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Sample records for image acquisition technique

  1. New partially parallel acquisition technique in cerebral imaging: preliminary findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tintera, Jaroslav; Gawehn, Joachim; Bauermann, Thomas; Vucurevic, Goran; Stoeter, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In MRI applications where short acquisition time is necessary, the increase of acquisition speed is often at the expense of image resolution and SNR. In such cases, the newly developed parallel acquisition techniques could provide images without mentioned limitations and in reasonably shortened measurement time. A newly designed eight-channel head coil array (i-PAT coil) allowing for parallel acquisition of independently reconstructed images (GRAPPA mode) has been tested for its applicability in neuroradiology. Image homogeneity was tested in standard phantom and healthy volunteers. BOLD signal changes were studied in a group of six volunteers using finger tapping stimulation. Phantom studies revealed an important drop of signal even after the use of a normalization filter in the center of the image and an important increase of artifact power with reduction of measurement time strongly depending on the combination of acceleration parameters. The additional application of a parallel acquisition technique such as GRAPPA decreases measurement time in the range of about 30%, but further reduction is often possible only at the expense of SNR. This technique performs best in conditions in which imaging speed is important, such as CE MRA, but time resolution still does not allow the acquisition of angiograms separating the arterial and venous phase. Significantly larger areas of BOLD activation were found using the i-PAT coil compared to the standard head coil. Being an eight-channel surface coil array, peripheral cortical structures profit from high SNR as high-resolution imaging of small cortical dysplasias and functional activation of cortical areas imaged by BOLD contrast. In BOLD contrast imaging, susceptibility artifacts are reduced, but only if an appropriate combination of acceleration parameters is used. (orig.)

  2. New partially parallel acquisition technique in cerebral imaging: preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tintera, Jaroslav [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Gawehn, Joachim; Bauermann, Thomas; Vucurevic, Goran; Stoeter, Peter [University Clinic Mainz, Institute of Neuroradiology, Mainz (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    In MRI applications where short acquisition time is necessary, the increase of acquisition speed is often at the expense of image resolution and SNR. In such cases, the newly developed parallel acquisition techniques could provide images without mentioned limitations and in reasonably shortened measurement time. A newly designed eight-channel head coil array (i-PAT coil) allowing for parallel acquisition of independently reconstructed images (GRAPPA mode) has been tested for its applicability in neuroradiology. Image homogeneity was tested in standard phantom and healthy volunteers. BOLD signal changes were studied in a group of six volunteers using finger tapping stimulation. Phantom studies revealed an important drop of signal even after the use of a normalization filter in the center of the image and an important increase of artifact power with reduction of measurement time strongly depending on the combination of acceleration parameters. The additional application of a parallel acquisition technique such as GRAPPA decreases measurement time in the range of about 30%, but further reduction is often possible only at the expense of SNR. This technique performs best in conditions in which imaging speed is important, such as CE MRA, but time resolution still does not allow the acquisition of angiograms separating the arterial and venous phase. Significantly larger areas of BOLD activation were found using the i-PAT coil compared to the standard head coil. Being an eight-channel surface coil array, peripheral cortical structures profit from high SNR as high-resolution imaging of small cortical dysplasias and functional activation of cortical areas imaged by BOLD contrast. In BOLD contrast imaging, susceptibility artifacts are reduced, but only if an appropriate combination of acceleration parameters is used. (orig.)

  3. Acquisition and visualization techniques for narrow spectral color imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, László; García, Rafael; Basa, János; Hegedüs, Ramón

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces a new approach in narrow-band imaging (NBI). Existing NBI techniques generate images by selecting discrete bands over the full visible spectrum or an even wider spectral range. In contrast, here we perform the sampling with filters covering a tight spectral window. This image acquisition method, named narrow spectral imaging, can be particularly useful when optical information is only available within a narrow spectral window, such as in the case of deep-water transmittance, which constitutes the principal motivation of this work. In this study we demonstrate the potential of the proposed photographic technique on nonunderwater scenes recorded under controlled conditions. To this end three multilayer narrow bandpass filters were employed, which transmit at 440, 456, and 470 nm bluish wavelengths, respectively. Since the differences among the images captured in such a narrow spectral window can be extremely small, both image acquisition and visualization require a novel approach. First, high-bit-depth images were acquired with multilayer narrow-band filters either placed in front of the illumination or mounted on the camera lens. Second, a color-mapping method is proposed, using which the input data can be transformed onto the entire display color gamut with a continuous and perceptually nearly uniform mapping, while ensuring optimally high information content for human perception.

  4. Image acquisition system using on sensor compressed sampling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pravir Singh; Choi, Gwan Seong

    2018-01-01

    Advances in CMOS technology have made high-resolution image sensors possible. These image sensors pose significant challenges in terms of the amount of raw data generated, energy efficiency, and frame rate. This paper presents a design methodology for an imaging system and a simplified image sensor pixel design to be used in the system so that the compressed sensing (CS) technique can be implemented easily at the sensor level. This results in significant energy savings as it not only cuts the raw data rate but also reduces transistor count per pixel; decreases pixel size; increases fill factor; simplifies analog-to-digital converter, JPEG encoder, and JPEG decoder design; decreases wiring; and reduces the decoder size by half. Thus, CS has the potential to increase the resolution of image sensors for a given technology and die size while significantly decreasing the power consumption and design complexity. We show that it has potential to reduce power consumption by about 23% to 65%.

  5. Rapid musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging using integrated parallel acquisition techniques (IPAT) - Initial experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaneehsen, B.; Oberholzer, K.; Kreitner, K.-F.; Mueller, L.P.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using multiple receiver coil elements for time saving integrated parallel imaging techniques (iPAT) in traumatic musculoskeletal disorders. Material and methods: 6 patients with traumatic derangements of the knee, ankle and hip underwent MR imaging at 1.5 T. For signal detection of the knee and ankle, we used a 6-channel body array coil that was placed around the joints, for hip imaging two 4-channel body array coils and two elements of the spine array coil were combined for signal detection. All patients were investigated with a standard imaging protocol that mainly consisted of different turbo spin-echo sequences (PD-, T 2 -weighted TSE with and without fat suppression, STIR). All sequences were repeated with an integrated parallel acquisition technique (iPAT) using a modified sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) technique with an acceleration factor of 2. Overall image quality was subjectively assessed using a five-point scale as well as the ability for detection of pathologic findings. Results: Regarding overall image quality, there were no significant differences between standard imaging and imaging using mSENSE. All pathologies (occult fracture, meniscal tear, torn and interpositioned Hoffa's cleft, cartilage damage) were detected by both techniques. iPAT led to a 48% reduction of acquisition time compared with standard technique. Additionally, time savings with iPAT led to a decrease of pain-induced motion artifacts in two cases. Conclusion: In times of increasing cost pressure, iPAT using multiple coil elements seems to be an efficient and economic tool for fast musculoskeletal imaging with diagnostic performance comparable to conventional techniques. (orig.) [de

  6. Image acquisition and planimetry systems to develop wounding techniques in 3D wound model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Ann-Kathrin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing represents a complex biological repair process. Established 2D monolayers and wounding techniques investigate cell migration, but do not represent coordinated multi-cellular systems. We aim to use wound surface area measurements obtained from image acquisition and planimetry systems to establish our wounding technique and in vitro organotypic tissue. These systems will be used in our future wound healing treatment studies to assess the rate of wound closure in response to wound healing treatment with light therapy (photobiomodulation. The image acquisition and planimetry systems were developed, calibrated, and verified to measure wound surface area in vitro. The system consists of a recording system (Sony DSC HX60, 20.4 M Pixel, 1/2.3″ CMOS sensor and calibrated with 1mm scale paper. Macro photography with an optical zoom magnification of 2:1 achieves sufficient resolution to evaluate the 3mm wound size and healing growth. The camera system was leveled with an aluminum construction to ensure constant distance and orientation of the images. The JPG-format images were processed with a planimetry system in MATLAB. Edge detection enables definition of the wounded area. Wound area can be calculated with surface integrals. To separate the wounded area from the background, the image was filtered in several steps. Agar models, injured through several test persons with different levels of experience, were used as pilot data to test the planimetry software. These image acquisition and planimetry systems support the development of our wound healing research. The reproducibility of our wounding technique can be assessed by the variability in initial wound surface area. Also, wound healing treatment effects can be assessed by the change in rate of wound closure. These techniques represent the foundations of our wound model, wounding technique, and analysis systems in our ongoing studies in wound healing and therapy.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisition techniques intended to decrease movement artefact in paediatric brain imaging: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfield, Julie; Kealey, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Attaining paediatric brain images of diagnostic quality can be difficult because of young age or neurological impairment. The use of anaesthesia to reduce movement in MRI increases clinical risk and cost, while CT, though faster, exposes children to potentially harmful ionising radiation. MRI acquisition techniques that aim to decrease movement artefact may allow diagnostic paediatric brain imaging without sedation or anaesthesia. We conducted a systematic review to establish the evidence base for ultra-fast sequences and sequences using oversampling of k-space in paediatric brain MR imaging. Techniques were assessed for imaging time, occurrence of movement artefact, the need for sedation, and either image quality or diagnostic accuracy. We identified 24 relevant studies. We found that ultra-fast techniques had shorter imaging acquisition times compared to standard MRI. Techniques using oversampling of k-space required equal or longer imaging times than standard MRI. Both ultra-fast sequences and those using oversampling of k-space reduced movement artefact compared with standard MRI in unsedated children. Assessment of overall diagnostic accuracy was difficult because of the heterogeneous patient populations, imaging indications, and reporting methods of the studies. In children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus there is evidence that ultra-fast MRI is sufficient for the assessment of ventricular size. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisition techniques intended to decrease movement artefact in paediatric brain imaging: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodfield, Julie [University of Edinburgh, Child Life and Health, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kealey, Susan [Western General Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Attaining paediatric brain images of diagnostic quality can be difficult because of young age or neurological impairment. The use of anaesthesia to reduce movement in MRI increases clinical risk and cost, while CT, though faster, exposes children to potentially harmful ionising radiation. MRI acquisition techniques that aim to decrease movement artefact may allow diagnostic paediatric brain imaging without sedation or anaesthesia. We conducted a systematic review to establish the evidence base for ultra-fast sequences and sequences using oversampling of k-space in paediatric brain MR imaging. Techniques were assessed for imaging time, occurrence of movement artefact, the need for sedation, and either image quality or diagnostic accuracy. We identified 24 relevant studies. We found that ultra-fast techniques had shorter imaging acquisition times compared to standard MRI. Techniques using oversampling of k-space required equal or longer imaging times than standard MRI. Both ultra-fast sequences and those using oversampling of k-space reduced movement artefact compared with standard MRI in unsedated children. Assessment of overall diagnostic accuracy was difficult because of the heterogeneous patient populations, imaging indications, and reporting methods of the studies. In children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus there is evidence that ultra-fast MRI is sufficient for the assessment of ventricular size. (orig.)

  9. Rapid musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging using integrated parallel acquisition techniques (IPAT) - Initial experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaneehsen, B.; Oberholzer, K.; Kreitner, K.-F. [Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Mueller, L.P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie

    2003-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using multiple receiver coil elements for time saving integrated parallel imaging techniques (iPAT) in traumatic musculoskeletal disorders. Material and methods: 6 patients with traumatic derangements of the knee, ankle and hip underwent MR imaging at 1.5 T. For signal detection of the knee and ankle, we used a 6-channel body array coil that was placed around the joints, for hip imaging two 4-channel body array coils and two elements of the spine array coil were combined for signal detection. All patients were investigated with a standard imaging protocol that mainly consisted of different turbo spin-echo sequences (PD-, T{sub 2}-weighted TSE with and without fat suppression, STIR). All sequences were repeated with an integrated parallel acquisition technique (iPAT) using a modified sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) technique with an acceleration factor of 2. Overall image quality was subjectively assessed using a five-point scale as well as the ability for detection of pathologic findings. Results: Regarding overall image quality, there were no significant differences between standard imaging and imaging using mSENSE. All pathologies (occult fracture, meniscal tear, torn and interpositioned Hoffa's cleft, cartilage damage) were detected by both techniques. iPAT led to a 48% reduction of acquisition time compared with standard technique. Additionally, time savings with iPAT led to a decrease of pain-induced motion artifacts in two cases. Conclusion: In times of increasing cost pressure, iPAT using multiple coil elements seems to be an efficient and economic tool for fast musculoskeletal imaging with diagnostic performance comparable to conventional techniques. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Einsatz integrierter paralleler Akquisitionstechniken (iPAT) zur Verkuerzung der Untersuchungszeit bei muskuloskelettalen Verletzungen. Material und Methoden: 6 Patienten mit einem Knie, Sprunggelenks- oder Huefttrauma wurden bei 1,5 T

  10. Amplitudes, acquisition and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloor, Robert

    1998-12-31

    Accurate seismic amplitude information is important for the successful evaluation of many prospects and the importance of such amplitude information is increasing with the advent of time lapse seismic techniques. It is now widely accepted that the proper treatment of amplitudes requires seismic imaging in the form of either time or depth migration. A key factor in seismic imaging is the spatial sampling of the data and its relationship to the imaging algorithms. This presentation demonstrates that acquisition caused spatial sampling irregularity can affect the seismic imaging and perturb amplitudes. Equalization helps to balance the amplitudes, and the dealing strategy improves the imaging further when there are azimuth variations. Equalization and dealiasing can also help with the acquisition irregularities caused by shot and receiver dislocation or missing traces. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Fast magnetic resonance imaging of the knee using a parallel acquisition technique (mSENSE): a prospective performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Romaneehsen, Bernd; Oberholzer, Katja; Dueber, Christoph; Krummenauer, Frank; Mueller, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging strategy that uses multiple receiver coil elements and integrated parallel imaging techniques (iPAT) in traumatic and degenerative disorders of the knee and to compare this technique with a standard MR imaging protocol was evaluated. Ninety patients with suspected internal derangements of the knee joint prospectively underwent MR imaging at 1.5 T. For signal detection, a 6-channel array coil was used. All patients were investigated with a standard imaging protocol consisting of different turbo spin-echo sequences proton density (PD), T 2 -weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) with and without fat suppression in three imaging planes. All sequences were repeated with an integrated parallel acquisition technique (iPAT) using the modified sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) algorithm with an acceleration factor of 2. Two radiologists independently evaluated and scored all images with regard to overall image quality, artefacts and pathologic findings. Agreement of the parallel ratings between readers and imaging techniques, respectively, was evaluated by means of pairwise kappa coefficients that were stratified for the area of evaluation. Agreement between the parallel readers for both the iPAT imaging and the conventional technique, respectively, as well as between imaging techniques was found encouraging with inter-observer kappa values ranging between 0.78 and 0.98 for both imaging techniques, and the inter-method kappa values ranging between 0.88 and 1.00 for both clinical readers. All pathological findings (e.g. occult fractures, meniscal and cruciate ligament tears, torn and interpositioned Hoffa's cleft, cartilage damage) were detected by both techniques with comparable performance. The use of iPAT lead to a 48% reduction of acquisition time compared with standard technique. Parallel imaging using mSENSE proved to be an efficient and economic tool for fast musculoskeletal MR imaging of the knee joint with comparable

  12. Histogram-based normalization technique on human brain magnetic resonance images from different acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofei; Shi, Lin; Luo, Yishan; Yang, Wei; Li, Hongpeng; Liang, Peipeng; Li, Kuncheng; Mok, Vincent C T; Chu, Winnie C W; Wang, Defeng

    2015-07-28

    Intensity normalization is an important preprocessing step in brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) analysis. During MR image acquisition, different scanners or parameters would be used for scanning different subjects or the same subject at a different time, which may result in large intensity variations. This intensity variation will greatly undermine the performance of subsequent MRI processing and population analysis, such as image registration, segmentation, and tissue volume measurement. In this work, we proposed a new histogram normalization method to reduce the intensity variation between MRIs obtained from different acquisitions. In our experiment, we scanned each subject twice on two different scanners using different imaging parameters. With noise estimation, the image with lower noise level was determined and treated as the high-quality reference image. Then the histogram of the low-quality image was normalized to the histogram of the high-quality image. The normalization algorithm includes two main steps: (1) intensity scaling (IS), where, for the high-quality reference image, the intensities of the image are first rescaled to a range between the low intensity region (LIR) value and the high intensity region (HIR) value; and (2) histogram normalization (HN),where the histogram of low-quality image as input image is stretched to match the histogram of the reference image, so that the intensity range in the normalized image will also lie between LIR and HIR. We performed three sets of experiments to evaluate the proposed method, i.e., image registration, segmentation, and tissue volume measurement, and compared this with the existing intensity normalization method. It is then possible to validate that our histogram normalization framework can achieve better results in all the experiments. It is also demonstrated that the brain template with normalization preprocessing is of higher quality than the template with no normalization processing. We have proposed

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of renal masses with rapid-acquisition spin-echo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilenberg, S.S.; Lee, J.K.T.; Brown, J.J.; Heiken, J.P.; Mirowitz, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-DTPA-enhanced rapid-acquisition spin-echo (RASE) imaging with standard spin-echo techniques for detecting renal cysts and solid renal neoplasms. RASE imaging combines a short TR (275 msec)/short TE (10 msec), single excitation pulse sequence with half-Fourier data sampling. Eighteen patients with CT evidence of renal masses were first evaluated with standard T1-and T2-weighted SE sequences. Pre- and serial postcontrast (Cd-DTPA, 0.1 mmol./kg) RASE sequences were then performed during suspended respiration. A final set of postcontrast images was obtained with the standard T1-weighted SE sequence. Each set of MR images was first reviewed separately (ie, T1, T2, pre- and post-contrast RASE, etc)

  14. Energy-dependent imaging in digital radiography: a review on acquisition, processing and display technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppini, G.; Maltinti, G.; Valli, G.; Baroni, M.; Buchignan, M.; Valli, G.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of energy-dependent imaging in digital radiography are analyzed paying particular attention to digital video systems. The main techniques developed in recent years for selective energy imaging are reviewed following a unified approach. Discussion about advantages and limits of energy methods is carried out by a comparative analysis of computer simulated data and experimental results as obtained by standard x-ray equipments coupled to a digital video unit. Geometric phantoms are used as test object, as also images of a chest phantom are produced. Since signal-to-noise ratio degradation is one of the major problems when dealing with selective imaging, a particular effort is made to investigate noise effects. In this perspective, an original colour encoding display of energy sequences is presented. By mapping the various energy measurements on different colour bands (typically those of an RGB TV-monitor), an increased image conspicuity is obtained without a significant noise degradation: this is ensured by the energy dependence of attenuation coefficients and by the integrating characteristics of the display device

  15. Data acquisition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Testing neutron generators and major subassemblies has undergone a transition in the past few years. Digital information is now used for storage and analysis. The key to the change is the availability of a high-speed digitizer system. The status of the Sandia Laboratory data acquisition and handling system as applied to this area is surveyed. 1 figure

  16. General image acquisition parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teissier, J.M.; Lopez, F.M.; Langevin, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The general parameters are of primordial importance to achieve image quality in terms of spatial resolution and contrast. They also play a role in the acquisition time for each sequence. We describe them separately, before associating them in a decision tree gathering the various options that are possible for diagnosis

  17. VIBE with parallel acquisition technique - a novel approach to dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobritz, M.; Radkow, T.; Bautz, W.; Fellner, F.A.; Nittka, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The VIBE (volume interpolated breath-hold examination) sequence in combination with parallel acquisition technique (iPAT: integrated parallel acquisition technique) allows dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver with high temporal and spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to obtain first clinical experience with this technique for the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions. Materials and Methods: We examined 10 consecutive patients using a 1.5 T MR system (gradient field strength 30 mT/m) with a phased-array coil combination. Following sequences- were acquired: T 2 -w TSE and T 1 -w FLASH, after administration of gadolinium, 6 VIBE sequences with iPAT (TR/TE/matrix/partition thickness/time of acquisition: 6.2 ms/ 3.2 ms/256 x 192/4 mm/13 s), as well as T 1 -weighted FLASH with fat saturation. Two observers evaluated the different sequences concerning the number of lesions and their dignity. Following lesions were found: hepatocellular carcinoma (5 patients), hemangioma (2), metastasis (1), cyst (1), adenoma (1). Results: The VIBE sequences were superior for the detection of lesions with arterial hyperperfusion with a total of 33 focal lesions. 21 lesions were found with T 2 -w TSE and 20 with plain T 1 -weighted FLASH. Diagnostic accuracy increased with the VIBE sequence in comparison to the other sequences. Conclusion: VIBE with iPAT allows MR imaging of the liver with high spatial and temporal resolution providing dynamic contrast-enhanced information about the whole liver. This may lead to improved detection of liver lesions, especially hepatocellular carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  18. High-Speed Data Acquisition and Digital Signal Processing System for PET Imaging Techniques Applied to Mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. D.; Benlloch, J. M.; Cerda, J.; Lerche, Ch. W.; Pavon, N.; Sebastia, A.

    2004-06-01

    This paper is framed into the Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) project, whose aim is to develop an innovative gamma ray sensor for early breast cancer diagnosis. Currently, breast cancer is detected using low-energy X-ray screening. However, functional imaging techniques such as PET/FDG could be employed to detect breast cancer and track disease changes with greater sensitivity. Furthermore, a small and less expensive PET camera can be utilized minimizing main problems of whole body PET. To accomplish these objectives, we are developing a new gamma ray sensor based on a newly released photodetector. However, a dedicated PEM detector requires an adequate data acquisition (DAQ) and processing system. The characterization of gamma events needs a free-running analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with sampling rates of more than 50 Ms/s and must achieve event count rates up to 10 MHz. Moreover, comprehensive data processing must be carried out to obtain event parameters necessary for performing the image reconstruction. A new generation digital signal processor (DSP) has been used to comply with these requirements. This device enables us to manage the DAQ system at up to 80 Ms/s and to execute intensive calculi over the detector signals. This paper describes our designed DAQ and processing architecture whose main features are: very high-speed data conversion, multichannel synchronized acquisition with zero dead time, a digital triggering scheme, and high throughput of data with an extensive optimization of the signal processing algorithms.

  19. Data acquisition techniques using PC

    CERN Document Server

    Austerlitz, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Data Acquisition Techniques Using Personal Computers contains all the information required by a technical professional (engineer, scientist, technician) to implement a PC-based acquisition system. Including both basic tutorial information as well as some advanced topics, this work is suitable as a reference book for engineers or as a supplemental text for engineering students. It gives the reader enough understanding of the topics to implement a data acquisition system based on commercial products. A reader can alternatively learn how to custom build hardware or write his or her own software.

  20. Suitability of helical multislice acquisition technique for routine unenhanced brain CT: an image quality study using a 16-row detector configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernalsteen, Danielle; Cosnard, Guy; Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Robert, Annie [Public Health School, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Epidemiologics and Medical Statistics, Brussels (Belgium); Vlassenbroek, Alain [CT Clinical Science, Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Subjective and objective image quality (IQ) criteria, radiation doses, and acquisition times were compared using incremental monoslice, incremental multislice, and helical multislice acquisition techniques for routine unenhanced brain computed tomography (CT). Twenty-four patients were examined by two techniques in the same imaging session using a 16-row CT system equipped with 0.75-width detectors. Contiguous ''native'' 3-mm-thick slices were reconstructed for all acquisitions from four detectors for each slice (4 x 0.75 mm), with one channel available per detector. Two protocols were tailored to compare: (1) one-slice vs four-slice incremental images; (2) incremental vs helical four-slice images. Two trained observers independently scored 12 subjective items of IQ. Preference for the technique was assessed by one-tailed t test and the interobserver variation by two-tailed t test. The two observers gave very close IQ scores for the three techniques without significant interobserver variations. Measured IQ parameters failed to reveal any difference between techniques, and an approximate half radiation dose reduction was obtained by using the full 16-row configuration. Acquisition times were cumulatively shortened by using the multislice and the helical modality. (orig.)

  1. Suitability of helical multislice acquisition technique for routine unenhanced brain CT: an image quality study using a 16-row detector configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernalsteen, Danielle; Cosnard, Guy; Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry; Robert, Annie; Vlassenbroek, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Subjective and objective image quality (IQ) criteria, radiation doses, and acquisition times were compared using incremental monoslice, incremental multislice, and helical multislice acquisition techniques for routine unenhanced brain computed tomography (CT). Twenty-four patients were examined by two techniques in the same imaging session using a 16-row CT system equipped with 0.75-width detectors. Contiguous ''native'' 3-mm-thick slices were reconstructed for all acquisitions from four detectors for each slice (4 x 0.75 mm), with one channel available per detector. Two protocols were tailored to compare: (1) one-slice vs four-slice incremental images; (2) incremental vs helical four-slice images. Two trained observers independently scored 12 subjective items of IQ. Preference for the technique was assessed by one-tailed t test and the interobserver variation by two-tailed t test. The two observers gave very close IQ scores for the three techniques without significant interobserver variations. Measured IQ parameters failed to reveal any difference between techniques, and an approximate half radiation dose reduction was obtained by using the full 16-row configuration. Acquisition times were cumulatively shortened by using the multislice and the helical modality. (orig.)

  2. Dual isotope, single acquisition parathyroid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantafillou, M.; McDonald, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine parathyroid imaging using Thallium-201(TI) and Technetium-99m(Tc) is an often used imaging modality for the detection of parathyroid adenomas and hyper parathyroidism. The conventional Tl/Tc subtraction technique requires 2 separate injections and acquisitions which are then normalised and subtracted from each other. This lengthy technique is uncomfortable for patients and can result in false positive scan results due to patient movement between and during the acquisition process. We propose a simplified injection and single acquisition technique, that reduces the chance of movement and thus reduces the chance of false positive scan results. The technique involves the injection of Tc followed by the Tl injection 10 minutes later. After a further 10 min wait, imaging is performed using a dual isotope acquisition, with window (W) 1 set on 140 keV 20%W 5% off peak and W2 peaked for 70 keV 20%W., acquired for 10 minutes. We have imaged 27 patients with this technique, 15 had positive parathyroid imaging. Of the 15, 11 had positive ultrasound correlation. Of the remaining 4, 2 have had positive surgical findings for adenomas, the other 2 are awaiting follow-up. Of the 12 patients with negative parathyroid imaging, 2 have been shown to be false - negative with surgery. In conclusion, the single acquisition technique suggested by us is a valid method of imaging parathyroids that reduces the chance of false positive results due to movement

  3. Multimodality imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Sopena, Ramón; Bartumeus, Paula; Sopena, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    In multimodality imaging, the need to combine morphofunctional information can be approached by either acquiring images at different times (asynchronous), and fused them through digital image manipulation techniques or simultaneously acquiring images (synchronous) and merging them automatically. The asynchronous post-processing solution presents various constraints, mainly conditioned by the different positioning of the patient in the two scans acquired at different times in separated machines. The best solution to achieve consistency in time and space is obtained by the synchronous image acquisition. There are many multimodal technologies in molecular imaging. In this review we will focus on those multimodality image techniques more commonly used in the field of diagnostic imaging (SPECT-CT, PET-CT) and new developments (as PET-MR). The technological innovations and development of new tracers and smart probes are the main key points that will condition multimodality image and diagnostic imaging professionals' future. Although SPECT-CT and PET-CT are standard in most clinical scenarios, MR imaging has some advantages, providing excellent soft-tissue contrast and multidimensional functional, structural and morphological information. The next frontier is to develop efficient detectors and electronics systems capable of detecting two modality signals at the same time. Not only PET-MR but also MR-US or optic-PET will be introduced in clinical scenarios. Even more, MR diffusion-weighted, pharmacokinetic imaging, spectroscopy or functional BOLD imaging will merge with PET tracers to further increase molecular imaging as a relevant medical discipline. Multimodality imaging techniques will play a leading role in relevant clinical applications. The development of new diagnostic imaging research areas, mainly in the field of oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry, will impact the way medicine is performed today. Both clinical and experimental multimodality studies, in

  4. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging. Development of a 3D radial acquisition technique with optimized k-space sampling density and high SNR-efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, Armin Michael

    2009-01-01

    A 3D radial k-space acquisition technique with homogenous distribution of the sampling density (DA-3D-RAD) is presented. This technique enables short echo times (TE 23 Na-MRI, and provides a high SNR-efficiency. The gradients of the DA-3D-RAD-sequence are designed such that the average sampling density in each spherical shell of k-space is constant. The DA-3D-RAD-sequence provides 34% more SNR than a conventional 3D radial sequence (3D-RAD) if T 2 * -decay is neglected. This SNR-gain is enhanced if T 2 * -decay is present, so a 1.5 to 1.8 fold higher SNR is measured in brain tissue with the DA-3D-RAD-sequence. Simulations and experimental measurements show that the DA-3D-RAD sequence yields a better resolution in the presence of T 2 * -decay and less image artefacts when B 0 -inhomogeneities exist. Using the developed sequence, T 1 -, T 2 * - and Inversion-Recovery- 23 Na-image contrasts were acquired for several organs and 23 Na-relaxation times were measured (brain tissue: T 1 =29.0±0.3 ms; T 2s * ∼4 ms; T 2l * ∼31 ms; cerebrospinal fluid: T 1 =58.1±0.6 ms; T 2 * =55±3 ms (B 0 =3 T)). T 1 - und T 2 * -relaxation times of cerebrospinal fluid are independent of the selected magnetic field strength (B0 = 3T/7 T), whereas the relaxation times of brain tissue increase with field strength. Furthermore, 23 Na-signals of oedemata were suppressed in patients and thus signals from different tissue compartments were selectively measured. (orig.)

  5. Review of advanced imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathology informatics encompasses digital imaging and related applications. Several specialized microscopy techniques have emerged which permit the acquisition of digital images ("optical biopsies" at high resolution. Coupled with fiber-optic and micro-optic components, some of these imaging techniques (e.g., optical coherence tomography are now integrated with a wide range of imaging devices such as endoscopes, laparoscopes, catheters, and needles that enable imaging inside the body. These advanced imaging modalities have exciting diagnostic potential and introduce new opportunities in pathology. Therefore, it is important that pathology informaticists understand these advanced imaging techniques and the impact they have on pathology. This paper reviews several recently developed microscopic techniques, including diffraction-limited methods (e.g., confocal microscopy, 2-photon microscopy, 4Pi microscopy, and spatially modulated illumination microscopy and subdiffraction techniques (e.g., photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. This article serves as a primer for pathology informaticists, highlighting the fundamentals and applications of advanced optical imaging techniques.

  6. SU-E-J-11: Measurement of Eye Lens Dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with Different CBCT Acquisition Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S; Dhote, D; Kumar, R; Thakur, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure actual patient eye lens dose for different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocol of Varian’s On Board Imagining (OBI) system using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimeter and study the eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens Methods: OSL dosimeter was used to measure eye lens dose of patient. OSL dosimeter was placed on patient forehead center during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens dose. For three different cone beam acquisition protocol (standard dose head, low dose head and high quality head) of Varian On-Board Imaging, eye lens doses were measured. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter to eye lens. Results: Measured eye lens dose for standard dose head was in the range of 1.8 mGy to 3.2 mGy, for high quality head protocol dose was in range of 4.5mGy to 9.9 mGy whereas for low dose head was in the range of 0.3mGy to 0.7mGy. Dose to eye lens is depends upon position of isocenter. For posterioraly located tumor eye lens dose is less. Conclusion: From measured doses it can be concluded that by proper selection of imagining protocol and frequency of imaging, it is possible to restrict the eye lens dose below the new limit set by ICRP. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should be counter balanced by careful consideration of imaging protocol especially for very intense imaging sequences for Adoptive Radiotherapy or IMRT

  7. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  8. D Models for All: Low-Cost Acquisition Through Mobile Devices in Comparison with Image Based Techniques. Potentialities and Weaknesses in Cultural Heritage Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagati, C.; Lo Turco, M.; Bocconcino, M. M.; Donato, V.; Galizia, M.

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays, 3D digital imaging proposes effective solutions for preserving the expression of human creativity across the centuries, as well as is a great tool to guarantee global dissemination of knowledge and wide access to these invaluable resources of the past. Nevertheless, in several cases, a massive digitalisation of cultural heritage items (from the archaeological site up to the monument and museum collections) could be unworkable due to the still high costs in terms of equipment and human resources: 3D acquisition technologies and the need of skilled team within cultural institutions. Therefore, it is necessary to explore new possibilities offered by growing technologies: the lower costs of these technologies as well as their attractive visual quality constitute a challenge for researchers. Besides these possibilities, it is also important to consider how information is spread through graphic representation of knowledge. The focus of this study is to explore the potentialities and weaknesses of a newly released low cost device in the cultural heritage domain, trying to understand its effective usability in museum collections. The aim of the research is to test their usability, critically analysing the final outcomes of this entry level technology in relation to the other better assessed low cost technologies for 3D scanning, such as Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques (also produced by the same device) combined with dataset generated by a professional digital camera. The final outcomes were compared in terms of quality definition, time processing and file size. The specimens of the collections of the Civic Museum Castello Ursino in Catania have been chosen as the site of experimentation.

  9. 3D MODELS FOR ALL: LOW-COST ACQUISITION THROUGH MOBILE DEVICES IN COMPARISON WITH IMAGE BASED TECHNIQUES. POTENTIALITIES AND WEAKNESSES IN CULTURAL HERITAGE DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Santagati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, 3D digital imaging proposes effective solutions for preserving the expression of human creativity across the centuries, as well as is a great tool to guarantee global dissemination of knowledge and wide access to these invaluable resources of the past. Nevertheless, in several cases, a massive digitalisation of cultural heritage items (from the archaeological site up to the monument and museum collections could be unworkable due to the still high costs in terms of equipment and human resources: 3D acquisition technologies and the need of skilled team within cultural institutions. Therefore, it is necessary to explore new possibilities offered by growing technologies: the lower costs of these technologies as well as their attractive visual quality constitute a challenge for researchers. Besides these possibilities, it is also important to consider how information is spread through graphic representation of knowledge. The focus of this study is to explore the potentialities and weaknesses of a newly released low cost device in the cultural heritage domain, trying to understand its effective usability in museum collections. The aim of the research is to test their usability, critically analysing the final outcomes of this entry level technology in relation to the other better assessed low cost technologies for 3D scanning, such as Structure from Motion (SfM techniques (also produced by the same device combined with dataset generated by a professional digital camera. The final outcomes were compared in terms of quality definition, time processing and file size. The specimens of the collections of the Civic Museum Castello Ursino in Catania have been chosen as the site of experimentation.

  10. Microwave Breast Imaging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Rubæk, Tonny

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the applicability of microwave radiation for breast cancer detection. Microwave imaging systems are categorized based on their hardware architecture. The advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques are discussed. The fundamental tradeoffs are indicated between...... various requirements to be fulfilled in the design of an imaging system for breast cancer detection and some strategies to overcome these limitations....

  11. Image acquisition system for traffic monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, Glen; Corke, Peter I.; Dunn, Paul; Jensen, Murray; Macintyre, Ian B.; Mills, Dennis C.; Nguyen, Hao; Simons, Ben

    1995-03-01

    An imaging system for monitoring traffic on multilane highways is discussed. The system, named Safe-T-Cam, is capable of operating 24 hours per day in all but extreme weather conditions and can capture still images of vehicles traveling up to 160 km/hr. Systems operating at different remote locations are networked to allow transmission of images and data to a control center. A remote site facility comprises a vehicle detection and classification module (VCDM), an image acquisition module (IAM) and a license plate recognition module (LPRM). The remote site is connected to the central site by an ISDN communications network. The remote site system is discussed in this paper. The VCDM consists of a video camera, a specialized exposure control unit to maintain consistent image characteristics, and a 'real-time' image processing system that processes 50 images per second. The VCDM can detect and classify vehicles (e.g. cars from trucks). The vehicle class is used to determine what data should be recorded. The VCDM uses a vehicle tracking technique to allow optimum triggering of the high resolution camera of the IAM. The IAM camera combines the features necessary to operate consistently in the harsh environment encountered when imaging a vehicle 'head-on' in both day and night conditions. The image clarity obtained is ideally suited for automatic location and recognition of the vehicle license plate. This paper discusses the camera geometry, sensor characteristics and the image processing methods which permit consistent vehicle segmentation from a cluttered background allowing object oriented pattern recognition to be used for vehicle classification. The image capture of high resolution images and the image characteristics required for the LPRMs automatic reading of vehicle license plates, is also discussed. The results of field tests presented demonstrate that the vision based Safe-T-Cam system, currently installed on open highways, is capable of producing automatic

  12. Simultaneous acquisition of physiological data and nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, M.S.; Klein, H.A.; Orenstein, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    A technique has been developed that allows the simultaneous acquisition of both image and physiological data into a standard nuclear medicine computer system. The physiological data can be displayed along with the nuclear medicine images allowing temporal correlation between the two. This technique has been used to acquire images of gastroesophageal reflux simultaneously with the intraluminal esophageal pH. The resulting data are displayed either as a standard dynamic sequence with the physiological data appearing in a corner of the image or as condensed dynamic images

  13. Transient data acquisition techniques under EDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telford, S.

    1985-06-01

    This paper is the first of a series which describes the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the MARS project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Although EDS was developed for use on AVLIS, the functional requirements, overall design, and specific techniques are applicable to any experimental data acquisition system involving large quantities of transient data. In particular this paper will discuss the techniques and equipment used to do the data acquisition. Included are what types of hardware are used and how that hardware (CAMAC, digital oscilloscopes) is interfaced to the HP computers. In this discussion the author will address the problems encountered and the solutions used, as well as the performance of the instrument/computer interfaces. The second topic the author will discuss is how the acquired data is associated to graphics and analysis portions of EDS through efficient real time data bases. This discussion will include how the acquired data is folded into the overall structure of EDS providing the user immediate access to raw and analyzed data. By example you will see how easily a new diagnostic can be added to the EDS structure without modifying the other parts of the system. 8 figs

  14. [PACS-based endoscope image acquisition workstation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J B; Zhuang, T G

    2001-01-01

    A practical PACS-based Endoscope Image Acquisition Workstation is here introduced. By a Multimedia Video Card, the endoscope video is digitized and captured dynamically or statically into computer. This workstation realizes a variety of functions such as the endoscope video's acquisition and display, as well as the editing, processing, managing, storage, printing, communication of related information. Together with other medical image workstation, it can make up the image sources of PACS for hospitals. In addition, it can also act as an independent endoscopy diagnostic system.

  15. Quantitative diffusion MRI using reduced field-of-view and multi-shot acquisition techniques: Validation in phantoms and prostate imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Holmes, James; Rabanillo, Iñaki; Guidon, Arnaud; Wells, Shane; Hernando, Diego

    2018-04-17

    To evaluate the reproducibility of quantitative diffusion measurements obtained with reduced Field of View (rFOV) and Multi-shot EPI (msEPI) acquisitions, using single-shot EPI (ssEPI) as a reference. Diffusion phantom experiments, and prostate diffusion-weighted imaging in healthy volunteers and patients with known or suspected prostate cancer were performed across the three different sequences. Quantitative diffusion measurements of apparent diffusion coefficient, and diffusion kurtosis parameters (healthy volunteers), were obtained and compared across diffusion sequences (rFOV, msEPI, and ssEPI). Other possible confounding factors like b-value combinations and acquisition parameters were also investigated. Both msEPI and rFOV have shown reproducible quantitative diffusion measurements relative to ssEPI; no significant difference in ADC was observed across pulse sequences in the standard diffusion phantom (p = 0.156), healthy volunteers (p ≥ 0.12) or patients (p ≥ 0.26). The ADC values within the non-cancerous central gland and peripheral zone of patients were 1.29 ± 0.17 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s and 1.74 ± 0.23 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s respectively. However, differences in quantitative diffusion parameters were observed across different number of averages for rFOV, and across b-value groups and diffusion models for all the three sequences. Both rFOV and msEPI have the potential to provide high image quality with reproducible quantitative diffusion measurements in prostate diffusion MRI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Image Acquisition in Real Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, Carlos Jorquera left NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to focus on erasing the growing void between high-performance cameras and the requisite software to capture and process the resulting digital images. Since his departure from NASA, Jorquera s efforts have not only satisfied the private industry's cravings for faster, more flexible, and more favorable software applications, but have blossomed into a successful entrepreneurship that is making its mark with improvements in fields such as medicine, weather forecasting, and X-ray inspection. Formerly a JPL engineer who constructed imaging systems for spacecraft and ground-based astronomy projects, Jorquera is the founder and president of the three-person firm, Boulder Imaging Inc., based in Louisville, Colorado. Joining Jorquera to round out the Boulder Imaging staff are Chief Operations Engineer Susan Downey, who also gained experience at JPL working on space-bound projects including Galileo and the Hubble Space Telescope, and Vice President of Engineering and Machine Vision Specialist Jie Zhu Kulbida, who has extensive industrial and research and development experience within the private sector.

  18. MONSOON Image Acquisition System | CTIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff CTIO History CTIO Directors Historic Highlights Site Description Contact Us Astronomers Observing Contact Acknowledgments TS4 History ISPI ISPI Exposure Time Calculator OSIRIS Spartan Optical Imagers single detector to very large focal planes made from arrays of detectors. The basic hierarchy of a

  19. Image Improvement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, R. A.

    1997-05-01

    Over the last decade, a repertoire of techniques have been developed and/or refined to improve the quality of high spatial resolution solar movies taken from ground based observatories. These include real time image motion corrections, frame selection, phase diversity measurements of the wavefront, and extensive post processing to partially remove atmospheric distortion. Their practical application has been made possible by the increasing availability and decreasing cost of large CCD's with fast digital readouts and high speed computer workstations with large memories. Most successful have been broad band (0.3 to 10 nm) filtergram movies which can use exposure times of 10 to 30 ms, short enough to ``freeze'' atmospheric motions. Even so, only a handful of movies with excellent image quality for more than a hour have been obtained to date. Narrowband filtergrams (about 0.01 nm), such as those required for constructing magnetograms and Dopplergrams, have been more challenging although some single images approach the quality of the best continuum images. Some promising new techniques and instruments, together with persistence and good luck, should continue the progress made in the last several years.

  20. Smartphone Image Acquisition During Postmortem Monocular Indirect Ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Patrick E; Schoppe, Candace H; Thibault, Kirk L; Porter, William T

    2016-01-01

    The medical usefulness of smartphones continues to evolve as third-party applications exploit and expand on the smartphones' interface and capabilities. This technical report describes smartphone still-image capture techniques and video-sequence recording capabilities during postmortem monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy. Using these devices and techniques, practitioners can create photographic documentation of fundal findings, clinically and at autopsy, without the expense of a retinal camera. Smartphone image acquisition of fundal abnormalities can promote ophthalmological telemedicine--especially in regions or countries with limited resources--and facilitate prompt, accurate, and unbiased documentation of retinal hemorrhages in infants and young children. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  2. Dynamic Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Free-Breathing: Feasibility of a Cartesian T1-Weighted Acquisition Technique With Compressed Sensing and Additional Self-Navigation Signal for Hard-Gated and Motion-Resolved Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbach, Benjamin; Bucher, Andreas M; Wichmann, Julian L; Nickel, Dominik; Polkowski, Christoph; Hammerstingl, Renate; Vogl, Thomas J; Bodelle, Boris

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a free-breathing dynamic liver imaging technique using a prototype Cartesian T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breathhold examination (VIBE) sequence with compressed sensing and simultaneous acquisition of a navigation signal for hard-gated and motion state-resolved reconstruction. A total of 43 consecutive oncologic patients (mean age, 66 ± 11 years; 44% female) underwent free-breathing dynamic liver imaging for the evaluation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer using a prototype Cartesian VIBE sequence (field of view, 380 × 345 mm; image matrix, 320 × 218; echo time/repetition time, 1.8/3.76 milliseconds; flip angle, 10 degrees; slice thickness, 3.0 mm; acquisition time, 188 seconds) with continuous data sampling and additionally acquired self-navigation signal. Data were iteratively reconstructed using 2 different approaches: first, a hard-gated reconstruction only using data associated to the dominating motion state (CS VIBE, Compressed Sensing VIBE), and second, a motion-resolved reconstruction with 6 different motion states as additional image dimension (XD VIBE, eXtended dimension VIBE). Continuous acquired data were grouped in 16 subsequent time increments with 11.57 seconds each to resolve arterial and venous contrast phases. For image quality assessment, both CS VIBE and XD VIBE were compared with the patient's last staging dynamic liver magnetic resonance imaging including a breathhold (BH) VIBE as reference standard 4.5 ± 1.2 months before. Representative quality parameters including respiratory artifacts were evaluated for arterial and venous phase images independently, retrospectively and blindly by 3 experienced radiologists, with higher scores indicating better examination quality. To assess diagnostic accuracy, same readers evaluated the presence of metastatic lesions for XD VIBE and CS VIBE compared with reference BH examination in a second session. Compared with CS VIBE, XD VIBE

  3. Data acquisition system for radiographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, R.C.; Votano, J.R.; Russ, T.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a continuous data acquisition system for radiographic imaging without interrupting acquisition activity the acquisition system. It comprises at least two memory means for storing radiographic data from a radiation detector wherein each of the memory means having a plurality of addressable memory locations and each of the memory means are such that the locations of the memory means correspond to spatial locations in the radiation detector; logic control means for sensing radiographic data transmitted by the radiation detector, for selecting one of the memory means for storage of the data, for transferring data to the selected memory means, and for switching form one memory means to another memory means according to a predefined schedule and according to memory capacity level, the logic control means further comprising a logic device which receives data and increments the contents of locations in a memory means in response to such data; and interface control means for reading data from one or the other memory means when such memory means is not actively acquiring data such that data can be acquired continuously by the system

  4. Image acquisition in laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Brijesh S.; Georgeson, Keith E.; Hardin, William D., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery rely uniquely on high quality display of acquired images, but a multitude of problems plague the researcher who attempts to reproduce such images for educational purposes. Some of these are intrinsic limitations of current laparoscopic/endoscopic visualization systems, while others are artifacts solely of the process used to acquire and reproduce such images. Whatever the genesis of these problems, a glance at current literature will reveal the extent to which endoscopy suffers from an inability to reproduce what the surgeon sees during a procedure. The major intrinsic limitation to the acquisition of high-quality still images from laparoscopic procedures lies in the inability to couple directly a camera to the laparoscope. While many systems have this capability, this is useful mostly for otolaryngologists, who do not maintain a sterile field around their scopes. For procedures in which a sterile field must be maintained, one trial method has been to use a beam splitter to send light both to the still camera and the digital video camera. This is no solution, however, since this results in low quality still images as well as a degradation of the image that the surgeon must use to operate, something no surgeon tolerates lightly. Researchers thus must currently rely on other methods for producing images from a laparoscopic procedure. Most manufacturers provide an optional slide or print maker that provides a hardcopy output from the processed composite video signal. The results achieved from such devices are marginal, to say the least. This leaves only one avenue for possible image production, the videotape record of an endoscopic or laparoscopic operation. Video frame grabbing is at least a problem to which industry has applied considerable time and effort to solving. Our own experience with computerized enhancement of videotape frames has been very promising. Computer enhancement allows the researcher to correct several of the

  5. Impacts of Vocabulary Acquisition Techniques Instruction on Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orawiwatnakul, Wiwat

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine how the selected vocabulary acquisition techniques affected the vocabulary ability of 35 students who took EN 111 and investigate their attitudes towards the techniques instruction. The research study was one-group pretest and post-test design. The instruments employed were in-class exercises…

  6. Image processing techniques for quantification and assessment of brain MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijf, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used technique to acquire digital images of the human brain. A variety of acquisition protocols is available to generate images in vivo and noninvasively, giving great opportunities to study the anatomy and physiology of the human brain. In my thesis,

  7. Hardware and software for image acquisition in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fideles, E.L.; Vilar, G.; Silva, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    A system for image acquisition and processing in nuclear medicine is presented, including the hardware and software referring to acquisition. The hardware is consisted of an analog-digital conversion card, developed in wire-wape. Its function is digitate the analogic signs provided by gamma camera. The acquisitions are made in list or frame mode. (C.G.C.)

  8. Multivariate statistical analysis for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectral imaging: Effect of image acquisition time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peebles, D.E.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Kotula, P.G.; Hutton, S.; Blomfield, C.

    2004-01-01

    The acquisition of spectral images for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a relatively new approach, although it has been used with other analytical spectroscopy tools for some time. This technique provides full spectral information at every pixel of an image, in order to provide a complete chemical mapping of the imaged surface area. Multivariate statistical analysis techniques applied to the spectral image data allow the determination of chemical component species, and their distribution and concentrations, with minimal data acquisition and processing times. Some of these statistical techniques have proven to be very robust and efficient methods for deriving physically realistic chemical components without input by the user other than the spectral matrix itself. The benefits of multivariate analysis of the spectral image data include significantly improved signal to noise, improved image contrast and intensity uniformity, and improved spatial resolution - which are achieved due to the effective statistical aggregation of the large number of often noisy data points in the image. This work demonstrates the improvements in chemical component determination and contrast, signal-to-noise level, and spatial resolution that can be obtained by the application of multivariate statistical analysis to XPS spectral images

  9. The image acquisition system design of floor grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang-jiang; Liu, Wei; Liu, Hui-qin

    2018-01-01

    Based on linear CCD, high resolution image real-time acquisition system serves as designing a set of image acquisition system for floor grinder through the calculation of optical imaging system. The entire image acquisition system can collect images of ground before and after the work of the floor grinder, and the data is transmitted through the Bluetooth system to the computer and compared to realize real-time monitoring of its working condition. The system provides technical support for the design of unmanned ground grinders.

  10. Near-vertical seismic reflection image using a novel acquisition technique across the Vrancea Zone and Foscani Basin, south-eastern Carpathians (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panea, I.; Stephenson, R.; Knapp, C.; Mocanu, V.; Drijkoningen, G.; Matenco, L.; Knapp, J.; Prodehl, K.

    2005-12-01

    The DACIA PLAN (Danube and Carpathian Integrated Action on Process in the Lithosphere and Neotectonics) deep seismic sounding survey was performed in August-September 2001 in south-eastern Romania, at the same time as the regional deep refraction seismic survey VRANCEA 2001. The main goal of the experiment was to obtain new information on the deep structure of the external Carpathians nappes and the architecture of Tertiary/Quaternary basins developed within and adjacent to the seismically-active Vrancea zone, including the Focsani Basin. The seismic reflection line had a WNW-ESE orientation, running from internal East Carpathians units, across the mountainous south-eastern Carpathians, and the foreland Focsani Basin towards the Danube Delta. There were 131 shot points along the profile, with about 1 km spacing, and data were recorded with stand-alone RefTek-125s (also known as "Texans"), supplied by the University Texas at El Paso and the PASSCAL Institute. The entire line was recorded in three deployments, using about 340 receivers in the first deployment and 640 receivers in each of the other two deployments. The resulting deep seismic reflection stacks, processed to 20 s along the entire profile and to 10 s in the eastern Focsani Basin, are presented here. The regional architecture of the latter, interpreted in the context of abundant independent constraint from exploration seismic and subsurface data, is well imaged. Image quality within and beneath the thrust belt is of much poorer quality. Nevertheless, there is good evidence to suggest that a thick (˜10 km) sedimentary basin having the structure of a graben and of indeterminate age underlies the westernmost part of the Focsani Basin, in the depth range 10-25 km. Most of the crustal depth seismicity observed in the Vrancea zone (as opposed to the more intense upper mantle seismicity) appears to be associated with this sedimentary basin. The sedimentary successions within this basin and other horizons

  11. A Data Acquisition System for Medical Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abellan, Carlos; Cachemiche, Jean-Pierre; Rethore, Frederic; Morel, Christian

    2013-06-01

    A data acquisition system for medical imaging applications is presented. Developed at CPPM, it provides high performance generic data acquisition and processing capabilities. The DAQ system is based on the PICMG xTCA standard and is composed of 1 up to 10 cards in a single rack, each one with 2 Altera Stratix IV FPGAs and a Fast Mezzanine Connector (FMC). Several mezzanines have been produced, each one with different functionalities. Some examples are: a mezzanine capable of receiving 36 optical fibres with up to 180 Gbps sustained data rates or a mezzanine with 12 x 5 Gbps input links, 12 x 5 Gbps output links and an SFP+ connector for control purposes. Several rack sizes are also available, thus making the system scalable from a one card desktop system useful for development purpose up to a full featured rack mounted DAQ for high end applications. Depending on the application, boards may exchange data at speeds of up to 25.6 Gbps bidirectional sustained rates in a double star topology through back-plane connections. Also, front panel optical fibres can be used when higher rates are required by the application. The system may be controlled by a standard Ethernet connection, thus providing easy integration with control computers and avoiding the need for drivers. Two control systems are foreseen. A Socket connection provides easy interaction with automation software regardless of the operating system used for the control PC. Moreover a web server may run on the Envision cards and provide an easy intuitive user interface. The system and its different components will be introduced. Some preliminary measurements with high speed signal links will be presented as well as the signal conditioning used to allow these rates. (authors)

  12. Graphical user interface for image acquisition and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    An event-driven GUI-based image acquisition interface for the IDL programming environment designed for CCD camera control and image acquisition directly into the IDL environment where image manipulation and data analysis can be performed, and a toolbox of real-time analysis applications. Running the image acquisition hardware directly from IDL removes the necessity of first saving images in one program and then importing the data into IDL for analysis in a second step. Bringing the data directly into IDL creates an opportunity for the implementation of IDL image processing and display functions in real-time. program allows control over the available charge coupled device (CCD) detector parameters, data acquisition, file saving and loading, and image manipulation and processing, all from within IDL. The program is built using IDL's widget libraries to control the on-screen display and user interface.

  13. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT and Magnetic resonance (MR imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  14. An Ibm PC/AT-Based Image Acquisition And Processing System For Quantitative Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongmin; Alexander, Thomas

    1986-06-01

    In recent years, a large number of applications have been developed for image processing systems in the area of biological imaging. We have already finished the development of a dedicated microcomputer-based image processing and analysis system for quantitative microscopy. The system's primary function has been to facilitate and ultimately automate quantitative image analysis tasks such as the measurement of cellular DNA contents. We have recognized from this development experience, and interaction with system users, biologists and technicians, that the increasingly widespread use of image processing systems, and the development and application of new techniques for utilizing the capabilities of such systems, would generate a need for some kind of inexpensive general purpose image acquisition and processing system specially tailored for the needs of the medical community. We are currently engaged in the development and testing of hardware and software for a fairly high-performance image processing computer system based on a popular personal computer. In this paper, we describe the design and development of this system. Biological image processing computer systems have now reached a level of hardware and software refinement where they could become convenient image analysis tools for biologists. The development of a general purpose image processing system for quantitative image analysis that is inexpensive, flexible, and easy-to-use represents a significant step towards making the microscopic digital image processing techniques more widely applicable not only in a research environment as a biologist's workstation, but also in clinical environments as a diagnostic tool.

  15. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  16. Urologic imaging and interventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book provides an overview of all imaging modalities and invasive techniques of the genitourinary system. Three general chapters discuss ionic and nonionic contrast media, the management of reactions to contrast media, and radiation doses from various uroradiologic procedures. Chapters are devoted to intravenous pyelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, lymphography, arteriography, and venography. Two chapters discuss the pediatric applications of uroradiology and ultrasound. Two chapters integrate the various imaging techniques of the upper and lower genitourinary systems into an algorithmic approach for various pathologic entities

  17. VIBE with parallel acquisition technique - a novel approach to dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the liver; VIBE mit paralleler Akquisitionstechnik - eine neue Moeglichkeit der dynamischen kontrastverstaerkten MRT der Leber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobritz, M.; Radkow, T.; Bautz, W.; Fellner, F.A. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Nittka, M. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: The VIBE (volume interpolated breath-hold examination) sequence in combination with parallel acquisition technique (iPAT: integrated parallel acquisition technique) allows dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver with high temporal and spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to obtain first clinical experience with this technique for the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions. Materials and Methods: We examined 10 consecutive patients using a 1.5 T MR system (gradient field strength 30 mT/m) with a phased-array coil combination. Following sequences- were acquired: T{sub 2}-w TSE and T{sub 1}-w FLASH, after administration of gadolinium, 6 VIBE sequences with iPAT (TR/TE/matrix/partition thickness/time of acquisition: 6.2 ms/ 3.2 ms/256 x 192/4 mm/13 s), as well as T{sub 1}-weighted FLASH with fat saturation. Two observers evaluated the different sequences concerning the number of lesions and their dignity. Following lesions were found: hepatocellular carcinoma (5 patients), hemangioma (2), metastasis (1), cyst (1), adenoma (1). Results: The VIBE sequences were superior for the detection of lesions with arterial hyperperfusion with a total of 33 focal lesions. 21 lesions were found with T{sub 2}-w TSE and 20 with plain T{sub 1}-weighted FLASH. Diagnostic accuracy increased with the VIBE sequence in comparison to the other sequences. Conclusion: VIBE with iPAT allows MR imaging of the liver with high spatial and temporal resolution providing dynamic contrast-enhanced information about the whole liver. This may lead to improved detection of liver lesions, especially hepatocellular carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die VIBE-Sequenz (Volume Interpolated Breath-hold Examination) in Kombination mit paralleler Bildgebung (iPAT) ermoeglicht eine dynamische kontrastmittel-gestuetzte Untersuchung der Leber in hoher zeitlicher und oertlicher Aufloesung. Ziel war es, erste klinische Erfahrungen mit dieser Technik in der Detektion fokaler

  18. Developments in medical imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Cornelis

    1979-01-01

    A review of the developments in medical imaging in the past 25 years shows a strong increase in the number of physical methods which have become available for obtaining images of diagnostic value. It is shown that despite this proliferation of methods the equipment used for obtaining the images can be based on a common structure. Also the resulting images can be characterized by a few relevant parameters which indicate their information content. On the basis of this common architecture a study is made of the potential capabilities of the large number of medical imaging techniques available now and in the future. Also the requirements and possibilities for handling the images obtained and for controlling the diagnostic systems are investigated [fr

  19. In search of the best technique for vocabulary acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohseni-Far

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Teade plagiaadi kohta / Report of an Act of Plagiarism (6. mai 2012 / 6 May, 2012ERÜ aastaraamatus 4 (2008 lk 121–138 ilmunud Mohammad Mohseni-Far'i artikli "In Search of the Best Technique for Vocabulary Acquisition" näol on tegemist iseenda plagiaadiga. Sama artikkel on 2008. a ilmunud lisaks ERÜ aastaraamatule veel KAKS KORDA ligilähedases sõnastuses ning ligilähedase pealkirjaga. Kuna autor on tegelnud sõnastuse muutmisega, siis järelikult on tegemist teadliku plagiaadiga. Vt ka Check for Plagiarism On the Web.We are sorry to inform that Mohammad Mohseni-Far, the author of 'In Search of the Best Technique for Vocabulary Acquisition' published in ERÜ aastaraamat / EAAL yearbook, Vol. 4 (2008 pp. 121–138, has published the same article TWICE in another journal just by changing the title and a few wordings. The plagiarism is verified, using the Check for Plagiarism On the Web.A Cognitively-oriented Encapsulation of Strategies Utilized for Lexical Development: In search of a flexible and highly interactive curriculum. – Porta Linguarum 9 (2008, 35–42. Techniques and Strategies Utilized for Vocabulary Acquisition: the necessity to design a multifaceted framework with an instructionally wise equilibrium. – Porta Linguarum 8 (2007, 137–152.ERÜ aastaraamatu toimetus / Editors of the EAAL yearbook***The present study is intended to critically examine vocabulary learning/acquisition techniques within second/foreign language context. Accordingly, the purpose of this survey is to concentrate particularly on the variables connected with lexical knowledge and establish a fairly all-inclusive framework which comprises and expounds on the most significant strategies and relevant factors within the vocabulary acquisition context. At the outset, the study introduces four salient variables; learner, task and strategy serve as a general structure of inquiry (Flavell’s cognitive model, 1992. Besides, the variable of context

  20. Imaging techniques for ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    These seminar proceedings contain 16 lectures on the following topics: 1. From imaging to quantification - ultrasound methods in medical diagnostics; 2. SAFT, TOFD, Phased Array - classical applications and recent developments in ultrasonic imaging; 3. Innovative ultrasonic imaging methods in research and application; 4. Industrial ultrasonic testing of fibre-reinforced structures of complex geometry; 5. Visualisation of crack tips in the inspection of wheel set shafts with longitudinal boreholes as a means of avoiding unnecessary wheel set changes; 6. Areal analysis of the propagation of Lamb waves on curved, anisotropic structures; 7. High-resolution representation in immersion technique testing; 8. Variants in generating images from phased array measurement data - practical examples involving copper, carbon-fibre reinforced plastic and other materials; 9. GIUM - an unconventional method of microstructure imaging using ultrasonic stimulation and laser vibrometry scanning; 10. Innovative air-ultrasonic testing concepts for improved imaging; 11. Use of imaging methods for improving the quality of test results from nondestructive testing; 12. Modelling and visualisation of EMUS stimulation for transducer optimisation; 13. Use of SAFT in the manufacture of energy conversion machines; 14. Ultrasonic imaging tests for improved defect characterisation during weld seam inspection on longitudinally welded large-diameter pipes; 15. SAFT reconstruction for testing austenitic weld seams and dissimilar metal weld seams for transverse cracks; 16. Imaging-based optimisation method for quantitative ultrasonic testing of anisotropic inhomogeneous austenitic welded joints with determination and utilisation of their elastic properties. One contribution has been abstracted separately. [de

  1. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Wesson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and are nearest neighbour techniques of two sub-types: Individual Target and Border Tracing. The contaminated data is estimated through Kriging, considered the optimal technique for the spatial interpolation of Gaussian data, where the 'screening effect' that occurs with the Kriging weighting distribution around target points is exploited to ensure computational efficiency. Matrix rank reduction techniques in combination with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD are also suggested for finding an efficient solution to the Kriging Equations which can cope with near singular systems. Rainfall estimation at ground level from radar rainfall volume scan data is of interest and importance in earth bound applications such as hydrology and agriculture. As an extension of the above, Ordinary Kriging is applied to three-dimensional radar rainfall data to estimate rainfall rate at ground level. Keywords: ground clutter, data infilling, Ordinary Kriging, nearest neighbours, Singular Value Decomposition, border tracing, computation time, ground level rainfall estimation

  2. Run control techniques for the Fermilab DART data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L.; Moore, C.; Pordes, R.; Udumula, L.; Votava, M.; Drunen, E. van; Zioulas, G.

    1996-01-01

    DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by the Fermilab Computing Division in collaboration with eight High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run-control which implements flexible, distributed, extensible and portable paradigms for the control monitoring of a data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting aspects of the run-control - why we chose the concepts we did, the benefits we have seen from the choices we made, as well as our experiences in deploying and supporting it for experiments during their commissioning and sub-system testing phases. We emphasize the software and techniques we believe are extensible to future use, and potential future modifications and extensions for those we feel are not. (author)

  3. Run control techniques for the Fermilab DART data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L.

    1995-10-01

    DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by the Fermilab Computing Division in collaboration with eight High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run-control which implements flexible, distributed, extensible and portable paradigms for the control and monitoring of data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting aspects of the run-control - why we chose the concepts we did, the benefits we have seen from the choices we made, as well as our experiences in deploying and supporting it for experiments during their commissioning and sub-system testing phases. We emphasize the software and techniques we believe are extensible to future use, and potential future modifications and extensions for those we feel are not

  4. Software for the acquisition and proses of Gammagraphy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Hoz Olivera, J.; Hernandez Garcia, J.

    1999-01-01

    In Cuba, the piece of equipment most widespread in Gammagraphy studies is the rectilinear scanner. In the years 1997-98, all such equipment was coupled to the microcomputer by specialists from Nuclear Research and Service Center and Marie Curie Oncological Hospital, both in Camaguey city. The results went beyond expectations, which allowed for the continuation of work in these departments with quality higher than that of the original version. This paper describes the software for acquiring and processing the images. The acquisition software is a wizard application that guides technicians through the different steps of the study and allows for the use of the computer in other tasks during the study. MDI (Multiple Document Interface) is the image processing software, which makes it possible for technicians to simultaneously visualize several studies for comparison, to apply several image processing techniques, to insert comments on the study and to show anatomical marks, to mention only a few advantages. The software were developed in Delphi 3.0 for Windows 95 or higher

  5. MR imaging of ore for heap bioleaching studies using pure phase encode acquisition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Marijke A.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2012-03-01

    Various MRI techniques were considered with respect to imaging of aqueous flow fields in low grade copper ore. Spin echo frequency encoded techniques were shown to produce unacceptable image distortions which led to pure phase encoded techniques being considered. Single point imaging multiple point acquisition (SPI-MPA) and spin echo single point imaging (SESPI) techniques were applied. By direct comparison with X-ray tomographic images, both techniques were found to be able to produce distortion-free images of the ore packings at 2 T. The signal to noise ratios (SNRs) of the SESPI images were found to be superior to SPI-MPA for equal total acquisition times; this was explained based on NMR relaxation measurements. SESPI was also found to produce suitable images for a range of particles sizes, whereas SPI-MPA SNR deteriorated markedly as particles size was reduced. Comparisons on a 4.7 T magnet showed significant signal loss from the SPI-MPA images, the effect of which was accentuated in the case of unsaturated flowing systems. Hence it was concluded that SESPI was the most robust imaging method for the study of copper ore heap leaching hydrology.

  6. The design of a new model circuit for image acquisition from nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Nan; Jin Yongjie

    1995-01-01

    A new practical model of image acquisition circuit is given. It can be applied to data acquisition system of γ camera from nuclear medicine directly. Its idea also can be applied to some image acquisition system of nuclear event

  7. Detector techniques and data acquisition for LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071367; Cittolin, Sergio; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    An overview of the technologies for LHC tracking detectors, particle identification and calorimeters will be given. In addition, the requirements of the front-end readout electronics for each type of detector will be addressed. The latest results from the R&D studies in each of the technologies will be presented. The data handling techniques needed to read out the LHC detectors and the multi-level trigger systems used to select the events of interest will be described. An overview of the LHC experiments data acquisition architectures and their current state of developments will be presented.

  8. Techniques for depth-resolved imaging through turbid media including coherence-gated imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsby, C; French, P M W

    2003-01-01

    This article aims to review the panoply of techniques for realising optical imaging through turbid media such as biological tissue. It begins by briefly discussing optical scattering and outlines the various approaches that have been developed to image through scattering media including spatial filtering, time-gated imaging and coherence-based techniques. The discussion includes scanning and wide-field techniques and concentrates on techniques to discriminate in favour of unscattered ballistic light although imaging with scattered light is briefly reviewed. Wide-field coherence-gated imaging techniques are discussed in some detail with particular emphasis placed on techniques to achieve real-time high-resolution three-dimensional imaging including through turbid media, providing rapid whole-field acquisition and high depth and transverse spatial resolution images. (topical review)

  9. Clinical application of Half Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo (HASTE) imaging accelerated by simultaneous multi-slice acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jenni; P Marques, José; Ter Telgte, Annemieke; van Dorst, Anouk; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Meijer, Frederick J A; Norris, David G

    2018-01-01

    As a single-shot sequence with a long train of refocusing pulses, Half-Fourier Acquisition Single-Shot Turbo-Spin-Echo (HASTE) suffers from high power deposition limiting use at high resolutions and high field strengths, particularly if combined with acceleration techniques such as simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) imaging. Using a combination of multiband (MB)-excitation and PINS-refocusing pulses will effectively accelerate the acquisition time while staying within the SAR limitations. In particular, uncooperative and young patients will profit from the speed of the MB-PINS HASTE sequence, as clinical diagnosis can be possible without sedation. Materials and MethodsMB-excitation and PINS-refocusing pulses were incorporated into a HASTE-sequence with blipped CAIPIRINHA and TRAPS including an internal FLASH reference scan for online reconstruction. Whole brain MB-PINS HASTE data were acquired on a Siemens 3T-Prisma system from 10 individuals and compared to a clinical HASTE protocol. ResultsThe proposed MB-PINS HASTE protocol accelerates the acquisition by about a factor 2 compared to the clinical HASTE. The diagnostic image quality proved to be comparable for both sequences for the evaluation of the overall aspect of the brain, the detection of white matter changes and areas of tissue loss, and for the evaluation of the CSF spaces although artifacts were more frequently encountered with MB-PINS HASTE. ConclusionsMB-PINS HASTE enables acquisition of slice accelerated highly T2-weighted images and provides good diagnostic image quality while reducing acquisition time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An evaluation on CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seong-wook; Ko, Junho; Yoo, Yon-sik; Kim, Yoonsang

    2017-02-01

    Recent medical virtual reality (VR) applications to minimize re-operations are being studied for improvements in surgical efficiency and reduction of operation error. The CT image acquisition method considering three-dimensional (3D) modeling for medical VR applications is important, because the realistic model is required for the actual human organ. However, the research for medical VR applications has focused on 3D modeling techniques and utilized 3D models. In addition, research on a CT image acquisition method considering 3D modeling has never been reported. The conventional CT image acquisition method involves scanning a limited area of the lesion for the diagnosis of doctors once or twice. However, the medical VR application is required to acquire the CT image considering patients' various postures and a wider area than the lesion. A wider area than the lesion is required because of the necessary process of comparing bilateral sides for dyskinesia diagnosis of the shoulder, pelvis, and leg. Moreover, patients' various postures are required due to the different effects on the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, in this paper, we perform a comparative experiment on the acquired CT images considering image area (unilateral/bilateral) and patients' postures (neutral/abducted). CT images are acquired from 10 patients for the experiments, and the acquired CT images are evaluated based on the length per pixel and the morphological deviation. Finally, by comparing the experiment results, we evaluate the CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications.

  11. Applying of USB interface technique in nuclear spectrum acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianbin; Huang Jinhua

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces applying of USB technique and constructing nuclear spectrum acquisition system via PC's USB interface. The authors choose the USB component USB100 module and the W77E58μc to do the key work. It's easy to apply USB interface technique, when USB100 module is used. USB100 module can be treated as a common I/O component for the μc controller, and can be treated as a communication interface (COM) when connected to PC' USB interface. It's easy to modify the PC's program for the new system with USB100 module. The authors can smoothly change from ISA, RS232 bus to USB bus. (authors)

  12. Target acquisition performance : Effects of target aspect angle, dynamic imaging and signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, J.A.; Bijl, P.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Dijk, J.

    2008-01-01

    In an extensive Target Acquisition (TA) performance study, we recorded static and dynamic imagery of a set of military and civilian two-handheld objects at a range of distances and aspect angles with an under-sampled uncooled thermal imager. Next, we applied signal processing techniques including

  13. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  14. High dynamic range image acquisition based on multiplex cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hairui; Sun, Huayan; Zhang, Tinghua

    2018-03-01

    High dynamic image is an important technology of photoelectric information acquisition, providing higher dynamic range and more image details, and it can better reflect the real environment, light and color information. Currently, the method of high dynamic range image synthesis based on different exposure image sequences cannot adapt to the dynamic scene. It fails to overcome the effects of moving targets, resulting in the phenomenon of ghost. Therefore, a new high dynamic range image acquisition method based on multiplex cameras system was proposed. Firstly, different exposure images sequences were captured with the camera array, using the method of derivative optical flow based on color gradient to get the deviation between images, and aligned the images. Then, the high dynamic range image fusion weighting function was established by combination of inverse camera response function and deviation between images, and was applied to generated a high dynamic range image. The experiments show that the proposed method can effectively obtain high dynamic images in dynamic scene, and achieves good results.

  15. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-01-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  16. Acquisition of STEM Images by Adaptive Compressive Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Weiyi; Feng, Qianli; Srinivasan, Ramprakash; Stevens, Andrew; Browning, Nigel D.

    2017-07-01

    Compressive Sensing (CS) allows a signal to be sparsely measured first and accurately recovered later in software [1]. In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), it is possible to compress an image spatially by reducing the number of measured pixels, which decreases electron dose and increases sensing speed [2,3,4]. The two requirements for CS to work are: (1) sparsity of basis coefficients and (2) incoherence of the sensing system and the representation system. However, when pixels are missing from the image, it is difficult to have an incoherent sensing matrix. Nevertheless, dictionary learning techniques such as Beta-Process Factor Analysis (BPFA) [5] are able to simultaneously discover a basis and the sparse coefficients in the case of missing pixels. On top of CS, we would like to apply active learning [6,7] to further reduce the proportion of pixels being measured, while maintaining image reconstruction quality. Suppose we initially sample 10% of random pixels. We wish to select the next 1% of pixels that are most useful in recovering the image. Now, we have 11% of pixels, and we want to decide the next 1% of “most informative” pixels. Active learning methods are online and sequential in nature. Our goal is to adaptively discover the best sensing mask during acquisition using feedback about the structures in the image. In the end, we hope to recover a high quality reconstruction with a dose reduction relative to the non-adaptive (random) sensing scheme. In doing this, we try three metrics applied to the partial reconstructions for selecting the new set of pixels: (1) variance, (2) Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence using a Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel, and (3) entropy. Figs. 1 and 2 display the comparison of Peak Signal-to-Noise (PSNR) using these three different active learning methods at different percentages of sampled pixels. At 20% level, all the three active learning methods underperform the original CS without active learning. However

  17. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  18. Imaging XPS - a new technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurker, N.; Ebel, M.F.; Ebel, H.

    1983-01-01

    XPS imaging promises to be a powerful analytic tool because it enables specific information on both elements and bonding to be recorded on a two-dimensional distribution map. As far as the authors are aware, the only scanning XPS method to date which has been found to be practical is essentially a scanned-particle-beam method, like scanning AES, and it is only applicable to thin film specimens. This paper provides the basic ideas of a new imaging XPS technique based on a quite different concept. It will be applicable to any kind of specimen that can be analysed in a conventional XPS system. It makes use of the dispersion properties of a spherical condenser-type spectrometer and applies a two-dimensional electron detection device for decoding the energy and emission position of an analysed photoelectron. Experimental arrangement and theory of operation are presented. (author)

  19. Acquisition and performance of the Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1997-01-01

    The Star Imager performance under various ground-based operating conditions is discussed. The precision is generally found to be in the range of 1 arcsecond 1 pointing and 5 to 8 times larger for the measured roll about the boresight. Even though a carefully planned and conducted test series has...... of the Star Imager may be extended to 5-6 deg/sec, as demonstrated by the "Thunderstorm III" flight data, or by decreasing the integration time, as for the ASTRID II micro satellite version of the instrument, expected to operate at rates up to 18 degrees per second....

  20. Evaluation of the influence of acquisition parameters of microtomography in image quality applied by carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T. M. P.; Machado, A. S.; Araújo, O. M. O.; Ferreira, C. G.; Lopes, R. T.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray computed microtomography is a powerful nondestructive technique for 2D and 3D structure analysis. However, parameters used in acquisition promote directs influence in qualitative and quantitative results in characterization of samples, due image resolution. The aim of this study is value the influence of theses parameters in results through of tests changing these parameters in different situations and system characterization. Results demonstrate those pixel size and detector matrixes are the main parameters that influence in resolution and image quality. Microtomography was considered an excellent technique for characterization using the best image resolution possible.

  1. Patient-adapted reconstruction and acquisition dynamic imaging method (PARADIGM) for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Nitin; Bresler, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a challenging problem because the MR data acquisition is often not fast enough to meet the combined spatial and temporal Nyquist sampling rate requirements. Current approaches to this problem include hardware-based acceleration of the acquisition, and model-based image reconstruction techniques. In this paper we propose an alternative approach, called PARADIGM, which adapts both the acquisition and reconstruction to the spatio-temporal characteristics of the imaged object. The approach is based on time-sequential sampling theory, addressing the problem of acquiring a spatio-temporal signal under the constraint that only a limited amount of data can be acquired at a time instant. PARADIGM identifies a model class for the particular imaged object using a scout MR scan or auxiliary data. This object-adapted model is then used to optimize MR data acquisition, such that the imaging constraints are met, acquisition speed requirements are minimized, essentially perfect reconstruction of any object in the model class is guaranteed, and the inverse problem of reconstructing the dynamic object has a condition number of one. We describe spatio-temporal object models for various dynamic imaging applications including cardiac imaging. We present the theory underlying PARADIGM and analyze its performance theoretically and numerically. We also propose a practical MR imaging scheme for 2D dynamic cardiac imaging based on the theory. For this application, PARADIGM is predicted to provide a 10–25 × acceleration compared to the optimal non-adaptive scheme. Finally we present generalized optimality criteria and extend the scheme to dynamic imaging with three spatial dimensions

  2. Bone surface enhancement in ultrasound images using a new Doppler-based acquisition/processing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Tang, Songyuan; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging has long been considered as a potential aid in orthopedic surgeries. US technologies are safe, portable and do not use radiations. This would make them a desirable tool for real-time assessment of fractures and to monitor fracture healing. However, image quality of US imaging methods in bone applications is limited by speckle, attenuation, shadow, multiple reflections and other imaging artifacts. While bone surfaces typically appear in US images as somewhat ‘brighter’ than soft tissue, they are often not easily distinguishable from the surrounding tissue. Therefore, US imaging methods aimed at segmenting bone surfaces need enhancement in image contrast prior to segmentation to improve the quality of the detected bone surface. In this paper, we present a novel acquisition/processing technique for bone surface enhancement in US images. Inspired by elastography and Doppler imaging methods, this technique takes advantage of the difference between the mechanical and acoustic properties of bones and those of soft tissues to make the bone surface more easily distinguishable in US images. The objective of this technique is to facilitate US-based bone segmentation methods and improve the accuracy of their outcomes. The newly proposed technique is tested both in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these preliminary experiments suggest that the use of the proposed technique has the potential to significantly enhance the detectability of bone surfaces in noisy ultrasound images.

  3. Bone surface enhancement in ultrasound images using a new Doppler-based acquisition/processing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Tang, Songyuan; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-17

    Ultrasound (US) imaging has long been considered as a potential aid in orthopedic surgeries. US technologies are safe, portable and do not use radiations. This would make them a desirable tool for real-time assessment of fractures and to monitor fracture healing. However, image quality of US imaging methods in bone applications is limited by speckle, attenuation, shadow, multiple reflections and other imaging artifacts. While bone surfaces typically appear in US images as somewhat 'brighter' than soft tissue, they are often not easily distinguishable from the surrounding tissue. Therefore, US imaging methods aimed at segmenting bone surfaces need enhancement in image contrast prior to segmentation to improve the quality of the detected bone surface. In this paper, we present a novel acquisition/processing technique for bone surface enhancement in US images. Inspired by elastography and Doppler imaging methods, this technique takes advantage of the difference between the mechanical and acoustic properties of bones and those of soft tissues to make the bone surface more easily distinguishable in US images. The objective of this technique is to facilitate US-based bone segmentation methods and improve the accuracy of their outcomes. The newly proposed technique is tested both in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these preliminary experiments suggest that the use of the proposed technique has the potential to significantly enhance the detectability of bone surfaces in noisy ultrasound images.

  4. An enhanced approach for biomedical image restoration using image fusion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Ghada Sabah; Abbas, Fatma Ismail; Abood, Ziad M.; Kadhim, Kadhim K.; Karam, Nada S.

    2018-05-01

    Biomedical image is generally noisy and little blur due to the physical mechanisms of the acquisition process, so one of the common degradations in biomedical image is their noise and poor contrast. The idea of biomedical image enhancement is to improve the quality of the image for early diagnosis. In this paper we are using Wavelet Transformation to remove the Gaussian noise from biomedical images: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) image and Radiography (Radio) image, in different color spaces (RGB, HSV, YCbCr), and we perform the fusion of the denoised images resulting from the above denoising techniques using add image method. Then some quantive performance metrics such as signal -to -noise ratio (SNR), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and Mean Square Error (MSE), etc. are computed. Since this statistical measurement helps in the assessment of fidelity and image quality. The results showed that our approach can be applied of Image types of color spaces for biomedical images.

  5. Imaging techniques for myocardial inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, J.B.; Henkin, R.E.; Robinson, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders which results in morbidity and mortality in young individuals. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of these patients have histologic evidence of myocarditis which is potentially treatable with immunosuppression. The identification of myocardial inflammation may therefore lead to development of therapeutic regimens designed to treat the cause rather than the effect of the myocardial disease. Ultimately, this may result in improvement in the abysmal prognosis of DC. The currently accepted technique for identification of active myocardial inflammation is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is not perfect, however, since pathologic standards for the diagnosis of myocarditis have not been established. Furthermore, focal inflammation may give rise to sampling error. The inflammation-avid radioisotope gallium-67 citrate has been used as an adjunct to biopsy improving the yield of myocarditis from 7 percent to 36 percent. Serial imaging correlates well to biopsy results. Future studies are designed to study the applicability of lymphocyte labelling techniques to myocardial inflammatory disease

  6. Optical Acquisition, Image and Data Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-30

    It is from problems where the syntactic method is a suitable this pattern vector that one starts the analysis and approach are fingerprint ...reference axes. FiG. 3. (a) Texture of French canvas ; (b) HT of a block of Fig. 3a: (c) HT of a block of Fig. 3a with preprocessing for line thinning...the p-0 (HT) plane as it will appear in the following illustrations. Figure 3a shows the texture image of French canvas (Brodatz’s plate No. 20

  7. Quantitation of structural distortion with gradient-echo imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, R.D.; Schwaighofer, B.W.; Hesselink, J.R.; Chu, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the structural distortion and measurement error associated with fast MR imaging of the spinal neural foramina. Dry skeletal specimens and a thin cadaveric sagittal section through the neural foramina were placed in a water bath. MR images were obtained with a 1.5-T unit in different planes and with various pulse sequences. The size and shape of each neural foramen were carefully measured on the images and on the skeletal specimens. Gradient-echo (GRE) techniques (gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state, MPGR, three-dimensional volume acquisition) resulted in structural distortion in up to 10% on the fresh skeleton and 30% of the dry skeleton specimens when a small TE was used (the foramina appear narrower on the images)

  8. Tooling Techniques Enhance Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    mission. The manufacturing techniques developed to create the components have yielded innovations advancing medical imaging, transportation security, and even energy efficiency.

  9. Data acquisition system for a proton imaging apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Sipala, V; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M; Candiano, G; Capineri, L; Cirrone, G A P; Civinini, C; Cuttone, G; Lo Presti, D; Marrazzo, L; Mazzaglia, E; Menichelli, D; Randazzo, N; Talamonti, C; Tesi, M; Valentini, S

    2009-01-01

    New developments in the proton-therapy field for cancer treatments, leaded Italian physics researchers to realize a proton imaging apparatus consisting of a silicon microstrip tracker to reconstruct the proton trajectories and a calorimeter to measure their residual energy. For clinical requirements, the detectors used and the data acquisition system should be able to sustain about 1 MHz proton rate. The tracker read-out, using an ASICs developed by the collaboration, acquires the signals detector and sends data in parallel to an FPGA. The YAG:Ce calorimeter generates also the global trigger. The data acquisition system and the results obtained in the calibration phase are presented and discussed.

  10. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Fitzgerald@umassmed.edu [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Knopp, Michael V. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Ohio, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core St. Louis, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Rosen, Mark A. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine–Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Shankar, Lalitha K. [National Cancer Institute, Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Laurie, Fran [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Moni, Janaki [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Coleman, C. Norman; Deye, James A.; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  11. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J.; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Followill, David S.; Galvin, James; Knopp, Michael V.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Rosen, Mark A.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Shankar, Lalitha K.; Laurie, Fran; Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Moni, Janaki; Coleman, C. Norman; Deye, James A.; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  12. Variable flip angle excitation for reduced acquisition time magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, T.C.; Ortendahl, D.A.; Hylton, N.M.; Carlson, J.W.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes an MRI technique which can be used to acquire images at short TR values while maintaining the sensitivity to disease found in longer TR images. For spin echo imaging there are three acquisition parameters that can be set in the imaging protocol; TR, the repetition interval; TE, the time of echo and Θ, the excitation flip angle. Standard imaging techniques set Θ to 90 degrees regardless of the TR value. With Θ fixed, imaging systems have been optimized by varying the value for TE and TR with the results in general indicating the need for long TR values. However, if the flip angle is included as a variable acquisition parameter the optimal operating point can be changed. The solution to the Bloch equation shows a functional relationship between the flip angle and the ratio TR/T1. This functionality was first observed by Ernst and Anderson as a method to increase the signal generated in fourier transform magnetic resonance spectroscopy. When TR/T1<1 the optimum flip angle for producing maximum magnetization in the transverse plane is less then 90 degrees. Therefore, by reducing both TR and flip angle it is possible to maintain signal intensity while reducing the time of data acquisition

  13. Optimization of PET image quality by means of 3D data acquisition and iterative image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, J.; Zaers, J.; Trojan, H.; Bellemann, M.E.; Adam, L.E.; Haberkorn, U.; Brix, G.

    1998-01-01

    The experiments were performed at the latest-generation whole-body PET system ECAT EXACT HR + . For 2D data acquisition, a collimator of thin tungsten septa was positioned in the field-of-view. Prior to image reconstruction, the measured 3D data were sorted into 2D sinograms by using the Fourier rebinning (FORE) algorithm developed by M. Defrise. The standard filtered backprojection (FBP) method and an optimized ML/EM algorithm with overrelaxation for accelerated convergence were employed for image reconstruction. The spatial resolution of both methods as well as the convergence and noise properties of the ML/EM algorithm were studied in phantom measurements. Furthermore, patient data were acquired in the 2D mode as well as in the 3D mode and reconstructed with both techniques. At the same spatial resolution, the ML/EM-reconstructed images showed fewer and less prominent artefacts than the FBP-reconstructed images. The resulting improved detail conspicuously was achieved for the data acquired in the 2D mode as well as in the 3D mode. The best image quality was obtained by iterative 2D reconstruction of 3D data sets which were previously rebinned into 2D sinograms with help of the FORE algorithm. The phantom measurements revealed that 50 iteration steps with the otpimized ML/EM algorithm were sufficient to keep the relative quantitation error below 5%. (orig./MG) [de

  14. New diffusion imaging method with a single acquisition sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, Ph.S.; Bittoun, J.; Lefevre, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is related to the molecular diffusion coefficient and to physiologic information: microcirculation in the capillary network, incoherent slow flow, and restricted diffusion. The authors present a new MR imaging sequence that yields computed ADC images in only one acquisition of 9-minutes with a 1.5-T imager (GE Signa). Compared to the previous method, this sequence is at least two times faster and thus can be used as a routine examination to supplement T1-, T2-, and density-weighted images. The method was assessed by measurement of the molecular diffusion in liquids, and the first clinical images obtained in neurologic diseases demonstrate its efficiency for clinical investigation. The possibility of separately imaging diffusion and perfusion is supported by an algorithm

  15. Parallel imaging: is GRAPPA a useful acquisition tool for MR imaging intended for volumetric brain analysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Anders

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The work presented here investigates parallel imaging applied to T1-weighted high resolution imaging for use in longitudinal volumetric clinical studies involving Alzheimer's disease (AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI patients. This was in an effort to shorten acquisition times to minimise the risk of motion artefacts caused by patient discomfort and disorientation. The principle question is, "Can parallel imaging be used to acquire images at 1.5 T of sufficient quality to allow volumetric analysis of patient brains?" Methods Optimisation studies were performed on a young healthy volunteer and the selected protocol (including the use of two different parallel imaging acceleration factors was then tested on a cohort of 15 elderly volunteers including MCI and AD patients. In addition to automatic brain segmentation, hippocampus volumes were manually outlined and measured in all patients. The 15 patients were scanned on a second occasion approximately one week later using the same protocol and evaluated in the same manner to test repeatability of measurement using images acquired with the GRAPPA parallel imaging technique applied to the MPRAGE sequence. Results Intraclass correlation tests show that almost perfect agreement between repeated measurements of both segmented brain parenchyma fraction and regional measurement of hippocampi. The protocol is suitable for both global and regional volumetric measurement dementia patients. Conclusion In summary, these results indicate that parallel imaging can be used without detrimental effect to brain tissue segmentation and volumetric measurement and should be considered for both clinical and research studies where longitudinal measurements of brain tissue volumes are of interest.

  16. New calibration technique for KCD-based megavoltage imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Zheng, Wei; DiBianca, Frank A.; Zeman, Herbert D.; Laughter, Joseph S.

    1999-05-01

    In megavoltage imaging, current commercial electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), despite having the advantage of immediate digital imaging over film, suffer from poor image contrast and spatial resolution. The feasibility of using a kinestatic charge detector (KCD) as an EPID to provide superior image contrast and spatial resolution for portal imaging has already been demonstrated in a previous paper. The KCD system had the additional advantage of requiring an extremely low dose per acquired image, allowing for superior imaging to be reconstructed form a single linac pulse per image pixel. The KCD based images utilized a dose of two orders of magnitude less that for EPIDs and film. Compared with the current commercial EPIDs and film, the prototype KCD system exhibited promising image qualities, despite being handicapped by the use of a relatively simple image calibration technique, and the performance limits of medical linacs on the maximum linac pulse frequency and energy flux per pulse delivered. This image calibration technique fixed relative image pixel values based on a linear interpolation of extrema provided by an air-water calibration, and accounted only for channel-to-channel variations. The counterpart of this for area detectors is the standard flat fielding method. A comprehensive calibration protocol has been developed. The new technique additionally corrects for geometric distortions due to variations in the scan velocity, and timing artifacts caused by mis-synchronization between the linear accelerator and the data acquisition system (DAS). The role of variations in energy flux (2 - 3%) on imaging is demonstrated to be not significant for the images considered. The methodology is presented, and the results are discussed for simulated images. It also allows for significant improvements in the signal-to- noise ratio (SNR) by increasing the dose using multiple images without having to increase the linac pulse frequency or energy flux per pulse. The

  17. Acquisition and Post-Processing of Immunohistochemical Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgewick, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    Augmentation of digital images is almost always a necessity in order to obtain a reproduction that matches the appearance of the original. However, that augmentation can mislead if it is done incorrectly and not within reasonable limits. When procedures are in place for insuring that originals are archived, and image manipulation steps reported, scientists not only follow good laboratory practices, but avoid ethical issues associated with post processing, and protect their labs from any future allegations of scientific misconduct. Also, when procedures are in place for correct acquisition of images, the extent of post processing is minimized or eliminated. These procedures include white balancing (for brightfield images), keeping tonal values within the dynamic range of the detector, frame averaging to eliminate noise (typically in fluorescence imaging), use of the highest bit depth when a choice is available, flatfield correction, and archiving of the image in a non-lossy format (not JPEG).When post-processing is necessary, the commonly used applications for correction include Photoshop, and ImageJ, but a free program (GIMP) can also be used. Corrections to images include scaling the bit depth to higher and lower ranges, removing color casts from brightfield images, setting brightness and contrast, reducing color noise, reducing "grainy" noise, conversion of pure colors to grayscale, conversion of grayscale to colors typically used in fluorescence imaging, correction of uneven illumination (flatfield correction), merging color images (fluorescence), and extending the depth of focus. These corrections are explained in step-by-step procedures in the chapter that follows.

  18. Gallium-67 imaging with low collimators and energy weighted acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamill, J.J.; DeVito, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the medium and high energy collimators used in 67 Ga imaging have poorer resolution than low-energy collimators, such as the LEAP. The low energy collimators could be used for gallium imaging if the background under the 93 and 185 keV peaks could be reduced without degrading the signal-to-noise ratio unacceptably. energy weighted acquisition provides a means of accomplishing this background reduction. The authors have developed weighing functions for gallium imaging through LEAP and high resolution collimators. The resolution of the low energy collimators is realized while the background is comparable to, or better than, the background in normal, energy-window imaging with the medium energy collimator. The pixel noise is somewhat greater than the Poisson noise in normal gallium imaging, and some noise correlations, or noise texture, is introduced

  19. A digital data acquisition scheme for SPECT and PET small animal imaging detectors for Theranostic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, M.; Fysikopoulos, E.; Loudos, G.

    2017-11-01

    Nanoparticle based drug delivery is considered as a new, promising technology for the efficient treatment of various diseases. When nanoparticles are radiolabelled it is possible to image them, using molecular imaging techniques. The use of magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia is one of the most promising nanomedicine directions and requires the accurate, non-invasive, monitoring of temperature increase and drug release. The combination of imaging and therapy has opened the very promising Theranostics domain. In this work, we present a digital data acquisition scheme for nuclear medicine dedicated detectors for Theranostic applications.

  20. Imaging Techniques in Endodontics: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, B. S.; Subash, T. S.; Narmatha, V. J.; Anamika, T.; Snehil, T. K.; Nandini, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the relevance of imaging techniques such as, computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, and ultrasound, to endodontic practice. Many limitations of the conventional radiographic techniques have been overcome by the newer methods. Advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in endodontic practice are also discussed. PMID:22530184

  1. Stable image acquisition for mobile image processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Kai-Fabian; Fritze, Alexander; Gillich, Eugen; Mönks, Uwe; Lohweg, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Today, mobile devices (smartphones, tablets, etc.) are widespread and of high importance for their users. Their performance as well as versatility increases over time. This leads to the opportunity to use such devices for more specific tasks like image processing in an industrial context. For the analysis of images requirements like image quality (blur, illumination, etc.) as well as a defined relative position of the object to be inspected are crucial. Since mobile devices are handheld and used in constantly changing environments the challenge is to fulfill these requirements. We present an approach to overcome the obstacles and stabilize the image capturing process such that image analysis becomes significantly improved on mobile devices. Therefore, image processing methods are combined with sensor fusion concepts. The approach consists of three main parts. First, pose estimation methods are used to guide a user moving the device to a defined position. Second, the sensors data and the pose information are combined for relative motion estimation. Finally, the image capturing process is automated. It is triggered depending on the alignment of the device and the object as well as the image quality that can be achieved under consideration of motion and environmental effects.

  2. Biomedical image acquisition system using a gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jara B, A.T.; Sevillano, J.; Del Carpio S, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    A gamma camera images PC acquisition board has been developed. The digital system has been described using VHDL and has been synthesized and implemented in a Altera Max7128S CPLD and two PALs 16L8. The use of programmable-logic technologies has afforded a higher scale integration and a reduction of the digital delays and also has allowed us to modify and bring up to date the entire digital design easily. (orig.)

  3. Fundamentals of functional imaging I: current clinical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, A; Martín Noguerol, T; Mata, L Alcalá

    2018-05-01

    Imaging techniques can establish a structural, physiological, and molecular phenotype for cancer, which helps enable accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment. In recent years, various imaging techniques that make it possible to study the functional characteristics of tumors quantitatively and reproducibly have been introduced and have become established in routine clinical practice. Perfusion studies enable us to estimate the microcirculation as well as tumor angiogenesis and permeability using ultrafast dynamic acquisitions with ultrasound, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Diffusion-weighted sequences now form part of state-of-the-art MR imaging protocols to evaluate oncologic lesions in any anatomic location. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides information about the occupation of the extracellular and extravascular space and indirectly estimates the cellularity and apoptosis of tumors, having demonstrated its relation with biologic aggressiveness in various tumor lines and its usefulness in the evaluation of the early response to systemic and local targeted therapies. Another tool is hydrogen proton MR spectroscopy, which is used mainly in the study of the metabolic characteristics of brain tumors. However, the complexity of the technique and its lack of reproducibility have limited its clinical use in other anatomic areas, although much experience with the use of this technique in the assessment of prostate and breast cancers as well as liver lesions has also accumulated. This review analyzes the imaging techniques that make it possible to evaluate the physiological and molecular characteristics of cancer that have already been introduced into clinical practice, such as techniques that evaluate angiogenesis through dynamic acquisitions after the administration of contrast material, diffusion-weighted imaging, or hydrogen proton MR spectroscopy, as well as their principal applications in oncology. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado

  4. IMAGE ACQUISITION CONSTRAINTS FOR PANORAMIC FRAME CAMERA IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kauhanen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an approach to quantify the amount of projective error produced by an offset of projection centres in a panoramic imaging workflow. We have limited this research to such panoramic workflows in which several sub-images using planar image sensor are taken and then stitched together as a large panoramic image mosaic. The aim is to simulate how large the offset can be before it introduces significant error to the dataset. The method uses geometrical analysis to calculate the error in various cases. Constraints for shooting distance, focal length and the depth of the area of interest are taken into account. Considering these constraints, it is possible to safely use even poorly calibrated panoramic camera rig with noticeable offset in projection centre locations. The aim is to create datasets suited for photogrammetric reconstruction. Similar constraints can be used also for finding recommended areas from the image planes for automatic feature matching and thus improve stitching of sub-images into full panoramic mosaics. The results are mainly designed to be used with long focal length cameras where the offset of projection centre of sub-images can seem to be significant but on the other hand the shooting distance is also long. We show that in such situations the error introduced by the offset of the projection centres results only in negligible error when stitching a metric panorama. Even if the main use of the results is with cameras of long focal length, they are feasible for all focal lengths.

  5. Technique for image interpolation using polynomial transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escalante Ramírez, B.; Martens, J.B.; Haskell, G.G.; Hang, H.M.

    1993-01-01

    We present a new technique for image interpolation based on polynomial transforms. This is an image representation model that analyzes an image by locally expanding it into a weighted sum of orthogonal polynomials. In the discrete case, the image segment within every window of analysis is

  6. Reconstructing flaw image using dataset of full matrix capture technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Jeong Seok [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    A conventional phased array ultrasonic system offers the ability to steer an ultrasonic beam by applying independent time delays of individual elements in the array and produce an ultrasonic image. In contrast, full matrix capture (FMC) is a data acquisition process that collects a complete matrix of A-scans from every possible independent transmit-receive combination in a phased array transducer and makes it possible to reconstruct various images that cannot be produced by conventional phased array with the post processing as well as images equivalent to a conventional phased array image. In this paper, a basic algorithm based on the LLL mode total focusing method (TFM) that can image crack type flaws is described. And this technique was applied to reconstruct flaw images from the FMC dataset obtained from the experiments and ultrasonic simulation.

  7. Plant phenomics: an overview of image acquisition technologies and image data analysis algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Sanz, Fernando; Navarro, Pedro J; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2017-11-01

    The study of phenomes or phenomics has been a central part of biology. The field of automatic phenotype acquisition technologies based on images has seen an important advance in the last years. As with other high-throughput technologies, it addresses a common set of problems, including data acquisition and analysis. In this review, we give an overview of the main systems developed to acquire images. We give an in-depth analysis of image processing with its major issues and the algorithms that are being used or emerging as useful to obtain data out of images in an automatic fashion. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Diffusion MRI of the neonate brain: acquisition, processing and analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannek, Kerstin [University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Centre for Advanced Imaging, Brisbane (Australia); Guzzetta, Andrea [IRCCS Stella Maris, Department of Developmental Neuroscience, Calambrone Pisa (Italy); Colditz, Paul B. [University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Perinatal Research Centre, Brisbane (Australia); Rose, Stephen E. [University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Centre for Advanced Imaging, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)

    2012-10-15

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) is a popular noninvasive imaging modality for the investigation of the neonate brain. It enables the assessment of white matter integrity, and is particularly suited for studying white matter maturation in the preterm and term neonate brain. Diffusion tractography allows the delineation of white matter pathways and assessment of connectivity in vivo. In this review, we address the challenges of performing and analysing neonate dMRI. Of particular importance in dMRI analysis is adequate data preprocessing to reduce image distortions inherent to the acquisition technique, as well as artefacts caused by head movement. We present a summary of techniques that should be used in the preprocessing of neonate dMRI data, and demonstrate the effect of these important correction steps. Furthermore, we give an overview of available analysis techniques, ranging from voxel-based analysis of anisotropy metrics including tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to recently developed methods of statistical analysis addressing issues of resolving complex white matter architecture. We highlight the importance of resolving crossing fibres for tractography and outline several tractography-based techniques, including connectivity-based segmentation, the connectome and tractography mapping. These techniques provide powerful tools for the investigation of brain development and maturation. (orig.)

  9. UTOFIA: an underwater time-of-flight image acquisition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driewer, Adrian; Abrosimov, Igor; Alexander, Jonathan; Benger, Marc; O'Farrell, Marion; Haugholt, Karl Henrik; Softley, Chris; Thielemann, Jens T.; Thorstensen, Jostein; Yates, Chris

    2017-10-01

    In this article the development of a newly designed Time-of-Flight (ToF) image sensor for underwater applications is described. The sensor is developed as part of the project UTOFIA (underwater time-of-flight image acquisition) funded by the EU within the Horizon 2020 framework. This project aims to develop a camera based on range gating that extends the visible range compared to conventional cameras by a factor of 2 to 3 and delivers real-time range information by means of a 3D video stream. The principle of underwater range gating as well as the concept of the image sensor are presented. Based on measurements on a test image sensor a pixel structure that suits best to the requirements has been selected. Within an extensive characterization underwater the capability of distance measurements in turbid environments is demonstrated.

  10. Image acquisition in general radiography: The utilisation of DDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayre, C.M.; Eyden, A.; Blackman, S.; Carlton, K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This article explores image acquisition with DDR. General radiographic technology continues to advance therefore it remains paramount to continually reflect on DDR hardware and software amongst radiographers in an imaging modality that constitutes approximately 90% of all radiological examinations. Method: This article reports findings from a wider ethnographic study of two general radiography environments in the United Kingdom (UK). Participant observation and semi-structured interviews were the methods used to uncover original data. Results: Two key themes are discussed. Firstly, ‘the extent of DDR knowledge’ amongst radiographers is examined. The findings uncover that not all radiographers have an adequate knowledge base with DDR technology. Secondly, ‘pitfalls and near misses with DDR’ is discussed. This theme highlights the potential danger of radiographers ‘over-repeating’ X-ray examinations, coincided with the occurrence of radiological incidents whereby a patient is exposed to ionising radiation with no added benefit. Conclusion: This paper concludes by challenging the current ‘skill base’ to operate DDR equipment. In addition, new pitfalls and near misses are highlighted, which may help forestall radiation incidents in the future. Dose and image optimisation remain central tenets to the role of the radiographer. Advances in knowledge: Few studies have challenged image acquisition with DDR. This study adds to existing knowledge by uncovering original phenomena that may initiate discussions within the radiography community and continually enhance healthcare delivery. - Highlights: • Radiographers may not have appropriate knowledge of DDR technology. • Suggests DDR may facilitate a ‘hit and miss’ approach to image acquisition. • Identifies radiographic errors with DDR, leading to radiological incidents.

  11. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part I. The image acquisition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Mammography is a very well-established imaging modality for the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. However, since the introduction of digital imaging to the realm of radiology, more advanced, and especially tomographic imaging methods have been made possible. One of these methods, breast tomosynthesis, has finally been introduced to the clinic for routine everyday use, with potential to in the future replace mammography for screening for breast cancer. In this two part paper, the extensive research performed during the development of breast tomosynthesis is reviewed, with a focus on the research addressing the medical physics aspects of this imaging modality. This first paper will review the research performed on the issues relevant to the image acquisition process, including system design, optimization of geometry and technique, x-ray scatter, and radiation dose. The companion to this paper will review all other aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging, including the reconstruction process. PMID:23298126

  12. A time-efficient acquisition protocol for multipurpose diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrband, Farshid; O'Brien, Kieran; Barth, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Several diffusion-weighted MRI techniques have been developed and validated during the past 2 decades. While offering various neuroanatomical inferences, these techniques differ in their proposed optimal acquisition design, preventing clinicians and researchers benefiting from all potential inference methods, particularly when limited time is available. This study reports an optimal design that enables for a time-efficient diffusion-weighted MRI acquisition scheme at 7 Tesla. The primary audience of this article is the typical end user, interested in diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla. We tested b-values in the range of 700 to 3000 s/mm 2 with different number of angular diffusion-encoding samples, against a data-driven "gold standard." The suggested design is a protocol with b-values of 1000 and 2500 s/mm 2 , with 25 and 50 samples, uniformly distributed over two shells. We also report a range of protocols in which the results of fitting microstructural models to the diffusion-weighted data had high correlation with the gold standard. We estimated minimum acquisition requirements that enable diffusion tensor imaging, higher angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging, neurite orientation dispersion, and density imaging and white matter tract integrity across whole brain with isotropic resolution of 1.8 mm in less than 11 min. Magn Reson Med 78:2170-2184, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Survey Of Lossless Image Coding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnychuck, Paul W.; Rabbani, Majid

    1989-04-01

    Many image transmission/storage applications requiring some form of data compression additionally require that the decoded image be an exact replica of the original. Lossless image coding algorithms meet this requirement by generating a decoded image that is numerically identical to the original. Several lossless coding techniques are modifications of well-known lossy schemes, whereas others are new. Traditional Markov-based models and newer arithmetic coding techniques are applied to predictive coding, bit plane processing, and lossy plus residual coding. Generally speaking, the compression ratio offered by these techniques are in the area of 1.6:1 to 3:1 for 8-bit pictorial images. Compression ratios for 12-bit radiological images approach 3:1, as these images have less detailed structure, and hence, their higher pel correlation leads to a greater removal of image redundancy.

  14. Motion-robust diffusion tensor acquisition at routine 3T magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, Hasina; Abe, Osamu; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Shigeki

    2010-01-01

    We compared different acquisition and reconstruction methods in phantom and human studies in the clinical setting to validate our hypothesis that optimizing the k-space acquisition and reconstruction method could decrease motion artifacts. Diffusion tensor images of a water phantom were obtained with three table displacement magnitudes: 1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm. Images were reconstructed using homodyne and zero-fill reconstruction. Overscanning in 8- and 16-k y lines was tested. We performed visual assessment of the artifacts using reconstructed coronal images and analyzed them with Wilcoxon signed-ranks test both for phantom and human studies. Also, fractional anisotropy (FA) changes between acquisition methods were compared. Artifacts due to smaller displacement (1 and 2 mm) were significantly reduced in 16-k y overscan with zero filling. The Wilcoxon signed-ranks test showed significant differences (P<0.031 for reconstruction methods and P<0.016 for overscanning methods). FA changes were statistically significant (P<0.037; Student's t-test). The Wilcoxon signed-ranks test showed significant reductions (P<0.005) in the human study. Motion-induced artifacts can be reduced by optimizing acquisition and reconstruction methods. The techniques described in this study offer an effective method for robust estimation of diffusion tensor in the presence of motion-related artifactual data points. (author)

  15. Improvement of Sidestream Dark Field Imaging with an Image Acquisition Stabilizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balestra, Gianmarco M.; Bezemer, Rick; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Yong, Ze-Yie; Sjauw, Krishan D.; Engstrom, Annemarie E.; Koopmans, Matty; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the present study we developed, evaluated in volunteers, and clinically validated an image acquisition stabilizer (IAS) for Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging. METHODS: The IAS is a stainless steel sterilizable ring which fits around the SDF probe tip. The IAS creates

  16. Improvement of Sidestream Dark Field Imaging with an Image Acquisition Stabilizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Balestra (Gianmarco); R. Bezemer (Rick); E.C. Boerma (Christiaan); Z-Y. Yong (Ze-Yie); K.D. Sjauw (Krishan); A.E. Engstrom (Annemarie); M. Koopmans (Matty); C. Ince (Can)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In the present study we developed, evaluated in volunteers, and clinically validated an image acquisition stabilizer (IAS) for Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging.Methods: The IAS is a stainless steel sterilizable ring which fits around the SDF probe tip. The IAS creates

  17. Imaging techniques for medical diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudden, F.

    1982-01-01

    In the last few decades, science, engineering and medicine have combinded to improve the quality of our lives to a level previously unimagined. Within the framework of medical engineering - the field of activity of the Medical Engineering Group of Siemens AG - diagnostic image-generating systems have played an important role in effecting these changes and improvements. The importance of these systems to the success of the Group is clearly evident. Diagnostic imaging systems account for 65% of the sales achieved by this Group. In this article an overview is presented of the major innovations and the aims of developments in the field of imaging systems. (orig.)

  18. Optimized image acquisition for breast tomosynthesis in projection and reconstruction space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Baker, Jay A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2009-01-01

    span, the performance rolled off beyond a certain number of projections, indicating that simply increasing the number of projections in tomosynthesis may not necessarily improve its performance. The best performance for both projection images and tomosynthesis slices was obtained for 15-17 projections spanning an angular arc of ∼45 deg. - the maximum tested in our study, and for an acquisition dose equal to single-view mammography. The optimization framework developed in this framework is applicable to other reconstruction techniques and other multiprojection systems.

  19. Elastography of the Breast: Imaging Techniques and Pitfalls in Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) elastography is a tool that indicates the hardness of a lesion. Recent studies using elastography with freehand compression have shown similar diagnostic performance to conventional US in differentiating benign lesions from malignant breast masses. On the other hand, the acquired information is not quantitative, and the reliability of the imaging technique to correctly compress the tissue depends on the skill of the operator, resulting in substantial interobserver variability during data acquisition and interpretation. To overcome this, shear wave elastography was developed to provide quantitative information on the tissue elasticity. The system works by remotely inducing mechanical vibrations through the acoustic radiation force created by a focused US beam. This review discusses the principles and examination techniques of the two types of elastography systems and provides practical points to reduce the interobserver variability or errors during data acquisition and interpretation

  20. Elastography of the Breast: Imaging Techniques and Pitfalls in Interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Ultrasound (US) elastography is a tool that indicates the hardness of a lesion. Recent studies using elastography with freehand compression have shown similar diagnostic performance to conventional US in differentiating benign lesions from malignant breast masses. On the other hand, the acquired information is not quantitative, and the reliability of the imaging technique to correctly compress the tissue depends on the skill of the operator, resulting in substantial interobserver variability during data acquisition and interpretation. To overcome this, shear wave elastography was developed to provide quantitative information on the tissue elasticity. The system works by remotely inducing mechanical vibrations through the acoustic radiation force created by a focused US beam. This review discusses the principles and examination techniques of the two types of elastography systems and provides practical points to reduce the interobserver variability or errors during data acquisition and interpretation

  1. Imageability and age of acquisition effects in disyllabic word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Michael J; Schock, Jocelyn

    2013-01-01

    Imageability and age of acquisition (AoA) effects, as well as key interactions between these variables and frequency and consistency, were examined via multiple regression analyses for 1,936 disyllabic words, using reaction time and accuracy measures from the English Lexicon Project. Both imageability and AoA accounted for unique variance in lexical decision and naming reaction time performance. In addition, across both tasks, AoA and imageability effects were larger for low-frequency words than high-frequency words, and imageability effects were larger for later acquired than earlier acquired words. In reading aloud, consistency effects in reaction time were larger for later acquired words than earlier acquired words, but consistency did not interact with imageability in the reaction time analysis. These results provide further evidence that multisyllabic word recognition is similar to monosyllabic word recognition and indicate that AoA and imageability are valid predictors of word recognition performance. In addition, the results indicate that meaning exerts a larger influence in the reading aloud of multisyllabic words than monosyllabic words. Finally, parallel-distributed-processing approaches provide a useful theoretical framework to explain the main effects and interactions.

  2. Sparse-sampling with time-encoded (TICO) stimulated Raman scattering for fast image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakert, Hubertus; Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Modern biomedical imaging modalities aim to provide researchers a multimodal contrast for a deeper insight into a specimen under investigation. A very promising technique is stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, which can unveil the chemical composition of a sample with a very high specificity. Although the signal intensities are enhanced manifold to achieve a faster acquisition of images if compared to standard Raman microscopy, there is a trade-off between specificity and acquisition speed. Commonly used SRS concepts either probe only very few Raman transitions as the tuning of the applied laser sources is complicated or record whole spectra with a spectrometer based setup. While the first approach is fast, it reduces the specificity and the spectrometer approach records whole spectra -with energy differences where no Raman information is present-, which limits the acquisition speed. Therefore, we present a new approach based on the TICO-Raman concept, which we call sparse-sampling. The TICO-sparse-sampling setup is fully electronically controllable and allows probing of only the characteristic peaks of a Raman spectrum instead of always acquiring a whole spectrum. By reducing the spectral points to the relevant peaks, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced compared to a uniformly, equidistantly sampled Raman spectrum while the specificity and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) are maintained. Furthermore, all laser sources are completely fiber based. The synchronized detection enables a full resolution of the Raman signal, whereas the analogue and digital balancing allows shot noise limited detection. First imaging results with polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads confirm the advantages of TICO sparse-sampling. We achieved a pixel dwell time as low as 35 μs for an image differentiating both species. The mechanical properties of the applied voice coil stage for scanning the sample currently limits even faster acquisition.

  3. Improvement of Sidestream Dark Field Imaging with an Image Acquisition Stabilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Balestra, Gianmarco M; Bezemer, Rick; Boerma, E Christiaan; Yong, Ze-Yie; Sjauw, Krishan D; Engstrom, Annemarie E; Koopmans, Matty; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In the present study we developed, evaluated in volunteers, and clinically validated an image acquisition stabilizer (IAS) for Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging. Methods The IAS is a stainless steel sterilizable ring which fits around the SDF probe tip. The IAS creates adhesion to the imaged tissue by application of negative pressure. The effects of the IAS on the sublingual microcirculatory flow velocities, the force required to induce pressure artifacts (PA), the time ...

  4. Composite Techniques Based Color Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Ibrahim Abood

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Compression for color image is now necessary for transmission and storage in the data bases since the color gives a pleasing nature and natural for any object, so three composite techniques based color image compression is implemented to achieve image with high compression, no loss in original image, better performance and good image quality. These techniques are composite stationary wavelet technique (S, composite wavelet technique (W and composite multi-wavelet technique (M. For the high energy sub-band of the 3rd level of each composite transform in each composite technique, the compression parameters are calculated. The best composite transform among the 27 types is the three levels of multi-wavelet transform (MMM in M technique which has the highest values of energy (En and compression ratio (CR and least values of bit per pixel (bpp, time (T and rate distortion R(D. Also the values of the compression parameters of the color image are nearly the same as the average values of the compression parameters of the three bands of the same image.

  5. Reliability of contemporary data-acquisition techniques for LEED analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noonan, J.R.; Davis, H.L.

    1980-10-01

    It is becoming clear that one of the principal limitations in LEED structure analysis is the quality of the experimental I-V profiles. This limitation is discussed, and data acquisition procedures described, which for simple systems, seem to enhance the quality of agreement between the results of theoretical model calculations and experimental LEED spectra. By employing such procedures to obtain data from Cu(100), excellent agreement between computed and measured profiles has been achieved. 7 figures

  6. Fast image acquisition and processing on a TV camera-based portal imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, K.; Meyer, J.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper describes the fast acquisition and processing of portal images directly from a TV camera-based portal imaging device (Siemens Beamview Plus trademark). This approach employs not only hard- and software included in the standard package installed by the manufacturer (in particular the frame grabber card and the Matrox(tm) Intellicam interpreter software), but also a software tool developed in-house for further processing and analysis of the images. The technical details are presented, including the source code for the Matrox trademark interpreter script that enables the image capturing process. With this method it is possible to obtain raw images directly from the frame grabber card at an acquisition rate of 15 images per second. The original configuration by the manufacturer allows the acquisition of only a few images over the course of a treatment session. The approach has a wide range of applications, such as quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam, real-time imaging, real-time verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, and generation of movies of the radiation field (fluoroscopy mode). (orig.)

  7. IMAGE ANALYSIS BASED ON EDGE DETECTION TECHNIQUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纳瑟; 刘重庆

    2002-01-01

    A method that incorporates edge detection technique, Markov Random field (MRF), watershed segmentation and merging techniques was presented for performing image segmentation and edge detection tasks. It first applies edge detection technique to obtain a Difference In Strength (DIS) map. An initial segmented result is obtained based on K-means clustering technique and the minimum distance. Then the region process is modeled by MRF to obtain an image that contains different intensity regions. The gradient values are calculated and then the watershed technique is used. DIS calculation is used for each pixel to define all the edges (weak or strong) in the image. The DIS map is obtained. This help as priority knowledge to know the possibility of the region segmentation by the next step (MRF), which gives an image that has all the edges and regions information. In MRF model,gray level l, at pixel location i, in an image X, depends on the gray levels of neighboring pixels. The segmentation results are improved by using watershed algorithm. After all pixels of the segmented regions are processed, a map of primitive region with edges is generated. The edge map is obtained using a merge process based on averaged intensity mean values. A common edge detectors that work on (MRF) segmented image are used and the results are compared. The segmentation and edge detection result is one closed boundary per actual region in the image.

  8. No-gold-standard evaluation of image-acquisition methods using patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K; Frey, Eric

    2017-02-11

    Several new and improved modalities, scanners, and protocols, together referred to as image-acquisition methods (IAMs), are being developed to provide reliable quantitative imaging. Objective evaluation of these IAMs on the clinically relevant quantitative tasks is highly desirable. Such evaluation is most reliable and clinically decisive when performed with patient data, but that requires the availability of a gold standard, which is often rare. While no-gold-standard (NGS) techniques have been developed to clinically evaluate quantitative imaging methods, these techniques require that each of the patients be scanned using all the IAMs, which is expensive, time consuming, and could lead to increased radiation dose. A more clinically practical scenario is where different set of patients are scanned using different IAMs. We have developed an NGS technique that uses patient data where different patient sets are imaged using different IAMs to compare the different IAMs. The technique posits a linear relationship, characterized by a slope, bias, and noise standard-deviation term, between the true and measured quantitative values. Under the assumption that the true quantitative values have been sampled from a unimodal distribution, a maximum-likelihood procedure was developed that estimates these linear relationship parameters for the different IAMs. Figures of merit can be estimated using these linear relationship parameters to evaluate the IAMs on the basis of accuracy, precision, and overall reliability. The proposed technique has several potential applications such as in protocol optimization, quantifying difference in system performance, and system harmonization using patient data.

  9. Spatial Angular Compounding Technique for H-Scan Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairalseed, Mawia; Xiong, Fangyuan; Kim, Jung-Whan; Mattrey, Robert F; Parker, Kevin J; Hoyt, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    H-Scan is a new ultrasound imaging technique that relies on matching a model of pulse-echo formation to the mathematics of a class of Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials. This technique may be beneficial in the measurement of relative scatterer sizes and in cancer therapy, particularly for early response to drug treatment. Because current H-scan techniques use focused ultrasound data acquisitions, spatial resolution degrades away from the focal region and inherently affects relative scatterer size estimation. Although the resolution of ultrasound plane wave imaging can be inferior to that of traditional focused ultrasound approaches, the former exhibits a homogeneous spatial resolution throughout the image plane. The purpose of this study was to implement H-scan using plane wave imaging and investigate the impact of spatial angular compounding on H-scan image quality. Parallel convolution filters using two different Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials that describe ultrasound scattering events are applied to the radiofrequency data. The H-scan processing is done on each radiofrequency image plane before averaging to get the angular compounded image. The relative strength from each convolution is color-coded to represent relative scatterer size. Given results from a series of phantom materials, H-scan imaging with spatial angular compounding more accurately reflects the true scatterer size caused by reductions in the system point spread function and improved signal-to-noise ratio. Preliminary in vivo H-scan imaging of tumor-bearing animals suggests this modality may be useful for monitoring early response to chemotherapeutic treatment. Overall, H-scan imaging using ultrasound plane waves and spatial angular compounding is a promising approach for visualizing the relative size and distribution of acoustic scattering sources. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Image processing techniques for digital orthophotoquad production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Joy J.; Ladner, L. J.; Champion, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Orthophotographs have long been recognized for their value as supplements or alternatives to standard maps. Recent trends towards digital cartography have resulted in efforts by the US Geological Survey to develop a digital orthophotoquad production system. Digital image files were created by scanning color infrared photographs on a microdensitometer. Rectification techniques were applied to remove tile and relief displacement, thereby creating digital orthophotos. Image mosaicking software was then used to join the rectified images, producing digital orthophotos in quadrangle format.

  11. Image processing techniques for remote sensing data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    interpretation and for processing of scene data for autonomous machine perception. The technique of digital image processing are used for' automatic character/pattern recognition, industrial robots for product assembly and inspection, military recognizance... and spatial co-ordinates into discrete components. The mathematical concepts involved are the sampling and transform theory. Two dimensional transforms are used for image enhancement, restoration, encoding and description too. The main objective of the image...

  12. Image Acquisition of Robust Vision Systems to Monitor Blurred Objects in Hazy Smoking Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yongjin; Park, Seungkyu; Baik, Sunghoon; Kim, Donglyul; Nam, Sungmo; Jeong, Kyungmin

    2014-01-01

    Image information in disaster area or radiation area of nuclear industry is an important data for safety inspection and preparing appropriate damage control plans. So, robust vision system for structures and facilities in blurred smoking environments, such as the places of a fire and detonation, is essential in remote monitoring. Vision systems can't acquire an image when the illumination light is blocked by disturbance materials, such as smoke, fog, dust. The vision system based on wavefront correction can be applied to blurred imaging environments and the range-gated imaging system can be applied to both of blurred imaging and darken light environments. Wavefront control is a widely used technique to improve the performance of optical systems by actively correcting wavefront distortions, such as atmospheric turbulence, thermally-induced distortions, and laser or laser device aberrations, which can reduce the peak intensity and smear an acquired image. The principal applications of wavefront control are for improving the image quality in optical imaging systems such as infrared astronomical telescopes, in imaging and tracking rapidly moving space objects, and in compensating for laser beam distortion through the atmosphere. A conventional wavefront correction system consists of a wavefront sensor, a deformable mirror and a control computer. The control computer measures the wavefront distortions using a wavefront sensor and corrects it using a deformable mirror in a closed-loop. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra

  13. Image Acquisition of Robust Vision Systems to Monitor Blurred Objects in Hazy Smoking Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yongjin; Park, Seungkyu; Baik, Sunghoon; Kim, Donglyul; Nam, Sungmo; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Image information in disaster area or radiation area of nuclear industry is an important data for safety inspection and preparing appropriate damage control plans. So, robust vision system for structures and facilities in blurred smoking environments, such as the places of a fire and detonation, is essential in remote monitoring. Vision systems can't acquire an image when the illumination light is blocked by disturbance materials, such as smoke, fog, dust. The vision system based on wavefront correction can be applied to blurred imaging environments and the range-gated imaging system can be applied to both of blurred imaging and darken light environments. Wavefront control is a widely used technique to improve the performance of optical systems by actively correcting wavefront distortions, such as atmospheric turbulence, thermally-induced distortions, and laser or laser device aberrations, which can reduce the peak intensity and smear an acquired image. The principal applications of wavefront control are for improving the image quality in optical imaging systems such as infrared astronomical telescopes, in imaging and tracking rapidly moving space objects, and in compensating for laser beam distortion through the atmosphere. A conventional wavefront correction system consists of a wavefront sensor, a deformable mirror and a control computer. The control computer measures the wavefront distortions using a wavefront sensor and corrects it using a deformable mirror in a closed-loop. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra

  14. Payload Configurations for Efficient Image Acquisition - Indian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudraiah, D. R. M.; Saxena, M.; Paul, S.; Narayanababu, P.; Kuriakose, S.; Kiran Kumar, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    The world is increasingly depending on remotely sensed data. The data is regularly used for monitoring the earth resources and also for solving problems of the world like disasters, climate degradation, etc. Remotely sensed data has changed our perspective of understanding of other planets. With innovative approaches in data utilization, the demands of remote sensing data are ever increasing. More and more research and developments are taken up for data utilization. The satellite resources are scarce and each launch costs heavily. Each launch is also associated with large effort for developing the hardware prior to launch. It is also associated with large number of software elements and mathematical algorithms post-launch. The proliferation of low-earth and geostationary satellites has led to increased scarcity in the available orbital slots for the newer satellites. Indian Space Research Organization has always tried to maximize the utility of satellites. Multiple sensors are flown on each satellite. In each of the satellites, sensors are designed to cater to various spectral bands/frequencies, spatial and temporal resolutions. Bhaskara-1, the first experimental satellite started with 2 bands in electro-optical spectrum and 3 bands in microwave spectrum. The recent Resourcesat-2 incorporates very efficient image acquisition approach with multi-resolution (3 types of spatial resolution) multi-band (4 spectral bands) electro-optical sensors (LISS-4, LISS-3* and AWiFS). The system has been designed to provide data globally with various data reception stations and onboard data storage capabilities. Oceansat-2 satellite has unique sensor combination with 8 band electro-optical high sensitive ocean colour monitor (catering to ocean and land) along with Ku band scatterometer to acquire information on ocean winds. INSAT- 3D launched recently provides high resolution 6 band image data in visible, short-wave, mid-wave and long-wave infrared spectrum. It also has 19 band

  15. Biometric image enhancement using decision rule based image fusion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagayee, G. Mary Amirtha; Arumugam, S.

    2010-02-01

    Introducing biometrics into information systems may result in considerable benefits. Most of the researchers confirmed that the finger print is widely used than the iris or face and more over it is the primary choice for most privacy concerned applications. For finger prints applications, choosing proper sensor is at risk. The proposed work deals about, how the image quality can be improved by introducing image fusion technique at sensor levels. The results of the images after introducing the decision rule based image fusion technique are evaluated and analyzed with its entropy levels and root mean square error.

  16. Imaging techniques and investigation protocols in pediatric emergency imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharitzer, M.; Hoermann, M.; Puig, S.; Prokop, M.

    2002-01-01

    Paediatric emergencies demand a quick and efficient radiological investigation with special attention to specific adjustments related to patient age and radiation protection. Imaging modalities are improving rapidly and enable to diagnose childhood diseases and injuries more quickly, accurately and safely. This article provides an overview of imaging techniques adjusted to the age of the child and an overview of imaging strategies of common paediatric emergencies. Optimising the imaging parameters (digital radiography, different screen-film systems, exposure specifications) allows for substantial reduction of radiation dose. Spiral- and multislice-CT reduce scan time and enable a considerable reduction of radiation exposure if scanning parameters (pitch setting, tube current) are properly adjusted. MRI is still mainly used for neurological or spinal emergencies despite the advent of fast imaging sequences. The radiologist's task is to select an appropriate imaging strategy according to expected differential diagnosis and to adjust the imaging techniques to the individual patient. (orig.) [de

  17. Silhouette-based approach of 3D image reconstruction for automated image acquisition using robotic arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, N.; Saad, W. H. M.; Manap, N. A.; Saad, N. M.; Syafeeza, A. R.

    2017-06-01

    This study presents the approach of 3D image reconstruction using an autonomous robotic arm for the image acquisition process. A low cost of the automated imaging platform is created using a pair of G15 servo motor connected in series to an Arduino UNO as a main microcontroller. Two sets of sequential images were obtained using different projection angle of the camera. The silhouette-based approach is used in this study for 3D reconstruction from the sequential images captured from several different angles of the object. Other than that, an analysis based on the effect of different number of sequential images on the accuracy of 3D model reconstruction was also carried out with a fixed projection angle of the camera. The effecting elements in the 3D reconstruction are discussed and the overall result of the analysis is concluded according to the prototype of imaging platform.

  18. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  19. Evaluation of Acquisition Strategies for Image-Based Construction Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttas, S.; Braun, A.; Borrmann, A.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    Construction site monitoring is an essential task for keeping track of the ongoing construction work and providing up-to-date information for a Building Information Model (BIM). The BIM contains the as-planned states (geometry, schedule, costs, ...) of a construction project. For updating, the as-built state has to be acquired repeatedly and compared to the as-planned state. In the approach presented here, a 3D representation of the as-built state is calculated from photogrammetric images using multi-view stereo reconstruction. On construction sites one has to cope with several difficulties like security aspects, limited accessibility, occlusions or construction activity. Different acquisition strategies and techniques, namely (i) terrestrial acquisition with a hand-held camera, (ii) aerial acquisition using a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and (iii) acquisition using a fixed stereo camera pair at the boom of the crane, are tested on three test sites. They are assessed considering the special needs for the monitoring tasks and limitations on construction sites. The three scenarios are evaluated based on the ability of automation, the required effort for acquisition, the necessary equipment and its maintaining, disturbance of the construction works, and on the accuracy and completeness of the resulting point clouds. Based on the experiences during the test cases the following conclusions can be drawn: Terrestrial acquisition has the lowest requirements on the device setup but lacks on automation and coverage. The crane camera shows the lowest flexibility but the highest grade of automation. The UAV approach can provide the best coverage by combining nadir and oblique views, but can be limited by obstacles and security aspects. The accuracy of the point clouds is evaluated based on plane fitting of selected building parts. The RMS errors of the fitted parts range from 1 to a few cm for the UAV and the hand-held scenario. First results show that the crane camera

  20. EVALUATION OF ACQUISITION STRATEGIES FOR IMAGE-BASED CONSTRUCTION SITE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tuttas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Construction site monitoring is an essential task for keeping track of the ongoing construction work and providing up-to-date information for a Building Information Model (BIM. The BIM contains the as-planned states (geometry, schedule, costs, ... of a construction project. For updating, the as-built state has to be acquired repeatedly and compared to the as-planned state. In the approach presented here, a 3D representation of the as-built state is calculated from photogrammetric images using multi-view stereo reconstruction. On construction sites one has to cope with several difficulties like security aspects, limited accessibility, occlusions or construction activity. Different acquisition strategies and techniques, namely (i terrestrial acquisition with a hand-held camera, (ii aerial acquisition using a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV and (iii acquisition using a fixed stereo camera pair at the boom of the crane, are tested on three test sites. They are assessed considering the special needs for the monitoring tasks and limitations on construction sites. The three scenarios are evaluated based on the ability of automation, the required effort for acquisition, the necessary equipment and its maintaining, disturbance of the construction works, and on the accuracy and completeness of the resulting point clouds. Based on the experiences during the test cases the following conclusions can be drawn: Terrestrial acquisition has the lowest requirements on the device setup but lacks on automation and coverage. The crane camera shows the lowest flexibility but the highest grade of automation. The UAV approach can provide the best coverage by combining nadir and oblique views, but can be limited by obstacles and security aspects. The accuracy of the point clouds is evaluated based on plane fitting of selected building parts. The RMS errors of the fitted parts range from 1 to a few cm for the UAV and the hand-held scenario. First results show that the crane

  1. Evaluation of a new image compression technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algra, P.R.; Kroon, H.M.; Noordveld, R.B.; DeValk, J.P.J.; Seeley, G.W.; Westerink, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of a new image compression technique, subband coding using vector quantization, on 44 CT examinations of the upper abdomen. Three independent radiologists reviewed the original images and compressed versions. The compression ratios used were 16:1 and 20:1. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed no difference in the diagnostic contents between originals and their compressed versions. Subjective visibility of anatomic structures was equal. Except for a few 20:1 compressed images, the observers could not distinguish compressed versions from original images. They conclude that subband coding using vector quantization is a valuable method for data compression in CT scans of the abdomen

  2. Oncologic applications of diagnostic imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, L.J.; Thrall, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    Before appropriate therapy can be instituted for a cancer patient, the presence and extent of tumor must be evaluated. Deciding which imaging technique to use depends on tumor location, type, and biologic behavior. Conventional radiography provides important information at a relatively low cost compared with other imaging modalities. Ultrasound is a valuable adjunct to radiography, but does not replace it because both imaging modalities provide unique information. Nuclear medicine procedures contribute additional, unique data by providing physiological information, but specificity is lacking. Both CT and MRI provide images with exquisite anatomic detail, but availability and cost prohibit their general use

  3. Three-dimensional image acquisition and reconstruction system on a mobile device based on computer-generated integral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Kim, Byeong-Jun; Piao, Yan-Ling; Park, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Piao, Mei-Lan; Yoo, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Nam

    2017-10-01

    A mobile three-dimensional image acquisition and reconstruction system using a computer-generated integral imaging technique is proposed. A depth camera connected to the mobile device acquires the color and depth data of a real object simultaneously, and an elemental image array is generated based on the original three-dimensional information for the object, with lens array specifications input into the mobile device. The three-dimensional visualization of the real object is reconstructed on the mobile display through optical or digital reconstruction methods. The proposed system is implemented successfully and the experimental results certify that the system is an effective and interesting method of displaying real three-dimensional content on a mobile device.

  4. Image fusion techniques in permanent seed implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Polo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last twenty years major software and hardware developments in brachytherapy treatment planning, intraoperative navigation and dose delivery have been made. Image-guided brachytherapy has emerged as the ultimate conformal radiation therapy, allowing precise dose deposition on small volumes under direct image visualization. In thisprocess imaging plays a central role and novel imaging techniques are being developed (PET, MRI-MRS and power Doppler US imaging are among them, creating a new paradigm (dose-guided brachytherapy, where imaging is used to map the exact coordinates of the tumour cells, and to guide applicator insertion to the correct position. Each of these modalities has limitations providing all of the physical and geometric information required for the brachytherapy workflow.Therefore, image fusion can be used as a solution in order to take full advantage of the information from each modality in treatment planning, intraoperative navigation, dose delivery, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation.Image fusion, understood as the visualization of any morphological volume (i.e. US, CT, MRI together with an additional second morpholo gical volume (i.e. CT, MRI or functional dataset (functional MRI, SPECT, PET, is a well known method for treatment planning, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation. The term image fusion is used when multiple patient image datasets are registered and overlaid or merged to provide additional information. Fused images may be created from multiple images from the same imaging modality taken at different moments (multi-temporalapproach, or by combining information from multiple modalities. Quality means that the fused images should provide additional information to the brachythe rapy process (diagnosis and staging, treatment planning, intraoperative imaging, treatment delivery and follow-up that cannot be obtained in other ways. In this review I will focus on the role of

  5. Task-driven image acquisition and reconstruction in cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, Grace J; Stayman, J Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Ehtiati, Tina

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that incorporates a mathematical definition of the imaging task, a model of the imaging system, and a patient-specific anatomical model to prospectively design image acquisition and reconstruction techniques to optimize task performance. The framework is applied to joint optimization of tube current modulation, view-dependent reconstruction kernel, and orbital tilt in cone-beam CT. The system model considers a cone-beam CT system incorporating a flat-panel detector and 3D filtered backprojection and accurately describes the spatially varying noise and resolution over a wide range of imaging parameters in the presence of a realistic anatomical model. Task-based detectability index (d′) is incorporated as the objective function in a task-driven optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. The orbital tilt was optimized through an exhaustive search across tilt angles ranging ±30°. For each tilt angle, the view-dependent tube current and reconstruction kernel (i.e. the modulation profiles) that maximized detectability were identified via an alternating optimization. The task-driven approach was compared with conventional unmodulated and automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies for a variety of imaging tasks and anthropomorphic phantoms. The task-driven strategy outperformed the unmodulated and AEC cases for all tasks. For example, d′ for a sphere detection task in a head phantom was improved by 30% compared to the unmodulated case by using smoother kernels for noisy views and distributing mAs across less noisy views (at fixed total mAs) in a manner that was beneficial to task performance. Similarly for detection of a line-pair pattern, the task-driven approach increased d′ by 80% compared to no modulation by means of view-dependent mA and kernel selection that yields modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum optimal to the task. Optimization of orbital tilt identified the

  6. Diagnosis of scaphoid fracture: optimal imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geijer M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mats Geijer Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital and Lund University, Lund, Sweden Abstract: This review aims to provide an overview of modern imaging techniques for evaluation of scaphoid fracture, with emphasis on occult fractures and an outlook on the possible evolution of imaging; it also gives an overview of the pathologic and anatomic basis for selection of techniques. Displaced scaphoid fractures detected by wrist radiography, with or without special scaphoid views, pose no diagnostic problems. After wrist trauma with clinically suspected scaphoid fracture and normal scaphoid radiography, most patients will have no clinically important fracture. Between 5% and 19% of patients (on average 16% in meta-analyses will, however, have an occult scaphoid fracture which, untreated, may lead to later, potentially devastating, complications. Follow-up imaging may be done with repeat radiography, tomosynthesis, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, or bone scintigraphy. However, no method is perfect, and choice of imaging may be based on availability, cost, perceived accuracy, or personal preference. Generally, MRI and bone scintigraphy are regarded as the most sensitive modalities, but both are flawed by false positive results at various rates. Keywords: occult fracture, wrist, radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging

  7. Secondary hypertension: Place of imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marichez, M.; Jeunemaitre, X.; Despres, E.; Plouin, P.F.; Melki, J.P.; Taleb, A.

    1987-01-01

    To determine and illustrate the place of various imaging techniques in the diagnosis of arterial hypertension, a retrospective study of 4,530 patients examined during the past 2 years at Broussals and Saint Joseph Hospitals in Paris was undertaken. Between 1975 and 1984, only 20% of our patients underwent surgery, but in the past 2 years, 6% of patients with hypertension underwent either surgery or transluminal angioplasty. At our institution, imaging studies performed were Doppler US, excretory urography, CT, MR imaging, scintigraphy, adrenal venography, and arteriography. The authors encountered over 156 cases of renovascular hypertension, 23 Conn adenomas, 13 pheochromocytomas, four adrenal carcinomas, and 46 parenchymatous renal anomalies. This paper presents the modalities and the pitfalls of each imaging technique. The authors also indicate the strategies used in the diagnostic approach and the results the authors obtained

  8. Steganalysis Techniques for Documents and Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    steganography . We then illustrated the efficacy of our model using variations of LSB steganography . For binary images , we have made significant progress in...efforts have focused on two areas. The first area is LSB steganalysis for grayscale images . Here, as we had proposed (as a challenging task), we have...generalized our previous steganalysis technique of sample pair analysis to a theoretical framework for the detection of the LSB steganography . The new

  9. NOTE: A method for controlling image acquisition in electronic portal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    Certain types of camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) which initiate image acquisition based on sensing a change in video level have been observed to trigger unreliably at the beginning of dynamic multileaf collimation sequences. A simple, novel means of controlling image acquisition with an Elekta linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is proposed which is based on illumination of a photodetector (ORP-12, Silonex Inc., Plattsburgh, NY, USA) by the electron gun of the accelerator. By incorporating a simple trigger circuit it is possible to derive a beam on/off status signal which changes at least 100 ms before any dose is measured by the accelerator. The status signal does not return to the beam-off state until all dose has been delivered and is suitable for accelerator pulse repetition frequencies of 50-400 Hz. The status signal is thus a reliable means of indicating the initiation and termination of radiation exposure, and thus controlling image acquisition of such EPIDs for this application.

  10. Meniscal tears: comparison of half-Fourier technique and conventional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabana, Wael; Maeseneer, Michel de; Machiels, Freddy; Ridder, Filip de; Osteaux, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether half-Fourier MR image acquisition technique can provide similar information to that of conventional MR acquisition technique for evaluation of meniscal tears. Materials and methods: We studied 101 menisci in 52 patients who were referred for evaluation of meniscal tears. Sagittal MR images of the knee were obtained for all patients by using proton density and T2-weighted SE sequences on a 1-T clinical system. The half-Fourier technique and conventional technique were used for all patients. All other imaging parameters were identical for both sequences (TR/TE=2400/20,70; 3 mm slice thickness; 200x256 matrix; field of view, 200; one signal acquired). Both sets of images were filmed with standard window and level settings. Images were randomised and interpreted independently by two radiologists for the presence of meniscal tears. Images were also subjectively assessed for image quality using a five-point grading scale. Results: On half-Fourier images, Reader 1 interpreted 23 menisci as torn, compared to 28 for Reader 2. On conventional images, Reader 1 interpreted 24 menisci as torn, compared to 26 for Reader 2. Agreement between interpretation of the conventional and that of the half-Fourier images was 99% for Reader 1, and 98% for Reader 2. Agreement between readers for the half-Fourier images was 95%, and for the conventional images 96%. No statistically significant difference was found in the subjective evaluation of image quality between the conventional and half-Fourier images. Conclusion: The half-Fourier acquisition technique compares favourably with the conventional technique for the evaluation of meniscal tears

  11. Novel imaging techniques for the nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint, A.

    1998-01-01

    Many of the developments of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) have been paralleled during the development of the scanning nuclear microprobe. Secondary electrons were used in the early development of both devices to provide specimen imaging due to the large numbers of secondaries produced per incident charged particle. Other imaging contrast techniques have also been developed on both machines. These include X-ray analysis, scattering contrast, transmission microscopy, channelling induced charge and others. The 'cross-section dependent' imaging techniques such as PIXE, RBS, NRA, etc., rely on the beam current on target for a given resolution. This has prompted research and development of brighter ion sources to maintain probe resolution at high beam current. Higher beam current bring problems with beam damage to the specimen. Low beam current techniques however rely on high countrate data collection systems, but this is only for spectroscopy. To produce an image we can increase beam currents to produce live-time images for specimen manipulation and observation. The work presented here will focus on some developments in live-time imaging with a nuclear micro probe that have taken place recently at the School of Physics, Microanalytical Research Centre (MARC), University of Melbourne

  12. Cellular imaging electron tomography and related techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book highlights important techniques for cellular imaging and covers the basics and applications of electron tomography and related techniques. In addition, it considers practical aspects and broadens the technological focus by incorporating techniques that are only now becoming accessible (e.g. block face imaging).  The first part of the book describes the electron microscopy 3D technique available to scientists around the world, allowing them to characterize organelles, cells and tissues. The major emphasis is on new technologies like scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography, though the book also reviews some of the more proven technologies like electron tomography. In turn, the second part is dedicated to the reconstruction of data sets, signal improvement and interpretation.

  13. SNR-optimized phase-sensitive dual-acquisition turbo spin echo imaging: a fast alternative to FLAIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunyeol; Park, Jaeseok

    2013-07-01

    Phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo imaging was recently introduced, producing high-resolution isotropic cerebrospinal fluid attenuated brain images without long inversion recovery preparation. Despite the advantages, the weighted-averaging-based technique suffers from noise amplification resulting from different levels of cerebrospinal fluid signal modulations over the two acquisitions. The purpose of this work is to develop a signal-to-noise ratio-optimized version of the phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo. Variable refocusing flip angles in the first acquisition are calculated using a three-step prescribed signal evolution while those in the second acquisition are calculated using a two-step pseudo-steady state signal transition with a high flip-angle pseudo-steady state at a later portion of the echo train, balancing the levels of cerebrospinal fluid signals in both the acquisitions. Low spatial frequency signals are sampled during the high flip-angle pseudo-steady state to further suppress noise. Numerical simulations of the Bloch equations were performed to evaluate signal evolutions of brain tissues along the echo train and optimize imaging parameters. In vivo studies demonstrate that compared with conventional phase-sensitive dual-acquisition single-slab three-dimensional turbo spin echo, the proposed optimization yields 74% increase in apparent signal-to-noise ratio for gray matter and 32% decrease in imaging time. The proposed method can be a potential alternative to conventional fluid-attenuated imaging. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Biometric iris image acquisition system with wavefront coding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sheng-Hsun; Yang, Hsi-Wen; Huang, Shao-Hung; Li, Yung-Hui; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Biometric signatures for identity recognition have been practiced for centuries. Basically, the personal attributes used for a biometric identification system can be classified into two areas: one is based on physiological attributes, such as DNA, facial features, retinal vasculature, fingerprint, hand geometry, iris texture and so on; the other scenario is dependent on the individual behavioral attributes, such as signature, keystroke, voice and gait style. Among these features, iris recognition is one of the most attractive approaches due to its nature of randomness, texture stability over a life time, high entropy density and non-invasive acquisition. While the performance of iris recognition on high quality image is well investigated, not too many studies addressed that how iris recognition performs subject to non-ideal image data, especially when the data is acquired in challenging conditions, such as long working distance, dynamical movement of subjects, uncontrolled illumination conditions and so on. There are three main contributions in this paper. Firstly, the optical system parameters, such as magnification and field of view, was optimally designed through the first-order optics. Secondly, the irradiance constraints was derived by optical conservation theorem. Through the relationship between the subject and the detector, we could estimate the limitation of working distance when the camera lens and CCD sensor were known. The working distance is set to 3m in our system with pupil diameter 86mm and CCD irradiance 0.3mW/cm2. Finally, We employed a hybrid scheme combining eye tracking with pan and tilt system, wavefront coding technology, filter optimization and post signal recognition to implement a robust iris recognition system in dynamic operation. The blurred image was restored to ensure recognition accuracy over 3m working distance with 400mm focal length and aperture F/6.3 optics. The simulation result as well as experiment validates the proposed code

  15. Performance evaluation of breast image compression techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastassopoulos, G; Lymberopoulos, D [Wire Communications Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Patras, Greece (Greece); Panayiotakis, G; Bezerianos, A [Medical Physics Department, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Greece (Greece)

    1994-12-31

    Novel diagnosis orienting tele working systems manipulate, store, and process medical data through real time communication - conferencing schemes. One of the most important factors affecting the performance of these systems is image handling. Compression algorithms can be applied to the medical images, in order to minimize : a) the volume of data to be stored in the database, b) the demanded bandwidth from the network, c) the transmission costs, and to minimize the speed of the transmitted data. In this paper an estimation of all the factors of the process that affect the presentation of breast images is made, from the time the images are produced from a modality, till the compressed images are stored, or transmitted in a Broadband network (e.g. B-ISDN). The images used were scanned images of the TOR(MAX) Leeds breast phantom, as well as typical breast images. A comparison of seven compression techniques has been done, based on objective criteria such as Mean Square Error (MSE), resolution, contrast, etc. The user can choose the appropriate compression ratio in order to achieve the desired image quality. (authors). 12 refs, 4 figs.

  16. Performance evaluation of breast image compression techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassopoulos, G.; Lymberopoulos, D.; Panayiotakis, G.; Bezerianos, A.

    1994-01-01

    Novel diagnosis orienting tele working systems manipulate, store, and process medical data through real time communication - conferencing schemes. One of the most important factors affecting the performance of these systems is image handling. Compression algorithms can be applied to the medical images, in order to minimize : a) the volume of data to be stored in the database, b) the demanded bandwidth from the network, c) the transmission costs, and to minimize the speed of the transmitted data. In this paper an estimation of all the factors of the process that affect the presentation of breast images is made, from the time the images are produced from a modality, till the compressed images are stored, or transmitted in a Broadband network (e.g. B-ISDN). The images used were scanned images of the TOR(MAX) Leeds breast phantom, as well as typical breast images. A comparison of seven compression techniques has been done, based on objective criteria such as Mean Square Error (MSE), resolution, contrast, etc. The user can choose the appropriate compression ratio in order to achieve the desired image quality. (authors)

  17. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  18. Range-Image Acquisition for Discriminated Objects in a Range-gated Robot Vision System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin; Park, Nak-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    demonstrated 3D imaging based on range-gated imaging. Robot vision is a key technology to remotely monitor structural safety in radiation area of nuclear industry. Especially, visualization technique in low-visibility areas, such as smoking and fog areas, is essential to monitor structural safety in emergency smoking areas. In this paper, a range acquisition technique to discriminate objects is developed. The developed technique to acquire object range images is adapted to a range-gated vision system. Visualization experiments are carried out to detect objects in low-visibility fog environment. The experimental result of this newly approach vision system is described in this paper.

  19. Range-Image Acquisition for Discriminated Objects in a Range-gated Robot Vision System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin; Park, Nak-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    demonstrated 3D imaging based on range-gated imaging. Robot vision is a key technology to remotely monitor structural safety in radiation area of nuclear industry. Especially, visualization technique in low-visibility areas, such as smoking and fog areas, is essential to monitor structural safety in emergency smoking areas. In this paper, a range acquisition technique to discriminate objects is developed. The developed technique to acquire object range images is adapted to a range-gated vision system. Visualization experiments are carried out to detect objects in low-visibility fog environment. The experimental result of this newly approach vision system is described in this paper

  20. An overview of data acquisition, signal coding and data analysis techniques for MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is given of the data acquisition, signal processing, and data analysis techniques that are currently in use with high power MST/ST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere/stratosphere troposphere) radars. This review supplements the works of Rastogi (1983) and Farley (1984) presented at previous MAP workshops. A general description is given of data acquisition and signal processing operations and they are characterized on the basis of their disparate time scales. Then signal coding, a brief description of frequently used codes, and their limitations are discussed, and finally, several aspects of statistical data processing such as signal statistics, power spectrum and autocovariance analysis, outlier removal techniques are discussed.

  1. Improvement of Sidestream Dark Field Imaging with an Image Acquisition Stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestra, Gianmarco M; Bezemer, Rick; Boerma, E Christiaan; Yong, Ze-Yie; Sjauw, Krishan D; Engstrom, Annemarie E; Koopmans, Matty; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we developed, evaluated in volunteers, and clinically validated an image acquisition stabilizer (IAS) for Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging. The IAS is a stainless steel sterilizable ring which fits around the SDF probe tip. The IAS creates adhesion to the imaged tissue by application of negative pressure. The effects of the IAS on the sublingual microcirculatory flow velocities, the force required to induce pressure artifacts (PA), the time to acquire a stable image, and the duration of stable imaging were assessed in healthy volunteers. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of the SDF setup in combination with the IAS, simultaneous bilateral sublingual imaging of the microcirculation were performed during a lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. One SDF device was operated handheld; the second was fitted with the IAS and held in position by a mechanic arm. Lateral drift, number of losses of image stability and duration of stable imaging of the two methods were compared. Five healthy volunteers were studied. The IAS did not affect microcirculatory flow velocities. A significantly greater force had to applied onto the tissue to induced PA with compared to without IAS (0.25 ± 0.15 N without vs. 0.62 ± 0.05 N with the IAS, p < 0.001). The IAS ensured an increased duration of a stable image sequence (8 ± 2 s without vs. 42 ± 8 s with the IAS, p < 0.001). The time required to obtain a stable image sequence was similar with and without the IAS. In eight mechanically ventilated patients undergoing a LRM the use of the IAS resulted in a significantly reduced image drifting and enabled the acquisition of significantly longer stable image sequences (24 ± 5 s without vs. 67 ± 14 s with the IAS, p = 0.006). The present study has validated the use of an IAS for improvement of SDF imaging by demonstrating that the IAS did not affect microcirculatory perfusion in the microscopic field of view. The IAS

  2. An asynchronous, pipelined, electronic acquisition system for Active Matrix Flat-Panel Imagers (AMFPIs)

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, W; Berry, J; Maolinbay, M; Martelli, C; Mody, P; Nassif, S; Yeakey, M

    1999-01-01

    The development of a full-custom electronic acquisition system designed for readout of large-area active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays is reported. The arrays, which comprise two-dimensional matrices of pixels utilizing amorphous silicon thin-film transistors, are themselves under development for a wide variety of X-ray imaging applications. The acquisition system was specifically designed to facilitate detailed, quantitative investigations of the properties of these novel imaging arrays and contains significant enhancements compared to a previously developed acquisition system. These enhancements include pipelined preamplifier circuits to allow faster readout speed, expanded addressing capabilities allowing a maximum of 4096 array data lines, and on-board summing of image frames. The values of many acquisition system parameters, including timings and voltages, may be specified and downloaded from a host computer. Once acquisition is enabled, the system operates asynchronously of its host computer. The sys...

  3. Improvement of sidestream dark field imaging with an image acquisition stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, Gianmarco M; Bezemer, Rick; Boerma, E Christiaan; Yong, Ze-Yie; Sjauw, Krishan D; Engstrom, Annemarie E; Koopmans, Matty; Ince, Can

    2010-07-13

    In the present study we developed, evaluated in volunteers, and clinically validated an image acquisition stabilizer (IAS) for Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging. The IAS is a stainless steel sterilizable ring which fits around the SDF probe tip. The IAS creates adhesion to the imaged tissue by application of negative pressure. The effects of the IAS on the sublingual microcirculatory flow velocities, the force required to induce pressure artifacts (PA), the time to acquire a stable image, and the duration of stable imaging were assessed in healthy volunteers. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of the SDF setup in combination with the IAS, simultaneous bilateral sublingual imaging of the microcirculation were performed during a lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. One SDF device was operated handheld; the second was fitted with the IAS and held in position by a mechanic arm. Lateral drift, number of losses of image stability and duration of stable imaging of the two methods were compared. Five healthy volunteers were studied. The IAS did not affect microcirculatory flow velocities. A significantly greater force had to applied onto the tissue to induced PA with compared to without IAS (0.25 +/- 0.15 N without vs. 0.62 +/- 0.05 N with the IAS, p IAS ensured an increased duration of a stable image sequence (8 +/- 2 s without vs. 42 +/- 8 s with the IAS, p IAS. In eight mechanically ventilated patients undergoing a LRM the use of the IAS resulted in a significantly reduced image drifting and enabled the acquisition of significantly longer stable image sequences (24 +/- 5 s without vs. 67 +/- 14 s with the IAS, p = 0.006). The present study has validated the use of an IAS for improvement of SDF imaging by demonstrating that the IAS did not affect microcirculatory perfusion in the microscopic field of view. The IAS improved both axial and lateral SDF image stability and thereby increased the critical force required

  4. Comparative study of image restoration techniques in forensic image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijhold, Jurrien; Kuijper, Arjan; Westhuis, Jaap-Harm

    1997-02-01

    In this work we investigated the forensic applicability of some state-of-the-art image restoration techniques for digitized video-images and photographs: classical Wiener filtering, constrained maximum entropy, and some variants of constrained minimum total variation. Basic concepts and experimental results are discussed. Because all methods appeared to produce different results, a discussion is given of which method is the most suitable, depending on the image objects that are questioned, prior knowledge and type of blur and noise. Constrained minimum total variation methods produced the best results for test images with simulated noise and blur. In cases where images are the most substantial part of the evidence, constrained maximum entropy might be more suitable, because its theoretical basis predicts a restoration result that shows the most likely pixel values, given all the prior knowledge used during restoration.

  5. Acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region for biomedical prototyping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meurer, Maria Ines; Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes da; Santa Barbara, Ailton; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Oliveira, Marilia Gerhardt de; Silva, Daniela Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical prototyping has resulted from a merger of rapid prototyping and imaging diagnosis technologies. However, this process is complex, considering the necessity of interaction between biomedical sciences and engineering. Good results are highly dependent on the acquisition of computed tomography images and their subsequent manipulation by means of specific software. The present study describes the experience of a multidisciplinary group of researchers in the acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region aiming at biomedical prototyping for surgical purposes. (author)

  6. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......) and sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that all methods used suggested that the KCl tablets were smoother than the NaCl tablets and higher compression pressure made the tablets smoother. Imaging methods like optical microscopy and SEM can give useful information about the roughness of the sample surface...

  7. Applications Of Binary Image Analysis Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropf, H.; Enderle, E.; Kammerer, H. P.

    1983-10-01

    After discussing the conditions where binary image analysis techniques can be used, three new applications of the fast binary image analysis system S.A.M. (Sensorsystem for Automation and Measurement) are reported: (1) The human view direction is measured at TV frame rate while the subject's head is free movable. (2) Industrial parts hanging on a moving conveyor are classified prior to spray painting by robot. (3) In automotive wheel assembly, the eccentricity of the wheel is minimized by turning the tyre relative to the rim in order to balance the eccentricity of the components.

  8. Region-based multifocus image fusion for the precise acquisition of Pap smear images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Mijares, Santiago; Bescós, Jesús

    2018-05-01

    A multifocus image fusion method to obtain a single focused image from a sequence of microscopic high-magnification Papanicolau source (Pap smear) images is presented. These images, captured each in a different position of the microscope lens, frequently show partially focused cells or parts of cells, which makes them unpractical for the direct application of image analysis techniques. The proposed method obtains a focused image with a high preservation of original pixels information while achieving a negligible visibility of the fusion artifacts. The method starts by identifying the best-focused image of the sequence; then, it performs a mean-shift segmentation over this image; the focus level of the segmented regions is evaluated in all the images of the sequence, and best-focused regions are merged in a single combined image; finally, this image is processed with an adaptive artifact removal process. The combination of a region-oriented approach, instead of block-based approaches, and a minimum modification of the value of focused pixels in the original images achieve a highly contrasted image with no visible artifacts, which makes this method especially convenient for the medical imaging domain. The proposed method is compared with several state-of-the-art alternatives over a representative dataset. The experimental results show that our proposal obtains the best and more stable quality indicators. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  9. Spacing Techniques in Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition: Short-Term Gains vs. Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the results of two experiments using the spacing technique (Leitner, 1972; Landauer & Bjork, 1978) in second language vocabulary acquisition. In the past, studies in this area have produced mixed results attempting to differentiate between massed, uniform and expanded intervals of spacing (Balota, Duchek, & Logan,…

  10. Basic evaluation of the new pulse sequence for simultaneous acquisition of T1- and T2-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurose, Atsunari; Takahashi, Tohru; Ohishi, Tae; Ishikawa, Akihiro

    2006-01-01

    A novel pulse sequence that enables simultaneous acquisition of T1-weighted (T1W) and T2-weighted (T2W) images is presented. In this new technique, the inversion recovery (IR) pulse of conventional fast inversion recovery (Fast IR) is replaced with a pulse train that consists of a fast spin echo (FSE) and 180(y)+90(x) for driven inversion (DI). By using a shorter T1 and independent k-space ordering, the first part of the sequence provides T2W images and the second part provides T1W images, thereby enabling simultaneous acquisition in a single scan time comparable to that of Fast IR. Signal simulation also was conducted, and this was compared with conventional scanning techniques using normal volunteers. In the human studies, both T1W and T2W images showed the same image quality as conventional images, suggesting the potential for this technique to replace the combination of Fast IR and T2W FSE for scan-time reduction. (author)

  11. Improvement of Sidestream Dark Field Imaging with an Image Acquisition Stabilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjauw Krishan D

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study we developed, evaluated in volunteers, and clinically validated an image acquisition stabilizer (IAS for Sidestream Dark Field (SDF imaging. Methods The IAS is a stainless steel sterilizable ring which fits around the SDF probe tip. The IAS creates adhesion to the imaged tissue by application of negative pressure. The effects of the IAS on the sublingual microcirculatory flow velocities, the force required to induce pressure artifacts (PA, the time to acquire a stable image, and the duration of stable imaging were assessed in healthy volunteers. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of the SDF setup in combination with the IAS, simultaneous bilateral sublingual imaging of the microcirculation were performed during a lung recruitment maneuver (LRM in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. One SDF device was operated handheld; the second was fitted with the IAS and held in position by a mechanic arm. Lateral drift, number of losses of image stability and duration of stable imaging of the two methods were compared. Results Five healthy volunteers were studied. The IAS did not affect microcirculatory flow velocities. A significantly greater force had to applied onto the tissue to induced PA with compared to without IAS (0.25 ± 0.15 N without vs. 0.62 ± 0.05 N with the IAS, p Conclusions The present study has validated the use of an IAS for improvement of SDF imaging by demonstrating that the IAS did not affect microcirculatory perfusion in the microscopic field of view. The IAS improved both axial and lateral SDF image stability and thereby increased the critical force required to induce pressure artifacts. The IAS ensured a significantly increased duration of maintaining a stable image sequence.

  12. Authenticity techniques for PACS images and records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.; Abundo, Marco; Huang, H. K.

    1995-05-01

    Along with the digital radiology environment supported by picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) comes a new problem: How to establish trust in multimedia medical data that exist only in the easily altered memory of a computer. Trust is characterized in terms of integrity and privacy of digital data. Two major self-enforcing techniques can be used to assure the authenticity of electronic images and text -- key-based cryptography and digital time stamping. Key-based cryptography associates the content of an image with the originator using one or two distinct keys and prevents alteration of the document by anyone other than the originator. A digital time stamping algorithm generates a characteristic `digital fingerprint' for the original document using a mathematical hash function, and checks that it has not been modified. This paper discusses these cryptographic algorithms and their appropriateness for a PACS environment. It also presents experimental results of cryptographic algorithms on several imaging modalities.

  13. Advanced imaging techniques in pediatric body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtier, Jesse [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology, Charleston, SC (United States); Anupindi, Sudha A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    While there are many challenges specific to pediatric abdomino-pelvic MRI, many recent advances are addressing these challenges. It is therefore essential for radiologists to be familiar with the latest advances in MR imaging. Laudable efforts have also recently been implemented in many centers to improve the overall experience of pediatric patients, including the use of dedicated radiology child life specialists, MRI video goggles, and improved MR suite environments. These efforts have allowed a larger number of children to be scanned while awake, with fewer studies being done under sedation or anesthesia; this has resulted in additional challenges from patient motion and difficulties with breath-holding and tolerating longer scan times. In this review, we highlight common challenges faced in imaging the pediatric abdomen and pelvis and discuss the application of the newest techniques to address these challenges. Additionally, we highlight the newest advances in quantified imaging techniques, specifically in MR liver iron quantification. The techniques described in this review are all commercially available and can be readily implemented. (orig.)

  14. A line array based near field imaging technique for characterising acoustical properties of elongated targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, F.P.G.

    1995-01-01

    With near field imaging techniques the acoustical pressure waves at distances other than the recorded can be calculated. Normally, acquisition on a two dimensional plane is necessary and extrapolation is performed by a Rayleigh integral. A near field single line instead of two dimensional plane

  15. An acquisition system for CMOS imagers with a genuine 10 Gbit/s bandwidth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guérin, C.; Mahroug, J.; Tromeur, W.; Houles, J.; Calabria, P.; Barbier, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a high data throughput acquisition system for pixel detector readout such as CMOS imagers. This CMOS acquisition board offers a genuine 10 Gbit/s bandwidth to the workstation and can provide an on-line and continuous high frame rate imaging capability. On-line processing can be implemented either on the Data Acquisition Board or on the multi-cores workstation depending on the complexity of the algorithms. The different parts composing the acquisition board have been designed to be used first with a single-photon detector called LUSIPHER (800×800 pixels), developed in our laboratory for scientific applications ranging from nano-photonics to adaptive optics. The architecture of the acquisition board is presented and the performances achieved by the produced boards are described. The future developments (hardware and software) concerning the on-line implementation of algorithms dedicated to single-photon imaging are tackled.

  16. Percutaneous vertebroplasty with the rotational fluoroscopy imaging technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannavale, Alessandro; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Wlderk, Andrea; Cirelli, Carlo; D' Adamo, Alessandro; Fanelli, Fabrizio [University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Unit, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of the rotational angiography unit (RAU) as a single technique to guide percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP). Twenty-five consecutive patients (35 vertebral bodies, 20 lumbar and 15 thoracic) were treated using RA fluoroscopy. Using a state-of-the-art flat-panel angiographer (Artis zee, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), rotational acquisitions were obtained in all patients for immediate post-procedure 2D/3D reconstructions. Pre- and postoperative back pain was assessed with the visual analog scale (VAS). Fluoroscopy time, patient radiation dose exposure, technical success, mean procedure time, mean number of rotational acquisitions and procedural complications were recorded. All features were compared with a historical cohort of patients (N = 25) who underwent PVP under CT and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy guidance. In all cases, safe and accurate control of the needle insertion and bone-cement injection was successfully obtained with high-quality fluoroscopy images. One cement leakage was detected in the RAU group, and two leakages were detected in the CT and C-arm fluoroscopy group. Technical features were significantly different between the two groups (RAU vs. CT): mean procedure time: 38.2 min vs. 60.2 min (p = 0.02); median fluoroscopy time: 14.58 and 4.58 min (p = 0.02); median number of rotational acquisitions: 5 vs. 10 (p = 0.02); mean patient dose: 6 ± 1.3 mSv vs. 23 ± 1.3 mSv (p = 0.02). There were minor complications (pain, small hematoma) in two patients (8%) in the study group and three cases (12%) in the control group. RAU guidance is an effective and safe technique for performing PVP because it reduces the procedural time and radiation exposure. (orig.)

  17. Upright CBCT: A novel imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenia J Fave

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a method for acquiring and correcting upright images using the on board CBCT imager. An upright imaging technique would allow for the introduction of upright radiation therapy treatments, which would benefit a variety of patients including those with thoracic cancers whose lung volumes are increased in an upright position and those who experience substantial discomfort during supine treatment positions.Methods: To acquire upright CBCT images, the linac head was positioned at 0 degrees, the KV imager and detector arms extended to their lateral positions, and the couch placed at 270 degrees. The KV imager was programmed to begin taking continuous fluoroscopic projections as the couch rotated from 270 to 90 degrees. The FOV was extended by performing this procedure twice, once with the detector shifted 14.5 cm towards the gantry and once with it shifted 14.5 cm away from the gantry. The two resulting sets of images were stitched together prior to reconstruction. The imaging parameters were chosen to deliver the some dose as that delivered during a simulation CT. A simulation CT was deformably registered to an upright CBCT reconstruction in order to evaluate the possibility of correcting the HU values via mapping.Results: Both spatial linearity and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright CBCT when compared to a simulation CT. Low contrast resolution and HU linearity decreased. Streaking artifacts were caused by the limited 180 degree arc angle and a sharp point artifact in the center of the axial slices resulted at the site of the stitching. A method for correcting the HUs was shown to be robust against these artifacts.Conclusion: Upright CBCT could be of great benefit to many patients. This study demonstrates its feasibility and presents solutions to some of its first hurdles before clinical implementation.--------------------------Cite this article as:Fave X, Yang J, Balter P, Court L. Upright CBCT: A novel imaging

  18. Noun Imageability Facilitates the Acquisition of Plurals: Survival Analysis of Plural Emergence in Children

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolík, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 4 (2014), s. 335-350 ISSN 0090-6905 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP407/10/2047 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : Language acquisition * Imageability * Morphology * Acquisition of inflections * Semantic generality Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.633, year: 2014

  19. Flame analysis using image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her Jie, Albert Chang; Zamli, Ahmad Faizal Ahmad; Zulazlan Shah Zulkifli, Ahmad; Yee, Joanne Lim Mun; Lim, Mooktzeng

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents image processing techniques with the use of fuzzy logic and neural network approach to perform flame analysis. Flame diagnostic is important in the industry to extract relevant information from flame images. Experiment test is carried out in a model industrial burner with different flow rates. Flame features such as luminous and spectral parameters are extracted using image processing and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). Flame images are acquired using FLIR infrared camera. Non-linearities such as thermal acoustic oscillations and background noise affect the stability of flame. Flame velocity is one of the important characteristics that determines stability of flame. In this paper, an image processing method is proposed to determine flame velocity. Power spectral density (PSD) graph is a good tool for vibration analysis where flame stability can be approximated. However, a more intelligent diagnostic system is needed to automatically determine flame stability. In this paper, flame features of different flow rates are compared and analyzed. The selected flame features are used as inputs to the proposed fuzzy inference system to determine flame stability. Neural network is used to test the performance of the fuzzy inference system.

  20. Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging with Polarity Switching for Concurrent Acquisition of Positive and Negative Ion Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Andrew R.; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-06-01

    We have recently developed a multiplex mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) method which incorporates high mass resolution imaging and MS/MS and MS3 imaging of several compounds in a single data acquisition utilizing a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (Perdian and Lee, Anal. Chem. 82, 9393-9400, 2010). Here we extend this capability to obtain positive and negative ion MS and MS/MS spectra in a single MS imaging experiment through polarity switching within spiral steps of each raster step. This methodology was demonstrated for the analysis of various lipid class compounds in a section of mouse brain. This allows for simultaneous imaging of compounds that are readily ionized in positive mode (e.g., phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins) and those that are readily ionized in negative mode (e.g., sulfatides, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylserines). MS/MS imaging was also performed for a few compounds in both positive and negative ion mode within the same experimental set-up. Insufficient stabilization time for the Orbitrap high voltage leads to slight deviations in observed masses, but these deviations are systematic and were easily corrected with a two-point calibration to background ions.

  1. Seismic imaging of glaciomarine sediments of Antarctica: Optimizing the acquisition parameters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pandey, D.; Chaubey, A.K.; Rajan, S.

    This paper presents some of the significant points on the designing and acquisition parameters for multi-channel seismic reflection survey in the Antarctic waters with an emphasis of imaging Glaciomarine sediments. Due to their importance...

  2. Research on remote sensing image pixel attribute data acquisition method in AutoCAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Guangtong; Liu, Jun; Liu, Hui

    2013-07-01

    The remote sensing image has been widely used in AutoCAD, but AutoCAD lack of the function of remote sensing image processing. In the paper, ObjectARX was used for the secondary development tool, combined with the Image Engine SDK to realize remote sensing image pixel attribute data acquisition in AutoCAD, which provides critical technical support for AutoCAD environment remote sensing image processing algorithms.

  3. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests

  4. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe E-mail: philippe.duvauchelle@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-09-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests.

  5. Special feature on imaging systems and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George

    2013-07-01

    The IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST'2012) was held in Manchester, UK, on 16-17 July 2012. The participants came from 26 countries or regions: Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, UAE, UK and USA. The technical program of the conference consisted of a series of scientific and technical sessions, exploring physical principles, engineering and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, as reflected by the diversity of the submitted papers. Following a rigorous review process, a total of 123 papers were accepted, and they were organized into 30 oral presentation sessions and a poster session. In addition, six invited keynotes were arranged. The conference not only provided the participants with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and disseminate research outcomes but also paved a way to establish global collaboration. Following the IST'2012, a total of 55 papers, which were technically extended substantially from their versions in the conference proceeding, were submitted as regular papers to this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology . Following a rigorous reviewing process, 25 papers have been finally accepted for publication in this special feature and they are organized into three categories: (1) industrial tomography, (2) imaging systems and techniques and (3) image processing. These papers not only present the latest developments in the field of imaging systems and techniques but also offer potential solutions to existing problems. We hope that this special feature provides a good reference for researchers who are active in the field and will serve as a catalyst to trigger further research. It has been our great pleasure to be the guest editors of this special feature. We would like to thank the authors for their contributions, without which it would

  6. Acquisition and Processing Protocols for Uav Images: 3d Modeling of Historical Buildings Using Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtiyoso, A.; Koehl, M.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Freville, T.

    2017-08-01

    Photogrammetry has seen an increase in the use of UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) for both large and smaller scale cartography. The use of UAVs is also advantageous because it may be used for tasks requiring quick response, including in the case of the inspection and monitoring of buildings. The objective of the project is to study the acquisition and processing protocols which exist in the literature and to adapt them for UAV projects. This implies a study on the calibration of the sensors, flight planning, comparison of software solutions, data management, and analysis on the different products of a UAV project. Two historical buildings of the city of Strasbourg were used as case studies: a part of the Rohan Palace façade and the St-Pierre-le-Jeune Catholic church. In addition, a preliminary test was performed on the Josephine Pavilion. Two UAVs were used in this research; namely the Sensefly Albris and the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. The experiments have shown that the calibration parameters tend to be unstable for small sensors. Furthermore, the dense matching of images remains a particular problem to address in a close range photogrammetry project, more so in the presence of noise on the images. Data management in cases where the number of images is high is also very important. The UAV is nevertheless a suitable solution for the surveying and recording of historical buildings because it is able to take images from points of view which are normally inaccessible to classical terrestrial techniques.

  7. A digital receiver module with direct data acquisition for magnetic resonance imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weinan; Sun, Hongyu; Wang, Weimin

    2012-10-01

    A digital receiver module for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with detailed hardware implementations is presented. The module is based on a direct sampling scheme using the latest mixed-signal circuit design techniques. A single field-programmable gate array chip is employed to perform software-based digital down conversion for radio frequency signals. The modular architecture of the receiver allows multiple acquisition channels to be implemented on a highly integrated printed circuit board. To maintain the phase coherence of the receiver and the exciter in the context of direct sampling, an effective phase synchronization method was proposed to achieve a phase deviation as small as 0.09°. The performance of the described receiver module was verified in the experiments for both low- and high-field (0.5 T and 1.5 T) MRI scanners and was compared to a modern commercial MRI receiver system.

  8. Experimental single-chip color HDTV image acquisition system with 8M-pixel CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Funatsu, Ryohei; Mitani, Kohji; Nojiri, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    We have developed an experimental single-chip color HDTV image acquisition system using 8M-pixel CMOS image sensor. The sensor has 3840 × 2160 effective pixels and is progressively scanned at 60 frames per second. We describe the color filter array and interpolation method to improve image quality with a high-pixel-count single-chip sensor. We also describe an experimental image acquisition system we used to measured spatial frequency characteristics in the horizontal direction. The results indicate good prospects for achieving a high quality single chip HDTV camera that reduces pseudo signals and maintains high spatial frequency characteristics within the frequency band for HDTV.

  9. Iris recognition and what is next? Iris diagnosis: a new challenging topic for machine vision from image acquisition to image interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Molecular image-based techniques are widely used in medicine to detect specific diseases. Look diagnosis is an important issue but also the analysis of the eye plays an important role in order to detect specific diseases. These topics are important topics in medicine and the standardization of these topics by an automatic system can be a new challenging field for machine vision. Compared to iris recognition has the iris diagnosis much more higher demands for the image acquisition and interpretation of the iris. One understands by iris diagnosis (Iridology) the investigation and analysis of the colored part of the eye, the iris, to discover factors, which play an important role for the prevention and treatment of illnesses, but also for the preservation of an optimum health. An automatic system would pave the way for a much wider use of the iris diagnosis for the diagnosis of illnesses and for the purpose of individual health protection. With this paper, we describe our work towards an automatic iris diagnosis system. We describe the image acquisition and the problems with it. Different ways are explained for image acquisition and image preprocessing. We describe the image analysis method for the detection of the iris. The meta-model for image interpretation is given. Based on this model we show the many tasks for image analysis that range from different image-object feature analysis, spatial image analysis to color image analysis. Our first results for the recognition of the iris are given. We describe how detecting the pupil and not wanted lamp spots. We explain how to recognize orange blue spots in the iris and match them against the topological map of the iris. Finally, we give an outlook for further work.

  10. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging. Development of a 3D radial acquisition technique with optimized k-space sampling density and high SNR-efficiency; Natrium-Magnetresonanztomographie. Entwicklung einer 3D radialen Messtechnik mit optimierter k-Raum-Abtastdichte und hoher SNR-Effizienz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, Armin Michael

    2009-04-01

    A 3D radial k-space acquisition technique with homogenous distribution of the sampling density (DA-3D-RAD) is presented. This technique enables short echo times (TE<0.5 ms), that are necessary for {sup 23}Na-MRI, and provides a high SNR-efficiency. The gradients of the DA-3D-RAD-sequence are designed such that the average sampling density in each spherical shell of k-space is constant. The DA-3D-RAD-sequence provides 34% more SNR than a conventional 3D radial sequence (3D-RAD) if T{sub 2}{sup *}-decay is neglected. This SNR-gain is enhanced if T{sub 2}{sup *}-decay is present, so a 1.5 to 1.8 fold higher SNR is measured in brain tissue with the DA-3D-RAD-sequence. Simulations and experimental measurements show that the DA-3D-RAD sequence yields a better resolution in the presence of T{sub 2}{sup *}-decay and less image artefacts when B{sub 0}-inhomogeneities exist. Using the developed sequence, T{sub 1}-, T{sub 2}{sup *}- and Inversion-Recovery-{sup 23}Na-image contrasts were acquired for several organs and {sup 23}Na-relaxation times were measured (brain tissue: T{sub 1}=29.0{+-}0.3 ms; T{sub 2s}{sup *}{approx}4 ms; T{sub 2l}{sup *}{approx}31 ms; cerebrospinal fluid: T{sub 1}=58.1{+-}0.6 ms; T{sub 2}{sup *}=55{+-}3 ms (B{sub 0}=3 T)). T{sub 1}- und T{sub 2}{sup *}-relaxation times of cerebrospinal fluid are independent of the selected magnetic field strength (B0 = 3T/7 T), whereas the relaxation times of brain tissue increase with field strength. Furthermore, {sup 23}Na-signals of oedemata were suppressed in patients and thus signals from different tissue compartments were selectively measured. (orig.)

  11. Design and development of the associated-particle three-dimensional imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ussery, L.E.; Hollas, C.L.

    1994-10-01

    The authors describe the development of the ''associated-particle'' imaging technique for producing low-resolution three-dimensional images of objects. Based on the t(d,n) 4 He reaction, the method requires access to only one side of the object being imaged and allows for the imaging of individual chemical elements in the material under observation. Studies were performed to (1) select the appropriate components of the system, including detectors, data-acquisition electronics, and neutron source, and (2) optimize experimental methods for collection and presentation of data. This report describes some of the development steps involved and provides a description of the complete final system that was developed

  12. An asynchronous, pipelined, electronic acquisition system for Active Matrix Flat-Panel Imagers (AMFPIs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, W.; Antonuk, L.E. E-mail: antonuk@umich.edu; Berry, J.; Maolinbay, M.; Martelli, C.; Mody, P.; Nassif, S.; Yeakey, M

    1999-07-11

    The development of a full-custom electronic acquisition system designed for readout of large-area active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays is reported. The arrays, which comprise two-dimensional matrices of pixels utilizing amorphous silicon thin-film transistors, are themselves under development for a wide variety of X-ray imaging applications. The acquisition system was specifically designed to facilitate detailed, quantitative investigations of the properties of these novel imaging arrays and contains significant enhancements compared to a previously developed acquisition system. These enhancements include pipelined preamplifier circuits to allow faster readout speed, expanded addressing capabilities allowing a maximum of 4096 array data lines, and on-board summing of image frames. The values of many acquisition system parameters, including timings and voltages, may be specified and downloaded from a host computer. Once acquisition is enabled, the system operates asynchronously of its host computer. The system allows image capture in both radiographic mode (corresponding to the capture of individual X-ray images), and fluoroscopic mode (corresponding to the capture of a continual series of X-ray images). A detailed description of the system architecture and the underlying motivations for the design is reported in this paper. (author)

  13. Computer technique for correction of nonhomogeneous distribution in radiologic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florian, Rogerio V.; Frere, Annie F.; Schiable, Homero; Marques, Paulo M.A.; Marques, Marcio A.

    1996-01-01

    An image processing technique to provide a 'Heel' effect compensation on medical images is presented. It is reported that the technique can improve the structures detection due to background homogeneity and can be used for any radiologic system

  14. Ultrasonic imaging in LMFBRs using digital techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fothergill, J.R.; McKnight, J.A.; Barrett, L.M.

    Ultrasonic technology for providing images of components immersed in the opaque sodium of LMFBRs is being developed at RNL. For many years the application has been restricted by the unavailability of convenient ultrasonic sources and receivers capable of withstanding the reactor environment. Until recently, for example, important ultrasonic instrument design, such as for future sweep arms, had to be based on waveguided ultrasonics. RNL have developed an economic immersible transducer that can be deployed during reactor shut-down, when many demands for ultrasonic imaging are made. The transducer design is not suited at present to the sophisticated techniques of phased arrays; consequently image formation must depend on the physical scanning of a target using one or more transducers in pulse-echo mode. The difficulties of access into a fast reactor impose further restrictions. Some applications may involve easy scanning sequences, thus the sweep arm requires only a rotation to provide a map of the reactor core area. For a more detailed examination of the same area, however, special engineering solutions are needed to provide a more satisfactory scanning sequence. A compromise solution involving the rotating shield movement is being used for a PFR experiment to examine a limited area of the core. (author)

  15. Diffusion weighted imaging demystified. The technique and potential clinical applications for soft tissue imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fayad, Laura M. [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2018-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a fast, non-contrast technique that is readily available and easy to integrate into an existing imaging protocol. DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping offers a quantitative metric for soft tissue evaluation and provides information regarding the cellularity of a region of interest. There are several available methods of performing DWI, and artifacts and pitfalls must be considered when interpreting DWI studies. This review article will review the various techniques of DWI acquisition and utility of qualitative as well as quantitative methods of image interpretation, with emphasis on optimal methods for ADC measurement. The current clinical applications for DWI are primarily related to oncologic evaluation: For the assessment of de novo soft tissue masses, ADC mapping can serve as a useful adjunct technique to routine anatomic sequences for lesion characterization as cyst or solid and, if solid, benign or malignant. For treated soft tissue masses, the role of DWI/ADC mapping in the assessment of treatment response as well as recurrent or residual neoplasm in the setting of operative management is discussed, especially when intravenous contrast medium cannot be given. Emerging DWI applications for non-neoplastic clinical indications are also reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion weighted imaging demystified. The technique and potential clinical applications for soft tissue imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fayad, Laura M.

    2018-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a fast, non-contrast technique that is readily available and easy to integrate into an existing imaging protocol. DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping offers a quantitative metric for soft tissue evaluation and provides information regarding the cellularity of a region of interest. There are several available methods of performing DWI, and artifacts and pitfalls must be considered when interpreting DWI studies. This review article will review the various techniques of DWI acquisition and utility of qualitative as well as quantitative methods of image interpretation, with emphasis on optimal methods for ADC measurement. The current clinical applications for DWI are primarily related to oncologic evaluation: For the assessment of de novo soft tissue masses, ADC mapping can serve as a useful adjunct technique to routine anatomic sequences for lesion characterization as cyst or solid and, if solid, benign or malignant. For treated soft tissue masses, the role of DWI/ADC mapping in the assessment of treatment response as well as recurrent or residual neoplasm in the setting of operative management is discussed, especially when intravenous contrast medium cannot be given. Emerging DWI applications for non-neoplastic clinical indications are also reviewed. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic autofocus for continuous-scanning time-delay-and-integration image acquisition in automated microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Zanoguera, Miguel E; Laris, Casey A; Nguyen, Lam K; Oliva, Mike; Price, Jeffrey H

    2007-01-01

    Efficient image cytometry of a conventional microscope slide means rapid acquisition and analysis of 20 gigapixels of image data (at 0.3-microm sampling). The voluminous data motivate increased acquisition speed to enable many biomedical applications. Continuous-motion time-delay-and-integrate (TDI) scanning has the potential to speed image acquisition while retaining sensitivity, but the challenge of implementing high-resolution autofocus operating simultaneously with acquisition has limited its adoption. We develop a dynamic autofocus system for this need using: 1. a "volume camera," consisting of nine fiber optic imaging conduits to charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, that acquires images in parallel from different focal planes, 2. an array of mixed analog-digital processing circuits that measure the high spatial frequencies of the multiple image streams to create focus indices, and 3. a software system that reads and analyzes the focus data streams and calculates best focus for closed feedback loop control. Our system updates autofocus at 56 Hz (or once every 21 microm of stage travel) to collect sharply focused images sampled at 0.3x0.3 microm(2)/pixel at a stage speed of 2.3 mms. The system, tested by focusing in phase contrast and imaging long fluorescence strips, achieves high-performance closed-loop image-content-based autofocus in continuous scanning for the first time.

  18. Froth Image Acquisition and Enhancement on Optical Correction and Retinex Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixing Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To well monitor and optimize the flotation production, a computer vision and image analysis system is used. In such a system, the first important step is to acquire the froth surface images in high quality. Froth imaging quality is hard to control, and the industrial field noise, froth 3D properties, complex textures, and mixed colors can also cause the flotation image to be difficult to segment and process. To acquire high quality images, a new system for image acquisition of the lead flotation is studied. The system constructs the free-form surface lens based on the non-imaging optics theory, which can improve the optical efficiency of the lens and the uniformity of light sources, and can reduce flare effects. For the compensation, an improved MSR (Multi-Scale Retinex adaptive image algorithm is proposed to increase the brightness and intensity contrast for small bubbles, and to enhance texture details and froth weak edges by analyzing the Retinex output characteristics of the shaded area and improving the gain function. Under the condition of the optimal parameters, the image acquisition system can obtain uniform illumination and reduce different noises. Experiments show that the new froth image acquisition system increases Signal/Noise by 14%, contrast by 21%, and image segmentation accuracy by 26% in an image.

  19. Automated Image Acquisition System for the Verification of Copper-Brass Seal Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringa, E.; Bergonzi, C.; Littmann, F.; ); Marszalek, Y.; Tempesta, S.; )

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a system for the verification of copper-brass seals realized by JRC according to DG ENER requirements. DG ENER processes about 20,000 metal seals per year. The verification of metal seals consists in visually checking the identity of a removed seal. The identity of a copper-brass seal is defined by a random stain pattern realized by the seal producer together with random scratches engraved when the seals are initialized ('seal production'). In order to verify that the seal returned from the field is the expected one its pattern is compared with an image taken during seal production. Formerly, seal initialization and verification were very heavy tasks as seal pictures were acquired with a camera one by one both in the initialization and verification stages. During the initialization the Nuclear Safeguards technicians had to place one by one new seals under a camera and acquire the related reference images. During the verification, the technician had to take used seals and place them one by one under a camera to take new pictures. The new images were presented to the technicians without any preprocessing and the technicians had to recognize the seal. The new station described in this paper has an automated image acquisition system allowing to easily process seals in batches of 100 seals. To simplify the verification, a software automatically centres and rotates the newly acquired seal image in order to perfectly overlap with the reference image acquired during the production phase. The new system significantly speeds up seal production and helps particularly with the demanding task of seal verification. As a large part of the seals is dealt with by a joint Euratom-IAEA team, the IAEA directly profits from this development. The new tool has been in routine use since mid 2013. (author)

  20. Combined Acquisition Technique (CAT) for Neuroimaging of Multiple Sclerosis at Low Specific Absorption Rates (SAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Armin; Choli, Morwan; Blaimer, Martin; Breuer, Felix A.; Jakob, Peter M.; Bartsch, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare a novel combined acquisition technique (CAT) of turbo-spin-echo (TSE) and echo-planar-imaging (EPI) with conventional TSE. CAT reduces the electromagnetic energy load transmitted for spin excitation. This radiofrequency (RF) burden is limited by the specific absorption rate (SAR) for patient safety. SAR limits restrict high-field MRI applications, in particular. Material and Methods The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. T2- and PD-weighted brain images of n = 40 Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients were acquired by CAT and TSE at 3 Tesla. Lesions were recorded by two blinded, board-certificated neuroradiologists. Diagnostic equivalence of CAT and TSE to detect MS lesions was evaluated along with their SAR, sound pressure level (SPL) and sensations of acoustic noise, heating, vibration and peripheral nerve stimulation. Results Every MS lesion revealed on TSE was detected by CAT according to both raters (Cohen’s kappa of within-rater/across-CAT/TSE lesion detection κCAT = 1.00, at an inter-rater lesion detection agreement of κLES = 0.82). CAT reduced the SAR burden significantly compared to TSE (pCAT were 29.0 (±5.7) % for the T2-contrast and 32.7 (±21.9) % for the PD-contrast (expressed as percentages of the effective SAR limit of 3.2 W/kg for head examinations). Average SPL of CAT was no louder than during TSE. Sensations of CAT- vs. TSE-induced heating, noise and scanning vibrations did not differ. Conclusion T2−/PD-CAT is diagnostically equivalent to TSE for MS lesion detection yet substantially reduces the RF exposure. Such SAR reduction facilitates high-field MRI applications at 3 Tesla or above and corresponding protocol standardizations but CAT can also be used to scan faster, at higher resolution or with more slices. According to our data, CAT is no more uncomfortable than TSE scanning. PMID:24608106

  1. Combined acquisition technique (CAT for neuroimaging of multiple sclerosis at low specific absorption rates (SAR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Biller

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare a novel combined acquisition technique (CAT of turbo-spin-echo (TSE and echo-planar-imaging (EPI with conventional TSE. CAT reduces the electromagnetic energy load transmitted for spin excitation. This radiofrequency (RF burden is limited by the specific absorption rate (SAR for patient safety. SAR limits restrict high-field MRI applications, in particular. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. T2- and PD-weighted brain images of n = 40 Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients were acquired by CAT and TSE at 3 Tesla. Lesions were recorded by two blinded, board-certificated neuroradiologists. Diagnostic equivalence of CAT and TSE to detect MS lesions was evaluated along with their SAR, sound pressure level (SPL and sensations of acoustic noise, heating, vibration and peripheral nerve stimulation. RESULTS: Every MS lesion revealed on TSE was detected by CAT according to both raters (Cohen's kappa of within-rater/across-CAT/TSE lesion detection κCAT = 1.00, at an inter-rater lesion detection agreement of κLES = 0.82. CAT reduced the SAR burden significantly compared to TSE (p<0.001. Mean SAR differences between TSE and CAT were 29.0 (± 5.7 % for the T2-contrast and 32.7 (± 21.9 % for the PD-contrast (expressed as percentages of the effective SAR limit of 3.2 W/kg for head examinations. Average SPL of CAT was no louder than during TSE. Sensations of CAT- vs. TSE-induced heating, noise and scanning vibrations did not differ. CONCLUSION: T2-/PD-CAT is diagnostically equivalent to TSE for MS lesion detection yet substantially reduces the RF exposure. Such SAR reduction facilitates high-field MRI applications at 3 Tesla or above and corresponding protocol standardizations but CAT can also be used to scan faster, at higher resolution or with more slices. According to our data, CAT is no more uncomfortable than TSE scanning.

  2. Three dimensional image presentation techniques in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizer, S.M.; Fuchs, H.

    1987-01-01

    Medical images can be presented three-dimensionally by techniques that either calculate the effect of reflections from surfaces predefined from slices or project a three-space of luminosities computed from voxel intensities onto the visual receptors. Sliced-based reflective displays are the most common type. Means of producing surface descriptions both via voxel sets and via slice contours are reviewed. Advantages of and means of transparent display to allow the appreciation of the 3D relationships among objects are set forth. Ways to produce additional depth cues by stereoscopy and the kinetic depth effect are discussed, and the importance of interactive modification of viewpoint, clipping plane, displayed objects, etc. are explained. A new device, UNC's Pixel-planes, for accomplishing this in real time are illustrated. Voxel intensity based display methods avoid the need for time-consuming predefinition of object surfaces and thus can allow exploration of 3D image data. Varifocal mirror hardware and fast computation of one or more projections based on object probabilities are two of the more important approaches. While 3D display provides important information about 3D relationships, it cannot provide the kind of appreciation of subtle grey-scale changes that 2D display can. Methods that can combine these two kinds of information by superimposing 2D grey-scale slices on or in the context of 3D displays are discussed. Applications of these techniques for both diagnosis and radiotherapy planning are used as illustrations and guides to the usefulness of these techniques with CT, MRI, and other 3D medical imaging modalities. 24 refs.; 5 figs

  3. The study on acquisition mode and reconstruction parameters of brain FDG PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Chuantao; Liu Yongchang; Guan Yihui; Zhao Jun; Lin Xiangtong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of acquisition mode on the brain PET images. Methods: After changing conditions and parameters, the authors got brain PET images of different acquisition modes, different emission counts, different transmission times; and compared with the reference images the impacts of different acquisition modes, different acquisition conditions were assessed. Results: Compared with 2D mode, much higher background and noise were observed on the reconstruction images of 3D mode, and the bottoms of the brain structure were not well displayed. But the middle part of brain structure displayed well in 2D and 3D mode without difference; the gray/white radioactivity ratios were 2.108 +- 0.183 and 2.286 +- 0.232 under 2D and 3D mode, respectively. The gray/white radioactivity ratios with different emission counts were 2.108 +- 0.183, 2.215 +- 0.158, 2.161 +- 0.176, respectively, there was no evident difference among them. With transmission counts increasing, the segmented image outline of Hoffman phantom and brain structure became clear and integral. Conclusions: Different acquisition modes, different emission counts and different transmission times are of certain impacts on brain FDG PET images, and it should be paid more attention in clinical practice

  4. The blood-pool technique of radionuclide ventriculography: Data acquisition and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Schauenburg, W.

    1986-01-01

    For gated heart studies an in-vitro-labelling of erythrocytes is commonly used. Rest and exercise studies are acquired from LAO. Complementary studies may have different views. Besides the most common direct frame mode acquisition, there are the more flexible list mode and a hybrid mode. Concerning evaluation the ejection fraction is the leading parameter of global ventricular analysis. In local analysis a pixelwise evaluation generates functional images of phases and amplitudes (the Fourier approach developed by the Ulm group) or Noelep's trend images. Special attention has to be paid to the varying cycle length when a sine or cosine fitting (Fourier) is used for curve smoothing or phase and amplitude images. There are two opposed problems: If there are undetected QRS-complexes, the end of the representative cycle will contain early phases of subsequent cycles which must be cut off. In the case of really varying cycle length, the last images of the representative cycle must be corrected for acquisition time per frame. The total count curve may help to discriminate both cases and supplies suitable correction factors in the latter case. (orig.) [de

  5. Improvements in image quality with pseudo-parallel imaging in the phase-scrambling fourier transform technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Satoshi; Kawawa, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yoshifumi

    2010-01-01

    The signal obtained in the phase-scrambling Fourier transform (PSFT) imaging technique can be transformed to the signal described by the Fresnel transform of the objects, in which the amplitude of the PSFT presents some kind of blurred image of the objects. Therefore, the signal can be considered to exist in the object domain as well as the Fourier domain of the object. This notable feature makes it possible to assign weights to the reconstructed images by applying a weighting function to the PSFT signal after data acquisition, and as a result, pseudo-parallel image reconstruction using these aliased image data with different weights on the images is feasible. In this study, the improvements in image quality with such pseudo-parallel imaging were examined and demonstrated. The weighting function of the PSFT signal that provides a given weight on the image is estimated using the obtained image data and is iteratively updated after sensitivity encoding (SENSE)-based image reconstruction. Simulation studies showed that reconstruction errors were dramatically reduced and that the spatial resolution was also improved in almost all image spaces. The proposed method was applied to signals synthesized from MR image data with phase variations to verify its effectiveness. It was found that the image quality was improved and that images almost entirely free of aliasing artifacts could be obtained. (author)

  6. Mammogram synthesis using a 3D simulation. I. Breast tissue model and image acquisition simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakic, Predrag R.; Albert, Michael; Brzakovic, Dragana; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2002-01-01

    A method is proposed for generating synthetic mammograms based upon simulations of breast tissue and the mammographic imaging process. A computer breast model has been designed with a realistic distribution of large and medium scale tissue structures. Parameters controlling the size and placement of simulated structures (adipose compartments and ducts) provide a method for consistently modeling images of the same simulated breast with modified position or acquisition parameters. The mammographic imaging process is simulated using a compression model and a model of the x-ray image acquisition process. The compression model estimates breast deformation using tissue elasticity parameters found in the literature and clinical force values. The synthetic mammograms were generated by a mammogram acquisition model using a monoenergetic parallel beam approximation applied to the synthetically compressed breast phantom

  7. Image acquisition and analysis for beam diagnostics, applications of the Taiwan photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.Y.; Chen, J.; Cheng, Y.S.; Hsu, K.T.; Hu, K.H.; Kuo, C.H.; Wu, C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Design and implementation of image acquisition and analysis is in proceeding for the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) diagnostic applications. The optical system contains screen, lens, and lighting system. A CCD camera with Gigabit Ethernet interface (GigE Vision) will be a standard image acquisition device. Image acquisition will be done on EPICS IOC via PV channel and analysis the properties by using Matlab tool to evaluate the beam profile (sigma), beam size position and tilt angle et al. The EPICS IOC integrated with Matlab as a data processing system is not only could be used in image analysis but also in many types of equipment data processing applications. Progress of the project will be summarized in this report. (authors)

  8. Three-dimensional ultrasonic imaging of concrete elements using different SAFT data acquisition and processing schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schickert, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing systems using transducer arrays and the SAFT (Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique) reconstruction allow for imaging the internal structure of concrete elements. At one-sided access, three-dimensional representations of the concrete volume can be reconstructed in relatively great detail, permitting to detect and localize objects such as construction elements, built-in components, and flaws. Different SAFT data acquisition and processing schemes can be utilized which differ in terms of the measuring and computational effort and the reconstruction result. In this contribution, two methods are compared with respect to their principle of operation and their imaging characteristics. The first method is the conventional single-channel SAFT algorithm which is implemented using a virtual transducer that is moved within a transducer array by electronic switching. The second method is the Combinational SAFT algorithm (C-SAFT), also named Sampling Phased Array (SPA) or Full Matrix Capture/Total Focusing Method (TFM/FMC), which is realized using a combination of virtual transducers within a transducer array. Five variants of these two methods are compared by means of measurements obtained at test specimens containing objects typical of concrete elements. The automated SAFT imaging system FLEXUS is used for the measurements which includes a three-axis scanner with a 1.0 m × 0.8 m scan range and an electronically switched ultrasonic array consisting of 48 transducers in 16 groups. On the basis of two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstructed images, qualitative and some quantitative results of the parameters image resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, measurement time, and computational effort are discussed in view of application characteristics of the SAFT variants

  9. Detection and compensation of organ/lesion motion using 4D-PET/CT respiratory gated acquisition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria; Di Muzio, Nadia; Gianolli, Luigi; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Messa, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the degradation effects produced by respiratory organ and lesion motion on PET/CT images and to define the role of respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques to compensate for such effects. Methods: Based on the literature and on our own experience, technical recommendations and clinical indications for the use of RG 4D PET/CT have been outlined. Results: RG 4D-PET/CT techniques require a state of the art PET/CT scanner, a respiratory monitoring system and dedicated acquisition and processing protocols. Patient training is particularly important to obtain a regular breathing pattern. An adequate number of phases has to be selected to balance motion compensation and statistical noise. RG 4D PET/CT motion free images may be clinically useful for tumour tissue characterization, monitoring patient treatment and target definition in radiation therapy planning. Conclusions: RG 4D PET/CT is a valuable tool to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy and to assess and measure organ and lesion motion for radiotherapy planning.

  10. From experimental imaging techniques to virtual embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Wolfgang J; Tassy, Olivier; Darras, Sébastien; Geyer, Stefan H; Thieffry, Denis

    2004-01-01

    Modern embryology increasingly relies on descriptive and functional three dimensional (3D) and four dimensional (4D) analysis of physically, optically, or virtually sectioned specimens. To cope with the technical requirements, new methods for high detailed in vivo imaging, as well as the generation of high resolution digital volume data sets for the accurate visualisation of transgene activity and gene product presence, in the context of embryo morphology, were recently developed and are under construction. These methods profoundly change the scientific applicability, appearance and style of modern embryo representations. In this paper, we present an overview of the emerging techniques to create, visualise and administrate embryo representations (databases, digital data sets, 3-4D embryo reconstructions, models, etc.), and discuss the implications of these new methods on the work of modern embryologists, including, research, teaching, the selection of specific model organisms, and potential collaborators.

  11. Use of imaging techniques in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, C.; Rudder, D.; Jimenez, P.

    2002-01-01

    Imaging techniques are used in radiation oncology for: disease diagnosis, tumor localization and staging, treatment simulation, treatment planning, clinical dosimetry displays, treatment verification and patient follow up. In industrialized countries, up to the 1970's, conventional radiology was used for diagnosis, simulation and planning. Gamma cameras helped tumor staging by detecting metastases. In the 1970's, simulators were developed for exclusive use in radiation oncology departments. Clinical dosimetry displays consisted mainly in axial dose distributions. Treatment verification was done placing films in the radiation beam with the patient under treatment. In the 1980's, 2-D imaging was replaced by 3-D displays with the incorporation of computerized tomography (CT) scanners, and in the 1990's of magnetic resonance imagers (MRI). Ultrasound units, briefly used in the 1960's for treatment planning purposes, were found again useful, mainly for brachytherapy dosimetry. Digital portal imagers allowed accurate treatment field verification. Treatment planning systems incorporated the capability of 'inverse planning', i.e. once the desired dose distribution is decided, the field size, gantry, collimator and couch angles, etc, can be automatically selected. At the end of the millennium, image fusion permitted excellent anatomical display of tumors and adjacent sensitive structures. The 2000's are seeing a change from anatomical to functional imaging with the advent of MRI units capable of spectroscopy at 3 Tesla and positron emission tomography (PET) units. In 2001 combined CT/PET units appeared in RT departments. In 2002, fusion of CT, MRI and PET images became available. Molecular imaging is being developed. The situation in developing countries is quite different. To start with, cancer incidence is different in developing and in industrialized countries. In addition, the health services pattern is different: Cancer treatment is mostly done in public institutions

  12. Effects of Resolution, Range, and Image Contrast on Target Acquisition Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Justin G; Terhaar, Phil; Pavlovic, Nada J

    2018-05-01

    We sought to determine the joint influence of resolution, target range, and image contrast on the detection and identification of targets in simulated naturalistic scenes. Resolution requirements for target acquisition have been developed based on threshold values obtained using imaging systems, when target range was fixed, and image characteristics were determined by the system. Subsequent work has examined the influence of factors like target range and image contrast on target acquisition. We varied the resolution and contrast of static images in two experiments. Participants (soldiers) decided whether a human target was located in the scene (detection task) or whether a target was friendly or hostile (identification task). Target range was also varied (50-400 m). In Experiment 1, 30 participants saw color images with a single target exemplar. In Experiment 2, another 30 participants saw monochrome images containing different target exemplars. The effects of target range and image contrast were qualitatively different above and below 6 pixels per meter of target for both tasks in both experiments. Target detection and identification performance were a joint function of image resolution, range, and contrast for both color and monochrome images. The beneficial effects of increasing resolution for target acquisition performance are greater for closer (larger) targets.

  13. Marketing practitioner’s tacit knowledge acquisition using Repertory Grid Technique (RTG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Afdhal; Adriman, Ramzi

    2018-05-01

    The tacit knowledge of Marketing practitioner’s experts is excellent resources and priceless. It takes into account their experiential, skill, ideas, belief systems, insight and speculation into management decision-making. This expertise is an individual intuitive judgment and personal shortcuts to complete the work efficiently. Tacit knowledge of Marketing practitioner’s experts is one of best problem solutions in marketing strategy, environmental analysis, product management and partner’s relationship. This paper proposes the acquisition method of tacit knowledge from Marketing practitioner’s using Repertory Grid Technique (RGT). The RGT is a software application for tacit acquisition knowledge to provide a systematic approach to capture and acquire the constructs from an individual. The result shows the understanding of RGT could make TKE and MPE get a good result in capturing and acquiring tacit knowledge of Marketing practitioner’s experts.

  14. Design of area array CCD image acquisition and display system based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Li, Tianting; Pan, Yue; Dai, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    With the development of science and technology, CCD(Charge-coupled Device) has been widely applied in various fields and plays an important role in the modern sensing system, therefore researching a real-time image acquisition and display plan based on CCD device has great significance. This paper introduces an image data acquisition and display system of area array CCD based on FPGA. Several key technical challenges and problems of the system have also been analyzed and followed solutions put forward .The FPGA works as the core processing unit in the system that controls the integral time sequence .The ICX285AL area array CCD image sensor produced by SONY Corporation has been used in the system. The FPGA works to complete the driver of the area array CCD, then analog front end (AFE) processes the signal of the CCD image, including amplification, filtering, noise elimination, CDS correlation double sampling, etc. AD9945 produced by ADI Corporation to convert analog signal to digital signal. Developed Camera Link high-speed data transmission circuit, and completed the PC-end software design of the image acquisition, and realized the real-time display of images. The result through practical testing indicates that the system in the image acquisition and control is stable and reliable, and the indicators meet the actual project requirements.

  15. Working Papers in Acquisition of Knowledge for Image Understanding Research,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-15

    Rmvt 112,7,P IM Y. K3p ’Of’ z4-" odK zw Mw; OW, ev 6 "ONO T;I 11; "VI lip, IA wo 44 jo . ... . ...... I I WORKING PAPERS IN ACQUISITION OF...paradigm than any other. They have collected protocolt on subjects verbally describing scenes, after examining them visually. The control variable they... collection of Elements of Control Flow (ECF). To avoid creation of either file, the user presses the return key without typing a name to the respective

  16. MR fingerprinting using the quick echo splitting NMR imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Jerecic, Renate; Duerk, Jeffrey; Seiberlich, Nicole; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a quantitative method for the relaxation properties with a reduced radio frequency (RF) power deposition by combining magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) technique with quick echo splitting NMR imaging technique (QUEST). A QUEST-based MRF sequence was implemented to acquire high-order echoes by increasing the gaps between RF pulses. Bloch simulations were used to calculate a dictionary containing the range of physically plausible signal evolutions using a range of T 1 and T 2 values based on the pulse sequence. MRF-QUEST was evaluated by comparing to the results of spin-echo methods. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of MRF-QUEST was compared with the clinically available methods. MRF-QUEST quantifies the relaxation properties with good accuracy at the estimated head SAR of 0.03 W/kg. T 1 and T 2 values estimated by MRF-QUEST are in good agreement with the traditional methods. The combination of the MRF and the QUEST provides an accurate quantification of T 1 and T 2 simultaneously with reduced RF power deposition. The resulting lower SAR may provide a new acquisition strategy for MRF when RF energy deposition is problematic. Magn Reson Med 77:979-988, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. MR sialography: evaluation of an ultra-fast sequence in consideration of a parallel acquisition technique and different functional conditions in patients with salivary gland diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petridis, C.; Ries, T.; Cramer, M.C.; Graessner, J.; Petersen, K.U.; Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M.; Weiss, F.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate an ultra-fast sequence for MR sialography requiring no post-processing and to compare the acquisition technique regarding the effect of oral stimulation with a parallel acquisition technique in patients with salivary gland diseases. Materials and Methods: 128 patients with salivary gland disease were prospectively examined using a 1.5-T superconducting system with a 30 mT/m maximum gradient capability and a maximum slew rate of 125 mT/m/sec. A single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequence (ss-TSE) with an acquisition time of 2.8 sec was used in transverse and oblique sagittal orientation. All images were obtained with and without a parallel imaging technique. The evaluation of the ductal system of the parotid and submandibular gland was performed using a visual scale of 1-5 for each side. The images were assessed by two independent experienced radiologists. An ANOVA with posthoc comparisons and an overall two tailed significance level of p=0.05 was used for the statistical evaluation. An intraclass correlation was computed to evaluate interobserver variability and a correlation of >0.8 was determined, thereby indicating a high correlation. Results: Depending on the diagnosed diseases and the absence of abruption of the ducts, all parts of excretory ducts were able to be visualized in all patients using the developed technique with an overall rating for all ducts of 2.70 (SD±0.89). A high correlation was achieved between the two observers with an intraclass correlation of 0.73. Oral application of a sialogogum improved the visibility of excretory ducts significantly (p<0.001). In contrast, the use of a parallel imaging technique led to a significant decrease in image quality (p=0,011). (orig.)

  18. Image processing techniques for thermal, x-rays and nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadda, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes image acquisition techniques for the non-visible range of electromagnetic spectrum especially thermal, x-rays and nuclear radiations. Thermal imaging systems are valuable tools used for applications ranging from PCB inspection, hot spot studies, fire identification, satellite imaging to defense applications. Penetrating radiations like x-rays and gamma rays are used in NDT, baggage inspection, CAT scan, cardiology, radiography, nuclear medicine etc. Neutron radiography compliments conventional x-rays and gamma radiography. For these applications, image processing and computed tomography are employed for 2-D and 3-D image interpretation respectively. The paper also covers main features of image processing systems for quantitative evaluation of gray level and binary images. (author)

  19. Helium-3 MR q-space imaging with radial acquisition and iterative highly constrained back-projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Rafael L; Holmes, James H; Wu, Yu-Chien; Alexander, Andrew; Fain, Sean B

    2010-01-01

    An undersampled diffusion-weighted stack-of-stars acquisition is combined with iterative highly constrained back-projection to perform hyperpolarized helium-3 MR q-space imaging with combined regional correction of radiofrequency- and T1-related signal loss in a single breath-held scan. The technique is tested in computer simulations and phantom experiments and demonstrated in a healthy human volunteer with whole-lung coverage in a 13-sec breath-hold. Measures of lung microstructure at three different lung volumes are evaluated using inhaled gas volumes of 500 mL, 1000 mL, and 1500 mL to demonstrate feasibility. Phantom results demonstrate that the proposed technique is in agreement with theoretical values, as well as with a fully sampled two-dimensional Cartesian acquisition. Results from the volunteer study demonstrate that the root mean squared diffusion distance increased significantly from the 500-mL volume to the 1000-mL volume. This technique represents the first demonstration of a spatially resolved hyperpolarized helium-3 q-space imaging technique and shows promise for microstructural evaluation of lung disease in three dimensions. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. CT and MRI techniques for imaging around orthopedic hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Thuy Duong; Skornitzke, Stephan; Weber, Marc-Andre [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Sutter, Reto [Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland). Radiology

    2018-01-15

    Orthopedic hardware impairs image quality in cross-sectional imaging. With an increasing number of orthopedic implants in an aging population, the need to mitigate metal artifacts in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is becoming increasingly relevant. This review provides an overview of the major artifacts in CT and MRI and state-of-the-art solutions to improve image quality. All steps of image acquisition from device selection, scan preparations and parameters to image post-processing influence the magnitude of metal artifacts. Technological advances like dual-energy CT with the possibility of virtual monochromatic imaging (VMI) and new materials offer opportunities to further reduce artifacts in CT and MRI. Dedicated metal artifact reduction sequences contain algorithms to reduce artifacts and improve imaging of surrounding tissue and are essential tools in orthopedic imaging to detect postoperative complications in early stages.

  1. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. Methods and Materials: One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results: Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against

  2. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Wendy [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ren, Lei, E-mail: lei.ren@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, You [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. Methods and Materials: One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results: Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against

  3. Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph (RAISE) Renewal Proposal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The optical design of RAISE is based on a new class of UV/EUV imaging spectrometers that use  only two reflections to provide quasi-stigmatic performance...

  4. Upconversion applied for mid-IR hyperspectral image acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Kehlet, Louis Martinus; Sanders, Nicolai Højer

    2015-01-01

    Different schemes for upconversion mid-IR hyperspectral imaging is implemented and compared in terms of spectral coverage, spectral resolution, speed and noise. Phasematch scanning and scanning of the object within the field of view is considered....

  5. 3D imaging acquisition, modeling, and prototyping for facial defects reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Cavagnini, Gianluca; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach that combines optical three-dimensional imaging, reverse engineering (RE) and rapid prototyping (RP) for mold production in the prosthetic reconstruction of facial prostheses is presented. A commercial laser-stripe digitizer is used to perform the multiview acquisition of the patient's face; the point clouds are aligned and merged in order to obtain a polygonal model, which is then edited to sculpture the virtual prothesis. Two physical models of both the deformed face and the 'repaired' face are obtained: they differ only in the defect zone. Depending on the material used for the actual prosthesis, the two prototypes can be used either to directly cast the final prosthesis or to fabricate the positive wax pattern. Two case studies are presented, referring to prostetic reconstructions of an eye and of a nose. The results demonstrate the advantages over conventional techniques as well as the improvements with respect to known automated manufacturing techniques in the mold construction. The proposed method results into decreased patient's disconfort, reduced dependence on the anaplasthologist skill, increased repeatability and efficiency of the whole process.

  6. Image Mosaic Techniques OptimizationUsing Wavelet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUAn-qi; CUILi

    2014-01-01

    This essay concentrates on two key procedures of image mosaic——image registration and imagefusion.Becauseof the character of geometric transformation invariance of edge points, wecalculate the angle difference of the direction vector ofedge points in different images anddraw an angle difference histogramto adjust the rotationproblem. Through this way, algorithm based on gray information is expandedandcan be used in images withdisplacementand rotation. Inthe term of image fusion, wavelet multi-scale analysis is used to fuse spliced images. In order to choose the best method of imagefusion,weevaluate the results of different methods of image fusion by cross entropy.

  7. Gamma camera image acquisition, display, and processing with the personal microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, J.L.; Pratt, J.P.; Roberts, D.R.; Johnson, T.; Feyerabend, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors evaluated the potential of a microcomputer for direct acquisition, display, and processing of gamma camera images. Boards for analog-to-digital conversion and image zooming were designed, constructed, and interfaced to the Macintosh II (Apple Computer, Cupertino, Calif). Software was written for processing of single, gated, and time series images. The system was connected to gamma cameras, and its performance was compared with that of dedicated nuclear medicine computers. Data could be acquired from gamma cameras at rates exceeding 200,000 counts per second, with spatial resolution exceeding intrinsic camera resolution. Clinical analysis could be rapidly performed. This system performed better than most dedicated nuclear medicine computers with respect to speed of data acquisition and spatial resolution of images while maintaining full compatibility with the standard image display, hard-copy, and networking formats. It could replace such dedicated systems in the near future as software is refined

  8. Usefulness of the dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes for detection of pituitary microadenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Bee; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik; Choi, Jin Wook

    2012-03-01

    Does dynamic gadolinium-enhanced imaging with simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes improve diagnostic accuracy of pituitary microadenomas compared with coronal images alone? Fifty-six patients underwent 3-T sella MRI including dynamic simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes after gadolinium injection. According to conspicuity, lesions were divided into four scores (0, no; 1, possible; 2, probable; 3, definite delayed enhancing lesion). Additional information on supplementary sagittal images compared with coronal ones was evaluated with a 4-point score (0, no; 1, possible; 2, probable; 3, definite additional information). Accuracy of tumour detection was calculated. Average scores for lesion detection of a combination of two planes, coronal, and sagittal images were 2.59, 2.32, and 2.18. 6/10 lesions negative on coronal images were detected on sagittal ones. Accuracy of a combination of two planes, of coronal and of sagittal images was 92.86%, 82.14% and 75%. Six patients had probable or definite additional information on supplementary sagittal images compared with coronal ones alone (10.71%). Dynamic MRI with combined coronal and sagittal planes was more accurate for detection of pituitary microadenomas than routinely used coronal images. Simultaneous dynamic enhanced acquisition can make study time fast and costs low. We present a new dynamic MRI technique for evaluating pituitary microadenomas • This technique provides simultaneous acquisition of contrast enhanced coronal and sagittal images. • This technique makes the diagnosis more accurate and reduces the examination time. • Such MR imaging only requires one single bolus of contrast agent.

  9. A review of equine renal imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, H.K.; Toal, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Radiography has a limited role in the evaluation of the kidneys in foals and adult horses. Ultrasonography is the current method of choice for structural evaluation of the kidneys in horses as it provides additional information to standard serum chemistry and urinalysis evaluation. A variety of structural abnormalities have been identified in diseased equine kidneys with the use of ultrasound. Ultrasound guided renal biopsy is the preferred method for performing renal biopsy in the horse. The use of Duplex Doppler ultrasound may allow for the characterization of regional hemodynamics of the equine kidney, but is currently an untapped method for evaluation of equine renal hemodynamics. Radionuclide methods including scintigraphy and quantitative renal function measurement can be used to provide further information about equine renal function. Scintigraphy can provide structural and possibly functional information. Quantitative methods using radiopharmaceuticals can provide precise measurement of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal blood flow. This method is especially helpful in identifying acute renal failure and in guiding response to treatment. All equine renal imaging techniques should be a supplement to the physical examination and standard laboratory tests. Additional diagnostic aids such as urinary tract endoscopy should also be considered in horses with hematuria, hydroureter, and suspected calculi. Taken together, all these modalities provide a thorough evaluation of the equine renal system and provide a basis for the clinician to select treatment options and provide prognostic information to the owner

  10. Research of aerial imaging spectrometer data acquisition technology based on USB 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junze; Wang, Yueming; He, Daogang; Yu, Yanan

    2016-11-01

    With the emergence of UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) platform for aerial imaging spectrometer, research of aerial imaging spectrometer DAS(data acquisition system) faces new challenges. Due to the limitation of platform and other factors, the aerial imaging spectrometer DAS requires small-light, low-cost and universal. Traditional aerial imaging spectrometer DAS system is expensive, bulky, non-universal and unsupported plug-and-play based on PCIe. So that has been unable to meet promotion and application of the aerial imaging spectrometer. In order to solve these problems, the new data acquisition scheme bases on USB3.0 interface.USB3.0 can provide guarantee of small-light, low-cost and universal relying on the forward-looking technology advantage. USB3.0 transmission theory is up to 5Gbps.And the GPIF programming interface achieves 3.2Gbps of the effective theoretical data bandwidth.USB3.0 can fully meet the needs of the aerial imaging spectrometer data transmission rate. The scheme uses the slave FIFO asynchronous data transmission mode between FPGA and USB3014 interface chip. Firstly system collects spectral data from TLK2711 of high-speed serial interface chip. Then FPGA receives data in DDR2 cache after ping-pong data processing. Finally USB3014 interface chip transmits data via automatic-dma approach and uploads to PC by USB3.0 cable. During the manufacture of aerial imaging spectrometer, the DAS can achieve image acquisition, transmission, storage and display. All functions can provide the necessary test detection for aerial imaging spectrometer. The test shows that system performs stable and no data lose. Average transmission speed and storage speed of writing SSD can stabilize at 1.28Gbps. Consequently ,this data acquisition system can meet application requirements for aerial imaging spectrometer.

  11. A spiral-based volumetric acquisition for MR temperature imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Zhao, Li; Miller, G Wilson; Geeslin, Matthew; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Elias, W Jeffrey; Wintermark, Max; Butts Pauly, Kim; Meyer, Craig H

    2018-06-01

    To develop a rapid pulse sequence for volumetric MR thermometry. Simulations were carried out to assess temperature deviation, focal spot distortion/blurring, and focal spot shift across a range of readout durations and maximum temperatures for Cartesian, spiral-out, and retraced spiral-in/out (RIO) trajectories. The RIO trajectory was applied for stack-of-spirals 3D imaging on a real-time imaging platform and preliminary evaluation was carried out compared to a standard 2D sequence in vivo using a swine brain model, comparing maximum and mean temperatures measured between the two methods, as well as the temporal standard deviation measured by the two methods. In simulations, low-bandwidth Cartesian trajectories showed substantial shift of the focal spot, whereas both spiral trajectories showed no shift while maintaining focal spot geometry. In vivo, the 3D sequence achieved real-time 4D monitoring of thermometry, with an update time of 2.9-3.3 s. Spiral imaging, and RIO imaging in particular, is an effective way to speed up volumetric MR thermometry. Magn Reson Med 79:3122-3127, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Full-field wrist pulse signal acquisition and analysis by 3D Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; Su, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Xiaohai; Gao, Zeren; Wu, Shangquan; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2017-11-01

    Pulse diagnosis is an essential part in four basic diagnostic methods (inspection, listening, inquiring and palpation) in traditional Chinese medicine, which depends on longtime training and rich experience, so computerized pulse acquisition has been proposed and studied to ensure the objectivity. To imitate the process that doctors using three fingertips with different pressures to feel fluctuations in certain areas containing three acupoints, we established a five dimensional pulse signal acquisition system adopting a non-contacting optical metrology method, 3D digital image correlation, to record the full-field displacements of skin fluctuations under different pressures. The system realizes real-time full-field vibration mode observation with 10 FPS. The maximum sample frequency is 472 Hz for detailed post-processing. After acquisition, the signals are analyzed according to the amplitude, pressure, and pulse wave velocity. The proposed system provides a novel optical approach for digitalizing pulse diagnosis and massive pulse signal data acquisition for various types of patients.

  13. Digital image processing techniques in archaeology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Santanam, K.; Vaithiyanathan, R.; Tripati, S.

    Digital image processing involves the manipulation and interpretation of digital images with the aid of a computer. This form of remote sensing actually began in the 1960's with a limited number of researchers analysing multispectral scanner data...

  14. Dependence of image quality on acquisition time for the PET/CT Biograph mCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Duran, Flavia; Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection; Dinter, Dietmar; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Schoenahl, Frederic [Siemens Healthcare Molecular Imaging, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    The impact of acquisition time on reconstructed PET image quality is analyzed for different acquisition times (1, 2, 3 and 4 min). Image quality was tested according to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007, the evaluation for the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the reconstructed activity ratio (RAR) for three algorithms, i.e. OSEM, TrueX and TOF applying different effective iteration numbers. The present work shows that the image quality of 3 and 4 min acquisition time for spherical lesions of 10 mm diameter are not significantly different between TrueX, TOF and OSEM. The 2 min acquisition time should be used carefully for the TrueX and OSEM algorithms in small lesions, because the levels of background noise are high compared to 3 or 4 min measurements. Also, the reconstructed activity ratio is underestimated to be approximately half of the expected value. For large lesions the three algorithms perform similarly for all acquisition durations, however, OSEM has the advantage of a more accurately reconstructed activity ratio compared to TrueX and TOF, which are more strongly influenced by noise. (orig.)

  15. The low-order wavefront control system for the PICTURE-C mission: high-speed image acquisition and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewawasam, Kuravi; Mendillo, Christopher B.; Howe, Glenn A.; Martel, Jason; Finn, Susanna C.; Cook, Timothy A.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2017-09-01

    The Planetary Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Recoverable Experiment - Coronagraph (PICTURE-C) mission will directly image debris disks and exozodiacal dust around nearby stars from a high-altitude balloon using a vector vortex coronagraph. The PICTURE-C low-order wavefront control (LOWC) system will be used to correct time-varying low-order aberrations due to pointing jitter, gravity sag, thermal deformation, and the gondola pendulum motion. We present the hardware and software implementation of the low-order ShackHartmann and reflective Lyot stop sensors. Development of the high-speed image acquisition and processing system is discussed with the emphasis on the reduction of hardware and computational latencies through the use of a real-time operating system and optimized data handling. By characterizing all of the LOWC latencies, we describe techniques to achieve a framerate of 200 Hz with a mean latency of ˜378 μs

  16. Technique for producing cardiac radionuclide motion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, I.C.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    Sequential frames of different portions of the cardiac cycle are gated into a minicomputer by using an EKG signal recorded onto digital tape simultaneously with imaging information. Serial display of these frames on the computer oscilloscope or projection of 35-mm half frames of these images provides a cardiac motion image with information content adequate for qualitatively assessing cardiac motion. (U.S.)

  17. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-01-01

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution

  18. SU-F-J-220: Micro-CT Based Quantification of Mouse Brain Vasculature: The Effects of Acquisition Technique and Contrast Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, C; Lamba, M; Qi, Z; LaSance, K; Tipton, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cognitive impairment from radiation therapy to the brain may be linked to the loss of total blood volume in the brain. To account for brain injury, it is crucial to develop an understanding of blood volume loss as a result of radiation therapy. This study investigates µCT based quantification of mouse brain vasculature, focusing on the effect of acquisition technique and contrast material. Methods: Four mice were scanned on a µCT scanner (Siemens Inveon). The reconstructed voxel size was 18µm3 and all protocols were Hounsfield Unit (HU) calibrated. The mice were injected with 40mg of gold nanoparticles (MediLumine) or 100µl of Exitron 12000 (Miltenyi Biotec). Two acquisition techniques were also performed. A single kVp technique scanned the mouse once using an x-ray beam of 80kVp and segmentation was completed based on a threshold of HU values. The dual kVp technique scanned the mouse twice using 50kVp and 80kVp, this segmentation was based on the ratio of the HU value of the two kVps. After image reconstruction and segmentation, the brain blood volume was determined as a percentage of the total brain volume. Results: For the single kVp acquisition at 80kVp, the brain blood volume had an average of 3.5% for gold and 4.0% for Exitron 12000. Also at 80kVp, the contrast-noise ratio was significantly better for images acquired with the gold nanoparticles (2.0) than for those acquired with the Exitron 12000 (1.4). The dual kVp acquisition shows improved separation of skull from vasculature, but increased image noise. Conclusion: In summary, the effects of acquisition technique and contrast material for quantification of mouse brain vasculature showed that gold nanoparticles produced more consistent segmentation of brain vasculature than Exitron 12000. Also, dual kVp acquisition may improve the accuracy of brain vasculature quantification, although the effect of noise amplification warrants further study.

  19. SU-F-J-220: Micro-CT Based Quantification of Mouse Brain Vasculature: The Effects of Acquisition Technique and Contrast Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, C; Lamba, M; Qi, Z; LaSance, K; Tipton, C [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cognitive impairment from radiation therapy to the brain may be linked to the loss of total blood volume in the brain. To account for brain injury, it is crucial to develop an understanding of blood volume loss as a result of radiation therapy. This study investigates µCT based quantification of mouse brain vasculature, focusing on the effect of acquisition technique and contrast material. Methods: Four mice were scanned on a µCT scanner (Siemens Inveon). The reconstructed voxel size was 18µm3 and all protocols were Hounsfield Unit (HU) calibrated. The mice were injected with 40mg of gold nanoparticles (MediLumine) or 100µl of Exitron 12000 (Miltenyi Biotec). Two acquisition techniques were also performed. A single kVp technique scanned the mouse once using an x-ray beam of 80kVp and segmentation was completed based on a threshold of HU values. The dual kVp technique scanned the mouse twice using 50kVp and 80kVp, this segmentation was based on the ratio of the HU value of the two kVps. After image reconstruction and segmentation, the brain blood volume was determined as a percentage of the total brain volume. Results: For the single kVp acquisition at 80kVp, the brain blood volume had an average of 3.5% for gold and 4.0% for Exitron 12000. Also at 80kVp, the contrast-noise ratio was significantly better for images acquired with the gold nanoparticles (2.0) than for those acquired with the Exitron 12000 (1.4). The dual kVp acquisition shows improved separation of skull from vasculature, but increased image noise. Conclusion: In summary, the effects of acquisition technique and contrast material for quantification of mouse brain vasculature showed that gold nanoparticles produced more consistent segmentation of brain vasculature than Exitron 12000. Also, dual kVp acquisition may improve the accuracy of brain vasculature quantification, although the effect of noise amplification warrants further study.

  20. Fluoroscopic dose reduction by acquisition frame rate reduction and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, S.L.; Mirvis, S.E.; Pals, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    A new design for fluoroscopic exposure reduction incorporates pulsed x-ray exposure, progressive scan video acquisition at frame rates below 30 Hz, interlaced video display at 30 Hz, and a video rate image processing. To evaluate this design, a variety of phantom systems have been developed to measure the impact of low frame rate pulsed digital fluoroscopy on the performance of several clinical tasks (e.g., catheter placement). The authors are currently using these phantoms with a digital fluoroscopy system using continuous x-ray, interlaced video acquisition and variable acquisition frame rate. The design of their target digital fluoroscopic system, sample image sequences, and the results of some preliminary phantom studies are reported

  1. A Hybrid Technique for Medical Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamgir Nyma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical image segmentation is an essential and challenging aspect in computer-aided diagnosis and also in pattern recognition research. This paper proposes a hybrid method for magnetic resonance (MR image segmentation. We first remove impulsive noise inherent in MR images by utilizing a vector median filter. Subsequently, Otsu thresholding is used as an initial coarse segmentation method that finds the homogeneous regions of the input image. Finally, an enhanced suppressed fuzzy c-means is used to partition brain MR images into multiple segments, which employs an optimal suppression factor for the perfect clustering in the given data set. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed approach in noisy environment, we add different types of noise and different amount of noise to T1-weighted brain MR images. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other FCM based algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy for both noise-free and noise-inserted MR images.

  2. Development of an acquisition protocol and a segmentation algortihm for wounds of cutaneous Leishmaniasis in digital images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Kristians; Castañeda, Benjamín; Miranda, César; Lavarello, Roberto; Llanos, Alejandro

    2010-03-01

    We developed a protocol for the acquisition of digital images and an algorithm for a color-based automatic segmentation of cutaneous lesions of Leishmaniasis. The protocol for image acquisition provides control over the working environment to manipulate brightness, lighting and undesirable shadows on the injury using indirect lighting. Also, this protocol was used to accurately calculate the area of the lesion expressed in mm2 even in curved surfaces by combining the information from two consecutive images. Different color spaces were analyzed and compared using ROC curves in order to determine the color layer with the highest contrast between the background and the wound. The proposed algorithm is composed of three stages: (1) Location of the wound determined by threshold and mathematical morphology techniques to the H layer of the HSV color space, (2) Determination of the boundaries of the wound by analyzing the color characteristics in the YIQ space based on masks (for the wound and the background) estimated from the first stage, and (3) Refinement of the calculations obtained on the previous stages by using the discrete dynamic contours algorithm. The segmented regions obtained with the algorithm were compared with manual segmentations made by a medical specialist. Broadly speaking, our results support that color provides useful information during segmentation and measurement of wounds of cutaneous Leishmaniasis. Results from ten images showed 99% specificity, 89% sensitivity, and 98% accuracy.

  3. The technique of Cerenkov ring image detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerveld, D.

    1990-01-01

    Charged particles with an energy between 2 GeV and 25 GeV can be identified in the DELPHI barrel RICH detector by using the technique of Cerenkov ring image detection. The method of identification is based on a determination of the Cerenkov angle by measuring the positions of the emitted Cerenkov photons to high precision in a photon detector. The resolution in the photon that can be obtained depends mainly on the chromatic dispersion in the radiators and on the resolution in the photon detector is used in the barrel RICH in combination with two radiators. The photon detector consists of 48 drift tubes, constructed from quarz plates, each equipped with a wire chamber at the end. The drift gas with which the tubes are filled contains a small admixture of TMAE vapour from which the Cerenkov photons can liberate photoelectrons. It is shown in this thesis that an efficient photon detection and an accurate localization of the photon conversion points is possible. The spatial resolution of the photon detector is determind by the resolution of the wire chambe, the accuracy of the drift measurement, the distortions in the paths of the drifting electrons. The resolution of the wire chamber has been measured to be 0.8 mm in the x- and 1.7 mm in the y-coordinate. The error in the z-coordinate introduced by the drift time measurement is 0.2 mm. The distortions in the paths of the drifting electrons have been measured both in the x and y-direction. The longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients have been measured as a function of the field strength for two different drift gas mixtures. (author). 96 refs.; 61 figs.; 11 tabs

  4. Technique for Targeting Arteriovenous Malformations Using Frameless Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Dimitre; Liu, Lina; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Moore, Teri; Sarmiento, Marily; Chang, Steve D.; Dodd, Robert; Marks, Michael; Do, Huy M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To integrate three-dimensional (3D) digital rotation angiography (DRA) and two-dimensional (2D) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging into a targeting methodology enabling comprehensive image-guided robotic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: DRA geometric integrity was evaluated by imaging a phantom with embedded markers. Dedicated DSA acquisition modes with preset C-arm positions were configured. The geometric reproducibility of the presets was determined, and its impact on localization accuracy was evaluated. An imaging protocol composed of anterior-posterior and lateral DSA series in combination with a DRA run without couch displacement between acquisitions was introduced. Software was developed for registration of DSA and DRA (2D-3D) images to correct for: (a) small misalignments of the C-arm with respect to the estimated geometry of the set positions and (b) potential patient motion between image series. Within the software, correlated navigation of registered DRA and DSA images was incorporated to localize AVMs within a 3D image coordinate space. Subsequent treatment planning and delivery followed a standard image-guided robotic radiosurgery process. Results: DRA spatial distortions were typically smaller than 0.3 mm throughout a 145-mm x 145-mm x 145-mm volume. With 2D-3D image registration, localization uncertainties resulting from the achievable reproducibility of the C-arm set positions could be reduced to about 0.2 mm. Overall system-related localization uncertainty within the DRA coordinate space was 0.4 mm. Image-guided frameless robotic radiosurgical treatments with this technique were initiated. Conclusions: The integration of DRA and DSA into the process of nidus localization increases the confidence with which radiosurgical ablation of AVMs can be performed when using only an image-guided technique. Such an approach can increase patient comfort, decrease time pressure on clinical and

  5. Bulk density estimation using a 3-dimensional image acquisition and analysis system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyduk Adam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a concept of dynamic bulk density estimation of a particulate matter stream using a 3-d image analysis system and a conveyor belt scale. A method of image acquisition should be adjusted to the type of scale. The paper presents some laboratory results of static bulk density measurements using the MS Kinect time-of-flight camera and OpenCV/Matlab software. Measurements were made for several different size classes.

  6. Time of acquisition and network stability in pediatric resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J.H. White (Tonya); R.L. Muetzel (Ryan); M. Schmidt (Marcus); S.J.E. Langeslag (Sandra); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); A. Hofman (Albert); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractResting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has been shown to elucidate reliable patterns of brain networks in both children and adults. Studies in adults have shown that rs-fMRI acquisition times of ∼5 to 6 min provide adequate sampling to produce stable spatial maps

  7. Dual-energy chest imaging with the variable compensation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbins, J.T.; Powell, A.O.

    1988-01-01

    The authors reported on a new imaging algorithm, termed the variable compensation (VC) technique, that combines the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) advantages of x-ray beam compensation with the ability to adjust retrospectively the amount of displayed image equalization. The VC technique acquires a compensated image of the patient and also an image of the modulated beam profile incident on the patient. A fraction of the beam profile image is then subtracted from the compensated image. A limitation of traditional dual-energy techniques is the significant S/N degradation in poorly penetrated regions. Their new VC technique permits improvement in image S/N before formation of the dual-energy image pair. Specifically, the authors subtract 100% of the beam image from the compensated image for both the high- and low-energy images and produce a pair of images that appear similar to the normal high- and low-energy pair, except for improved S/N in the mediastinum due to the beam compensator. S/N measurements in tissue-canceled chest phantom images show the improved S/N visualization of calcified squares in the mediastinum with our technique

  8. Image acquisition for the pediatric radiology PACS module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, B.K.; Morioka, C.; Mankovich, N.J.; Stewart, B.; Huang, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    The prototype PACS module implemented at UCLA's pediatric radiology section has multi-modality access to image data from any of the three types of sources: digital modalities (i.e. CT, MR, and DSA), the Fuji Computed Radiography unit (FCR), and laser film digitizers. An interface unit was built to facilitate real-time data transfer from the FCR to the VAX11/750 which serves as the PACS host computer. The design of the interface unit, methods for linking to digital modalities, and characteristics of two film digitizers are described

  9. A Real-Time Image Acquisition And Processing System For A RISC-Based Microcomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, Adrian J.; Allinson, Nigel M.

    1989-03-01

    A low cost image acquisition and processing system has been developed for the Acorn Archimedes microcomputer. Using a Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) architecture, the ARM (Acorn Risc Machine) processor provides instruction speeds suitable for image processing applications. The associated improvement in data transfer rate has allowed real-time video image acquisition without the need for frame-store memory external to the microcomputer. The system is comprised of real-time video digitising hardware which interfaces directly to the Archimedes memory, and software to provide an integrated image acquisition and processing environment. The hardware can digitise a video signal at up to 640 samples per video line with programmable parameters such as sampling rate and gain. Software support includes a work environment for image capture and processing with pixel, neighbourhood and global operators. A friendly user interface is provided with the help of the Archimedes Operating System WIMP (Windows, Icons, Mouse and Pointer) Manager. Windows provide a convenient way of handling images on the screen and program control is directed mostly by pop-up menus.

  10. A system for the acquisition and segmentation of plane static images in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fideles, Ederson Lacerda.

    1994-09-01

    In nuclear medicine an image is obtained by employing a radioactive compound that is selectively fixed by the organ or tissue under study. In the traditional exams a radiation detector and a oscilloscope are used to obtain analog images of the organs that can be visualized directly or printed in film. In the modern approach, computers are used in the processing of the images obtained. In the present work an A/D board was developed to be used with an IBM compatible PC (XT or AT) for the acquisition of planar static images generated by the gamma camera. Pre-processing routines were developed to prepare the images for the image processing routines developed for the image segmentation. For this segmentation task thresholding methods were used based on the optimization of a certain criterion based on the histogram in such a way that the object can be separated from the background. (author). 25 refs., 26 figs

  11. Development of Optical Molecular Imaging System for the Acquisition of Bioluminescence Signals from Small Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Il; Kim, Hyeon Sik; Jeong, Hye Jin; Lee, Hyung Jae; Moon, Seung Min; Kwon, Seung Young; Jeong, Shin Young; Bom, Hee Seung; Min, Jung Joon; Choi, Eun Seo

    2009-01-01

    Optical imaging is providing great advance and improvement in genetic and molecular imaging of animals and humans. Optical imaging system consists of optical imaging devices, which carry out major function for monitoring, tracing, and imaging in most of molecular in-vivo researches. In bio-luminescent imaging, small animals containing luciferase gene locally irradiate light, and emitted photons transmitted through skin of the small animals are imaged by using a high sensitive charged coupled device (CCD) camera. In this paper, we introduced optical imaging system for the image acquisition of bio-luminescent signals emitted from small animals. In the system, Nikon lens and four LED light sources were mounted at the inside of a dark box. A cooled CCD camera equipped with a control module was used. We tested the performance of the optical imaging system using effendorf tube and light emitting bacteria which injected intravenously into CT26 tumor bearing nude mouse. The performance of implemented optical imaging system for bio-luminescence imaging was demonstrated and the feasibility of the system in small animal imaging application was proved. We anticipate this system could be a useful tool for the molecular imaging of small animals adaptable for various experimental conditions in future

  12. Systematic approach to acquisition and transmission of digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, J.L.; Pratt, J.P.; Roberts, D.R.; Feyerabend, A.; Nemchak, J.; Johnson, S.

    1990-01-01

    While the feasibility of teleradiology has been demonstrated locally and over long distances, general use remains limited for reasons including the expense of the equipment, difficulty in use of the equipment, and slow rates of data transmission. This paper examines remote image transmission in a systematic fashion directed at the above problems. A Macintosh II-based nuclear medicine computer system was developed and interfaced directly to gamma cameras within our department. A network was then established linking multiple computers within the hospital with the use of Apple Talk to nearby hospitals that use Ethernet and to remove locations up to 1,000 miles away with use of a VPN 56 telephone service

  13. Compositional images from the Diffraction Enhanced Imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnah, M.O.; Zhong, Z.; Parham, C.; Zhang, H.; Chapman, D.

    2007-01-01

    Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) derives X-ray contrast from absorption, refraction, and extinction. While the refraction angle image of DEI represents the gradient of the projected mass density of the object, the absorption image measures the projected attenuation (μt)-bar of an object. Using a simple integral method it has been shown that a mass density image (ρt)-bar can be obtained from the refraction angle image. It then is a simple matter to develop a combinational image by dividing these two images to create a μ/ρ image. The μ/ρ is a fundamental property of a material and is therefore useful for identifying the composition of an object. In projection X-ray imaging the μ/ρ image identifies the integrated composition of the elements along the beam path. When applied to DEI computed tomography (CT), the image identifies the composition in each voxel. This method presents a new type of spectroscopy based in radiography. We present the method of obtaining the compositional image, the results of experiments in which we verify the method with known standards and an application of the method to breast cancer imaging

  14. Vesical endometriosis: utility of imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, M.; Cascon, E.; Robledo, R.; Perez, M.

    1999-01-01

    We present three cases of vesical endometriosis initially studied with ultrasound. One case was also studied with intravenous urography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We discuss on the utility of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of vesical endometriosis. (Author) 9 refs

  15. Development of flow velocity measurement techniques in visible images. Improvement of particle image velocimetry techniques on image process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Motohiko; Kamide, Hideki; Hishida, Koichi

    1999-10-01

    Noise reduction system was developed to improve applicability of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to complicated configure bounded flows. For fast reactor safety and thermal hydraulic studies, experiments are performed in scale models which usually have rather complicated geometry and structures such as fuel subassemblies, heat exchangers, etc. The structures and stuck dusts on the view window of the models obscure the particle image. Thus the image except the moving particles can be regarded as a noise. In the present study, two noise reduction techniques are proposed. The one is the Time-averaged Light Intensity Subtraction method (TIS) which subtracts the time-averaged light intensity of each pixel in the sequential images from the each corresponding pixel. The other one is the Minimum Light Intensity Subtraction method (MIS) which subtracts the minimum light intensity of each pixel in the sequential images from the each corresponding pixel. Both methods are examined on their capabilities of noise reduction. As for the original 'bench mark' image, the image made from Large Eddy Simulation was used. To the bench mark image, noises are added which are referred as sample images. Both methods reduce the rate of vector with the error of more than one pixel from 90% to less than 5%. Also, more than 50% of the vectors have the error of less than 0.2 pixel. The analysis of uncertainty shows that these methods enhances the accuracy of vector measurement 3 ∼ 12 times if the image with noise were processed, and the MIS method has 1.1 ∼ 2.1 times accuracy compared to the TIS. Thus the present noise reduction methods are quite efficient to enhance the accuracy of flow velocity fields measured with particle images including structures and deposits on the view window. (author)

  16. MR angiography of the carotid arteries in 3 D TOF-technique with sagittal ''double-slab'' acquisition using a new head-neck coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, J.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, S.; Heller, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to assess the value of MR angiography (MRA) in sagittal technique compared to DSA in the evaluation of carotid artery stenosis. Methods: 80 Carotid arteries in 40 symptomatic patients were prospectively studied with DSA and MRA. MRA was carried out by means of 3D time-of-flight technique with a FISP sequence (T E 6 ms/T R 80 ms, flip angle 25 , FOV 240x210 mm, matrix 157x256 mm, in-plane resolution 1.34x0.94 mm, partition thickness 1.32 mm, slab thickness 45 mm, acquisition time 7 min) using a new head-neck coil. Data acquisition was performed in sagittal orientation with the 'double-slab' technique. Imaging quality of the extracranial carotid arteries and correctness of quantification of stenosis was performed. Results: Imaging quality was good at the origin of the carotid arteries in 65%, at the bifurcation region in 98% and near the skull base in 81%. The agreement of DSA and MRA was 96% of the normal arteries (24/25), 90% of the severe stenoses (28/31) and 100% of the occluded arteries (9/9). Conclusion: MRA in sagittal 'double-slab' technique is a noninvasive technique allowing to detect normal arteries and candidates for surgery with high degree of certainity. (orig.) [de

  17. Data of NODDI diffusion metrics in the brain and computer simulation of hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI acquisition scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandana Kodiweera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides NODDI diffusion metrics in the brains of 52 healthy participants and computer simulation data to support compatibility of hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI, “Hybrid diffusion imaging” [1] acquisition scheme in fitting neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI model, “NODDI: practical in vivo neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging of the human brain” [2]. HYDI is an extremely versatile diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI technique that enables various analyzes methods using a single diffusion dataset. One of the diffusion data analysis methods is the NODDI computation, which models the brain tissue with three compartments: fast isotropic diffusion (e.g., cerebrospinal fluid, anisotropic hindered diffusion (e.g., extracellular space, and anisotropic restricted diffusion (e.g., intracellular space. The NODDI model produces microstructural metrics in the developing brain, aging brain or human brain with neurologic disorders. The first dataset provided here are the means and standard deviations of NODDI metrics in 48 white matter region-of-interest (ROI averaging across 52 healthy participants. The second dataset provided here is the computer simulation with initial conditions guided by the first dataset as inputs and gold standard for model fitting. The computer simulation data provide a direct comparison of NODDI indices computed from the HYDI acquisition [1] to the NODDI indices computed from the originally proposed acquisition [2]. These data are related to the accompanying research article “Age Effects and Sex Differences in Human Brain White Matter of Young to Middle-Aged Adults: A DTI, NODDI, and q-Space Study” [3].

  18. Screening crops for efficient phosphorus acquisition in a low phosphorus soil using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meena, S.; Malarvizhi, P.; Rajeswari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Deficiency of phosphorus (P) is the major limitation to agricultural production. Identification of cultivars with greater capacity to grow in soils having low P availability (phosphorus efficiency) will help in P management in a sustainable way. Green house experiment with maize (CO 6) and cotton (MCU 13) as test crops with four levels of phosphorus (0, 3.75, 7.50 and 15 mg P kg -1 soil) was conducted in a P deficient soil (7.2 kg ha -1 ) to study the phosphorus acquisition characteristics and to select efficient crop using 32 P radiotracer technique. Carrier free 32 P obtained as orthophosphoric acid in dilute hydrochloric acid medium from the Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Mumbai was used for labeling the soil @ 3200 kBq pot -1 . After 60 days the crops were harvested and the radioactivity was measured in the plant samples using Liquid scintillation counter (PerkinElmer - Tricarb 2810 TR). Different values of specific radioactivity and Isotopically Exchangeable Phosphorus for maize and cotton indicated that chemically different pools of soil P were utilized and maize accessing a larger pool than cotton. Maize having recorded high Phosphorus Use Efficiency, Phosphorus Efficiency and low Phosphorus Stress Factor values, it is a better choice for P deficient soils. Higher Phosphorus Acquisition Efficiency of maize (59 %) than cotton (48%) can be related to the ability of maize to take up P from insoluble inorganic P forms. (author)

  19. Methods of Hematoxylin and Erosin Image Information Acquisition and Optimization in Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Woong Bae; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Kwang Gi; Choi, Yongdoo; Chang, Hee Jin; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2016-07-01

    We produced hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining-like color images by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which can obtain the same or more information in comparison to conventional tissue staining. We improved images by using several image converting techniques, including morphological methods, color space conversion methods, and segmentation methods. An image obtained after image processing showed coloring very similar to that in images produced by H&E staining, and it is advantageous to conduct analysis through fluorescent dye imaging and microscopy rather than analysis based on single microscopic imaging. The colors used in CLSM are different from those seen in H&E staining, which is the method most widely used for pathologic diagnosis and is familiar to pathologists. Computer technology can facilitate the conversion of images by CLSM to be very similar to H&E staining images. We believe that the technique used in this study has great potential for application in clinical tissue analysis.

  20. Gated listmode acquisition with the QuadHIDAC animal PET to image mouse hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefers, K.P.; Lang, N.; Stegger, L.; Schober, O.; Schaefers, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this study was to develop ECG and respiratory gating in combination with listmode acquisition for the quadHIDAC small-animal PET scanner. Methods: ECG and respiratory gating was realized with the help of an external trigger device (BioVET) synchronized with the listmode acquisition. Listmode data of a mouse acquisition (injected with 6.5 MBq of 18 F-FDG) were sorted according to three different gating definitions: 12 cardiac gates, 8 respiratory gates and a combination of 8 cardiac and 8 respiratory gates. Images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (ramp filter), and parameters like left ventricular wall thickness (WT), wall-to-wall separation (WS) and blood to myocardium activity ratios (BMR) were calculated. Results: cardiac gated images show improvement of all parameters (WT 2.6 mm, WS 4.1 mm, BRM 2.3) in diastole compared to ungated images (WT 3.0 mm, WS 3.4 mm, BMR 1.3). Respiratory gating had little effect on calculated parameters. Conclusion: ECG gating with the quadHIDAC can improve myocardial image quality in mice. This could have a major impact on the calculation of an image-derived input function for kinetic modelling. (orig.)

  1. Automated system for acquisition and image processing for the control and monitoring boned nopal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano, E.; de Posada, E.; Arronte, M.; Ponce, L.; Flores, T.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a system for acquisition and image processing to control the removal of thorns nopal vegetable (Opuntia ficus indica) in an automated machine that uses pulses of a laser of Nd: YAG. The areolas, areas where thorns grow on the bark of the Nopal, are located applying segmentation algorithms to the images obtained by a CCD. Once the position of the areolas is known, coordinates are sent to a motors system that controls the laser to interact with all areolas and remove the thorns of the nopal. The electronic system comprises a video decoder, memory for image and software storage, and digital signal processor for system control. The firmware programmed tasks on acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation, recognition and interpretation of the areolas. This system achievement identifying areolas and generating table of coordinates of them, which will be send the motor galvo system that controls the laser for removal

  2. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adluru, Ganesh, E-mail: gadluru@gmail.com; Anderson, Jeffrey [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States); Gur, Yaniv [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David [Advanced MRI Technologies, Sebastpool, California, 95472 (United States); DiBella, Edward V. R. [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To improve rank constrained reconstructions for undersampled multi-image MRI acquisitions. Methods: Motivated by the recent developments in low-rank matrix completion theory and its applicability to rapid dynamic MRI, a new reordering-based rank constrained reconstruction of undersampled multi-image data that uses prior image information is proposed. Instead of directly minimizing the nuclear norm of a matrix of estimated images, the nuclear norm of reordered matrix values is minimized. The reordering is based on the prior image estimates. The method is tested on brain diffusion imaging data and dynamic contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion data. Results: Good quality images from data undersampled by a factor of three for diffusion imaging and by a factor of 3.5 for dynamic cardiac perfusion imaging with respiratory motion were obtained. Reordering gave visually improved image quality over standard nuclear norm minimization reconstructions. Root mean squared errors with respect to ground truth images were improved by ∼18% and ∼16% with reordering for diffusion and perfusion applications, respectively. Conclusions: The reordered low-rank constraint is a way to inject prior image information that offers improvements over a standard low-rank constraint for undersampled multi-image MRI reconstructions.

  3. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adluru, Ganesh; Anderson, Jeffrey; Gur, Yaniv; Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To improve rank constrained reconstructions for undersampled multi-image MRI acquisitions. Methods: Motivated by the recent developments in low-rank matrix completion theory and its applicability to rapid dynamic MRI, a new reordering-based rank constrained reconstruction of undersampled multi-image data that uses prior image information is proposed. Instead of directly minimizing the nuclear norm of a matrix of estimated images, the nuclear norm of reordered matrix values is minimized. The reordering is based on the prior image estimates. The method is tested on brain diffusion imaging data and dynamic contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion data. Results: Good quality images from data undersampled by a factor of three for diffusion imaging and by a factor of 3.5 for dynamic cardiac perfusion imaging with respiratory motion were obtained. Reordering gave visually improved image quality over standard nuclear norm minimization reconstructions. Root mean squared errors with respect to ground truth images were improved by ∼18% and ∼16% with reordering for diffusion and perfusion applications, respectively. Conclusions: The reordered low-rank constraint is a way to inject prior image information that offers improvements over a standard low-rank constraint for undersampled multi-image MRI reconstructions

  4. Color image Segmentation using automatic thresholding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrabi, R.; Ben Braiek, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, entropy and between-class variance based thresholding methods for color images segmentation are studied. The maximization of the between-class variance (MVI) and the entropy (ME) have been used as a criterion functions to determine an optimal threshold to segment images into nearly homogenous regions. Segmentation results from the two methods are validated and the segmentation sensitivity for the test data available is evaluated, and a comparative study between these methods in different color spaces is presented. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the MVI method for color image segmentation.

  5. Sampling Number Effects in 2D and Range Imaging of Range-gated Acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Jai-Wan; Jeong, Kyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the number effects of sampling images for making a 2D image and a range image from acquired RGI images. We analyzed the number effects of RGI images for making a 2D image and a range image using a RGI vision system. As the results, 2D image quality was not much depended on the number of sampling images but on how much well extract efficient RGI images. But, the number of RGI images was important for making a range image because range image quality was proportional to the number of RGI images. Image acquiring in a monitoring area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate control plans. To overcome the non-visualization problem caused by airborne obstacle particles, vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination lightening through disturbance airborne particles. One of these powerful active vision systems is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from raining or smoking environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through airborne disturbance particles. Thus, in contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology robust for low-visibility environments

  6. Sampling Number Effects in 2D and Range Imaging of Range-gated Acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Jai-Wan; Jeong, Kyung-Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we analyzed the number effects of sampling images for making a 2D image and a range image from acquired RGI images. We analyzed the number effects of RGI images for making a 2D image and a range image using a RGI vision system. As the results, 2D image quality was not much depended on the number of sampling images but on how much well extract efficient RGI images. But, the number of RGI images was important for making a range image because range image quality was proportional to the number of RGI images. Image acquiring in a monitoring area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate control plans. To overcome the non-visualization problem caused by airborne obstacle particles, vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination lightening through disturbance airborne particles. One of these powerful active vision systems is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from raining or smoking environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through airborne disturbance particles. Thus, in contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology robust for low-visibility environments.

  7. Implementation of the neutron noise technique for subcritical reactors using a new data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellino, Pablo A.; Gomez, Angel

    2009-01-01

    A new data acquisition system was designed and programmed for nuclear kinetics parameter estimations in subcritical reactors. The system allows using any of the neutron noise techniques, since it could store the whole information available in the neutron detection system. The α Rossi, α Feynman and spectral analysis methods were performed in order to estimate the prompt neutron decay constant (and hence the reactivity). The measurements were done in the nuclear research reactor RA-1, where introducing the control rods, different reactivity levels where reached (until -7 dollars). With the three methods used, agreement was found between the estimations and the reference reactivities in each level, even when the detector efficiency was low. All the measurements were performed with a high gamma flux, although the results were found to be satisfactory. (author)

  8. Diffraction Contrast Tomography: A Novel 3D Polycrystalline Grain Imaging Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuettner, Lindsey Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) is a non-destructive way of imaging microstructures of polycrystalline materials such as metals or crystalline organics. It is a useful technique to map 3D grain structures as well as providing crystallographic information such as crystal orientation, grain shape, and strain. Understanding the internal microstructure of a material is important in understanding the bulk material properties. This report gives a general overview of the similar techniques, DCT data acquisition, and analysis processes. Following the short literature review, potential work and research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is discussed.

  9. Evaluation of Parallel and Fan-Beam Data Acquisition Geometries and Strategies for Myocardial SPECT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yujin; Tsui, B. M. W.; Gilland, K. L.; Frey, E. C.; Gullberg, G. T.

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluates myocardial SPECT images obtained from parallel-hole (PH) and fan-beam (FB) collimator geometries using both circular-orbit (CO) and noncircular-orbit (NCO) acquisitions. A newly developed 4-D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom was used to simulate the /sup 99m/Tc-sestamibi uptakes in human torso with myocardial defects in the left ventricular (LV) wall. Two phantoms were generated to simulate patients with thick and thin body builds. Projection data including the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response and scatter were generated using SIMSET Monte Carlo simulations. A large number of photon histories were generated such that the projection data were close to noise free. Poisson noise fluctuations were then added to simulate the count densities found in clinical data. Noise-free and noisy projection data were reconstructed using the iterative OS-EM reconstruction algorithm with attenuation compensation. The reconstructed images from noisy projection data show that the noise levels are lower for the FB as compared to the PH collimator due to increase in detected counts. The NCO acquisition method provides slightly better resolution and small improvement in defect contrast as compared to the CO acquisition method in noise-free reconstructed images. Despite lower projection counts the NCO shows the same noise level as the CO in the attenuation corrected reconstruction images. The results from the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) study show that FB collimator is superior to PH collimator in myocardial defect detection, but the NCO shows no statistical significant difference from the CO for either PH or FB collimator. In conclusion, our results indicate that data acquisition using NCO makes a very small improvement in the resolution over CO for myocardial SPECT imaging. This small improvement does not make a significant difference on myocardial defect detection. However, an FB collimator provides better defect detection than a

  10. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  11. A camac based data acquisition system for flat-panel image array readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, E.J.; Antonuk, L.E.; Berry, J.E.; Huang, W.; Mody, P.; Yorkston, J.; Longo, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A readout system has been developed to facilitate the digitization and subsequent display of image data from two-dimensional, pixellated, flat-panel, amorphous silicon imaging arrays. These arrays have been designed specifically for medical x-ray imaging applications. The readout system is based on hardware and software developed for various experiments at CERN and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Additional analog signal processing and digital control electronics were constructed specifically for this application. The authors report on the form of the resulting data acquisition system, discuss aspects of its performance, and consider the compromises which were involved in its design

  12. Merits and limitations of functional imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    The functional image is a powerful tool to look at physiologic information. It is ideally suited to the radiotracer method which measures regional physiology. It is ideal for regional analysis, providing a format which nicely complements the more traditional and anatomically oriented data displays. The functional image must be used intelligently, however, with the user aware of its limitations and of the meaning of indices which it is measuring. (orig.)

  13. Rapid anatomical brain imaging using spiral acquisition and an expanded signal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lars; Engel, Maria; Barmet, Christoph; Haeberlin, Maximilian; Wilm, Bertram J; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Schmid, Thomas; Gross, Simon; Brunner, David O; Stephan, Klaas E; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2018-03-01

    We report the deployment of spiral acquisition for high-resolution structural imaging at 7T. Long spiral readouts are rendered manageable by an expanded signal model including static off-resonance and B 0 dynamics along with k-space trajectories and coil sensitivity maps. Image reconstruction is accomplished by inversion of the signal model using an extension of the iterative non-Cartesian SENSE algorithm. Spiral readouts up to 25 ms are shown to permit whole-brain 2D imaging at 0.5 mm in-plane resolution in less than a minute. A range of options is explored, including proton-density and T 2 * contrast, acceleration by parallel imaging, different readout orientations, and the extraction of phase images. Results are shown to exhibit competitive image quality along with high geometric consistency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Three dimensional imaging technique for laser-plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shaoen; Zheng Zhijian; Liu Zhongli

    2001-01-01

    A CT technique for laser-plasma diagnostic and a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction program (CT3D) have been developed. The 3D images of the laser-plasma are reconstructed by using a multiplication algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) from five pinhole camera images obtained along different sight directions. The technique has been used to measure the three-dimensional distribution of X-ray of laser-plasma experiments in Xingguang II device, and the good results are obtained. This shows that a CT technique can be applied to ICF experiments

  15. Three dimensional imaging technique for laser-plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaoen, Jiang; Zhijian, Zheng; Zhongli, Liu [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2001-04-01

    A CT technique for laser-plasma diagnostic and a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction program (CT3D) have been developed. The 3D images of the laser-plasma are reconstructed by using a multiplication algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) from five pinhole camera images obtained along different sight directions. The technique has been used to measure the three-dimensional distribution of X-ray of laser-plasma experiments in Xingguang II device, and the good results are obtained. This shows that a CT technique can be applied to ICF experiments.

  16. Millimeter-wave Imaging Systems with Aperture Synthesis Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löffler, Torsten; Krozer, Viktor; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes development of a millimetre-wave imaging system using multi-element aperture filling techniques [1]. Such imaging systems are increasingly demonstrated for security applications and in particular standoff imaging of persons and bonding flaw and defect detection [2]. The major ...

  17. An efficient similarity measure technique for medical image registration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, an efficient similarity measure technique is proposed for medical image registration. The proposed approach is based on the Gerschgorin circles theorem. In this approach, image registration is carried out by considering Gerschgorin bounds of a covariance matrix of two compared images with normalized ...

  18. Enhancement of SAR images using fuzzy shrinkage technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents speckle noise reduction in SAR images using a combination of curvelet and fuzzy logic technique to restore speckle-affected images. This method overcomes the limitation of discontinuity in hard threshold and permanent deviation in soft threshold. First, it decomposes noise image into different ...

  19. Red blood cell image enhancement techniques for cells with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quality or challenging conditions of the images such as poor illumination of blood smear and most importantly overlapping RBC. The algorithm comprises of two RBC segmentation that can be selected based on the image quality, circle mask technique and grayscale blood smear image processing. Detail explanations ...

  20. Combined neutron imaging techniques for cultural heritage purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna, T.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the different new neutron techniques developed by the Ancient Charm collaboration to image objects of cultural heritage importance: Prompt-gamma-ray activation imaging (PGAI) coupled to cold/thermal neutron transmission tomography, Neutron Resonance Capture Imaging (NRCI) and Neutron Resonance Tomography.

  1. Simultaneous acquisition of multislice PET and MR images: initial results with a MR-compatible PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-12-01

    PET and MRI are powerful imaging techniques that are largely complementary in the information they provide. We have designed and built a MR-compatible PET scanner based on avalanche photodiode technology that allows simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR images in small animals. The PET scanner insert uses magnetic field-insensitive, position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) detectors coupled, via short lengths of optical fibers, to arrays of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator crystals. The optical fibers are used to minimize electromagnetic interference between the radiofrequency and gradient coils and the PET detector system. The PET detector module components and the complete PET insert assembly are described. PET data were acquired with and without MR sequences running, and detector flood histograms were compared with the ones generated from the data acquired outside the magnet. A uniform MR phantom was also imaged to assess the effect of the PET detector on the MR data acquisition. Simultaneous PET and MRI studies of a mouse were performed ex vivo. PSAPDs can be successfully used to read out large numbers of scintillator crystals coupled through optical fibers with acceptable performance in terms of energy and timing resolution and crystal identification. The PSAPD-LSO detector performs well in the 7-T magnet, and no visible artifacts are detected in the MR images using standard pulse sequences. The first images from the complete system have been successfully acquired and reconstructed, demonstrating that simultaneous PET and MRI studies are feasible and opening up interesting possibilities for dual-modality molecular imaging studies.

  2. Estimation of organ-absorbed radiation doses during 64-detector CT coronary angiography using different acquisition techniques and heart rates: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Kawashima, Hiroko (Dept. of Quantum Medical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa (Japan)), email: matsuk@mhs.mp.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Noto, Kimiya; Takata, Tadanori; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki (Dept. of Radiological Technology, Kanazawa Univ. Hospital, Kanazawa (Japan)); Shimono, Tetsunori (Dept. of Radiology, Hoshigaoka Koseinenkin Hospital, Hirakata (Japan)); Matsui, Osamu (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa (Japan))

    2011-07-15

    Background: Though appropriate image acquisition parameters allow an effective dose below 1 mSv for CT coronary angiography (CTCA) performed with the latest dual-source CT scanners, a single-source 64-detector CT procedure results in a significant radiation dose due to its technical limitations. Therefore, estimating the radiation doses absorbed by an organ during 64-detector CTCA is important. Purpose: To estimate the radiation doses absorbed by organs located in the chest region during 64-detector CTCA using different acquisition techniques and heart rates. Material and Methods: Absorbed doses for breast, heart, lung, red bone marrow, thymus, and skin were evaluated using an anthropomorphic phantom and radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLDs). Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated helical and ECG-triggered non-helical acquisitions were performed by applying a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute (bpm) and ECG-gated helical acquisitions using ECG modulation (ECGM) of the tube current were performed by applying simulated heart rates of 40, 60, and 90 bpm after placing RPLDs on the anatomic location of each organ. The absorbed dose for each organ was calculated by multiplying the calibrated mean dose values of RPLDs with the mass energy coefficient ratio. Results: For all acquisitions, the highest absorbed dose was observed for the heart. When the helical and non-helical acquisitions were performed by applying a simulated heart rate of 60 bpm, the absorbed doses for heart were 215.5, 202.2, and 66.8 mGy for helical, helical with ECGM, and non-helical acquisitions, respectively. When the helical acquisitions using ECGM were performed by applying simulated heart rates of 40, 60, and 90 bpm, the absorbed doses for heart were 178.6, 139.1, and 159.3 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: ECG-triggered non-helical acquisition is recommended to reduce the radiation dose. Also, controlling the patients' heart rate appropriately during ECG-gated helical acquisition with

  3. Innovative Hyperspectral Imaging-Based Techniques for Quality Evaluation of Fruits and Vegetables: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhen Lu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available New, non-destructive sensing techniques for fast and more effective quality assessment of fruits and vegetables are needed to meet the ever-increasing consumer demand for better, more consistent and safer food products. Over the past 15 years, hyperspectral imaging has emerged as a new generation of sensing technology for non-destructive food quality and safety evaluation, because it integrates the major features of imaging and spectroscopy, thus enabling the acquisition of both spectral and spatial information from an object simultaneously. This paper first provides a brief overview of hyperspectral imaging configurations and common sensing modes used for food quality and safety evaluation. The paper is, however, focused on the three innovative hyperspectral imaging-based techniques or sensing platforms, i.e., spectral scattering, integrated reflectance and transmittance, and spatially-resolved spectroscopy, which have been developed in our laboratory for property and quality evaluation of fruits, vegetables and other food products. The basic principle and instrumentation of each technique are described, followed by the mathematical methods for processing and extracting critical information from the acquired data. Applications of these techniques for property and quality evaluation of fruits and vegetables are then presented. Finally, concluding remarks are given on future research needs to move forward these hyperspectral imaging techniques.

  4. Single breath-hold real-time cine MR imaging: improved temporal resolution using generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Rieber, Johannes; Nittka, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test parallel imaging techniques for improvement of temporal resolution in multislice single breath-hold real-time cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) in comparison with standard segmented single-slice SSFP techniques. Eighteen subjects were examined on a 1.5-T scanner using a multislice real-time cine SSFP technique using the GRAPPA algorithm. Global left ventricular parameters (EDV, ESV, SV, EF) were evaluated and results compared with a standard segmented single-slice SSFP technique. Results for EDV (r=0.93), ESV (r=0.99), SV (r=0.83), and EF (r=0.99) of real-time multislice SSFP imaging showed a high correlation with results of segmented SSFP acquisitions. Systematic differences between both techniques were statistically non-significant. Single breath-hold multislice techniques using GRAPPA allow for improvement of temporal resolution and for accurate assessment of global left ventricular functional parameters. (orig.)

  5. Advanced techniques in digital mammographic images recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliu, R. Azir

    2011-01-01

    Computer Aided Detection and Diagnosis is used in digital radiography as a second thought in the process of determining diagnoses, which reduces the percentage of wrong diagnoses of the established interpretation of mammographic images. The issues that are discussed in the dissertation are the analyses and improvement of advanced technologies in the field of artificial intelligence, more specifically in the field of machine learning for solving diagnostic problems and automatic detection of speculated lesions in digital mammograms. The developed of SVM-based ICAD system with cascade architecture for analyses and comparison mammographic images in both projections (CC and MLO) gives excellent result for detection and masses and microcalcifications. In order to develop a system with optimal performances of sensitivity, specificity and time complexity, a set of relevant characteristics need to be created which will show all the pathological regions that might be present in the mammographic image. The structure of the mammographic image, size and the large number of pathological structures in this area are the reason why the creation of a set of these features is necessary for the presentation of good indicators. These pathological structures are a real challenge today and the world of science is working in that direction. The doctoral dissertation showed that the system has optimal results, which are confirmed by experts, and institutions, which are dealing with these same issues. Also, the thesis presents a new approach for automatic identification of regions of interest in the mammographic image where regions of interest are automatically selected for further processing mammography in cases when the number of examined patients is higher. Out of 480 mammographic images downloaded from MIAS database and tested with ICAD system the author shows that, after separation and selection of relevant features of ICAD system the accuracy is 89.7% (96.4% for microcalcifications

  6. A rapid and robust gradient measurement technique using dynamic single-point imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyungseok; McMillan, Alan B

    2017-09-01

    We propose a new gradient measurement technique based on dynamic single-point imaging (SPI), which allows simple, rapid, and robust measurement of k-space trajectory. To enable gradient measurement, we utilize the variable field-of-view (FOV) property of dynamic SPI, which is dependent on gradient shape. First, one-dimensional (1D) dynamic SPI data are acquired from a targeted gradient axis, and then relative FOV scaling factors between 1D images or k-spaces at varying encoding times are found. These relative scaling factors are the relative k-space position that can be used for image reconstruction. The gradient measurement technique also can be used to estimate the gradient impulse response function for reproducible gradient estimation as a linear time invariant system. The proposed measurement technique was used to improve reconstructed image quality in 3D ultrashort echo, 2D spiral, and multi-echo bipolar gradient-echo imaging. In multi-echo bipolar gradient-echo imaging, measurement of the k-space trajectory allowed the use of a ramp-sampled trajectory for improved acquisition speed (approximately 30%) and more accurate quantitative fat and water separation in a phantom. The proposed dynamic SPI-based method allows fast k-space trajectory measurement with a simple implementation and no additional hardware for improved image quality. Magn Reson Med 78:950-962, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Fast in vivo bioluminescence tomography using a novel pure optical imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence tomography (BLT is a novel optical molecular imaging technique that advanced the conventional planar bioluminescence imaging (BLI into a quantifiable three-dimensional (3D approach in preclinical living animal studies in oncology. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct tumor lesions inside animal body accurately, the prior structural information is commonly obtained from X-ray computed tomography (CT. This strategy requires a complicated hybrid imaging system, extensive post imaging analysis and involvement of ionizing radiation. Moreover, the overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. Here, we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic (POBT system and a novel BLT workflow based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. This method can reconstruct the 3D surface of an imaging subject based on a sparse set of planar white-light and bioluminescent images, so that the prior structural information can be offered for 3D tumor lesion reconstruction without the involvement of CT. The performance of this novel technique was evaluated through the comparison with a conventional dual-modality tomographic (DMT system and a commercialized optical imaging system (IVIS Spectrum using three breast cancer xenografts. The results revealed that the new technique offered comparable in vivo tomographic accuracy with the DMT system (P>0.05 in much shorter data analysis time. It also offered significantly better accuracy comparing with the IVIS system (P<0.04 without sacrificing too much time.

  8. Optical replication techniques for image slicers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmoll, J.; Robertson, D.J.; Dubbeldam, C.M.; Bortoletto, F.; Pína, L.; Hudec, René; Prieto, E.; Norrie, C.; Ramsay- Howat, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 50, 4-5 (2006), s. 263-266 ISSN 1387-6473 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : smart focal planes * image slicers * replication Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.914, year: 2006

  9. Comparing imaging procedures: techniques and examples. Gastroenterology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    The distinct advantages of nuclear medicine procedures, in comparison to radiography, contrast studies, computerized tomography and ultrasound, are emphasized. Scintigraphic methods offer quantitative data regarding function which competing imaging modalities are unable to provide, and make them the studies of choice in the evaluation of gastrointestinal physiology and functional abnormalities

  10. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Imaging Techniques in Arterial Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Adler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional imaging has become a critical aspect in the evaluation of arterial injuries. In particular, angiography using computed tomography (CT is the imaging of choice. A variety of techniques and options are available when evaluating for arterial injuries. Techniques involve contrast bolus, various phases of contrast enhancement, multiplanar reconstruction, volume rendering, and maximum intensity projection. After the images are rendered, a variety of features may be seen that diagnose the injury. This article provides a general overview of the techniques, important findings, and pitfalls in cross sectional imaging of arterial imaging, particularly in relation to computed tomography. In addition, the future directions of computed tomography, including a few techniques in the process of development, is also discussed.

  11. Experimental and theoretical contributions to X-ray phase-contrast techniques for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diemoz, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Several X-ray phase-contrast techniques have recently been developed. Unlike conventional X-ray methods, which measure the absorption properties of the tissues, these techniques derive contrast also from the modulation of the phase produced by the sample. Since the phase shift can be significant even for small details characterized by weak or absent absorption, the achievable image contrast can be greatly increased, notably for the soft biological tissues. These methods are therefore very promising for applications in the medical domain. The aim of this work is to contribute to a deeper understanding of these techniques, in particular propagation-based imaging (PBI), analyzer-based imaging (ABI) and grating interferometry (GIFM), and to study their potential and the best practical implementation for medical imaging applications. An important part of this work is dedicated to the use of mathematical algorithms for the extraction, from the acquired images, of quantitative sample information (the absorption, refraction and scattering sample properties). In particular, five among the most known algorithms based on the geometrical optics approximation have been theoretically analysed and experimentally compared, in planar and tomographic modalities, by using geometrical phantoms and human bone-cartilage and breast samples. A semi-quantitative method for the acquisition and reconstruction of tomographic images in the ABI and GIFM techniques has also been proposed. The validity conditions are analyzed in detail and the method, enabling a considerable simplification of the imaging procedure, has been experimentally checked on phantoms and human samples. Finally, a theoretical and experimental comparison of the PBI, ABI and GIFM techniques is presented. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these techniques are discussed. The results obtained from this analysis can be very useful for determining the most adapted technique for a given application. (author)

  12. Smart acquisition EELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sader, Kasim; Schaffer, Bernhard; Vaughan, Gareth; Brydson, Rik; Brown, Andy; Bleloch, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a novel acquisition methodology for the recording of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM): 'Smart Acquisition'. Smart Acquisition allows the independent control of probe scanning procedures and the simultaneous acquisition of analytical signals such as EELS. The original motivation for this work arose from the need to control the electron dose experienced by beam-sensitive specimens whilst maintaining a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio in the EEL signal for the extraction of useful analytical information (such as energy loss near edge spectral features) from relatively undamaged areas. We have developed a flexible acquisition framework which separates beam position data input, beam positioning, and EELS acquisition. In this paper we demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique on beam-sensitive thin films of amorphous aluminium trifluoride. Smart Acquisition has been used to expose lines to the electron beam, followed by analysis of the structures created by line-integrating EELS acquisitions, and the results are compared to those derived from a standard EELS linescan. High angle annular dark-field images show clear reductions in damage for the Smart Acquisition areas compared to the conventional linescan, and the Smart Acquisition low loss EEL spectra are more representative of the undamaged material than those derived using a conventional linescan. Atomically resolved EELS of all four elements of CaNdTiO show the high resolution capabilities of Smart Acquisition.

  13. Smart acquisition EELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sader, Kasim, E-mail: k.sader@leeds.ac.uk [SuperSTEM, J block, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Schaffer, Bernhard [SuperSTEM, J block, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vaughan, Gareth [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Brydson, Rik [SuperSTEM, J block, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Brown, Andy [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Bleloch, Andrew [SuperSTEM, J block, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We have developed a novel acquisition methodology for the recording of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM): 'Smart Acquisition'. Smart Acquisition allows the independent control of probe scanning procedures and the simultaneous acquisition of analytical signals such as EELS. The original motivation for this work arose from the need to control the electron dose experienced by beam-sensitive specimens whilst maintaining a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio in the EEL signal for the extraction of useful analytical information (such as energy loss near edge spectral features) from relatively undamaged areas. We have developed a flexible acquisition framework which separates beam position data input, beam positioning, and EELS acquisition. In this paper we demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique on beam-sensitive thin films of amorphous aluminium trifluoride. Smart Acquisition has been used to expose lines to the electron beam, followed by analysis of the structures created by line-integrating EELS acquisitions, and the results are compared to those derived from a standard EELS linescan. High angle annular dark-field images show clear reductions in damage for the Smart Acquisition areas compared to the conventional linescan, and the Smart Acquisition low loss EEL spectra are more representative of the undamaged material than those derived using a conventional linescan. Atomically resolved EELS of all four elements of CaNdTiO show the high resolution capabilities of Smart Acquisition.

  14. Jet-images: computer vision inspired techniques for jet tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, Josh; Kagan, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,Menlo Park, CA 94028 (United States)

    2015-02-18

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon-initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  15. Jet-images: computer vision inspired techniques for jet tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogan, Josh; Kagan, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon-initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  16. Acoustical holographic Siamese image technique for imaging radial cracks in reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Gribble, R.P.

    1985-04-01

    This paper describes a unique technique (i.e., ''Siamese imaging'') for imaging quasi-vertical defects in reactor pipe weldments. The Siamese image is a bi-symmetrical view of the inner surface defect. Image construction geometry consists of two probes (i.e., source/receiver) operating either from opposite sides or the same side of the defect to be imaged. As the probes are scanned across a lower surface connected defect, they encounter two images - first the normal upright image and then the inverted image. The final integrated image consists of two images connected along their baselines, thus we call it a ''Siamese image.'' The experimental imaging results on simulated and natural cracks in reactor piping weldments graphically illustrate this unique technique. Excellent images of mechanical fatique and thermal cracks were obtained on ferritic and austenitic piping

  17. Effects of various event building techniques on data acquisition system architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsotti, E.; Booth, A.; Bowden, M.

    1990-04-01

    The preliminary specifications for various new detectors throughout the world including those at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) already make it clear that existing event building techniques will be inadequate for the high trigger and data rates anticipated for these detectors. In the world of high-energy physics many approaches have been taken to solving the problem of reading out data from a whole detector and presenting a complete event to the physicist, while simultaneously keeping deadtime to a minimum. This paper includes a review of multiprocessor and telecommunications interconnection networks and how these networks relate to event building in general, illustrating advantages of the various approaches. It presents a more detailed study of recent research into new event building techniques which incorporate much greater parallelism to better accommodate high data rates. The future in areas such as front-end electronics architectures, high speed data links, event building and online processor arrays is also examined. Finally, details of a scalable parallel data acquisition system architecture being developed at Fermilab are given. 35 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab

  18. An application specific integrated circuit and data acquisition system for digital X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuville, E.; Cederstroem, B.; Danielsson, M.; Luo, L.; Nygren, D.; Oltman, E.; Vestlund, J.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition system for digital X-ray imaging. The chip consists of 16 parallel channels, each containing preamplifier, shaper, comparator and a 16 bit counter. We have demonstrated noiseless single-photon counting over a threshold of 7.2 keV using Silicon detectors and are presently capable of maximum counting rates of 2 MHz per channel. The ASIC is controlled by a personal computer through a commercial PCI card, which is also used for data acquisition. The content of the 16 bit counters are loaded into a shift register and transferred to the PC at any time at a rate of 20 MHz. The system is non-complicated, low cost and high performance and is optimised for digital X-ray imaging applications. (orig.)

  19. An application specific integrated circuit and data acquisition system for digital X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuville, E.; Cederstroem, B.; Danielsson, M.; Luo, L.; Nygren, D.; Oltman, E.; Vestlund, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    We have developed an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition system for digital X-ray imaging. The chip consists of 16 parallel channels, each containing preamplifier, shaper, comparator and a 16 bit counter. We have demonstrated noiseless single-photon counting over a threshold of 7.2 keV using Silicon detectors and are presently capable of maximum counting rates of 2 MHz per channel. The ASIC is controlled by a personal computer through a commercial PCI card, which is also used for data acquisition. The content of the 16 bit counters are loaded into a shift register and transferred to the PC at any time at a rate of 20 MHz. The system is non-complicated, low cost and high performance and is optimised for digital X-ray imaging applications. (orig.). 11 refs.

  20. A Comparison of Techniques for Approximating Full Image-Based Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus B.; Laursen, Rune Elmgaard

    2006-01-01

    Light probes, or environment maps, are used extensively in computer graphics for visual effects involving rendering virtual objects into real scenes (Augment Reality). A light probe is a High Dynamic Range omni-directional image covering all directions on a sphere at some location. Each pixel...... in the light probe image measures the incident radiance at the light probe acquisition point. The figure above shows an example of a light probe image in the longitude-latitude mapping, (similar to an atlas mapping of the Earth). Using the light probe information a virtual object can be rendered with correct...... scene illumination and inserted into images of the scene with credible shading, reflections and shadows. Rendering virtual objects with light probe information is a very time consuming process. Therefore several techniques exist which attempt to approximate the light probe with a set of directional...

  1. Resolution revival technique for subwavelength imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Repän, Taavi; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    The method to achieve a high resolution of subwavelength features (to improve the contrast function) for a dark-field hyperlens—hyperbolic metamaterial slab possessing metallic properties at the interface — is developed. The technique requires the introduction of the phase difference between the o...

  2. Single photon imaging. New instrumentation and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Colsher, J.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of Anger scintillation cameras continues to be enhanced through a series of small improvements which result in significantly better imaging characteristics. The most recent changes in camera design consist of: (1) the introduction of photomultipliers with better photocathode and electron collection efficiencies, (2) the use of thinner (3/8 or 1/4 in) crystals giving slightly better intrinsic resolution for low gamma-ray energies, (3) inclusion of a spatially varying energy window to compensate for variations of light collection efficiency, (4) event-by-event, real-time distortion removal for uniformity correction, and (5) introduction of new methods to improve the count-rate capability. Whereas some of these improvements are due to better understanding of the fundamentals of camera design, others are the result of technological advances in electronic components such as analogue-to-digital converters, microprocessors and high-density digital memories. The development of single photon tomography has developed along two parallel paths. Multipinhole and rotating slant-hole collimator attachments provide some degree of longitudinal tomography, and are currently being applied to cardiac imaging. At the same time rotating camera systems capable of transverse as well as longitudinal imaging are being refined technically and evaluated clinically. Longitudinal tomography is of limited use in quantitative studies and is likely to be an interim solution to three-dimensional imaging. Rotating camera systems, on the other hand, not only provide equal resolution in all three dimensions but are also capable of providing quantitative accuracy. This is the result of progress in attenuation correction and the design of special collimators. Single photon tomography provides a small but noticeable improvement in diagnostic accuracy which is likely to result in widespread use of rotating camera systems in the future

  3. Image acquisition, transmission and assignment in 60Co container inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhifang; Zhou Liye; Liu Ximing; Wang Liqiang

    1999-01-01

    The author describes the data acquisition mode and image reconstruction method in 60 Co container inspection system, analyzes the relationship between line pick period and geometry distortion, makes clear the demand to data transmitting rate. It discusses several data communication methods, draws up a plan for network, realizes automatic direction and reasonable assignment of data in the system, cooperation of multi-computer and parallel processing, thus greatly improves the systems inspection efficiency

  4. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  5. A review of imaging techniques for systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Ming J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography, MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, PET (Positron Emission Tomography, and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

  6. Employing image processing techniques for cancer detection using microarray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan Khalilabad, Nastaran; Hassanpour, Hamid

    2017-02-01

    Microarray technology is a powerful genomic tool for simultaneously studying and analyzing the behavior of thousands of genes. The analysis of images obtained from this technology plays a critical role in the detection and treatment of diseases. The aim of the current study is to develop an automated system for analyzing data from microarray images in order to detect cancerous cases. The proposed system consists of three main phases, namely image processing, data mining, and the detection of the disease. The image processing phase performs operations such as refining image rotation, gridding (locating genes) and extracting raw data from images the data mining includes normalizing the extracted data and selecting the more effective genes. Finally, via the extracted data, cancerous cell is recognized. To evaluate the performance of the proposed system, microarray database is employed which includes Breast cancer, Myeloid Leukemia and Lymphomas from the Stanford Microarray Database. The results indicate that the proposed system is able to identify the type of cancer from the data set with an accuracy of 95.45%, 94.11%, and 100%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Automatic construction of 3D-ASM intensity models by simulating image acquisition: application to myocardial gated SPECT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Butakoff, Constantine; Aguade, Santiago; Sukno, Federico; Moragas, Gloria; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2008-11-01

    Active shape models bear a great promise for model-based medical image analysis. Their practical use, though, is undermined due to the need to train such models on large image databases. Automatic building of point distribution models (PDMs) has been successfully addressed and a number of autolandmarking techniques are currently available. However, the need for strategies to automatically build intensity models around each landmark has been largely overlooked in the literature. This work demonstrates the potential of creating intensity models automatically by simulating image generation. We show that it is possible to reuse a 3D PDM built from computed tomography (CT) to segment gated single photon emission computed tomography (gSPECT) studies. Training is performed on a realistic virtual population where image acquisition and formation have been modeled using the SIMIND Monte Carlo simulator and ASPIRE image reconstruction software, respectively. The dataset comprised 208 digital phantoms (4D-NCAT) and 20 clinical studies. The evaluation is accomplished by comparing point-to-surface and volume errors against a proper gold standard. Results show that gSPECT studies can be successfully segmented by models trained under this scheme with subvoxel accuracy. The accuracy in estimated LV function parameters, such as end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, and ejection fraction, ranged from 90.0% to 94.5% for the virtual population and from 87.0% to 89.5% for the clinical population.

  8. Automated synthesis of image processing procedures using AI planning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Mortensen, Helen

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the Multimission VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) Planner (MVP) (Chien 1994) system, which uses artificial intelligence planning techniques (Iwasaki & Friedland, 1985, Pemberthy & Weld, 1992, Stefik, 1981) to automatically construct executable complex image processing procedures (using models of the smaller constituent image processing subprograms) in response to image processing requests made to the JPL Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). The MVP system allows the user to specify the image processing requirements in terms of the various types of correction required. Given this information, MVP derives unspecified required processing steps and determines appropriate image processing programs and parameters to achieve the specified image processing goals. This information is output as an executable image processing program which can then be executed to fill the processing request.

  9. New approaches in intelligent image analysis techniques, methodologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamatsu, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an Introduction and 11 independent chapters, which are devoted to various new approaches of intelligent image processing and analysis. The book also presents new methods, algorithms and applied systems for intelligent image processing, on the following basic topics: Methods for Hierarchical Image Decomposition; Intelligent Digital Signal Processing and Feature Extraction; Data Clustering and Visualization via Echo State Networks; Clustering of Natural Images in Automatic Image Annotation Systems; Control System for Remote Sensing Image Processing; Tissue Segmentation of MR Brain Images Sequence; Kidney Cysts Segmentation in CT Images; Audio Visual Attention Models in Mobile Robots Navigation; Local Adaptive Image Processing; Learning Techniques for Intelligent Access Control; Resolution Improvement in Acoustic Maps. Each chapter is self-contained with its own references. Some of the chapters are devoted to the theoretical aspects while the others are presenting the practical aspects and the...

  10. Imaging techniques in clay sciences: a key tool to go a step further

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, J.C.; Michau, N.; Schaefer, T.

    2012-01-01

    the need to study microstructure of clay-rocks and clay based materials from multi-scale techniques and multiple scientific disciplines. Nevertheless at the end of the 90's, several scientific and/or technological bottlenecks, like the imaging the clays in 3D, limited our capacity to bridge small scale processes to macro-scale behaviors and properties. Over the last decade, R and D programs on nuclear waste disposal have tackled many issues to go further in our understanding of clays. Through different results and current studies, we have reviewed various developments and improvements on imaging techniques and their applications on clay-rocks and clay based materials currently under investigations. The presentation will address successively the different questions asked at each step, from the acquisition to the use of the data: - improvement and development of sampling and microstructure preservation methods to image undisturbed samples, - emergence of 3D techniques (X-ray microtomography, FIB/SEM...) and their application to clay based materials and clay rocks, - improvement of image acquisition and treatment of 2D/3D images, - development of multi-scale methodologies, - cross-cutting between imaging and analytical techniques to get quantitative information on pore and mineral spatial distribution, - imaging in 2D/3D the microstructure of clay materials under THMC conditions and environmental conditions, - extraction of quantitative information from image analysis using statistical approaches or cross-correlation to quantitative techniques, - correlation between microstructure characteristic parameters and macroscopic properties, - modeling of multi-scale THMC processes using data extracted from images. Conclusions drawn up from this review show up that imaging techniques have progressively turned into an essential tool to support THMC experimental or numerical studies in a sense that they have gradually evolved from a qualitative observation mean to a quantitative

  11. Optimal timing of image acquisition for arterial first pass CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelgrim, G.J., E-mail: g.j.pelgrim@umcg.nl [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands (CMI-nen), Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Nieuwenhuis, E.R., E-mail: e.r.nieuwenhuis@student.utwente.nl [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands (CMI-nen), Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Duguay, T.M., E-mail: duguay@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Dept. of Radiology, 25 Courtenay Drive, SC 29425, Charleston (United States); Geest, R.J. van der, E-mail: R.J.van_der_Geest@lumc.nl [Leiden University Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Postbus 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Varga-Szemes, A., E-mail: vargaasz@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Dept. of Radiology, 25 Courtenay Drive, SC 29425, Charleston (United States); Slump, C.H., E-mail: c.h.slump@utwente.nl [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands (CMI-nen), Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Fuller, S.R., E-mail: fullerst@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Dept. of Radiology, 25 Courtenay Drive, SC 29425, Charleston (United States); Oudkerk, M., E-mail: m.oudkerk@umcg.nl [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging North East Netherlands (CMI-nen), Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U.J., E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Dept. of Radiology, 25 Courtenay Drive, SC 29425, Charleston (United States); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Optimal timing of static, single-shot CT perfusion scans is important to differentiate ischemic from non-ischemic myocardial segments. • Time delay between reaching 150 and 250 HU thresholds in the ascending aorta and optimal contrast in the myocardium are 4 and 2 s, respectively. • Attenuation difference of more than 15 HU between normal and ischemic myocardium is present during approximately 8 s. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the optimal timing of arterial first pass computed tomography (CT) myocardial perfusion imaging (CTMPI) based on dynamic CTMPI acquisitions. Methods and materials: Twenty-five patients (59 ± 8.4 years, 14 male)underwent adenosine-stress dynamic CTMPI on second-generation dual-source CT in shuttle mode (30 s at 100 kV and 300 mAs). Stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as reference standard for differentiation of non-ischemic and ischemic segments. The left ventricle (LV) wall was manually segmented according to the AHA 16-segment model. Hounsfield units (HU) in myocardial segments and ascending (AA) and descending aorta (AD) were monitored over time. Time difference between peak AA and peak AD and peak myocardial enhancement was calculated, as well as the, time delay from fixed HU thresholds of 150 and 250 HU in the AA and AD to a minimal difference of 15 HU between normal and ischemic segments. Furthermore, the duration of the 15 HU difference between ischemic and non-ischemic segments was calculated. Results: Myocardial ischemia was observed by MRI in 10 patients (56.3 ± 9.0 years; 8 male). The delay between the maximum HU in the AA and AD and maximal HU in the non-ischemic segments was 2.8 s [2.2–4.3] and 0.0 s [0.0–2.8], respectively. Differentiation between ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial segments in CT was best during a time window of 8.6 ± 3.8 s. Time delays for AA triggering were 4.5 s [2.2–5.6] and 2.2 s [0–2.8] for the 150 HU and 250 HU thresholds, respectively. While for

  12. New techniques for resolution enhancement of 3D x-ray tomographic imaging from incomplete data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vengrinovich, V.; Zolotarev, S.; Denkevich, Y.; Tillack, G.-R.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of dimensions directly from tomographic images, restored from only few x-ray projections, made in a limited observation sector, is considered exploiting pipes wall thickness assessment like a typical example. Both experiments and simulations are used to extract main errors sources. It is taken from as known, that neglecting of the scattered radiation and beam hardening effects results in image blurring, strong artifacts and finally inaccurate sizing. The computerized technique is developed to simulate the contribution of scattered radiation and beam hardening for the purpose of their further extraction from projected data. After those accompanying effects extraction the iterative Bayesian techniques are applied to reconstruct images from the projections, using volumetric and/or shell representation of the objects like pipes. The achieved error of virtual pipe wall thickness assessment from 3D images can be as small as 300μk comparing to 1mm provided by modern techniques. Finally the conclusion was drawn that standard projection techniques using X- or Gamma rays in combination with X-ray film or imaging plates can be applied for the data acquisition to reconstruct finally wall thickness profiles in an in-field environment. (author)

  13. Quantitative outcome measures for systemic sclerosis-related Microangiopathy - Reliability of image acquisition in Nailfold Capillaroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsdale, Graham; Moore, Tonia; O'Leary, Neil; Berks, Michael; Roberts, Christopher; Manning, Joanne; Allen, John; Anderson, Marina; Cutolo, Maurizio; Hesselstrand, Roger; Howell, Kevin; Pizzorni, Carmen; Smith, Vanessa; Sulli, Alberto; Wildt, Marie; Taylor, Christopher; Murray, Andrea; Herrick, Ariane L

    2017-09-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopic parameters hold increasing promise as outcome measures for clinical trials in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Their inclusion as outcomes would often naturally require capillaroscopy images to be captured at several time points during any one study. Our objective was to assess repeatability of image acquisition (which has been little studied), as well as of measurement. 41 patients (26 with SSc, 15 with primary Raynaud's phenomenon) and 10 healthy controls returned for repeat high-magnification (300×) videocapillaroscopy mosaic imaging of 10 digits one week after initial imaging (as part of a larger study of reliability). Images were assessed in a random order by an expert blinded observer and 4 outcome measures extracted: (1) overall image grade and then (where possible) distal vessel locations were marked, allowing (2) vessel density (across the whole nailfold) to be calculated (3) apex width measurement and (4) giant vessel count. Intra-rater, intra-visit and intra-rater inter-visit (baseline vs. 1week) reliability were examined in 475 and 392 images respectively. A linear, mixed-effects model was used to estimate variance components, from which intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were determined. Intra-visit and inter-visit reliability estimates (ICCs) were (respectively): overall image grade, 0.97 and 0.90; vessel density, 0.92 and 0.65; mean vessel width, 0.91 and 0.79; presence of giant capillary, 0.68 and 0.56. These estimates were conditional on each parameter being measurable. Within-operator image analysis and acquisition are reproducible. Quantitative nailfold capillaroscopy, at least with a single observer, provides reliable outcome measures for clinical studies including randomised controlled trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Improvement of DSA, reduction of acquisition images and suppression of halation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kinichi; Kaga, Yuji; Eguchi, Yoichi; Kinai, Shigeo; Asahina, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hitoshi; Ogura, Ichiro; Yasuhara, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is seeing widespread use. Especially, intraarterial DSA (IA-DSA) makes good use of interventional radiology. However, we know that the skin dose for DSA is so much larger than general angiography, and halations often appearing on DSA images. In this report, we show two improvements of DSA. First, the skin dose for DSA is successfully decreased to one-sixth compared with the late DSA of cerebral artery by a reduction in acquisition images. Secondly, we are doing well in suppressing halation by exchanging the control point of automatic exposure control (AEC) from one-half to one-fourth. (author)

  15. Effects of acquisition time and reconstruction algorithm on image quality, quantitative parameters, and clinical interpretation of myocardial perfusion imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Lotte H; Menashi, Changez A K; Andersen, Ulrik B

    2013-01-01

    time (HT) protocols and Evolution for Cardiac Software. METHODS: We studied 45 consecutive, non-selected patients referred for a clinically indicated routine 2-day stress/rest (99m)Tc-Sestamibi myocardial perfusion SPECT. All patients underwent an FT and an HT scan. Both FT and HT scans were processed......-RR) and for quantitative analysis (FT-FBP, HT-FBP, and HT-RR). The datasets were analyzed using commercially available QGS/QPS software and read by two observers evaluating image quality and clinical interpretation. Image quality was assessed on a 10-cm visual analog scale score. RESULTS: HT imaging was associated......: Use of RR reconstruction algorithms compensates for loss of image quality associated with reduced scan time. Both HT acquisition and RR reconstruction algorithm had significant effects on motion and perfusion parameters obtained with standard software, but these effects were relatively small...

  16. CATEGORICAL IMAGE COMPONENTS IN THE FORMING SYSTEM OF A MARKETING TECHNIQUES MANAGER’S IMAGE CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Borisovna Cherednyakova

    2015-01-01

    Based on the understanding of the image culture formation of managers of marketing techniques, as a representative of the social and communication interaction of public structures, categorical apparatus of image culture with an emphasis on the etymology of the image, as an integral component of image culture was analyzed. Categorical components of the image are presented from the standpoint of image culture, as personal new formation, an integral part of the professional activity of the marke...

  17. Segmentation techniques for extracting humans from thermal images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dickens, JS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A pedestrian detection system for underground mine vehicles is being developed that requires the segmentation of people from thermal images in underground mine tunnels. A number of thresholding techniques are outlined and their performance on a...

  18. Assessment of resectability of pancreatic cancer with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging: technique, surgical correlation and patient outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.A.; Ward, J.; Guthrie, J.A.; Robinson, P.J.A.; Guillou, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our work was to investigate the use of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR (DCEMR) technique for staging apparently localised pancreatic cancer, and to determine the patterns of tumour and vascular enhancement with this technique. Thirty-five consecutive patients were examined. The MR findings were correlated with surgical findings in 13 patients and with clinical outcome in 22 patients. Breath-hold gradient-echo fast low angle shot (TR = 100, TE = 4, flip angle 80 ) acquisitions were obtained at 10 and 40 s (right anterior coronal oblique plane) and at 90 s (axial plane) following intravenous gadolinium. Mean contrast-to-noise ratio was higher on the first than the second acquisition (p < 0.001) and higher on the second acquisition than the third (p < 0.005). Tumour conspicuity was greatest and arterial anatomy was best demonstrated on the first acquisition and the portal venous anatomy on the second. Small tumours were isointense by the third acquisition. Maximal intensity projections were helpful. The MR findings correctly predicted the surgical findings in 11 of 13 cases (85 %) and the clinical course in the other 22 patients. The DCEMR imaging technique is valuable in the staging of patients with pancreatic cancer. Capillary and portal venous phase images are both required for complete local staging. (orig.)

  19. Coded Aperture Nuclear Scintigraphy: A Novel Small Animal Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Schellingerhout

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and demonstrate the utility of coded aperture (CA nuclear scintigraphy for imaging small animals. CA imaging uses multiple pinholes in a carefully designed mask pattern, mounted on a conventional gamma camera. System performance was assessed using point sources and phantoms, while several animal experiments were performed to test the usefulness of the imaging system in vivo, with commonly used radiopharmaceuticals. The sensitivity of the CA system for 99mTc was 4.2 × 103 cps/Bq (9400 cpm/μCi, compared to 4.4 × 104 cps/Bq (990 cpm/μCi for a conventional collimator system. The system resolution was 1.7 mm, as compared to 4–6 mm for the conventional imaging system (using a high-sensitivity low-energy collimator. Animal imaging demonstrated artifact-free imaging with superior resolution and image quality compared to conventional collimator images in several mouse and rat models. We conclude that: (a CA imaging is a useful nuclear imaging technique for small animal imaging. The advantage in signal-to-noise can be traded to achieve higher resolution, decreased dose or reduced imaging time. (b CA imaging works best for images where activity is concentrated in small volumes; a low count outline may be better demonstrated using conventional collimator imaging. Thus, CA imaging should be viewed as a technique to complement rather than replace traditional nuclear imaging methods. (c CA hardware and software can be readily adapted to existing gamma cameras, making their implementation a relatively inexpensive retrofit to most systems.

  20. An observer study comparing spot imaging regions selected by radiologists and a computer for an automated stereo spot mammography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lydick, Justin T.; Gandra, Chaitanya R.; Chen, Nelson G.; Helvie, Mark A.; Bailey, Janet E.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Paramagul, Chintana; Blane, Caroline E.; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas A.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing an automated stereo spot mammography technique for improved imaging of suspicious dense regions within digital mammograms. The technique entails the acquisition of a full-field digital mammogram, automated detection of a suspicious dense region within that mammogram by a computer aided detection (CAD) program, and acquisition of a stereo pair of images with automated collimation to the suspicious region. The latter stereo spot image is obtained within seconds of the original full-field mammogram, without releasing the compression paddle. The spot image is viewed on a stereo video display. A critical element of this technique is the automated detection of suspicious regions for spot imaging. We performed an observer study to compare the suspicious regions selected by radiologists with those selected by a CAD program developed at the University of Michigan. True regions of interest (TROIs) were separately determined by one of the radiologists who reviewed the original mammograms, biopsy images, and histology results. We compared the radiologist and computer-selected regions of interest (ROIs) to the TROIs. Both the radiologists and the computer were allowed to select up to 3 regions in each of 200 images (mixture of 100 CC and 100 MLO views). We computed overlap indices (the overlap index is defined as the ratio of the area of intersection to the area of interest) to quantify the agreement between the selected regions in each image. The averages of the largest overlap indices per image for the 5 radiologist-to-computer comparisons were directly related to the average number of regions per image traced by the radiologists (about 50% for 1 region/image, 84% for 2 regions/image and 96% for 3 regions/image). The average of the overlap indices with all of the TROIs was 73% for CAD and 76.8%+/-10.0% for the radiologists. This study indicates that the CAD determined ROIs could potentially be useful for a screening technique that includes stereo spot

  1. Evaluation of radiographic imaging techniques in lung nodule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, J.T.; Kruger, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Dual-energy radiography appears to be the most effective technique to address bone superposition that compromises conventional chest radiography. A dual-energy, single-exposure, film-based technique was compared with a dual-energy, dual-exposure technique and conventional chest radiography in a simulated lung nodule detection study. Observers detected more nodules on images produced by dual-energy techniques than on images produced by conventional chest radiography. The difference between dual-energy and conventional chest radiography is statistically significant and the difference between dual-energy, dual-exposure and single-exposure techniques is statistically insignificant. The single-exposure technique has the potential to replace the dual-exposure technique in future clinical application

  2. Point-and-stare operation and high-speed image acquisition in real-time hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Richard D.; Bannon, David P.; Ciccone, Domenic; Hill, Sam L.

    2010-04-01

    The design and optical performance of a small-footprint, low-power, turnkey, Point-And-Stare hyperspectral analyzer, capable of fully automated field deployment in remote and harsh environments, is described. The unit is packaged for outdoor operation in an IP56 protected air-conditioned enclosure and includes a mechanically ruggedized fully reflective, aberration-corrected hyperspectral VNIR (400-1000 nm) spectrometer with a board-level detector optimized for point and stare operation, an on-board computer capable of full system data-acquisition and control, and a fully functioning internal hyperspectral calibration system for in-situ system spectral calibration and verification. Performance data on the unit under extremes of real-time survey operation and high spatial and high spectral resolution will be discussed. Hyperspectral acquisition including full parameter tracking is achieved by the addition of a fiber-optic based downwelling spectral channel for solar illumination tracking during hyperspectral acquisition and the use of other sensors for spatial and directional tracking to pinpoint view location. The system is mounted on a Pan-And-Tilt device, automatically controlled from the analyzer's on-board computer, making the HyperspecTM particularly adaptable for base security, border protection and remote deployments. A hyperspectral macro library has been developed to control hyperspectral image acquisition, system calibration and scene location control. The software allows the system to be operated in a fully automatic mode or under direct operator control through a GigE interface.

  3. An Image Registration Based Technique for Noninvasive Vascular Elastography

    OpenAIRE

    Valizadeh, Sina; Makkiabadi, Bahador; Mirbagheri, Alireza; Soozande, Mehdi; Manwar, Rayyan; Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Non-invasive vascular elastography is an emerging technique in vascular tissue imaging. During the past decades, several techniques have been suggested to estimate the tissue elasticity by measuring the displacement of the Carotid vessel wall. Cross correlation-based methods are the most prevalent approaches to measure the strain exerted in the wall vessel by the blood pressure. In the case of a low pressure, the displacement is too small to be apparent in ultrasound imaging, especially in th...

  4. Preliminary study on X-ray fluorescence computed tomography imaging of gold nanoparticles: Acceleration of data acquisition by multiple pinholes scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaya, Tenta; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Seo, Seung-Jum; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Kim, Jong-Ki; Yuasa, Tetsuya

    2018-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have recently attracted attention in nanomedicine as novel contrast agents for cancer imaging. A decisive tomographic imaging technique has not yet been established to depict the 3-D distribution of GNPs in an object. An imaging technique known as pinhole-based X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is a promising method that can be used to reconstruct the distribution of GNPs from the X-ray fluorescence emitted by GNPs. We address the acceleration of data acquisition in pinhole-based XFCT for preclinical use using a multiple pinhole scheme. In this scheme, multiple projections are simultaneously acquired through a multi-pinhole collimator with a 2-D detector and full-field volumetric beam to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the projections; this enables fast data acquisition. To demonstrate the efficacy of this method, we performed an imaging experiment using a physical phantom with an actual multi-pinhole XFCT system that was constructed using the beamline AR-NE7A at KEK. The preliminary study showed that the multi-pinhole XFCT achieved a data acquisition time of 20 min at a theoretical detection limit of approximately 0.1 Au mg/ml and at a spatial resolution of 0.4 mm.

  5. CATEGORICAL IMAGE COMPONENTS IN THE FORMING SYSTEM OF A MARKETING TECHNIQUES MANAGER’S IMAGE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Borisovna Cherednyakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the understanding of the image culture formation of managers of marketing techniques, as a representative of the social and communication interaction of public structures, categorical apparatus of image culture with an emphasis on the etymology of the image, as an integral component of image culture was analyzed. Categorical components of the image are presented from the standpoint of image culture, as personal new formation, an integral part of the professional activity of the marketing techniques manager: object-communicative categorical component, subject-activity categorical component of image, personality-oriented categorical component, value-acmeological categorical component of image.The aim is to identify and justify the image categorical components as a component of image culture of the marketing techniques manager.Method and methodology of work – a general scientific research approach reflecting scientific apparatus of research.Results. Categorical components of the image, as an image culture component of manager of marketing techniques were defined.Practical implication of the results. The theoretical part of «Imageology» course, special course «Image culture of manager of marketing techniques», the theoretical and methodological study and the formation of image culture.

  6. MR-sialography: optimisation and evaluation of an ultra-fast sequence in parallel acquisition technique and different functional conditions of salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habermann, C.R.; Cramer, M.C.; Aldefeld, D.; Weiss, F.; Kaul, M.G.; Adam, G.; Graessner, J.; Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M.; Petersen, K.U.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To optimise a fast sequence for MR-sialography and to compare a parallel and non-parallel acquisition technique. Additionally, the effect of oral stimulation regarding the image quality was evaluated. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed by using a 1.5-T superconducting system. After developing a sufficient sequence for MR-sialography, a single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequence (ss-TSE) with an acquisition time of 2.8 sec was used in transverse and oblique sagittal orientation in 27 healthy volunteers. All images were performed with and without parallel imaging technique. The assessment of the ductal system of the submandibular and parotid gland was performed using a 1 to 5 visual scale for each side separately. Images were evaluated by four independent experienced radiologists. For statistical evaluation, an ANOVA with post-hoc comparisons was used with an overall two-tailed significance level of P=.05. For evaluation of interobserver variability, an intraclass correlation was computed and correlation >.08 was determined to indicate a high correlation. Results: All parts of salivary excretal ducts could be visualised in all volunteers, with an overall rating for all ducts of 2.26 (SD±1.09). Between the four observers a high correlation could be obtained with an intraclass correlation of 0.9475. A significant influence regarding the slice angulations could not be obtained (p=0.74). In all healthy volunteers the visibility of excretory ducts improved significantly after oral application of a Sialogogum (p 2 =0.049). The use of a parallel imaging technique did not lead to an improvement of visualisation, showing a significant loss of image quality compared to an acquistion technique without parallel imaging (p 2 =0.013). Conclusion: The optimised ss-TSE MR-sialography seems to be a fast and sufficient technique for visualisation of excretory ducts of the main salivary glands, with no elaborate post-processing needed. To improve results of MR

  7. The new techniques of scintigraphic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of scintigraphic imaging is not to explore the morphology of an organ (or its abnormalities) but rather its functional and metabolic characteristics. It is thus important that a molecular structure (e.g., a hormonal receptor or an antigen) closely linked to the functional activity of an organ or tissue be targeted on its cell surface. Such diagnostic targeting requires the synthesis and labeling of a radiopharmaceutical substance specific for the receptor or antigen in question. It also requires a detection system adapted to count rates and signal-to-background ratios (generally moderate). The synthesis of new radiopharmaceutical agents, a critical stage for the future of nuclear medicine, is a long and often risky process in which success is difficult to foresee. Radiolabeling must be stable in vitro and in vivo, and the radiopharmaceutical must subsequently retain its capability of recognizing the targeted molecule. In endocrinology, the exemplary achievement in this direction has been the synthesis of 131 I-6-iodomethylnorcholesterol and 131 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine for functional scintigraphy of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Progress in detection equipment has been marked by the development of monophotonic tomoscintigraphy, using gamma cameras with a revolving head to obtain slices in different spatial planes showing the distribution in the organism of the injected radiopharmaceutical agent [fr

  8. The power of imageability: How the acquisition of inflected forms is facilitated in highly imageable verbs and nouns in Czech children

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolík, Filip; Kříž, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 6 (2015), s. 446-465 ISSN 0142-7237 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-26779S Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : acquisition of inflections * imageability * language acquisition * grammar acquisition * morphology Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 1.254, year: 2015 http://fla.sagepub.com/content/35/6/446.full.pdf+html

  9. Techniques and software architectures for medical visualisation and image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a flexible software platform for medical visualisation and image processing, a technique for the segmentation of the shoulder skeleton from CT data and three techniques that make contributions to the field of direct volume rendering. Our primary goal was to investigate the use

  10. Muscle perfusion and metabolic heterogeneity: insights from noninvasive imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in noninvasive imaging techniques have enabled the study of local changes in perfusion and metabolism in skeletal muscle as well as patterns of heterogeneity in these variables in humans. In this review, the principles of these techniques along with some recent findings...... on functional heterogeneity in human skeletal muscle will be presented....

  11. Acquisition of Dental Skills in Preclinical Technique Courses: Influence of Spatial and Manual Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwibbe, Anja; Kothe, Christian; Hampe, Wolfgang; Konradt, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Sixty years of research have not added up to a concordant evaluation of the influence of spatial and manual abilities on dental skill acquisition. We used Ackerman's theory of ability determinants of skill acquisition to explain the influence of spatial visualization and manual dexterity on the task performance of dental students in two…

  12. A Quantitative Three-Dimensional Image Analysis Tool for Maximal Acquisition of Spatial Heterogeneity Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, Mark C; Misener, Ruth; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques provide spatial insight into environmental and cellular interactions and are implemented in various fields, including tissue engineering, but have been restricted by limited quantification tools that misrepresent or underutilize the cellular phenomena captured. This study develops image postprocessing algorithms pairing complex Euclidean metrics with Monte Carlo simulations to quantitatively assess cell and microenvironment spatial distributions while utilizing, for the first time, the entire 3D image captured. Although current methods only analyze a central fraction of presented confocal microscopy images, the proposed algorithms can utilize 210% more cells to calculate 3D spatial distributions that can span a 23-fold longer distance. These algorithms seek to leverage the high sample cost of 3D tissue imaging techniques by extracting maximal quantitative data throughout the captured image.

  13. Three-dimensional MR imaging of the cerebrospinal system with the RARE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, J.; Ott, D.; Ylayasski, J.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional RARE myelography is a fast technique for high-resolution imaging of the cerebrospinal fluid. A data set with 1 x 1 x 1-mm resolution can be generated with a 12-minute acquisition time. Sophisticated three-dimensional display algorithms allow reconstruction of planes at arbitrary angles and full three-dimensional displays, which yield extremely useful information for neurosurgical planning. Additionally, the injection of contrast agent can be simulated on the computer and communication pathways between structures of interest can be found noninvasively

  14. Dynamic circular buffering: a technique for equilibrium gated blood pool imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, J J; Rahms, H; Green, M V; Del Pozo, F

    1996-03-01

    We have devised a software technique called "dynamic circular buffering" (DCB) with which we create a gated blood pool image sequence of the heart in real time using the best features of LIST and FRAME mode methods of acquisition/processing. The routine is based on the concept of independent "agents" acting on the timing and position data continuously written into the DCB. This approach allows efficient asynchronous operation on PC-type machines and enhanced capability on systems capable of true multiprocessing and multithreading.

  15. WE-G-18C-08: Real Time Tumor Imaging Using a Novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI Reconstruction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Whelan, B; Keall, P; Greer, P; Kim, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI reconstruction technique can accelerate image acquisition whilst maintaining high image quality for lung cancer patients. Methods: 18 MRI datasets from 5 lung cancer patients were acquired using a 3T MRI scanner. These datasets were retrospectively reconstructed using (A) The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique, (B) The conventional keyhole technique and (C) the conventional zero filling technique. The dynamic keyhole technique in MRI refers to techniques in which previously acquired k-space data is used to supplement under sampled data obtained in real time. The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique utilizes a previously acquired a library of kspace datasets in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in realtime. A simultaneously acquired respiratory signal is utilized to sort, match and combine the two k-space streams with respect to respiratory displacement. Reconstruction performance was quantified by (1) comparing the keyhole size (which corresponds to imaging speed) required to achieve the same image quality, and (2) maintaining a constant keyhole size across the three reconstruction methods to compare the resulting image quality to the ground truth image. Results: (1) The dynamic keyhole method required a mean keyhole size which was 48% smaller than the conventional keyhole technique and 60% smaller than the zero filling technique to achieve the same image quality. This directly corresponds to faster imaging. (2) When a constant keyhole size was utilized, the Dynamic Keyhole technique resulted in the smallest difference of the tumor region compared to the ground truth. Conclusion: The dynamic keyhole is a simple and adaptable technique for clinical applications requiring real-time imaging and tumor monitoring such as MRI guided radiotherapy. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the imaging frequency by a factor of five compared with full k

  16. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  17. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, Stephen; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  18. A Novel Contrast Enhancement Technique on Palm Bone Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tsang Chang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Contrast enhancement plays a fundamental role in image processing. Many histogram-based techniques are widely used for contrast enhancement of given images, due to their simple function and effectiveness. However, the conventional histogram equalization (HE methods result in excessive contrast enhancement, which causes natural looking and satisfactory results for a variety of low contrast images. To solve such problems, a novel multi-histogram equalization technique is proposed to enhance the contrast of the palm bone X-ray radiographs in this paper. For images, the mean-variance analysis method is employed to partition the histogram of the original grey scale image into multiple sub-histograms. These histograms are independently equalized. By using this mean-variance partition method, a proposed multi-histogram equalization technique is employed to achieve the contrast enhancement of the palm bone X-ray radiographs. Experimental results show that the multi-histogram equalization technique achieves a lower average absolute mean brightness error (AMBE value. The multi-histogram equalization technique simultaneously preserved the mean brightness and enhanced the local contrast of the original image.

  19. New developments in electron microscopy for serial image acquisition of neuronal profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in electron microscopy largely automate the continuous acquisition of serial electron micrographs (EMGs), previously achieved by laborious manual serial ultrathin sectioning using an ultramicrotome and ultrastructural image capture process with transmission electron microscopy. The new systems cut thin sections and capture serial EMGs automatically, allowing for acquisition of large data sets in a reasonably short time. The new methods are focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, ultramicrotome/serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, automated tape-collection ultramicrotome/scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope camera array. In this review, their positive and negative aspects are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Techniques for combining isotopic images obtained at different energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussaline, F.; Di Paola, R.; Bazin, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The technique described should be considered as a first step towards the classification of scintigraphic data where the energy is included. As in all such studies the interpretation of the resulting images is not necessarily at first evident, and certain experience needs to be established. This applies in particular to the images obtained with the higher factors. It is possible that the use of this technique may resolve, without requiring a priori information, the problem previously encountered using the other 'subtraction' type techniques [fr

  1. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos, NM; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos, NM; Mosher, John C [Los Alamos, NM; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos, NM; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  2. A Blind High-Capacity Wavelet-Based Steganography Technique for Hiding Images into other Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAMAD, S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The flourishing field of Steganography is providing effective techniques to hide data into different types of digital media. In this paper, a novel technique is proposed to hide large amounts of image data into true colored images. The proposed method employs wavelet transforms to decompose images in a way similar to the Human Visual System (HVS for more secure and effective data hiding. The designed model can blindly extract the embedded message without the need to refer to the original cover image. Experimental results showed that the proposed method outperformed all of the existing techniques not only imperceptibility but also in terms of capacity. In fact, the proposed technique showed an outstanding performance on hiding a secret image whose size equals 100% of the cover image while maintaining excellent visual quality of the resultant stego-images.

  3. PLEIADES-HR INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR GEOMETRIC IMAGE QUALITY COMMISSIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Greslou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of 2012, the first Pleiades-HR satellite of the program conducted by the French National Space Agency, CNES, delivers 20 km wide color scenes with a 70 cm ground sampling distance. A second satellite should be launched in 2013 which will achieve an almost world-wide coverage with a revisit interval of 24h. The assessment of the image quality and the calibration operation have been performed by CNES Image Quality team during the 6 month commissioning phase that followed the satellite launch. The geometric commissioning activities consist in improve the geometric quality of the images in order to meet very demanding specifications as localization accuracy, local coherence, dynamic stability, length alteration … This goal has been achieved through the implementation of new methods of calibration and performance assessment. Some of these methods are based on the exploitation of very specific satellite acquisitions that have been achieved thanks to the amazing agility of the Pleiades satellite. Thus, many stars acquisitions and very slow earth pictures have been processed to characterize dynamic phenomena. Similarly, “along-cross track” pairs have been exploited to improve the accuracy of the focal plane description. This paper deals with these new methods. It describes their accuracy and their operational interests.

  4. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  5. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  6. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ∼15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ∼45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different

  7. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  8. Task-based data-acquisition optimization for sparse image reconstruction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yujia; Lou, Yang; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates that imaging hardware should be optimized by use of an ideal observer (IO) that exploits full statistical knowledge of the class of objects to be imaged, without consideration of the reconstruction method to be employed. However, accurate and tractable models of the complete object statistics are often difficult to determine in practice. Moreover, in imaging systems that employ compressive sensing concepts, imaging hardware and (sparse) image reconstruction are innately coupled technologies. We have previously proposed a sparsity-driven ideal observer (SDIO) that can be employed to optimize hardware by use of a stochastic object model that describes object sparsity. The SDIO and sparse reconstruction method can therefore be "matched" in the sense that they both utilize the same statistical information regarding the class of objects to be imaged. To efficiently compute SDIO performance, the posterior distribution is estimated by use of computational tools developed recently for variational Bayesian inference. Subsequently, the SDIO test statistic can be computed semi-analytically. The advantages of employing the SDIO instead of a Hotelling observer are systematically demonstrated in case studies in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data acquisition schemes are optimized for signal detection tasks.

  9. Variability of textural features in FDG PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galavis, P.E.; Hollensen, Christian; Jallow, N.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Characterization of textural features (spatial distributions of image intensity levels) has been considered as a tool for automatic tumor segmentation. The purpose of this work is to study the variability of the textural features in PET images due to different acquisition modes...... reconstruction parameters. Lesions were segmented on a default image using the threshold of 40% of maximum SUV. Fifty different texture features were calculated inside the tumors. The range of variations of the features were calculated with respect to the average value. Results. Fifty textural features were...... classified based on the range of variation in three categories: small, intermediate and large variability. Features with small variability (range 30%). Conclusion. Textural features such as entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient, and low-gray level run emphasis exhibited small...

  10. Introduction to basic molecular biologic techniques for molecular imaging researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2004-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a rapidly growing field due to the advances in molecular biology and imaging technologies. With the introduction of imaging reporter genes into the cell, diverse cellular processes can be monitored, quantified and imaged non-invasively in vivo. These processes include the gene expression, protein-protein interactions, signal transduction pathways, and monitoring of cells such as cancer cells, immune cells, and stem cells. In the near future, molecular imaging analysis will allow us to observe the incipience and progression of the disease. These will make us easier to give a diagnosis in the early stage of intractable diseases such as cancer, neuro-degenerative disease, and immunological disorders. Additionally, molecular imaging method will be a valuable tool for the real-time evaluation of cells in molecular biology and the basic biological studies. As newer and more powerful molecular imaging tools become available, it will be necessary to corporate clinicians, molecular biologists and biochemists for the planning, interpretation, and application of these techniques to their fullest potential. In order for such a multidisciplinary team to be effective, it is essential that a common understanding of basic biochemical and molecular biologic techniques is achieved. Basic molecular techniques for molecular imaging methods are presented in this paper

  11. Imaging of mass distribution in paper by electrography technique, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimasu, Hiroshi; Luner, P.

    1991-01-01

    Four paper imaging techniques (β-radiography, electrography, light transmission, and soft x-radiography) were compared in terms of their process parameters and image characteristics (exposure time, spatial variation, contrast, spatial resolution, correlation with mass, and limitation in basis weight range) with the same newsprint sample and electron microscope film. As far as the imaging conditions chosen here are concerned, electrography gave a higher spatial resolution, shorter exposure time, and the wider basis weight range than β-radiography. Light transmission image could be obtained in a very short time, but gave the poorest spatial resolution and correlation with mass. Soft x-radiography gave the highest spatial resolution, but the poorest spatial variation and contrast. The proper imaging technique and conditions need to be selected depending on the specific paper property in question. (author)

  12. Static dual-channel polarization imaging spectrometer for simultaneous acquisition of inphase and antiphase interference images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Tingkui; Zhang, Chunmin; Ren, Wenyi; Jian, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    The raw data acquired by Fourier-transform imaging spectrometers are the physical superposition of an interferogram and image. To reconstruct an accurate spectrum from a pure interferogram via Fourier transformation and get a pure image that is undisturbed by fringes, the interferogram and the image need to be separated. Although it can be achieved by digital image processing, heavy computations with approximation would be introduced. To overcome these drawbacks and in the meantime avoid the influence of the rapid changes of the observed scene and the perturbations of the rotating elements, a static dual-channel polarization imaging spectrometer that can simultaneously acquire inphase and antiphase interference images is presented. The extraction of a pure image and pure fringe can be simply achieved from the difference and the summation of the two interference images, respectively. The feasibility of the spectrometer and its features are described, and the influence of the polarization direction of the polarizers on the background image and fringe is discussed

  13. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L2 mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  14. Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child\\'s clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.

  15. Simultaneous acquisition of dual analyser-based phase contrast X-ray images for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Pavlov, Konstantin M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Vine, David J.; Siu, Karen K.W.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siew, Melissa L.L.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Lewis, Rob A.

    2008-01-01

    Analyser-based phase contrast X-ray imaging can provide high-contrast images of biological tissues with exquisite sensitivity to the boundaries between tissues. The phase and absorption information can be extracted by processing multiple images acquired at different analyser orientations. Recording both the transmitted and diffracted beams from a thin Laue analyser crystal can make phase retrieval possible for dynamic systems by allowing full field imaging. This technique was used to image the thorax of a mechanically ventilated newborn rabbit pup using a 25 keV beam from the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The diffracted image was produced from the (1 1 1) planes of a 50 mm x 40 mm, 100 μm thick Si analyser crystal in the Laue geometry. The beam and analyser were large enough to image the entire chest, making it possible to observe changes in anatomy with high contrast and spatial resolution

  16. Simultaneous acquisition of dual analyser-based phase contrast X-ray images for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchen, Marcus J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au; Pavlov, Konstantin M. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Physics and Electronics, School of Science and Technology, University of New England, NSW 2351 (Australia)], E-mail: Konstantin.Pavlov@sci.monash.edu.au; Hooper, Stuart B. [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Stuart.Hooper@med.monash.edu.au; Vine, David J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: David.Vine@sci.monash.edu.au; Siu, Karen K.W. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Karen.Siu@sci.monash.edu.au; Wallace, Megan J. [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Megan.Wallace@med.monash.edu.au; Siew, Melissa L.L. [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Melissa.Siew@med.monash.edu.au; Yagi, Naoto [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo (Japan)], E-mail: yagi@spring8.or.jp; Uesugi, Kentaro [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo (Japan)], E-mail: ueken@spring8.or.jp; Lewis, Rob A. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)], E-mail: Rob.Lewis@sync.monash.edu.au

    2008-12-15

    Analyser-based phase contrast X-ray imaging can provide high-contrast images of biological tissues with exquisite sensitivity to the boundaries between tissues. The phase and absorption information can be extracted by processing multiple images acquired at different analyser orientations. Recording both the transmitted and diffracted beams from a thin Laue analyser crystal can make phase retrieval possible for dynamic systems by allowing full field imaging. This technique was used to image the thorax of a mechanically ventilated newborn rabbit pup using a 25 keV beam from the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The diffracted image was produced from the (1 1 1) planes of a 50 mm x 40 mm, 100 {mu}m thick Si analyser crystal in the Laue geometry. The beam and analyser were large enough to image the entire chest, making it possible to observe changes in anatomy with high contrast and spatial resolution.

  17. Optimization of a shorter variable-acquisition time for legs to achieve true whole-body PET/CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takuro; Miwa, Kenta; Murata, Taisuke; Miyaji, Noriaki; Wagatsuma, Kei; Motegi, Kazuki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate PET images as a function of acquisition time for various leg sizes, and to optimize a shorter variable-acquisition time protocol for legs to achieve better qualitative and quantitative accuracy of true whole-body PET/CT images. The diameters of legs to be modeled as phantoms were defined based on data derived from 53 patients. This study analyzed PET images of a NEMA phantom and three plastic bottle phantoms (diameter, 5.68, 8.54 and 10.7 cm) that simulated the human body and legs, respectively. The phantoms comprised two spheres (diameters, 10 and 17 mm) containing fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose solution with sphere-to-background ratios of 4 at a background radioactivity level of 2.65 kBq/mL. All PET data were reconstructed with acquisition times ranging from 10 to 180, and 1200 s. We visually evaluated image quality and determined the coefficient of variance (CV) of the background, contrast and the quantitative %error of the hot spheres, and then determined two shorter variable-acquisition protocols for legs. Lesion detectability and quantitative accuracy determined based on maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) in PET images of a patient using the proposed protocols were also evaluated. A larger phantom and a shorter acquisition time resulted in increased background noise on images and decreased the contrast in hot spheres. A visual score of ≥ 1.5 was obtained when the acquisition time was ≥ 30 s for three leg phantoms, and ≥ 120 s for the NEMA phantom. The quantitative %errors of the 10- and 17-mm spheres in the leg phantoms were ± 15 and ± 10%, respectively, in PET images with a high CV (scan mean SUV max of three lesions using the current fixed-acquisition and two proposed variable-acquisition time protocols in the clinical study were 3.1, 3.1 and 3.2, respectively, which did not significantly differ. Leg acquisition time per bed position of even 30-90

  18. MO-DE-BRA-06: 3D Image Acquisition and Reconstruction Explained with Online Animations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the principles of 3D imaging and image reconstruction is fundamental to the field of medical imaging. Clinicians, technologists, physicists, patients, students, and inquisitive minds all stand to benefit from greater comprehension of the supporting technologies. To help explain the basic principles of 3D imaging, we developed multi-frame animations that convey the concepts of tomographic imaging. The series of free (gif) animations are accessible online, and provide a multimedia introduction to the main concepts of image reconstruction. Methods: Text and animations were created to convey the principles of analytic tomography in CT, PET, and SPECT. Specific topics covered included: principles of sinograms/image data storage, forward projection, principles of PET acquisitions, and filtered backprojection. A total of 8 animations were created and presented for CT, PET, and digital phantom formats. In addition, a free executable is also provided to allow users to create their own tomographic animations – providing an opportunity for interaction and personalization to help foster user interest. Results: Tutorial text and animations have been posted online, freely available to view or download. The animations are in first position in a google search of “image reconstruction animations”. The website currently receives approximately 200 hits/month, from all over the world, and the usage is growing. Positive feedback has been collected from users. Conclusion: We identified a need for improved teaching tools to help visualize the (temporally variant) concepts of image reconstruction, and have shown that animations can be a useful tool for this aspect of education. Furthermore, posting animations freely on the web has shown to be a good way to maximize their impact in the community. In future endeavors, we hope to expand this animated content, to cover principles of iterative reconstruction, as well as other phenomena relating to imaging.

  19. MO-DE-BRA-06: 3D Image Acquisition and Reconstruction Explained with Online Animations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesner, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the principles of 3D imaging and image reconstruction is fundamental to the field of medical imaging. Clinicians, technologists, physicists, patients, students, and inquisitive minds all stand to benefit from greater comprehension of the supporting technologies. To help explain the basic principles of 3D imaging, we developed multi-frame animations that convey the concepts of tomographic imaging. The series of free (gif) animations are accessible online, and provide a multimedia introduction to the main concepts of image reconstruction. Methods: Text and animations were created to convey the principles of analytic tomography in CT, PET, and SPECT. Specific topics covered included: principles of sinograms/image data storage, forward projection, principles of PET acquisitions, and filtered backprojection. A total of 8 animations were created and presented for CT, PET, and digital phantom formats. In addition, a free executable is also provided to allow users to create their own tomographic animations – providing an opportunity for interaction and personalization to help foster user interest. Results: Tutorial text and animations have been posted online, freely available to view or download. The animations are in first position in a google search of “image reconstruction animations”. The website currently receives approximately 200 hits/month, from all over the world, and the usage is growing. Positive feedback has been collected from users. Conclusion: We identified a need for improved teaching tools to help visualize the (temporally variant) concepts of image reconstruction, and have shown that animations can be a useful tool for this aspect of education. Furthermore, posting animations freely on the web has shown to be a good way to maximize their impact in the community. In future endeavors, we hope to expand this animated content, to cover principles of iterative reconstruction, as well as other phenomena relating to imaging.

  20. A Document Imaging Technique for Implementing Electronic Loan Approval Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manikandan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The image processing is one of the leading technologies of computer applications. Image processing is a type of signal processing, the input for image processor is an image or video frame and the output will be an image or subset of image [1]. Computer graphics and computer vision process uses an image processing techniques. Image processing systems are used in various environments like medical fields, computer-aided design (CAD, research fields, crime investigation fields and military fields. In this paper, we proposed a document image processing technique, for establishing electronic loan approval process (E-LAP [2]. Loan approval process has been tedious process, the E-LAP system attempts to reduce the complexity of loan approval process. Customers have to login to fill the loan application form online with all details and submit the form. The loan department then processes the submitted form and then sends an acknowledgement mail via the E-LAP to the requested customer with the details about list of documents required for the loan approval process [3]. The approaching customer can upload the scanned copies of all required documents. All this interaction between customer and bank take place using an E-LAP system.

  1. Data acquisition and control system for the ECE imaging diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, C.; Lan, T.; Zhu, Y.; Xie, J.; Gao, B.; Liu, W.; Yu, C.; Milne, P. G.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2017-06-01

    A 384-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system is installed on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) and 7-gigabyte data is produced for each regular discharge of a 10-second pulse. The data acquisition and control (DAC) system for the EAST ECEI diagnostics covers the large data production and embeds the ability to report the data quality instantly after the discharge. The symmetric routing design of the timing signal distributions among the 384 channels provides a low-cost solution to the synchronization of a large number of channels. The application of the load-balance bond service largely reduces the configuration difficulty and the cost in the high-speed data transferring tasks. Benefiting from the various kinds of hardware units with dedicated functionalities, an automated and user interactive DAC work flow is achieved, including the pre-selections of the automation scheme and the observation region, 384-channel data acquisition and local caching, post-discharge imaging data quality evaluation, remote system status monitoring, and inter-discharge imaging system event handling. The system configuration in a specific physics experiment is further optimized through the associated operating software which is enhanced by the input of the tokamak operation status and the region of interest (ROI) from other diagnostics. The DAC system is based on a modularized design and scalable to the long-pulse discharges in the EAST tokamak.

  2. Design and DSP implementation of star image acquisition and star point fast acquiring and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guohui; Wang, Xiaodong; Hao, Zhihang

    2006-02-01

    Star sensor is a special high accuracy photoelectric sensor. Attitude acquisition time is an important function index of star sensor. In this paper, the design target is to acquire 10 samples per second dynamic performance. On the basis of analyzing CCD signals timing and star image processing, a new design and a special parallel architecture for improving star image processing are presented in this paper. In the design, the operation moving the data in expanded windows including the star to the on-chip memory of DSP is arranged in the invalid period of CCD frame signal. During the CCD saving the star image to memory, DSP processes the data in the on-chip memory. This parallelism greatly improves the efficiency of processing. The scheme proposed here results in enormous savings of memory normally required. In the scheme, DSP HOLD mode and CPLD technology are used to make a shared memory between CCD and DSP. The efficiency of processing is discussed in numerical tests. Only in 3.5ms is acquired the five lightest stars in the star acquisition stage. In 43us, the data in five expanded windows including stars are moved into the internal memory of DSP, and in 1.6ms, five star coordinates are achieved in the star tracking stage.

  3. Data acquisition and control system for the ECE imaging diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, C.; Lan, T.; Xie, J.; Gao, B.; Liu, W.; Yu, C.; Zhu, Y.; Domier, C.W.; Luhmann, N.C.; Milne, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    A 384-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system is installed on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) and 7-gigabyte data is produced for each regular discharge of a 10-second pulse. The data acquisition and control (DAC) system for the EAST ECEI diagnostics covers the large data production and embeds the ability to report the data quality instantly after the discharge. The symmetric routing design of the timing signal distributions among the 384 channels provides a low-cost solution to the synchronization of a large number of channels. The application of the load-balance bond service largely reduces the configuration difficulty and the cost in the high-speed data transferring tasks. Benefiting from the various kinds of hardware units with dedicated functionalities, an automated and user interactive DAC work flow is achieved, including the pre-selections of the automation scheme and the observation region, 384-channel data acquisition and local caching, post-discharge imaging data quality evaluation, remote system status monitoring, and inter-discharge imaging system event handling. The system configuration in a specific physics experiment is further optimized through the associated operating software which is enhanced by the input of the tokamak operation status and the region of interest (ROI) from other diagnostics. The DAC system is based on a modularized design and scalable to the long-pulse discharges in the EAST tokamak.

  4. MRI technique for the snapshot imaging of quantitative velocity maps using RARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiko, G.; Sederman, A. J.; Gladden, L. F.

    2012-03-01

    A quantitative PGSE-RARE pulse sequence was developed and successfully applied to the in situ dissolution of two pharmaceutical formulations dissolving over a range of timescales. The new technique was chosen over other existing fast velocity imaging techniques because it is T2 weighted, not T2∗ weighted, and is, therefore, robust for imaging time-varying interfaces and flow in magnetically heterogeneous systems. The complex signal was preserved intact by separating odd and even echoes to obtain two phase maps which are then averaged in post-processing. Initially, the validity of the technique was shown when imaging laminar flow in a pipe. Subsequently, the dissolution of two drugs was followed in situ, where the technique enables the imaging and quantification of changes in the form of the tablet and the flow field surrounding it at high spatial and temporal resolution. First, the complete 3D velocity field around an eroding salicylic acid tablet was acquired at a resolution of 98 × 49 μm2, within 20 min, and monitored over ˜13 h. The tablet was observed to experience a heterogeneous flow field and, hence a heterogeneous shear field, which resulted in the non-symmetric erosion of the tablet. Second, the dissolution of a fast dissolving immediate release tablet was followed using one-shot 2D velocity images acquired every 5.2 s at a resolution of 390 × 390 μm2. The quantitative nature of the technique and fast acquisition times provided invaluable information on the dissolution behaviour of this tablet, which had not been attainable previously with conventional quantitative MRI techniques.

  5. MRI technique for the snapshot imaging of quantitative velocity maps using RARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiko, G; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F

    2012-03-01

    A quantitative PGSE-RARE pulse sequence was developed and successfully applied to the in situ dissolution of two pharmaceutical formulations dissolving over a range of timescales. The new technique was chosen over other existing fast velocity imaging techniques because it is T(2) weighted, not T(2)(∗) weighted, and is, therefore, robust for imaging time-varying interfaces and flow in magnetically heterogeneous systems. The complex signal was preserved intact by separating odd and even echoes to obtain two phase maps which are then averaged in post-processing. Initially, the validity of the technique was shown when imaging laminar flow in a pipe. Subsequently, the dissolution of two drugs was followed in situ, where the technique enables the imaging and quantification of changes in the form of the tablet and the flow field surrounding it at high spatial and temporal resolution. First, the complete 3D velocity field around an eroding salicylic acid tablet was acquired at a resolution of 98×49 μm(2), within 20 min, and monitored over ∼13 h. The tablet was observed to experience a heterogeneous flow field and, hence a heterogeneous shear field, which resulted in the non-symmetric erosion of the tablet. Second, the dissolution of a fast dissolving immediate release tablet was followed using one-shot 2D velocity images acquired every 5.2 s at a resolution of 390×390 μm(2). The quantitative nature of the technique and fast acquisition times provided invaluable information on the dissolution behaviour of this tablet, which had not been attainable previously with conventional quantitative MRI techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acquisition performance of LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral imager in real-time mode of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, P. R.; Permala, R.; Jayani, A. P. S.

    2018-05-01

    LAPAN-A3/IPB satellite was launched in June 2016 and its multispectral imager has been producing Indonesian coverage images. In order to improve its support for remote sensing application, the imager should produce images with high quality and quantity. To improve the quantity of LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral image captured, image acquisition could be executed in real-time mode from LAPAN ground station in Bogor when the satellite passes west Indonesia region. This research analyses the performance of LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral imager acquisition in real-time mode, in terms of image quality and quantity, under assumption of several on-board and ground segment limitations. Results show that with real-time operation mode, LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral imager could produce twice as much as image coverage compare to recorded mode. However, the images produced in real-time mode will have slightly degraded quality due to image compression process involved. Based on several analyses that have been done in this research, it is recommended to use real-time acquisition mode whenever it possible, unless for some circumstances that strictly not allow any quality degradation of the images produced.

  7. Variability of textural features in FDG PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galavis, Paulina E; Hollensen, Christian; Jallow, Ngoneh; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of textural features (spatial distributions of image intensity levels) has been considered as a tool for automatic tumor segmentation. The purpose of this work is to study the variability of the textural features in PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters. Twenty patients with solid tumors underwent PET/CT scans on a GE Discovery VCT scanner, 45-60 minutes post-injection of 10 mCi of [(18)F]FDG. Scans were acquired in both 2D and 3D modes. For each acquisition the raw PET data was reconstructed using five different reconstruction parameters. Lesions were segmented on a default image using the threshold of 40% of maximum SUV. Fifty different texture features were calculated inside the tumors. The range of variations of the features were calculated with respect to the average value. Fifty textural features were classified based on the range of variation in three categories: small, intermediate and large variability. Features with small variability (range ≤ 5%) were entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient (second order feature) and low-gray level run emphasis (high-order feature). The features with intermediate variability (10% ≤ range ≤ 25%) were entropy-GLCM, sum entropy, high gray level run emphsis, gray level non-uniformity, small number emphasis, and entropy-NGL. Forty remaining features presented large variations (range > 30%). Textural features such as entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient, and low-gray level run emphasis exhibited small variations due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters. Features with low level of variations are better candidates for reproducible tumor segmentation. Even though features such as contrast-NGTD, coarseness, homogeneity, and busyness have been previously used, our data indicated that these features presented large variations, therefore they could not be considered as a good candidates for tumor

  8. Variability of textural features in FDG PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galavis, Paulina E.; Jallow, Ngoneh; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Jeraj, Robert; Hollensen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Background. Characterization of textural features (spatial distributions of image intensity levels) has been considered as a tool for automatic tumor segmentation. The purpose of this work is to study the variability of the textural features in PET images due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters. Material and methods. Twenty patients with solid tumors underwent PET/CT scans on a GE Discovery VCT scanner, 45-60 minutes post-injection of 10 mCi of [ 18 F]FDG. Scans were acquired in both 2D and 3D modes. For each acquisition the raw PET data was reconstructed using five different reconstruction parameters. Lesions were segmented on a default image using the threshold of 40% of maximum SUV. Fifty different texture features were calculated inside the tumors. The range of variations of the features were calculated with respect to the average value. Results. Fifty textural features were classified based on the range of variation in three categories: small, intermediate and large variability. Features with small variability (range = 5%) were entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient (second order feature) and low-gray level run emphasis (high-order feature). The features with intermediate variability (10% = range = 25%) were entropy-GLCM, sum entropy, high gray level run emphasis, gray level non-uniformity, small number emphasis, and entropy-NGL. Forty remaining features presented large variations (range > 30%). Conclusion. Textural features such as entropy-first order, energy, maximal correlation coefficient, and low-gray level run emphasis exhibited small variations due to different acquisition modes and reconstruction parameters. Features with low level of variations are better candidates for reproducible tumor segmentation. Even though features such as contrast-NGTD, coarseness, homogeneity, and busyness have been previously used, our data indicated that these features presented large variations, therefore they could not be

  9. Fast, free-breathing, in vivo fetal imaging using time-resolved 3D MRI technique: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Glenn, Orit A; Xu, Duan

    2014-04-01

    Fetal MR imaging is very challenging due to the movement of fetus and the breathing motion of the mother. Current clinical protocols involve quick 2D scouting scans to determine scan plane and often several attempts to reorient the scan plane when the fetus moves. This makes acquisition of fetal MR images clinically challenging and results in long scan times in order to obtain images that are of diagnostic quality. Compared to 2D imaging, 3D imaging of the fetus has many advantages such as higher SNR and ability to reformat images in multiple planes. However, it is more sensitive to motion and challenging for fetal imaging due to irregular fetal motion in addition to maternal breathing and cardiac motion. This aim of this study is to develop a fast 3D fetal imaging technique to resolve the challenge of imaging the moving fetus. This 3D imaging sequence has multi-echo radial sampling in-plane and conventional Cartesian encoding through plane, which provides motion robustness and high data acquisition efficiency. The utilization of a golden-ratio based projection profile allows flexible time-resolved image reconstruction with arbitrary temporal resolution at arbitrary time points as well as high signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio. The nice features of the developed image technique allow the 3D visualization of the movements occurring throughout the scan. In this study, we applied this technique to three human subjects for fetal MRI and achieved promising preliminary results of fetal brain, heart and lung imaging.

  10. The influence of the microscope lamp filament colour temperature on the process of digital images of histological slides acquisition standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzynska, Anna; Roszkowiak, Lukasz; Pijanowska, Dorota; Kozlowski, Wojciech; Markiewicz, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the digital images of the tissue biopsy captured with optical microscope using bright field technique under various light conditions. The range of colour's variation in immunohistochemically stained with 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine and Haematoxylin tissue samples is immense and coming from various sources. One of them is inadequate setting of camera's white balance to microscope's light colour temperature. Although this type of error can be easily handled during the stage of image acquisition, it can be eliminated with use of colour adjustment algorithms. The examination of the dependence of colour variation from microscope's light temperature and settings of the camera is done as an introductory research to the process of automatic colour standardization. Six fields of view with empty space among the tissue samples have been selected for analysis. Each field of view has been acquired 225 times with various microscope light temperature and camera white balance settings. The fourteen randomly chosen images have been corrected and compared, with the reference image, by the following methods: Mean Square Error, Structural SIMilarity and visual assessment of viewer. For two types of backgrounds and two types of objects, the statistical image descriptors: range, median, mean and its standard deviation of chromaticity on a and b channels from CIELab colour space, and luminance L, and local colour variability for objects' specific area have been calculated. The results have been averaged for 6 images acquired in the same light conditions and camera settings for each sample. The analysis of the results leads to the following conclusions: (1) the images collected with white balance setting adjusted to light colour temperature clusters in certain area of chromatic space, (2) the process of white balance correction for images collected with white balance camera settings not matched to the light temperature moves image descriptors into proper

  11. IMAGE SEGMENTATION BASED ON MARKOV RANDOM FIELD AND WATERSHED TECHNIQUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纳瑟; 刘重庆

    2002-01-01

    This paper presented a method that incorporates Markov Random Field(MRF), watershed segmentation and merging techniques for performing image segmentation and edge detection tasks. MRF is used to obtain an initial estimate of x regions in the image under process where in MRF model, gray level x, at pixel location i, in an image X, depends on the gray levels of neighboring pixels. The process needs an initial segmented result. An initial segmentation is got based on K-means clustering technique and the minimum distance, then the region process in modeled by MRF to obtain an image contains different intensity regions. Starting from this we calculate the gradient values of that image and then employ a watershed technique. When using MRF method it obtains an image that has different intensity regions and has all the edge and region information, then it improves the segmentation result by superimpose closed and an accurate boundary of each region using watershed algorithm. After all pixels of the segmented regions have been processed, a map of primitive region with edges is generated. Finally, a merge process based on averaged mean values is employed. The final segmentation and edge detection result is one closed boundary per actual region in the image.

  12. Four-channel surface coil array for sequential CW-EPR image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Ayano; Emoto, Miho; Fujii, Hirotada; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    This article describes a four-channel surface coil array to increase the area of visualization for continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. A 776-MHz surface coil array was constructed with four independent surface coil resonators and three kinds of switches. Control circuits for switching the resonators were also built to sequentially perform EPR image acquisition for each resonator. The resonance frequencies of the resonators were shifted using PIN diode switches to decouple the inductively coupled coils. To investigate the area of visualization with the surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed using a glass cell phantom filled with a solution of nitroxyl radicals. The area of visualization obtained with the surface coil array was increased approximately 3.5-fold in comparison to that with a single surface coil resonator. Furthermore, to demonstrate the applicability of this surface coil array to animal imaging, three-dimensional EPR imaging was performed in a living mouse with an exogenously injected nitroxyl radical imaging agent.

  13. Video Multiple Watermarking Technique Based on Image Interlacing Using DWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital watermarking is one of the important techniques to secure digital media files in the domains of data authentication and copyright protection. In the nonblind watermarking systems, the need of the original host file in the watermark recovery operation makes an overhead over the system resources, doubles memory capacity, and doubles communications bandwidth. In this paper, a robust video multiple watermarking technique is proposed to solve this problem. This technique is based on image interlacing. In this technique, three-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT is used as a watermark embedding/extracting domain, Arnold transform is used as a watermark encryption/decryption method, and different types of media (gray image, color image, and video are used as watermarks. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying different types of attacks such as: geometric, noising, format-compression, and image-processing attacks. The simulation results show the effectiveness and good performance of the proposed technique in saving system resources, memory capacity, and communications bandwidth.

  14. Video multiple watermarking technique based on image interlacing using DWT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Abdel Kader, Neamat S; Zorkany, M

    2014-01-01

    Digital watermarking is one of the important techniques to secure digital media files in the domains of data authentication and copyright protection. In the nonblind watermarking systems, the need of the original host file in the watermark recovery operation makes an overhead over the system resources, doubles memory capacity, and doubles communications bandwidth. In this paper, a robust video multiple watermarking technique is proposed to solve this problem. This technique is based on image interlacing. In this technique, three-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used as a watermark embedding/extracting domain, Arnold transform is used as a watermark encryption/decryption method, and different types of media (gray image, color image, and video) are used as watermarks. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying different types of attacks such as: geometric, noising, format-compression, and image-processing attacks. The simulation results show the effectiveness and good performance of the proposed technique in saving system resources, memory capacity, and communications bandwidth.

  15. MICROARRAY IMAGE GRIDDING USING GRID LINE REFINEMENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Biju

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An important stage in microarray image analysis is gridding. Microarray image gridding is done to locate sub arrays in a microarray image and find co-ordinates of spots within each sub array. For accurate identification of spots, most of the proposed gridding methods require human intervention. In this paper a fully automatic gridding method which enhances spot intensity in the preprocessing step as per a histogram based threshold method is used. The gridding step finds co-ordinates of spots from horizontal and vertical profile of the image. To correct errors due to the grid line placement, a grid line refinement technique is proposed. The algorithm is applied on different image databases and results are compared based on spot detection accuracy and time. An average spot detection accuracy of 95.06% depicts the proposed method’s flexibility and accuracy in finding the spot co-ordinates for different database images.

  16. High-contrast 3D image acquisition using HiLo microscopy with an electrically tunable lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Katrin; Smolarski, André; Fischer, Andreas; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Stürmer, Moritz; Wallrabe, Ulricke; Czarske, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We present a HiLo microscope with an electrically tunable lens for high-contrast three-dimensional image acquisition. HiLo microscopy combines wide field and speckled illumination images to create optically sectioned images. Additionally, the depth-of-field is not fixed, but can be adjusted between wide field and confocal-like axial resolution. We incorporate an electrically tunable lens in the HiLo microscope for axial scanning, to obtain three-dimensional data without the need of moving neither the sample nor the objective. The used adaptive lens consists of a transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane into which an annular piezo bending actuator is embedded. A transparent fluid is filled between the membrane and the glass substrate. When actuated, the piezo generates a pressure in the lens which deflects the membrane and thus changes the refractive power. This technique enables a large tuning range of the refractive power between 1/f = (-24 . . . 25) 1/m. As the NA of the adaptive lens is only about 0.05, a fixed high-NA lens is included in the setup to provide high resolution. In this contribution, the scan properties and capabilities of the tunable lens in the HiLo microscope are analyzed. Eventually, exemplary measurements are presented and discussed.

  17. Imaging of the hip and bony pelvis. Techniques and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). MRI Centre; Johnson, K.J. [Princess of Wales Birmingham Children' s Hospital (United Kingdom); Whitehouse, R.W. (eds.) [Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2006-07-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook on imaging of the bony pelvis and hip joint that provides a detailed description of the techniques and imaging findings relevant to this complex anatomical region. In the first part of the book, the various techniques and procedures employed for imaging the pelvis and hip are discussed in detail. The second part of the book documents the application of these techniques to the diverse clinical problems and diseases encountered. Among the many topics addressed are congenital and developmental disorders including developmental dysplasia of the hip, irritable hip and septic arthritis, Perthes' disease and avascular necrosis, slipped upper femoral epiphysis, bony and soft tissue trauma, arthritis, tumours and hip prostheses. Each chapter is written by an acknowledged expert in the field, and a wealth of illustrative material is included. This book will be of great value to musculoskeletal and general radiologists, orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists. (orig.)

  18. Unsupervised color image segmentation using a lattice algebra clustering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urcid, Gonzalo; Ritter, Gerhard X.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a lattice algebra clustering technique for segmenting digital images in the Red-Green- Blue (RGB) color space. The proposed technique is a two step procedure. Given an input color image, the first step determines the finite set of its extreme pixel vectors within the color cube by means of the scaled min-W and max-M lattice auto-associative memory matrices, including the minimum and maximum vector bounds. In the second step, maximal rectangular boxes enclosing each extreme color pixel are found using the Chebychev distance between color pixels; afterwards, clustering is performed by assigning each image pixel to its corresponding maximal box. The two steps in our proposed method are completely unsupervised or autonomous. Illustrative examples are provided to demonstrate the color segmentation results including a brief numerical comparison with two other non-maximal variations of the same clustering technique.

  19. Improving face image extraction by using deep learning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. R.; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2016-03-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has made a collection of over a 1.2 million research articles containing 3.2 million figure images searchable using the Open-iSM multimodal (text+image) search engine. Many images are visible light photographs, some of which are images containing faces ("face images"). Some of these face images are acquired in unconstrained settings, while others are studio photos. To extract the face regions in the images, we first applied one of the most widely-used face detectors, a pre-trained Viola-Jones detector implemented in Matlab and OpenCV. The Viola-Jones detector was trained for unconstrained face image detection, but the results for the NLM database included many false positives, which resulted in a very low precision. To improve this performance, we applied a deep learning technique, which reduced the number of false positives and as a result, the detection precision was improved significantly. (For example, the classification accuracy for identifying whether the face regions output by this Viola- Jones detector are true positives or not in a test set is about 96%.) By combining these two techniques (Viola-Jones and deep learning) we were able to increase the system precision considerably, while avoiding the need to manually construct a large training set by manual delineation of the face regions.

  20. Electromagnetic considerations for RF current density imaging [MRI technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, G C; Joy, M G; Armstrong, R L; Henkelman, R M

    1995-01-01

    Radio frequency current density imaging (RF-CDI) is a recent MRI technique that can image a Larmor frequency current density component parallel to B(0). Because the feasibility of the technique was demonstrated only for homogeneous media, the authors' goal here is to clarify the electromagnetic assumptions and field theory to allow imaging RF currents in heterogeneous media. The complete RF field and current density imaging problem is posed. General solutions are given for measuring lab frame magnetic fields from the rotating frame magnetic field measurements. For the general case of elliptically polarized fields, in which current and magnetic field components are not in phase, one can obtain a modified single rotation approximation. Sufficient information exists to image the amplitude and phase of the RF current density parallel to B(0) if the partial derivative in the B(0) direction of the RF magnetic field (amplitude and phase) parallel to B(0) is much smaller than the corresponding current density component. The heterogeneous extension was verified by imaging conduction and displacement currents in a phantom containing saline and pure water compartments. Finally, the issues required to image eddy currents are presented. Eddy currents within a sample will distort both the transmitter coil reference system, and create measurable rotating frame magnetic fields. However, a three-dimensional electro-magnetic analysis will be required to determine how the reference system distortion affects computed eddy current images.

  1. Image acquisition optimization of a limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for lung radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yawei; Deng, Xinchen; Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) has been previously developed for four-dimensional (4D) intrafraction target verification either during arc delivery or between three-dimensional (3D)/IMRT beams. Preliminary studies showed that LIVE can accurately estimate the target volume using kV/MV projections acquired over orthogonal view 30° scan angles. Currently, the LIVE imaging acquisition requires slow gantry rotation and is not clinically optimized. The goal of this study is to optimize the image acquisition parameters of LIVE for different patient respiratory periods and gantry rotation speeds for the effective clinical implementation of the system. Limited-angle intrafraction verification imaging acquisition was optimized using a digital anthropomorphic phantom (XCAT) with simulated respiratory periods varying from 3 s to 6 s and gantry rotation speeds varying from 1°/s to 6°/s. LIVE scanning time was optimized by minimizing the number of respiratory cycles needed for the four-dimensional scan, and imaging dose was optimized by minimizing the number of kV and MV projections needed for four-dimensional estimation. The estimation accuracy was evaluated by calculating both the center-of-mass-shift (COMS) and three-dimensional volume-percentage-difference (VPD) between the tumor in estimated images and the ground truth images. The robustness of LIVE was evaluated with varied respiratory patterns, tumor sizes, and tumor locations in XCAT simulation. A dynamic thoracic phantom (CIRS) was used to further validate the optimized imaging schemes from XCAT study with changes of respiratory patterns, tumor sizes, and imaging scanning directions. Respiratory periods, gantry rotation speeds, number of respiratory cycles scanned and number of kV/MV projections acquired were all positively correlated with the estimation accuracy of LIVE. Faster gantry rotation speed or longer respiratory period allowed less respiratory cycles to be scanned and less kV/MV projections

  2. A technique for automatically extracting useful field of view and central field of view images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Param Dev; Aheer, Deepak; Kumar, Jay Prakash; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Patel, Chetan; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandra Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to ensure the uniform response of the single photon emission computed tomography gamma camera system before using it for the clinical studies by exposing it to uniform flood source. Vendor specific acquisition and processing protocol provide for studying flood source images along with the quantitative uniformity parameters such as integral and differential uniformity. However, a significant difficulty is that the time required to acquire a flood source image varies from 10 to 35 min depending both on the activity of Cobalt-57 flood source and the pre specified counts in the vendors protocol (usually 4000K-10,000K counts). In case the acquired total counts are less than the total prespecified counts, and then the vendor's uniformity processing protocol does not precede with the computation of the quantitative uniformity parameters. In this study, we have developed and verified a technique for reading the flood source image, remove unwanted information, and automatically extract and save the useful field of view and central field of view images for the calculation of the uniformity parameters. This was implemented using MATLAB R2013b running on Ubuntu Operating system and was verified by subjecting it to the simulated and real flood sources images. The accuracy of the technique was found to be encouraging, especially in view of practical difficulties with vendor-specific protocols. It may be used as a preprocessing step while calculating uniformity parameters of the gamma camera in lesser time with fewer constraints.

  3. A technique for automatically extracting useful field of view and central field of view images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Param Dev; Aheer, Deepak; Kumar, Jay Prakash; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Patel, Chetan; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandra Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to ensure the uniform response of the single photon emission computed tomography gamma camera system before using it for the clinical studies by exposing it to uniform flood source. Vendor specific acquisition and processing protocol provide for studying flood source images along with the quantitative uniformity parameters such as integral and differential uniformity. However, a significant difficulty is that the time required to acquire a flood source image varies from 10 to 35 min depending both on the activity of Cobalt-57 flood source and the pre specified counts in the vendors protocol (usually 4000K-10,000K counts). In case the acquired total counts are less than the total prespecified counts, and then the vendor's uniformity processing protocol does not precede with the computation of the quantitative uniformity parameters. In this study, we have developed and verified a technique for reading the flood source image, remove unwanted information, and automatically extract and save the useful field of view and central field of view images for the calculation of the uniformity parameters. This was implemented using MATLAB R2013b running on Ubuntu Operating system and was verified by subjecting it to the simulated and real flood sources images. The accuracy of the technique was found to be encouraging, especially in view of practical difficulties with vendor-specific protocols. It may be used as a preprocessing step while calculating uniformity parameters of the gamma camera in lesser time with fewer constraints

  4. Osteonecrosis of the sesamoid bone: contribution of modern imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leleu, J.P.; Heno, P.; Rispal, P.; Joullie, M.; Laurent, F.

    1990-01-01

    We report a case of osteonecrosis of the sesamoid bone or Renander disease in a young male serviceman. Modern imaging techniques proved useful for identifying the lesion. CT scan and above all magnetic resonance imaging established the accurate diagnosis. The combination of a hypointense signal from the sesamoid bone with an effusion in the first metatarsophalangeal joint should be considered as characteristic of osteonecrosis of the sesamoid bone [fr

  5. Detection of Glaucoma Using Image Processing Techniques: A Critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Naveen; Chauhan, R P; Dahiya, Nidhi

    2018-01-01

    The primary objective of this article is to present a summary of different types of image processing methods employed for the detection of glaucoma, a serious eye disease. Glaucoma affects the optic nerve in which retinal ganglion cells become dead, and this leads to loss of vision. The principal cause is the increase in intraocular pressure, which occurs in open-angle and angle-closure glaucoma, the two major types affecting the optic nerve. In the early stages of glaucoma, no perceptible symptoms appear. As the disease progresses, vision starts to become hazy, leading to blindness. Therefore, early detection of glaucoma is needed for prevention. Manual analysis of ophthalmic images is fairly time-consuming and accuracy depends on the expertise of the professionals. Automatic analysis of retinal images is an important tool. Automation aids in the detection, diagnosis, and prevention of risks associated with the disease. Fundus images obtained from a fundus camera have been used for the analysis. Requisite pre-processing techniques have been applied to the image and, depending upon the technique, various classifiers have been used to detect glaucoma. The techniques mentioned in the present review have certain advantages and disadvantages. Based on this study, one can determine which technique provides an optimum result.

  6. Empirical gradient threshold technique for automated segmentation across image modalities and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, J; Majurski, M; Peskin, A; Breen, C; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2015-10-01

    New microscopy technologies are enabling image acquisition of terabyte-sized data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of images. In order to retrieve and analyze the biological information in these large data sets, segmentation is needed to detect the regions containing cells or cell colonies. Our work with hundreds of large images (each 21,000×21,000 pixels) requires a segmentation method that: (1) yields high segmentation accuracy, (2) is applicable to multiple cell lines with various densities of cells and cell colonies, and several imaging modalities, (3) can process large data sets in a timely manner, (4) has a low memory footprint and (5) has a small number of user-set parameters that do not require adjustment during the segmentation of large image sets. None of the currently available segmentation methods meet all these requirements. Segmentation based on image gradient thresholding is fast and has a low memory footprint. However, existing techniques that automate the selection of the gradient image threshold do not work across image modalities, multiple cell lines, and a wide range of foreground/background densities (requirement 2) and all failed the requirement for robust parameters that do not require re-adjustment with time (requirement 5). We present a novel and empirically derived image gradient threshold selection method for separating foreground and background pixels in an image that meets all the requirements listed above. We quantify the difference between our approach and existing ones in terms of accuracy, execution speed, memory usage and number of adjustable parameters on a reference data set. This reference data set consists of 501 validation images with manually determined segmentations and image sizes ranging from 0.36 Megapixels to 850 Megapixels. It includes four different cell lines and two image modalities: phase contrast and fluorescent. Our new technique, called Empirical Gradient Threshold (EGT), is derived from this reference

  7. Prognostic aspects on the development of imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehl, H.

    1985-01-01

    The development of imaging techniques designed for medical diagnostics and their application within the health service system are forecast up to the year 2000. The changes in the structure of the imaging methods that are to be expected in the GDR are outlined. Considering the users' needs and demands to be met by the manufacturers, in the long-term forecast it is dealt with more specifically with X-ray techniques, computer tomography, ultrasonic diagnostics, video endoscopy and the use of expert systems. (author)

  8. A novel data processing technique for image reconstruction of penumbral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongwei; Li, Hongyun; Xu, Zeping; Song, Guzhou; Zhang, Faqiang; Zhou, Lin

    2011-06-01

    CT image reconstruction technique was applied to the data processing of the penumbral imaging. Compared with other traditional processing techniques for penumbral coded pinhole image such as Wiener, Lucy-Richardson and blind technique, this approach is brand new. In this method, the coded aperture processing method was used for the first time independent to the point spread function of the image diagnostic system. In this way, the technical obstacles was overcome in the traditional coded pinhole image processing caused by the uncertainty of point spread function of the image diagnostic system. Then based on the theoretical study, the simulation of penumbral imaging and image reconstruction was carried out to provide fairly good results. While in the visible light experiment, the point source of light was used to irradiate a 5mm×5mm object after diffuse scattering and volume scattering. The penumbral imaging was made with aperture size of ~20mm. Finally, the CT image reconstruction technique was used for image reconstruction to provide a fairly good reconstruction result.

  9. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary lesions: Description of a technique aiming clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Optazaite, Elzbieta; Sommer, Gregor; Safi, Seyer; Heussel, Claus Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    To propose a technique for evaluation of pulmonary lesions using contrast-enhanced MRI; to assess morphological patterns of enhancement and correlate quantitative analysis with histopathology. Material and methods: Thirty-six patients were prospectively studied. Volumetric-interpolated T1W images were obtained during consecutive breath holds after bolus triggered contrast injection. Volume coverage of first three acquisitions was limited (higher temporal resolution) and last acquisition obtained at 4th min. Two radiologists individually evaluated the patterns of enhancement. Region-of-interest-based signal intensity (SI)-time curves were created to assess quantitative parameters. Results: Readers agreed moderately to substantially concerning lesions’ enhancement pattern. SI-time curves could be created for all lesions. In comparison to benign, malignant lesions showed higher values of maximum enhancement, early peak, slope and 4th min enhancement. Early peak >15% showed 100% sensitivity to detect malignancy, maximum enhancement >40% showed 100% specificity. Conclusions: The proposed technique is robust, simple to perform and can be applied in clinical scenario. It allows visual evaluation of enhancement pattern/progression together with creation of SI-time curves and assessment of derived quantitative parameters. Perfusion analysis was highly sensitive to detect malignancy, in accordance to what is recommended by most recent guidelines on imaging evaluation of pulmonary lesions

  10. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary lesions: Description of a technique aiming clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radiology Department, German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum – DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes 3900, Campus Universitario Monte Alegre, 14048 900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Optazaite, Elzbieta, E-mail: optazaite@andrulis.eu [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Gregor, E-mail: gregor.sommer@usb.ch [Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben 4, CH-4031 Basel (Switzerland); Safi, Seyer, E-mail: seyer.safi@gmail.com [Surgery Department, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus Peter, E-mail: heussel@uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2015-01-15

    To propose a technique for evaluation of pulmonary lesions using contrast-enhanced MRI; to assess morphological patterns of enhancement and correlate quantitative analysis with histopathology. Material and methods: Thirty-six patients were prospectively studied. Volumetric-interpolated T1W images were obtained during consecutive breath holds after bolus triggered contrast injection. Volume coverage of first three acquisitions was limited (higher temporal resolution) and last acquisition obtained at 4th min. Two radiologists individually evaluated the patterns of enhancement. Region-of-interest-based signal intensity (SI)-time curves were created to assess quantitative parameters. Results: Readers agreed moderately to substantially concerning lesions’ enhancement pattern. SI-time curves could be created for all lesions. In comparison to benign, malignant lesions showed higher values of maximum enhancement, early peak, slope and 4th min enhancement. Early peak >15% showed 100% sensitivity to detect malignancy, maximum enhancement >40% showed 100% specificity. Conclusions: The proposed technique is robust, simple to perform and can be applied in clinical scenario. It allows visual evaluation of enhancement pattern/progression together with creation of SI-time curves and assessment of derived quantitative parameters. Perfusion analysis was highly sensitive to detect malignancy, in accordance to what is recommended by most recent guidelines on imaging evaluation of pulmonary lesions.

  11. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Cardiology Practice: A Concise Guide to Image Acquisition and Clinical Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena-López, Silvia; Hinojar, Rocío; Puntmann, Valentina O

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance plays an increasingly important role in routine cardiology clinical practice. It is a versatile imaging modality that allows highly accurate, broad and in-depth assessment of cardiac function and structure and provides information on pertinent clinical questions in diseases such as ischemic heart disease, nonischemic cardiomyopathies, and heart failure, as well as allowing unique indications, such as the assessment and quantification of myocardial iron overload or infiltration. Increasing evidence for the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance, together with the spread of knowledge and skill outside expert centers, has afforded greater access for patients and wider clinical experience. This review provides a snapshot of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in modern clinical practice by linking image acquisition and postprocessing with effective delivery of the clinical meaning. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-d image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da; Braz, Delson

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source-detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7, 31 x 31 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl), BGO, CdWO 4 , LSO, GOS and GSO scintillation detectors with pixel dimensions ranging from 1 x 1 cm 2 to 10 x 10 μm 2 and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that results in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. A 2D image of two thyroid follicles simulated by using MCNP4B code is shown

  13. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  14. improvement of digital image watermarking techniques based on FPGA implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Hadedy, M.E

    2006-01-01

    digital watermarking provides the ownership of a piece of digital data by marking the considered data invisibly or visibly. this can be used to protect several types of multimedia objects such as audio, text, image and video. this thesis demonstrates the different types of watermarking techniques such as (discrete cosine transform (DCT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and their characteristics. then, it classifies these techniques declaring their advantages and disadvantages. an improved technique with distinguished features, such as peak signal to noise ratio ( PSNR) and similarity ratio (SR) has been introduced. the modified technique has been compared with the other techniques by measuring heir robustness against differ attacks. finally, field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) based implementation and comparison, for the proposed watermarking technique have been presented and discussed

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part I: Normal anatomy, imaging technique, and osseous abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Part I of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses normal elbow anatomy and the technical factors involved in obtaining high-quality magnetic resonance images of the elbow. Part I also discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with osseous abnormalities of the elbow. With proper patient positioning and imaging technique, magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the osseous structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum and can be used to evaluate the size, location, stability, and viability of the osteochondritis dissecans fragment. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early stress injury to the proximal ulna in athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect radiographically occult fractures of the elbow in both children and adults. Magnetic resonance imaging is also useful in children to further evaluate elbow fractures which are detected on plain-film radiographs. (orig.)

  16. Indications and technique of fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenbaum, U.; Woitek, R.; Furtner, J.; Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation and confirmation of fetal pathologies previously suspected or diagnosed with ultrasound. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Technique for prenatal fetal examination. Fetal MRI is an established supplementary technique to prenatal ultrasound. Fetal MRI should only be used as an additional method in prenatal diagnostics and not for routine screening. Fetal MRI should only be performed in perinatal medicine centers after a previous level III ultrasound examination. (orig.) [de

  17. Evaluation of Medium Spatial Resolution BRDF-Adjustment Techniques Using Multi-Angular SPOT4 (Take5) Acquisitions

    OpenAIRE

    Claverie, Martin; Vermote, Eric; Franch, Belen; He, Tao; Hagolle, Olivier; Kadiri, Mohamed; Masek, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution sensor Surface Reflectance (SR) data are affected by surface anisotropy but are difficult to adjust because of the low temporal frequency of the acquisitions and the low angular sampling. This paper evaluates five high spatial resolution Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjustment techniques. The evaluation is based on the noise level of the SR Time Series (TS) corrected to a normalized geometry (nadir view, 45° sun zenith angle) extracted from the multi-...

  18. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Afshar

    Full Text Available Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 10(10 pixels, but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments.

  19. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 10(10) pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments.

  20. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 1010 pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments. PMID:27046144

  1. Hyperspectral imaging using the single-pixel Fourier transform technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Senlin; Hui, Wangwei; Wang, Yunlong; Huang, Kaicheng; Shi, Qiushuai; Ying, Cuifeng; Liu, Dongqi; Ye, Qing; Zhou, Wenyuan; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technology is playing an increasingly important role in the fields of food analysis, medicine and biotechnology. To improve the speed of operation and increase the light throughput in a compact equipment structure, a Fourier transform hyperspectral imaging system based on a single-pixel technique is proposed in this study. Compared with current imaging spectrometry approaches, the proposed system has a wider spectral range (400-1100 nm), a better spectral resolution (1 nm) and requires fewer measurement data (a sample rate of 6.25%). The performance of this system was verified by its application to the non-destructive testing of potatoes.

  2. Parallel image-acquisition in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with a surface coil array: Proof-of-concept experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Ayano; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    This article describes a feasibility study of parallel image-acquisition using a two-channel surface coil array in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. Parallel EPR imaging was performed by multiplexing of EPR detection in the frequency domain. The parallel acquisition system consists of two surface coil resonators and radiofrequency (RF) bridges for EPR detection. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method of parallel image-acquisition with a surface coil array, three-dimensional EPR imaging was carried out using a tube phantom. Technical issues in the multiplexing method of EPR detection were also clarified. We found that degradation in the signal-to-noise ratio due to the interference of RF carriers is a key problem to be solved.

  3. Simultaneous Multislice Echo Planar Imaging With Blipped Controlled Aliasing in Parallel Imaging Results in Higher Acceleration: A Promising Technique for Accelerated Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filli, Lukas; Piccirelli, Marco; Kenkel, David; Guggenberger, Roman; Andreisek, Gustav; Beck, Thomas; Runge, Val M; Boss, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of accelerated diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of skeletal muscle using echo planar imaging (EPI) applying simultaneous multislice excitation with a blipped controlled aliasing in parallel imaging results in higher acceleration unaliasing technique. After federal ethics board approval, the lower leg muscles of 8 healthy volunteers (mean [SD] age, 29.4 [2.9] years) were examined in a clinical 3-T magnetic resonance scanner using a 15-channel knee coil. The EPI was performed at a b value of 500 s/mm2 without slice acceleration (conventional DTI) as well as with 2-fold and 3-fold acceleration. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were measured in all 3 acquisitions. Fiber tracking performance was compared between the acquisitions regarding the number of tracks, average track length, and anatomical precision using multivariate analysis of variance and Mann-Whitney U tests. Acquisition time was 7:24 minutes for conventional DTI, 3:53 minutes for 2-fold acceleration, and 2:38 minutes for 3-fold acceleration. Overall FA and MD values ranged from 0.220 to 0.378 and 1.595 to 1.829 mm2/s, respectively. Two-fold acceleration yielded similar FA and MD values (P ≥ 0.901) and similar fiber tracking performance compared with conventional DTI. Three-fold acceleration resulted in comparable MD (P = 0.199) but higher FA values (P = 0.006) and significantly impaired fiber tracking in the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles (number of tracks, P DTI of skeletal muscle with similar image quality and quantification accuracy of diffusion parameters. This may increase the clinical applicability of muscle anisotropy measurements.

  4. Microvascular imaging: techniques and opportunities for clinical physiological measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, John; Howell, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The microvasculature presents a particular challenge in physiological measurement because the vessel structure is spatially inhomogeneous and perfusion can exhibit high variability over time. This review describes, with a clinical focus, the wide variety of methods now available for imaging of the microvasculature and their key applications. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging are established, commercially-available techniques for determining microvascular perfusion, with proven clinical utility for applications such as burn-depth assessment. Nailfold capillaroscopy is also commercially available, with significant published literature that supports its use for detecting microangiopathy secondary to specific connective tissue diseases in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon. Infrared thermography measures skin temperature and not perfusion directly, and it has only gained acceptance for some surgical and peripheral microvascular applications. Other emerging technologies including imaging photoplethysmography, optical coherence tomography, photoacoustic tomography, hyperspectral imaging, and tissue viability imaging are also described to show their potential as techniques that could become established tools for clinical microvascular assessment. Growing interest in the microcirculation has helped drive the rapid development in perfusion imaging of the microvessels, bringing exciting opportunities in microvascular research. (topical review)

  5. A Kalman filter technique applied for medical image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goliaei, S.; Ghorshi, S.; Manzuri, M. T.; Mortazavi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical images contain information about vital organic tissues inside of human body and are widely used for diagnoses of disease or for surgical purposes. Image reconstruction is essential for medical images for some applications such as suppression of noise or de-blurring the image in order to provide images with better quality and contrast. Due to vital rule of image reconstruction in medical sciences the corresponding algorithms with better efficiency and higher speed is desirable. Most algorithms in image reconstruction are operated on frequency domain such as the most popular one known as filtered back projection. In this paper we introduce a Kalman filter technique which is operated in time domain for medical image reconstruction. Results indicated that as the number of projection increases in both normal collected ray sum and the collected ray sum corrupted by noise the quality of reconstructed image becomes better in terms of contract and transparency. It is also seen that as the number of projection increases the error index decreases.

  6. Study of CT image texture using deep learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sandeep; Fan, Jiahua; Chevalier, David

    2018-03-01

    For CT imaging, reduction of radiation dose while improving or maintaining image quality (IQ) is currently a very active research and development topic. Iterative Reconstruction (IR) approaches have been suggested to be able to offer better IQ to dose ratio compared to the conventional Filtered Back Projection (FBP) reconstruction. However, it has been widely reported that often CT image texture from IR is different compared to that from FBP. Researchers have proposed different figure of metrics to quantitate the texture from different reconstruction methods. But there is still a lack of practical and robust method in the field for texture description. This work applied deep learning method for CT image texture study. Multiple dose scans of a 20cm diameter cylindrical water phantom was performed on Revolution CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha) and the images were reconstructed with FBP and four different IR reconstruction settings. The training images generated were randomly allotted (80:20) to a training and validation set. An independent test set of 256-512 images/class were collected with the same scan and reconstruction settings. Multiple deep learning (DL) networks with Convolution, RELU activation, max-pooling, fully-connected, global average pooling and softmax activation layers were investigated. Impact of different image patch size for training was investigated. Original pixel data as well as normalized image data were evaluated. DL models were reliably able to classify CT image texture with accuracy up to 99%. Results show that the deep learning techniques suggest that CT IR techniques may help lower the radiation dose compared to FBP.

  7. Performance evaluation of cardiac MRI image denoising techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AlAttar, M.A.; Mohamed, A.G.A.; Osman, N.F.; Fahmy, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Black-blood cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in diagnosing a number of heart diseases. The technique suffers inherently from low contrast-to-noise ratio between the myocardium and the blood. In this work, we examined the performance of different classification

  8. Wavelet techniques for reversible data embedding into images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kamstra; H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe proliferation of digital information in our society has enticed a lot of research into data embedding techniques that add information to digital content like images, audio and video. This additional information can be used for various purposes and different applications place

  9. An improved technique for the prediction of optimal image resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-10-04

    Oct 4, 2010 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJEST ... robust technique for predicting optimal image resolution for the mapping of savannah ecosystems was developed. .... whether to purchase multi-spectral imagery acquired by GeoEye-2 ..... Analysis of the spectral behaviour of the pasture class in.

  10. Feminist Pedagogy, Body Image, and the Dance Technique Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sherrie; Oliver, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of feminist consciousness in dance technique class as related to body image, the myth of the perfect body, and the development of feminist pedagogy. Western concert dance forms have often been taught in a manner where imitating the teacher is primary in the learning process. In this traditional scenario,…

  11. Comparing Generative Adversarial Network Techniques for Image Creation and Modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Mathijs; Wiering, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Generative adversarial networks (GANs) have demonstrated to be successful at generating realistic real-world images. In this paper we compare various GAN techniques, both supervised and unsupervised. The effects on training stability of different objective functions are compared. We add an encoder

  12. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; hide

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  13. Coronary imaging techniques with emphasis on CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederlin, Mathieu; Latrabe, Valerie; Corneloup, Olivier; Cochet, Hubert; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery imaging in children is challenging, with high demands both on temporal and spatial resolution due to high heart rates and smaller anatomy. Although invasive conventional coronary angiography remains the benchmark technique, over the past 10 years, CT and MRI have emerged in the field of coronary imaging. The choice of hardware is important. For CT, the minimum requirement is a 64-channel scanner. The temporal resolution of the scanner is most important for optimising image quality and minimising radiation dose. Manufacturers have developed several modes of electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering to facilitate dose reduction. Recent technical advances have opened new possibilities in MRI coronary imaging. As a non-ionising radiation technique, MRI is of great interest in paediatric imaging. It is currently recommended in centres with appropriate expertise for the screening of patients with suspected congenital coronary anomalies. However, MRI is still not feasible in infants. This review describes and discusses the technical requirements and the pros and cons of all three techniques. (orig.)

  14. Reducing the absorbed dose in analogue radiography of infant chest images by improving the image quality, using image processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimian, A.; Yazdani, S.; Askari, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiographic inspection is one of the most widely employed techniques for medical testing methods. Because of poor contrast and high un-sharpness of radiographic image quality in films, converting radiographs to a digital format and using further digital image processing is the best method of enhancing the image quality and assisting the interpreter in their evaluation. In this research work, radiographic films of 70 infant chest images with different sizes of defects were selected. To digitise the chest images and employ image processing the two algorithms (i) spatial domain and (ii) frequency domain techniques were used. The MATLAB environment was selected for processing in the digital format. Our results showed that by using these two techniques, the defects with small dimensions are detectable. Therefore, these suggested techniques may help medical specialists to diagnose the defects in the primary stages and help to prevent more repeat X-ray examination of paediatric patients. (authors)

  15. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Parrish, Angela R; Cotarla, Ion; Jones, Laundette P; Johnson, Michael D; Furth, Priscilla A

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary

  16. Image analysis in modern ophthalmology: from acquisition to computer assisted diagnosis and telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrugo, Andrés G.; Millán, María S.; Cristóbal, Gabriel; Gabarda, Salvador; Sorel, Michal; Sroubek, Filip

    2012-06-01

    Medical digital imaging has become a key element of modern health care procedures. It provides visual documentation and a permanent record for the patients, and most important the ability to extract information about many diseases. Modern ophthalmology thrives and develops on the advances in digital imaging and computing power. In this work we present an overview of recent image processing techniques proposed by the authors in the area of digital eye fundus photography. Our applications range from retinal image quality assessment to image restoration via blind deconvolution and visualization of structural changes in time between patient visits. All proposed within a framework for improving and assisting the medical practice and the forthcoming scenario of the information chain in telemedicine.

  17. Adaptive differential correspondence imaging based on sorting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop an adaptive differential correspondence imaging (CI method using a sorting technique. Different from the conventional CI schemes, the bucket detector signals (BDS are first processed by a differential technique, and then sorted in a descending (or ascending order. Subsequently, according to the front and last several frames of the sorted BDS, the positive and negative subsets (PNS are created by selecting the relative frames from the reference detector signals. Finally, the object image is recovered from the PNS. Besides, an adaptive method based on two-step iteration is designed to select the optimum number of frames. To verify the proposed method, a single-detector computational ghost imaging (GI setup is constructed. We experimentally and numerically compare the performance of the proposed method with different GI algorithms. The results show that our method can improve the reconstruction quality and reduce the computation cost by using fewer measurement data.

  18. Wear Detection of Drill Bit by Image-based Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukeri, Maziyah; Zulhilmi Paiz Ismadi, Mohd; Rahim Othman, Abdul; Kamaruddin, Shahrul

    2018-03-01

    Image processing for computer vision function plays an essential aspect in the manufacturing industries for the tool condition monitoring. This study proposes a dependable direct measurement method to measure the tool wear using image-based analysis. Segmentation and thresholding technique were used as the means to filter and convert the colour image to binary datasets. Then, the edge detection method was applied to characterize the edge of the drill bit. By using cross-correlation method, the edges of original and worn drill bits were correlated to each other. Cross-correlation graphs were able to detect the difference of the worn edge despite small difference between the graphs. Future development will focus on quantifying the worn profile as well as enhancing the sensitivity of the technique.

  19. Characterization of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2D imaging acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da

    2007-05-01

    The image acquisition methods applied to nuclear medicine and radiobiology are a valuable research study for determination of thyroid anatomy to seek disorders associated to follicular cells. The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has also been used in problems related to radiation detection in order to map medical images since the improvement of data processing compatible with personnel computers (PC). This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array that could be coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD) through a fiber optic plate in order to map the follicles of thyroid gland. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits the application suggested here with spatial resolution of 10 μm and good detector efficiency. The methodology results are useful to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A source - detector simulation is performed by using a MCNP4B (Monte Carlo for Neutron Photon transport) general code considering different source energies, detector materials and geometries including pixel sizes and reflector types. The results demonstrate that by using MCNP4B code is possible to searching for useful parameters related to the systems used in nuclear medicine, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology studies to acquiring thyroid follicles images. (author)

  20. Crosstalk correction for simultaneous acquisition imaging by Tc-99m and I-123 in brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, J. K.; Lee, M. C.; Baek, M. Y.; Shin, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    We tend to separate a single isotope image in simultaneous acquisition image at different spatially distribution of dual isotope. Using the brain phantom to be separate two region with 2:1 ratio, each region filled with Tc-99m (140 keV) 185 MBq (1.5 mCi) and I-123 (159 keV) 55.5 MBq (1.5 mCi). We consider that Tc-99m exists in I-123 region, so inject 74 MBq Tc-99m on that region. For 10 % symmetrical energy windows centered on the Tc-99m and I-123 photopeaks we evaluate the crosstalk effects. That equation express as A140 Tcpp + KitIpp and A159 = KtiTcpp + Ipp. We acquired increase value comparable with naive value by the crosstalk. Then estimate crosstalk fraction, we can separate correction image. Through the experiment Kti and Kit are 0.38 and 0.29. Applying these values to Tc-99m energy window and I-123 window, we conclude that this method is able to separate images of each isotope. It is useful to investigate crosstalk contribution for other combinations of isotope

  1. A System for Acquisition, Processing and Visualization of Image Time Series from Multiple Camera Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Melih Tanis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A system for multiple camera networks is proposed for continuous monitoring of ecosystems by processing image time series. The system is built around the Finnish Meteorological Image PROcessing Toolbox (FMIPROT, which includes data acquisition, processing and visualization from multiple camera networks. The toolbox has a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI for which only minimal computer knowledge and skills are required to use it. Images from camera networks are acquired and handled automatically according to the common communication protocols, e.g., File Transfer Protocol (FTP. Processing features include GUI based selection of the region of interest (ROI, automatic analysis chain, extraction of ROI based indices such as the green fraction index (GF, red fraction index (RF, blue fraction index (BF, green-red vegetation index (GRVI, and green excess (GEI index, as well as a custom index defined by a user-provided mathematical formula. Analysis results are visualized on interactive plots both on the GUI and hypertext markup language (HTML reports. The users can implement their own developed algorithms to extract information from digital image series for any purpose. The toolbox can also be run in non-GUI mode, which allows running series of analyses in servers unattended and scheduled. The system is demonstrated using an environmental camera network in Finland.

  2. Dynamic arrythmia filtration for gated blood pool imaging: Validation against list - Mode technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Rocchini, A.; Wu-Connolly, L.

    1985-01-01

    Normal resting heart rate variation distort the diastolic portions of time-activity curves (TACs) generated from gated blood pool (GBP) images. This alters calculated measures of diastolic function e.g. peak filling rate (PFR). The authors compared diastolic filling parameters obtained by two methods of arrythmia removal, list-mode (LM) acquisition and a new approach, dynamic arrythima filtration (DAF). LM acquisition techniques reject beats of unusual cycle length, thus reducing the TAC distortions caused by heart rate variation but is time consuming and requires large amounts of disk storage. In DAF systems data is evaluated for cycle length in real-time and accepted or rejected immediately according to preset, operator determined cycle-length criteria, thus eliminating the need for post-processing of data and for large mass data storage. The authors prospectively determined EF, time to end-systole (TES), PFR, ad TPFR on 25 GBP patients. Camera and ECG data were sent simultaneously to 2 computers. One acquired data via LM and the other by DAF. Fluctuations in heart rate during GBP acquisition may cause errors in calculation of filling parameters. Both LM and DAF remove cycles of unusual length. DAF is less time consuming and technically demanding than LM and provides results which correlate closely with those obtained by LM

  3. Appropriate electromagnetic techniques for imaging geothermal fracture zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groom, R; Walker, P [PetRos EiKon Incorporated, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Electromagnetic surface detection of fracture zones has often been approached by using the magnetotelluric method. This technique suffers greatly from the quantity and scale of the conductive inhomogeneities lying above the fracture zones. Additionally, it suffers from the inherent inability to focus the source on the target. There are no such source focusing capabilities in magnetotellurics. Accordingly, the quantity of magnetotelluric data required to resolve targets in such complex conditions can make the technique inefficient and insufficient from a cost perspective. When attempting to reveal a subsurface structure and image it, the basic physical responses at hand must be kept in mind, and the appropriate source must be utilized, which most effectively illuminates the target. A further advantage to controlled sources is that imaging techniques may be used to accentuate the response due to knowledge and control of the source.

  4. High temporal resolution magnetic resonance imaging: development of a parallel three dimensional acquisition method for functional neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabrait, C.

    2007-11-01

    Echo Planar Imaging is widely used to perform data acquisition in functional neuroimaging. This sequence allows the acquisition of a set of about 30 slices, covering the whole brain, at a spatial resolution ranging from 2 to 4 mm, and a temporal resolution ranging from 1 to 2 s. It is thus well adapted to the mapping of activated brain areas but does not allow precise study of the brain dynamics. Moreover, temporal interpolation is needed in order to correct for inter-slices delays and 2-dimensional acquisition is subject to vascular in flow artifacts. To improve the estimation of the hemodynamic response functions associated with activation, this thesis aimed at developing a 3-dimensional high temporal resolution acquisition method. To do so, Echo Volume Imaging was combined with reduced field-of-view acquisition and parallel imaging. Indeed, E.V.I. allows the acquisition of a whole volume in Fourier space following a single excitation, but it requires very long echo trains. Parallel imaging and field-of-view reduction are used to reduce the echo train durations by a factor of 4, which allows the acquisition of a 3-dimensional brain volume with limited susceptibility-induced distortions and signal losses, in 200 ms. All imaging parameters have been optimized in order to reduce echo train durations and to maximize S.N.R., so that cerebral activation can be detected with a high level of confidence. Robust detection of brain activation was demonstrated with both visual and auditory paradigms. High temporal resolution hemodynamic response functions could be estimated through selective averaging of the response to the different trials of the stimulation. To further improve S.N.R., the matrix inversions required in parallel reconstruction were regularized, and the impact of the level of regularization on activation detection was investigated. Eventually, potential applications of parallel E.V.I. such as the study of non-stationary effects in the B.O.L.D. response

  5. Implementation of an image acquisition and processing system based on FlexRIO, CameraLink and areaDetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquembri, S.; Ruiz, M. [Instrumentation and Applied Acoustic Research Group, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain); Barrera, E., E-mail: eduardo.barrera@upm.es [Instrumentation and Applied Acoustic Research Group, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain); Sanz, D.; Bustos, A. [Instrumentation and Applied Acoustic Research Group, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain); Castro, R.; Vega, J. [National Fusion Laboratory, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The system presented acquires and process images from any CameraLink compliant camera. • The frame grabber implanted with FlexRIO technology have image time stamping and preprocessing capabilities. • The system is integrated into EPICS using areaDetector for a flexible configuration of image the acquisition and processing chain. • Is fully compatible with the architecture of the ITER Fast Controllers. - Abstract: Image processing systems are commonly used in current physics experiments, such as nuclear fusion experiments. These experiments usually require multiple cameras with different resolutions, framerates and, frequently, different software drivers. The integration of heterogeneous types of cameras without a unified hardware and software interface increases the complexity of the acquisition system. This paper presents the implementation of a distributed image acquisition and processing system for CameraLink cameras. This system implements a camera frame grabber using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), a reconfigurable hardware platform that allows for image acquisition and real-time preprocessing. The frame grabber is integrated into Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) using the areaDetector EPICS software module, which offers a common interface shared among tens of cameras to configure the image acquisition and process these images in a distributed control system. The use of areaDetector also allows the image processing to be parallelized and concatenated using: multiple computers; areaDetector plugins; and the areaDetector standard type for data, NDArrays. The architecture developed is fully compatible with ITER Fast Controllers and the entire system has been validated using a camera hardware simulator that stream videos from fusion experiment databases.

  6. High efficient optical remote sensing images acquisition for nano-satellite: reconstruction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Feng; Xin, Lei; Fu, Jie; Huang, Puming

    2017-10-01

    Large amount of data is one of the most obvious features in satellite based remote sensing systems, which is also a burden for data processing and transmission. The theory of compressive sensing(CS) has been proposed for almost a decade, and massive experiments show that CS has favorable performance in data compression and recovery, so we apply CS theory to remote sensing images acquisition. In CS, the construction of classical sensing matrix for all sparse signals has to satisfy the Restricted Isometry Property (RIP) strictly, which limits applying CS in practical in image compression. While for remote sensing images, we know some inherent characteristics such as non-negative, smoothness and etc.. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to present a novel measurement matrix that breaks RIP. The new sensing matrix consists of two parts: the standard Nyquist sampling matrix for thumbnails and the conventional CS sampling matrix. Since most of sun-synchronous based satellites fly around the earth 90 minutes and the revisit cycle is also short, lots of previously captured remote sensing images of the same place are available in advance. This drives us to reconstruct remote sensing images through a deep learning approach with those measurements from the new framework. Therefore, we propose a novel deep convolutional neural network (CNN) architecture which takes in undersampsing measurements as input and outputs an intermediate reconstruction image. It is well known that the training procedure to the network costs long time, luckily, the training step can be done only once, which makes the approach attractive for a host of sparse recovery problems.

  7. A dual-view digital tomosynthesis imaging technique for improved chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C., E-mail: cshaw@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77054 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) has been shown to be useful for reducing the overlapping of abnormalities with anatomical structures at various depth levels along the posterior–anterior (PA) direction in chest radiography. However, DTS provides crude three-dimensional (3D) images that have poor resolution in the lateral view and can only be displayed with reasonable quality in the PA view. Furthermore, the spillover of high-contrast objects from off-fulcrum planes generates artifacts that may impede the diagnostic use of the DTS images. In this paper, the authors describe and demonstrate the use of a dual-view DTS technique to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed volume image data for more accurate rendition of the anatomy and slice images with improved resolution and reduced artifacts, thus allowing the 3D image data to be viewed in views other than the PA view. Methods: With the dual-view DTS technique, limited angle scans are performed and projection images are acquired in two orthogonal views: PA and lateral. The dual-view projection data are used together to reconstruct 3D images using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization iterative algorithm. In this study, projection images were simulated or experimentally acquired over 360° using the scanning geometry for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). While all projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images, selected projections were extracted and used to reconstruct single- and dual-view DTS images for comparison with the CBCT images. For realistic demonstration and comparison, a digital chest phantom derived from clinical CT images was used for the simulation study. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged for the experimental study. The resultant dual-view DTS images were visually compared with the single-view DTS images and CBCT images for the presence of image artifacts and accuracy of CT numbers and anatomy and quantitatively compared with root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) values

  8. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine

  9. Dynamic motion analysis of fetuses with central nervous system disorders by cine magnetic resonance imaging using fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition and parallel imaging: a preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wan-Yuo; Ono, Shigeki; Oi, Shizuo; Shen, Shu-Huei; Wong, Tai-Tong; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Hung, Jeng-Hsiu

    2006-08-01

    The authors present a novel cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, two-dimensional (2D) fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) technique with parallel imaging. It achieves temporal resolution at less than half a second as well as high spatial resolution cine imaging free of motion artifacts for evaluating the dynamic motion of fetuses in utero. The information obtained is used to predict postnatal outcome. Twenty-five fetuses with anomalies were studied. Ultrasonography demonstrated severe abnormalities in five of the fetuses; the other 20 fetuses constituted a control group. The cine fetal MR imaging demonstrated fetal head, neck, trunk, extremity, and finger as well as swallowing motions. Imaging findings were evaluated and compared in fetuses with major central nervous system (CNS) anomalies in five cases and minor CNS, non-CNS, or no anomalies in 20 cases. Normal motility was observed in the latter group. For fetuses in the former group, those with abnormal motility failed to survive after delivery, whereas those with normal motility survived with functioning preserved. The power deposition of radiofrequency, presented as specific absorption rate (SAR), was calculated. The SAR of FIESTA was approximately 13 times lower than that of conventional MR imaging of fetuses obtained using single-shot fast spin echo sequences. The following conclusions are drawn: 1) Fetal motion is no longer a limitation for prenatal imaging after the implementation of parallel imaging with 2D FIESTA, 2) Cine MR imaging illustrates fetal motion in utero with high clinical reliability, 3) For cases involving major CNS anomalies, cine MR imaging provides information on extremity motility in fetuses and serves as a prognostic indicator of postnatal outcome, and 4) The cine MR used to observe fetal activity is technically 2D and conceptually three-dimensional. It provides four-dimensional information for making proper and timely obstetrical and/or postnatal management

  10. Change detection of medical images using dictionary learning techniques and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Varvara; Babyn, Paul; Zhu, Hongmei

    2014-07-01

    Automatic change detection methods for identifying the changes of serial MR images taken at different times are of great interest to radiologists. The majority of existing change detection methods in medical imaging, and those of brain images in particular, include many preprocessing steps and rely mostly on statistical analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Although most methods utilize registration software, tissue classification remains a difficult and overwhelming task. Recently, dictionary learning techniques are being used in many areas of image processing, such as image surveillance, face recognition, remote sensing, and medical imaging. We present an improved version of the EigenBlockCD algorithm, named the EigenBlockCD-2. The EigenBlockCD-2 algorithm performs an initial global registration and identifies the changes between serial MR images of the brain. Blocks of pixels from a baseline scan are used to train local dictionaries to detect changes in the follow-up scan. We use PCA to reduce the dimensionality of the local dictionaries and the redundancy of data. Choosing the appropriate distance measure significantly affects the performance of our algorithm. We examine the differences between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] norms as two possible similarity measures in the improved EigenBlockCD-2 algorithm. We show the advantages of the [Formula: see text] norm over the [Formula: see text] norm both theoretically and numerically. We also demonstrate the performance of the new EigenBlockCD-2 algorithm for detecting changes of MR images and compare our results with those provided in the recent literature. Experimental results with both simulated and real MRI scans show that our improved EigenBlockCD-2 algorithm outperforms the previous methods. It detects clinical changes while ignoring the changes due to the patient's position and other acquisition artifacts.

  11. Validation of a low dose simulation technique for computed tomography images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Muenzel

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluation of a new software tool for generation of simulated low-dose computed tomography (CT images from an original higher dose scan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Original CT scan data (100 mAs, 80 mAs, 60 mAs, 40 mAs, 20 mAs, 10 mAs; 100 kV of a swine were acquired (approved by the regional governmental commission for animal protection. Simulations of CT acquisition with a lower dose (simulated 10-80 mAs were calculated using a low-dose simulation algorithm. The simulations were compared to the originals of the same dose level with regard to density values and image noise. Four radiologists assessed the realistic visual appearance of the simulated images. RESULTS: Image characteristics of simulated low dose scans were similar to the originals. Mean overall discrepancy of image noise and CT values was -1.2% (range -9% to 3.2% and -0.2% (range -8.2% to 3.2%, respectively, p>0.05. Confidence intervals of discrepancies ranged between 0.9-10.2 HU (noise and 1.9-13.4 HU (CT values, without significant differences (p>0.05. Subjective observer evaluation of image appearance showed no visually detectable difference. CONCLUSION: Simulated low dose images showed excellent agreement with the originals concerning image noise, CT density values, and subjective assessment of the visual appearance of the simulated images. An authentic low-dose simulation opens up opportunity with regard to staff education, protocol optimization and introduction of new techniques.

  12. Development of fuel number reader by ultrasonic imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omote, T.; Yoshida, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a spent fuel ID number reader using ultrasonic imaging techniques that has been developed to realize efficient and automatic verification of fuel numbers, thereby to reduce mental load and radiation exposure for operators engaged in the verification task. The ultrasonic imaging techniques for automatic fuel number recognition are described. High-speed and high reliability imaging of the spent fuel ID number are obtained by using linear array type ultrasonic probe. The ultrasonic wave is scanned by switching array probe in vertical direction, and scanned mechanically in horizontal direction. Time for imaging of spent fuel ID number on assembly was confirmed less than three seconds by these techniques. And it can recognize spent fuel ID number even if spent fuel ID number can not be visualized by an optical method because of depositing fuel number regions by soft card. In order to recognize spent fuel ID number more rapidly and more reliably, coded fuel number expressed by plural separate recesses form is developed. Every coded fuel number consists of six small holes (about 1 mm dia.) and can be marked adjacent to the existing fuel number expressed by letters and numbers

  13. Statistical methods of evaluating and comparing imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 20 years several new methods of generating images of internal organs and the anatomy of the body have been developed and used to enhance the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment. These include ultrasonic scanning, radioisotope scanning, computerised X-ray tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The new techniques have made a considerable impact on radiological practice in hospital departments, not least on the investigational process for patients suspected or known to have malignant disease. As a consequence of the increased range of imaging techniques now available, there has developed a need to evaluate and compare their usefulness. Over the past 10 years formal studies of the application of imaging technology have been conducted and many reports have appeared in the literature. These studies cover a range of clinical situations. Likewise, the methodologies employed for evaluating and comparing the techniques in question have differed widely. While not attempting an exhaustive review of the clinical studies which have been reported, this paper aims to examine the statistical designs and analyses which have been used. First a brief review of the different types of study is given. Examples of each type are then chosen to illustrate statistical issues related to their design and analysis. In the final sections it is argued that a form of classification for these different types of study might be helpful in clarifying relationships between them and bringing a perspective to the field. A classification based upon a limited analogy with clinical trials is suggested

  14. Astronomical Image Compression Techniques Based on ACC and KLT Coder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schindler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a compression of image data in applications in astronomy. Astronomical images have typical specific properties — high grayscale bit depth, size, noise occurrence and special processing algorithms. They belong to the class of scientific images. Their processing and compression is quite different from the classical approach of multimedia image processing. The database of images from BOOTES (Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System has been chosen as a source of the testing signal. BOOTES is a Czech-Spanish robotic telescope for observing AGN (active galactic nuclei and the optical transient of GRB (gamma ray bursts searching. This paper discusses an approach based on an analysis of statistical properties of image data. A comparison of two irrelevancy reduction methods is presented from a scientific (astrometric and photometric point of view. The first method is based on a statistical approach, using the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT with uniform quantization in the spectral domain. The second technique is derived from wavelet decomposition with adaptive selection of used prediction coefficients. Finally, the comparison of three redundancy reduction methods is discussed. Multimedia format JPEG2000 and HCOMPRESS, designed especially for astronomical images, are compared with the new Astronomical Context Coder (ACC coder based on adaptive median regression.

  15. Applicability of three-dimensional imaging techniques in fetal medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner Junior, Heron; Daltro, Pedro; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro, E-mail: heronwerner@hotmail.com [Clinica de Diagnostico Por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Jorge Lopes dos; Belmonte, Simone; Ribeiro, Gerson [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Objective: To generate physical models of fetuses from images obtained with three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, occasionally, computed tomography (CT), in order to guide additive manufacturing technology. Materials and Methods: We used 3D-US images of 31 pregnant women, including 5 who were carrying twins. If abnormalities were detected by 3D-US, both MRI and in some cases CT scans were then immediately performed. The images were then exported to a workstation in DICOM format. A single observer performed slice-by-slice manual segmentation using a digital high resolution screen. Virtual 3D models were obtained from software that converts medical images into numerical models. Those models were then generated in physical form through the use of additive manufacturing techniques. Results: Physical models based upon 3D-US, MRI, and CT images were successfully generated. The postnatal appearance of either the aborted fetus or the neonate closely resembled the physical models, particularly in cases of malformations. Conclusion: The combined use of 3D-US, MRI, and CT could help improve our understanding of fetal anatomy. These three screening modalities can be used for educational purposes and as tools to enable parents to visualize their unborn baby. The images can be segmented and then applied, separately or jointly, in order to construct virtual and physical 3D models. (author)

  16. Applicability of three-dimensional imaging techniques in fetal medicine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner Júnior, Heron; dos Santos, Jorge Lopes; Belmonte, Simone; Ribeiro, Gerson; Daltro, Pedro; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Marchiori, Edson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To generate physical models of fetuses from images obtained with three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, occasionally, computed tomography (CT), in order to guide additive manufacturing technology. Materials and Methods We used 3D-US images of 31 pregnant women, including 5 who were carrying twins. If abnormalities were detected by 3D-US, both MRI and in some cases CT scans were then immediately performed. The images were then exported to a workstation in DICOM format. A single observer performed slice-by-slice manual segmentation using a digital high resolution screen. Virtual 3D models were obtained from software that converts medical images into numerical models. Those models were then generated in physical form through the use of additive manufacturing techniques. Results Physical models based upon 3D-US, MRI, and CT images were successfully generated. The postnatal appearance of either the aborted fetus or the neonate closely resembled the physical models, particularly in cases of malformations. Conclusion The combined use of 3D-US, MRI, and CT could help improve our understanding of fetal anatomy. These three screening modalities can be used for educational purposes and as tools to enable parents to visualize their unborn baby. The images can be segmented and then applied, separately or jointly, in order to construct virtual and physical 3D models. PMID:27818540

  17. WE-E-18A-07: MAGIC: Multi-Acquisition Gain Image Correction for Mobile X-Ray Systems with Intrinsic Localization Crosshairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y; Sharp, G [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Gain calibration for X-ray imaging systems with movable flat panel detectors (FPD) and intrinsic crosshairs is a challenge due to the geometry dependence of the heel effect and crosshair artifact. This study aims to develop a gain correction method for such systems by implementing the multi-acquisition gain image correction (MAGIC) technique. Methods: Raw flat-field images containing crosshair shadows and heel effect were acquired in 4 different FPD positions with fixed exposure parameters. The crosshair region was automatically detected and substituted with interpolated values from nearby exposed regions, generating a conventional single-image gain-map for each FPD position. Large kernel-based correction was applied to these images to correct the heel effect. A mask filter was used to invalidate the original cross-hair regions previously filled with the interpolated values. A final, seamless gain-map was created from the processed images by either the sequential filling (SF) or selective averaging (SA) techniques developed in this study. Quantitative evaluation was performed based on detective quantum efficiency improvement factor (DQEIF) for gain-corrected images using the conventional and proposed techniques. Results: Qualitatively, the MAGIC technique was found to be more effective in eliminating crosshair artifacts compared to the conventional single-image method. The mean DQEIF over the range of frequencies from 0.5 to 3.5 mm-1 were 1.09±0.06, 2.46±0.32, and 3.34±0.36 in the crosshair-artifact region and 2.35±0.31, 2.33±0.31, and 3.09±0.34 in the normal region, for the conventional, MAGIC-SF, and MAGIC-SA techniques, respectively. Conclusion: The introduced MAGIC technique is appropriate for gain calibration of an imaging system associated with a moving FPD and an intrinsic crosshair. The technique showed advantages over a conventional single image-based technique by successfully reducing residual crosshair artifacts, and higher image quality

  18. Time-resolved C-arm cone beam CT angiography (TR-CBCTA) imaging from a single short-scan C-arm cone beam CT acquisition with intra-arterial contrast injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinsheng; Garrett, John W.; Li, Ke; Wu, Yijing; Johnson, Kevin; Schafer, Sebastian; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2018-04-01

    Time-resolved C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) angiography (TR-CBCTA) images can be generated from a series of CBCT acquisitions that satisfy data sufficiency condition in analytical image reconstruction theory. In this work, a new technique was developed to generate TR-CBCTA images from a single short-scan CBCT data acquisition with contrast media injection. The reconstruction technique enabling this application is a previously developed image reconstruction technique, synchronized multi-artifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON). In this new application, the acquired short-scan CBCT projection data were sorted into a union of several sub-sectors of view angles and each sub-sector of view angles corresponds to an individual image volume to be reconstructed. The SMART-RECON method was then used to jointly reconstruct all of these individual image volumes under two constraints: (1) each individual image volume is maximally consistent with the measured cone-beam projection data within the corresponding view angle sector and (2) the nuclear norm of the image matrix is minimized. The difference between these reconstructed individual image volumes is used to generated the desired subtracted angiograms. To validate the technique, numerical simulation data generated from a fractal tree angiogram phantom were used to quantitatively study the accuracy of the proposed method and retrospective in vivo human subject studies were used to demonstrate the feasibility of generating TR-CBCTA in clinical practice.

  19. New techniques for imaging and analyzing lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roggli, V.L.; Ingram, P.; Linton, R.W.; Gutknecht, W.F.; Mastin, P.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The recent technological revolution in the field of imaging techniques has provided pathologists and toxicologists with an expanding repertoire of analytical techniques for studying the interaction between the lung and the various exogenous materials to which it is exposed. Analytical problems requiring elemental sensitivity or specificity beyond the range of that offered by conventional scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis are particularly appropriate for the application of these newer techniques. Electron energy loss spectrometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and laser microprobe mass analysis each offer unique advantages in this regard, but also possess their own limitations and disadvantages. Diffraction techniques provide crystalline structural information available through no other means. Bulk chemical techniques provide useful cross-checks on the data obtained by microanalytical approaches. It is the purpose of this review to summarize the methodology of these techniques, acknowledge situations in which they have been used in addressing problems in pulmonary toxicology, and comment on the relative advantages and disadvantages of each approach. It is necessary for an investigator to weigh6 each of these factors when deciding which technique is best suited for any given analytical problem; often it is useful to employ a combination of two or more of the techniques discussed. It is anticipated that there will be increasing utilization of these technologies for problems in pulmonary toxicology in the decades to come. 92 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  20. Fractal Image Compression Based on High Entropy Values Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douaa Younis Abbaas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many attempts tried to improve the encoding stage of FIC because it consumed time. These attempts worked by reducing size of the search pool for pair range-domain matching but most of them led to get a bad quality, or a lower compression ratio of reconstructed image. This paper aims to present a method to improve performance of the full search algorithm by combining FIC (lossy compression and another lossless technique (in this case entropy coding is used. The entropy technique will reduce size of the domain pool (i. e., number of domain blocks based on the entropy value of each range block and domain block and then comparing the results of full search algorithm and proposed algorithm based on entropy technique to see each of which give best results (such as reduced the encoding time with acceptable values in both compression quali-ty parameters which are C. R (Compression Ratio and PSNR (Image Quality. The experimental results of the proposed algorithm proven that using the proposed entropy technique reduces the encoding time while keeping compression rates and reconstruction image quality good as soon as possible.

  1. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Rogalla, Patrik; Hilbig, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences. (orig.)

  2. Method for signal conditioning and data acquisition system, based on variable amplification and feedback technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, Livio, E-mail: livio.conti@uninettunouniversity.net [Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università Telematica Internazionale Uninettuno, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II 39, 00186 Rome, Italy INFN Sezione Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Sgrigna, Vittorio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, 84 Via della Vasca Navale, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Zilpimiani, David [National Institute of Geophysics, Georgian Academy of Sciences, 1 M. Alexidze St., 009 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Assante, Dario [Facoltà di Ingegneria, Università Telematica Internazionale Uninettuno, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II 39, 00186 Rome, Italy INFN Sezione Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2014-08-21

    An original method of signal conditioning and adaptive amplification is proposed for data acquisition systems of analog signals, conceived to obtain a high resolution spectrum of any input signal. The procedure is based on a feedback scheme of the signal amplification with aim at maximizing the dynamic range and resolution of the data acquisition system. The paper describes the signal conditioning, digitization, and data processing procedures applied to an a priori unknown signal in order to enucleate its amplitude and frequency content for applications in different environments: on the ground, in space, or in the laboratory. An electronic board of the conditioning module has also been constructed and described. In the paper are also discussed the main fields of application and advantages of the method with respect to those known today.

  3. Method for signal conditioning and data acquisition system, based on variable amplification and feedback technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Livio; Sgrigna, Vittorio; Zilpimiani, David; Assante, Dario

    2014-01-01

    An original method of signal conditioning and adaptive amplification is proposed for data acquisition systems of analog signals, conceived to obtain a high resolution spectrum of any input signal. The procedure is based on a feedback scheme of the signal amplification with aim at maximizing the dynamic range and resolution of the data acquisition system. The paper describes the signal conditioning, digitization, and data processing procedures applied to an a priori unknown signal in order to enucleate its amplitude and frequency content for applications in different environments: on the ground, in space, or in the laboratory. An electronic board of the conditioning module has also been constructed and described. In the paper are also discussed the main fields of application and advantages of the method with respect to those known today

  4. TOF-SIMS imaging technique with information entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Kawashima, Y.; Kudo, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is capable of chemical imaging of proteins on insulated samples in principal. However, selection of specific peaks related to a particular protein, which are necessary for chemical imaging, out of numerous candidates had been difficult without an appropriate spectrum analysis technique. Therefore multivariate analysis techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA), and analysis with mutual information defined by information theory, have been applied to interpret SIMS spectra of protein samples. In this study mutual information was applied to select specific peaks related to proteins in order to obtain chemical images. Proteins on insulated materials were measured with TOF-SIMS and then SIMS spectra were analyzed by means of the analysis method based on the comparison using mutual information. Chemical mapping of each protein was obtained using specific peaks related to each protein selected based on values of mutual information. The results of TOF-SIMS images of proteins on the materials provide some useful information on properties of protein adsorption, optimality of immobilization processes and reaction between proteins. Thus chemical images of proteins by TOF-SIMS contribute to understand interactions between material surfaces and proteins and to develop sophisticated biomaterials

  5. The Handbook of Medical Image Perception and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Ehsan; Krupinski, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Peter Ayton; Part V. Optimization and Practical Issues: 25. Optimization of 2D and 3D radiographic systems Jeff Siewerdson; 26. Applications of AFC methodology in optimization of CT imaging systems Kent Ogden and Walter Huda; 27. Perceptual issues in reading mammograms Margarita Zuley; 28. Perceptual optimization of display processing techniques Richard Van Metter; 29. Optimization of display systems Elizabeth Krupinski and Hans Roehrig; 30. Ergonomic radiologist workplaces in the PACS environment Carl Zylack; Part VI. Epilogue: 31. Future prospects of medical image perception Ehsan Samei and Elizabeth Krupinski; Index.

  6. Clinical evaluation of reducing acquisition time on single-photon emission computed tomography image quality using proprietary resolution recovery software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Matthew D; Waddington, Wendy W; Dickson, John C; Prakash, Vineet; Ell, Peter J; Bomanji, Jamshed B

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional model-based resolution recovery (RR) reconstruction algorithm that compensates for collimator-detector response, resulting in an improvement in reconstructed spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images, was tested. The software is said to retain image quality even with reduced acquisition time. Clinically, any improvement in patient throughput without loss of quality is to be welcomed. Furthermore, future restrictions in radiotracer supplies may add value to this type of data analysis. The aims of this study were to assess improvement in image quality using the software and to evaluate the potential of performing reduced time acquisitions for bone and parathyroid SPECT applications. Data acquisition was performed using the local standard SPECT/CT protocols for 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate bone and 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile parathyroid SPECT imaging. The principal modification applied was the acquisition of an eight-frame gated data set acquired using an ECG simulator with a fixed signal as the trigger. This had the effect of partitioning the data such that the effect of reduced time acquisitions could be assessed without conferring additional scanning time on the patient. The set of summed data sets was then independently reconstructed using the RR software to permit a blinded assessment of the effect of acquired counts upon reconstructed image quality as adjudged by three experienced observers. Data sets reconstructed with the RR software were compared with the local standard processing protocols; filtered back-projection and ordered-subset expectation-maximization. Thirty SPECT studies were assessed (20 bone and 10 parathyroid). The images reconstructed with the RR algorithm showed improved image quality for both full-time and half-time acquisitions over local current processing protocols (Pimproved image quality compared with local processing protocols and has been

  7. UAV PHOTOGRAMMETRY WITH OBLIQUE IMAGES: FIRST ANALYSIS ON DATA ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Aicardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many studies revealed the advantages of using airborne oblique images for obtaining improved 3D city models (e.g. including façades and building footprints. Expensive airborne cameras, installed on traditional aerial platforms, usually acquired the data. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of acquire and use oblique images for the 3D reconstruction of a historical building, obtained by UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and traditional COTS (Commercial Off-the-Shelf digital cameras (more compact and lighter than generally used devices, for the realization of high-level-of-detail architectural survey. The critical issues of the acquisitions from a common UAV (flight planning strategies, ground control points, check points distribution and measurement, etc. are described. Another important considered aspect was the evaluation of the possibility to use such systems as low cost methods for obtaining complete information from an aerial point of view in case of emergency problems or, as in the present paper, in the cultural heritage application field. The data processing was realized using SfM-based approach for point cloud generation: different dense image-matching algorithms implemented in some commercial and open source software were tested. The achieved results are analysed and the discrepancies from some reference LiDAR data are computed for a final evaluation. The system was tested on the S. Maria Chapel, a part of the Novalesa Abbey (Italy.

  8. Uav Photogrammetry with Oblique Images: First Analysis on Data Acquisition and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicardi, I.; Chiabrando, F.; Grasso, N.; Lingua, A. M.; Noardo, F.; Spanò, A.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, many studies revealed the advantages of using airborne oblique images for obtaining improved 3D city models (e.g. including façades and building footprints). Expensive airborne cameras, installed on traditional aerial platforms, usually acquired the data. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of acquire and use oblique images for the 3D reconstruction of a historical building, obtained by UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) and traditional COTS (Commercial Off-the-Shelf) digital cameras (more compact and lighter than generally used devices), for the realization of high-level-of-detail architectural survey. The critical issues of the acquisitions from a common UAV (flight planning strategies, ground control points, check points distribution and measurement, etc.) are described. Another important considered aspect was the evaluation of the possibility to use such systems as low cost methods for obtaining complete information from an aerial point of view in case of emergency problems or, as in the present paper, in the cultural heritage application field. The data processing was realized using SfM-based approach for point cloud generation: different dense image-matching algorithms implemented in some commercial and open source software were tested. The achieved results are analysed and the discrepancies from some reference LiDAR data are computed for a final evaluation. The system was tested on the S. Maria Chapel, a part of the Novalesa Abbey (Italy).

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of new imaging techniques in breast diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordenne, W; Bauduin, E [Liege Univ. (Belgium)

    1989-01-01

    During the last decade, the hypothetical carcinogenic effects of mammography have lead to new technical developments in X-ray diagnosis and to use of other imaging techniques such as ultrasonography (US), transillumination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many preliminary studies were published but few clinical trials are really convincing. According to the definition of a diagnostic tool, none of these new modalities is supposed to supplant mammography in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Improvements are expected by digital mammography in the near future. (Authors).

  10. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-01-01

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom

  11. Data acquisition and processing system of the electron cyclotron emission imaging system of the KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. B.; Lee, W.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A new innovative electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic system for the Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) produces a large amount of data. The design of the data acquisition and processing system of the ECEI diagnostic system should consider covering the large data production and flow. The system design is based on the layered structure scalable to the future extension to accommodate increasing data demands. Software architecture that allows a web-based monitoring of the operation status, remote experiment, and data analysis is discussed. The operating software will help machine operators and users validate the acquired data promptly, prepare next discharge, and enhance the experiment performance and data analysis in a distributed environment.

  12. A comparison of analogue and digital techniques in upper gastrointestinal examinations: absorbed dose and diagnostic quality of the images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelsson, B.; Hansson, I.B. [Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Boden, K.; Witt, H.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Fransson, S.G. [Department of Thoracic Radiology, University Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden); Persliden, J. [Department of Radiation Physics, University Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2000-08-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether patient exposure and diagnostic quality of the image is significantly influenced by the introduction of digital image acquisition techniques. Evaluation was performed for three different techniques (analogue, analogue fluoro+digital radiography, digital) in examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The evaluation was done from data acquired in three different departments. Patient exposure was recorded as KERMA-area product (KAP) and the individual patient readings were normalised to a standard size patient. Image quality was assessed using visual grading with a reference image. The recorded KAP values were significantly higher (22.3 Gycm{sup 2}) for the fully digital technique compared to the others (analogue 6.8 Gycm{sup 2}, analogue+digital 3.6 Gycm{sup 2}). This was due mostly to an increased number of exposures. The diagnostic quality of the image was, however, also regarded to be slightly lower for the technique giving the lowest patient dose with the smallest number of exposures (analogue+digital). The digital examination technique, as used in this study, thus resulted in significantly higher patient dose without any significant gain in diagnostic quality of the image. (orig.)

  13. A comparison of analogue and digital techniques in upper gastrointestinal examinations: absorbed dose and diagnostic quality of the images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, B.; Hansson, I.B.; Boden, K.; Witt, H.H.; Fransson, S.G.; Persliden, J.

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether patient exposure and diagnostic quality of the image is significantly influenced by the introduction of digital image acquisition techniques. Evaluation was performed for three different techniques (analogue, analogue fluoro+digital radiography, digital) in examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The evaluation was done from data acquired in three different departments. Patient exposure was recorded as KERMA-area product (KAP) and the individual patient readings were normalised to a standard size patient. Image quality was assessed using visual grading with a reference image. The recorded KAP values were significantly higher (22.3 Gycm 2 ) for the fully digital technique compared to the others (analogue 6.8 Gycm 2 , analogue+digital 3.6 Gycm 2 ). This was due mostly to an increased number of exposures. The diagnostic quality of the image was, however, also regarded to be slightly lower for the technique giving the lowest patient dose with the smallest number of exposures (analogue+digital). The digital examination technique, as used in this study, thus resulted in significantly higher patient dose without any significant gain in diagnostic quality of the image. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of biological leaf tissue using biospeckle laser imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, M. Z.; Mujeeb, A.; Nirala, A. K.

    2018-06-01

    We report on the application of an optical imaging technique, the biospeckle laser, as a potential tool to assess biological and medicinal plant leaves. The biospeckle laser technique is a non-invasive and non-destructive optical technique used to investigate biological objects. Just after their removal from plants, the torn leaves were used for biospeckle laser imaging. Quantitative evaluation of the biospeckle data using the inertia moment (IM) of the time history speckle pattern, showed that the IM can be utilized to provide a biospeckle signature to the plant leaves. It showed that leaves from different plants can have their own characteristic IM values. We further investigated the infected regions of the leaves that display a relatively lower biospeckle activity than the healthy tissue. It was easy to discriminate between the infected and healthy regions of the leaf tissue. The biospeckle technique can successfully be implemented as a potential tool for the taxonomy of quality leaves. Furthermore, the technique can help boost the quality of ayurvedic medicines.

  15. Dynamic subtraction magnetic resonance venography: a new real time imaging technique for the detection of dural sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, C.; Birchall, D.; Connolly, D.; English, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Requests for imaging suspected dural sinus thrombosis are increasing. Conventional magnetic imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) are often used to detect venous sinus thrombosis, but these techniques are prone to technical problems. Catheter angiography is sometimes required as the final arbiter in the evaluation of the dural venous sinuses. Recent technical developments in MR scanning have allowed the development of dynamic subtraction MRA. This technique is beginning to be applied to the assessment of intracranial vascular malformations. We have recently applied the technique to the imaging of the dural venous sinuses, and describe our early experience with the technique. Imaging was performed on a Philips Intera 1.5T scanner with gradient strength 33 mT and slew rate 130 T/m/sec. T1-weighed fast field echo imaging was performed (flip angle 400, TR 1.5 msec) during bolus injection of gadolinium (5ml gadolinium followed by a 10 ml saline chaser) at 5-6 ml/sec using a MRI-compatible pump injector. Slice thickness depended on the plane of acquisition, but was between 100- 150 mm. Images were acquired in three orthogonal projections in each case, using 3 separate contrast injections. Mask images were obtained before the arrival of contrast, and subtracted reconstructed images were obtained in real time, providing a dynamic display of the intracranial circulation including the dural venous sinuses. Frame rate was 1 frame per 0.8 seconds. We will present dynamic MR angiographic images in a number of patients. Normal appearances and those seen in venous sinus thrombosis will be presented in the video display. Dynamic MR venography is a new technique for the imaging of dural venous sinuses. In our practice, it has proved a valuable adjunct for the imaging of patients with dural venous sinus thrombosis. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Monitoring of civil engineering structures using Digital Image Correlation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesa, M.; Szczepanek, D.; Kujawińska, M.; Świercz, A.; Kołakowski, P.

    2010-06-01

    The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique enables full field, noncontact measurements of displacements and strains of a wide variety of objects. An adaptation of the DIC technique for monitoring of civil-engineering structures is presented in the paper. A general concept of the complex, automatic monitoring system, in which the DIC sensor plays an important role is described. Some new software features, which aim to facilitate outdoor measurements and speed up the correlation analysis, is also introduced. As an example of application, measurements of a railway bridge in Nieporet (Poland) are presented. The experimental results are compared with displacements of a FEM model of the bridge.

  17. The eletermiation of GER using gastroesophageal image in technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Guowei; Shang Kezhong; Han Pinfang; Ma Jixiao

    1995-01-01

    The Diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) using radionuclide imaging is a simple, sensitive, non-invasive and quantitative technique. The authors reported the results of 18 normal persons and 84 cases of suspected GER patients examined by this technique. No reflux was found in normal group, there were 78.6% detectability in patients group, while the detectability X-ray examination were 70.2% in same group of patients. 23 cases were undergoing endoscopic examination, only 6 cases had revealed the presence of reflux, thereby eletectability was only 26.0%

  18. A Novel Technique for Prealignment in Multimodality Medical Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image pair is often aligned initially based on a rigid or affine transformation before a deformable registration method is applied in medical image registration. Inappropriate initial registration may compromise the registration speed or impede the convergence of the optimization algorithm. In this work, a novel technique was proposed for prealignment in both monomodality and multimodality image registration based on statistical correlation of gradient information. A simple and robust algorithm was proposed to determine the rotational differences between two images based on orientation histogram matching accumulated from local orientation of each pixel without any feature extraction. Experimental results showed that it was effective to acquire the orientation angle between two unregistered images with advantages over the existed method based on edge-map in multimodalities. Applying the orientation detection into the registration of CT/MR, T1/T2 MRI, and monomadality images with respect to rigid and nonrigid deformation improved the chances of finding the global optimization of the registration and reduced the search space of optimization.

  19. A new approach to electrical impedance imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afroj Quadir, K.; Nasir, F.; Rahman, M.; Rabbani, K.S.

    2004-09-01

    It is possible to obtain a 2 dimensional (2D) image of a volume conductor, to locate a few widely separated objects, by driving ac constant currents through two orthogonal pairs of electrodes and measuring the resulting potential differences between several diagonally placed electrodes at the centre and back-projecting their impedance values along equi-potential lines. This has been termed as Pigeon Hole Imaging (PHI). Experimental verification has been attempted using a small insulating object placed at different locations in a saline filled 2D phantom. For a 6 x 6 matrix, the image in 16 pixels in close proximity of the diagonal along which electrodes are arranged, coincide with the object positions, while they do nt for the remaining 20 pixels. We applied a new technique where image smearing patterns have been used to correct the images in 14 of these pixels while 6 pixels near the two opposite comers still remain uncertain. Thus 30 pixels out of 36 give the right object position which may be termed a success. The concept may be extended further to higher order matrices by increasing the number of diagonal electrodes. The present work mainly concentrates on the feasibility of localization of a single small object in one matrix position of the image. (author)

  20. A Review On Segmentation Based Image Compression Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Thayammal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract -The storage and transmission of imagery become more challenging task in the current scenario of multimedia applications. Hence, an efficient compression scheme is highly essential for imagery, which reduces the requirement of storage medium and transmission bandwidth. Not only improvement in performance and also the compression techniques must converge quickly in order to apply them for real time applications. There are various algorithms have been done in image compression, but everyone has its own pros and cons. Here, an extensive analysis between existing methods is performed. Also, the use of existing works is highlighted, for developing the novel techniques which face the challenging task of image storage and transmission in multimedia applications.

  1. A secure cyclic steganographic technique for color images using randomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, K.; Ahmad, J.; Rehman, N.U.

    2014-01-01

    Information Security is a major concern in today's modern era. Almost all the communicating bodies want the security, confidentiality and integrity of their personal data. But this security goal cannot be achieved easily when we are using an open network like internet. Steganography provides one of the best solutions to this problem. This paper represents a new Cyclic Steganographic Technique (CST) based on Least Significant Bit (LSB) for true color (RGB) images. The proposed method hides the secret data in the LSBs of cover image pixels in a randomized cyclic manner. The proposed technique is evaluated using both subjective and objective analysis using histograms changeability, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Mean Square Error (MSE). Experimentally it is found that the proposed method gives promising results in terms of security, imperceptibility and robustness as compared to some existent methods and vindicates this new algorithm. (author)

  2. Study on Efficiency of Fusion Techniques for IKONOS Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanmei; Yu, Haiyang; Guijun, Yang; Nie, Chenwei; Yang, Xiaodong; Ren, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Many image fusion techniques have been proposed to achieve optimal resolution in the spatial and spectral domains. Six different merging methods were listed in this paper and the efficiency of fusion techniques was assessed in qualitative and quantitative aspect. Both local and global evaluation parameters were used in the spectral quality and a Laplace filter method was used in spatial quality assessment. By simulation, the spectral quality of the images merged by Brovery was demonstrated to be the worst. In contrast, GS and PCA algorithms, especially the Pansharpening provided higher spectral quality than the standard Brovery, wavelet and CN methods. In spatial quality assessment, the CN method represented best compared with that of others, while the Brovery algorithm was worst. The wavelet parameters that performed best achieved acceptable spectral and spatial quality compared to the others

  3. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilsky, A V; Lozhkin, V A; Markovich, D M; Tokarev, M P

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART. (paper)

  4. Machine-assisted verification of latent fingerprints: first results for nondestructive contact-less optical acquisition techniques with a CWL sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Mario; Kiltz, Stefan; Krapyvskyy, Dmytro; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Leich, Marcus

    2011-11-01

    A machine-assisted analysis of traces from crime scenes might be possible with the advent of new high-resolution non-destructive contact-less acquisition techniques for latent fingerprints. This requires reliable techniques for the automatic extraction of fingerprint features from latent and exemplar fingerprints for matching purposes using pattern recognition approaches. Therefore, we evaluate the NIST Biometric Image Software for the feature extraction and verification of contact-lessly acquired latent fingerprints to determine potential error rates. Our exemplary test setup includes 30 latent fingerprints from 5 people in two test sets that are acquired from different surfaces using a chromatic white light sensor. The first test set includes 20 fingerprints on two different surfaces. It is used to determine the feature extraction performance. The second test set includes one latent fingerprint on 10 different surfaces and an exemplar fingerprint to determine the verification performance. This utilized sensing technique does not require a physical or chemical visibility enhancement of the fingerprint residue, thus the original trace remains unaltered for further investigations. No particular feature extraction and verification techniques have been applied to such data, yet. Hence, we see the need for appropriate algorithms that are suitable to support forensic investigations.

  5. Change detection of medical images using dictionary learning techniques and PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Varvara; Babyn, Paul; Zhu, Hongmei

    2014-03-01

    Automatic change detection methods for identifying the changes of serial MR images taken at different times are of great interest to radiologists. The majority of existing change detection methods in medical imaging, and those of brain images in particular, include many preprocessing steps and rely mostly on statistical analysis of MRI scans. Although most methods utilize registration software, tissue classification remains a difficult and overwhelming task. Recently, dictionary learning techniques are used in many areas of image processing, such as image surveillance, face recognition, remote sensing, and medical imaging. In this paper we present the Eigen-Block Change Detection algorithm (EigenBlockCD). It performs local registration and identifies the changes between consecutive MR images of the brain. Blocks of pixels from baseline scan are used to train local dictionaries that are then used to detect changes in the follow-up scan. We use PCA to reduce the dimensionality of the local dictionaries and the redundancy of data. Choosing the appropriate distance measure significantly affects the performance of our algorithm. We examine the differences between L1 and L2 norms as two possible similarity measures in the EigenBlockCD. We show the advantages of L2 norm over L1 norm theoretically and numerically. We also demonstrate the performance of the EigenBlockCD algorithm for detecting changes of MR images and compare our results with those provided in recent literature. Experimental results with both simulated and real MRI scans show that the EigenBlockCD outperforms the previous methods. It detects clinical changes while ignoring the changes due to patient's position and other acquisition artifacts.

  6. Evaluation of Medium Spatial Resolution BRDF-Adjustment Techniques Using Multi-Angular SPOT4 (Take5 Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Claverie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution sensor Surface Reflectance (SR data are affected by surface anisotropy but are difficult to adjust because of the low temporal frequency of the acquisitions and the low angular sampling. This paper evaluates five high spatial resolution Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF adjustment techniques. The evaluation is based on the noise level of the SR Time Series (TS corrected to a normalized geometry (nadir view, 45° sun zenith angle extracted from the multi-angular acquisitions of SPOT4 over three study areas (one in Arizona, two in France during the five-month SPOT4 (Take5 experiment. Two uniform techniques (Cst, for Constant, and Av, for Average, relying on the Vermote–Justice–Bréon (VJB BRDF method, assume no variation in space of the BRDF shape. Two methods (VI-dis, for NDVI-based disaggregation and LC-dis, for Land-Cover based disaggregation are based on disaggregation of the MODIS-derived BRDF VJB parameters using vegetation index and land cover, respectively. The last technique (LUM, for Look-Up Map relies on the MCD43 MODIS BRDF products and a crop type data layer. The VI-dis technique produced the lowest level of noise corresponding to the most effective adjustment: reduction from directional to normalized SR TS noises by 40% and 50% on average, for red and near-infrared bands, respectively. The uniform techniques displayed very good results, suggesting that a simple and uniform BRDF-shape assumption is good enough to adjust the BRDF in such geometric configuration (the view zenith angle varies from nadir to 25°. The most complex techniques relying on land cover (LC-dis and LUM displayed contrasting results depending on the land cover.

  7. Enhanced EDX images by fusion of multimodal SEM images using pansharpening techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, G; Angulo, J; Moreaud, M; Sorbier, L

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the potential interest of image fusion in the context of multimodal scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. In particular, we aim at merging the backscattered electron images that usually have a high spatial resolution but do not provide enough discriminative information to physically classify the nature of the sample, with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) images that have discriminative information but a lower spatial resolution. The produced images are named enhanced EDX. To achieve this goal, we have compared the results obtained with classical pansharpening techniques for image fusion with an original approach tailored for multimodal SEM fusion of information. Quantitative assessment is obtained by means of two SEM images and a simulated dataset produced by a software based on PENELOPE. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Investigation progress of imaging techniques monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; An Rui

    2006-01-01

    Recently stem cell therapy has showed potential clinical application in diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, malignant tumor and trauma. Efficient techniques of non-invasively monitoring stem cell transplants will accelerate the development of stem cell therapies. This paper briefly reviews the clinical practice of stem cell, in addition, makes a review of monitoring methods including magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging which have been used in stem cell therapy. (authors)

  9. Analysis of Cultural Heritage by Accelerator Techniques and Analytical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Toque, Jay Arre; Murayama, Yusuke

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present the result of experimental investigation using two very important accelerator techniques: (1) synchrotron radiation XRF and XAFS; and (2) accelerator mass spectrometry and multispectral analytical imaging for the investigation of cultural heritage. We also want to introduce a complementary approach to the investigation of artworks which is noninvasive and nondestructive that can be applied in situ. Four major projects will be discussed to illustrate the potential applications of these accelerator and analytical imaging techniques: (1) investigation of Mongolian Textile (Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan Period) using XRF, AMS and electron microscopy; (2) XRF studies of pigments collected from Korean Buddhist paintings; (3) creating a database of elemental composition and spectral reflectance of more than 1000 Japanese pigments which have been used for traditional Japanese paintings; and (4) visible light-near infrared spectroscopy and multispectral imaging of degraded malachite and azurite. The XRF measurements of the Japanese and Korean pigments could be used to complement the results of pigment identification by analytical imaging through spectral reflectance reconstruction. On the other hand, analysis of the Mongolian textiles revealed that they were produced between 12th and 13th century. Elemental analysis of the samples showed that they contained traces of gold, copper, iron and titanium. Based on the age and trace elements in the samples, it was concluded that the textiles were produced during the height of power of the Mongol empire, which makes them a valuable cultural heritage. Finally, the analysis of the degraded and discolored malachite and azurite demonstrates how multispectral analytical imaging could be used to complement the results of high energy-based techniques.

  10. Automation of a McBain-Bakr-type thermogravimetric analyzer using a digital image correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trexler, M.D.; Sanders, T.H. Jr