3Σu continuum transition. In order to begin to address this issue, we have recently revisited the problem by measuring electron impact induced a 3Σg+ - b 3Σu emission cross sections. We have also measured direct excitation cross sections of the triplet a 3Σg+ state. Using these, we are able to partition the excitation function into its direct and cascade components. As stated above, these results will enable improved understanding of phenomena observed in Saturn's atmosphere

  14. Synthesis, structures, and photophysical properties of π-expanded oligothiophene 8-mers and their Saturn-like C₆₀ complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Cojal González, José D; Hasegawa, Masashi; Nishinaga, Tohru; Haque, Tahmina; Takase, Masayoshi; Otani, Hiroyuki; Rabe, Jürgen P; Iyoda, Masahiko

    2015-03-25

    Two isomers of a multifunctional π-expanded macrocyclic oligothiophene 8-mer, E,E-1 and Z,Z-1, were synthesized using a McMurry coupling of a dialdehyde composed of four 2,5-thienylene and three ethynylene units under high dilution conditions. On the other hand, cyclo[8](2,5-thienylene-ethynylene) 2 was synthesized by intramolecular Sonogashira cyclization of ethynyl bromide 5. From STM measurements, both E,E-1 and Z,Z-1 formed self-assembled monolayers at the solid-liquid interface to produce porous networks, and from X-ray analyses of E,E-1 and 2, both compounds had a round shape with a honeycomb stacked structure. E,E-1 formed various fibrous polymorphs due to nanophase separation of the macrorings. E,E-1 and Z,Z-1 in solution exhibited photochromism upon irradiation with visible and UV light, respectively, and this photoisomerization was confirmed by using STM. Furthermore, amorphous films of Z,Z-1 and E,E-1 showed photoisomerization, although single crystals, fibers, and square tubes of E,E-1 remained unchanged under similar conditions. E,E-1 with a 12.5-14.7 Å inner cavity incorporated fullerene C60 in the cavity in solution and the solid state to produce a Saturn-like complex, whose structure was determined by X-ray analysis. 2 also formed a Saturn-like complex with C60 in the solid state. These Saturn-like complexes are stabilized by van der Waals interactions between the sulfur atoms of 8-mer and C60. The complexes exhibited charge-transfer interactions in the solid state. Like E,E-1, Saturn-like complex E,E-1⊃C60 formed small cube and fiber structures depending on the solvent used, whereas those of Saturn-like complex 2⊃C60 were limited due to the rigidity of the macroring of 2.

  15. A detailed numerical analysis of asymmetrical density distribution in Saturn's F ring during an encounter with Prometheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's rings, reminiscent of an early Solar system present a unique opportunity to investigate experimentally some mechanisms thought to be responsible for planet and planetesimal formation in protoplanetary discs. Here, we extended the comparison of our numerical models of Prometheus encountering the F ring employing non-interacting and interacting particles. Higher resolution analysis revealed that the density increases known to exist at channel edges is more complex and localized than previously thought. Asymmetry between density increases on channel edges revealed that the channel edge facing way from Prometheus to be the most stable but with lowest maximum increases. However, on the channel edge facing Prometheus the interacting model showed large chaotic fluctuations in the maximum density of some clumps, much larger than those of the other channel. The likely cause of this asymmetry is a variance in localized turbulence introduced into the F ring by Prometheus. High-resolution velocity dispersion maps showed that there was a spatial link between the highest densities and the highest velocity dispersions in the interacting model. Thus, suggesting that the high velocity dispersion we see is the reason for the observed inhomogeneous distribution of fans (evidence of embedded moonlets) on some of the channel edges facing Prometheus.

  16. The EBLM project. III. A Saturn-size low-mass star at the hydrogen-burning limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Boetticher, Alexander; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Queloz, Didier; Gill, Sam; Lendl, Monika; Delrez, Laetitia; Anderson, David R.; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Faedi, Francesca; Gillon, Michaël; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Hebb, Leslie; Hellier, Coel; Jehin, Emmanuël; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Martin, David V.; Pepe, Francesco; Pollacco, Don; Ségransan, Damien; Smalley, Barry; Udry, Stéphane; West, Richard

    2017-08-01

    We report the discovery of an eclipsing binary system with mass-ratio q ˜ 0.07. After identifying a periodic photometric signal received by WASP, we obtained CORALIE spectroscopic radial velocities and follow-up light curves with the Euler and TRAPPIST telescopes. From a joint fit of these data we determine that EBLM J0555-57 consists of a sun-like primary star that is eclipsed by a low-mass companion, on a weakly eccentric 7.8-day orbit. Using a mass estimate for the primary star derived from stellar models, we determine a companion mass of 85 ± 4 MJup (0.081 M⊙) and a radius of 0.84+ 0.14-0.04RJup (0.084 R⊙) that is comparable to that of Saturn. EBLM J0555-57Ab has a surface gravity log g2 =5.50+ 0.03-0.13 and is one of the densest non-stellar-remnant objects currently known. These measurements are consistent with models of low-mass stars. The photometry tables and radial velocities are only available at the CDS and on demand via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/L6

  17. Study of Oblique Propagating Whistler Mode Waves in Presence of Parallel DC Electric Field in Magnetosphere of Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kaur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper whistler mode waves have been investigated in magnetosphere of Saturn. The derivation for perturbed distribution function, dispersion relation and growth rate have been determined by using the method of characteristic and kinetic approach. Analytical expressions for growth rate and real frequency of whistlers propagating oblique to magnetic field direction are attained. Calculations have been performed at 6 radial distances in plasma sheet region of Saturn’s magnetosphere as per data provided by Cassini. Work has been extended for bi-Maxwellian as well as Loss-cone distribution function. Parametric analysis show that temperature anisotropy, increase in number density, energy density and angle of propagation increases the growth rate of whistler waves along with significant shift in wave number. In case of Loss-cone distribution, increase in growth rate of whistlers is significantly more than for bi-Maxwellian distribution function. Generation of second harmonics can also be seen in the graphs plotted. It is concluded that parallel DC field stabilizes the wave and temperature anisotropy, angle of propagation, number density and energy density of electrons enhances the growth rate. Thus the results are of importance in analyzing observed VLF emissions over wide spectrum of frequency range in Saturnian magnetosphere. The analytical model developed can also be used to study various types of instabilities in planetary magnetospheres.

  18. The latitudinal structure of the nightside outer magnetosphere of Saturn as revealed by velocity moments of thermal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Nemeth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the latitudinal behavior of the azimuthal plasma velocities in the outer magnetosphere of Saturn using the numerical ion moments derived from the measurements of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer. One of the new results presented is that although these moments display some scatter, a significant positive correlation is found to exist between the azimuthal velocity and the plasma density, such that on average, the higher the density the higher the rotation speed. We also found that both the azimuthal velocity and the density anticorrelate with the magnitude of the radial component of the magnetic field and drop rapidly with increasing distance from the magnetic equator. The azimuthal velocities show periodic behavior with a period near the planetary rotation period, which can also be explained by the strong dependence on magnetic latitude, taking into account the flapping of the magnetodisk. It is thus found that the dense plasma near the magnetic equator rotates around the planet at high speed, while the dilute plasma at higher latitudes in the northern and southern hemispheres rotates significantly slower. The latitudinal gradient observed in the azimuthal speed is suggested to be a direct consequence of the sub-corotation of the plasma in the outer magnetosphere, with highest speeds occurring on field lines at lowest latitudes mapping to the rapidly rotating inner regions of the plasma sheet, and the speed falling as one approaches the lobe, where the field lines are connected to strongly sub-corotating plasma.

  19. The SATURN trial: the value of maintenance erlotinib in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Joel W

    2010-12-01

    The first-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) generally consists of a maximum of six cycles of platinum-based doublet chemotherapy followed by surveillance for disease progression. Recently, the strategy of starting second-line treatment immediately following the completion of chemotherapy, known as 'maintenance' chemotherapy, has been investigated. The use of maintenance pemetrexed improves both progression-free and overall survival, while the use of maintenance docetaxel did not significantly improve overall survival. The Sequential Tarceva in Unresectable NSCLC (SATURN) study investigated the use of maintenance erlotinib following the completion of first-line chemotherapy. It demonstrated a significant improvement in overall survival from 11.1 months in the placebo group to 12.3 months in patients receiving maintenance erlotinib, with the important caveat that only 21% of patients in the placebo group ever received erlotinib. A subset of patients whose tumors had EGF receptor mutations had a higher magnitude of benefit from maintenance treatment. Therefore, maintenance erlotinib should be considered in the treatment of patients with NSCLC.

  20. Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) as tracers of solar wind conditions near Saturn: Event lists and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, E.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Badman, S. V.; Paranicas, C.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Bučík, R.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Radioti, A.

    2018-01-01

    The lack of an upstream solar wind monitor poses a major challenge to any study that investigates the influence of the solar wind on the configuration and the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere. Here we show how Cassini MIMI/LEMMS observations of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) transients, that are both linked to energetic processes in the heliosphere such us Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs), can be used to trace enhanced solar wind conditions at Saturn's distance. SEP protons can be easily distinguished from magnetospheric ions, particularly at the MeV energy range. Many SEPs are also accompanied by strong GCR Forbush Decreases. GCRs are detectable as a low count-rate noise signal in a large number of LEMMS channels. As SEPs and GCRs can easily penetrate into the outer and middle magnetosphere, they can be monitored continuously, even when Cassini is not situated in the solar wind. A survey of the MIMI/LEMMS dataset between 2004 and 2016 resulted in the identification of 46 SEP events. Most events last more than two weeks and have their lowest occurrence rate around the extended solar minimum between 2008 and 2010, suggesting that they are associated to ICMEs rather than CIRs, which are the main source of activity during the declining phase and the minimum of the solar cycle. We also list of 17 time periods ( > 50 days each) where GCRs show a clear solar periodicity ( ∼ 13 or 26 days). The 13-day period that derives from two CIRs per solar rotation dominates over the 26-day period in only one of the 17 cases catalogued. This interval belongs to the second half of 2008 when expansions of Saturn's electron radiation belts were previously reported to show a similar periodicity. That observation not only links the variability of Saturn's electron belts to solar wind processes, but also indicates that the source of the observed periodicity in GCRs may be local. In this case GCR

  1. Dissolution on Saturn's Moon Titan: A 3D Karst Landscape Evolution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Thomas; Fleurant, Cyril; Seignovert, Benoît; Cordier, Daniel; Bourgeois, Olivier; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Lucas, Antoine

    2017-04-01

    Titan is an Earth-like world possessing a nitrogen-rich atmosphere that covers a surface with signs of lacustrine (lakes, seas, depressions), fluvial (channels, valleys) and aeolian (dunes) activity [1]. The chemistry implied in the geological processes is, however, strikingly different from that on Earth. Titan's extremely cold environment (T -180°C) allows water to exist only under the form of icy "bedrock". The presence of methane as the second major constituent in the atmosphere, as well as an active nitrogen-methane photochemistry, allows methane and ethane to drive a hydrocarbon cycle similar to the terrestrial hydrological cycle. A plethora of organic solids, more or less soluble in liquid hydrocarbons, is also produced in the atmosphere and can lead, by atmospheric sedimentation over geological timescales, to formation of some kind of organic geological sedimentary layer. Based on comparisons between Titan's landscapes seen in the Cassini spacecraft data and terrestrial analogues, karstic-like dissolution and evaporitic crystallization have been suggested in various instances to take part in the landscape development on Titan. Dissolution has been invoked, for instance, for the development of the so-called "labyrinthic terrain", located at high latitudes and resembling terrestrial cockpit or polygonal karst terrain. In this work, we aim at testing this hypothesis by comparing the natural landscapes visible in the Cassini/RADAR images of Titan's surface, with those inferred from the use of a 3D Landscape Evolution Model (LEM) based on the Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development (CHILD) [2] modified to include karstic dissolution as the major geological process [3]. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are generated from an initial quasi-planar surface for a set of dissolution rates, diffusion coefficients (solute transport), and sink densities of the mesh. The landscape evolves over millions of years. Synthetic SAR images are generated from these DEMs

  2. Seasonal Variability of Saturn's Tropospheric Temperatures, Winds and Para-H2 from Cassini Far-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, P. G. J; Achterberg, R. K.; Orton, G. S.; Flasar, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Far-IR 16-1000 micrometer spectra of Saturn's hydrogen-helium continuum measured by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) are inverted to construct a near-continuous record of upper tropospheric (70-700 mbar) temperatures and para-H2 fraction as a function of latitude, pressure and time for a third of a saturnian year (2004-2014, from northern winter to northern spring). The thermal field reveals evidence of reversing summertime asymmetries superimposed onto the belt/zone structure. The temperature structure is almost symmetric about the equator by 2014, with seasonal lag times that increase with depth and are qualitatively consistent with radiative climate models. Localised heating of the tropospheric hazes (100-250 mbar) create a distinct perturbation to the temperature profile that shifts in magnitude and location, declining in the autumn hemisphere and growing in the spring. Changes in the para-H2 (f(sub p)) distribution are subtle, with a 0.02-0.03 rise over the spring hemisphere (200-500 mbar) perturbed by (i) low-f(sub p) air advected by both the springtime storm of 2010 and equatorial upwelling; and (ii) subsidence of high-f(sub p) air at northern high latitudes, responsible for a developing north-south asymmetry in f(sub p). Conversely, the shifting asymmetry in the para-H2 disequilibrium primarily reflects the changing temperature structure (and hence the equilibrium distribution of f(sub p)), rather than actual changes in f(sub p) induced by chemical conversion or transport. CIRS results interpolated to the same point in the seasonal cycle as re-analysed Voyager-1 observations (early northern spring) show qualitative consistency from year to year (i.e., the same tropospheric asymmetries in temperature and f(sub p)), with the exception of the tropical tropopause near the equatorial zones and belts, where downward propagation of a cool temperature anomaly associated with Saturn's stratospheric oscillation could potentially perturb tropopause

  3. Seasonal variability of Saturn's tropospheric temperatures, winds and para-H2 from Cassini far-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Achterberg, R. K.; Orton, G. S.; Flasar, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Far-IR 16-1000 μ m spectra of Saturn's hydrogen-helium continuum measured by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) are inverted to construct a near-continuous record of upper tropospheric (70-700 mbar) temperatures and para-H2 fraction as a function of latitude, pressure and time for a third of a saturnian year (2004-2014, from northern winter to northern spring). The thermal field reveals evidence of reversing summertime asymmetries superimposed onto the belt/zone structure. The temperature structure is almost symmetric about the equator by 2014, with seasonal lag times that increase with depth and are qualitatively consistent with radiative climate models. Localised heating of the tropospheric hazes (100-250 mbar) create a distinct perturbation to the temperature profile that shifts in magnitude and location, declining in the autumn hemisphere and growing in the spring. Changes in the para-H2 (fp) distribution are subtle, with a 0.02-0.03 rise over the spring hemisphere (200-500 mbar) perturbed by (i) low-fp air advected by both the springtime storm of 2010 and equatorial upwelling; and (ii) subsidence of high-fp air at northern high latitudes, responsible for a developing north-south asymmetry in fp . Conversely, the shifting asymmetry in the para-H2 disequilibrium primarily reflects the changing temperature structure (and hence the equilibrium distribution of fp), rather than actual changes in fp induced by chemical conversion or transport. CIRS results interpolated to the same point in the seasonal cycle as re-analysed Voyager-1 observations (early northern spring) show qualitative consistency from year to year (i.e., the same tropospheric asymmetries in temperature and fp), with the exception of the tropical tropopause near the equatorial zones and belts, where downward propagation of a cool temperature anomaly associated with Saturn's stratospheric oscillation could potentially perturb tropopause temperatures, para-H2 and winds. Quantitative

  4. Outreach for Cassini Huyghens mission and future Saturn and Titan exploration: From the Antikythera Mechanism to the TSSM mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussas, Xenophon; Bampasidis, Georgios; Coustenis, Athena; Solomonidou, Anezina

    2010-05-01

    These days Outreach is an activity tightly related to success in science. The public with its great interest to space and astronomy in general, the solar system exploration and Saturn and Titan in particular, loves the scientific outcome of Cassini and Huygens. This love of the public gives a lot, as its known interest to space, persuades politicians and policy makers to support space and future Saturn and Titan explorations. We use the scientific results from Cassini and Huyghens together with a mosaic from ancient science concerning the history of solar system exploration, such as the oldest known complex astronomical device, the Antikyhtera Mechanism, in outreach activities to ensure future missions and continuous support to present ones. A future mission to the Saturnian System focusing on exotic Titan will broaden people's interest not only to Physics and Astronomy, but to Mechanics, Technology and even Philosophy as well, since, obviously, the roots of the vast contribution of Space Science and Astronomy to the contemporary society can be traced back to the first astronomers of Antiquity. As an example we use the Antikythera Mechanism, a favourite astronomical device for the public, which is the first geared astronomical device ever, constructed that combines the spirit of the ancient Astronomy and scientific accuracy. It is common belief that Astronomy and Astrophysics is a perfect tool to easily involve people in Science, as the public is always interested in space subjects, captivated by the beauty and the mystery of the Universe. Years after the successful entry, descent and landing of the Huygens probe on Titan's surface, the outstanding achievements of the Cassini-Huygens mission enhance the outreach potential of Space Science. Titan is an earth-like world, embedded in a dense nitrogen atmospheric envelop and a surface carved by rivers, mountains, dunes and lakes, its exploration will certainly empower the perspective of the society for space activities

  5. Determination of the 20 MeV linear accelerator, new injector for the synchrotron Saturne. Choice of the electrical and dynamical particle parameters; Determination de l'accelerateur lineaire de 20 MeV, nouvel injecteur du synchrotron Saturne. Choix des parametres electriques, dynamique des particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prome, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-12-15

    This report takes place in the general determination of the 20 MeV linear accelerator which will be the new Saturne injector; it deals with particle dynamics. Starting from beam requirements at the output of the linac, cells lengths with variable synchronous phase angle, buncher and de-buncher parameters, beam emittances at the output in several phase spaces are successively determined. (author) [French] Dans le contexte general de la determination de l'accelerateur lineaire de 20 MeV, nouvel injecteur du synchrotron Saturne, ce rapport traite de la partie relative au mecanisme de l'acceleration des particules; a partir des caracteristiques souhaitees pour le faisceau a la sortie de cet accelerateur, on determine successivement les longueurs des cellules, compte tenu du choix d'un angle de phase synchrone variable, les caracteristiques du groupeur et du degroupeur et les emittances du faisceau en sortie dans les differents plans de phase. (auteur)

  6. A Large Seasonal Variation of Energetic C+ and CO+ Abundances in Saturn's Magnetosphere Probably Resulting from Changing Ring Illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. C.; Christon, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    In mid-2014 the Cassini/CHEMS instrument observed a rather dramatic increase in the relative abundances of both C+ and CO+ (factors of 2 to 4). The enhancements then decreased during 2015 and 2016, with CO+ decreasing much more quickly. C+ and CO+ (these mass 28 molecular ions could also include N2+) are trace components of the energetic (96-220 keV) ion population in Saturn's magnetosphere, which is dominated by water group ions W+ (O+, OH+, and H2O+ and H30+), H+, and H2+. We suggest that the C+ and CO+ enhancements are associated with CO2, possibly from Enceladus, building up on the cold rings near equinox, but then released from the north side of the A, and possibly B, rings as they were warmed above 80K in late 2013 or early 2014 by increasing solar illumination after the 2009 equinox (Morishima et al, 2016). Hodyss et al (2008) found preferential sublimation of CO2 from a CO2:H2O ice mixture when it was warmed above 80K. Meteoroid bombardment could be another source of carbon in the ring ice. After release from the ice, transport, dissociation, ionization, and then acceleration in the magnetosphere would produce the observed energetic C+ and CO+, with the enhancements subsiding as the CO2 and other carbon species gradually become depleted. We will report the relevant abundance ratios from SOI in 2004 through the Sept. 15, 2017 end of mission to test this hypothesis. Hodyss, R. et al, Icarus, 194, 836-842, 2008. Morishima, R. et al, Icarus, 279, 2-19, 2016.

  7. Simulations of the response function of a plasma ion beam spectrometer for the Cassini mission to Saturn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilppola, J.H.; Tanskanen, P.J.; Huomo, H.; Barraclough, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    To obtain very high (∼1%) energy resolution with spherical-section electrostatic analyzers requires high precision in both fabrication and in the alignment process. In order to aid in the calibration of the instrument and to help minimize fabrication costs, we have applied simulation models to the ion beam spectrometer for the NASA/ESA Cassini mission to Saturn. Previously we studied the effects of misalignment and simple irregularities of the hemispherical surfaces on the performance of an electrostatic analyzer. We have considered a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer equipped with an aperture plate to collimate the stray electric field at the entrance apertures. The influence of a curved entrance aperture has also been added to the simulation model, and its effects have been studied in detail. A cylindrical three-dimensional simultaneous overrelaxation algorithm has been introduced to solve for the stray electric field. The maximum loss of transmitted particles with respect to the transmission of an ideal instrument has been set at 10%. We demonstrate that the deviation in the distributions of the energies is less than 0.2% and that the deviation in the distributions of entrance angles of transmitted particles is less than 0.1 degree. It has been found that the energy resolution of an electrostatic analyzer can be improved from ΔE/E=(1.6±0.2)% to ΔE/E=(1.3±0.2)% by the introduction of front aperture plates. Through the introduction of curved entrance slits, the azimuthal angle resolution has changed from β=(1.4±0.1)degree for the simplified geometry simulation results of our previous article to β=(2.3±0.1)degree. We have confirmed that an accuracy of 25 μm in the alignment of the two hemispherical surfaces is sufficient to give the instrument the desired resolutions. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. New insights about the structure and variability of Saturn's electron radiation belts from Cassini's Ring-Grazing and Proximal orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, E.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Dialynas, K.; Sergis, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    During 2008, Cassini performed a unique series of orbits with a period of about 7 days which allowed us to monitor the evolution of Saturn's radiation belts across time scales shorter than the 28-day solar rotation and to identify the role of Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) as a key driver of dynamics for the belts' MeV electron population. Cassini's "Grand Finale" included a new set of such short-period orbits (6.5 to 7.2 days long), executed continuously between November 20, 2016 until September 15, 2017. While the 2008 observations were typically limited up to the L-shell of the G-ring, the Grand Finale orbits probed the radiation belts deeper and for a longer duration, covering the sparsely sampled regions outside the F- and A-rings and the previously unexplored particle trapping region inside the main rings. Observations with Cassini's MIMI/LEMMS instrument reveal that the electron belt intensities are persistently asymmetric in local time all the way down to the exterior edge of the main rings. The strength of this asymmetry appears to correlate with the appearence of transient belt components and changes in the intensity of the main belts which may be triggered by solar-wind or magnetospheric driven storms. The intensity of transient components in the electron belts, that may also appear in the small gap between the A- and the F-rings, evolve over several weeks, indicating that convection may occasionally dominate diffusive electron transport, the time scales of which are longer. Detection of MeV electrons inside the main rings during the Proximal orbits is ambiguous, but if electrons are present, all the LEMMS channels that may contain their signal indicate that their distribution would be very stable in time and unaffected by convective fields that drive electron transport outside the main rings.

  9. A Nonequilibrium Figure of Saturn's Satellite Iapetus and the Origin of the Equatorial Ridge on Its Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratyev, B. P.

    2018-03-01

    The structure, dynamical equilibrium, and evolution of Saturn's moon Iapetus are studied. It has been shown that, in the current epoch, the oblateness of the satellite ɛ2 ≈ 0.046 does not correspond to its angular velocity of rotation, which causes the secular spherization behavior of the ice shell of Iapetus. To study this evolution, we apply a spheroidal model, containing a rock core and an ice shell with an external surface ɛ2, to Iapetus. The model is based on the equilibrium finite-difference equation of the Clairaut theory, while the model parameters are taken from observations. The mean radius of the rock core and the oblateness of its level surface, ɛ1 ≈ 0.028, were determined. It was found that Iapetus is covered with a thick ice shell, which is 56.6% of the mean radius of the figure. We analyze a role of the core in the evolution of the shape of a gravitating figure. It was determined that the rock core plays a key part in the settling of the ice masses of the equatorial bulge, which finally results in the formation of a large circular equatorial ridge on the surface of the satellite. From the known mean altitude of this ice ridge, it was found that, in the epoch of its formation, the rotation period of Iapetus was 166 times shorter than that at present, as little as T ≈ 11h27m. This is consistent with the fact that a driving force of the evolution of the satellite in our model was its substantial despinning. The model also predicts that the ice ridge should be formed more intensively in the leading (dark and, consequently, warmer) hemisphere of the satellite, where the ice is softer. This inference agrees with the observations: in the leading hemisphere of Iapetus, the ridge is actually high and continuous everywhere, while it degenerates into individual ice peaks in the opposite colder hemisphere.

  10. The Gravity Field of Saturn and the Mass of the Saturnian Rings at the end of the Cassini Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert A.; Brozovic, Marina; Roth, Duane C.

    2016-05-01

    Following its flyby of Titan on 2016 November 29, Cassini will begin a set 20 high inclination orbits, known as the F-ring orbits, that pass over the ring plane and have periapses near the F-ring. The final Titan flyby on 2017 April 22 will redirect the spacecraft into the proximal orbits, a series 22 orbits with periapses between the innermost D-ring and the upper layer of Saturn’s atmosphere. The proximal orbits will be strongly perturbed the gravitational field of Saturn and slightly perturbed by the gravity of rings. The ring gravity will also affect the F-ring orbits. This paper presents the results of an analysis of simulated radiometric data acquired during the final 42 Cassini orbits. We investigate the sensitivity of the data to the ring mass and gravitational harmonics of the planet. We limit the simulated data quantity to the DSN coverage currently being requested by the Cassini Project augumented by several critical passes expected to be obtained from ESA southern hemisphere stations. We assume a data accuracy consistent with projected effects of solar plasma. In the dynamical model of the spacecraft motion we account for non-gravitational accelerations caused by the planned momentum management to be performed with Reaction Wheel Assembly and thrusters, by the Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator, and by solar radiation pressure. We use a weighted-least squares procedure to obtain estimates of spacecraft’s state, masses of the rings, the gravity harmonics, and the non-gravitational accelerations. We find that the final orbits of the Cassini mission should yield high accuracy estimates of the gravitational harmonics through J12 and statistically meaningful estimates of the A- and B-ring masses.The research described in this paper was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Adminstration.

  11. The Christiansen Effect in Saturn's narrow dusty rings and the spectral identification of clumps in the F ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, M.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Showalter, M.R.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Baines, K.; Sotin, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Stellar occultations by Saturn's rings observed with the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft reveal that dusty features such as the F ring and the ringlets in the Encke and the Laplace Gaps have distinctive infrared transmission spectra. These spectra show a narrow optical depth minimum at wavelengths around 2.87??m. This minimum is likely due to the Christiansen Effect, a reduction in the extinction of small particles when their (complex) refractive index is close to that of the surrounding medium. Simple Mie-scattering models demonstrate that the strength of this opacity dip is sensitive to the size distribution of particles between 1 and 100??m across. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of the occultation data is sufficient to reveal variations in the transmission spectra within and among these rings. In both the Encke Gap ringlets and F ring, the opacity dip weakens with increasing local optical depth, which is consistent with the larger particles being concentrated near the cores of these rings. The Encke Gap ringlets also show systematically weaker opacity dips than the F ring and Laplace Gap ringlet, implying that the former has a smaller fraction of grains less than ~30??m across. However, the strength of the opacity dip varies most dramatically within the F ring; certain compact regions of enhanced optical depth lack an opacity dip and therefore appear to have a greatly reduced fraction of grains in the few-micron size range. Such spectrally-identifiable structures probably represent a subset of the compact optically-thick clumps observed by other Cassini instruments. These variations in the ring's particle size distribution can provide new insights into the processes of grain aggregation, disruption and transport within dusty rings. For example, the unusual spectral properties of the F-ring clumps could perhaps be ascribed to small grains adhering onto the surface of larger particles in regions of anomalously

  12. Southern African Treatment Resistance Network (SATuRN) RegaDB HIV drug resistance and clinical management database: supporting patient management, surveillance and research in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasa, Justen; Lessells, Richard; Rossouw, Theresa; Naidu, Kevindra; Van Vuuren, Cloete; Goedhals, Dominique; van Zyl, Gert; Bester, Armand; Skingsley, Andrew; Stott, Katharine; Danaviah, Siva; Chetty, Terusha; Singh, Lavanya; Moodley, Pravi; Iwuji, Collins; McGrath, Nuala; Seebregts, Christopher J; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-01-01

    Substantial amounts of data have been generated from patient management and academic exercises designed to better understand the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and design interventions to control it. A number of specialized databases have been designed to manage huge data sets from HIV cohort, vaccine, host genomic and drug resistance studies. Besides databases from cohort studies, most of the online databases contain limited curated data and are thus sequence repositories. HIV drug resistance has been shown to have a great potential to derail the progress made thus far through antiretroviral therapy. Thus, a lot of resources have been invested in generating drug resistance data for patient management and surveillance purposes. Unfortunately, most of the data currently available relate to subtype B even though >60% of the epidemic is caused by HIV-1 subtype C. A consortium of clinicians, scientists, public health experts and policy markers working in southern Africa came together and formed a network, the Southern African Treatment and Resistance Network (SATuRN), with the aim of increasing curated HIV-1 subtype C and tuberculosis drug resistance data. This article describes the HIV-1 data curation process using the SATuRN Rega database. The data curation is a manual and time-consuming process done by clinical, laboratory and data curation specialists. Access to the highly curated data sets is through applications that are reviewed by the SATuRN executive committee. Examples of research outputs from the analysis of the curated data include trends in the level of transmitted drug resistance in South Africa, analysis of the levels of acquired resistance among patients failing therapy and factors associated with the absence of genotypic evidence of drug resistance among patients failing therapy. All these studies have been important for informing first- and second-line therapy. This database is a free password-protected open source database available on

  13. A change of seasons in Saturn's stratosphere from Cassini/CIRS: evolution of the equatorial oscillation and reversal of hemispheric transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Fouchet, Thierry; Hesman, Brigette; Bjoraker, Gordon; Spiga, Aymeric; Cassini/CIRS Team

    2016-10-01

    Due to its axial tilt of 26.7°, Saturn's atmosphere undergoes significant seasonal variations in insolation that impact its thermal structure, chemistry and dynamics. The exceptional longevity of the Cassini mission enables us to uniquely investigate these changes over almost half a Saturn year. In this study, thermal infrared spectra acquired in 2015 by CIRS in limb viewing geometry are analyzed to map the temperature and the meridional distribution of five hydrocarbons from the lower to the upper stratosphere (10 mbar - 10 microbar). These new maps represent a snapshot of Saturn's atmosphere at the end of the northern spring and are compared to previous results obtained during northern winter (2005/2006) and early spring (2010/2011) (Guerlet et al., Icarus, 2009; Sylvestre et al., Icarus, 2015). Spectacular seasonal changes in temperature are observed, not only at high latitudes where the most extreme insolation variations take place, but also at 20N-20S where the mechanical forcing of the equatorial oscillation induces temperature anomalies of up to +/-20K. These results are compared with predictions from a radiative climate model (Guerlet et al., Icarus, 2014). Apart from the equatorial region, the seasonal warming and cooling trends observed by CIRS are, to first order, consistent with the predictions. One notable exception is that the region under the ring's shadow is found warmer than expected from the radiative model, both in 2005 and 2015. The spatial distribution of hydrocarbons, by-products of the methane photochemistry, also undergoes significant seasonal change in the upper stratosphere. In 2005, a local maximum of hydrocarbons was observed at 20-30N, at odds with the low photochemical production in this region (under the ring's shadow at that time). Together with the high temperature anomaly, we had interpreted this result as the signature of a downwelling branch of the meridional circulation. In 2015, not only has this local maximum vanished, but a

  14. Efficacy and safety of maintenance erlotinib in Asian patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a subanalysis of the phase III, randomized SATURN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Long; Kim, Joo-Hang; Park, Keunchil; Zaatar, Adel; Klingelschmitt, Gaëlle; Ng, Christina

    2012-08-01

    Maintenance therapy, commenced immediately after the completion of first-line chemotherapy, is a promising strategy for improving treatment outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The global phase III SequentiAl Tarceva in UnResectable NSCLC (SATURN) study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib as maintenance treatment in NSCLC patients without progression after first-line chemotherapy. We report a retrospective subanalysis of Asian patients enrolled in SATURN. Patients with advanced NSCLC with no evidence of progression after four cycles of chemotherapy were randomized to receive erlotinib 150 mg/day or placebo, until progressive disease or limiting toxicity. The co-primary endpoints of SATURN were progression-free survival (PFS) in all patients and in those with positive EGFR immunohistochemistry (IHC) status. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), disease control rate, safety, quality of life (QoL) and biomarker analyses. In total, 126 patients from East and South-East Asian centers were randomized (14% of the intent-to-treat population): 88 from Korea, 28 from China and 10 from Malaysia; one patient was excluded from this analysis due to Indian ethnicity. PFS was significantly prolonged in the erlotinib treatment arm, both overall (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.57; p=0.0067) and in patients with EGFR IHC-positive disease (HR=0.50; p=0.0057). There was a trend towards an increase in OS, which reached statistical significance in the EGFR IHC-positive subgroup (p=0.0233). The overall response rate was significantly higher with erlotinib compared with placebo (24% versus 5%; p=0.0025). Erlotinib was generally well tolerated and had no negative impact on QoL in this subpopulation. The most common treatment-related adverse events were rash, diarrhea and pruritus. Erlotinib was effective and well tolerated in Asian patients, producing benefits consistent with those

  15. Lo sguardo di Saturno. Critica della modernità e regimi scopici in «Die Ringe des Saturn» di W. G. Sebald

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ribatti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the footsteps of Horkheimer and Adorno’s Dialektik der Aufklärung, W. G. Sebald’s Die Ringe des Saturn develops a particular indictment of Enlightenment rationality, which manifests itself primarily as a critical examination of the three most prominent “scopic regimes” of the modern era: the “Cartesian Perspectivalism”, the “Descriptive paradigm” of Dutch seventeenth-century Art, and the “Baroque” visual culture. The critical exploration of these visual strategies stands in as representative for wide epistemological problems related to the rational ordering and organization of human thought and knowledge.

  16. Long-term effects of maximally intensive statin therapy on changes in coronary atheroma composition: insights from SATURN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rishi; Libby, Peter; Nissen, Steven E; Wolski, Kathy; Ballantyne, Christie M; Barter, Phillip J; Chapman, M John; Erbel, Raimund; Raichlen, Joel S; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Tuzcu, E Murat; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of long-term maximally intensive statin therapy on indices of coronary atheroma composition in a randomized trial, and how these changes relate to modifications of serum lipoproteins and systemic inflammation. The Study of coronary Atheroma by inTravascular Ultrasound: the effect of Rosuvastatin vs. atorvastatiN (SATURN) employed serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measures of coronary atheroma in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg daily for 24 months. Seventy-one patients underwent serial assessment of indices of plaque composition by spectral analysis of the radiofrequency IVUS signal. Changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C; -52 (-72, -33) mg/dL, P < 0.001], C-reactive protein [CRP -0.2 (-1, 0.1) mg/L, P = 0.01], and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C; +2.8 (-0.3, 7.8) mg/dL, P < 0.001] were associated with regression of percent atheroma volume (PAV: -1.6 ± 3.6%, P < 0.001). A reduction in estimated fibro-fatty tissue volume accompanied atheroma regression (P < 0.001), while dense calcium tissue volume increased (P = 0.002). There were no changes in fibrous or necrotic core tissue volumes. Volumetric changes in necrotic core tissue correlated with on-treatment HDL-C (r = -0.27, P = 0.03) and CRP (r = 0.25, P = 0.03) levels. A per-lesion analysis showed a reduction in the number of pathological intimal thickening lesions (defined by ≥3 consecutive IVUS frames containing PAV of ≥40%, predominantly fibro-fatty plaque, with <10% confluent necrotic core and <10% confluent dense calcium) at follow-up (67 vs. 38, P = 0.001). Fibroatheromas and fibrotic lesions remained static in number. Changes in indices of atheroma composition accompany regression of coronary atheroma with maximally intensive statin therapy, and associate with anti-inflammatory effects of statins. NCT000620542.

  17. TWO PLANETARY COMPANIONS AROUND THE K7 DWARF GJ 221: A HOT SUPER-EARTH AND A CANDIDATE IN THE SUB-SATURN DESERT RANGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante [Department of Astronomy, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States); Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Wende, Sebastian, E-mail: parriaga@astro.puc.cl [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We report two low-mass companions orbiting the nearby K7 dwarf GJ 221 that have emerged from reanalyzing 4.4 yr of publicly available HARPS spectra complemented with 2 years of high-precision Doppler measurements with Magellan/PFS. The HARPS measurements alone contain the clear signal of a low-mass companion with a period of 125 days and a minimum mass of 53.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} (GJ 221b), falling in a mass range where very few planet candidates have been found (sub-Saturn desert). The addition of 17 PFS observations allows the confident detection of a second low-mass companion (6.5 M{sub Circled-Plus }) in a hot orbit (3.87 day period, GJ 221c). Spectroscopic and photometric calibrations suggest that GJ 221 is slightly depleted ([Fe/H] {approx} -0.1) compared to the Sun, so the presence of two low-mass companions in the system confirms the trend that slightly reduced stellar metallicity does not prevent the formation of planets in the super-Earth to sub-Saturn mass regime.

  18. TWO PLANETARY COMPANIONS AROUND THE K7 DWARF GJ 221: A HOT SUPER-EARTH AND A CANDIDATE IN THE SUB-SATURN DESERT RANGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian; Wende, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    We report two low-mass companions orbiting the nearby K7 dwarf GJ 221 that have emerged from reanalyzing 4.4 yr of publicly available HARPS spectra complemented with 2 years of high-precision Doppler measurements with Magellan/PFS. The HARPS measurements alone contain the clear signal of a low-mass companion with a period of 125 days and a minimum mass of 53.2 M ⊕ (GJ 221b), falling in a mass range where very few planet candidates have been found (sub-Saturn desert). The addition of 17 PFS observations allows the confident detection of a second low-mass companion (6.5 M ⊕ ) in a hot orbit (3.87 day period, GJ 221c). Spectroscopic and photometric calibrations suggest that GJ 221 is slightly depleted ([Fe/H] ∼ –0.1) compared to the Sun, so the presence of two low-mass companions in the system confirms the trend that slightly reduced stellar metallicity does not prevent the formation of planets in the super-Earth to sub-Saturn mass regime.

  19. Study of atmospheric stratification influence on pollutants dispersion using a numerical fluid mechanics model. Code-Saturne validation with the Prairie Grass experiment/Study of atmospheric stratification influence on pollutants dispersion using a numerical fluid mechanics software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, Fanny

    2010-09-01

    A validation of Code-Saturne, a computational fluids dynamics model developed by EDF, is proposed for stable conditions. The goal is to guarantee the performance of the model in order to use it for impacts study. A comparison with the Prairie Grass data field experiment and with two Gaussian plume models will be done [fr

  20. Saturn chorus intensity variations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menietti, J. D.; Schippers, P.; Katoh, Y.; Leisner, J. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 9 (2013), 5592–5602 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : chorus spatial wave growth * electron distribution anisotropy * whistler-mode waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://aurora2.troja.mff.cuni.cz/~santolik/papers/jgra50529.pdf

  1. Terrestrial planet and asteroid formation in the presence of giant planets. I. Relative velocities of planetesimals subject to Jupiter and Saturn perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, S J; Wetherill, G W

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the orbital evolution of 10(13)- to 10(25) -g planetesimals near 1 AU and in the asteroid belt (near 2.6 AU) prior to the stage of evolution when the mutual perturbations between the planetesimals become important. We include nebular gas drag and the effects of Jupiter and Saturn at their present masses and in their present orbits. Gas drag introduces a size-dependent phasing of the secular perturbations, which leads to a pronounced dip in encounter velocities (Venc) between bodies of similar mass. Plantesimals of identical mass have Venc approximately 1 and approximately 10 m s-1 (near 1 and 2.6 AU, respectively) while bodies differing by approximately 10 in mass have Venc approximately 10 and approximately 100 m s-1 (near 1 and 2.6 AU, respectively). Under these conditions, growth, rather than erosion, will occur only by collisions of bodies of nearly the same mass. There will be essentially no gravitational focusing between bodies less than 10(22) to 10(25) g, allowing growth of planetary embryos in the terrestrial planet region to proceed in a slower nonrunaway fashion. The environment in the asteroid belt will be even more forbidding and it is uncertain whether even the severely depleted present asteroid belt could form under these conditions. The perturbations of Jupiter and Saturn are quite sensitive to their semi-major axes and decrease when the planets' heliocentric distances are increased to allow for protoplanet migration. It is possible, though not clearly demonstrated, that this could produce a depleted asteroid belt but permit formation of a system of terrestrial planet embryos on a approximately 10(6)-year timescale, initially by nonrunaway growth and transitioning to runaway growth after approximately 10(5) years. The calculations reported here are valid under the condition that the relative velocities of the bodies are determined only by Jupiter and Saturn perturbations and by gas drag, with no mutual perturbations between

  2. The benthic fauna from the lower Maastrichtian chalk of Kronsmoor (Saturn quarry, northern Germany): composition and palaeoecologic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Julia; Linnert, Christian; Mutterlose, Jörg; Wilmsen, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The Saturn quarry near Kronsmoor (northern Germany) offers an undisturbed section of upper Campanian to lower Maastrichtian chalks. The target interval of the DFG project "Biodiversity and plankton-benthos coupling: an integrated ecosystem analysis from the Late Cretaceous Chalk" is focused on the lower Maastrichtian Belemnella obtusa Zone to mid-Belemnella sumensis Zone, i.e. to the uppermost Kronsmoor and lowermost Hemmoor formations. In this interval, a conspicuous increase in macrofossil abundance without apparent lithofacies changes has been observed and the project intends to integrate planktic, benthic and geochemical proxies for a comprehensive understanding of the Chalk Sea ecosystem. The aim of this study is the analysis of the benthic community. In a first step, the benthic body fossils of the c. 25-m-thick section were semi-quantitatively studied based on a collection of more than 1,000 specimens. Two successive benthic macrofossil assemblages were recognised: the lower interval (upper part of the Kronsmoor Formation, B. obtusa Zone) is characterized by low abundances, only about 100 macroinvertebrates were collected, mostly irregular and regular echinoids, brachiopods and crinoids. The upper interval (B. sumensis Zone) shows an eight times higher macroinvertebrate abundance and a conspicuous dominance of brachiopods, increasing from only 30 to over 500 specimens. In order to quantify the observed qualitative palaeoecological changes, 33 bulk samples of about 6 kg each were retrieved in a distance of c. 0.75 m. The bulk samples were frozen and thawed, washed and sieved in different sizes. The fraction 500 μm-1 mm and >1 mm were picked, sorted and counted. A diverse assemblage of bryozoans, foraminifers, shell fragments of brachiopods and bivalves, spines and test fragments of different echinoid taxa, parts of asteroids and ophiuroids, sponge debris, crinoids and small serpulids, is present. Reduced abundances in the lower part and generally higher

  3. Carbon dioxide on the satellites of Saturn: Results from the Cassini VIMS investigation and revisions to the VIMS wavelength scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D.P.; Meyer, A.W.; Brown, R.H.; Clark, R.N.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Sandford, S.A.; Mastrapa, R.M.E.; Filacchione, G.; Ore, C.M.D.; Nicholson, P.D.; Buratti, B.J.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Dalton, J.B.; Baines, K.H.; Matson, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Several of the icy satellites of Saturn show the spectroscopic signature of the asymmetric stretching mode of C-O in carbon dioxide (CO2) at or near the nominal solid-phase laboratory wavelength of 4.2675 ??m (2343.3 cm-1), discovered with the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft. We report here on an analysis of the variation in wavelength and width of the CO2 absorption band in the spectra of Phoebe, Iapetus, Hyperion, and Dione. Comparisons are made to laboratory spectra of pure CO2, CO2 clathrates, ternary mixtures of CO2 with other volatiles, implanted and adsorbed CO2 in non-volatile materials, and ab initio theoretical calculations of CO2 * nH2O. At the wavelength resolution of VIMS, the CO2 on Phoebe is indistinguishable from pure CO2 ice (each molecule's nearby neighbors are also CO2) or type II clathrate of CO2 in H2O. In contrast, the CO2 band on Iapetus, Hyperion, and Dione is shifted to shorter wavelengths (typically ???4.255 ??m (???2350.2 cm-1)) and broadened. These wavelengths are characteristic of complexes of CO2 with different near-neighbor molecules that are encountered in other volatile mixtures such as with H2O and CH3OH, and non-volatile host materials like silicates, some clays, and zeolites. We suggest that Phoebe's CO2 is native to the body as part of the initial inventory of condensates and now exposed on the surface, while CO2 on the other three satellites results at least in part from particle or UV irradiation of native H2O plus a source of C, implantation or accretion from external sources, or redistribution of native CO2 from the interior. The analysis presented here depends on an accurate VIMS wavelength scale. In preparation for this work, the baseline wavelength calibration for the Cassini VIMS was found to be distorted around 4.3 ??m, apparently as a consequence of telluric CO2 gas absorption in the pre-launch calibration. The effect can be reproduced by convolving a sequence of model detector

  4. The reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane - Temperature dependence of the rate constant and implications for germane photochemistry in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the formation and loss processes for GeH4 are required in order to provide data to help determine the major chemical form in which germanium exists in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. The reaction of hydrogen atoms with germane is one of the most important of these reactions. The absolute rate constant for this reaction as a function of temperature and pressure is studied. Flash photolysis of dilute mixtures of GeH4 in argon, combined with time-resolved detection of H atoms via Lyman alpha resonance fluorescence, is employed to measure the reaction rate. The reaction is shown to be moderately rapid, independent of total pressure, but possessing a positive temperature dependence.

  5. Partial pressures and nature of products. Application to the photolysis of PH3 and NH3 in the atmosphere of Jupiter and Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, J C; El Chaouch, S; Bouayad, A; Janati, T

    2001-01-01

    The photolysis of mixtures of gases containing NH3 or PH3 presents important differences mainly due to the strength of the X-H bond. On some examples, these differences are evidenced and the consequences for mixtures of gases containing these two compounds are shown: the photolysis of ammonia and ethylene mainly gives ethyl-, butyl- and hexylamine whereas the photolysis of phosphine and ethylene leads to ethyl- and vinylphosphine. When gaseous mixtures of NH3, PH3 and ethylene are photolyzed together, the presence of phosphine dramatically decreases the formation of nitrogen derivatives. The relevance of such lab studies to the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn is discussed. c2001 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Data imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepy, G.

    1999-01-01

    After an introduction about data imaging in general, the principles of imaging data collected via neutron scattering experiments are presented. Some computer programs designed for data imaging purposes are reviewed. (K.A.)

  7. Tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Tomographic images of an object or scene are produced by an analysis of two or more stereographic images of the scene including shifting one image laterally with respect to another and logically summing the image data sets. Several image processing, edge enhancement and edge extraction algorithms may be applied to the images in digitised video data form to provide wire-frame or skeleton type representations of each of the original images. Tomographic images of planes not parallel with the image plane (or normal to the camera axes) may be produced by changing the magnification of one image prior to logical summing. The images may be generated by three video cameras arranged on two orthogonal axes for elimination of spurious coincidences. The images are preferably produced using X-rays. (author)

  8. Image Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Laura Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    In large datasets, it is time consuming or even impossible to pick out interesting images. Our proposed solution is to find statistics to quantify the information in each image and use those to identify and pick out images of interest.

  9. Quantum Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kolobov, Mikhail I

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Imaging is a newly born branch of quantum optics that investigates the ultimate performance limits of optical imaging allowed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Using the methods and techniques from quantum optics, quantum imaging addresses the questions of image formation, processing and detection with sensitivity and resolution exceeding the limits of classical imaging. This book contains the most important theoretical and experimental results achieved by the researchers of the Quantum Imaging network, a research programme of the European Community.

  10. Oceanographic data collected from SATURN River Radar by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2009-06-06 to 2010-10-22 (NCEI Accession 0162195)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162195 contains navigational and physical data collected at SATURN River Radar, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon....

  11. Oceanographic data collected from SATURN River Station 05 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2009-06-23 to 2016-12-06 (NCEI Accession 0162430)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162430 contains biological, chemical, navigational and physical data collected at SATURN River Station 05, a fixed station in the Columbia River...

  12. Oceanographic data collected from Saturn Estuary Station 03 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2008-04-19 to 2017-08-01 (NCEI Accession 0162617)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162617 contains biological, chemical and physical data collected at Saturn Estuary Station 03, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  13. Oceanographic data collected from SATURN-09 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2014-09-08 to 2016-06-10 (NCEI Accession 0162185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162185 contains biological, chemical and physical data collected at SATURN-09, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon....

  14. Oceanographic data collected from SATURN-07 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2012-05-03 to 2017-01-24 (NCEI Accession 0162184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162184 contains biological, chemical and physical data collected at SATURN-07, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon....

  15. Oceanographic data collected from Saturn Estuary Station 01 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2008-04-13 to 2017-07-01 (NCEI Accession 0162182)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162182 contains biological, chemical and physical data collected at Saturn Estuary Station 01, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  16. Oceanographic data collected from SATURN-10 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2015-09-01 to 2016-12-16 (NCEI Accession 0162186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162186 contains biological, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected at SATURN-10, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  17. Image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Blanken, Henk; Vries de, A.P.; Blok, H.E.; Feng, L; Feng, L.

    2007-01-01

    The field of image processing addresses handling and analysis of images for many purposes using a large number of techniques and methods. The applications of image processing range from enhancement of the visibility of cer- tain organs in medical images to object recognition for handling by

  18. Image city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities.......Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities....

  19. Rate Constant for the Reaction CH3 + CH3 Yields C2H6 at T = 155 K and Model Calculation of the CH3 Abundance in the Atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Regina J.; Romani, Paul N.; Nesbitt, Fred L.; Iannone, Mark A.; Tardy, Dwight C.; Stief, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    The column abundances of CH3 observed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite on Saturn and Neptune were lower than predicted by atmospheric photochemical models, especially for Saturn. It has been suggested that the models underestimated the loss of CH3 due to poor knowledge of the rate constant k of the CH3 + CH3 self-reaction at the low temperatures and pressures of these atmospheres. Motivated by this suggestion, we undertook a combined experimental and photochemical modeling study of the CH3 + CH3 reaction and its role in determining planetary CH3 abundances. In a discharge flow-mass spectrometer system, k was measured at T = 155 K and three pressures of He. The results in units of cu cm/molecule/s are k(0.6 Torr) = 6.82 x 10(exp -11), k(1.0 Torr) = 6.98 x 10(exp -11), and k(1.5 Torr) = 6.91 x 10(exp -11). Analytical expressions for k were derived that (1) are consistent with the present laboratory data at T = 155 K, our previous data at T = 202 K and 298 K, and those of other studies in He at T = 296-298 K and (2) have some theoretical basis to provide justification for extrapolation. The derived analytical expressions were then used in atmospheric photochemical models for both Saturn and Neptune. These model results reduced the disparity with observations of Saturn, but not with observations of Neptune. However, the disparity for Neptune is much smaller. The solution to the remaining excess CH3 prediction in the models relative to the ISO observations lies, to a large extent, elsewhere in the CH3 photochemistry or transport, not in the CH3 + CH3 rate.

  20. Analysis of Hot Ions Detected during Equatorial Orbits of the Cassini Spacecraft at Saturn using the Convected Kappa Distribution Function and a Comparison to Voyager and Galileo Measurements at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Carbary, J. F.; Hill, M. E.; Dialynas, K.; Mauk, B.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    An extensive analysis of Cassini INCA and CHEMS measurements of 5-149 keV ions acquired during all equatorial orbits has been completed using a 3-D convected kappa distribution model. The computed plasma azimuthal speed, expressed as a fraction of the local corotation speed, decreases sharply with increasing distance from Saturn. The oxygen ion profile follows the hydrogen ion trend. For both species, the polar convection speed is the smallest of the 3 velocity components, and is centered about zero, but the radial speed has a significant radially outward component. Further, the radial component is enhanced in the pre-dawn sector. The hydrogen and oxygen temperatures increase with decreasing distance to Saturn. The calculated pattern of convection is consistent with an empirical model of plasma convection that includes outward radial transport and escape of plasma in a dawnside boundary layer of plasma entrained by the dawn magnetosheath flow. When the model convection pattern is scaled to the sub-solar magnetopause distance and to the sizes of Jupiter and Saturn, the pattern agrees with that derived from analysis of hot ions detected by the LECP detector on Voyager and the EPD instrument on Galileo. This and previous analysis of hot ion distributions has shown that the convected kappa distribution, with isotropy assumed in the plasma rest frame, has well described hot ion observed fluxes within a limited range of ion energies and has produced meaningful and ordered physical plasma parameters including plasma bulk velocity vectors, kappa distribution temperature profiles, and the general magnetospheric convection pattern at Jupiter and Saturn.

  1. Evaluation of EGFR protein expression by immunohistochemistry using H-score and the magnification rule: re-analysis of the SATURN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazières, Julien; Brugger, Wolfram; Cappuzzo, Federico; Middel, Peter; Frosch, Alice; Bara, Ilze; Klingelschmitt, Gaelle; Klughammer, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    The phase III SATURN study demonstrated that first-line maintenance erlotinib extended progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) versus placebo in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) found no significant interaction between EGFR IHC status and PFS (p = 0.63) or OS (p = 0.52). The FLEX study of first-line cetuximab plus chemotherapy demonstrated that EGFR IHC expression was predictive of improved OS with cetuximab when assessed by H-score with a magnification rule. This novel method was used to reassess samples from SATURN. The H-score method assigned a score of 0-300 to each patient, based on the percentage of cells stained at different intensities viewed at various magnifications. The discriminatory threshold was set at 200, per the FLEX study, and existing samples were re-read and classed as low (H-score < 200) or high (≥200) EGFR expression. PFS and OS were re-analyzed based on these new classifications. In the overall and EGFR wild-type populations, erlotinib provided a consistent survival benefit versus placebo. Hazard ratios (HRs) in the overall population were similar between EGFR IHC-positive and -negative patients for median PFS (HR 0.68 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.86] and 0.76 [95% CI 0.62-0.93], respectively) and OS (HR 0.80 [95% CI 0.62-1.05] and 0.80 [95% CI 0.64-1.01] for IHC-positive and IHC-negative, respectively). In the EGFR wild-type population, HRs were again similar between EGFR IHC-positive and -negative subpopulations for PFS (HR 0.69 [95% CI 0.51-0.95] and 0.84 [95% CI 0.63-1.12], respectively) and OS (HR 0.78 [95% CI 0.55-1.10] and 0.76 [95% CI 0.55-1.05], respectively). These data suggest that EGFR IHC does not have value as a marker to predict erlotinib benefit in the first-line maintenance setting for advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights

  2. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  3. Image denoising using cloud images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Huanjing; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Feng

    2013-09-01

    Image denoising manages to recover a digital image from its noisy version by exploring the statistical features inside a given noisy image. Most denoising methods perform well at low noise levels but lose efficiency at higher ones. In this paper, we propose a novel image denoising method, which restores an image by exploiting the correlations between the noisy image and the images retrieved from the cloud. Given a noisy image, we first retrieve relevant images based on feature-level similarity. These images are then geometrically aligned to the noisy image to increase global statistical correlation. Using the aligned images as references, we propose recovering the image with patch-level noise removal. For each noisy patch, we first retrieve similar patches from the references and stack these patches (including the noisy one) into a three dimensional (3D) group. We then obtain the noise free (NF) patches by collaborative filtering over the 3D groups. These recovered NF patches are aggregated together, producing the desired NF image. Experimental results demonstrate that our scheme achieves significantly better results compared to state-of-the-art methods in terms of both objective and subjective qualities.

  4. Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  5. Microwave imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorino, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the most relevant theoretical and algorithmic aspects of modern microwave imaging approaches Microwave imaging-a technique used in sensing a given scene by means of interrogating microwaves-has recently proven its usefulness in providing excellent diagnostic capabilities in several areas, including civil and industrial engineering, nondestructive testing and evaluation, geophysical prospecting, and biomedical engineering. Microwave Imaging offers comprehensive descriptions of the most important techniques so far proposed for short-range microwave imaging-in

  6. Image alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  7. The Outer Planets and their Moons Comparative Studies of the Outer Planets prior to the Exploration of the Saturn System by Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Encrenaz, T; Owen, T. C; Sotin, C

    2005-01-01

    This volume gives an integrated summary of the science related to the four giant planets in our solar system. It is the result of an ISSI workshop on «A comparative study of the outer planets before the exploration of Saturn by Cassini-Huygens» which was held at ISSI in Bern on January 12-16, 2004. Representatives of several scientific communities, such as planetary scientists, astronomers, space physicists, chemists and astrobiologists have met with the aim to review the knowledge on four major themes: (1) the study of the formation and evolution processes of the outer planets and their satellites, beginning with the formation of compounds and planetesimals in the solar nebula, and the subsequent evolution of the interiors of the outer planets, (2) a comparative study of the atmospheres of the outer planets and Titan, (3) the study of the planetary magnetospheres and their interactions with the solar wind, and (4) the formation and properties of satellites and rings, including their interiors, surfaces, an...

  8. Ground-based measurements of the 1.3 to 0.3 mm spectrum of Jupiter and Saturn, and their detailed calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Juan R.; Serabyn, Eugene; Wiedner, Martina C.; Moreno, Raphäel; Orton, Glenn

    2017-07-01

    One of the legacies of the now retired Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) is presented in this paper. We measured for the first time the emission of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn across the 0.3 to 1.3 mm wavelength range using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer mounted on the 10.4 m dish of the CSO at Mauna Kea, Hawaii, 4100 m above sea level. A careful calibration, including the evaluation of the antenna performance over such a wide wavelength range and the removal of the Earth's atmosphere effects, has allowed the detection of broad absorption lines on those planets' atmospheres. The calibrated data allowed us to verify the predictions of standard models for both planets in this spectral region, and to confirm the absolute radiometry in the case of Jupiter. Besides their physical interest, the results are also important as both planets are calibration references in the current era of operating ground-based and space-borne submillimeter instruments.

  9. Ground-based measurements of the 1.3 to 0.3 millimeter spectrum of Jupiter and Saturn, and their detailed calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Juan R; Serabyn, Eugene; Wiedner, Martina C; Moreno, Raphäel; Orton, Glenn

    2017-07-01

    One of the legacies of the now retired Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) is presented in this paper. We measured for the first time the emission of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn across the 0.3 to 1.3 mm wavelength range using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer mounted on the 10.4-meter dish of the CSO at Mauna Kea, Hawaii, 4100 meters above sea level. A careful calibration, including the evaluation of the antenna performance over such a wide wavelength range and the removal of the Earth's atmosphere effects, has allowed the detection of broad absorption lines on those planets' atmospheres. The calibrated data allowed us to verify the predictions of standard models for both planets in this spectral region, and to confirm the absolute radiometry in the case of Jupiter. Besides their physical interest, the results are also important as both planets are calibration references in the current era of operating ground-based and space-borne submillimeter instruments.

  10. Bruxas e índias filhas de Saturno: arte, bruxaria e canibalismo Witches and indian women, daughters of Saturn: arts, witchcraft and cannibalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yobenj Aucardo Chicangana-Bayona

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O artigo indaga pela representação da mulher nas pinturas e gravuras sobre a bruxaria dos séculos XVI e XVII, procurando estabelecer uma tipologia iconográfica e percorrendo a construção de estigmas negativos imputados no corpo feminino e na sua degradação natural. O texto, apoiado em fontes visuais como pinturas e gravuras, principalmente da Renascença alemã, demonstra como as índias do Novo Mundo foram associadas com as bruxas da Europa e com o deus clássico Saturno, através do mito do canibalismo.The article inquires into the representation of women in the paintings and engravings about witchcraft in the XVI-XVII centuries, trying to establish an iconographic typology and covering the construction of negative stigmas attributed to the feminine body and its natural degradation. Through the support of visual sources such as paintings and engravings, mainly from the German Renaissance, the text demonstrates how the Indian women of the New World were associated to the witches of Europe and with the classic god Saturn, through the myth of cannibalism.

  11. In-situ Planetary Subsurface Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Weber, R. C.; Dimech, J. L.; Kedar, S.; Neal, C. R.; Siegler, M.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical and seismic instruments are considered the most effective tools for studying the detailed global structures of planetary interiors. A planet's interior bears the geochemical markers of its evolutionary history, as well as its present state of activity, which has direct implications to habitability. On Earth, subsurface imaging often involves massive data collection from hundreds to thousands of geophysical sensors (seismic, acoustic, etc) followed by transfer by hard links or wirelessly to a central location for post processing and computing, which will not be possible in planetary environments due to imposed mission constraints on mass, power, and bandwidth. Emerging opportunities for geophysical exploration of the solar system from Venus to the icy Ocean Worlds of Jupiter and Saturn dictate that subsurface imaging of the deep interior will require substantial data reduction and processing in-situ. The Real-time In-situ Subsurface Imaging (RISI) technology is a mesh network that senses and processes geophysical signals. Instead of data collection then post processing, the mesh network performs the distributed data processing and computing in-situ, and generates an evolving 3D subsurface image in real-time that can be transmitted under bandwidth and resource constraints. Seismic imaging algorithms (including traveltime tomography, ambient noise imaging, and microseismic imaging) have been successfully developed and validated using both synthetic and real-world terrestrial seismic data sets. The prototype hardware system has been implemented and can be extended as a general field instrumentation platform tailored specifically for a wide variety of planetary uses, including crustal mapping, ice and ocean structure, and geothermal systems. The team is applying the RISI technology to real off-world seismic datasets. For example, the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE) deployed during the Apollo 17 Moon mission consisted of four geophone instruments

  12. Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Electronic Imagery, Inc.'s ImageScale Plus software, developed through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Kennedy Space Flight Center for use on space shuttle Orbiter in 1991, enables astronauts to conduct image processing, prepare electronic still camera images in orbit, display them and downlink images to ground based scientists for evaluation. Electronic Imagery, Inc.'s ImageCount, a spin-off product of ImageScale Plus, is used to count trees in Florida orange groves. Other applications include x-ray and MRI imagery, textile designs and special effects for movies. As of 1/28/98, company could not be located, therefore contact/product information is no longer valid.

  13. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  14. Cerenkov Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial...

  15. Models of bright storm clouds and related dark ovals in Saturn's Storm Alley as constrained by 2008 Cassini/VIMS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Baines, K. H.; Fry, P. M.

    2018-03-01

    A 5° latitude band on Saturn centered near planetocentric latitude 36°S is known as "Storm Alley" because it has been for several extended periods a site of frequent lightning activity and associated thunderstorms, first identified by Porco et al. (2005). The thunderstorms appeared as bright clouds at short and long continuum wavelengths, and over a period of a week or so transformed into dark ovals (Dyudina et al., 2007). The ovals were found to be dark over a wide spectral range, which led Baines et al. (2009) to suggest the possibility that a broadband absorber such as soot produced by lightning could play a significant role in darkening the clouds relative to their surroundings. Here we show that an alternative explanation, which is that the clouds are less reflective because of reduced optical depth, provides an excellent fit to near infrared spectra of similar features obtained by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) in 2008, and leads to a plausible scenario for cloud evolution. We find that the background clouds and the oval clouds are both dominated by the optical properties of a ubiquitous upper cloud layer, which has the same particle size in both regions, but about half the optical depth and physical thickness in the dark oval regions. The dark oval regions are also marked by enhanced emissions in the 5-μm window region, a result of lower optical depth of the deep cloud layer near 3.1-3.8 bar, presumably composed of ammonium hydrosulfide (NH4SH). The bright storm clouds completely block this deep thermal emission with a thick layer of ammonia (NH3) clouds extending from the middle of the main visible cloud layer probably as deep as the 1.7-bar NH3 condensation level. Other condensates might also be present at higher pressures, but are obscured by the NH3 cloud. The strong 3-μm spectral absorption that was displayed by Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 (Sromovsky et al., 2013) is weaker in these storms because the contrast is

  16. 35 years since the start up and the first plasma of the stellarator-torsatron Saturn. Main results for one decade of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsenya, V. S.; Georgiyevsky, A. V.; Solodovchencko, S. I.

    2005-01-01

    limits for this paper, it is not possible to list even the main papers on this subject. However, many references can be found in the book Stellarator [7], and in some reviews, e.g., [1,8,9]. The first in the world torsatron Saturn built in KIPT in 1970 (first experiments - in March 1970 [10,11]) was designed to operate in two modes: stellarator and torsatron. In the latter case, it could operate without available toroidal field winding, which was coiled in the form of a continuous two-layer winding producing a toroidal field without noticeable ripples (less than 1% at the plasma edge). Successful experience obtained with this device became a base for development and fabrication in KIPT the whole family of torsatron-type devices: Vint-20, U- 3, U-3M, and U-2M. Finishing this history of torsatrons, we would like to note here the first l=1 ultimate torsatron Vint-20 (start in 1972, experiments since 1973 [12,13]) with a helical winding law providing the compensation of a vertical magnetic field. The magnetic configuration with B0 up to 1.8 T was produced by a sole conductor a toroidal helix placed in a vacuum volume. Due to the chosen winding law, it was partially discharged from the action of ponderomotive forces. The Uragan-3 [14,15] and Uragan-3M [16] installations are the first torsatrons with a spatial divertor as intrinsic part of magnetic configuration and the first devices with a quasi-force-free magnetic system. In this paper we present the most interesting and important results obtained in experiments on Saturn. To shorten the text, the description of experimental details are omitted in this review and can be found in corresponding references. (Author)

  17. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    The Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is found to be made of three major cycles with periods of about 9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 years. The side frequencies appear to be closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (range between 9.5 and 10.5 years, and median 9.93 years) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years). The central cycle may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle that appears to be approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns. The major beat periods occur at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima that occurred during 1900-1920 and 1960-1980 and the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005 and a secular upward trending during the 20th century: this modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature

  18. Harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafetta, N.

    2012-12-01

    We show that the Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles that are closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (~9.93 year), to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years) and to a central cycle that may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle. The central harmonic is approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A harmonic model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals major beat periods occurring at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. Equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic solar proxy records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima around 1900-1920 and 1960-1980, the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005, and a secular upward trending during the 20th century. The latter modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature modulation since 1850. The model forecasts a new prolonged solar minimum during 2020-2045, which is produced by the minima of both the 61 and 115-year reconstructed cycles. Finally, the model predicts

  19. Cerenkov imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L J; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial structures. Imaging can basically be done using a sensitive camera optimized for low-light conditions, and it has a better resolution than any other nuclear imaging modality. CLI has been shown to effectively diagnose disease with regularly used PET isotope ((18)F-FDG) in clinical setting. Cerenkov luminescence tomography, Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy, and intraoperative Cerenkov imaging have also been explored with positive conclusions expanding the current range of applications. Cerenkov has also been used to improve PET imaging resolution since the source of both is the radioisotope being used. Smart imaging agents have been designed based on modulation of the Cerenkov signal using small molecules and nanoparticles giving better insight of the tumor biology. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.H.; Reid, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear imaging, utilizing relatively low photon energy emitting isotopes, allows an assessment of anatomic configuration and organ function. This method of imaging is predicted on the utilization of physiologically active radioisotope-labeled compounds or biologically active radioisotopes. Localization of such isotopes in normal or abnormal concentrations may be due to varying physiological or pathological mechanisms

  1. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  2. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  3. Incompatible Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sassene, Michel J.; Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    is, however, based on a taken-for-granted image of asthmatics as, per se, striving to be symptom-free. This image is incompatible with interviewed asthmatics' day-to-day performances of their asthma, and renders invisible (a) that their asthma performances emphasize an economy of good passages...

  4. 2D and 3D simulation of cavitating flows: development of an original algorithm in code Saturne and study of the influence of turbulence modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chebli, Rezki

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is one of the most demanding physical phenomena influencing the performance of hydraulic machines. It is therefore important to predict correctly its inception and development, in order to quantify the performance drop it induces, and also to characterize the resulting flow instabilities. The aim of this work is to develop an unsteady 3D algorithm for the numerical simulation of cavitation in an industrial CFD solver 'Code Saturne'. It is based on a fractional step method and preserves the minimum/maximum principle of the void fraction. An implicit solver, based on a transport equation of the void fraction coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations is proposed. A specific numerical treatment of the cavitation source terms provides physical values of the void fraction (between 0 and 1) without including any artificial numerical limitation. The influence of RANS turbulence models on the simulation of cavitation on 2D geometries (Venturi and Hydrofoil) is then studied. It confirms the capability of the two-equation eddy viscosity models, k-epsilon and k-omega-SST, with the modification proposed by Reboud et al. (1998) to reproduce the main features of the unsteady sheet cavity behavior. The second order model RSM-SSG, based on the Reynolds stress transport, appears able to reproduce the highly unsteady flow behavior without including any arbitrary modification. The three-dimensional effects involved in the instability mechanisms are also analyzed. This work allows us to achieve a numerical tool, validated on complex configurations of cavitating flows, to improve the understanding of the physical mechanisms that control the three-dimensional unsteady effects involved in the mechanisms of instability. (author)

  5. Medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology almost 25 years ago, non-invasive imaging has become firmly established as an essential tool in the diagnosis of disease. Fully three-dimensional imaging of internal organs is now possible, b and for studies which explore the functional status of the body. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function are available, and scanners which combine anatomical and functional imaging in a single device are under development. Such techniques have been made possible through r ecent technological and mathematical advances. This series of lectures will review both the physical basis of medical imaging techniques using X-rays, gamma and positron emitting radiosiotopes, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and the mathematical methods used to reconstruct three-dimentional distributions from projection data. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simple radiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo biochemistry. They ...

  6. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  7. The particle size distribution in Saturn's Main Rings from VIMS and UVIS stellar occultations and RSS radio occultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerousek, R. G.; Colwell, J. E.; Hedman, M. M.; Marouf, E. A.; French, R. G.; Esposito, L. W.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    The parameters of a simple power-law particle size distribution can be inferred from measurements of optical depth at multiple wavelengths (Marouf et al. 1982, 1983, Zebker et al. 1985) where the number of particles of radius between a and a+da is given by n(a)da = n0(a/a0)-qda with amin ≤ a ≤ amax. In the C ring and Cassini division where the surface mass density is low, the Toomre critical wavelength for gravitational collapse is comparable to the radii of the largest particles ( 1 m) and the effects of viewing geometry on measured normal optical depth can be ignored. In these regions, we fit optical depths measured by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) at λ = 2.9μm, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) at λ = 0.15μm, and by the Radio Science Subsystem (RSS) at X band (λ = 3.6cm) and Ka band (λ = 9.4mm) to power-law derived optical depths and constrain the power-law parameters at 10km radial resolution. In the A and B rings where the Toomre critical wavelength is much larger than the radii of the largest particles, self-gravity wakes (ephemeral elongated particle aggregates canted to the direction of orbital motion by Keplerian shear) form. Occultations of these ring regions that occur at different viewing geometries measure different normal optical depths. We model and remove the geometric effects on the ring normal optical depth using the self-gravity wake model of Colwell et al. (2006, 2007) and fit wake model derived optical depths to power-law determined optical depths to constrain the parameters of the power-law particle size distribution. We find average values of amin 5 mm in the background C ring, the C ring plateaus, and in the Cassini Division. In the A and B ring and outside the strong density waves triggered by resonances with Janus and Mimas, we find amin 9 mm except in the trans-Encke region were the minimum particle radius drops to 5 mm and again to about 3.5 mm in the trans-Keeler region near the A ring outer

  8. Saturn-like charge-transfer complexes Li₄&B₃₆, Li₅&B₃₆⁺, and Li₆&B₃₆²⁺: exohedral metalloborospherenes with a perfect cage-like B₃₆⁴⁻ core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wen-Juan; Chen, Qiang; Li, Hai-Ru; Yan, Miao; Mu, Yue-Wen; Lu, Hai-Gang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-04-21

    Based on extensive first-principles theory calculations, we present the possibility of construction of the Saturn-like charge-transfer complexes Li4&B36 (2), Li5&B36(+) (3), and Li6&B36(2+) (4) all of which contain a perfect cage-like B36(4-) (1) core composed of twelve interwoven boron double chains with a σ + π double delocalization bonding pattern, extending the Bn(q) borospherene family from n = 38-42 to n = 36 with the highest symmetry of T(h).

  9. Image perception and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1987-01-01

    The author develops theoretical and practical models of image perception and image processing, based on phenomenology and structuralism and leading to original perception: fundamental for a positivistic approach of research work for the development of artificial intelligence that will be able in an automated system fo 'reading' X-ray pictures. (orig.) [de

  10. COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lafon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present specific capabilities and limitations of the use of color digital images in a characterization process. The whole process is investigated, from the acquisition of digital color images to the analysis of the information relevant to various applications in the field of material characterization. A digital color image can be considered as a matrix of pixels with values expressed in a vector-space (commonly 3 dimensional space whose specificity, compared to grey-scale images, is to ensure a coding and a representation of the output image (visualisation printing that fits the human visual reality. In a characterization process, it is interesting to regard color image attnbutes as a set of visual aspect measurements on a material surface. Color measurement systems (spectrocolorimeters, colorimeters and radiometers and cameras use the same type of light detectors: most of them use Charge Coupled Devices sensors. The difference between the two types of color data acquisition systems is that color measurement systems provide a global information of the observed surface (average aspect of the surface: the color texture is not taken into account. Thus, it seems interesting to use imaging systems as measuring instruments for the quantitative characterization of the color texture.

  11. Thumbnail Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Nanna; Teilmann, Stina

    2017-01-01

    and strategic terms; and a cultural question of how human-computer interaction design works with navigational uncertainty, both as an experience to be managed and a resource to be exploited. This paper considers two copyright infringement cases that involved search engines as defendants, Kelly v. Arriba Soft......This article argues that thumbnail images are infrastructural images that raise issues of uncertainty in two distinct, but interrelated, areas: a legal question of how to define, understand and govern visual information infrastructures, in particular image search systems in epistemological...

  12. Image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    The paper touches upon indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Different conceptions of what subject indexing means are described as a basis for defining an operational subject indexing strategy for images. The methodology is based on the art historian Erwin Panofsky......), special knowledge about image codes, and special knowledge about history of ideas. The semiologist Roland Barthes has established a semiology for pictorial expressions based on advertising photos. Barthes uses the concepts denotation/connotation where denotations can be explained as the sober expression...

  13. Image Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glance Mission and Vision Organizational Structure Director's Message Strategic Plans & Reports Budget & Legislation ... The Image Gallery contains high-quality digital photographs available from the National Center for Complementary ...

  14. Body Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  15. Image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindler, M.; Radtke, F.; Demel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The book is arranged in seven sections, describing various applications of volumetric analysis using image processing systems, and various methods of diagnostic evaluation of images obtained by gamma scintigraphy, cardic catheterisation, and echocardiography. A dynamic ventricular phantom is explained that has been developed for checking and calibration for safe examination of patient, the phantom allowing extensive simulation of volumetric and hemodynamic conditions of the human heart: One section discusses the program development for image processing, referring to a number of different computer systems. The equipment described includes a small non-expensive PC system, as well as a standardized nuclear medical diagnostic system, and a computer system especially suited to image processing. (orig.) [de

  16. Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect body image Pre-baby body Pregnancy and eating disorders Looking for information on mental health conditions? Visit ... Mental health section. Fact sheets Anorexia nervosa Binge eating disorder Bulimia nervosa Cosmetics and your health Depression during ...

  17. Geriatric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Peh, Wilfred C.G.; Guermazi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Considers all aspect of geriatric imaging. Explains clearly how to distinguish the healthy elderly from those in need of treatment. Superbly illustrated. Written by recognized experts in field. In the elderly, the coexistence of various diseases, the presence of involutional and degenerative changes, and the occurrence of both physical and cognitive problems represent ''the norm.'' It is therefore important to know how to distinguish the healthy elderly from those in need of treatment as a sound basis for avoiding overdiagnosis and overtreatment. This aspect is a central theme in Geriatric Imaging, which covers a wide range of applications of different imaging techniques and clearly explains both the potential and the limitations of diagnostic imaging in geriatric patients. Individual sections are devoted to each major region or system of the body, and a concluding section focuses specifically on interventional procedures. The book, written by recognized experts in the field, is superbly illustrated and will be an ideal resource for geriatricians, radiologists, and trainees.

  18. Image processing

    OpenAIRE

    Rino, Franco

    2014-01-01

    An image segmentation method has a training phase, and a segmentation phase. In the training phase a frame of pixel lated data from a camera is processed using information on camera characteristics to render it camera-independent. The camera independent data are processed using a chosen value of illuminant spectral characteristics to derive reflectivity data of the items in the image. Pixels of high reflectivity are established. Then, using data from the high reflectivity pixels, the actual i...

  19. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart. This paper presents a synthesis technique to generate images of 3D objects that are detectable by humans, but difficult for an automatic algorithm to recognize. The technique allows generating an infinite number of images with emerging figures. Our algorithm is designed so that locally the synthesized images divulge little useful information or cues to assist any segmentation or recognition procedure. Therefore, as we demonstrate, computer vision algorithms are incapable of effectively processing such images. However, when a human observer is presented with an emergence image, synthesized using an object she is familiar with, the figure emerges when observed as a whole. We can control the difficulty level of perceiving the emergence effect through a limited set of parameters. A procedure that synthesizes emergence images can be an effective tool for exploring and understanding the factors affecting computer vision techniques. © 2009 ACM.

  20. Rosuvastatin preserves renal function and lowers cystatin C in HIV-infected subjects on antiretroviral therapy: the SATURN-HIV trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Chris T; Hileman, Corrilynn O; Funderburg, Nicholas T; McComsey, Grace A

    2014-10-15

    In chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, plasma cystatin C may be inf