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Sample records for iip supernova discovered

  1. Supernova 2009kf: An Ultraviolet Bright Type IIP Supernova Discovered With Pan-Starrs 1 and Galex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. SUPERNOVA 2009kf: AN ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHT TYPE IIP SUPERNOVA DISCOVERED WITH PAN-STARRS 1 AND GALEX M. T. Botticella1, C...January 29; accepted 2010 May 12; published 2010 June 16 ABSTRACT We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of a luminous Type IIP Supernova ...magnitude MNUV = −21.5 ± 0.5 mag suggests such SNe could be discovered out to z ∼ 2.5 in the PS1 survey. Key words: stars: evolution – supernovae

  2. Magnetar Powered Ordinary Type IIP Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Thompson, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the properties of Type IIP supernovae that are dominantly powered by the rotational kinetic energy of the newly born neutron star. While the spin-down of a magnetar has previously been proposed as a viable energy source in the context of super-luminous supernovae, we show that a similar mechanism could produce both normal and peculiar Type IIP supernova light curves from red supergiant progenitors for a range of initial spin periods and equivalent dipole magnetic field strength...

  3. HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Bersten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present progress in light curve models of type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P obtained using a newly devel- oped, one-dimensional hydrodynamic code. Using simple initial models (polytropes, we reproduced the global behavior of the observed light curves and we analyzed the sensitivity of the light curves to the variation of free parameters.

  4. A Study of the Type II-P Supernova 2003gd in M74

    CERN Document Server

    Hendry, M A; Maund, J R; Pastorello, A; Zampieri, L; Benetti, S; Turatto, M; Cappellaro, E; Meikle, W P S; Kotak, R; Irwin, M J; Jonker, P G; Vermaas, L; Peletier, R F; Van Woerden, H; Exter, K M; Pollacco, D L; Leon, S; Verley, S; Benn, C R; Pignata, G

    2005-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic data of the type II-P supernova 2003gd, which was discovered in M74 close to the end of its plateau phase. SN 2003gd is the first type II supernova to have a directly confirmed red supergiant progenitor. We compare SN 2003gd with SN 1999em, a similar type II-P supernova, and estimate an explosion date of 18th March 2003. We determine a reddening towards the supernova of E(B-V) = 0.14+/-0.06, using three different methods. We also calculate three new distances to M74 of 9.6+/-2.8 Mpc, 7.7+/-1.7 Mpc and 9.6+/-2.2 Mpc. The former was estimated using the Standardised Candle Method (SCM), for type II supernovae, and the latter two using the Brightest Supergiants Method (BSM). When combined with existing kinematic and BSM distance estimates, we derive a mean value of 9.3+/-1.8 Mpc. SN 2003gd was found to have a lower tail luminosity compared to other ``normal'' type II-P SNe bringing into question the nature of this supernova. We present a discussion concluding that this is ...

  5. SUPERNOVA 2003ie WAS LIKELY A FAINT TYPE IIP EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sergeev, Sergey G., E-mail: iair.arcavi@weizmann.ac.il [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny, Crimea 98409 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We present new photometric observations of supernova (SN) 2003ie starting one month before discovery, obtained serendipitously while observing its host galaxy. With only a weak upper limit derived on the mass of its progenitor (<25 M{sub Sun }) from previous pre-explosion studies, this event could be a potential exception to the ''red supergiant (RSG) problem'' (the lack of high-mass RSGs exploding as Type IIP SNe). However, this is true only if SN2003ie was a Type IIP event, something which has never been determined. Using recently derived core-collapse SN light-curve templates, as well as by comparison to other known SNe, we find that SN2003ie was indeed a likely Type IIP event. However, with a plateau magnitude of {approx} - 15.5 mag, it is found to be a member of the faint Type IIP class. Previous members of this class have been shown to arise from relatively low-mass progenitors (<12 M{sub Sun }). It therefore seems unlikely that this SN had a massive RSG progenitor. The use of core-collapse SN light-curve templates is shown to be helpful in classifying SNe with sparse coverage. These templates are likely to become more robust as large homogeneous samples of core-collapse events are collected.

  6. Photometric and Spectroscopic Properties of Type II-P Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Faran, Tamar; Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Leonard, Douglas C.; Li, Weidong; Modjaz, Maryam; Nakar, Ehud; Serduke, Frank J. D.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    We study a sample of 23 Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), all observed with the same set of instruments. Analysis of their photometric evolution confirms that their typical plateau duration is 100 days with little scatter, showing a tendency to get shorter for more energetic SNe. The rise time from explosion to plateau does not seem to correlate with luminosity. We analyze their spectra, measuring typical ejecta velocities, and confirm that they follow a well behaved power-law decline. W...

  7. Type II-P Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey and the Standardized Candle Method

    CERN Document Server

    D'Andrea, Chris B; Dilday, Benjamin; Frieman, Joshua A; Holtzman, Jon; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J C; Yasuda, Naoki; Cinabro, David; Jha, Saurabh; Nichol, Robert C; Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Atlee, David W; Basset, Bruce; Castander, Francisco J; Goobar, Ariel; Miquel, Ramon; Nordin, Jakob; Östman, Linda; Prieto, Jose Luis; Quimby, Robert; Riess, Adam G; Stritzinger, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    We apply the Standardized Candle Method (SCM) for Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), which relates the velocity of the ejecta of a SN to its luminosity during the plateau, to 15 SNe II-P discovered over the three season run of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II Supernova Survey. The redshifts of these SNe - 0.027 0.01) as all of the current literature on the SCM combined. We find that the SDSS SNe have a very small intrinsic I-band dispersion (0.22 mag), which can be attributed to selection effects. When the SCM is applied to the combined SDSS-plus-literature set of SNe II-P, the dispersion increases to 0.29 mag, larger than the scatter for either set of SNe separately. We show that the standardization cannot be further improved by eliminating SNe with positive plateau decline rates, as proposed in Poznanski et al. (2009). We thoroughly examine all potential systematic effects and conclude that for the SCM to be useful for cosmology, the methods currently used to determine the Fe II velocity at day 50 mus...

  8. Optical Signatures of Circumstellar Interaction in Type IIP Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Chugai, N N; Utrobin, V P; Chugai, Nikolai N.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Utrobin, Victor P.

    2007-01-01

    We propose new diagnostics for circumstellar interaction in Type IIP supernovae by the detection of high velocity (HV) absorption features in Halpha and He I 10830 A lines during the photospheric stage. To demonstrate the method, we compute the ionization and excitation of H and He in supernova ejecta taking into account time-dependent effects and X-ray irradiation. We find that the interaction with a typical red supergiant wind should result in the enhanced excitation of the outer layers of unshocked ejecta and the emergence of corresponding HV absorption, i.e. a depression in the blue absorption wing of Halpha and a pronounced absorption of He I 10830 A at a radial velocity of about -10,000 km/s. We identify HV absorption in Halpha and He I 10830 A lines of SN 1999em and in Halpha of SN 2004dj as being due to this effect. The derived mass loss rate is close to 10^{-6} Msun/yr for both supernovae, assuming a wind velocity 10 km/s. We argue that, in addition to the HV absorption formed in the unshocked ejecta...

  9. Photometric and Spectroscopic Properties of Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Faran, Tamar; Filippenko, Alexei V; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Modjaz, Maryam; Nakar, Ehud; Serduke, Frank J D; Silverman, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    We study a sample of 23 Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), all observed with the same set of instruments. Analysis of their photometric evolution confirms that their typical plateau duration is 100 days with little scatter, showing a tendency to get shorter for more energetic SNe. The rise time from explosion to plateau does not seem to correlate with luminosity. We analyze their spectra, measuring typical ejecta velocities, and confirm that they follow a well behaved power-law decline. We find indications of high-velocity material in the spectra of six of our SNe. We test different dust extinction correction methods by asking the following - does the uniformity of the sample increase after the application of a given method? A reasonably behaved underlying distribution should become tighter after correction. No method we tested made a significant improvement.

  10. Bolometric Lightcurves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Jeremy A.; Baron, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the bolometric lightcurves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au and 2009E) which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe lightcurves using three different techniques common in the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the lightcurves calculated by SuperBoL along with previously published lightcurves, as well as peak luminosities and 56Ni yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction lightcurves largely agree with previously published lightcurves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with 0.2 ≤ δL/L ≤ 0.5. Peak luminosities and 56Ni masses are similarly comparable to previous work. SN 2000cb remains an unusual member of this sub-group, owing to the faster rise and flatter plateau than the other supernovae in the sample. Initial comparisons with the NLTE atmosphere code PHOENIX show that the direct integration technique reproduces the luminosity of a model supernova spectrum to ˜5% when given synthetic photometry of the spectrum as input. Our code is publicly available. The ability to produce bolometric lightcurves from observed sets of broad-band light curves should be helpful in the interpretation of other types of supernovae, particularly those that are not well characterized, such as extremely luminous supernovae and faint fast objects.

  11. Bolometric Light Curves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Jeremy A.; Baron, E.

    2017-04-01

    We examine the bolometric light curves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au, and 2009E), which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors like that of SN 1987A, using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe light curves using three different common techniques common from the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the light curves calculated by SuperBoL, along with previously published light curves, as well as peak luminosities and 56Ni yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction light curves largely agree with previously published light curves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with 0.2≲ δ {L}{bol}/{L}{bol}≲ 0.5. Peak luminosities and 56Ni masses are similarly comparable to previous work. SN 2000cb remains an unusual member of this sub-group, owing to the faster rise and flatter plateau than the other supernovae in the sample. Initial comparisons with the NLTE atmosphere code PHOENIX show that the direct integration technique reproduces the luminosity of a model supernova spectrum to ∼5% when given synthetic photometry of the spectrum as input. Our code is publicly available. The ability to produce bolometric light curves from observed sets of broadband light curves should be helpful in the interpretation of other types of supernovae, particularly those that are not well characterized, such as extremely luminous supernovae and faint fast objects.

  12. Probing Shock Breakout with Serendipitous GALEX Detections of Two SNLS Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gezari, Suvi; Basa, Stephane; Martin, D Chris; Neill, James D; Woosley, S E; Hillier, D John; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Bazin, Gurvan; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Forster, Karl; Fouchez, Dominique; Friedman, Peter G; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Du, Jeremy Le; Lidman, Chris; Mazure, Alain; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Schiminovich, David; Sullivan, Mark; Wyder, Ted K

    2008-01-01

    We report the serendipitous detection by GALEX of fast ( 1 mag) UV emission from two Type II Plateau (II-P) supernovae (SNe) at z=0.185 and 0.324 discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). Optical photometry and VLT spectroscopy 2 weeks after the GALEX detections link the onset of UV emission to the time of shock breakout. Using radiation hydrodymanics and non-LTE radiative transfer simulations, and starting from a standard red supergiant (RSG; Type II-P SN progenitor) star evolved self-consistently from the main sequence to iron core collapse, we model the shock breakout phase and the 55 hours that follow. Although our one-temperature treatment prevents us from modeling the radiative precursor, the small RSG atmospheric scale height suggests a < 2000 s duration. A duration of many hours would require an extended low-density envelope, incompatible with our RSG envelope structure. In our model, the breakout signature is a luminous (M_FUV ~ -20) thermal < 1 hr-long soft X-ray burst (lambda_peak ~ 9...

  13. Bolometric Lightcurves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Lusk, Jeremy A

    2016-01-01

    We examine the bolometric lightcurves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au and 2009E) which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe lightcurves using three different techniques common in the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the lightcurves calculated by SuperBoL along with previously published lightcurves, as well as peak luminosities and Ni-56 yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction lightcurves largely agree with previously published lightcurves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with $0.2 \\leq \\delta L_{bol}/L_{bol} \\leq 0.5$. Peak luminosities and Ni-5...

  14. Type II-P Supernovae as Standard Candles: The SDSS-II Sample Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi; Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the observed correlation between Hbeta and FeII velocities for Type II-P supernovae (SNe~II-P) using 28 optical spectra of 13 SNe II-P and demonstrate that it is well modeled by a linear relation with a dispersion of about 300 km/s. Using this correlation, we reanalyze the publicly available sample of SNe II-P compiled by D'Andrea et al. and find a Hubble diagram with an intrinsic scatter of 11% in distance, which is nearly as tight as that measured before their sample is added to ...

  15. SHOCK BREAKOUT AND EARLY LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE OBSERVED WITH KEPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnavich, P. M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN, 46556-5670 (United States); Tucker, B. E. [The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, via Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Shaya, E. J.; Olling, R. P. [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Kasen, D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Villar, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P). Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5 ± 0.4 and 13.3 ± 0.4 rest-frame days, respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280 ± 20 R{sub ⊙}) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490 ± 20 R{sub ⊙}), but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0 ± 0.3 × 10{sup 51} erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict, possibly due to the supernova shock wave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass-loss rate of 10{sup −4}M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve. No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a SNe II-P.

  16. The death of massive stars - I. Observational constraints on the progenitors of type II-P supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smartt, S J; Crockett, R M; Maund, J R

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a 10.5 yr, volume limited (28 Mpc) search for supernova (SN) progenitor stars. We compile all SNe discovered within this volume (132, of which 27% are type Ia) and determine the relative rates of each sub-type from literature studies : II-P (59%), Ib/c (29%), IIb (5%), IIn (4%) and II-L (3%). Twenty II-P SNe have high quality optical or near-IR pre-explosion images that allow a meaningful search for the progenitor stars. In four cases they are clearly red supergiants, one case is unconstrained, two fall on compact coeval star clusters and the other 13 have no progenitor detected. We review and update all the available data for the host galaxies (distance, metallicity and extinction) and determine masses and upper mass estimates using the STARS stellar evolutionary code and a single consistent homogeneous method. A maximum likelihood calculation suggests that the minimum stellar mass for a type II-P to form is m(min)=8.5 +1/-1.5 Msol and the maximum mass for II-P progenitors is m(max)...

  17. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Garnavich, P M; Rest, A; Shaya, E J; Olling, R P; Kasen, D; Villar, A

    2016-01-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae. Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5$\\pm 0.4$ and 13.3$\\pm 0.4$ rest-frame days respectively. Based on fits to idealized analytic models, we find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280$\\pm 20$ R$_\\odot$) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490$\\pm 20$ R$_\\odot$) but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0$\\pm 0.3\\times 10^{51}$ erg. The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict possibly due to the supernova shockwave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass loss rate of $10^{-4}$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape ...

  18. On the Lack of X-ray Bright Type IIP Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V

    2014-01-01

    Type IIP Supernovae (SNe) are expected to arise from Red Supergiant stars (RSGs). These stars have observed mass-loss rates that span more than two orders of magnitude, from $< 10^{-6}$ solar masses yr$^{-1}$ to almost $ 10^{-4} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission from at least some IIP's should reflect the larger end of the high mass-loss rates. Strangely, no IIP SNe are seen where the X-ray luminosity is large enough to suggest mass-loss rates greater than about $ 10^{-5} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$. We investigate if this could be due to absorption of the X-ray emission. After carefully studying all the various aspects, we conclude that absorption would not be large enough to prevent us from having detected X-ray emission from high mass-loss rate IIP's. This leads us to the conclusion that there may be an upper limit of $\\sim 10^{-5} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$ to the mass-loss rate of Type IIP progenitors, and therefore to the luminosity of RSGs that explode to form Type IIPs. Thi...

  19. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nugent, P; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Ellis, R; Fabbro, S; Fouchez, D; Gal-Yam, A; Howell, D A; Leonard, D C; Neill, J D; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Sullivan, M; Astier, Pierre; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Conley, Alex; Ellis, Richard; Fabbro, Sebastien; Fouchez, Dominique; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leonard, Douglas C.; Neill, James D.; Nugent, Peter; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J.; Regnault, Nicolas; Sullivan, Mark

    2006-01-01

    We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift up to z~0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy & Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNe II-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, a cross-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We app...

  20. Supernova progenitors, their variability and the Type IIP Supernova ASASSN-16fq in M66

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C. S.; Fraser, M.; Adams, S. M.; Sukhbold, T.; Prieto, J. L.; Müller, T.; Bock, G.; Brown, J. S.; Dong, Subo; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Khan, R.; Shappee, B. J.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2017-05-01

    We identify a pre-explosion counterpart to the nearby Type IIP supernova ASASSN-16fq (SN 2016cok) in archival Hubble Space Telescope data. The source appears to be a blend of several stars that prevents obtaining accurate photometry. However, with reasonable assumptions about the stellar temperature and extinction, the progenitor almost certainly had an initial mass M* ≲ 17 M⊙, and was most likely in the mass range of M* = 8-12 M⊙. Observations once ASASSN-16fq has faded will have no difficulty accurately determining the properties of the progenitor. In 8 yr of Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) data, no significant progenitor variability is detected to rms limits of roughly 0.03 mag. Of the six nearby supernova (SN) with constraints on the low-level variability, SN 1987A, SN 1993J, SN 2008cn, SN 2011dh, SN 2013ej and ASASSN-16fq, only the slowly fading progenitor of SN 2011dh showed clear evidence of variability. Excluding SN 1987A, the 90 per cent confidence limit implied by these sources on the number of outbursts over the last decade before the SN that last longer than 0.1 yr (full width at half-maximum) and are brighter than MR < -8 mag is approximately Nout ≲ 3. Our continuing LBT monitoring programme will steadily improve constraints on pre-SN progenitor variability at amplitudes far lower than achievable by SN surveys.

  1. Supernova 2013by: A Type IIL Supernova with a IIP-like light curve drop

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, S; Stritzinger, M; Howell, D A; Arcavi, I; McCully, C; Childress, M J; Hsiao, E Y; Contreras, C; Morrell, N; Phillips, M M; Gromadzki, M; Kirshner, R P; Marion, G H

    2015-01-01

    We present multi-band ultraviolet and optical light curves, as well as visual-wavelength and near-infrared spectroscopy of the Type II linear (IIL) supernova (SN) 2013by. We show that SN 2013by and other SNe IIL in the literature, after their linear decline phase that start after maximum, have a sharp light curve decline similar to that seen in Type II plateau (IIP) supernovae. This light curve feature has rarely been observed in other SNe IIL due to their relative rarity and the intrinsic faintness of this particular phase of the light curve. We suggest that the presence of this drop could be used as a physical parameter to distinguish between subclasses of SNe II, rather than their light curve decline rate shortly after peak. Close inspection of the spectra of SN 2013by indicate asymmetric line profiles and signatures of high-velocity hydrogen. Late (less than 90 days after explosion) near-infrared spectra of SN 2013by exhibit oxygen lines, indicating significant mixing within the ejecta. From the late-time...

  2. Type II-P Supernovae as Standard Candles: The SDSS-II Sample Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the observed correlation between Hbeta and FeII velocities for Type II-P supernovae (SNe~II-P) using 28 optical spectra of 13 SNe II-P and demonstrate that it is well modeled by a linear relation with a dispersion of about 300 km/s. Using this correlation, we reanalyze the publicly available sample of SNe II-P compiled by D'Andrea et al. and find a Hubble diagram with an intrinsic scatter of 11% in distance, which is nearly as tight as that measured before their sample is added to the existing set. The larger scatter reported in their work is found to be systematic, and most of it can be alleviated by measuring Hbeta rather than FeII velocities, due to the low signal-to-noise ratios and early epochs at which many of the optical spectra were obtained. Their sample, while supporting the mounting evidence that SNe II-P are good cosmic rulers, is biased toward intrinsically brighter objects and is not a suitable set to improve upon SN II-P correlation parameters. This will await a dedicated survey.

  3. Supernova Progenitors, Their Variability, and the Type IIP Supernova ASASSN-16fq in M66

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S; Adams, S M; Sukhbold, T; Prieto, J L; Muller, T; Bock, G; Brown, J S; Dong, Subo; Holoien, T W -S; Khan, R; Shappee, B J; Stanek, K Z

    2016-01-01

    We identify a pre-explosion counterpart to the nearby Type IIP supernova ASASSN-16fq (SN 2016cok) in archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. The source appears to be a blend of several stars that prevents obtaining accurate photometry. However, with reasonable assumptions about the stellar temperature and extinction, the progenitor almost certainly had an initial mass M<17Msun, and was most likely in the mass range 8-12Msun. Observations once ASASSN-16fq has faded will have no difficulty accurately determining the properties of the progenitor. In 8 years of Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) data, no significant progenitor variability is detected to RMS limits of roughly 0.03 mag. Of the six nearby SN with constraints on low level variability, SN 1987A, SN 1993J, SN 2008cn, SN 2011dh, SN 2013ej and ASASSN-16fq, only the slowly fading progenitor of SN 2011dh showed clear evidence of variability. Excluding SN 1987A, the 90% confidence limit implied by these sources on the number of outbursts over the last d...

  4. A dozen type II-P supernovae seen with the eyes of Spitzer

    CERN Document Server

    Szalai, T

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC SNe), especially those of type II-plateau (II-P), are thought to be important contributors to cosmic dust production. The most obvious indicator of the presence of newly-formed and/or pre-existing dust is the time-dependent mid-infrared (MIR) excess coming from the environment of SNe. Our goal was to collect publicly available, previously unpublished measurements on type II-P (or peculiar IIP) SNe from the Spitzer database. The temporal changes of the observed fluxes may be indicative of the underlying supernova, while spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to the fluxes in different IRAC channels may reveal the physical parameters of the mid-IR radiation, presumably due to warm dust. IRS spectra were extracted and calibrated with SPICE, while photometric SEDs were assembled using IRAF and MOPEX. Calculated SEDs from observed fluxes were fit with simple dust models to get basic information on the dust presumed as the source of MIR radiation. We found twelve SNe satisfying the ...

  5. A semi-analytical light curve model and its application to type IIP supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Andrea P; Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J Craig

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a semi-analytical light curve modeling code which can be used for estimating physical properties of core collapse supernovae (SNe) in a quick and efficient way. To verify our code we fit light curves of Type II SNe and compare our best parameter estimates to those from hydrodynamical calculations. For this analysis we use the quasi-bolometric light curves of five different Type IIP supernovae. In each case we get appropriate results for the initial pre-supernova parameters. We conclude that this semi-analytical light curve model is useful to get approximate physical properties of Type II SNe without using time-consuming numerical hydrodynamic simulations.

  6. Condensation of dust in the ejecta of type II-P supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We study the production of dust in Type II-P supernova by coupling the gas-phase chemistry to the dust nucleation and condensation phases. We consider two supernova progenitor masses with homogeneous and clumpy ejecta to assess the chemical type and quantity of dust that forms. Grain size distributions are derived as a function of post-explosion time. Methods: The chemistry of the gas phase and the simultaneous formation of dust clusters are described by a chemical network. The formation of key species (CO, SiO) and dust clusters of silicates, alumina, silica, metal carbides and sulphides, pure metals, and amorphous carbon is considered. The master equations describing the chemistry of the nucleation phase are coupled to a dust condensation formalism based on Brownian coagulation. Results: Type II-P supernovae produce dust grains of various chemical compositions and size distributions as a function of time. The grain size distributions gain in complexity with time, are slewed towards large grains, and d...

  7. Broad band polarimetric investigation of Type IIP supernova 2013ej

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Brajesh; Eswaraiah, C; Kawabata, K S

    2015-01-01

    We present results based on follow-up observations of the Type II-plateau supernova (SN) 2013ej at 6 epochs spanning a total duration of $\\sim$37 d. The $R_{c}$-band linear polarimetric observations were carried out between the end of the plateau and the beginning of the nebular phases as noticed in the photometric light curve. The contribution due to interstellar polarization (ISP) was constrained by using couple of approaches, i.e. based upon the observations of foreground stars lying within 5\\arcmin\\, and 10$\\degr$ radius of the SN location and also investigating the extinction due to the Milky Way and host galaxy towards the SN direction. Our analysis revealed that in general the intrinsic polarization of the SN is higher than the polarization values for the foreground stars and exhibits an increasing trend during our observations. After correcting the ISP of $\\sim$0.6 per cent, the maximum intrinsic polarization of SN~2013ej is found to be 2.14 $\\pm$ 0.57 per cent. Such a strong polarization has rarely b...

  8. Improved Standardization of Type II-P Supernovae: Application to an Expanded Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong; Bloom, Joshua S; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J; Nugent, Peter E; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Cenko, S Bradley; Gates, Elinor L; Leonard, Douglas C; Miller, Adam A; Modjaz, Maryam; Serduke, Frank J D; Smith, Nathan; Swift, Brandon J; Wong, Diane S

    2008-01-01

    In the epoch of precise and accurate cosmology, cross-confirmation using a variety of cosmographic methods is paramount to circumvent systematic uncertainties. Owing to progenitor histories and explosion physics differing from those of Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia), Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) are unlikely to be affected by evolution in the same way. Based on a new analysis of 17 SNe II-P, and on an improved methodology, we find that SNe II-P are good standardizable candles, almost comparable to SNe Ia. We derive a tight Hubble diagram with dispersion of 10% in distance, using the simple correlation between luminosity and photospheric velocity introduced by Hamuy & Pinto 2002. We show that the descendent method of Nugent et al. 2006 can be further simplified and that the correction for dust extinction has low statistical impact. We find that our SN sample favors, on average, a very steep dust law with total to selective extinction R_V<2. Such an extinction law has been recently inferred for many SNe I...

  9. After the Fall: Late-Time Spectroscopy of Type IIP Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Wheeler, J Craig; Filippenko, Alexei V; Vinko, Jozsef; Marion, G H; Cenko, S Bradley; Chornock, Ryan; Clubb, Kelsey I; Foley, Ryan J; Graham, Melissa L; Kelly, Patrick L; Matheson, Thomas; Shields, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    Herein we analyse late-time (post-plateau; 103 < t < 1229 d) optical spectra of low-redshift (z < 0.016), hydrogen-rich Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP). Our newly constructed sample contains 91 nebular spectra of 38 SNe IIP, which is the largest dataset of its kind ever analysed in one study, and many of the objects have complementary photometric data. We determined the peak and total luminosity, velocity of the peak, HWHM intensity, and profile shape for many emission lines. Temporal evolution of these values and various flux ratios are studied. We also investigate the correlations between these measurements and photometric observables, such as the peak and plateau absolute magnitudes and the late-time light curve decline rates in various optical bands. The strongest and most robust result we find is that the luminosities of all spectral features (except those of helium) tend to be higher in objects with steeper late-time V-band decline rates. A steep late-time V-band slope likely arises from less eff...

  10. Extensive Spectroscopy and Photometry of the Type IIP Supernova 2013ej

    CERN Document Server

    Dhungana, G; Vinko, J; Silverman, J M; Wheeler, J C; Marion, G H; Zheng, W; Fox, O D; Akerlof, C; Biro, B I; Borkovits, T; Cenko, S B; Clubb, K I; Filippenko, A V; Ferrante, F V; Graham, M L; Hegedus, T; Kelly, P; Kelemen, J; Lee, W H; Marschalko, G; Molnár, L; Nagy, A P; Ordasi, A; Pal, A; Sarneczky, K; Shivvers, I; Szakats, R; Szalai, T; Szegedi-Elek, E; Székely, P; Szing, A; Takáts, K; Vida, K

    2015-01-01

    We present extensive optical (UBVRI, g'r'i'z', and open CCD) and near-infrared (ZYJH) photometry for the very nearby Type IIP supernova (SN) 2013ej extending from +1 to +215 days after shock breakout. Substantial time series ultraviolet and optical spectroscopic observations obtained from +8 to +135 days after the explosion are also presented. We use early optical photometry to determine the time of shock breakout to be MJD 56496.9+/-0.3. We calibrate unfiltered CCD observations to pseudo-bolometric UBVRI light curve data of Type IIP supernovae (SNe), obtaining 4% precision with a B-V color-dependent correction. Considering well-observed SNe from the literature, we derive a UBVRIJHK bolometric calibration from the UBVRI measurement to better than 2% precision. We observe moderately strong Si~II {\\lambda}6355 as early as 8 days after explosion. We model spectra in the vicinity of Fe~II {\\lambda}5169 whenever observed to determine the photospheric velocity, v{\\phi}, yielding 4500+/-500 km s^-1 50 days after exp...

  11. A comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernova rise times as exemplified by the case of LSQ13cuw

    CERN Document Server

    Gall, E E E; Kotak, R; Jerkstrand, A; Leibundgut, B; Rabinowitz, D; Sollerman, J; Sullivan, M; Smartt, S J; Anderson, J P; Benetti, S; Baltay, C; Feindt, U; Fraser, M; González-Gaitán, S; Inserra, C; Maguire, K; McKinnon, R; Valenti, S; Young, D

    2015-01-01

    We report on our findings based on the analysis of observations of the Type II-L supernova LSQ13cuw within the framework of currently-accepted physical predictions of core-collapse supernova explosions. LSQ13cuw was discovered within a day of explosion, which is hitherto unprecedented for Type II-L supernovae. This motivated a comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernovae with relatively well-constrained explosion epochs and rise times to maximium (optical) light. From our sample of 19 such events, we find evidence of a positive correlation between the duration of the rise and the peak brightness. On average, SNe II-L tend to have brighter peak magnitudes and longer rise times than SNe II-P. However, this difference is clearest only at the extreme ends of the rise-time versus peak brightness relation. Using two different analytical models, we performed a parameter study to investigate the physical parameters that control the rise-time behaviour. In general, the models qualitatively reproduce aspects of t...

  12. SN 2004A: Another Type II-P Supernova with a Red Supergiant Progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Hendry, M A; Cenko, S B; Crockett, R M; Fox, D W; Gal-Yam, A; Kudritzki, R P; Maund, J R; Moon, D S; Smartt, S J

    2006-01-01

    We present a monitoring study of SN 2004A and probable discovery of a progenitor star in pre-explosion HST images. The photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of SN 2004A show that it was a normal Type II-P which was discovered in NGC 6207 about two weeks after explosion. We compare SN 2004A to the similar Type II-P SN 1999em and estimate an explosion epoch of 2004 January 6. We also calculate three new distances to NGC 6207 of 21.0 +/-4.3, 21.4 +/-3.5 and 25.1 +/-1.7Mpc. The former was calculated using the Standard Candle Method (SCM) for SNe II-P, and the latter two from the Brightest Supergiants Method (BSM). We combine these three distances with existing kinematic distances, to derive a mean value of 20.3 +/-3.4Mpc. Using this distance we estimate that the ejected nickel mass in the explosion is 0.046(+0.031,-0.017) Msolar. The progenitor of SN 2004A is identified in pre-explosion WFPC2 F814W images with a magnitude of mF814W = 24.3 +/-0.3, but is below the detection limit of the F606W images. We show th...

  13. Probable Bright Supernova discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-09-01

    A bright transient, which is a probable supernova, has been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  14. Sn 2008in - bridging the gap between normal and faint supernovae of type IIP

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Rupak; Benetti, Stefano; Pastorello, Andrea; Yuan, Fang; Brown, Peter J; Immler, Stefan; Fatkhullin, Timur A; Moskvitin, Alexander S; Maund, Justyn; Akerlof, Carl W; Wheeler, J Craig; Sokolov, Vladimir V; Quimby, Rorbert M; Bufano, Filomena; Kumar, Brajesh; Misra, Kuntal; Pandey, S B; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Roming, Peter W A; Sagar, Ram

    2011-01-01

    We present optical photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic observations of the Type II plateau supernova (SN) 2008in, which occurred in the outskirts of the nearly face-on spiral galaxy M 61. Photometric data in the X-rays, ultraviolet and near-infrared bands have been used to characterize this event. The SN field was imaged with the ROTSE-IIIb optical telescope about seven days before the explosion. This allowed us to constrain the epoch of the shock breakout to JD = 2454825.6. The duration of the plateau phase, as derived from the photometric monitoring, was ~ 98 days. The spectra of SN 2008in show a striking resemblance to those of the archetypal low-luminosity IIP SNe 1997D and 1999br. A comparison of ejecta kinematics of SN 2008in with the hydrodynamical simulations of Type IIP SNe by Dessart et al. (2010) indicates that it is a less energetic event (~ 5$\\times10^{50}$ erg). However, the light curve indicates that the production of radioactive $^{56}$Ni is significantly higher than that in the low-l...

  15. SN 2009ib: A Type II-P Supernova with an Unusually Long Plateau

    CERN Document Server

    Takats, K; Pumo, M L; Paillas, E; Zampieri, L; Elias-Rosa, N; Benetti, S; Bufano, F; Cappellaro, E; Ergon, M; Fraser, M; Hamuy, M; Inserra, C; Kankare, E; Smartt, S J; Stritzinger, M D; Van Dyk, S D; Haislip, J B; LaCluyze, A P; Moore, J P; Reichart, D

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2009ib, a Type II-P supernova in NGC 1559. This object has moderate brightness, similar to those of the intermediate-luminosity SNe 2008in and 2009N. Its plateau phase is unusually long, lasting for about 130 days after explosion. The spectra are similar to those of the subluminous SN 2002gd, with moderate expansion velocities. We estimate the $^{56}$Ni mass produced as $0.046 \\pm 0.015\\,{\\rm M}_{\\sun}$. We determine the distance to SN 2009ib using both the expanding photosphere method (EPM) and the standard candle method. We also apply EPM to SN 1986L, a type II-P SN that exploded in the same galaxy. Combining the results of different methods, we conclude the distance to NGC 1559 as $D=19.8 \\pm 2.8$ Mpc. We examine archival, pre-explosion images of the field taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, and find a faint source at the position of the SN, which has a yellow colour ($(V-I)_0 = 0.85$ mag). Assuming it is a single star, we estimate i...

  16. SN 2013ab : A normal type IIP supernova in NGC 5669

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Zampieri, Luca; Sand, David; Kumar, Brijesh; Pastorello, Andrea; Sutaria, Firoza; Maccarone, Thomas J; Kumar, Brajesh; Graham, M L; Howell, D Andy; Ochner, Paolo; Chandola, H C; Pandey, Shashi B

    2015-01-01

    We present densely-sampled ultraviolet/optical photometric and low-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of the type IIP supernova 2013ab in the nearby ($\\sim$24 Mpc) galaxy NGC 5669, from 2 to 190d after explosion. Continuous photometric observations, with the cadence of typically a day to one week, were acquired with the 1-2m class telescopes in the LCOGT network, ARIES telescopes in India and various other telescopes around the globe. The light curve and spectra suggest that the SN is a normal type IIP event with a plateau duration of $ \\sim80 $ days with mid plateau absolute visual magnitude of -16.7, although with a steeper decline during the plateau (0.92 mag 100 d$ ^{-1} $ in $ V $ band) relative to other archetypal SNe of similar brightness. The velocity profile of SN 2013ab shows striking resemblance with those of SNe 1999em and 2012aw. Following the Rabinak & Waxman (2011) prescription, the initial temperature evolution of the SN emission allows us to estimate the progenitor radius to be...

  17. The chemically controlled synthesis of dust in type II-P supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejecta of solar metallicity, Type II-P supernovae using a chemical kinetic approach. We follow the evolution of molecules and small dust cluster masses from day 100 to day 1500 after explosion. We consider stellar progenitors with initial mass of 12, 15, 19 and 25 Msun that explode as supernovae with stratified ejecta. The molecular precursors to dust grains comprise molecular chains, rings and small clusters of silica, silicates, metal oxides, sulphides and carbides, pure metals, and carbon, where the nucleation of silicate clusters is described by a two-step process of metal and oxygen addition. We study the impact of the 56Ni mass on the type and amount of synthesised dust. We predict that large masses of molecules including CO, SiO, SiS, O2, and SO form in the ejecta. We show that the discrepancy between the small dust masses detected at infrared wavelengths some 500 days post-explosion and the larger amounts of dust recently detected with Hersc...

  18. Optical and near infrared coverage of SN 2004et: physical parameters and comparison with other type IIP supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, K; Smartt, S J; Pastorello, A; Tsvetkov, D Yu; Benetti, S; Spiro, S; Arkharov, A A; Beccari, G; Botticella, M T; Cappellaro, E; Cristallo, S; Dolci, M; Elias-Rosa, N; Fiaschi, M; D., Gorshanov; Harutyunyan, A; Larionov, V M; Navasardyan, H; Pietrinferni, A; Raimondo, G; Di Rico, G; Valenti, S; Valentini, G; Zampieri, L

    2009-01-01

    We present new optical and near infrared (NIR) photometry and spectroscopy of the type IIP supernova, SN 2004et. In combination with already published data, this provides one of the most complete studies of optical and NIR data for any type IIP SN from just after explosion to +500 days. The contribution of the NIR flux to the bolometric light curve is estimated to increase from 15% at explosion to around 50% at the end of the plateau and then declines to 40% at 300 days. SN 2004et is one of the most luminous IIP SNe which has been well studied, and with a luminosity of log L = 42.3 erg/s, it is 2 times brighter than SN 1999em. We provide parametrised bolometric corrections as a function of time for SN 2004et and three other IIP SNe that have extensive optical and NIR data, which can be used as templates for future events. We compare the physical parameters of SN 2004et with those of other IIP SNe and find kinetic energies spanning the range of 10^50-10^51 ergs. We compare the ejected masses calculated from hy...

  19. Circumstellar Light Echo as a Possible Origin of the Polarization of Type IIP Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Takashi; Maeda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Masaomi

    2017-10-01

    Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) are the most common class of core-collapse SNe. They often show a rapid increase of polarization degree in the late phase. This time evolution is generally believed to originate from the emergence of an inner aspherical core, while the effect of polarized-scattered echoes by circumstellar (CS) dust around the SN may also substantially contribute to this polarization feature. In this study, we examine the effects of the scattered echoes on the SN polarization through radiative transfer simulations for various geometries and amounts of CS dust. It is found that asymmetrically distributed CS dust, which is generally inferred for red supergiants, can reproduce the observed polarization features. We have applied our results to SNe 2004dj and 2006ov, deriving the geometry and amount of CS dust to explain their observed polarization features in this scenario. For both SNe, the blob-like or bipolar distribution of CS dust rather than the disk-like distribution is favored. The derived dust masses {M}{dust} in the blob model (the bipolar CS dust model) for SNe 2004dj and 2006ov are ∼ 7.5× {10}-4 {M}ȯ (∼ 8.5× {10}-4 {M}ȯ ) and ∼ 5.2× {10}-4 {M}ȯ (∼ 1.3× {10}-3 {M}ȯ ), respectively. Even in the case where this process would not play a dominant role in the observed polarization signals, this effect should in principle contribute to it, the strength of which depends on the nature of the CS dust. Therefore, this effect must be taken into account in discussing the multi-dimensional structure of an SN explosion through polarimetric observations.

  20. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017dkb (=PTSS-17slg) as a Type IIP Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Yu, Xiaoguang; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tan, Hanjie; Li, Bin; Xu, Zhijian; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Xiang, Danfeng; Rui, Liming; Yang, Zesheng

    2017-05-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 370-880 nm) of SN 2017dkb (=PTSS-17slg), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Apr.30.81 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  1. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017cff (=PTSS-17nem) as a Young Type IIP Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Xin, Yuxin; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Xiang, Danfeng

    2017-03-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-900 nm) of SN 2017cff (=PTSS-17nem), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Mar.19.76 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  2. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017cff (=PTSS-17nem) as a Young Type IIP Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Xin, Yuxin; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Xiang, Danfeng

    2017-03-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-900 nm) of SN 2017cff (=PTSS-17nem), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Mar.19.76 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Type IIP supernovae from Pan-STARRS1 (Sanders+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Gezari, S.; Betancourt, M.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Foley, R. J.; Challis, P.; Drout, M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Marion, G. H.; Margutti, R.; McKinnon, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Narayan, G.; Rest, A.; Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M. E.; Burgett, W. S.; Draper, P. W.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, J. S.; Price, P. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2015-06-01

    We select an SN II light-curve sample from the transients discovered and monitored by Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) since the initiation of the survey in 2010, consisting of 18953 relevant photometric data points, 5096 of which are robust transient detections. The PS1 observations are obtained through a set of five broadband filters, which we refer to interchangeably as gP1, rP1, iP1, zP1, and yP1 or simply grizy (Stubbs et al. 2010ApJS..191..376S). We begin with a selection of PS1-discovered SNe that were classified as Type II through our spectroscopic follow-up campaign: 112 objects in total. Spectra were obtained using the Blue Channel and Hectospec spectrographs of the 6.5m MMT telescope, the Low Dispersion Survey Spectrograph (LDSS3) and Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) of the 6.5m Magellan telescopes, the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph of the 8m Gemini telescopes (GMOS), and the Andalucia Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (ALFOSC) at the 2.6m Nordic Optical Telescope. Details of our final SN IIP sample, as described in Section 3.4, are listed in Table 1. (4 data files).

  4. Integral field spectroscopy of supernova explosion sites: constraining mass and metallicity of the progenitors -- II. Type II-P and II-L supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Aldering, Greg; Arimoto, Nobuo; Maeda, Keiichi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Pereira, Rui; Usuda, Tomonori; Hashiba, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen explosion sites of type II-P and II-L supernovae in nearby galaxies have been observed using integral field spectroscopy, enabling both spatial and spectral study of the explosion sites. We used the properties of the parent stellar population of the coeval supernova progenitor star to derive its metallicity and initial mass (c.f. Paper I). The spectrum of the parent stellar population yields the estimates of metallicity via strong-line method, and age via comparison with simple stellar population (SSP) models. These metallicity and age parameters are adopted for the progenitor star. Age, or lifetime of the star, was used to derive initial (ZAMS) mass of the star by comparing with stellar evolution models. With this technique, we were able to determine metallicity and initial mass of the SN progenitors in our sample. Our result indicates that some type-II supernova progenitors may have been stars with mass comparable to SN Ib/c progenitors.

  5. After the Fall: Late-Time Spectroscopy of Type IIP Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Pickett, Stephanie; Craig Wheeler, J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Vinkó, József; Marion, G. H.; Bradley Cenko, S.; Chornock, Ryan; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Foley, Ryan J.; Graham, Melissa L.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Matheson, Thomas; Shields, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Herein we analyse late-time (post-plateau; 103 stars have ejecta with a more physically extended oxygen layer that is well-mixed with the hydrogen layer. In addition, we find a subset of objects with evidence for asymmetric 56Ni ejection, likely bipolar in shape. We also compare our observations to theoretical late-time spectral models of SNe IIP from two separate groups and find moderate-to-good agreement with both sets of models. Our SNe IIP spectra are consistent with models of 12-15 M⊙ progenitor stars having relatively low metallicity (Z ≤ 0.01).

  6. SN 2009js AT THE CROSSROADS BETWEEN NORMAL AND SUBLUMINOUS TYPE IIP SUPERNOVAE: OPTICAL AND MID-INFRARED EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, P. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yamanaka, M.; Itoh, R. [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tanaka, M. [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Nozawa, T.; Maeda, K.; Moriya, T. J. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Kawabata, K. S. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Saviane, I. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Santiago 19 (Chile); Hattori, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Sasada, M. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-20

    We present a study of SN 2009js in NGC 918. Multi-band Kanata optical photometry covering the first {approx}120 days shows the source to be a Type IIP SN. Reddening is dominated by that due to our Galaxy. One-year-post-explosion photometry with the New Technology Telescope and a Subaru optical spectrum 16 days post-discovery both imply a good match with the well-studied subluminous SN 2005cs. The plateau-phase luminosity of SN 2009js and its plateau duration are more similar to the intermediate luminosity IIP SN 2008in. Thus, SN 2009js shares characteristics with both subluminous and intermediate luminosity supernovae (SNe). Its radioactive tail luminosity lies between SN 2005cs and SN 2008in, whereas its quasi-bolometric luminosity decline from peak to plateau (quantified by a newly defined parameter {Delta}logL, which measures adiabatic cooling following shock breakout) is much smaller than both the others'. We estimate the ejected mass of {sup 56}Ni to be low ({approx}0.007 M{sub Sun }). The SN explosion energy appears to have been small, similar to that of SN 2005cs. SN 2009js is the first subluminous SN IIP to be studied in the mid-infrared. It was serendipitously caught by Spitzer at very early times. In addition, it was detected by WISE 105 days later with a significant 4.6 {mu}m flux excess above the photosphere. The infrared excess luminosity relative to the photosphere is clearly smaller than that of SN 2004dj, which has been extensively studied in the mid-infrared. The excess may be tentatively assigned to heated dust with mass {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun }, or to CO fundamental emission as a precursor to dust formation.

  7. Light-curve Analysis of Ordinary Type IIP Supernovae Based on Neutrino-driven Explosion Simulations in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2017-09-01

    Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) are the most numerous subclass of core-collapse SNe originating from massive stars. In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the properties of the SN outburst for a red supergiant progenitor model and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of the ordinary Type IIP SN 1999em. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of (parametrically triggered) neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the (explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics) code Prometheus, using a presupernova model of a 15 M ⊙ star as initial data. On approaching homologous expansion, the hydrodynamic and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the (implicit, Lagrangian, radiation hydrodynamics) code Crab to follow the evolution of the blast wave during the SN outburst. Our 3D neutrino-driven explosion model with an explosion energy of about 0.5× {10}51 erg produces 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail of SN 1999em. The considered presupernova model, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1999em, except for those connected to the presupernova structure of the outer stellar layers. Our 3D simulations show that the distribution of 56Ni-rich matter in velocity space is asymmetric with a strong dipole component that is consistent with the observations of SN 1999em. The monotonic decline in luminosity from the plateau to the radioactive tail in ordinary SNe IIP is a manifestation of the intense turbulent mixing at the He/H composition interface.

  8. SN 2013ej IN M74: A LUMINOUS AND FAST-DECLINING TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Fang [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Wang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Juncheng; Mo, Jun; Zhao, Xulin [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Jujia [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Brown, Peter J. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Zampieri, Luca [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Pumo, Maria Letizia [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo “Giuseppe S. Vaiana,” Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Zhang, Tianmeng, E-mail: huangfang@mail.bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2015-07-01

    We present extensive ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of the Type IIP supernova (SN IIP) 2013ej in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The multicolor light curves, spanning from ∼8–185 days after explosion, show that it has a higher peak luminosity (i.e., M{sub V} ∼ −17.83 mag at maximum light), a faster post-peak decline, and a shorter plateau phase (i.e., ∼50 days) compared to the normal Type IIP SN 1999em. The mass of {sup 56}Ni is estimated as 0.02 ± 0.01 M{sub ⊙} from the radioactive tail of the bolometric light curve. The spectral evolution of SN 2013ej is similar to that of SN 2004et and SN 2007od, but shows a larger expansion velocity (i.e., v{sub Fe} {sub ii} ∼ 4600 km s{sup −1} at t ∼ 50 days) and broader line profiles. In the nebular phase, the emission of the Hα line displays a double-peak structure, perhaps due to the asymmetric distribution of {sup 56}Ni produced in the explosion. With the constraints from the main observables such as bolometric light curve, expansion velocity, and photospheric temperature of SN 2013ej, we performed hydrodynamical simulations of the explosion parameters, yielding the total explosion energy as ∼0.7× 10{sup 51} erg, the radius of the progenitor as ∼600 R{sub ⊙}, and the ejected mass as ∼10.6 M{sub ⊙}. These results suggest that SN 2013ej likely arose from a red supergiant with a mass of 12–13 M{sub ⊙} immediately before the explosion.

  9. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli (Italy); Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Pignata, G.; Bufano, F. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Bayless, A. J. [Southwest Research Institute, Department of Space Science, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Pritchard, T. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Elias-Rosa, N. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC) Campus UAB, Torre C5, Za plata, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Haislip, J. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 120 E. Cameron Ave., Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Harutyunyan, A. [Fundación Galileo Galilei - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Rambla José Ana Fernández Pérez 7, E-38712 Breña Baja, TF - Spain (Spain); and others

    2014-06-01

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M {sub env} ∼ 20 M {sub ☉}, progenitor radius R ∼ 3 × 10{sup 13} cm (∼430 R {sub ☉}), explosion energy E ∼ 1.5 foe, and initial {sup 56}Ni mass ∼0.06 M {sub ☉}. These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M {sub ☉} of the Type IIP events.

  10. Towards Characterization of the Type IIP Supernova Progenitor Population: a Statistical Sample of Light Curves from Pan-STARRS1

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, N E; Gezari, S; Betancourt, M; Chornock, R; Berger, E; Foley, R J; Challis, P; Drout, M; Kirshner, R P; Lunnan, R; Marion, G H; Margutti, R; McKinnon, R; Milisavljevic, D; Narayan, G; Rest, A; Kankare, E; Mattila, S; Smartt, S J; Huber, M E; Burgett, W S; Draper, P W; Hodapp, K W; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J S; Price, P A; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the advent of wide-field sky surveys which obtain deep multi-band imaging has presented a new path for indirectly characterizing the progenitor populations of core-collapse supernovae (SN): systematic light curve studies. We assemble a set of 76 grizy-band Type IIP SN light curves from Pan-STARRS1 (PS1), obtained over a constant survey program of 4 years and classified using both spectroscopy and machine learning-based photometric techniques. We develop and apply a new Bayesian model for the full multi-band evolution of each light curve in the sample. We find no evidence for the existence of a discontinuous sub-population of fast-declining explosions (historically referred to as "Type IIL" SNe). However, we identify a highly significant continuous relation between the plateau phase decay rate and peak luminosity among our SNe IIP. These results argue in favor of a single predominant explosion parameter, likely determined by initial stellar mass, controlling the most significant observational ...

  11. Type IIP Supernova SN 2004et: A Multi-Wavelength Study in X-Ray, Optical and Radio

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Kuntal; Chandra, Poonam; Bhattacharya, D; Ray, Alak K; Sagar, Ram; Lewin, Walter H G

    2007-01-01

    We present X-ray, broad band optical and low frequency radio observations of the bright type IIP supernova SN 2004et. The \\cxo observed the supernova at three epochs, and the optical coverage spans a period of $\\sim$ 470 days since explosion. The X-ray emission softens with time, and we characterise the X-ray luminosity evolution as $\\Lx \\propto t^{-0.4}$. We use the observed X-ray luminosity to estimate a mass-loss rate for the progenitor star of $\\sim \\ee{2}{-6} M_\\odot \\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$. The optical light curve shows a pronounced plateau lasting for about 110 days. Temporal evolution of photospheric radius and color temperature during the plateau phase is determined by making black body fits. We estimate the ejected mass of $^{56}$Ni to be 0.06 $\\pm$ 0.03 M$_\\odot$. Using the expressions of Litvinova & Nad\\"{e}zhin (1985) we estimate an explosion energy of (0.98 $\\pm$ 0.25) $\\times 10^{51}$ erg. We also present a single epoch radio observation of SN 2004et. We compare this with the predictions of the m...

  12. New Galactic supernova remnants discovered with IPHAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, L; Contreras, M E; Olguín, L; Frew, D J; Stupar, M; Vázquez, R; Wright, N J; Corradi, R L M; Morris, R A H

    2013-01-01

    As part of a systematic search programme of a 10-degree wide strip of the Northern Galactic plane we present preliminary evidence for the discovery of four (and possibly five) new supernova remnants (SNRs). The pilot search area covered the 19-20 hour right ascension zone sampling from +20 to +55 degrees in declination using binned mosaic images from the INT Photometric H-alpha Survey (IPHAS). The optical identification of the candidate SNRs was based mainly on their filamentary and arc-like emission morphologies, their apparently coherent, even if fractured structure and clear disconnection from any diffuse neighbouring HII region type nebulosity. Follow-up optical spectroscopy was undertaken, sampling carefully across prominent features of these faint sources. The resulting spectra revealed typical emission line ratios for shock excited nebulae which are characteristic of SNRs, which, along with the latest diagnostic diagrams, strongly support the likely SNR nature of these sources: G038.7-1.3 (IPHASX J1906...

  13. TOWARD CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TYPE IIP SUPERNOVA PROGENITOR POPULATION: A STATISTICAL SAMPLE OF LIGHT CURVES FROM Pan-STARRS1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Challis, P.; Drout, M.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Marion, G. H.; Margutti, R.; McKinnon, R.; Milisavljevic, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gezari, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Betancourt, M. [Department of Statistics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Foley, R. J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Narayan, G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rest, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kankare, E.; Mattila, S. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, 21500 Piikkiö (Finland); Smartt, S. J., E-mail: nsanders@cfa.harvard.edu [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University, BT7 1NN, Belfast (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, wide-field sky surveys providing deep multiband imaging have presented a new path for indirectly characterizing the progenitor populations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe): systematic light-curve studies. We assemble a set of 76 grizy-band Type IIP SN light curves from Pan-STARRS1, obtained over a constant survey program of 4 yr and classified using both spectroscopy and machine-learning-based photometric techniques. We develop and apply a new Bayesian model for the full multiband evolution of each light curve in the sample. We find no evidence of a subpopulation of fast-declining explosions (historically referred to as ''Type IIL'' SNe). However, we identify a highly significant relation between the plateau phase decay rate and peak luminosity among our SNe IIP. These results argue in favor of a single parameter, likely determined by initial stellar mass, predominantly controlling the explosions of red supergiants. This relation could also be applied for SN cosmology, offering a standardizable candle good to an intrinsic scatter of ≲ 0.2 mag. We compare each light curve to physical models from hydrodynamic simulations to estimate progenitor initial masses and other properties of the Pan-STARRS1 Type IIP SN sample. We show that correction of systematic discrepancies between modeled and observed SN IIP light-curve properties and an expanded grid of progenitor properties are needed to enable robust progenitor inferences from multiband light-curve samples of this kind. This work will serve as a pathfinder for photometric studies of core-collapse SNe to be conducted through future wide-field transient searches.

  14. GALEX Detection of Shock Breakout in Type II-P Supernova PS1-13arp: Implications for the Progenitor Star Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Gezari, S; Sanders, N E; Soderberg, A M; Hung, T; Heinis, S; Smartt, S J; Rest, A; Scolnic, D; Chornock, R; Berger, E; Foley, R J; Huber, M E; Stubbs, P Price C W; Riess, A G; Kirshner, R P; Smith, K; Wood-Vasey, W M; Schiminovich, D; Martin, D C; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Flewelling, H; Kaiser, N; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R

    2015-01-01

    We present the GALEX detection of a UV burst at the time of explosion of an optically normal Type II-P supernova (PS1-13arp) from the Pan-STARRS1 survey at z=0.1665. The temperature and luminosity of the UV burst match the theoretical predictions for shock breakout in a red supergiant, but with a duration a factor of ~50 longer than expected. We compare the $NUV$ light curve of PS1-13arp to previous GALEX detections of Type IIP SNe, and find clear distinctions that indicate that the UV emission is powered by shock breakout, and not by the subsequent cooling envelope emission previously detected in these systems. We interpret the ~ 1 d duration of the UV signal with a shock breakout in the wind of a red supergiant with a pre-explosion mass-loss rate of ~ 10^-3 Msun yr^-1. This mass-loss rate is enough to prolong the duration of the shock breakout signal, but not enough to produce an excess in the optical plateau light curve or narrow emission lines powered by circumstellar interaction. This detection of non-st...

  15. Two superluminous supernovae from the early universe discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, D A; Lidman, C; Sullivan, M; Conley, A; Astier, P; Carlberg, C Balland R G; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra and lightcurves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at M_U = -22.7 is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and gives a rare glimpse into the restframe ultraviolet where these supernovae put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but based on the supernova spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ~ 1.5. Both supernovae have similar observer-frame griz lightcurves, which map to restframe lightcurves in the U-band and UV, rising in ~ 20 restframe days or longer, and declining over a similar timescale. The lightcurves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra to theoretical models, and identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectrum of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6...

  16. SN 2009js at the crossroads between normal and subluminous Type IIP supernovae: optical and mid-infrared evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gandhi, P; Tanaka, M; Nozawa, T; Kawabata, K S; Saviane, I; Maeda, K; Moriya, T J; Hattori, T; Sasada, M; Itoh, R

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of SN 2009js in NGC 918. Multi-band Kanata optical photometry covering the first ~120 days show the source to be a Type IIP SN. Reddening is dominated by that due to our Galaxy. One-year-post-explosion photometry with the NTT, and a Subaru optical spectrum 16 days post-discovery, both imply a good match with the well-studied subluminous SN 2005cs. The plateau phase luminosity of SN 2009js and its plateau duration are more similar to the intermediate luminosity IIP SN 2008in. Thus, SN 2009js shares characteristics with both subluminous and intermediate luminosity SNe. Its radioactive tail luminosity lies between SN 2005cs and SN 2008in, whereas its quasi-bolometric luminosity decline from peak to plateau (quantified by a newly-defined parameter Delta[logL] measuring adiabatic cooling following shock breakout) is much smaller than both the others. We estimate the ejected mass of 56Ni to be low (~0.007 Msun). The SN explosion energy appears to have been small, similar to SN 2005cs. SN 2009js i...

  17. Two Radio Supernova Remnants Discovered in the Outer Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Tyler; Reich, Wolfgang; Kothes, Roland; West, Jennifer; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220362

    2013-01-01

    We report on the discovery of two supernova remnants (SNRs) designated G152.4-2.1 and G190.9-2.2, using Canadian Galactic Plane Survey data. The aims of this paper are, first, to present evidence that favours the classification of both sources as SNRs, and, second, to describe basic parameters (integrated flux density, spectrum, and polarization) as well as properties (morphology, line-of-sight velocity, distance and physical size) to facilitate and motivate future observations. Spectral and polarization parameters are derived from multiwavelength data from existing radio surveys carried out at wavelengths between 6 and 92cm. In particular for the source G152.4-2.1 we also use new observations at 11cm done with the Effelsberg 100m telescope. The interstellar medium around the discovered sources is analyzed using 1-arcminute line data from neutral hydrogen (HI) and 45-arcsecond 12CO(J=1-0). G152.4-2.1 is a barrel shaped SNR with two opposed radio-bright polarized flanks on the North and South. The remnant, whi...

  18. Real-Time Detection and Rapid Multiwavelength Follow-up Observations of a Highly Subluminous Type II-P Supernova from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Green, Yoav; Yaron, Ofer; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Xu, Dong; Sternberg, Assaf; Quimby, Robert M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Ofek, Eran O; Walters, Richard; Nugent, Peter E; Poznanski, Dovi; Bloom, Joshua S; Cenko, S Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V; Li, Weidong; Silverman, J; Walker, Emma S; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, K; Howell, D Andrew; Mazzali, Paolo A; Frail, Dale A; Bersier, David; James, Phil A; Akerlof, C W; Yuan, Fang; Fox, Derek B; Law, Nicholas; Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is an optical wide-field variability survey carried out using a camera with a 7.8 square degree field of view mounted on the 48-in Oschin Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory. One of the key goals of this survey is to conduct high-cadence monitoring of the sky in order to detect optical transient sources shortly after they occur. Here, we describe the real-time capabilities of the PTF and our related rapid multiwavelength follow-up programs, extending from the radio to the gamma-ray bands. We present as a case study observations of the optical transient PTF10vdl (SN 2010id), revealed to be a very young core-collapse (Type II-P) supernova having a remarkably low luminosity. Our results demonstrate that the PTF now provides for optical transients the real-time discovery and rapid-response follow-up capabilities previously reserved only for high-energy transients like gamma-ray bursts.

  19. Palomar Transient Factory Discovers Another Possible super- Chandrasekhar Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Suzuki, N.; Cucchiara, A.; Botyanszki, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.

    2010-10-01

    The Type Ia supernova science working group of the Palomar Transient Factory (ATEL#1964) reports the discovery of a possible super-Chandrasekhar mass supernova, PTF10xgx. The supernova is at RA = 00:12:23.15, Dec = +02:30:44.1 (J2000) in the galaxy identified as APMUKS(BJ) B000949.39+021401.7 (Maddox et al. 1990, MNRAS, 243, 692). The supernova was discovered and classified by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope.

  20. ASASSN-15lh: The Most Luminous Supernova Ever Discovered

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Subo; Prieto, J L; Jha, S W; Stanek, K Z; Holoien, T W -S; Kochanek, C S; Thompson, T A; Morrell, N; Thompson, I B; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Brown, J S; Chen, Ping; Conseil, E; Danilet, A B; Falco, E; Grupe, D; Kiyota, S; Masi, G; Nicholls, B; Olivares, F; Pignata, G; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G V; Szczygiel, D M; Wozniak, P R

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery and early evolution of ASASSN-15lh, the most luminous supernova ever found. At redshift z=0.2326, ASASSN-15lh reached an absolute magnitude of M_{u,AB} ~ -23.5 and bolometric luminosity L_bol ~ 2.2x10^45 ergs/s, which is >~ 2 times more luminous than any previously known supernova. Its spectra match the hydrogen-poor sub-class of super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe-I), whose energy sources and progenitors are poorly understood. In contrast to known SLSNe-I, most of which reside in star-forming, dwarf galaxies, its host appears to be a luminous galaxy (M_V ~ -22; M_K ~ -25.1) with little star formation. In the two months since its first detection, ASASSN-15lh has radiated ~7.5x10^51 ergs, challenging the popular magnetar model for the engine of SLSNe-I.

  1. Two superluminous supernovae from the early universe discovered by the supernova legacy survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, D. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Kasen, D. [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Lidman, C. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Sullivan, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-389 (United States); Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N. [LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and University of Paris VI and VII, F-75005 Paris (France); Carlberg, R. G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Fouchez, D. [CPPM, CNRS-IN2P3 and University Aix Marseille II, Case 907, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V. [DSM/IRFU/SPP, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrett, K. [DRDC Ottawa, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1A 0Z4 (Canada); Pritchet, C. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-12-20

    We present spectra and light curves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae (SNe) discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at M{sub U} = –22.7 it is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and it gives a rare glimpse into the rest-frame ultraviolet where these SNe put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but on the basis of the SN spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ∼ 1.5. Both SNe have similar observer-frame griz light curves, which map to rest-frame light curves in the U band and UV, rising in ∼20 rest-frame days or longer and declining over a similar timescale. The light curves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra with theoretical models, and we identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectra of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6 and find that they are consistent with an expanding explosion of only a few solar masses of carbon, oxygen, and other trace metals. Thus, the progenitors appear to be related to those suspected for SNe Ic. A high kinetic energy, 10{sup 52} erg, is also favored. Normal mechanisms of powering core-collapse or thermonuclear SNe do not seem to work for these SNe. We consider models powered by {sup 56}Ni decay and interaction with circumstellar material, but we find that the creation and spin-down of a magnetar with a period of 2 ms, a magnetic field of 2 × 10{sup 14} G, and a 3 M {sub ☉} progenitor provides the best fit to the data.

  2. Identification of the Red Supergiant Progenitor of Supernova 2005cs: Do the Progenitors of Type II-P Supernovae Have Low Mass?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W; Filippenko, A V; Cuillandre, J C; Jha, S; Bloom, J S; Riess, A G; Livio, M; Li, Weidong; Dyk, Schuyler D. Van; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Jha, Saurabh; Bloom, Joshua S.; Riess, Adam G.; Livio, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The stars that end their lives as supernovae (SNe) have been directly observed in only a handful of cases, due mainly to the extreme difficulty in identifying them in images obtained prior to the SN explosions. Here we report the identification of the progenitor for the recent Type II-plateau (core-collapse) SN 2005cs in pre-explosion archival images of the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). From high-quality ground-based images of the SN from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we precisely determine the position of the SN and are able to isolate the SN progenitor to within 0".04 in the HST/ACS optical images. We further pinpoint the SN location to within 0".005 from HST/ACS ultraviolet images of the SN, confirming our progenitor identification. From photometry of the SN progenitor obtained with the pre-SN ACS images, and also limits to its brightness in pre-SN HST/NICMOS images, we infer that the progenitor is a red supergiant star of spe...

  3. Radio detection of the near-IR discovered supernova 2010P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Romero-Canizales, C.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S. D.

    2012-09-01

    We report the radio detection of supernova 2010P (cf. CBETs 2145, 2149) in Arp 299 in EVLA (8459 MHz) observations from 15th Jun 2011. SN2010P was discovered in near-IR images on 18th Jan 2010, and classified as a Type Ib/IIb SN based on its optical spectrum obtained on 11th Feb 2010 (cf. CBET 2189).

  4. Final Technical Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurabh W. Jha

    2012-10-03

    The final technical report from the project "Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae" led at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey by Prof. Saurabh W. Jha is presented, including all publications resulting from this award.

  5. New Variable Stars Discovered as By-product of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory Supernova Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO) 0.6 m telescope has been used for nearby supernova survey in more than 3000 fields, covering a total area of 235 deg2. More than 260 000 CCD images have been collected since April 1996, with 45 supernovae discovered. We searched for variables in about 90 000 images taken during 1996-1998. For the fields in which long period variables (LPVs) were discovered, we reduced further images taken from 1999 to 2000, for the period estimation.Among the 280 000 stars selected from the survey fields, i.e., brighter than 18 mag,we discovered seven new LPVs and reconfirmed three known LPVs. Additionally,we found 146 variable star candidates, and reconfirmed about 20 previously known or suspected objects.

  6. A unified explanation for the supernova rate-galaxy mass dependency based on supernovae discovered in Sloan galaxy spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, Or; Modjaz, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Using a method to discover and classify supernovae (SNe) in galaxy spectra, we detect 91 Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) and 16 Type II SNe (SNe II) among ~740,000 galaxies of all types and ~215,000 star-forming galaxies without active galactic nuclei, respectively, in Data Release 9 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Of these SNe, 22 SNe Ia and 8 SNe II are new discoveries reported here for the first time. We use our SN samples to measure SN rates per unit mass as a function of galaxy stellar mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR), as derived by the MPA-JHU Galspec pipeline. We confirm the rate-mass correlations, first discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, for both SNe Ia and SNe II at median redshifts of ~0.1 and ~0.075, respectively. The mass-normalized SN Ia and SN II rates, averaged over all masses and redshifts in their respective galaxy samples, are 0.10 +/- 0.01 (stat) +/- 0.01 (sys) X 10^-12 Msol^-1 yr^-1 and 0.52 +0.16 -0.13 (stat) +0.02 -0.05 (sys) X 10^-12 Msol^-1 yr^-1, respec...

  7. G306.3-0.9: A Newly Discovered Young Galactic Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Loi, Syheh T.; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24µm, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  8. PTF discovers and follows-up nearby, young, Type II supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Green, Y.; Walker, E.; Mazzali, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Poznanski, D.; Howell, D. A.; Dilday, B.; Fox, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    On UT 2010 Sep 15.243, the Palomar Transient Factory discovered an optical transient, PTF10vdl at RA(J2000) = 23:05:49.001 and DEC(J2000)=03:31:20.50 near NGC 7483. We obtained Target Of Opportunity spectra with Gemini-S/GMOS (PI Kasliwal) on Sep 16.29. The spectrum was extremely blue (f_nu proportional to nu^4.5) and nearly featureless. We further obtained a spectrum with the TNG/DOLORES (PI Walker) on Sep 17.40 and P-Cygni profiles of four Balmer lines were clearly visible, consistent with the redshift of NGC 7483, suggesting this is a Type II supernova.

  9. G306.3-0.9: A NEWLY DISCOVERED YOUNG GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Reis, Rubens C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Loi, Shyeh T.; Murphy, Tara; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gehrels, Neil; Petre, Robert [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kuin, Paul, E-mail: markrey@umich.edu [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of {approx}160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24 {mu}m, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  10. G306.3-0.9: A newly discovered young galactic supernova remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Mark; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon; Maitra, Dipankar; Gultekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie; Siegel, Michael; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William; Gaensler, Bryan; Reis, Rubens; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of ~ 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24microns, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  11. The Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae Discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.-C.; Sullivan, M.; McGuire, K.; Hook, I. M.; Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.; Arcavi, I.; Botyanszki, J.; Cenko, Stephen Bradley; DeRose, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the host galaxies of 82 low-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We determine star-formation rates, gas-phase stellar metallicities, and stellar masses and ages of these objects. As expected, strong correlations between the SN Ia light-curve width (stretch) and the host age mass metallicity are found: fainter, faster-declining events tend to be hosted by older massive metal-rich galaxies. There is some evidence that redder SNe Ia explode in higher metallicity galaxies, but we found no relation between the SN colour and host galaxy extinction based on the Balmer decrement, suggesting that the colour variation of these SNe does not primarily arise from this source. SNe Ia in higher-mass metallicity galaxies also appear brighter after stretch colour corrections than their counterparts in lower mass hosts, and the stronger correlation is with gas-phase metallicity suggesting this may be the more important variable. We also compared the host stellar mass distribution to that in galaxy targeted SN surveys and the high-redshift untargeted Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). SNLS has many more low mass galaxies, while the targeted searches have fewer. This can be explained by an evolution in the galaxy stellar mass function, coupled with a SN delay-time distribution proportional to t1. Finally, we found no significant difference in the mass--metallicity relation of our SN Ia hosts compared to field galaxies, suggesting any metallicity effect on the SN Ia rate is small.

  12. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  13. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  14. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Kndlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin*, N; Kühn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepé, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sánchez, D; Sander, A; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgr, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-01-01

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10-13 s s-1 . Its characteristic age of 104 years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  15. SN 2014cx: A case study of a normal type II-plateau supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Kelsi O'Leary

    Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) are characterized by hydrogen in the spectrum and an enduring period of nearly constant optical brightness, likely due to the progenitors having large, intact hydrogen envelopes (i.e. red supergiants). SNe II-P are the most commonly observed core-collapse event, and yet the basic characteristics of this class are still being defined. We add to the growing sample of II-P SNe with well-sampled observations of SN 2014cx. It was discovered on September 2, 2014 UT in the SBd galaxy NGC 337, which has a Tully-Fisher distance of 20.7 1.7 Mpc. SN 2014cx was classified as type II through spectra taken within a day of discovery, and later as II-P based on an initial photometric analysis. We initiated a photometric and spectropolarimetric campaign to follow SN 2014cx; over a five-month period, we obtained optical BVRcIc images using Mount Laguna Observatorys 40-inch telescope as part of the MOunt LAguna SUpernova Survey (MOLASUS) and spectropolarimetry as part of the SuperNova SpectroPOLarimetry project (SNSPOL). Here I present an analysis of the photometry and spectroscopy obtained during this campaign. From the photometric light- and color-curves, I establish the II-P classification, measuring a plateau decline-rate in V to be 0.0039 0.0005 mag/day, within normal bounds for SNe II-P. To better investigate the photometric behavior, I employ several techniques to establish that SN 2014cx's light suffers little to no host-galaxy extinction. I demonstrate that SN 2014cx's light- and color-curves exhibit shapes typical of SNe II-P, aside from minor peculiarities. From the spectropolarimetry, I analyze the extremely high signal-to-noise flux spectra. Using the FeII 5169 absorption feature, I find that the photospheric velocity shows temporal evolution typical of SNe II-P: declining steadily during the plateau as the photosphere recedes. Finally, I apply the the standardized candle method and determine a distance to SN 2014cx of 21.0 1.7 Mpc

  16. Discovery and Observations of the Unusually Bright Type-Defying II-P/II-L Supernova ASASSN-13co

    CERN Document Server

    Holoien, T W -S; Pejcha, O; Stanek, K Z; Kochanek, C S; Shappee, B J; Grupe, D; Morrell, N; Thorstensen, J R; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Davis, A B; Pojmanski, G; Szczygiel, D M

    2014-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of ASASSN-13co, an unusually luminous Type II supernova and the first core-collapse supernova discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). First detection of the supernova was on UT 2013 August 29 and the data presented span roughly 3.5 months after discovery. We use the recently developed model from Pejcha & Prieto (2014) to model the multi-band light curves of ASASSN-13co and derive the bolometric luminosity curve. We compare ASASSN-13co to other Type II supernovae to show that it was a unique event that was not only unusually bright for a Type II supernova but also exhibited an atypical light curve shape that does not cleanly match that of either a standard Type II-L or Type II-P supernova.

  17. The human-specific invariant chain isoform Iip35 modulates Iip33 trafficking and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Kine Marita Knudsen; Landsverk, Ole J B; Berg-Larsen, Axel; Bakke, Oddmund; Gregers, Tone F

    2014-10-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) is a multifunctional protein, which has an essential role in the assembly and transport of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. From a single gene, Ii is synthesized as four different isoforms: Iip33, Iip35, Iip41 and Iip43. Iip35 and Iip43 are specific to humans, and are formed due to an upstream alternative translation site, resulting in an N-terminal extension of 16 amino acids. This extension harbors a strong endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif. Consequently, Iip35 or Iip43 expressed alone are retained in the ER, whereas Iip33 and Iip41 rapidly traffic to the endosomal pathway. Endogenously expressed, the four isoforms form mixed heterotrimers in the ER; however, mainly due to the absence of the Iip35/p43 isoforms in mice, little is known about how they influence general Ii function. In this study, we have co-expressed Iip33 and Iip35 in human cells with and without MHC II to gain a better understanding of how Iip35 isoform influences the cellular properties of Iip33. We find that Iip35 significantly affects the properties of Iip33. In the presence of Iip35, the transport of Iip33 out of the ER is delayed, its half-life is dramatically prolonged and its ability to induce enlarged endosomes and delayed endosomal maturation is abrogated.

  18. Time-resolved 2-million-year-old supernova activity discovered in Earth's microfossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Peter; Bishop, Shawn; Egli, Ramon; Chernenko, Valentyna; Deneva, Boyana; Faestermann, Thomas; Famulok, Nicolai; Fimiani, Leticia; Gómez-Guzmán, José Manuel; Hain, Karin; Korschinek, Gunther; Hanzlik, Marianne; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2016-08-16

    Massive stars ([Formula: see text]), which terminate their evolution as core-collapse supernovae, are theoretically predicted to eject [Formula: see text] of the radioisotope (60)Fe (half-life 2.61 Ma). If such an event occurs sufficiently close to our solar system, traces of the supernova debris could be deposited on Earth. Herein, we report a time-resolved (60)Fe signal residing, at least partially, in a biogenic reservoir. Using accelerator mass spectrometry, this signal was found through the direct detection of live (60)Fe atoms contained within secondary iron oxides, among which are magnetofossils, the fossilized chains of magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacteria. The magnetofossils were chemically extracted from two Pacific Ocean sediment drill cores. Our results show that the (60)Fe signal onset occurs around 2.6 Ma to 2.8 Ma, near the lower Pleistocene boundary, terminates around 1.7 Ma, and peaks at about 2.2 Ma.

  19. Time-resolved 2-million-year-old supernova activity discovered in Earth's microfossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Peter; Bishop, Shawn; Egli, Ramon; Chernenko, Valentyna; Deneva, Boyana; Faestermann, Thomas; Famulok, Nicolai; Fimiani, Leticia; Gómez-Guzmán, José Manuel; Hain, Karin; Korschinek, Gunther; Hanzlik, Marianne; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Massive stars (M≳10 M⊙M≳10 M⊙), which terminate their evolution as core-collapse supernovae, are theoretically predicted to eject >10-5M⊙>10-5M⊙ of the radioisotope 60Fe (half-life 2.61 Ma). If such an event occurs sufficiently close to our solar system, traces of the supernova debris could be deposited on Earth. Herein, we report a time-resolved 60Fe signal residing, at least partially, in a biogenic reservoir. Using accelerator mass spectrometry, this signal was found through the direct detection of live 60Fe atoms contained within secondary iron oxides, among which are magnetofossils, the fossilized chains of magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacteria. The magnetofossils were chemically extracted from two Pacific Ocean sediment drill cores. Our results show that the 60Fe signal onset occurs around 2.6 Ma to 2.8 Ma, near the lower Pleistocene boundary, terminates around 1.7 Ma, and peaks at about 2.2 Ma.

  20. Optical Spectra and Light Curves of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Filippenko, A V

    2003-01-01

    I review recent optical observations of supernovae (SNe) conducted by my group. The Lick Observatory Supernova Search with the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope is currently the world's most successful search for nearby SNe. We also use this telescope to obtain multicolor light curves of SNe. One of the more interesting SNe we discovered is SN 2000cx, which differs from all previously observed SNe Ia. Another very strange SN Ia that we studied is SN 2002cx, many of whose properties are opposite those of SN 2000cx. Extensive data on SNe II-P 1999em and 1999gi were used to derive distances with the expanding photosphere method. Results from spectropolarimetry suggest that the deeper we peer into the ejecta of core-collapse SNe, the greater the asphericity. We are using Hubble Space Telescope data to identify, or set limits on, the progenitors of core-collapse SNe.

  1. Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae -- Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippenko, Alexei Vladimir [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; exploding white-dwarf stars) were the key to the Nobel-worthy 1998 discovery and subsequent verification that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, driven by the effects of dark energy. Understanding the nature of this mysterious, yet dominant, component of the Universe is at the forefront of research in cosmology and fundamental physics. SNe Ia will continue to play a leading role in this enterprise, providing precise cosmological distances that improve constraints on the nature of dark energy. However, for this effort to succeed, we need to more thoroughly understand relatively nearby SNe Ia, because our conclusions come only from comparisons between them and distant (high-redshift) SNe Ia. Thus, detailed studies of relatively nearby SNe Ia are the focus of this research program. Many interesting results were obtained during the course of this project; these were published in 32 refereed research papers that acknowledged the grant. A major accomplishment was the publication of supernova (SN) rates derived from about a decade of operation of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) with the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT). We have determined the most accurate rates for SNe of different types in large, nearby galaxies in the present-day Universe, and these can be compared with SN rates far away (and hence long ago in the past) to set constraints on the types of stars that explode. Another major accomplishment was the publication of the light curves (brightness vs. time) of 165 SNe Ia, along with optical spectroscopy of many of these SNe as well as other SNe Ia, providing an extensive, homogeneous database for detailed studies. We have conducted intensive investigations of a number of individual SNe Ia, including quite unusual examples that allow us to probe the entire range of SN explosions and provide unique insights into these objects and the stars before they explode. My team's studies have also

  2. Full Bayesian hierarchical light curve modeling of core-collapse supernova populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Nathan; Betancourt, Michael; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-06-01

    While wide field surveys have yielded remarkable quantities of photometry of transient objects, including supernovae, light curves reconstructed from this data suffer from several characteristic problems. Because most transients are discovered near the detection limit, signal to noise is generally poor; because coverage is limited to the observing season, light curves are often incomplete; and because temporal sampling can be uneven across filters, these problems can be exacerbated at any one wavelength. While the prevailing approach of modeling individual light curves independently is successful at recovering inferences for the objects with the highest quality observations, it typically neglects a substantial portion of the data and can introduce systematic biases. Joint modeling of the light curves of transient populations enables direct inference on population-level characteristics as well as superior measurements for individual objects. We present a new hierarchical Bayesian model for supernova light curves, where information inferred from observations of every individual light curve in a sample is partially pooled across objects to constrain population-level hyperparameters. Using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling technique, the model posterior can be explored to enable marginalization over weakly-identified hyperparameters through full Bayesian inference. We demonstrate our technique on the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Type IIP supernova light curve sample published by Sanders et al. (2015), consisting of nearly 20,000 individual photometric observations of more than 70 supernovae in five photometric filters. We discuss the Stan probabilistic programming language used to implement the model, computational challenges, and prospects for future work including generalization to multiple supernova types. We also discuss scientific results from the PS1 dataset including a new relation between the peak magnitude and decline rate of SNe IIP, a new perspective on the

  3. Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    We live in a Universe that is getting bigger faster. This astonishing discovery of Universal acceleration was made in the late 1990s by two teams who made observations of a special type of exploded star known as a `Supernova Type Ia'. (SNeIa) Since the discovery of the accelerating Universe, one of the biggest questions in modern cosmology has been to determine the cause of that acceleration - the answer to this question will have far reaching implications for our theories of cosmology and fundamental physics more broadly. The two main competing explanations for this apparent late time acceleration of the Universe are modified gravity and dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) has been designed and commissioned to find to find answers to these questions about the nature of dark energy and modified gravity. The new 570 megapixel Dark Energy Camera is currently operating with the Cerro-Tololo Inter American Observatory's 4m Blanco teleccope, carrying out a systematic search for SNeIa, and mapping out the large scale structure of the Universe by making observations of galaxies. The DES science program program which saw first light in September 2013 will run for five years in total. DES SNeIa data in combination with the other DES observations of large scale structure will enable us to put increasingly accurate constraints on the expansion history of the Universe and will help us distinguish between competing theories of dark energy and modified gravity. As we draw to the close of the first observing season of DES in March 2014, we will report on the current status of the DES supernova survey, presenting first year supernovae data, preliminary results, survey strategy, discovery pipeline, spectroscopic target selection and data quality. This talk will give the first glimpse of the DES SN first year data and initial results as we begin our five year survey in search of dark energy. On behalf of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.

  4. Metallicity from Type II Supernovae from the (i)PTF

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Rubin, A; Leloudas, G; Gal-Yam, A; Arcavi, I; Cao, Y; Filippenko, A V; Graham, M L; Mazzali, P A; Nugent, P E; Pan, Y -C; Silverman, J M; Xu, D; Yaron, O

    2016-01-01

    Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) have recently been proposed as metallicity ($Z$) probes. The spectral models of Dessart et al. (2014) showed that the pseudo-equivalent width of Fe II $\\lambda$5018 (pEW$_{5018}$) during the plateau phase depends on the primordial $Z$, but there was a paucity of SNe IIP exhibiting pEW$_{5018}$ compatible with $Z < 0.4 {\\rm Z}_{\\odot}$. This lack might be due to some physical property of the SN II population, or to the fact that those SNe were discovered in luminous, metal-rich targeted galaxies. Here we use SN II observations from the untargeted (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory [(i)PTF] survey, aiming to investigate the pEW$_{5018}$ distribution of this SN population and in particular to look for the presence of SNe II at lower $Z$. We perform pEW$_{5018}$ measurements on the spectra of a sample of 39 (i)PTF SNe II, selected to have well-constrained explosion epochs and light-curve properties (Rubin et al. 2015). Based on the comparison with the pEW$_{5018}$ spectral m...

  5. Ultraviolet Light Curves of Supernovae with Swift Uvot

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J; Immler, Stefan; Milne, Peter; Roming, Peter W A; Gehrels, Neil; Nousek, John; Panagia, Nino; Still, Martin; Berk, Daniel Vanden

    2008-01-01

    We present ultravioliet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift spacecraft. This is the largest sample of UV light curves from any single instrument and covers all major SN types and most subtypes. The UV light curves of SNe Ia are fairly homogenous while SNe Ib/c and IIP show more variety in their light curve shapes. The UV-optical colors clearly differentiate SNe Ia and IIP, particularly at early times. The color evolution of SNe IIP, however, makes their colors similar to SNe Ia at about 20 days after explosion. SNe Ib/c are shown to have varied UV-optical colors. The use of UV colors to help type SNe will be important for high redshift SNe discovered in optical observations. These data can be added to ground based optical and near infrared data to create bolometric light curves of individual objects and as checks on generic bolometric corrections used in the absence of UV data. This sample can also be compared with rest-frame UV obser...

  6. International Ice Patrol (IIP) Iceberg Sightings Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Ice Patrol (IIP) has been collecting information on iceberg activity in the North Atlantic since 1911. This database contains the data from these...

  7. Supernova VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, N.

    2009-08-01

    We review VLBI observations of supernovae over the last quarter century and discuss the prospect of imaging future supernovae with space VLBI in the context of VSOP-2. From thousands of discovered supernovae, most of them at cosmological distances, ˜50 have been detected at radio wavelengths, most of them in relatively nearby galaxies. All of the radio supernovae are Type II or Ib/c, which originate from the explosion of massive progenitor stars. Of these, 12 were observed with VLBI and four of them, SN 1979C, SN 1986J, SN 1993J, and SN 1987A, could be imaged in detail, the former three with VLBI. In addition, supernovae or young supernova remnants were discovered at radio wavelengths in highly dust-obscured galaxies, such as M82, Arp 299, and Arp 220, and some of them could also be imaged in detail. Four of the supernovae so far observed were sufficiently bright to be detectable with VSOP-2. With VSOP-2 the expansion of supernovae can be monitored and investigated with unsurpassed angular resolution, starting as early as the time of the supernova's transition from its opaque to transparent stage. Such studies can reveal, in a movie, the aftermath of a supernova explosion shortly after shock break out.

  8. Rare idiopathic intestinal pneumonias (IIPs) and histologic patterns in new ATS/ERS multidisciplinary classification of the IIPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johkoh, Takeshi, E-mail: johkoht@aol.com [Department of Radiology, Kinki Central Hospital of Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers (Japan); Fukuoka, Junya, E-mail: fukuokaj@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (Japan); Tanaka, Tomonori, E-mail: yotsudukayama@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •The new (ATS/ERS) update to the multidisciplinary classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) defines both rare IIPs and rare histologic patterns of IIPs. •Rare IIPs; lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis. •Rare histologic pattern, acute fibrionous organizing pneumonia, bronchocentric pattern of interstitial pneumonia. -- Abstract: The new American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) update to the multidisciplinary classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) defines both rare IIPs and rare histologic patterns of IIPs. Although these diseases are rare, each has some distinguishing imaging and pathologic characteristics. Common findings for IIPs in computed tomography (CT) include cysts in lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), upper lobe subpleural consolidation in pleuropulmonary fibroelastosis (PPFE), symmetrical consolidation in acute fibrinous organizing pneumonia (AFOP), and peribronchovascular consolidation or centrilobular nodules in bronchiolocentric pattern of interstitial pneumonia.

  9. iPTF13beo: The Double-Peaked Light Curve of a Type Ibn Supernova Discovered Shortly after Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbikov, Evgeny; Ofek, Eran O; Vreeswijk, Paul M; Nugent, Peter E; Chotard, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Cao, Yi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Tal, David; Arcavi, Iair; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Cenko, S Bradley; Sullivan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Type Ibn (SN 2006jc-like) supernova iPTF13beo. Detected by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory on 2013 May 19.39, ~3 hours after the estimated explosion time, iPTF13beo is the youngest and the most distant (430 Mpc) Type Ibn event ever observed. Type Ibn events are rare, and their early evolution, both photometric and spectroscopic, has not been studied yet. The iPTF13beo light curve is consistent with light curves of other Type Ibn SNe and with light curves of fast Type Ic events, but with a slightly faster rise-time of two days. In addition, the iPTF13beo light curve exhibits a double-peak structure separated by 9 days, not observed before in any Type Ibn SN. Low-resolution spectra were obtained during the two peaks of the iPTF13beo light curve. The spectrum taken during the rising stage (2.4 days after the estimated explosion time) is featureless and similar to early spectra of SNe Ic-BL. The spectrum obtained during the declining ...

  10. An extremely faint stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, Stefano; Cappellaro, Enrico; Benetti, Stefano; Mazzali, Paolo; Manteca, Jose; Taubenberger, Stefan; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Ferrando, Rafael; Harutyunyan, Avet; Hentunen, Veli-Pekka; Nissinen, Markku; Pian, Elena; Turatto, Massimo; Zampieri, Luca; Smartt, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    The final fate of massive stars depends on many factors, including the mass of the helium core, rotation rate, magnetic fields and metallicity. Theory suggests that some massive stars (initially greater than 25-30 solar masses) can die as under-luminous core-collapse supernovae (Ref.1,2,3). The models propose that the core mantle falls back onto the collapsed remnant, mass accretion leads to black hole formation and the remaining envelope including a very small fraction of radioactive elements is ejected with low kinetic energy. An alternative origin for low energy supernovae is the collapse of the oxygen-magnesium-neon core of a relatively low-mass star (7-8 solar masses) through electron capture (Ref 4,5). Only under-luminous type II-plateau (IIP) supernovae have been discovered so far (e.g. Ref. 6), and no weak hydrogen-stripped core-collapse supernova (of type Ib/c) has been detected. Here we show that faint Ib/c Supernovae do exist, and that they have been previously misclassified as peculiar thermonucle...

  11. Cosmological Constraints from Measurements of Type Ia Supernovae discovered during the first 1.5 years of the Pan-STARRS1 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rest, A; Foley, R J; Huber, M E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Tonry, J L; Berger, E; Soderberg, A M; Stubbs, C W; Riess, A; Kirshner, R P; Smartt, S J; Schlafly, E; Rodney, S; Botticella, M T; Brout, D; Challis, P; Czekala, I; Drout, M; Hudson, M J; Kotak, R; Leibler, C; Lunnan, R; Marion, G H; McCrum, M; Milisavljevic, D; Pastorello, A; Sanders, N E; Smith, K; Stafford, E; Thilker, D; Valenti, S; Wood-Vasey, W M; Zheng, Z; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Denneau, L; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Wainscoat, R; Waters, C

    2013-01-01

    We present griz light curves of 146 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia Supernovae (0.03discovered during the first 1.5 years of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. The Pan-STARRS1 natural photometric system is determined by a combination of on-site measurements of the instrument response function and observations of spectrophotometric standard stars. We have investigated spatial and time variations in the photometry, and we find that the systematic uncertainties in the photometric system are currently 1.2% without accounting for the uncertainty in the HST Calspec definition of the AB system. We discuss our efforts to minimize the systematic uncertainties in the photometry. A Hubble diagram is constructed with a subset of 112 SNe Ia (out of the 146) that pass our light curve quality cuts. The cosmological fit to 313 SNe Ia (112 PS1 SNe Ia + 201 low-z SNe Ia), using only SNe and assuming a constant dark energy equation of state and flatness, yields w = -1.015^{+0.319}_{-0.201}(Stat)+{0.164}_{-0....

  12. Observational properties of low redshift pair instability supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyreva, A; Langer, N; Yoon, S -C

    2014-01-01

    So called superluminous supernovae have been recently discovered in the local Universe. It appears possible that some of them originate from stellar explosions induced by the pair instability mechanism. Recent stellar evolution models also predict pair instability supernovae (PISNe) from very massive stars at fairly high metallicities (i.e. Z~0.004). We provide supernova (SN) models and synthetic light curves for two progenitor models, a 150 Msun red-supergiant and a 250 Msun yellow-supergiant at a metallicity of Z=0.001, for which the evolution from the main sequence to collapse, and the initiation of the PISN itself, has been previously computed in a realistic and self-consistent way. We are using the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA to describe the SN evolution of both models over a time frame of about 500 days. We describe the shock-breakout phases of both SNe which are characterized by a higher luminosity, a longer duration and a lower effective temperature than those of ordinary SNeIIP. We derive the...

  13. Optical and Ultraviolet Observations of the Very Young Type IIP SN 2014cx in NGC 337

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Fang; Zampieri, Luca; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Arcavi, Iair; Brown, Peter J; Graham, Melissa L; Filippenko, Alexei V; Zheng, WeiKang; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Rui, Liming; Valenti, Stefano; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Zhang, Kaicheng; Wang, Lifan

    2016-01-01

    Extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations are presented for SN 2014cx, a type IIP supernova (SN) exploding in the nearby galaxy NGC 337. The observations are performed in optical and ultraviolet bands, covering from -20 to +400 days from the peak light. The stringent detection limit from prediscovery images suggests that this supernova was actually detected within about 1 day after explosion. Evolution of the very early-time light curve of SN 2014cx is similar to that predicted from a shock breakout and post-shock cooling decline before reaching the optical peak. Our photometric observations show that SN 2014cx has a plateau duration of ~ 100 days, an absolute V-band magnitude of ~ -16.5 mag at t~50 days, and a nickel mass of 0.056+-0.008 Msun. The spectral evolution of SN 2014cx resembles that of normal SNe IIP like SN 1999em and SN 2004et, except that it has a slightly higher expansion velocity (~ 4200 km/s at 50 days). From the cooling curve of photospheric temperature, we derive that the progen...

  14. Cosmological constraints from measurements of type Ia supernovae discovered during the first 1.5 yr of the Pan-STARRS1 survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Scolnic, D.; Riess, A.; Rodney, S.; Brout, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Czekala, I.; Drout, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Huber, M. E.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT71NN (United Kingdom); Schlafly, E. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Botticella, M. T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present griz {sub P1} light curves of 146 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; 0.03 < z < 0.65) discovered during the first 1.5 yr of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. The Pan-STARRS1 natural photometric system is determined by a combination of on-site measurements of the instrument response function and observations of spectrophotometric standard stars. We find that the systematic uncertainties in the photometric system are currently 1.2% without accounting for the uncertainty in the Hubble Space Telescope Calspec definition of the AB system. A Hubble diagram is constructed with a subset of 113 out of 146 SNe Ia that pass our light curve quality cuts. The cosmological fit to 310 SNe Ia (113 PS1 SNe Ia + 222 light curves from 197 low-z SNe Ia), using only supernovae (SNe) and assuming a constant dark energy equation of state and flatness, yields w=−1.120{sub −0.206}{sup +0.360}(Stat){sub −0.291}{sup +0.269}(Sys). When combined with BAO+CMB(Planck)+H {sub 0}, the analysis yields Ω{sub M}=0.280{sub −0.012}{sup +0.013} and w=−1.166{sub −0.069}{sup +0.072} including all identified systematics. The value of w is inconsistent with the cosmological constant value of –1 at the 2.3σ level. Tension endures after removing either the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) or the H {sub 0} constraint, though it is strongest when including the H {sub 0} constraint. If we include WMAP9 cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints instead of those from Planck, we find w=−1.124{sub −0.065}{sup +0.083}, which diminishes the discord to <2σ. We cannot conclude whether the tension with flat ΛCDM is a feature of dark energy, new physics, or a combination of chance and systematic errors. The full Pan-STARRS1 SN sample with ∼three times as many SNe should provide more conclusive results.

  15. Nearby supernova factory announces 34 supernovae in one year'; best Rookie year ever for supernova search

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory), an international collaboration based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, announced that it had discovered 34 supernovae during the first year of the prototype system's operation (2 pages).

  16. Using Quantitative Spectroscopic Analysis to Determine the Properties and Distances of Type II-Plateau Supernovae: SNe 2005cs and 2006bp

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, Luc; Brown, Peter J; Hicken, Malcolm; Hillier, D John; Holland, Stephen T; Immler, Stefan; Kirshner, Robert P; Milne, Peter; Modjaz, Maryam; Roming, Peter W A

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the Type II Plateau supernovae (SN II-P) 2005cs and 2006bp with the non-LTE model atmosphere code CMFGEN. We fit 13 spectra in the first month for SN 2005cs and 18 for SN 2006bp. {\\sl Swift} ultraviolet photometry and ground-based optical photometry calibrate each spectrum. Our analysis shows both objects were discovered less than 3 days after they exploded, making these the earliest SN II-P spectra ever studied. They reveal broad and very weak lines from highly-ionized fast ejecta with an extremely steep density profile. We identify He{\\sc ii} 4686\\AA emission in the SN 2006bp ejecta. Days later, the spectra resemble the prototypical Type II-P SN 1999em, which had a supergiant-like photospheric composition. Despite the association of SN 2005cs with possible X-ray emission, the emergent UV and optical light comes from the photosphere, not from circumstellar emission. We surmise that the very steep density fall-off we infer at early times may be a fossil of the combined actions of the shock wave pas...

  17. Optical and Ultraviolet Observations of the Very Young Type IIP SN 2014cx in NGC 337

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zampieri, Luca; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Arcavi, Iair; Brown, Peter J.; Graham, Melissa L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Zheng, WeiKang; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Rui, Liming; Valenti, Stefano; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Zhang, Kaicheng; Wang, Lifan

    2016-12-01

    Extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations are presented for SN 2014cx, a Type IIP supernova (SN) exploding in the nearby galaxy NGC 337. The observations are performed in optical and ultraviolet bands, covering from -20 to +400 days from the peak light. The stringent detection limit from prediscovery images suggests that this supernova was actually detected within about one day after explosion. Evolution of the very early time light curve of SN 2014cx is similar to that predicted from a shock breakout and post-shock cooling decline before reaching the optical peak. Our photometric observations show that SN 2014cx has a plateau duration of ˜100 days, an absolute V-band magnitude of ˜ -16.5 mag at t≈ 50 days, and a nickel mass of 0.056 ± 0.008 {M}⊙ . The spectral evolution of SN 2014cx resembles that of normal SNe IIP like SN 1999em and SN 2004et, except that it has a slightly higher expansion velocity (˜4200 {km} {{{s}}}-1 at 50 days). From the cooling curve of photospheric temperature, we derive that the progenitor has a pre-explosion radius of ˜640 R {}⊙ , consistent with those obtained from SuperNova Explosion Code modeling (˜620 R {}⊙ ) and hydrodynamical modeling of the observables (˜570 R {}⊙ ). Moreover, the hydrodynamical simulations yield a total explosion energy of ˜ 0.4× {10}51 erg, and an ejected mass of ˜8 {M}⊙ . These results indicate that the immediate progenitor of SN 2014cx is likely a red supergiant star with a mass of ˜10 {M}⊙ .

  18. The Type II supernovae 2006V and 2006au: two SN 1987A-like events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Sollerman, J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Supernova 1987A revealed that a blue supergiant (BSG) star can end its life as a core-collapse supernova (SN). SN 1987A and other similar objects exhibit properties that distinguish them from ordinary Type II Plateau (IIP) SNe, whose progenitors are believed to be red supergiants (RSGs)....

  19. Photometric and Spectroscopic Evolution of the Type IIP SN 2007it to Day 944

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, J E; Clayton, Geoffrey; Gallagher, J S; Barlow, M J; Clem, J; Ercolano, B; Fabbri, J; Meixner, M; Otsuka, M; Welch, D L; Wesson, R

    2011-01-01

    SN 2007it is a bright, Type IIP supernova which shows indications of both pre-existing and newly formed dust. The visible photometry shows a bright late-time luminosity, powered by the 0.09 M$_{\\sun}$ of $^{56}$Ni present in the ejecta. There is also a sudden drop in optical brightness after day 339, and a corresponding brightening in the IR due to new dust forming in the ejecta. CO and SiO emission, generally thought to be precursors to dust formation, may have been detected in the mid-IR photometry of SN 2007it. The optical spectra show stronger than average [O I] emission lines and weaker than average [Ca II] lines, which may indicate a 16 - 27 M$_{\\sun}$ progenitor, on the higher end of expected Type IIP masses. Multi-component [O I] lines are also seen in the optical spectra, most likely caused by an asymmetric blob or a torus of oxygen core material being ejected during the SN explosion. Interaction with circumstellar material prior to day 540 may have created a cool dense shell between the forward and ...

  20. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  1. Confirmation with the SALT telescope of a young Type Ia supernova at z=0.046 discovered during the "Deeper Wider Faster" program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, I.; Cooke, J.; Pritchard, T. A.; Kotze, M.; Miszalski, B.; Shara, M.; Mestric, U.; Tucker, B.; Plant, K.; Spiewak, R.; Ryder, S.; Abbott, T.; Allen, Rebecca; Anderson, G.; Asher, A.; Baglio, M. C.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M.; Bernard, S.; Bhandari, S.; Caleb, M.; Campana, S.; Coward, D.; Curtin, C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Deller, A.; Devlin, J. F.; Farah, W.; Fluke, C.; Flynn, C.; Foran, G.; Fugazza, D.; Gawin, B.; Hegarty, S.; Hodgson, R.; Hodgson, S.; Horst, J.; Howell, E.; Hussaini, I.; Jacobs, C.; Ko, M.; Lien, A.; Meade, B.; Melandri, A.; Moller, A.; Murphy, M. T.; Nanayakkara, T.; O'Neill, M.; Oslowski, S.; Peng, B.; Petroff, E.; Rest, A.; Robert, F.; Valdes, F.; Vohl, D.

    2017-02-01

    Further to ATel #10072, we report an additional discovery of a young Type Ia supernova from imaging on February 03.5, 2017 UT with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at CTIO during the recent & ldquo;Deeper, Wider, Faster & rdquo; program observations.

  2. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous type II plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pumo, M L; Spiro, S; Pastorello, A; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Manicò, G; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe we infer explosion energies of $0.16$-$0.18$ foe, radii at explosion of $1.8$-$3.5 \\times 10^{13}$ cm, and ejected masses of $10$-$11.3$\\Msun. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range $\\sim 13.2$-$15.1$\\Msun\\, for SN 2003Z and $\\sim 11.4$-$12.9$\\Msun\\, for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way, enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that: a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP, b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explo...

  3. The Type IIP SN 2005ay: An Extensive Study From UltraViolet To Near-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufano, F. M.; Turatto, M.; Zampieri, L.; Gal-Yam, A.

    2006-08-01

    Several supernova types are thought to explode via the gravitational collapse of the core of massive stars at the end of their lifetimes. The great observational diversity has not been fully understood even if it clearly involves the progenitor masses and configurations at the time of explosion. These Supernovae, called Core Collapse Supernovae (CC SNe), are expected to dominate the counts of SNe observed at high redshifts and to be the only observable probe of the first generation stars (Pop III). Recently indicated as reliable distance indicators (Hamuy 02, Pastorello `03), CC SNe are objects of great interest but significantly less studied in comparison with the Termonuclear ones. With the aim to understand better the reasons of the heterogeneous behaviour , we have started an extensive study of the properties of SN II with different observational features (luminosity, velocity, etc..). Here we present the last results on our first observed target, SN2005ay, a Type IIP supernova observed in an extended way from the Ultraviolet wavelengths, provided by the GALEX , to the Optical and near-IR , obtained with IISP (Italian Intensive Supernova Program).

  4. Absolute-Magnitude Distributions of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Maddox, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M_B -15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of -19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at -16.75.

  5. Supersolar Ni/Fe production in the Type IIP SN 2012ec

    CERN Document Server

    Jerkstrand, Anders; Sollerman, Jesper; Inserra, Cosimo; Fraser, Morgan; Spyromilio, Jason; Fransson, Claes; Chen, Ting-Wan; Barbarino, Cristina; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Botticella, Maria Teresa; Della Valle, Massimo; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Valenti, Stefano; Maguire, Kate; Mazzali, Paolo; Tomasella, Lina

    2014-01-01

    SN 2012ec is a Type IIP supernova (SN) with a progenitor detection and comprehensive photospheric-phase observational coverage. Here, we present Very Large Telescope and PESSTO observations of this SN in the nebular phase. We model the nebular [O I] 6300, 6364 lines and find their strength to suggest a progenitor main-sequence mass of 13-15 Msun. SN 2012ec is unique among hydrogen-rich SNe in showing a distinct and unblended line of stable nickel [Ni II] 7378. This line is produced by 58Ni, a nuclear burning ash whose abundance is a sensitive tracer of explosive burning conditions. Using spectral synthesis modelling, we use the relative strengths of [Ni II] 7378 and [Fe II] 7155 (the progenitor of which is 56Ni) to derive a Ni/Fe production ratio of 0.19pm0.07, which is a factor 3.5pm1.2 times the solar value. High production of stable nickel is confirmed by a strong [Ni II] 1.939 micron line. This is the third reported case of a core-collapse supernova producing a Ni/Fe ratio far above the solar value, which...

  6. Supernova Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, the study of stellar explosions -- supernovae -- have focused almost exclusively on the strong optical emission that dominates the bolometric luminosity in the days following the ultimate demise of the star. Yet many of the leading breakthroughs in our understanding of stellar death have been enabled by obtaining data at other wavelengths. For example, I have shown that 1% of all supernovae give rise to powerful relativistic jets, representing the biggest bangs in the Universe since the Big Bang. My recent serendipitous X-ray discovery of a supernova in the act of exploding (“in flagrante delicto”) revealed a novel technique to discover new events and provide clues on the shock physics at the heart of the explosion. With the advent of sensitive new radio telescopes, my research group combines clues from across the electromagnetic spectrum (radio to gamma-ray), leading us to a holistic study of stellar death, the physics of the explosions, and their role in fertilizing the Universe with new elements, by providing the community with cosmic autopsy reports.

  7. A supernova distance to the anchor galaxy NGC 4258

    CERN Document Server

    Polshaw, J; Chambers, K C; Smartt, S J; Taubenberger, S; Kromer, M; Gall, E E E; Hillebrandt, W; Huber, M; Smith, K W; Wainscoat, R J

    2015-01-01

    The fortuitous occurrence of a type II-Plateau (IIP) supernova, SN~2014bc, in a galaxy for which distance estimates from a number of primary distance indicators are available provides a means with which to cross-calibrate the standardised candle method (SCM) for type IIP SNe. By applying calibrations from the literature we find distance estimates in line with the most precise measurement to NGC~4258 based on the Keplerian motion of masers (7.6$\\pm$0.23\\,Mpc), albeit with significant scatter. We provide an alternative local SCM calibration by only considering type IIP SNe that have occurred in galaxies for which a Cepheid distance estimate is available. We find a considerable reduction in scatter ($\\sigma_I = 0.16$\\, mag.), but note that the current sample size is limited. Applying this calibration, we estimate a distance to NGC~4258 of $7.08\\pm0.86$ Mpc.

  8. An extremely prolific supernova factory in the buried nucleus of the starburst galaxy IC 694

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Alberdi, A.; Polatidis, A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The central kiloparsec of many local uminous infrared galaxies are known to host intense bursts of massive star formation, leading to numerous explosions of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). However, the dust-enshrouded regions where those supernovae explode hamper their detection at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Aims: We investigate the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy IC 694 (=Arp 299-A) at radio wavelengths, aimed at discovering recently exploded CCSNe, as well as determining their rate of explosion, which carries crucial information about star formation rates, the initial mass function, and the starburst processes in action. Methods: We use the electronic European VLBI Network to image with milliarcsecond resolution the 5.0 GHz compact radio emission of the innermost nuclear region of IC 694. Results: Our observations detect a rich cluster of 26 compact radio emitting sources in the central 150 pc of the nuclear starburst in IC 694. The high brightness temperatures observed for the compact sources are indicative of a non-thermal origin for the observed radio emission, implying that most, if not all, of those sources are young radio supernovae (RSNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs). We find evidence of at least three relatively young, slowly evolving, long-lasting RSNe (A0, A12, and A15) that appear to have unusual properties, suggesting that the conditions in the local circumstellar medium (CSM) play a significant role in determining the radio behaviour of expanding SNe. Their radio luminosities are typical of normal RSNe, which result from the explosion of type IIP/b and type IIL SNe. All of these results provide support for a recent (less than 10-15 Myr) instantaneous starburst in the innermost regions of IC 694. Tables 1, 2 and Appendix are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. HESS J1818-154, a new composite supernova remnant discovered in TeV gamma rays and X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; de Wilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzynski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zabalza, V; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Composite supernova remnants (SNRs) constitute a small subclass of remnants of massive stellar explosions where non-thermal radiation is observed from both the expanding shell-like shock front and from a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) located inside of the SNR. These systems represent a unique evolutionary phase of SNRs where observations in the radio, X-ray and gamma-ray regimes allow the study of the co-evolution of both of these energetic phenomena. In this article, we report results from observations of the shell-type SNR G15.4+0.1 performed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) and XMM-Newton. A compact TeV gamma-ray source, HESSJ1818-154, located in the center and contained within the shell of G15.4+0.1 is detected by H.E.S.S. featuring a spectrum best represented by a power-law model with a spectral index of $-2.3 \\pm 0.3_{stat} \\pm 0.2_{sys}$ and an integral flux of F$(>0.42\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$)=($0.9 \\pm 0.3_{\\mathrm{stat}} \\pm 0.2_{\\mathrm{sys}}) \\times 10^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Furthermore, ...

  10. The Progenitor of the Type II-P SN 2004dj in NGC 2403

    CERN Document Server

    Maíz-Apellániz, J; Siegel, M H; Lipkin, Y; Maoz, D; Ofek, E O; Poznanski, D

    2004-01-01

    The Type II-P supernova 2004dj in the nearby galaxy NGC 2403 occurred at a position coincident with object 96 in the list of luminous stars and clusters in this galaxy published by Sandage in 1984. We compare archival images of NGC 2403 with recent images showing the SN to establish a definitive association between Sandage 96 and the SN. The archival images show that Sandage 96 is slightly resolved from the ground. Pre-outburst spectrograms in the blue region obtained by Humphreys and Aaronson reveal that Sandage 96 has a composite spectrum, dominated in the blue region by A- and B-type stars, while infrared photometry shows that Sandage 96 also contains red supergiants. These results show that Sandage 96 is a young compact cluster. We have studied the stellar population of Sandage 96, using published photometric measurements combined with a chi-square-fitting code. We derive a cluster age of 14 Myr, a reddening of E(4405-5495)=0.135, and a total stellar mass of 24 000 M_Sun. For this cluster age, the SN prog...

  11. Supernova detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahata, Masayuki [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray research, University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka-cho, Hida-shi, Gifu, Japan, 506-1205 (Japan)], E-mail: nakahata@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-11-01

    The detection of supernova neutrinos is reviewed, focusing on the current status of experiments to detect supernova burst neutrinos and supernova relic neutrinos. The capabilities of each detector currently operating and in development are assessed and the likely neutrino yield for a future supernova is estimated. It is expected that much more information will be obtained if a supernova burst were to occur in our Galaxy than was obtained for supernova SN1987A. The detection of supernova relic neutrinos is considered and it is concluded that a large volume detector with a neutron tagging technique is necessary.

  12. IIP framework: A tool for reuse-centric analog circuit design

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Current design of analog integrated circuits is still a time-consuming manual process resulting in static analog blocks which can hardly be reused. In order to address this problem, a new framework to ease reuse-centric bottom-up design of analog integrated circuits is introduced. Our IIP Framework (IIP: Intelligent Intellectual Property) enables the development of highly technology-independent analog circuit generators applicable in multiple design environments. IIP Generators are parameteri...

  13. Matching Supernovae to Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    One of the major challenges for modern supernova surveys is identifying the galaxy that hosted each explosion. Is there an accurate and efficient way to do this that avoids investing significant human resources?Why Identify Hosts?One problem in host galaxy identification. Here, the supernova lies between two galaxies but though the centroid of the galaxy on the right is closer in angular separation, this may be a distant background galaxy that is not actually near the supernova. [Gupta et al. 2016]Supernovae are a critical tool for making cosmological predictions that help us to understand our universe. But supernova cosmology relies on accurately identifying the properties of the supernovae including their redshifts. Since spectroscopic followup of supernova detections often isnt possible, we rely on observations of the supernova host galaxies to obtain redshifts.But how do we identify which galaxy hosted a supernova? This seems like a simple problem, but there are many complicating factors a seemingly nearby galaxy could be a distant background galaxy, for instance, or a supernovas host could be too faint to spot.The authors algorithm takes into account confusion, a measure of how likely the supernova is to be mismatched. In these illustrations of low (left) and high (right) confusion, the supernova is represented by a blue star, and the green circles represent possible host galaxies. [Gupta et al. 2016]Turning to AutomationBefore the era of large supernovae surveys, searching for host galaxies was done primarily by visual inspection. But current projects like the Dark Energy Surveys Supernova Program is finding supernovae by the thousands, and the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will likely discover hundreds of thousands. Visual inspection will not be possible in the face of this volume of data so an accurate and efficient automated method is clearly needed!To this end, a team of scientists led by Ravi Gupta (Argonne National Laboratory) has recently

  14. Core-Collapse supernovae and its progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars unable to sustain gravitational collapse, at the end of nuclear burning stage, turns out into core-collapse supernovae, leaving behind compact objects like neutron stars or black holes. The progenitor properties like mass and metallicity primarily governs the explosion parameters and type of compact remnant. In this contribution we summarize observational study of three Core Collapse type IIP SNe 2012aw, 2013ab and 2013ej, which are rigorously observed from ARIES and other Indian observatories and discuss their progenitor and explosion properties.

  15. Pulsational-Pair Instability Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E

    2016-01-01

    The final evolution of stars in the mass range 60 - 150 solar masses is explored. Depending upon their mass loss and rotation rates, many of these stars will end their lives as pulsational pair-instability supernovae. Even a non-rotating 70 solar mass star is pulsationally unstable during oxygen shell burning and can power a sub-luminous supernova. Rotation decreases the limit further. For more massive stars, the pulsations are less frequent, span a longer time, and are more powerful. Violent pulsations eject not only any residual low density envelope, but also that fraction of the helium core mass outside about 35 - 50 solar masses. The remaining core of helium and heavy elements continues to evolve, ultimately forming an iron core of about 2.5 solar masses that probably collapses to a black hole. A variety of observational transients result with total durations ranging from days to 10,000 years, and luminosities from 10$^{41}$ to 10$^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Many transients resemble ordinary Type IIp supernovae,...

  16. Radio Supernovae in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kamble, Atish; Berger, Edo; Zauderer, Ashley; Chakraborti, Sayan; Williams, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In the last three decades, about 50 radio supernovae have been detected as a result of targeted searches of optically discovered supernovae in the local universe. Despite this relatively small number some diversity among them has already been identified which is an indication of the underlying richness of radio supernovae waiting to be discovered. For example, comparison of star formation and supernova discovery rate imply that as many as half of the supernovae remain undetected in the traditional optical searches, either because of intrinsic dimness or due to dust obscuration. This has far reaching consequences to the models of stellar and galaxy evolution. A radio sky survey would be ideal to uncover larger supernova population. Transient radio sky would benefit significantly from such a survey. With the advent of advanced gravitational wave detectors a new window is set to open on the local Universe. Localization of these gravitational detectors is poor to identify electromagnetic counterparts of the gravi...

  17. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  18. A new precise mass for the progenitor of the Type IIP SN 2008bk

    CERN Document Server

    Maund, J R; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Eldridge, J J

    2013-01-01

    The progenitor of the Type IIP SN 2008bk was discovered in pre-explosion g'r'i'IYJHKs images, acquired with European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope FORS, HAWK-I and ISAAC instruments and the Gemini GMOS-S instrument. The wealth of pre-explosion observations makes the progenitor of this SN one of the best studied, since the detection of the progenitor of SN1987A. Previous analyses of the properties of the progenitor were hampered by the limited quality of the photometric calibration of the pre-explosion images and the crowded nature of the field containing the SN. We present new late-time observations of the site of SN2008bk acquired with identical instrument and filter configurations as the pre-explosion observations, and confirm that the previously identified red supergiant star was the progenitor of this SN and has now disappeared. Image subtraction techniques were used to conduct precise photometry of the now missing progenitor, independently of blending from any nearby stars. The nature of the ...

  19. Aspherical supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3

  20. Aspherical supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-05-21

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3

  1. The Beijing Astronomical Observatory supernova survey (Ⅱ)——Results in 1996

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卫东; 裘予雷; 乔琪源; 胡景耀; 李启斌

    1999-01-01

    Six supernovae (SNe) discovered in 1996 by the Beijing Astronomical Observatory Supernova (SN) Survey (BAOSS) are reported. SN 1996W, the first supernova discovered by the survey, has been monitored photometrically and spectroscopically for a long time. The spectra and photometry showed that it was a typical type Ⅱ-P supernova. SN 1996cb, the sixth SN discovered in 1996 and a peculiar one like SN 1993J, has also been observed intensively for a long time.

  2. Explosions of O-Ne-Mg Cores, the Crab Supernova, and Subluminous Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kitaura, F S; Hillebrandt, W

    2005-01-01

    We present results of simulations of stellar collapse and explosions in spherical symmetry for progenitor stars in the 8-10 solar mass range with an O-Ne-Mg core. The simulations were continued until nearly one second after core bounce and were performed with the Prometheus/Vertex code with a variable Eddington factor solver for the neutrino transport, including a state-of-the-art treatment of neutrino-matter interactions. Particular effort was made to implement nuclear burning and electron capture rates with sufficient accuracy to ensure a smooth continuation, without transients, from the progenitor evolution to core collapse. Using two different nuclear equations of state (EoSs), a soft version of the Lattimer & Swesty EoS and the significantly stiffer Wolff & Hillebrandt EoS, we found no prompt explosions, but instead delayed explosions, powered by neutrino heating and the neutrino-driven baryonic wind which sets in about 200 ms after bounce. The models eject little nickel ( 0.46, which suggests a ...

  3. The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamuy, M.; Pignata, G.; Maza, J.

    2012-01-01

    The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch (CHASE) project began in 2007 with the goal to discover young, nearby southern supernovae in order to (1) better understand the physics of exploding stars and their progenitors, and (2) refine the methods to derive extragalactic distances. During the first...

  4. Photometric redshifts for supernovae Ia in the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pascal, S; Rich, J; Guy, J; Bazin, G; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Sullivan, M

    2009-01-01

    We present a method using the SALT2 light curve fitter to determine the redshift of Type Ia supernovae in the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) based on their photometry in g', r', i' and z'. On 289 supernovae of the first three years of SNLS data, we obtain a precision $\\sigma_{\\Delta z/(1+z)} = 0.022$ on average up to a redshift of 1.0, with a higher precision of 0.016 for z0.45. The rate of events with $|\\Delta z|/(1+z)>0.15$ (catastrophic errors) is 1.4%. Both the precision and the rate of catastrophic errors are better than what can be currently obtained using host galaxy photometric redshifts. Photometric redshifts of this precision may be useful for future experiments which aim to discover up to millions of supernovae Ia but without spectroscopy for most of them.

  5. Ultraviolet observations of core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Tyler Anthony

    Ultraviolet observations of Core Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) have traditionally lagged behind observations in the optical and near-infrared. With the launch of Swift in 2004 this began to change. The systematic study of UV emission from these objects provides information about supernovae temperature, radius, metallicity and luminosity that may be difficult to obtain from the ground - especially at early times where upwards of 80% of the SNe bolometric flux may come from the UV region. We begin with the examination of an extraordinary Type IIn supernova SN 2007pk, which was at the time the earliest observed Type IIn SNe in the UV, and characterize the explosion properties while examining how the early observed UV emission compares with other observed CCSNe at early times. Building upon this we assemble the largest sample of CCSNe in the UV and examine the UV and bolometric characteristics of CCSNe by subtype. Using these bolometric light curves we go on to calculate empirically based bolometric corrections and UV- ux corrections for use by observers when observing filters are limited or UV observations are unable to be obtained. We improve upon this by identifying a small subsample of Type II Plateau SNe which have simultaneous ground based optical - near infrared data, and improve our bolometric light curve calculation method to more accurately determine bolometric light curve, corrections and UV corrections. Finally, we use recent hydrodynamical models to examine the accuracy of current modeling techniques to reproduce Type IIP SNe, the implications of progenitor properties on the light curves of the SNe, and possibility of future diagnostics for progenitor metalicity, radius, and explosion energies from Type IIP light curves and models.

  6. First Results from the La Silla-QUEST Supernova Survey and the Carnegie Supernova Project

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, E S; Campillay, A; Citrenbaum, C; Contreras, C; Ellman, N; Feindt, U; Gonzalez, C; Graham, M L; Hadjiyska, E; Hsiao, E Y; Krisciunas, K; McKinnon, R; Ment, K; Morrell, N; Nugent, P; Phillips, M; Rabinowitz, D; Rostami, S; Seron, J; Stritzinger, M; Sullivan, M; Tucker, B E

    2016-01-01

    The LaSilla/QUEST Variability Survey (LSQ) and the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP II) are collaborating to discover and obtain photometric light curves for a large sample of low redshift (z < 0.1) Type Ia supernovae. The supernovae are discovered in the LSQ survey using the 1 m ESO Schmidt telescope at the La Silla Observatory with the 10 square degree QUEST camera. The follow-up photometric observations are carried out using the 1 m Swope telescope and the 2.5 m du Pont telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory. This paper describes the survey, discusses the methods of analyzing the data and presents the light curves for the first 31 Type Ia supernovae obtained in the survey. The SALT 2.4 supernova light curve fitter was used to analyze the photometric data, and the Hubble diagram for this first sample is presented. The measurement errors for these supernovae averaged 4%, and their intrinsic spread was 14%.

  7. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  8. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  9. The ASAS-SN Bright Supernova Catalog $-$ II. 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Holoien, T W -S; Stanek, K Z; Kochanek, C S; Shappee, B J; Prieto, J L; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J; Bishop, D W; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Chen, Ping; Danilet, A B; Falco, E; Godoy-Rivera, D; Goss, N; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G V; Skowron, D M; Thompson, Todd A; Woźniak, P R; Avíla, C G; Bock, G; Carballo, J -L G; Conseil, E; Contreras, C; Cruz, I; andújar, J M F; Guo, Zhen; Hsiao, E Y; Kiyota, S; Koff, R A; Krannich, G; Madore, B F; Marples, P; Masi, G; Morrell, N; Monard, L A G; Munoz-Mateos, J C; Nicholls, B; Nicolas, J; Wagner, R M; Wiethoff, W S

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during 2015, its second full year of operations. The same information is presented for bright ($m_V\\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered by other sources in 2015. As with the first ASAS-SN bright supernova catalog, we also present redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes for all supernova host galaxies in both samples. Combined with our previous catalog, this work comprises a complete catalog of 455 supernovae from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were previously impossible. This is the second of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.

  10. The ASAS-SN Bright Supernova Catalog - II. 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Bishop, D. W.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Chen, Ping; Danilet, A. B.; Falco, E.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Goss, N.; Pojmanski, G.; Simonian, G. V.; Skowron, D. M.; Thompson, Todd A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Ávila, C. G.; Bock, G.; Carballo, J.-L. G.; Conseil, E.; Contreras, C.; Cruz, I.; Andújar, J. M. F.; Guo, Zhen; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Madore, B. F.; Marples, P.; Masi, G.; Morrell, N.; Monard, L. A. G.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wagner, R. M.; Wiethoff, W. S.

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript presents information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during 2015, its second full year of operations. The same information is presented for bright (mV ≤ 17), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered by other sources in 2015. As with the first ASAS-SN bright supernova catalog, we also present redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes for all supernova host galaxies in both samples. Combined with our previous catalog, this work comprises a complete catalog of 455 supernovae from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were previously impossible. This is the second of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.

  11. Recombination Effects on Supernovae Light-Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfriend, Tomer; Sari, Re'em

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae of type IIP are marked by the long plateau seen in their optical light curves. The plateau is believed to be the result of a recombination wave that propagates through the outflowing massive hydrogen envelope. Here, we analytically investigate the transition from a fully ionized envelope to a partially recombined one and its effects on the SN light curve. The motivation is to establish the underlying processes which dominate the evolution at late times when recombination takes place in the envelope, yet early enough so that $^{56}$Ni decay is a negligible source of energy. We assume a simple, yet adequate, hydrodynamic profile of the envelope and study the mechanisms which dominate the energy emission and the observed temperature. We consider the diffusion of photons through the envelope while analyzing the ionization fraction and the coupling between radiation and gas. We find that once recombination starts, the observed temperature decreases slowly in time. However, in a typical red supergiant (R...

  12. Smoking Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, H L; Dunne, L

    2007-01-01

    The question "Are supernovae important sources of dust?" is a contentious one. Observations with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) only detected very small amounts of hot dust in supernova remnants. Here, we review observations of two young Galactic remnants with the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA), which imply that large quantities of dust are produced by supernovae. The association of dust with the Cassiopeia A remnant is in question due to the contamination of foreground material. In this article, we compare the emission from cold dust with CO emission towards Kepler's supernova remnant. We detect very little CO at the location of the submillimetre peaks. A comparison of masses from the CO and the dust clouds are made, and we estimate the 3 sigma upper limit on the gas-to-dust ratios to range from 25 - 65 suggesting that we cannot yet rule out freshly-formed or swept up circumstellar dust in Kepler's supernova remnant.

  13. Type II-Plateau supernovae as metallicity probes of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, L; Hamuy, M; Hillier, D J; Lanz, T; Anderson, J P; Folatelli, G; Freedman, W L; Ley, F; Morrell, N; Persson, S E; Phillips, M M; Stritzinger, M; Suntzeff, N B

    2014-01-01

    We explore a method for metallicity determinations based on quantitative spectroscopy of type II-Plateau (II-P) supernovae (SNe). For consistency, we first evolve a set of 15Msun main sequence stars at 0.1, 0.4, 1, and 2 x the solar metallicity. At the onset of core collapse, we trigger a piston-driven explosion and model the resulting ejecta and radiation. Our theoretical models of such red-supergiant-star explosions at different metallicity show that synthetic spectra of SNe II-P possess optical signatures during the recombination phase that are sensitive to metallicity variations. This sensitivity can be quantified and the metallicity inferred from the strength of metal-line absorptions. Furthermore, these signatures are not limited to O, but also include Na, Ca, Sc, Ti, or Fe. When compared to a sample of SNe II-P from the Carnegie SN Project and previous SN followup programs, we find that most events lie at a metallicity between 0.4 and 2 x solar, with a marked scarcity of SN II-P events at SMC metallici...

  14. Discovering Wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Aboufadel, Edward

    1999-01-01

    An accessible and practical introduction to wavelets. With applications in image processing, audio restoration, seismology, and elsewhere, wavelets have been the subject of growing excitement and interest over the past several years. Unfortunately, most books on wavelets are accessible primarily to research mathematicians. Discovering Wavelets presents basic and advanced concepts of wavelets in a way that is accessible to anyone with only a fundamental knowledge of linear algebra. The basic concepts of wavelet theory are introduced in the context of an explanation of how the FBI uses wavelets

  15. First supernova companion star found

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Supernova 1993J exploding hi-res Size hi-res: 222 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) Supernova 1993J exploding (artist’s impression) New observations with the Hubble Space Telescope allow a look into a supernova explosion under development. In this artist’s view the red supergiant supernova progenitor star (left) is exploding after having transferred about 10 solar masses of hydrogen gas to the blue companion star (right). This interaction process happened over about 250 years and affected the supernova explosion to such an extent that SN 1993J was later known as one of the most peculiar supernovae ever seen. Supernova 1993J exploding hi-res Size hi-res: 4200 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) The site of the Supernova 1993J explosion A virtual journey into one of the spiral arms of the grand spiral Messier 81 (imaged with the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, left) reveals the superb razor-sharp imaging power of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (Hubble’s WFPC2 instrument, below). The close-up (with Hubble’s ACS, to the right) is centred on the newly discovered companion star to Supernova 1993J that itself is no longer visible. The quarter-circle around the supernova companion is a so-called light echo originating from sheets of dust in the galaxy reflecting light from the original supernova explosion. Supernova 1993J explosing site hi-res Size hi-res: 1502 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) Close-up of the Supernova 1993J explosion site (ACS/HRC image) This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the area in Messier 81 where Supernova 1993J exploded. The companion to the supernova ‘mother star’ that remains after the explosion is seen in the centre of the image. The image is taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and is a combination of four exposures taken with ACS’ High Resolution Camera. The exposures were taken through two near-UV filters (250W

  16. SOUSA's Swift Supernova Siblings

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae in its first ten years. Photometry from the Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope (UVOT) is being compiled in the Swift Optical/Ultraviolet Supernovae Archive (SOUSA). The diversity of supernovae leads to a wide dynamic range of intrinsic properties. The intrinsic UV brightness of supernovae as a function of type and epoch allows one to understand the distance ranges at which Swift can reliably detect supernovae. The large Swift sample also includes supernovae from the same galaxy as other Swift supernovae. Through the first ten years, these families include 34 supernovae from 16 host galaxies (two galaxies have each hosted three Swift supernovae).

  17. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo

    2007-01-08

    We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

  18. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Wesley Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dolence, Joshua C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  19. The Search for Lensed Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae that have multiple images due to gravitational lensing can provide us with a wealth of information both about the supernovae themselves and about our surrounding universe. But how can we find these rare explosions?Clues from Multiple ImagesWhen light from a distant object passes by a massive foreground galaxy, the galaxys strong gravitational pull can bend the light, distorting our view of the backgroundobject. In severe cases, this process can cause multiple images of the distant object to appear in the foreground lensing galaxy.An illustration of gravitational lensing. Light from the distant supernova is bent as it passes through a giant elliptical galaxy in the foreground, causing multiple images of the supernova to appear to be hosted by the elliptical galaxy. [Adapted from image by NASA/ESA/A. Feild (STScI)]Observations of multiply-imaged Type Ia supernovae (explosions that occur when white dwarfs in binary systems exceed their maximum allowed mass) could answer a number of astronomical questions. Because Type Ia supernovae are standard candles, distant, lensed Type Ia supernovae can be used to extend the Hubble diagram to high redshifts. Furthermore, the lensing time delays from the multiply-imaged explosion can provide high-precision constraints on cosmological parameters.The catch? So far, weve only found one multiply-imaged Type Ia supernova: iPTF16geu, discovered late last year. Were going to need a lot more of them to develop a useful sample! So how do we identify themutiply-imaged Type Ias among the many billions of fleeting events discovered in current and future surveys of transients?Searching for AnomaliesAbsolute magnitudes for Type Ia supernovae in elliptical galaxies. None are expected to be above -20 in the B band, so if we calculate a magnitude for a Type Ia supernova thats larger than this, its probably not hosted by the galaxy we think it is! [Goldstein Nugent 2017]Two scientists from University of California, Berkeley and

  20. The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamuy, M.; Pignata, G.; Maza, J.

    2012-01-01

    The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch (CHASE) project began in 2007 with the goal to discover young, nearby southern supernovae in order to (1) better understand the physics of exploding stars and their progenitors, and (2) refine the methods to derive extragalactic distances. During the first...... four years of operation, CHASE has produced more than 130 supernovae, being the most successful project of its type in the southern hemisphere. Here we describe the project and present illustrative examples of CHASE discoveries of particular relevance....

  1. A New Supernova Discovery/Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, D. A.; Nugent, P. E.; Sullivan, M.; Gal-Yam, A.

    2010-10-01

    The Type Ia supernova science working group of the Palomar Transient Factory (ATEL#1964) reports the discovery of the Type Ia supernova PTF10ygu at RA=09:37:30.30, Dec=+23:09:33.6 (J2000) in the host galaxy NGC 2929 at z=0.025. The supernova was discovered on Oct. 12.5 UT when it was at magnitude 19.2 in R-band (calibrated wrt the USNO catalog). There was nothing at this location on Oct 8.5 UT to a limiting magnitude of 20.3, and a marginal detection (S/N=5) at R=19.6 on Oct.

  2. Immediate dense circumstellar environment of supernova progenitors caused by wind acceleration: its effect on supernova light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Gräfener, Götz; Blinnikov, Sergei I.

    2017-07-01

    Type IIP supernova progenitors are often surrounded by dense circumstellar media that may result from mass-loss enhancement of the progenitors shortly before their explosions. Previous light-curve studies suggest that the mass-loss rates are enhanced up to ∼0.1 M⊙ yr-1, assuming a constant wind velocity. However, the density of circumstellar media at the immediate stellar vicinity can be much higher than previously inferred for a given mass-loss rate if wind acceleration is taken into account. We show that the wind acceleration has a huge impact when we estimate mass-loss rates from early light curves of Type IIP supernovae by taking SN 2013fs as an example. We perform numerical calculations of the interaction between supernova ejecta and circumstellar media with a constant mass-loss rate but with a β-law wind velocity profile. We find that the mass-loss rate of the progenitor of SN 2013fs shortly before the explosion, which was inferred to be ∼0.1 M⊙ yr-1 with a constant wind velocity of 10 km s-1 by a previous light-curve modelling, can be as low as ∼10-3 M⊙ yr-1 with the same terminal wind velocity of 10 km s-1 but with a wind velocity profile with β ≃ 5. In both cases, the mass of the circumstellar medium is similar (≃0.5 M⊙). Therefore, the beginning of the progenitor's mass-loss enhancement in our interpretation is ∼100 yr before the explosion, not several years. Our result indicates that the immediate dense environment of Type II supernova progenitors may be significantly influenced by wind acceleration.

  3. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for

  4. The ultraviolet properties of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter J.

    2009-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) probe an important wavelength region where hot temperatures, extinction, and metallicity have strong effects. In addition, they provide a comparison set against which to compare and better understand rest frame UV observations of high redshift SNe observed in the optical. UV observations, however, are rare due to the need for telescopes above the atmosphere and the difficulty in observing transient objects with space based observatories. Limited observations with space based observatories, primarily the International Ultraviolet Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope, are reviewed, after which the Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift spacecraft is introduced. With Swift we have observed more SNe than all previous UV missions combined. Case studies of two individual SNe are first presented: SNe 2005am and 2005cs. SN 2005am is the first young SN observed with Swift, and the near-UV (uvw1: central wavelength ~ 2600 λ) light curve is consistent with the previous "template" derived from IUE and HST observations of SNe 1990N and 1992A. SN 2005cs is the first plateau-type II (IIP) with a well observed UV light curve. UVOT observations show a dramatic drop in the UV brightness and shift in the spectral energy distribution from blue to red caused by the dropping temperature and resulting line blanketing in the UV. These case studies demonstrate the information available from the UV data for individual SNe. A photometry method for proper accounting of coincidence loss, aperture corrections, and subtraction of the underlying galaxy is detailed. This method is then applied to a large sample of SNe observed with UVOT. We present 25 light curves and compare SNe by type and across types. The SNe Ia, with a few exceptions, are shown to have very similar light curves in the near UV, whereas, the three SNe Ib/c we have observed are very different. The SNe IIP all have rapidly fading UV light curves, though with

  5. Echoes from Ancient supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, A; Suntzeff, N B; Olsen, K; Prieto, J L; Smith, R C; Welch, D L; Becker, A; Bergmann, M; Clocchiatti, A; Cook, K; Garg, A; Huber, M; Miknaitis, G; Minniti, D; Nikolaev, S; Stubbs, C

    2005-06-15

    In principle, historical supernovae could still be visible as scattered-light echoes even centuries later [1, 2]. Searches for surface brightness variations using photographic plates have not recovered any echoes in the regions of historical Galactic supernovae [3]. Using differenced images, our SuperMACHO collaboration has discovered three faint new variable surface brightness complexes with high apparent proper motion pointing back to well-defined positions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These correspond to three of the six smallest (and likely youngest) supernova remnants believed to be due to thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae [4]. A lower limit to the age of these remnants and echoes is 200 years given the lack of any reported LMC supernovae until 1987. The discovery of historical supernova echoes in the LMC suggests that similar echoes for Galactic supernovae such as Tycho, Kepler, Cas A, or SN1006 could be visible using standard image differencing techniques.

  6. Supernova Remnants as the Sources of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays holds still manymysteries hundred years after they were first discovered. Supernova remnants have for long been the most likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. I discuss here some recent evidence that suggests that supernova remnants can indeed efficiently accelerate cosmi

  7. Supernova Remnants as the Sources of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vink

    2012-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays holds still manymysteries hundred years after they were first discovered. Supernova remnants have for long been the most likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. I discuss here some recent evidence that suggests that supernova remnants can indeed efficiently accelerate cosmi

  8. Discovery and Classification of Five New Supernovae by the Palomar Transient Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, I.; Horesh, A.; Sesar, B.; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Ben-Ami, S.; Sternberg, A.; Green, Y.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Quimby, R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.; Bloom, J.; Cooke, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Law, N.

    2010-12-01

    We report the discovery and spectroscopic classification of five new supernovae from PTF (ATel #1964; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf). The supernovae were discovered by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration and by the users of Galaxy Zoo Supernovae, a citizen science project (http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org; Smith et al. 2010, arXiv 1011.2199), based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope.

  9. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  10. The Nearby Supernova Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Wood-Vasey, W M; Lee Byung Cheol; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Perlmutter, S; Siegrist, J L; Wang, L; Antilogus, P; Astier, Pierre; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Copin, Y; Smadja, G; Gangler, E; Castera, A; Adam, G; Bacon, R; Lemonnier, J P; Pecontal, A; Pécontal, E; Kessler, R

    2004-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) at redshifts 0.03discovered in unprecedented numbers using the same techniques as those used in distant SNe searches. In 2002, 35 SNe were found using our test-bed pipeline for automated SN search and discovery. The pipeline uses images from the asteroid search conducted by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking group at JPL. Improvements in our subtraction techniques and analysis have allowed us to increase our effective SN discovery rate to ~12 SNe/month in 2003.

  11. Supernovae, dark energy and the accelerating universe

    CERN Document Server

    Perlmutter, Saul

    1999-01-01

    Based on an analysis of 42 high-redshift supernovae discovered by the supernovae cosmology project, we have found evidence for a positive cosmological constant, Lambda, and hence an accelerating universe. In particular, the data are strongly inconsistent with a Lambda=0 flat cosmology, the simplest inflationary universe model. The size of our supernova sample allows us to perform a variety of statistical tests to check for possible systematic errors and biases. We will discuss results of these and other studies and the ongoing hunt for further loopholes to evade the apparent consequences of the measurements. We will present further work that begins to constrain the alternative physics theories of "dark energy" that have been proposed to explain these results. Finally, we propose a new concept for a definitive supernova measurement of the cosmological parameters.

  12. Detection of Supernova Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Bekman, B.; Holeczek, J.; Kisiel, J4

    2004-01-01

    Matter effects on neutrino oscillations in both, a supernova and the Earth, change the observed supernova neutrino spectra. We calculate the expected number of supernova neutrino interactions for ICARUS, SK and SNO detectors as a function of the distance which they traveled in the Earth. Calculations are performed for supernova type II at 10kpc from the Earth, using standard supernova neutrino fluxes described by thermal Fermi--Dirac distributions and the PREM I Earth matter density profile.

  13. Radioactive Iron Rain: Evidence of a Nearby Supernova Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A very close supernova explosion could have caused a mass extinction of life in Earth. In 1996, Brian Fields, the late Dave Schramm and the speaker proposed looking for unstable isotopes such as Iron 60 that could have been deposited by a recent nearby supernova explosion. A group from the Technical University of Munich has discovered Iron 60 in deep-ocean sediments and ferromanganese crusts due to one or more supernovae that exploded O(100) parsecs away about 2.5 million years ago. These results have recently been confirmed by a group from the Australian National University, and the Munich group has also discovered supernova Iron 60 in lunar rock samples. This talk will discuss the interpretation of these results in terms of supernova models, and the possible implications for life on Earth.

  14. Classification of 9 DES supernova by Magellan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Mandel, K.; Avelino, A.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Prajs, S.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.

    2016-09-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 9 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra were obtained using LDSS-3C (covering 420-950nm) on the 6.5m Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory.

  15. A Sample of Type II-L Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Faran, T; Filippenko, A V; Chornock, R; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Leonard, D C; Li, W; Modjaz, M; Serduke, F J D; Silverman, J M

    2014-01-01

    What are Type II-Linear supernovae (SNe II-L)? This class, which has been ill defined for decades, now receives significant attention -- both theoretically, in order to understand what happens to stars in the ~15-25Mo range, and observationally, with two independent studies suggesting that they cannot be cleanly separated photometrically from the regular hydrogen-rich SNe II-P characterised by a marked plateau in their light curve. Here, we analyze the multi-band light curves and extensive spectroscopic coverage of a sample of 35 SNe II and find that 11 of them could be SNe II-L. The spectra of these SNe are hydrogen deficient, typically have shallow Halpha absorption, may show indirect signs of helium via strong OI 7774 absorption, and have faster line velocities consistent with a thin hydrogen shell. The light curves can be mostly differentiated from those of the regular, hydrogen-rich SNe II-P by their steeper decline rates and higher luminosity, and we propose as a defining photometric characteristic the ...

  16. The Diversity of Type II Supernova vs. The Similarity in Their Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, S; Stritzinger, M D; Graham, M L; Hosseinzadeh, G; Arcavi, I; Bildsten, L; Jerkstrand, A; McCully, C; Pastorello, A; Piro, A L; Sand, D; Smartt, S J; Terreran, G; Baltay, C; Benetti, S; Brown, P; Filippenko, A V; Fraser, M; Rabinowitz, D; Sullivan, M; Yuan, F

    2016-01-01

    High-quality collections of Type II supernova (SN) light curves are scarce because they evolve for hundreds of days, making follow-up observations time consuming and often extending over multiple observing seasons. In light of these difficulties, the diversity of SNe II is not fully understood. Here we present ultraviolet and optical photometry of 12 SNe II monitored by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) during 2013-2014, and compare them with previously studied SNe having well-sampled light curves. We explore SN II diversity by searching for correlations between the slope of the linear light-curve decay after maximum light (historically used to divide SNe II into IIL and IIP) and other measured physical properties. While SNe IIL are found to be on average more luminous than SNe IIP, SNe IIL do not appear to synthesize more 56Ni than SNe IIP. Finally, optical nebular spectra obtained for several SNe in our sample are found to be consistent with models of red supergiant progenitors in...

  17. Observations of A Low-Velocity Type II-Plateau Supernova 2013am in M65

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jujia; Mazzali, Paolo A; Bai, Jinming; Zhang, Tianmeng; Bersier, David; Huang, Fang; Fan, Yufeng; Mo, Jun; Wang, Jianguo; Yi, Weimin; Wang, Chuanjun; Xin, Yuxin; Liangchang,; Zhang, Xiliang; Lun, Baoli; Wang, Xueli; He, Shousheng; Walker, Emma S

    2014-01-01

    Optical and ultraviolet observations for the nearby type II-plateau supernova (SN IIP) 2013am in the nearby spiral galaxy M65 are presented in this paper. The early spectra are characterized by relatively narrow P-Cygni features, with ejecta velocities much lower than observed in normal SNe IIP (i.e., $\\sim$2000 km s$^{-1}$ vs. $\\sim$5000 km $^{-1}$ in the middle of the plateau phase). Moreover, prominent \\ion{Ca}{2} absorptions are also detected in SN 2013am at relatively early phases. These spectral features are reminiscent of those seen in the low-velocity and low-luminosity SN IIP 2005cs. However, SN 2013am exhibits different photometric properties, having shorter plateau phases and brighter light-curve tails if compared to SN 2005cs. Adopting $R_{V}$=3.1 and a mean value of total reddening derived from the photometric and spectroscopic methods(i.e., $E(B-V)=0.55\\pm$0.19 mag), we find that SN 2013am may have reached an absolute $V$-band peak magnitude of $-15.83\\pm0.71$ mag and produced a $^{56}$Ni mass o...

  18. Optical and ultraviolet observations of a low-velocity type II plateau supernova 2013am in M65

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jujia; Bai, Jinming; Fan, Yufeng; Wang, Jianguo; Yi, Weimin; Wang, Chuanjun; Xin, Yuxin; Liangchang; Zhang, Xiliang; Lun, Baoli; Wang, Xueli; He, Shousheng [Yunnan Observatories (YNAO), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650216 (China); Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Fang; Mo, Jun [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mazzali, Paolo A.; Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Zhang, Tianmeng [National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Walker, Emma S., E-mail: jujia@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: baijinming@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Optical and ultraviolet observations for the nearby type II plateau supernova (SN IIP) 2013am in the nearby spiral galaxy M65 are presented in this paper. The early spectra are characterized by relatively narrow P-Cygni features, with ejecta velocities much lower than observed in normal SNe IIP (i.e., ∼2000 km s{sup –1} versus ∼5000 km {sup –1} in the middle of the plateau phase). Moreover, prominent Ca II absorptions are also detected in SN 2013am at relatively early phases. These spectral features are reminiscent of those seen in the low-velocity and low-luminosity SN IIP 2005cs. However, SN 2013am exhibits different photometric properties, having shorter plateau phases and brighter light curve tails if compared to SN 2005cs. Adopting R{sub V} = 3.1 and a mean value of total reddening derived from the photometric and spectroscopic methods (i.e., E(B – V) = 0.55 ± 0.19 mag), we find that SN 2013am may have reached an absolute V-band peak magnitude of –15.83 ± 0.71 mag and produced an {sup 56}Ni mass of 0.016{sub −0.006}{sup +0.010} M {sub ☉} in the explosion. These parameters are close to those derived for SN 2008in and SN 2009N, which have been regarded as 'gap-filler' objects linking the faint SNe IIP to the normal ones. This indicates that some low-velocity SNe IIP may not necessarily result from the low-energetic explosions. The low expansion velocities could be due to a lower metallicity of the progenitor stars, a larger envelope mass ejected in the explosion, or the effect of viewing angle where these SNe were observed at an angle away from the polar direction.

  19. See Change: the Supernova Sample from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Brian; Perlmutter, Saul; Boone, Kyle; Nordin, Jakob; Rubin, David; Lidman, Chris; Deustua, Susana E.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Aldering, Greg Scott; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, James; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Santos, Joana; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Fassbender, Rene; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Wechsler, Risa H.; Muzzin, Adam; Willis, Jon; Boehringer, Hans; Gladders, Michael; Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Hook, Isobel; Huterer, Dragan; Huang, Xiaosheng; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric; Pain, Reynald; Saunders, Clare; Suzuki, Nao; Barbary, Kyle H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Meyers, Joshua; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Sofiatti, Caroline; Wilson, Gillian; Rozo, Eduardo; Hilton, Matt; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Luther, Kyle; Yen, Mike; Fagrelius, Parker; Dixon, Samantha; Williams, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. Our SN Ia sample closely matches our pre-survey predictions; this sample will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z~1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, See Change will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With the primary observing campaign completed, we present the preliminary supernova sample and our path forward to the supernova cosmology results. We also compare the number of SNe Ia discovered in each cluster with our pre-survey expectations based on cluster mass and SFR estimates. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters at z~1.2 expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.7, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.

  20. Fabrication of optical element from unidirectional grown imidazole-imidazolium picrate monohydrate (IIP) organic crystals for nonlinear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, P.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear optical bulk single crystal of Imidazole-imidazolium picrate monohydrate (IIP) has been grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method using acetonitrile as solvent. First time we report the bulk growth of IIP crystal by SR method. The transparent IIP single crystal of maximum diameter 21 mm and length 46 mm was obtained by employing SR method. The grown crystal was subjected to high resolution X-ray diffraction, UV-vis-NIR transmittance, refractive index, hardness, dielectric and laser damage threshold studies. The crystalline perfection of the grown crystal was analyzed using HRXRD. Cut off wavelength and optical transmission window of the crystal was assessed by UV-vis-NIR and the refractive index of the crystal was found. The mechanical property of the crystal was estimated by Vicker's hardness test. The dielectric property of the crystal was measured as a function of frequency. The laser damage threshold value was determined. The particle size dependent second harmonic generation efficiency for IIP was evaluated with standard reference material potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) by Kurtz-Perry powder method using Nd:YAG laser, which established the existence of phase matching. The second harmonic generation (SHG) of IIP crystal was investigated by the SHG Maker fringes technique. The mechanism of growth is revealed by carrying out chemical etching using acetonitrile as etchant.

  1. A Comprehensive Investigation Into Modeling Supernovae Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Desmond

    Supernovae are a rich source of information. By studying their light curves and spectra we gain insights into stellar evolution, the nature of the progenitor star, surface abundances at the time of the explosion, whether previous mass-loss episodes have occurred, the physics of the explosion including the amount and type of elements synthesized, and whether the explosion has produced significant mixing between shells of different chemical composition. To maximize the information that can be gleaned from observations of supernovae it is essential that we have the necessary spectroscopic tools. To this end, we are developing a code, CMFGEN, capable of modeling supernova light curves and spectra. The code is currently being used, to study core-collapse supernovae as well as those arising from the nuclear detonation of a White Dwarf star. We wish to extend CMFGEN's capabilities by developing a procedure to handle non-monotonic velocity flows so that we can treat shock breakout and the interaction of supernova ejecta with circumstellar material. We will also investigate magnetar-powered SNe, and explore the connection between Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae and those supernovae associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursters. Through detailed studies of individual supernova, and through the construction of model grids, we are able to infer deficiencies in our modeling, in our atomic data, and in the progenitor models, and hence make refinements so that we can improve our understanding of all SNe classes. Previous (IUE), current (HST, Chandra, GALEX), and future NASA missions (James Webb Telescope) do/will provide a wealth of data on supernovae. The proposed research is related to strategic subgoal 3D: "Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe, and search for Earth-like planets." Supernovae are inherently coupled to the evolution of the universe and life: They can trigger star formation and they provide the raw materials (e.g., oxygen

  2. Bayesian Single-Epoch Photometric Classification of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, D; Gal-Yam, A; Poznanski, Dovi; Maoz, Dan; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2006-01-01

    (abridged) Ongoing supernova (SN) surveys find hundreds of candidates, that require confirmation for their use. Traditional classification based on followup spectroscopy of all candidates is virtually impossible for these large samples. We present an automatic Bayesian classifying algorithm for supernovae, the SN-ABC. We rely solely on single-epoch multiband photometry and host-galaxy (photometric) redshift information to sort SN candidates into the two major types, Ia and core-collapse supernovae. We test the SN-ABC performance on published samples of SNe from the SNLS and GOODS projects that have both broad-band photometry and spectroscopic classification (so the true type is known). The SN-ABC correctly classifies up to 97% (85%) of the type Ia (II-P) SNe in SNLS, and similar fractions of the GOODS SNe, depending on photometric redshift quality. We further test our method on large artificial samples to explore possible biases, and find that, in deep surveys, SNe Ia are best classified at redshifts z >~ 0.6...

  3. Hydrodynamical models of Type II-Plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bersten, Melina C; Hamuy, Mario

    2011-01-01

    We present bolometric light curves of Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) obtained using a newly developed, one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code with flux-limited radiation diffusion. Using our code we calculate the bolometric light curve and photospheric velocities of SN1999em obtaining a remarkably good agreement with observations despite the simplifications used in our calculation. The physical parameters used in our calculation are E=1.25 foe, M= 19 M_\\odot, R= 800 R_\\odot and M_{Ni}=0.056 M_\\odot. We find that an extensive mixing of 56Ni is needed in order to reproduce a plateau as flat as that shown by the observations. We also study the possibility to fit the observations with lower values of the initial mass consistently with upper limits that have been inferred from pre-supernova imaging of SN1999em in connection with stellar evolution models. We cannot find a set of physical parameters that reproduce well the observations for models with pre-supernova mass of \\leq 12 M_\\odot, although mode...

  4. High-Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer - From the IIP to the Global Hawk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shannon; Denning, Richard; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Lim, Boon; Tanabe, Jordan; Tanner, Alan; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Gaier, Todd

    2011-01-01

    The HAMSR instrument is a 25 channel cross-track microwave sounder developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the IIP-98 program. The instrument was recently upgraded under the NASA AITT program in 2008 to deploy on the Global Hawk UAV. The instrument now has state-of-the-art radiometric performance and the capability to process and display both brightness temperature imagery and derived products in real time. The improved performance of the instrument is demonstrated through retrievals of temperature and water vapor.

  5. Investigations of supernovae and supernova remnants in the era of SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lingzhi; Zhu, Hui; Tian, Wenwu; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Two main physical mechanisms are used to explain supernova explosions: thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf(Type Ia) and core collapse of a massive star (Type II and Type Ib/Ic). Type Ia supernovae serve as distance indicators that led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe. The exact nature of their progenitor systems however remain unclear. Radio emission from the interaction between the explosion shock front and its surrounding CSM or ISM provides an important probe into the progenitor star's last evolutionary stage. No radio emission has yet been detected from Type Ia supernovae by current telescopes. The SKA will hopefully detect radio emission from Type Ia supernovae due to its much better sensitivity and resolution. There is a 'supernovae rate problem' for the core collapse supernovae because the optically dim ones are missed due to being intrinsically faint and/or due to dust obscuration. A number of dust-enshrouded optically hidden supernovae should be discovered via SKA1-...

  6. Luminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2012-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe), the luminous explosions of stars, were observed since antiquity, with typical peak luminosity not exceeding 1.2x10^{43} erg/s (absolute magnitude >-19.5 mag). It is only in the last dozen years that numerous examples of SNe that are substantially super-luminous (>7x10^{43} erg/s; <-21 mag absolute) were well-documented. Reviewing the accumulated evidence, we define three broad classes of super-luminous SN events (SLSNe). Hydrogen-rich events (SLSN-II) radiate photons diffusing out from thick hydrogen layers where they have been deposited by strong shocks, and often show signs of interaction with circumstellar material. SLSN-R, a rare class of hydrogen-poor events, are powered by very large amounts of radioactive 56Ni and arguably result from explosions of very massive stars due to the pair instability. A third, distinct group of hydrogen-poor events emits photons from rapidly-expanding hydrogen-poor material distributed over large radii, and are not powered by radioactivity (SLSN-I). Thes...

  7. More Supernova Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    SEP 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE More Supernova Surprises 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...PERSPECTIVES More Supernova Surprises ASTRONOMY J. Martin Laming Spectroscopic observations of the supernova SN1987A are providing a new window into high...a core-collapse supernova ) have stretched and motivated research that has expanded our knowledge of astrophysics. The brightest such event in

  8. SNO and Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Virtue, C J

    2001-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has unique capabilities as a supernova detector. In the event of a galactic supernova there are opportunities, with the data that SNO would collect, to constrain certain intrinsic neutrino properties significantly, to test details of the various models of supernova dynamics, and to provide prompt notification to the astronomical community through the Supernova Early Warning System (SNEWS). This paper consists of a discussion of these opportunities illustrated by some preliminary Monte Carlo results.

  9. Spectroscopy of superluminous supernova host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leloudas, G.; Kruehler, T.; Schulze, S

    2015-01-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are very bright explosions that were only discovered recently and that show a preference for occurring in faint dwarf galaxies. Understanding why stellar evolution yields different types of stellar explosions in these environments is fundamental in order to both...... uncover the elusive progenitors of SLSNe and to study star formation in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we present the first results of our project to study SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES, focusing on the sample for which we have obtained spectroscopy. We show that SLSNe-I and SLSNe-R (hydrogen...

  10. Validity of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64) for predicting assertiveness in role-play situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leising, Daniel; Rehbein, Diana; Sporberg, Doreen

    2007-10-01

    The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64; Horowitz, Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 2000) is a self-report measure of maladaptive relationship behavior. Ninety-five adult female participants completed the IIP-64 and then interacted with a same-sex confederate in three diagnostic role plays, designed to evoke assertive responses. After each role play, both the participant and the confederate judged how assertive the participant had been, using two subscales from the Interpersonal Adjective Scales (IAS; Wiggins, 1995). The participants' general self-images, assessed with the IIP-64, were quite congruent with how they judged their own assertiveness in the role plays. But when role-play assertiveness was judged by the confederate, the match with the participants' general self-images was considerably lower. Our results indicate that self-reported interpersonal problems do not converge well with external judgments of interpersonal behavior.

  11. Overview of the nearby supernova factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldering, Greg; Adam, Gilles; Antilogus, Pierre; Astier, Pierre; Bacon, Roland; Bongard, S.; Bonnaud, C.; Copin, Yannick; Hardin, D.; Howell, D. Andy; Lemmonnier, Jean-Pierre; Levy, J.-M.; Loken, S.; Nugent, Peter; Pain, Reynald; Pecontal, Arlette; Pecontal, Emmanuel; Perlmutter, Saul; Quimby, Robert; Schahmaneche, Kyan; Smadja, Gerard; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael

    2002-07-29

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international experiment designed to lay the foundation for the next generation of cosmology experiments (such as CFHTLS, wP, SNAP and LSST) which will measure the expansion history of the Universe using Type Ia supernovae. The SNfactory will discover and obtain frequent lightcurve spectrophotometry covering 3200-10000 {angstrom} for roughly 300 Type Ia supernovae at the low-redshift end of the smooth Hubble flow. The quantity, quality, breadth of galactic environments, and homogeneous nature of the SNfactory dataset will make it the premier source of calibration for the Type Ia supernova width-brightness relation and the intrinsic supernova colors used for K-correction and correction for extinction by host-galaxy dust. This dataset will also allow an extensive investigation of additional parameters which possibly influence the quality of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological probes. The SNfactory search capabilities and follow-up instrumentation include wide-field CCD imagers on two 1.2-m telescopes (via collaboration with the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking team at JPL and the QUEST team at Yale), and a two-channel integral-field-unit optical spectrograph/imager being fabricated for the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. In addition to ground-based follow-up, UV spectra for a subsample of these supernovae will be obtained with HST. The pipeline to obtain, transfer via wireless and standard internet, and automatically process the search images is in operation. Software and hardware development is now underway to enable the execution of follow-up spectroscopy of supernova candidates at the Hawaii 2.2-m telescope via automated remote control of the telescope and the IFU spectrograph/imager.

  12. A 0.2-to-2.0GHz 65nm CMOS Receiver without LNA achieving >11dBm IIP3 and

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, M.C.M.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Ru, Z.; van Vliet, Frank Edward; Nauta, Bram

    2009-01-01

    Spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) is a key specification of radio receivers and spectrum analyzers, characterizing the maximum distance between signal and noise+distortion. SFDR is limited by the linearity (intercept point IIP3 mostly, sometimes IIP2) and the noise floor. As receivers already have

  13. The Frequency of Supernovae in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinder, Jens

    Supernovae are cosmic explosions of cataclysmic proportion that signify the death of a star. While being interesting phenomena in their own right, their brightness also make them excellent probes of the early universe. Depending on the type of the progenitor star and the origin of the explosion different subjects can be investigated. In this dissertation the work I have done on the detection, characterisation and rate measurements of supernovae in the Stockholm VIMOS Supernova Search is presented. We have discovered 16 supernovae that exploded billions of years ago (or, equivalently, at high redshift, z). The observed brightness and colour evolution have been used to classify the supernovae into either thermonuclear (type Ia) or core collapse (type II) supernovae. The accuracy of the classification code is high, only about 5% of the supernovae are mistyped, similar to other codes of the same kind. By comparing the observed frequency of supernovae to simulations the underlying supernova rate at these high redshifts have been measured. The main result reported in this thesis is that the core collapse supernova rate at high redshift matches the rates estimated from looking at the star formation history of the universe, and agree well with previous studies. The rate of Ia supernovae at high redshift have been investigated by several projects, our results show a somewhat higher rate of Ia supernovae than expected. Proper estimates of the systematic errors of rate measurements are found to be very important. Furthermore, by using novel techniques for reducing and stacking images, we have obtained a galaxy sample containing approximately 50,000 galaxies. Photometric redshifts have been obtained for most of the galaxies, the resulting accuracy below z=1 is on the order of 10%. The galaxy sample has also been used to find high redshift sources, so called Lyman Break Galaxies, at z=3-5.

  14. How supernovae became the basis of observational cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Pruzhinskaya, Maria Victorovna

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the discovery of one of the most important relationships in supernova cosmology - the relation between the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae and their luminosity decline rate after maximum light. The history of this relationship is quite long and interesting. The relationship was independently discovered by the American statistician and astronomer Bert Woodard Rust and the Soviet astronomer Yury Pavlovich Pskovskii in the 1970s. Using a limited sample of Type I supernovae they were able to show that the brighter the supernova is, the slower its luminosity declines after maximum. Only with the appearance of CCD cameras could Mark Phillips re-inspect this relationship on a new level of accuracy using a better sample of supernovae. His investigations confirmed the idea proposed earlier by Rust and Pskovskii.

  15. UBVRIz Light Curves of 51 Type II Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Galbany, Lluís; Phillips, Mark M; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Maza, José; de Jaeger, Thomas; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Krisciunas, Kevin; Morrell, Nidia I; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Krzeminski, Wojtek; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wischnjewski, Marina; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P; Gutiérrez, Claudia P; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; Anguita, Claudio; Galaz, Gaspar; Green, Elisabeth M; Impey, Chris; Kim, Yong-Cheol; Kirhakos, Sofia; Malkan, Mathew A; Mulchaey, John S; Phillips, Andrew C; Pizzella, Alessandro; Prosser, Charles F; Schmidt, Brian P; Schommer, Robert A; Sherry, William; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wells, Lisa A; Williger, Gerard M

    2015-01-01

    We present a compilation of UBV RIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986 to 2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calan/Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being thus shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  16. Initial Hubble Diagram Results from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, S; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Childress, M; Copin, Y; Gangler, E; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Pécontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigaudier, G; Ripoche, P; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Thomas, R C; Wu, C

    2008-01-01

    The use of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe a decade ago. Now that large second generation surveys have significantly increased the size and quality of the high-redshift sample, the cosmological constraints are limited by the currently available sample of ~50 cosmologically useful nearby supernovae. The Nearby Supernova Factory addresses this problem by discovering nearby supernovae and observing their spectrophotometric time development. Our data sample includes over 2400 spectra from spectral timeseries of 185 supernovae. This talk presents results from a portion of this sample including a Hubble diagram (relative distance vs. redshift) and a description of some analyses using this rich dataset.

  17. Multi-Epoch Spectroscopy of Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Robert; De Cia, Annalisa; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leloudas, Giorgos; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Perley, Daniel A.; Vreeswijk, Paul; Yan, Lin

    2016-06-01

    A growing sample of intrinsically rare supernovae is being uncovered by wide-field synoptic surveys, such as the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). A fraction of these events have been labeled "superluminous supernovae" due to their peak luminosities, which can exceed normal supernovae by factors of 10 to 100. The power sources for these events and thus their connection to normal luminosity supernovae remains uncertain. Here we present results from 134 spectroscopic observations of 17 hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSN-I) discovered by PTF. We select our targets from the full PTF sample using only spectroscopic information; we do not employ the traditional cut in absolute magnitude (e.g. M physical insights into the nature of these explosions offered by this unique dataset.

  18. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 60, La Serena (Chile); Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Krisciunas, Kevin [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Krzeminski, Wojtek [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); McCarthy, Patrick [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Folatelli, Gastón, E-mail: lgalbany@das.uchile.cl [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (IALP, CONICET) (Argentina); and others

    2016-02-15

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  19. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: V. Improving the Dark Energy Constraints Above z>1 and Building an Early-Type-Hosted Supernova Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, N; Lidman, C; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Barbary, K; Barrientos, L F; Botyanszki, J; Brodwin, M; Connolly, N; Dawson, K S; Dey, A; Doi, M; Donahue, M; Deustua, S; Eisenhardt, P; Ellingson, E; Faccioli, L; Fadeyev, V; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; Gonzalez, A H; Goobar, A; Gude, A; Hattori, T; Hoekstra, H; Hsiao, E; Huang, X; Ihara, Y; Jee, M J; Johnston, D; Kashikawa, N; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Kowalski, M; Linder, E V; Lubin, L; Melbourne, J; Meyers, J; Morokuma, T; Munshi, F; Mullis, C; Oda, T; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Pritchard, T; Rhodes, J; Ripoche, P; Rosati, P; Schlegel, D J; Spadafora, A; Stanford, S A; Stanishev, V; Stern, D; Strovink, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Wagner, M; Wang, L; Yasuda, N; Yee, H K C

    2011-01-01

    We present ACS, NICMOS, and Keck AO-assisted photometry of 20 Type Ia supernovae SNe Ia from the HST Cluster Supernova Survey. The SNe Ia were discovered over the redshift interval 0.623 1 SNe Ia. We describe how such a sample could be efficiently obtained by targeting cluster fields with WFC3 on HST.

  20. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  1. Supernova discoveries 2010: statistics and trends

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2013-01-01

    We have inspected all supernova discoveries reported during 2010, a total of 538 events. This number includes a small number of "supernova impostors" (bright extragalactic eruptions) but not novae or events that turned out to be Galactic stars. We examine the statistics of all discovered objects, as well as those of the subset of spectroscopically-confirmed events. This year shows the rise of wide-field non-targeted supernova surveys to prominence, with the largest numbers of events contributed by the CRTS and PTF surveys (189 and 88 events respectively), followed by the integrated contribution of numerous amateurs (82 events). Among spectroscopically-confirmed events the PTF (88 events) leads, before amateur discoveries (69 events), closely followed by the CRTS and PS1 surveys (67 and 63 events, respectively). Traditional galaxy-targeted surveys such as LOSS and CHASE, maintain a strong contribution (50 and 36 events, respectively) with high spectroscopic completeness (96% for LOSS). It is interesting to not...

  2. LSQ13fn: A type II-Plateau supernova with a possibly low metallicity progenitor that breaks the standardised candle relation

    CERN Document Server

    Polshaw, J; Dessart, L; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Inserra, C; Sim, S A; Smartt, S J; Sollerman, J; Baltay, C; Rabinowitz, D; Benetti, S; Botticella, M T; Campbell, H; Chen, T -W; Galbany, L; McKinnon, R; Nicholl, M; Smith, K W; Sullivan, M; Takats, K; Valenti, S; Young, D R

    2015-01-01

    We present optical imaging and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) LSQ13fn, a type II supernova with several hitherto-unseen properties. Although it initially showed strong symmetric spectral emission features attributable to \\ion{He}{ii}, \\ion{N}{iii}, and \\ion{C}{iii}, reminiscent of some interacting SNe, it transitioned into an object that would fall more naturally under a type II-Plateau (IIP) classification. However, its spectral evolution revealed several unusual properties: metal lines appeared later than expected, were weak, and some species were conspicuous by their absence. Furthermore, the line velocities were found to be lower than expected given the plateau brightness, breaking the SNe~IIP standardised candle method for distance estimates. We found that, in combination with a short phase of early-time ejecta-circumstellar material interaction, metal-poor ejecta, and a large progenitor radius could reasonably account for the observed behaviour. Comparisons with synthetic model spectra of SNe~IIP of a g...

  3. Youngest Stellar Explosion in Our Galaxy Discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have found the remains of the youngest supernova, or exploded star, in our Galaxy. The supernova remnant, hidden behind a thick veil of gas and dust, was revealed by the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which could see through the murk. The object is the first example of a "missing population" of young supernova remnants. 1985 and 2008 VLA Images Move cursor over image to blink. VLA Images of G1.9+0.3 in 1985 and 2008: Circle for size comparison. CREDIT: Green, et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF From observing supernovae in other galaxies, astronomers have estimated that about three such stellar explosions should occur in our Milky Way every century. However, the most recent one known until now occurred around 1680, creating the remnant called Cassiopeia A. The newly-discovered object is the remnant of an explosion only about 140 years ago. "If the supernova rate estimates are correct, there should be the remnants of about 10 supernova explosions in the Milky Way that are younger than Cassiopeia A," said David Green of the University of Cambridge in the UK, who led the VLA study. "It's great to finally track one of them down." Supernova explosions, which mark the violent death of a star, release tremendous amounts of energy and spew heavy elements such as calcium and iron into interstellar space. They thus seed the clouds of gas and dust from which new stars and planets are formed and, through their blast shocks, can even trigger such formation. The lack of evidence for young supernova remnants in the Milky Way had caused astronomers to wonder if our Galaxy, which appears otherwise normal, differed in some unknown way from others. Alternatively, scientists thought that the "missing" Milky Way supernovae perhaps indicated that their understanding of the relationship between supernovae and other galactic processes was in error. The astronomers made their discovery by measuring the expansion of the debris from

  4. EVLA Observations of an Extremely Young Type Ia Supernova PTF10ygu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi; Frail, Dale; Nugent, Peter; Howell, Andy; Sullivan, Mark; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Quimby, Robert; Ofek, Eran; Kulkarni, Shri; Yuan, Fang; Akerlof, Carl; McKay, Tim

    2010-10-01

    We triggered our NRAO Target Of Opportunity program "Exploring Transients in the Local Universe" and used the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) to observe PTF10ygu (ATEL#2934), an extremely young Type Ia supernova discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory. The EVLA observations were made on 2010 October 16.68 UT, when this Type Ia supernova was two weeks before maximum light (based on contemporaneous spectroscopy), one of the youngest supernovae to be observed in the radio.

  5. Supernovae neutrino pasta interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zidu; Horowitz, Charles; Caplan, Matthew; Berry, Donald; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, the neutron rich matter is believed to have complex structures, such as spherical, slablike, and rodlike shapes. They are collectively called ``nuclear pasta''. Supernovae neutrinos may scatter coherently on the ``nuclear pasta'' since the wavelength of the supernovae neutrinos are comparable to the nuclear pasta scale. Consequently, the neutrino pasta scattering is important to understand the neutrino opacity in the supernovae. In this work we simulated the ``nuclear pasta'' at different temperatures and densities using our semi-classical molecular dynamics and calculated the corresponding static structure factor that describes ν-pasta scattering. We found the neutrino opacities are greatly modified when the ``pasta'' exist and may have influence on the supernovae neutrino flux and average energy. Our neutrino-pasta scattering effect can finally be involved in the current supernovae simulations and we present preliminary proto neutron star cooling simulations including our pasta opacities.

  6. Supernova Neutrino Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Botella, Ines, E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-25

    The neutrino burst from a core collapse supernova can provide information about the explosion mechanism and the mechanisms of proto neutron star cooling but also about the intrinsic properties of the neutrino such as flavor oscillations. One important question is to understand to which extend can the supernova and the neutrino physics be decoupled in the observation of a single supernova. The possibility to probe the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the type of mass hierarchy from the detection of supernova neutrinos with liquid argon detectors is discussed in this paper. Moreover, a quantitatively study about the possibility to constrain the supernova parameters is presented. A very massive liquid argon detector ({approx} 100 kton) is needed to perform accurate measurements of these parameters. Finally the possible detection of the diffuse supernova neutrino background in liquid argon detectors is also described.

  7. An extremely luminous X-ray outburst at the birth of a supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, A M; Berger, E; Page, K L; Schady, P; Parrent, J; Pooley, D; Wang, X-Y; Ofek, E O; Cucchiara, A; Rau, A; Waxman, E; Simon, J D; Bock, D C-J; Milne, P A; Page, M J; Barentine, J C; Barthelmy, S D; Beardmore, A P; Bietenholz, M F; Brown, P; Burrows, A; Burrows, D N; Bryngelson, G; Byrngelson, G; Cenko, S B; Chandra, P; Cummings, J R; Fox, D B; Gal-Yam, A; Gehrels, N; Immler, S; Kasliwal, M; Kong, A K H; Krimm, H A; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T J; Mészáros, P; Nakar, E; O'Brien, P T; Overzier, R A; de Pasquale, M; Racusin, J; Rea, N; York, D G

    2008-05-22

    Massive stars end their short lives in spectacular explosions--supernovae--that synthesize new elements and drive galaxy evolution. Historically, supernovae were discovered mainly through their 'delayed' optical light (some days after the burst of neutrinos that marks the actual event), preventing observations in the first moments following the explosion. As a result, the progenitors of some supernovae and the events leading up to their violent demise remain intensely debated. Here we report the serendipitous discovery of a supernova at the time of the explosion, marked by an extremely luminous X-ray outburst. We attribute the outburst to the 'break-out' of the supernova shock wave from the progenitor star, and show that the inferred rate of such events agrees with that of all core-collapse supernovae. We predict that future wide-field X-ray surveys will catch each year hundreds of supernovae in the act of exploding.

  8. Instrument performance for IIP Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometers (TIMS) for vertically resolved CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Rairden, R. L.; Jamieson, T. H.; Mergenthaler, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometers (TIMS) have been developed to demonstrate measurement capability, when deployed in space, for multi-layer retrieval of CO from spectral measurements acquired in the solar reflective band ~ 4281 to 4301 cm-1 and in the thermal band ~ 2110 to 2165 cm-1. The presentation will describe [a] the top level designs [b] measured instrument performance parameters including spectral and spatial resolution, spectral quality and noise performance, [c] comparisons of the performance (spectral, spatial, noise) with instrument modeling and [d] calibration procedures and results for spectral registration, spectral response, flat fielding, zero level determination and radiometric. Good comparison with demonstration instrument performance and modeling gives a high level of confidence for instrument performance in the space based case. Lessons learned will be described. These are very valuable for the space deployed application. The TIMS are well suited for either LEO or GEO application.

  9. Classification of 5 DES supernovae by MMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Mandel, K.; Avelino, A.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 5 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra (330-850nm) were obtained using the Blue Channel Spectrograph on the MMT. Object classification was performed using SNID (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) and superfit (Howell et al, 2005, ApJ, 634, 119), the details of which are reported in the table below.

  10. The historical supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, David H

    1977-01-01

    The Historical Supernovae is an interdisciplinary study of the historical records of supernova. This book is composed of 12 chapters that particularly highlight the history of the Far East. The opening chapter briefly describes the features of nova and supernova, stars which spontaneously explode with a spectacular and rapid increase in brightness. The succeeding chapter deals with the search for the historical records of supernova from Medieval European monastic chronicles, Arabic chronicles, astrological works etc., post renaissance European scientific writings, and Far Eastern histories and

  11. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  12. ASASSN-16kz: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 555-G029

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Shields, J.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.

    2016-09-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 555-G029.

  13. ASASSN-17ek: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in LCRS B035620.1-420206

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.

    2017-04-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy LCRS B035620.1-420206.

  14. ASASSN-17hp: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 575-G066

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J. M.; Cacella, P.; Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Nicholls, B.

    2017-06-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 575-G066.

  15. Can pair-instability supernova models match the observations of superluminous supernovae?

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyreva, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of so-called superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are discovered. It is believed that at least some of them with slowly fading light curves originate in stellar explosions induced by the pair instability mechanism. Recent stellar evolution models naturally predict pair instability supernovae (PISNe) from very massive stars at wide range of metallicities (up to Z=0.006, Yusof et al. 2013). In the scope of this study we analyse whether PISN models can match the observational properties of SLSNe with various light curve shapes. Specifically, we explore the influence of different degrees of macroscopic chemical mixing in PISN explosive products on the resulting observational properties. We artificially apply mixing to the 250 Msun PISN evolutionary model from Kozyreva et al. (2014) and explore its supernova evolution with the one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. The greatest success in matching SLSN observations is achieved in the case of an extreme macroscopic mixing, where all r...

  16. Rapidly Rising Transients in the Supernova - Superluminous Supernova Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D Andrew; Bildsten, Lars; Leloudas, Giorgos; Hardin, Delphine; Prajs, Szymon; Perley, Daniel A; Svirski, Gilad; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Katz, Boaz; McCully, Curtis; Cenko, S Bradley; Lidman, Chris; Sullivan, Mark; Valenti, Stefano; Astier, Pierre; Balland, Cristophe; Carlberg, Ray G; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Pain, Reynald; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J; Regnault, Nicolas; Rich, James; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina

    2015-01-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t_{rise}~10d) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M_{peak}~-20) - one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as a Type II SN due to broad Halpha emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Halpha (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si II (as seen in Type Ia SNe), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM) and magnetar spindown can not r...

  17. New supernova candidates from the SDSS-DR7 spectral survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Ping Tu; A-Li Luo; Fu-Chao Wu; Chao Wu; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2009-01-01

    This letter presents 25 supernova candidates discovered from SDSS-DR7 by using our dedicated method, called Sample Decrease. Ten of them have been confirmed by other research groups, while the remaining 15, including 14 Type Ia and one Type Ⅱ, are first discovered based on Supernova Identification analysis. The results demonstrate that our method is reliable. The description of the method and some detailed spectral analysis procedures are also presented.

  18. ASASSN-16mv: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 563- G 035

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, B.; Shields, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.; Stone, G.; Post, R. S.; Masi, G.; Koff, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 563- G 035. ASASSN-16mv was discovered in images obtained on UT 2016-11-04.31 at V 16.8 mag. We also detect the object in images obtained on several previous epochs.

  19. Neutrinos from Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S; Choubey, Sandhya; Kar, Kamales

    2002-01-01

    In this review, the effect of flavor oscillations on the neutrinos released during supernova explosion after core collapse is described. In some scenarios there are large enhancement of the number of events compared to the no oscillation case. Various other features associated with supernova neutrinos are also discussed.

  20. Galaxy Zoo Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A M; Sullivan, M; Lintott, C J; Nugent, P E; Botyanszki, J; Kasliwal, M; Quimby, R; Bamford, S P; Fortson, L F; Schawinski, K; Hook, I; Blake, S; Podsiadlowski, P; Joensson, J; Gal-Yam, A; Arcavi, I; Howell, D A; Bloom, J S; Jacobsen, J; Kulkarni, S R; Law, N M; Ofek, E O; Walters, R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first results from a new citizen science project: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae. This proof of concept project uses members of the public to identify supernova candidates from the latest generation of wide-field imaging transient surveys. We describe the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae operations and scoring model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel method using imaging data and transients from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We examine the results collected over the period April-July 2010, during which nearly 14,000 supernova candidates from PTF were classified by more than 2,500 individuals within a few hours of data collection. We compare the transients selected by the citizen scientists to those identified by experienced PTF scanners, and find the agreement to be remarkable - Galaxy Zoo Supernovae performs comparably to the PTF scanners, and identified as transients 93% of the ~130 spectroscopically confirmed SNe that PTF located during the trial period (with no false positive iden...

  1. Molecules in supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The first molecules detected at infrared wavelengths in the ejecta of a Type II supernova, namely SN1987A, consisted of CO and SiO. Since then, confirmation of the formation of these two species in several other supernovae a few hundred days after explosion has been obtained. However, supernova environments appear to hamper the synthesis of large, complex species due to the lack of microscopically-mixed hydrogen deep in supernova cores. Because these environments also form carbon and silicate dust, it is of importance to understand the role played by molecules in the depletion of elements and how chemical species get incorporated into dust grains. In the present paper, we review our current knowledge of the molecular component of supernova ejecta, and present new trends and results on the synthesis of molecules in these harsh, explosive events.

  2. Software Based Supernova Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Stephen M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes software for detecting Supernova (SN) in images. The software can operate in real-time to discover SN while data is being collected so the instrumentation can immediately be re-tasked to perform spectroscopy or photometry of a discovery. Because the instrumentation captures two images per minute, the realtime budget is constrained to 30 seconds per target, a challenging goal. Using a set of two to four images, the program creates a "Reference" (REF) image and a "New" (NEW) image where all images are used in both NEW and REF but any SN survives the combination process only in the NEW image. This process produces good quality images having similar noise characteristics but without artifacts that might be interpreted as SN. The images are then adjusted for seeing and brightness differences using a variant of Tomaney and Crotts method of Point Spread Function (PSF) matching after which REF is subtracted from NEW to produce a Difference (DIF) image. A Classifier is then trained on a grid of artificial SN to estimate the statistical properties of four attributes and used in a process to mask false positives that can be clearly identified as such. Further training to avoid any remaining false positives sets the range, in standard deviations for each attribute, that the Classifier will accept as a valid SN. This training enables the Classifier to discriminate between SN and most subtraction residue. Lastly, the DIF image is scanned and measured by the Classifier to find locations where all four properties fall within their acceptance ranges. If multiple locations are found, the one best conforming to the training estimates is chosen. This location is then declared as a Candidate SN, the instrumentation re-tasked and the operator notified.

  3. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  4. The Supernova Legacy Survey 3-year sample: Type Ia Supernovae photometric distances and cosmological constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Guy, J; Conley, A; Regnault, N; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Fouchez, D; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K M; Pritchet, C J; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Balam, D; Baumont, S; Ellis, R S; Fabbro, S; Fakhouri, H K; Fourmanoit, N; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Graham, M L; Hsiao, E; Kronborg, T; Lidman, C; Mourao, A M; Perlmutter, S; Ripoche, P; Suzuki, N; Walker, E S

    2010-01-01

    We present photometric properties and distance measurements of 252 high redshift Type Ia supernovae (0.15 < z < 1.1) discovered during the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-colour light curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshifts. Systematic uncertainties arising from light curve modeling are studied, making use of two techniques to derive the peak magnitude, shape and colour of the supernovae, and taking advantage of a precise calibration of the SNLS fields. A flat LambdaCDM cosmological fit to 231 SNLS high redshift Type Ia supernovae alone gives Omega_M = 0.211 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.069(sys). The dominant systematic uncertainty comes from uncertainties in the photometri...

  5. Prospective Type Ia Supernova Surveys From Dome A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Bonissent, A.; /Marseille, CPPM; Christiansen, J.L.; /Cal. Poly.; Ealet, A.; /Marseille, CPPM; Faccioli, L.; /UC, Berkeley; Gladney, L.; /Pennsylvania U.; Kushner, G.; /LBL, Berkeley; Linder, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Stoughton, C.; /Fermilab; Wang, L.; /Texas A-M /Purple Mountain Observ.

    2010-02-01

    Dome A, the highest plateau in Antarctica, is being developed as a site for an astronomical observatory. The planned telescopes and instrumentation and the unique site characteristics are conducive toward Type Ia supernova surveys for cosmology. A self-contained search and survey over five years can yield a spectro-photometric time series of {approx}1000 z < 0.08 supernovae. These can serve to anchor the Hubble diagram and quantify the relationship between luminosities and heterogeneities within the Type Ia supernova class, reducing systematics. Larger aperture ({approx}>4-m) telescopes are capable of discovering supernovae shortly after explosion out to z {approx} 3. These can be fed to space telescopes, and can isolate systematics and extend the redshift range over which we measure the expansion history of the universe.

  6. Prospective Type Ia supernova surveys from Dome A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A.; Bonissent, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ealet, A.; Faccioli, L.; Gladney, L.; Kushner, G.; Linder, E.; Stoughton, C.; Wang, L.

    2010-03-10

    Dome A, the highest plateau in Antarctica, is being developed as a site for an astronomical observatory. The planned telescopes and instrumentation and the unique site characteristics are conducive toward Type Ia supernova surveys for cosmology. A self-contained search and survey over 5 years can yield a spectro-photometric time series of ~;; 1000 z< 0:08 supernovae. These can serve to anchor the Hubble diagram and quantify the relationship between luminosities and heterogeneities within the Type Ia supernova class, reducing systematics. Larger aperture (>=4-m) telescopes are capable of discovering supernovae shortly after explosion out to z ~;; 3. These can be fed to space telescopes, and can isolate systematics and extend the redshift range over which we measure the expansion history of the universe.

  7. Asphericity, Interaction, and Dust in the Type II-P/II-L Supernova 2013ej in Messier 74

    CERN Document Server

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Johansson, Joel; Hu, Maokai; Fox, Ori D; Wang, Lifan; Graham, Melissa L; Filippenko, Alexei V; Shivvers, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    SN 2013ej is a well-studied core-collapse supernova (SN) that stemmed from a directly identified red supergiant (RSG) progenitor in galaxy M74. The source exhibits signs of substantial geometric asphericity, X-rays from persistent interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), thermal emission from warm dust, and a light curve that appears intermediate between supernovae of Types II-P and II-L. The proximity of this source motivates a close inspection of these physical characteristics and their potential interconnection. We present multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SN 2013ej during the first 107 days, and deep optical spectroscopy and ultraviolet through infrared photometry past ~800 days. SN 2013ej exhibits the strongest and most persistent continuum and line polarization ever observed for a SN of its class during the recombination phase. Modeling indicates that the data are consistent with an oblate ellipsoidal photosphere, viewed nearly edge-on, and probably augmented by optical scattering from circumstell...

  8. Galaxy Zoo Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M.; Lynn, S.; Sullivan, M.; Lintott, C. J.; Nugent, P. E.; Botyanszki, J.; Kasliwal, M.; Quimby, R.; Bamford, S. P.; Fortson, L. F.; Schawinski, K.; Hook, I.; Blake, S.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Jönsson, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Law, N. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Walters, R.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the first results from a new citizen science project: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae. This proof-of-concept project uses members of the public to identify supernova candidates from the latest generation of wide-field imaging transient surveys. We describe the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae operations and scoring model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel method using imaging data and transients from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We examine the results collected over the period 2010 April-July, during which nearly 14 000 supernova candidates from the PTF were classified by more than 2500 individuals within a few hours of data collection. We compare the transients selected by the citizen scientists to those identified by experienced PTF scanners and find the agreement to be remarkable - Galaxy Zoo Supernovae performs comparably to the PTF scanners and identified as transients 93 per cent of the ˜130 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae (SNe) that the PTF located during the trial period (with no false positive identifications). Further analysis shows that only a small fraction of the lowest signal-to-noise ratio detections (r > 19.5) are given low scores: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae correctly identifies all SNe with ≥8σ detections in the PTF imaging data. The Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project has direct applicability to future transient searches, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, by both rapidly identifying candidate transient events and via the training and improvement of existing machine classifier algorithms. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 10 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project ().

  9. Light Curves of Core-Collapse Supernovae with Substantial Mass Loss using the New Open-Source SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC)

    CERN Document Server

    Morozova, V; Renzo, M; Ott, C D; Clausen, D; Couch, S M; Ellis, J; Roberts, L F

    2015-01-01

    We present the SuperNova Explosion Code SNEC, an open-source Lagrangian code for the hydrodynamics and equilibrium-diffusion radiation transport in the expanding envelopes of supernovae. Given a model of a progenitor star, an explosion energy, and an amount and distribution of radioactive nickel, SNEC generates the bolometric light curve, as well as the light curves in different wavelength bands assuming black body emission. As a first application of SNEC, we consider the explosions of a grid of 15 Msun (at zero-age main sequence) stars whose hydrogen envelopes are stripped to different extents and at different points in their evolution. The resulting light curves exhibit plateaus with durations of ~20-100 days if >~1.5-2 Msun of hydrogen-rich material is left and no plateau if less hydrogen-rich material is left. The shorter plateau lengths are unlike the Type IIP supernova light curves typically observed in nature. This suggests that, at least for zero-age main sequence masses <~ 20 Msun, hydrogen mass l...

  10. LEGUS Discovery of a Light Echo Around Supernova 2012aw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dyk, S.D.; Lee, J.C.; Anderson, J.; Andrews, J.E.; Calzetti, D.; Bright, S.N.; Ubeda, L.; Smith, L.J.; Sabbi, E.; Grebel, E.K.; Herrero, A.; de Mink, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered a luminous light echo around the normal Type II-Plateau Supernova (SN) 2012aw in Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351), detected in images obtained approximately two years after explosion with the Wide Field Channel 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope by the Legacy ExtraGalactic

  11. Multiwavelength observations of the Type IIb supernova 2009mg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oates, S. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Stritzinger, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    We present Swift Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations, and visual wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2009mg, discovered in the Sb galaxy ESO 121-G26. The observational properties of SN 2009mg are compared to the prototype Type IIb SNe 1993J...

  12. Classification of 3 DES supernovae by Gemini-North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2015-11-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 3 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. The spectra (380-820nm) were obtained using GMOS on Gemini-North. Object classification was performed using SNID (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) and superfit (Howell et al, 2005, ApJ, 634, 119), the details of which are reported in the table below.

  13. Multiwavelength observations of the Type IIb supernova 2009mg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oates, S. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Stritzinger, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    We present Swift Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations, and visual wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2009mg, discovered in the Sb galaxy ESO 121-G26. The observational properties of SN 2009mg are compared to the prototype Type IIb SNe 1993J...

  14. A Missing-Link in the Supernova-GRB Connection: The Case of SN 2012ap

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Chomiuk, Laura; Kamble, Atish; Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak; Hurley, Kevin; Margutti, Raffaella; Milisavljevic, Dan; Bietenholz, Michael; Brunthaler, Andreas; Pignata, Giuliano; Pian, Elena; Mazzali, Paolo; Fransson, Claes; Bartel, Norbert; Hamuy, Mario; Levesque, Emily; MacFadyen, Andrew; Dittmann, Jason; Krauss, Miriam; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Yamaoka, K; Takahashi, T; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Goldsten, J; Barthelmy, S; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H; Palmer, D; Golenetskii, S; Aptekar, R; Frederiks, D; Svinkin, D; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Enos, H; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X; Savchenko, V

    2014-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are characterized by ultra-relativistic outflows, while supernovae are generally characterized by non-relativistic ejecta. GRB afterglows decelerate rapidly usually within days, because their low-mass ejecta rapidly sweep up a comparatively larger mass of circumstellar material. However supernovae, with heavy ejecta, can be in nearly free expansion for centuries. Supernovae were thought to have non-relativistic outflows except for few relativistic ones accompanied by GRBs. This clear division was blurred by SN 2009bb, the first supernova with a relativistic outflow without an observed GRB. Yet the ejecta from SN 2009bb was baryon loaded, and in nearly-free expansion for a year, unlike GRBs. We report the first supernova discovered without a GRB, but with rapidly decelerating mildly relativistic ejecta, SN 2012ap. This shows that central engines in type Ic supernovae, even without an observed GRB, can produce both relativistic and rapidly decelerating outflows like GRBs.

  15. Automated search for supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  16. Photometric Supernova Classification With Machine Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Lochner, Michelle; Peiris, Hiranya V; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K

    2016-01-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Telescope (LSST), given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered with these surveys will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques fitting parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks and boosted decision trees. We test the pipeline on simulated multi-ba...

  17. Supernova electron capture rates

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Pinedo, G

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the Gamow-Teller strength distributions for the ground states and low lying states of several nuclei that play an important role in the precollapse evolution of supernova. The calculations reproduce the experimental GT distributions nicely. The GT distribution are used to calculate electron capture rates for typical presupernova conditions. The computed rates are noticeably smaller than the presently adopted rates. The possible implications for the supernova evolution are discussed.

  18. The Progenitor of the Type II-Plateau Supernova 2003gd in Messier 74

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dyk, S D; Filippenko, A V

    2003-01-01

    HST WFPC2 archival F606W and F300W images obtained within one year prior to the explosion of the nearby Type II supernova (SN) 2003gd in Messier 74 (NGC 628) have been analyzed to isolate the progenitor star. The SN site was located using precise astrometry applied to the HST images. Two plausible candidates are identified within 0.6" of the SN position in the F606W image. Neither candidate was detected in the F300W image. SN 2003gd appears to be of Type II-plateau (II-P), with age ~87 d on June 17 UT and with low reddening [E(B-V) = 0.13 mag]. The most likely of the two progenitor candidates has M_V_0 ~ -3.5 mag (for an extinction-corrected distance modulus of 29.3 mag) and, based on additional color information derived from a high-quality, archival ground-based I-band image, we estimate that this star was a red supergiant with initial mass M_ZAMS ~ 8 -- 9 Msun. This mass estimate is somewhat lower than, but relatively consistent with, recent limits placed on the progenitor masses of other SNe II-P, using HS...

  19. SALT spectroscopic classification of SN 2017erp as a type-Ia supernova well before maximum light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S. W.; Camacho, Y.; Dettman, K.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Skelton, R.

    2017-06-01

    We obtained SALT (+RSS) spectroscopy of SN 2017erp (discovered by K. Itagaki) on 2017 Jun 13.9 UT, covering the wavelength range 350-940 nm. Cross-correlation of the supernova spectrum with a template library using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) shows SN 2017erp is a type-Ia supernova before maximum light.

  20. Ethanol and xylitol production from glucose and xylose at high temperature by Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sachin; Singh, Surendra P; Mishra, Indra M; Adhikari, Dilip K

    2009-12-01

    A yeast strain Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 (MTCC 5314), isolated from soil samples collected from dumping sites of crushed sugarcane bagasse in Sugar Mill, showed growth and fermentation efficiency at high temperatures ranging from 45 degrees C to 50 degrees C. The yeast strain was able to use a wide range of substrates, such as glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, sucrose, and cellobiose, either for growth or fermentation to ethanol. The strain also showed xylitol production from xylose. In batch fermentation, the strain showed maximum ethanol concentration of 82 +/- 0.5 g l(-1) (10.4% v/v) on initial glucose concentration of 200 g l(-1), and ethanol concentration of 1.75 +/- 0.05 g l(-1) as well as xylitol concentration of 11.5 +/- 0.4 g l(-1) on initial xylose concentration of 20 g l(-1) at 50 degrees C. The strain was capable of simultaneously using glucose and xylose in a mixture of glucose concentration of 75 g l(-1) and xylose concentration of 25 g l(-1), achieving maximum ethanol concentration of 38 +/- 0.5 g l(-1) and xylitol concentration of 14.5 +/- 0.2 g l(-1) in batch fermentation. High stability of the strain was observed in a continuous fermentation by feeding the mixture of glucose concentration of 75 g l(-1) and xylose concentration of 25 g l(-1) by recycling the cells, achieving maximum ethanol concentration of 30.8 +/- 6.2 g l(-1) and xylitol concentration of 7.35 +/- 3.3 g l(-1) with ethanol productivity of 3.1 +/- 0.6 g l(-1) h(-1) and xylitol productivity of 0.75 +/- 0.35 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  1. SALT Spectroscopy of ASASSN-15lh: The Most Luminous Supernova?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Travis; Camacho, Yssavo; Dettman, Kyle; Jha, Saurabh W.

    2017-01-01

    In August 2015, ASASSN-15lh was discovered as the most luminous supernova (SN) ever found (Dong et al. 2016), more than twice as bright as other so-called super-luminous supernovae (SLSN). However, the spectral evolution of the transient is unlike any known supernova. To better understand this object, we have observed ASASSN-15lh with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). We obtained spectroscopic data in July 2016 and reduced and calibrated the spectrum for comparison with other supernovae. The new pectrum did not show strong supernova features and was dominated by light from the host galaxy. We used this late spectrum as a galaxy template, subtracting it from earlier data. However, we still find that ASASSN-15lh does not clearly resemble any known supernova. Either it is unique, or perhaps an alternate explanation is needed (e.g., a tidal disruption event; Leloudas et al. 2016). This Research Experience for Undergraduates project in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Rutgers University has been supported by funding from National Science Foundation grants PHY-1263280 and PHY-1560077.

  2. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, William P; Long, Knox S; Whitmore, Bradley C; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K D; Plucinsky, Paul P; Dopita, Michael A; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at H$\\alpha$, [O~I] 6300,6363, and [O~III] 4959,5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was missed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 $\\rm M_{sun}$, and the presence of broad H$\\alpha$ in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely....

  3. Cosmic Supernova Rate History and Type Ia Supernova Progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2001-01-01

    Adopting a single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernova progenitors with the metallicity effect, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in spiral and elliptical galaxies, and compare with the recent observational data up to z ~ 0.55.

  4. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  5. The Most Luminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Recent observations have revealed a stunning diversity of extremely luminous supernovae, seemingly increasing in radiant energy without bound. We consider simple approximate limits for what existing models can provide for the peak luminosity and total radiated energy for non-relativistic, isotropic stellar explosions. The brightest possible supernova is a Type I explosion powered by a sub-millisecond magnetar with field strength B ∼ few × {10}13 G. In extreme cases, such models might reach a peak luminosity of 2× {10}46 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and radiate a total energy of up to 4× {10}52 {erg}. Other less luminous models are also explored, including prompt hyper-energetic explosions in red supergiants, pulsational-pair instability supernovae, pair-instability supernovae, and colliding shells. Approximate analytic expressions and limits are given for each case. Excluding magnetars, the peak luminosity is near 3× {10}44 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 for the brightest models and the corresponding limit on total radiated energy is 3× {10}51 {erg}. Barring new physics, supernovae with a light output over 3× {10}51 erg must be rotationally powered, either during the explosion itself or after, the most obvious candidate being a rapidly rotating magnetar. A magnetar-based model for the recent transient event, ASASSN-15lh is presented that strains, but does not exceed the limits of what the model can provide.

  6. Discovering New Light States at Neutrino Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Rouven; /SLAC; Harnik, Roni; /Fermilab; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-11

    Experiments designed to measure neutrino oscillations also provide major opportunities for discovering very weakly coupled states. In order to produce neutrinos, experiments such as LSND collide thousands of Coulombs of protons into fixed targets, while MINOS and MiniBooNE also focus and then dump beams of muons. The neutrino detectors beyond these beam dumps are therefore an excellent arena in which to look for long-lived pseudoscalars or for vector bosons that kinetically mix with the photon. We show that these experiments have significant sensitivity beyond previous beam dumps, and are able to partially close the gap between laboratory experiments and supernovae constraints on pseudoscalars. Future upgrades to the NuMI beamline and Project X will lead to even greater opportunities for discovery. We also discuss thin target experiments with muon beams, such as those available in COMPASS, and show that they constitute a powerful probe for leptophilic PNGBs.

  7. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A: II - Dust sputtering and diagnosis for dust survival in supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Biscaro, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains formed in the Type II-b supernova by modelling the sputtering of grains located in dense ejecta clumps crossed by the reverse shock. Further sputtering in the inter-clump medium once the clumps are disrupted by the reverse shock is investigated. The dust evolution in the dense ejecta clumps of Type II-P supernovae and their remnants is also studied. We study oxygen-rich clumps that describe the ejecta oxygen core, and carbon-rich clumps that correspond to the outermost carbon-rich ejecta zone. We consider the dust components formed in the supernova, several reverse shock velocities and inter-clump gas temperatures, and derive dust grain size distributions and masses as a function of time. We find that non-thermal sputtering in clumps is important and accounts for reducing the grain population by ~ 40% to 80% in mass, depending on the clump gas over-density and the grain type and size. A Type II-b SN form...

  8. Discover your dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红

    2010-01-01

    《盗梦空间》(Inception)票房大热,几乎在全球掀起了一股探梦狂潮,现在就让我们跟随Inception主角Cobb的叙述,来discover your dream(探索你的梦境)吧。

  9. Cosmology with Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Scovacricchi, Dario; Bacon, David; Sullivan, Mark; Prajs, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) as standardisable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z~3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the "Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae" (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardisation values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalise over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ~100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Omega_m by at least 20% (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia a...

  10. Physics of supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-12-13

    Presupernova models of massive stars are presented and their explosion by ''delayed neutrino transport'' examined. A new form of long duration Type II supernova model is also explored based upon repeated encounter with the electron-positron pair instability in stars heavier than about 60 Msub solar. Carbon deflagration in white dwarfs is discussed as the probable explanation of Type I supernovae and special attention is paid to the physical processes whereby a nuclear flame propagates through degenerate carbon. 89 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  12. BVRI Photometry of Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Wynn C. G.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Peng, Chien Y.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas; Treffers, Richard R.; Richmond, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    We present optical photometry of one Type IIn supernova (1994Y) and nine Type Ia supernovae (1993Y, 1993Z, 1993ae, 1994B, 1994C, 1994M, 1994Q, 1994ae, and 1995D). SN 1993Y and SN 1993Z appear to be normal SN Ia events with similar rates of decline, but we do not have data near maximum brightness. The colors of SN 1994C suggest that it suffers from significant reddening or is intrinsically red. The light curves of SN 1994Y are complicated; they show a slow rise and gradual decline near maximum...

  13. Preparatory studies for the WFIRST supernova cosmology measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    In the context of the WFIRST-AFTA Science Definition Team we developed a first version of a supernova program, described in the WFIRST-AFTA SDT report. This program uses the imager to discover supernova candidates and an Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) to obtain spectrophotometric light curves and higher signal to noise spectra of the supernovae near peak to better characterize the supernovae and thus minimize systematic errors. While this program was judged a robust one, and the estimates of the sensitivity to the cosmological parameters were felt to be reliable, due to limitation of time the analysis was clearly limited in depth on a number of issues. The goal of this proposal is to further develop this program and refine the estimates of the sensitivities to the cosmological parameters using more sophisticated systematic uncertainty models and covariance error matrices that fold in more realistic data concerning observed populations of SNe Ia as well as more realistic instrument models. We propose to develop analysis algorithms and approaches that are needed to build, optimize, and refine the WFIRST instrument and program requirements to accomplish the best supernova cosmology measurements possible. We plan to address the following: a) Use realistic Supernova populations, subclasses and population drift. One bothersome uncertainty with the supernova technique is the possibility of population drift with redshift. We are in a unique position to characterize and mitigate such effects using the spectrophotometric time series of real Type Ia supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory). Each supernova in this sample has global galaxy measurements as well as additional local environment information derived from the IFS spectroscopy. We plan to develop methods of coping with this issue, e.g., by selecting similar subsamples of supernovae and allowing additional model flexibility, in order to reduce systematic uncertainties. These studies will allow us to

  14. Unifying Type II Supernova Light Curves with Dense Circumstellar Material

    CERN Document Server

    Morozova, Viktoriya; Valenti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding problem in the study of supernovae (SNe) has been the relationship between the Type IIP and Type IIL subclasses. Whether they come from distinct progenitors or they are from similar stars with some property that smoothly transitions from one class to another has been the subject of much debate. Here we show using one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic SN models that the multi-band light curves of SNe IIL are well fit by ordinary red supergiants surrounded by dense circumstellar material (CSM). The inferred extent of this material, coupled with a typical wind velocity of ~10-100 km/s, suggests enhanced activity by these stars during the last ~months to ~years of their lives, which may be connected with advanced stages of nuclear burning. Furthermore, we find that even for more plateau-like SNe that dense CSM provides a better fit to the first ~20 days of their light curves, indicating that the presence of such material may be more widespread than previously appreciated. Here we choose to model t...

  15. Formation of Dust in the Ejecta of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nozawa, Takaya; Kozasa, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaomi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the formation of dust grains in the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), adopting the carbon-deflagration W7 model. In the calculations of dust formation, we apply the nucleation and grain growth theory and consider the two cases with and without formation of CO and SiO molecules. The results of the calculations show that for the sticking probability of alpha_j=1, C, silicate, Si, and FeS grains can condense at early times of ~100--300 days after the explosion, whereas Fe and SiC grains cannot form substantially. Due to the low gas density in SNe Ia with no H-envelope, the average radii of the newly formed grains are generally below 0.01 micron, being much smaller than those in Type II-P SNe. This supports our previous conclusion that the radius of dust formed in the ejecta is smaller in SNe with less massive envelopes. The total dust mass ranges from 3x10^{-4} M_sun to 0.2 M_sun for alpha_j=0.1--1, depending on whether or not CO and SiO molecules are formed. We also estimate the optical dept...

  16. Supernova 2008bk and Its Red Supergiant Progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Taubenberger, Stefan; Li, Weidong; Howerton, Stanley; Pignata, Giuliano; Morrell, Nidia; Hamuy, Mario; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2010-01-01

    We have observed Supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, both photometrically and spectroscopically, primarily at late times. We find that it is a Type II-Plateau (II-P) SN, which most closely resembles the low-luminosity SN 1999br in NGC 4900. Given the overall similarity between the observed light curves and colors of SNe 2008bk and 1999br, we infer that the total visual extinction to SN 2008bk must be almost entirely due to the Galactic foreground, similar to that for SN 1999br: A_V=0.065 mag, which is substantially less than the 1.0 +/- 0.5 mag assumed by Mattila et al. (2008). Furthermore, we confirm the identification of the putative red supergiant progenitor star of the SN in high-quality g'r'i' Gemini-South images from 2007. Little ambiguity exists in this progenitor identification; besides the connection between the star Sk -69 202 and SN 1987A, it qualifies as one of the best SN progenitor identifications to date. From a combination of the Gemini images with archival, pre-SN, Very Large Telescope JHK_s i...

  17. Probing Efficient Cosmic-Ray Acceleration in Young Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V; Marcowith, A; Tatischeff, V

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a core collapse supernovae (SNe) results in a fast (but non- or mildly-relativistic) shock wave expanding outwards into the surrounding medium. The medium itself is likely modified due to the stellar mass-loss from the massive star progenitor, which may be Wolf-Rayet stars (for Type Ib/c SNe), red supergiant stars (for type IIP and perhaps IIb and IIL SNe), or some other stellar type. The wind mass-loss parameters determine the density structure of the surrounding medium. Combined with the velocity of the SN shock wave, this regulates the shock acceleration process. In this article we discuss the essential parameters that control the particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission in SNe, with particular reference to the Type IIb SN 1993J. The shock wave expanding into the high density medium leads to fast particle acceleration, giving rise to rapidly-growing plasma instabilities driven by the acceleration process itself. The instabilities grow over intraday timescales. This growth, combined wit...

  18. Discovering the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrie W.

    1999-04-01

    Discovering the Solar System Barrie W. Jones The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK Discovering the Solar System is a comprehensive, up-to-date account of the Solar System and of the ways in which the various bodies have been investigated and modelled. The approach is thematic, with sequences of chapters on the interiors of planetary bodies, on their surfaces, and on their atmospheres. Within each sequence there is a chapter on general principles and processes followed by one or two chapters on specific bodies. There is also an introductory chapter, a chapter on the origin of the Solar System, and a chapter on asteroids, comets and meteorites. Liberally illustrated with diagrams, black and white photographs and colour plates, Discovering the Solar System also features: * tables of essential data * question and answers within the text * end of section review questions with answers and comments Discovering the Solar System is essential reading for all undergraduate students for whom astronomy or planetary science are components of their degrees, and for those at a more advanced level approaching the subject for the first time. It will also be of great interest to non-specialists with a keen interest in astronomy. A small amount of scientific knowledge is assumed plus familiarity with basic algebra and graphs. There is no calculus. Praise for this book includes: ".certainly qualifies as an authoritative text. The author clearly has an encyclopedic knowledge of the subject." Meteorics and Planetary Science ".liberally doused with relevant graphs, tables, and black and white figures of good quality." EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union ".one of the best books on the Solar System I have seen. The general accuracy and quality of the content is excellent." Journal of the British Astronomical Association

  19. Discovering Phonemes of Bidayuh

    OpenAIRE

    Jecky Misieng

    2012-01-01

    There are generally three views of the notion of a phoneme. The structuralist view of the phoneme focuses on this language phenomenon as a phonetic reality. In discovering phonemes of a language, phonologists who hold this view will look for minimal contrasting pairs as a way to determine contrasting sounds of that language. They will also look for allophones or two sounds of the same phoneme which may appear in complementary distribution. This paper will discuss the possible application of t...

  20. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for the discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between September 1 and November 30 of 2005-7. During...... the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327...

  1. Scheduled discoveries of 7+ high-Redshift supernovae: First cosmology results and bounds on q{sub 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlmutter, S., FNAL

    1998-09-01

    Our search for high-redshift Type Ia supernovae discovered, in its first years, a sample of seven supernovae. Using a ``batch`` search strategy, almost all were discovered before maximum light and were observed over the peak of their light curves. The spectra and light curves indicate that almost all were Type Ia supernovae at redshifts z = 0.35 - 0.5. These high-redshift supernovae can provide a distance indicator and ``standard clock`` to study the cosmological parameters q{sub 0} , {Lambda}, {Omega}{sub 0} , and H{sub 0}. This presentation and the following presentations of Kim et al. (1996), Goldhaber et al. (1996), and Pain et al. (1996) will discuss observation strategies and rates, analysis and calibration issues, the sources of measurement uncertainty, and the cosmological implications, including bounds on q{sub 0} , of these first high-redshift supernovae from our ongoing search.

  2. Theoretical models for supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-09-21

    The results of recent numerical simulations of supernova explosions are presented and a variety of topics discussed. Particular emphasis is given to (i) the nucleosynthesis expected from intermediate mass (10sub solar less than or equal to M less than or equal to 100 Msub solar) Type II supernovae and detonating white dwarf models for Type I supernovae, (ii) a realistic estimate of the ..gamma..-line fluxes expected from this nucleosynthesis, (iii) the continued evolution, in one and two dimensions, of intermediate mass stars wherein iron core collapse does not lead to a strong, mass-ejecting shock wave, and (iv) the evolution and explosion of vary massive stars (M greater than or equal to 100 Msub solar of both Population I and III. In one dimension, nuclear burning following a failed core bounce does not appear likely to lead to a supernova explosion although, in two dimensions, a combination of rotation and nuclear burning may do so. Near solar proportions of elements from neon to calcium and very brilliant optical displays may be created by hypernovae, the explosions of stars in the mass range 100 M/sub solar/ to 300 M/sub solar/. Above approx. 300 M/sub solar/ a black hole is created by stellar collapse following carbon ignition. Still more massive stars may be copious producers of /sup 4/He and /sup 14/N prior to their collapse on the pair instability.

  3. Supernova 2013by

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valenti, S.; Sand, D.; Stritzinger, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet and optical light curves, as well as visual-wavelength and near-infrared spectroscopy of the Type II linear (IIL) supernova (SN) 2013by. We show that SN 2013by and other SNe IIL in the literature, after their linear decline phase that start after maximum, have...

  4. QCD and Supernovas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, T.

    2005-12-01

    In this contribution we briefly summarize aspects of the physics of QCD which are relevant to the supernova problem. The topic of greatest importance is the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear and strongly-interacting matter, which is required to describe the physics of the proto-neutron star (PNS) and the neutron star remnant (NSR) formed during a supernova event. Evaluation of the EOS in the regime of relevance for these systems, especially the NSR, requires detailed knowledge of the spectrum and strong interactions of hadrons of the accessible hadronic species, as well as other possible phases of strongly interacting matter, such as the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The forces between pairs of baryons (both nonstrange and strange) are especially important in determining the EOS at NSR densities. Predictions for these forces are unfortunately rather model dependent where not constrained by data, and there are several suggestions for the QCD mechanism underlying these short-range hadronic interactions. The models most often employed for determining these strong interactions are broadly of two types, 1) meson exchange models (usually assumed in the existing neutron star and supernova literature), and 2) quark-gluon models (mainly encountered in the hadron, nuclear and heavy-ion literature). Here we will discuss the assumptions made in these models, and discuss how they are applied to the determination of hadronic forces that are relevant to the supernova problem.

  5. The Most Luminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed an amazing diversity of extremely luminous supernovae, seemingly increasing in radiant energy without bound. We consider here the physical limits of what existing models can provide for the peak luminosity and total radiated energy for non-relativistic, isotropic stellar explosions. The brightest possible supernova is a Type I explosion powered by a sub-millisecond magnetar. Such models can reach a peak luminosity of $\\rm 2\\times10^{46}\\ erg\\ s^{-1}$ and radiate a total energy of $\\rm 4 \\times10^{52}\\ erg$. Other less luminous models are also explored, including prompt hyper-energetic explosions in red supergiants, pulsational-pair instability supernovae, and pair-instability supernovae. Approximate analytic expressions and limits are given for each case. Excluding magnetars, the peak luminosity is near $\\rm 1\\times10^{44}\\ erg\\ s^{-1}$ for the brightest models. The corresponding limits on total radiated power are $\\rm3 \\times 10^{51}\\ erg$ (Type I) and $\\rm1 \\times 10^{51}\\ ...

  6. Supernovae and Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Tornambé, A.

    2009-08-01

    A decade ago the observations of thermonuclear supernovae at high-redhifts showed that the expansion rate of the Universe is accelerating and since then, the evidence for cosmic acceleration has gotten stronger. This acceleration requires that the Universe is dominated by dark energy, an exotic component characterized by its negative pressure. Nowadays all the available astronomical data (i.e. thermonuclear supernovae, cosmic microwave background, barionic acoustic oscillations, large scale structure, etc.) agree that our Universe is made of about 70% of dark energy, 25% of cold dark matter and only 5% of known, familiar matter. This Universe is geometrically flat, older than previously thought, its destiny is no longer linked to its geometry but to dark energy, and we ignore about 95% of its components. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today. Current astronomical observations are compatible with dark energy being the vacuum energy. Supernovae have played a fundamental role in modern Cosmology and it is expected that they will contribute to unveil the dark energy. In order to do that it is mandatory to understand the limits of supernovae as cosmological distance indicators, improving their precision by a factor 10.

  7. Discovery and Classification of Three New Supernovae by the Palomar Transient Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, I.; Horesh, A.; Cau, Y.; Sternberg, A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ben-Ami, S.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Quimby, R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Nugent, P. E.; Sullivan, M.; Howell, D. A.; Bloom, J.; Cooke, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Law, N.

    2010-12-01

    We report the discovery and spectroscopic classification of three new supernovae from PTF (ATel #1964; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf). The supernovae were discovered by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope. Spectroscopy was undertaken with the Double-Beam Spectrograph (DBSP; Oke & Gunn 1982, PASP, 94, 586) on the Palomar 5-m Hale telescope on December 13 UT.

  8. Discovery and classification of 18 new supernovae by the Palomar Transient Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, I.; Xu, D.; Matheson, T.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Quimby, R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Nugent, P. E.; Sullivan, M.; Howell, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Ben-Ami, S.; Cooke, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Law, N.

    2010-11-01

    We report the discovery and spectroscopic classification of 18 new supernovae from PTF (ATel #1964; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf). The supernovae were discovered by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, as well as by Galaxy Zoo Supernovae (arXiv:1011.2199), based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope. Spectroscopy was undertaken with the R-C spectrograph mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the Mayall 4-m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory on UT 2010 November 2-4.

  9. PTF discovery of PTF10abyy, a young Type II Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Sternberg, A.; Green, Y.; Xu, D.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, H. Ebeling P.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Law, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/) reports the discovery of a new supernova, PTF10abyy. The supernova was discovered by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, on December 8 UT at RA(J2000) = 05:16:40.52 and DEC(J2000) = +06:47:53.8 at a magnitude of 18.7 in R-band (calibrated with respect to the USNOB1 catalog). The supernova was not detected down to mag 21 in previous PTF images taken during Dec.

  10. Possible use of the dedicated MARLY one meter telescope for intensive supernovae studies

    CERN Document Server

    Moniez, M

    2001-01-01

    The EROS2 microlensing search will end at the end of 2002. Apart of this microlensing search, EROS has discovered ~70 supernovae during 8 periods partially dedicated to a SN search. In this document, we investigated a new way of using the EROS telescope (The MARLY) after this date, as a dedicated nearby supernovae photometer. The performance of a set-up with two cameras allowing to simultaneously perform BVRI and U photometry have been estimated. Each year, of order of 100 type Ia supernovae at z ~0.05 should be photometrically followed-up during 80 days with a precision of 2% in BVRI and ~3,5% in U.

  11. The ASAS-SN Bright Supernova Catalog I: 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Brimacombe, J.; Bersier, D.; Bishop, D. W.; Dong, Subo; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G. V.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Falco, E.; Pojmanski, G.; Skowron, D. M.; Woźniak, P. R.; Ávila, C. G.; Conseil, E.; Contreras, C.; Cruz, I.; Fernández, J. M.; Koff, R. A.; Guo, Zhen; Herczeg, G. J.; Hissong, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Jose, J.; Kiyota, S.; Long, Feng; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W. S.

    2016-09-01

    We present basic statistics for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during its first year-and-a-half of operations, spanning 2013 and 2014. We also present the same information for all other bright (mV ≤ 17), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered from 2014 May 1 through the end of 2014, providing a comparison to the ASAS-SN sample starting from the point where ASAS-SN became operational in both hemispheres. In addition, we present collected redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes, where available, for all host galaxies of the bright supernovae in both samples. This work represents a comprehensive catalog of bright supernovae and their hosts from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were not previously possible because the all-sky emphasis of ASAS-SN redresses many previously existing biases. In particular, ASAS-SN systematically finds bright supernovae closer to the centers of host galaxies than either other professional surveys or amateurs, a remarkable result given ASAS-SN's poorer angular resolution. This is the first of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts that will be released by the ASAS-SN team.

  12. The ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue - I. 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Brimacombe, J.; Bersier, D.; Bishop, D. W.; Dong, Subo; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G. V.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Falco, E.; Pojmanski, G.; Skowron, D. M.; Woźniak, P. R.; Ávila, C. G.; Conseil, E.; Contreras, C.; Cruz, I.; Fernández, J. M.; Koff, R. A.; Guo, Zhen; Herczeg, G. J.; Hissong, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Jose, J.; Kiyota, S.; Long, Feng; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W. S.

    2017-01-01

    We present basic statistics for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during its first year-and-a-half of operations, spanning 2013 and 2014. We also present the same information for all other bright (mV ≤ 17), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered from 2014 May 1 through the end of 2014, providing a comparison to the ASAS-SN sample starting from the point where ASAS-SN became operational in both hemispheres. In addition, we present collected redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes, where available, for all host galaxies of the bright supernovae in both samples. This work represents a comprehensive catalogue of bright supernovae and their hosts from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were not previously possible because the all-sky emphasis of ASAS-SN redresses many previously existing biases. In particular, ASAS-SN systematically finds bright supernovae closer to the centres of host galaxies than either other professional surveys or amateurs, a remarkable result given ASAS-SN's poorer angular resolution. This is the first of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts that will be released by the ASAS-SN team.

  13. The Supernovae Analysis Application (SNAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Wollaeger, Ryan; Wiggins, Brandon; Even, Wesley; de la Rosa, Janie; Roming, Peter W. A.; Frey, Lucy; Young, Patrick A.; Thorpe, Rob; Powell, Luke; Landers, Rachel; Persson, Heather D.; Hay, Rebecca

    2017-09-01

    The SuperNovae Analysis aPplication (SNAP) is a new tool for the analysis of SN observations and validation of SN models. SNAP consists of a publicly available relational database with observational light curve, theoretical light curve, and correlation table sets with statistical comparison software, and a web interface available to the community. The theoretical models are intended to span a gridded range of parameter space. The goal is to have users upload new SN models or new SN observations and run the comparison software to determine correlations via the website. There are problems looming on the horizon that SNAP is beginning to solve. For example, large surveys will discover thousands of SNe annually. Frequently, the parameter space of a new SN event is unbounded. SNAP will be a resource to constrain parameters and determine if an event needs follow-up without spending resources to create new light curve models from scratch. Second, there is no rapidly available, systematic way to determine degeneracies between parameters, or even what physics is needed to model a realistic SN. The correlations made within the SNAP system are beginning to solve these problems.

  14. The Supernovae Analysis Application (SNAP)

    CERN Document Server

    Bayless, Amanda J; Wiggins, Brandon; Even, Wesley; Wollaeger, Ryan; de la Rosa, Janie; Roming, Peter W A; Frey, Lucy; Young, Patrick A; Thorpe, Rob; Powell, Luke; Landers, Rachel; Persson, Heather D; Hay, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The SuperNovae Analysis aPplication (SNAP) is a new tool for the analysis of SN observations and validation of SN models. SNAP consists of an open source relational database with (a) observational light curve, (b) theoretical light curve, and (c) correlation table sets, statistical comparison software, and a web interface available to the community. The theoretical models are intended to span a gridded range of parameter space. The goal is to have users to upload new SN models or new SN observations and run the comparison software to determine correlations via the web site. There are looming problems on the horizon that SNAP begins to solve. Namely, large surveys will discover thousands of SNe annually. Frequently, the parameter space of a new SN event is unbounded. SNAP will be a resource to constrain parameters and determine if an event needs follow-up without spending resources to create new light curve models from scratch. Secondly, there is not a rapidly available, systematic way to determine degeneracie...

  15. Students Discover Unique Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Three undergraduate students, from Leiden University in the Netherlands, have discovered an extrasolar planet. The extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is also the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 45a/08 A planet around a hot star The students were testing a method of investigating the light fluctuations of thousands of stars in the OGLE database in an automated way. The brightness of one of the stars was found to decrease for two hours every 2.5 days by about one percent. Follow-up observations, taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, confirmed that this phenomenon is caused by a planet passing in front of the star, blocking part of the starlight at regular intervals. According to Ignas Snellen, supervisor of the research project, the discovery was a complete surprise. "The project was actually meant to teach the students how to develop search algorithms. But they did so well that there was time to test their algorithm on a so far unexplored database. At some point they came into my office and showed me this light curve. I was completely taken aback!" The students, Meta de Hoon, Remco van der Burg, and Francis Vuijsje, are very enthusiastic. "It is exciting not just to find a planet, but to find one as unusual as this one; it turns out to be the first planet discovered around a fast rotating star, and it's also the hottest star found with a planet," says Meta. "The computer needed more than a thousand hours to do all the calculations," continues Remco. The planet is given the prosaic name OGLE2-TR-L9b. "But amongst ourselves we call it ReMeFra-1, after Remco, Meta, and myself," says Francis. The planet was discovered by looking at the brightness variations of about 15 700 stars, which had been observed by the OGLE survey once or twice per night for about four years between 1997 and 2000. Because the data had been made public

  16. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  17. A very faint core-collapse supernova in M85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorello, A; Della Valle, M; Smartt, S J; Zampieri, L; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Mazzali, P A; Patat, F; Spiro, S; Turatto, M; Valenti, S

    2007-10-18

    An anomalous transient in the early Hubble-type (S0) galaxy Messier 85 (M85) in the Virgo cluster was discovered by Kulkarni et al. on 7 January 2006 that had very low luminosity (peak absolute R-band magnitude M(R) of about -12) that was constant over more than 80 days, red colour and narrow spectral lines, which seem inconsistent with those observed in any known class of transient events. Kulkarni et al. suggest an exotic stellar merger as the possible origin. An alternative explanation is that the transient in M85 was a type II-plateau supernova of extremely low luminosity, exploding in a lenticular galaxy with residual star-forming activity. This intriguing transient might be the faintest supernova that has ever been discovered.

  18. 0935+05 Supernova 1995D in NGC 2962

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    1995-02-01

    Reiki Kushida of Yatsugatake South Base Observatory discovers 0935+05 Supernova 1995D in NGC 2962. Magnitude 14.0. Position RA 09h 40m 54.79s DEC +5° 08' 26.6" (2000). Nova AQL 95 confirmed spectroscopically "as a slow 'FE II'-class nova in its post-maximum phase of development. Requests continue to monitor 1436-63 Nova Cir 95.

  19. Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Richard; Jha, Saurabh; Kuhlmann, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    We have publicly released a blinded mix of simulated SNe, with types (Ia, Ib, Ic, II) selected in proportion to their expected rate. The simulation is realized in the griz filters of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with realistic observing conditions (sky noise, point spread function and atmospheric transparency) based on years of recorded conditions at the DES site. Simulations of non-Ia type SNe are based on spectroscopically confirmed light curves that include unpublished non-Ia samples donated from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP), the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II). We challenge scientists to run their classification algorithms and report a type for each SN. A spectroscopically confirmed subset is provided for training. The goals of this challenge are to (1) learn the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different classification algorithms, (2) use the results to improve classification algorithms, and (3) understand what spectroscopically confirmed sub-...

  20. Collective supernova neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, Alessandro [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Neutrinos emitted by core-collapse supernovae (SNe) represent an important laboratory for both particle physics and astrophysics. While propagating in the dense SN environment, they can feel not only the presence of background matter (via ordinary Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects) but also of the gas of neutrinos and antineutrinos (via neutrino-neutrino interaction effects). The neutrino-neutrino interactions appear to modify the flavor evolution of SN neutrinos in a collective way, completely different from the ordinary matter effects. In these conditions, the flavor evolution equations become highly nonlinear, sometimes resulting in surprising phenomena when the entire neutrino system oscillates coherently as a single collective mode. In this talk, I present the recent results on collective supernova neutrino flavor conversions and I discuss about the sensitivity of these effects to the ordering of the neutrino mass spectrum.

  1. ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CTR10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘楠

    2008-01-01

    ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CTR10作为ADIDAS控制型跑鞋中的佼佼者,鞋款结合了如立体FORMOTION,大面积的PRO-MODERATOR特殊材质,以及强化型的07款鞋模(EL-07),前脚掌大块ADIPRENE+等诸多ADIDAS的当家技术,但在实际的跑步过程中,这些技术点能否真正为跑步者带来明显的感受?请随我们进入到ADIDAS SUPERNOVA CONTROL10评测环节。

  2. Galaxy Outflows Without Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, Sharanya; Ostriker, Eve C

    2016-01-01

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have $\\approx 50-100\\,{\\rm km\\,s^{-1}}$ line-of-sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly-compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds $\\approx 35\\,{\\rm km\\...

  3. Supernova Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  4. Nurseries of Supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Teddy

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe) have long been the gold standard for precision cosmology and after several decades of intense research the supernova (SN) community was in 2011 honored by giving the Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery of Dark Energy to the leaders of the two big SN collaborations...... the gasphase metallicity, stellar mass and stellar age for this z = 1.55 host galaxy. I am also able to rule out the presence of any AGN though emission-line ratios. The host is classified as a highly star forming, low mass, low metallicity galaxy. It is a clear outlier in star formation and stellar mass...... compared to most low redshift (z 1) redshift SNe. This is mainly due to the change in specific star-formation rate as a function of redshift. This can potentially impact the use of high redshift SN Ia as standard candels...

  5. ASASSN-17ka: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 244-G 019

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monard, L. A. G.; Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Bock, G.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Masi, G.; Post, R. S.

    2017-07-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 244-G 019. ASASSN-17ka (AT 2017frr) was discovered in images obtained on UT 2017-07-27.23 at V 16.5 mag. We also detect the object in images obtained on UT 2017-07-24.24 (V 16.6), UT 2017-07-29.23 (V 16.0), and UT 2017-07-30.23 (V 16.5).

  6. ASASSN-17bu: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 375-G 018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, G.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.; Cruz, I.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.; Post, R. S.; Stone, G.

    2017-02-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 375-G 018. ASASSN-17bu (AT 2017yv) was discovered in images obtained on UT 2017-01-31.19 at V 16.6 mag. We also detect the object in images obtained on UT 2017-01-29.21 (V 17.1).

  7. ASASSN-16lg: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ARK 530

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.

    2016-10-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ARK 530. ASASSN-16lg (AT 2016gye) was discovered in images obtained on UT 2016-10-06.20 at V~16.2 mag. We also detect the object in images obtained on UT 2016-10-07.21 (V~16.0).

  8. Ethanol fermentation from molasses at high temperature by thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 and energy assessment for recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Diptarka; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Debashish; Suman, Sunil Kumar; Khan, Rashmi; Agrawal, Deepti; Adhikari, Dilip K

    2014-10-01

    High temperature ethanol fermentation from sugarcane molasses B using thermophilic Crabtree-positive yeast Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 was carried out in batch bioreactor system. Strain was found to have a maximum specific ethanol productivity of 0.688 g/g/h with 92 % theoretical ethanol yield. Aeration and initial sugar concentration were tuning parameters to regulate metabolic pathways of the strain for either cell mass or higher ethanol production during growth with an optimum sugar to cell ratio 33:1 requisite for fermentation. An assessment of ethanol recovery from fermentation broth via simulation study illustrated that distillation-based conventional recovery was significantly better in terms of energy efficiency and overall mass recovery in comparison to coupled solvent extraction-azeotropic distillation technique for the same.

  9. Estimation of length scale of RS II-$p$ braneworld model through perturbations in Helium's atom ground state energy

    CERN Document Server

    Garrido, Nephtali

    2012-01-01

    We put to the test an effective three-dimensional electrostatic potential, obtained effectively by considering an electrostatic source inside a (5+$p$)-dimensional braneworld scenario with $p$ compact and one infinite spacial extra dimensions in the RS II-$p$ model, for $p=1$ and $p=2$. This potential is regular at the source and matches the standard Coulomb potential outside a neighborhood. We use variational and perturbative approximation methods to calculate corrections to the ground energy of the Helium atom modified by this potential, by making use of a 6 and 39-parameter trial wave function of Hylleraas type for the ground state. These corrections to the ground-state energy are compared with experimental data for Helium atom in order to set bounds for the extra dimensions length scale. We find that these bounds are less restrictive than the ones obtained by Morales et. al. through a calculation using the Lamb shift in Hydrogen.

  10. Supernova Constraints and Systematic Uncertainties from the First 3 Years of the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Conley, A; Sullivan, M; Regnault, N; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Fouchez, D; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K M; Pritchet, C J; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Balam, D; Baumont, S; Ellis, R S; Fabbro, S; Fakhouri, H K; Fourmanoit, N; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Graham, M L; Hudson, M J; Hsiao, E; Kronborg, T; Lidman, C; Mourao, A M; Neill, J D; Perlmutter, S; Ripoche, P; Suzuki, N; Walker, E S; 10.1088/0067-0049/192/1/1

    2011-01-01

    We combine high redshift Type Ia supernovae from the first 3 years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) with other supernova (SN) samples, primarily at lower redshifts, to form a high-quality joint sample of 472 SNe (123 low-$z$, 93 SDSS, 242 SNLS, and 14 {\\it Hubble Space Telescope}). SN data alone require cosmic acceleration at >99.9% confidence, including systematic effects. For the dark energy equation of state parameter (assumed constant out to at least $z=1.4$) in a flat universe, we find $w = -0.91^{+0.16}_{-0.20}(\\mathrm{stat}) ^{+0.07}_{-0.14} (\\mathrm{sys})$ from SNe only, consistent with a cosmological constant. Our fits include a correction for the recently discovered relationship between host-galaxy mass and SN absolute brightness. We pay particular attention to systematic uncertainties, characterizing them using a systematics covariance matrix that incorporates the redshift dependence of these effects, as well as the shape-luminosity and color-luminosity relationships. Unlike previous work, we ...

  11. SN 2013ej - A type IIL supernova with weak signs of interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Subhash; Kumar, Brijesh; Duggal, Chetna; Misra, Kuntal; Brown, Peter J; Singh, Mridweeka; Dwarkadas, Vikram; York, Donald G; Chakraborti, Sayan; Chandola, H C; Dahlstrom, Julie; Ray, Alak; Safonova, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova 2013ej. It is one of the brightest type II supernovae exploded in a nearby ($\\sim 10$ Mpc) galaxy NGC 628. The light curve characteristics are similar to type II SNe, but with a relatively shorter ($ \\sim85 $ day) and steeper ($ \\sim1.7 $ mag (100 d)$^{-1} $ in V) plateau phase. The SN shows a large drop of 2.4 mag in V band brightness during plateau to nebular transition. The absolute ultraviolet (UV) light curves are identical to SN 2012aw, showing a similar UV plateau trend extending up to 85 days. The radioactive $^{56}$Ni mass estimated from the tail luminosity is $ 0.02 $M$_{\\odot}$ which is significantly lower than typical type IIP SNe. The characteristics of spectral features and evolution of line velocities indicate that SN 2013ej is a type II event. However, light curve characteristics and some spectroscopic features provide strong support in classifying it as a type IIL event. A detailed SYNOW modelling of spectra indicates ...

  12. The Crab nebula and the class of Type IIn-P supernovae caused by sub-energetic electron-capture explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    What sort of supernova (SN) gave rise to the Crab nebula? While there are several indications that the Crab arose from a sub-energetic explosion of an 8-10 M⊙ progenitor star, this would appear to conflict with the high luminosity indicated by historical observations. This paper shows that several well-known observed properties of the Crab and SN 1054 are well matched by a particular breed of Type IIn SN. The Crab's properties are best suited to the Type IIn-P subclass (Type IIn spectra with plateau light curves), exemplified by SNe 1994W, 2009kn and 2011ht. These events probably arise from relatively low energy (1050 erg) explosions with low 56Ni yield that may result from electron-capture SN (ecSN) explosions, but their high visual-wavelength luminosity and Type IIn spectra are dominated by shock interaction with dense circumstellar material (CSM) rather than the usual recombination photosphere. In this interaction, a large fraction of the 1050 erg of the total kinetic energy can be converted to visual-wavelength luminosity. After about 120 d, nearly all of the mass outside the neutron star in the CSM and ejecta ends up in a slowly expanding (1000-1500 km s-1) thin dense shell, which is then accelerated and fragmented by the growing pulsar wind nebula in the subsequent 1000 yr, producing the complex network of filaments seen today. There is no need to invoke the extended, invisible fast SN envelope hypothesized to reside outside the Crab. As differentiated from a normal SN II-P, SNe IIn-P provide a much better explanation for several observed features of the Crab: (1) no blast wave outside the Crab nebula filaments, (2) no rapidly expanding SN envelope outside the filaments, (3) a total mass of ˜5 M⊙ swept up in a thin slow shell, (4) a low kinetic energy of the Crab at least an order of magnitude below a normal core-collapse SN, (5) a high peak luminosity (-18 mag) despite the low kinetic energy, (6) chemical abundances consistent with an 8-10 M⊙ star and

  13. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  14. Observations and Theory of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J C

    2003-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the observations of supernovae and the theory of their explosion mechanisms. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: observations of the spectra, spectropolarimetry, and light curves of supernovae of various types, theory of thermonuclear explosions, core collapse, and radioactive decay, applications to cosmology, and possible connections to gamma-ray bursts.

  15. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Huaiyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  16. Mass Varying Neutrinos in Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi-Torres, F; de Holanda, P C; Peres, O L G

    2010-01-01

    We study limits for the mass varying neutrino model, using constrains from supernova neutrinos placed by the r-process condition, $Y_e<0.5$. Also, we use this model in a supernova environment to study the regions of survival probability in the oscillation space parameter ($\\tan^2\\theta$ and $\\Delta m^2_0$), considering the channel $\

  17. Photometric Supernova Classification with Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Michelle; McEwen, Jason D.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K.

    2016-08-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  18. The ASAS-SN Bright Supernova Catalog I: 2013-2014

    CERN Document Server

    Holoien, T W -S; Kochanek, C S; Shappee, B J; Prieto, J L; Brimacombe, J; Bersier, D; Bishop, D W; Dong, Subo; Brown, J S; Danilet, A B; Simonian, G V; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Falco, E; Pojmanski, G; Skowron, D M; Wozniak, P R; Avila, C G; Conseil, E; Contreras, C; Cruz, I; Fernandez, J M; Koff, R A; Guo, Zhen; Herczeg, G J; Hissong, J; Hsiao, E Y; Jose, J; Kiyota, S; Long, Feng; Monard, L A G; Nicholls, B; Nicolas, J; Wiethoff, W S

    2016-01-01

    We present basic statistics for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during its first year-and-a-half of operations, spanning 2013 and 2014. We also present the same information for all other bright ($m_V\\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered from 2014 May 1 through the end of 2014, providing a comparison to the ASAS-SN sample starting from the point where ASAS-SN became operational in both hemispheres. In addition, we present collected redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes, where available, for all host galaxies of the bright supernovae in both samples. This work represents a comprehensive catalog of bright supernovae and their hosts from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were not previously possible because the all-sky emphasis of ASAS-SN redresses most previously existing biases. In particular, ASAS-SN systematically finds supernovae closer to the centers of host galaxies than either other...

  19. Spectroscopic confirmation of high-redshift supernovae with the ESO VLT

    CERN Document Server

    Lidman, C E; Folatelli, G; Garavini, G; Nobili, S; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Antilogus, P; Astier, Pierre; Blanc, G; Burns, M S; Conley, A; Deustua, S E; Doi, M; Ellis, R; Fabbro, S; Fadeev, V; Gibbons, R; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D E; Hook, I; Kashikawa, N; Kim, A G; Knop, R A; Lee Byung Cheol; Méndez, J; Morokuma, T; Motohara, K; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Perlmutter, S; Prasad, V; Quimby, R; Raux, J; Regnault, N; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Sainton, G; Schaefer, B E; Schahmaneche, K; Smith, E; Spadafora, A L; Stanishev, V; Walton, N A; Wang, L; Wood-Vasey, W M; Yasuda, N

    2004-01-01

    We present VLT FORS1 and FORS2 spectra of 39 candidate high-redshift supernovae that were discovered as part of a cosmological study using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) over a wide range of redshifts. From the spectra alone, 20 candidates are spectrally classified as SNe Ia with redshifts ranging from z=0.212 to z=1.181. Of the remaining 19 candidates, 1 might be a Type II supernova and 11 exhibit broad supernova-like spectral features and/or have supernova-like light curves. The candidates were discovered in 8 separate ground-based searches. In those searches in which SNe Ia at z ~ 0.5 were targeted, over 80% of the observed candidates were spectrally classified as SNe Ia. In those searches in which SNe Ia with z > 1 were targeted, 4 candidates with z > 1 were spectrally classified as SNe Ia and later followed with ground and space based observatories. We present the spectra of all candidates, including those that could not be spectrally classified as supernova.

  20. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, Şişli, İstanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  1. Cosmology with superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scovacricchi, D.; Nichol, R. C.; Bacon, D.; Sullivan, M.; Prajs, S.

    2016-02-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) as standardizable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z ˜ 3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the `Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae' (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardization values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalize over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ≃100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Ωm by at least 20 per cent (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia and 10 000 LSST-like SLSNe can measure Ωm and w to 2 and 4 per cent, respectively. The real power of SLSNe becomes evident when we consider possible temporal variations in w(a), giving possible uncertainties of only 2, 5 and 14 per cent on Ωm, w0 and wa, respectively, from the combination of DES SNe Ia, LSST-like SLSNe and Planck. These errors are competitive with predicted Euclid constraints, indicating a future role for SLSNe for probing the high-redshift Universe.

  2. GALAXY OUTFLOWS WITHOUT SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, Sharanya [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, 2nd Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Scannapieco, Evan [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 876004, Tempe-85287 (United States); Ostriker, Eve C., E-mail: sharanya.sur@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sharanya.sur@asu.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have ≈50–100 km s{sup −1} line of sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds ≈35 km s{sup −1}, as occurs in the dense disks that have star-formation rate (SFR) densities above ≈0.1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the SFR density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.

  3. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Habibi, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipole anisotropy or anisotropy in higher multipole moments that would be detectable by the LSST.

  4. X-Ray Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Immler, S; Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter H.G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of X-ray observations of supernovae (SNe). By observing the (~0.1--100 keV) X-ray emission from young SNe, physical key parameters such as the circumstellar matter (CSM) density, mass-loss rate of the progenitor and temperature of the outgoing and reverse shock can be derived as a function of time. Despite intensive search over the last ~25 years, only 15 SNe have been detected in X-rays. We review the individual X-ray observations of these SNe and discuss their implications as to our understanding of the physical processes giving rise to the X-ray emission.

  5. Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS): Survey Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Mori, Kensho; Matsumoto, Emiko; Kikuchi, Yuki; Shibata, Takumi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Naoto; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Soyano, Takao; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Sarugaku, Yuki; Richmond, Michael W; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Aldering, Greg; Arimatsu, Ko; Contreras, Carlos; Horiuchi, Takashi; Hsiao, Eric Y; Itoh, Ryosuke; Iwata, Ikuru; Koji,; Kawabata, S; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Paolo,; Mazzali,; Misawa, Toru; Moritani, Yuki; Morrell, Nidia; Okamoto, Rina; Pavlyuk, Nikolay; Phillips, Mark M; Pian, Elena; Sahu, Devendra; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sano, Kei; Stritzinger, Maximilian D; Tachibana, Yutaro; Taddia, Francesco; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Tateuchi, Ken; Tomita, Akihiko; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Ui, Takahiro; Ukita, Nobuharu; Urata, Yuji; Walker, Emma S; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-01-01

    The Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS) is a high-cadence optical wide-field supernova (SN) survey. The primary goal of the survey is to catch the very early light of a SN, during the shock breakout phase. Detection of SN shock breakouts combined with multi-band photometry obtained with other facilities would provide detailed physical information on the progenitor stars of SNe. The survey is performed using a 2.2x2.2 deg field-of-view instrument on the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope, the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC). We take a three-minute exposure in g-band once every hour in our survey, reaching magnitude g~20-21. About 100 nights of telescope time per year have been spent on the survey since April 2012. The number of the shock breakout detections is estimated to be of order of 1 during our 3-year project. This paper summarizes the KISS project including the KWFC observing setup, the survey strategy, the data reduction system, and CBET-reported SNe discovered so far by KISS.

  6. Supernovae, compact stars and nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1989-08-25

    We briefly review the current understanding of supernova. We investigate the implications of rapid rotation corresponding to the frequency of the new pulsar reported in the supernovae remnant SN1987A. It places very stringent conditions on the equation of state if the star is assumed to be bound by gravity alone. We find that the central energy density of the star must be greater than 12 times that of nuclear density to be stable against the most optimistic estimate of general relativistic instabilities. This is too high for the matter to plausibly consist of individual hadrons. We conclude that the newly discovered pulsar, if its half-millisecond signals are attributable to rotation, cannot be a neutron star. We show that it can be a strange quark star, and that the entire family of strange stars can sustain high rotation under appropriate conditions. We discuss the conversion of a neutron star to strange star, the possible existence of a crust of heavy ions held in suspension by centrifugal and electric forces, the cooling and other features. 39 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS): Survey strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tanaka, Masaomi; Mori, Kensho; Matsumoto, Emiko; Kikuchi, Yuki; Shibata, Takumi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Naoto; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Soyano, Takao; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Sarugaku, Yuki; Richmond, Michael W.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Aldering, Greg; Arimatsu, Ko; Contreras, Carlos; Horiuchi, Takashi; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Itoh, Ryosuke; Iwata, Ikuru; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Mazzali, Paolo; Misawa, Toru; Moritani, Yuki; Morrell, Nidia; Okamoto, Rina; Pavlyuk, Nikolay; Phillips, Mark M.; Pian, Elena; Sahu, Devendra; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sano, Kei; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Tachibana, Yutaro; Taddia, Francesco; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Tateuchi, Ken; Tomita, Akihiko; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Ui, Takahiro; Ukita, Nobuharu; Urata, Yuji; Walker, Emma S.; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-12-01

    The Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS) is a high-cadence optical wide-field supernova (SN) survey. The primary goal of the survey is to catch the very early light of a SN, during the shock breakout phase. Detection of SN shock breakouts combined with multi-band photometry obtained with other facilities would provide detailed physical information on the progenitor stars of SNe. The survey is performed using a 2.2° × 2.2° field-of-view instrument on the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope, the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC). We take a 3-min exposure in g-band once every hour in our survey, reaching magnitude g ˜ 20-21. About 100 nights of telescope time per year have been spent on the survey since 2012 April. The number of the shock breakout detections is estimated to be of the order of 1 during our three-year project. This paper summarizes the KISS project including the KWFC observing setup, the survey strategy, the data reduction system, and CBET-reported SNe discovered so far by KISS.

  8. Core-collapse supernova progenitor constraints using the spatial distributions of massive stars in local galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, T.; Portinari, L.; Mattila, S.; Fraser, M.; Kankare, E.; Izzard, R. G.; James, P.; González-Fernández, C.; Maund, J. R.; Thompson, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the spatial correlations between the Hα emission and different types of massive stars in two local galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Messier 33. We compared these to correlations derived for core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) in the literature to connect CCSNe of different types with the initial masses of their progenitors and to test the validity of progenitor mass estimates which use the pixel statistics method. We obtained samples of evolved massive stars in both galaxies from catalogues with good spatial coverage and/or completeness, and combined them with coordinates of main-sequence stars in the LMC from the SIMBAD database. We calculated the spatial correlation of stars of different classes and spectral types with Hα emission. We also investigated the effects of distance, noise and positional errors on the pixel statistics method. A higher correlation with Hα emission is found to correspond to a shorter stellar lifespan, and we conclude that the method can be used as an indicator of the ages, and therefore initial masses, of SN progenitors. We find that the spatial distributions of type II-P SNe and red supergiants of appropriate initial mass (≳9 M⊙) are consistent with each other. We also find the distributions of type Ic SNe and WN stars with initial masses ≳20 M⊙ consistent, while supergiants with initial masses around 15 M⊙ are a better match for type IIb and II-L SNe. The type Ib distribution corresponds to the same stellar types as type II-P, which suggests an origin in interacting binaries. On the other hand, we find that luminous blue variable stars show a much stronger correlation with Hα emission than do type IIn SNe.

  9. Spectroscopic Classification of AT2016cvv as a normal Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D. C.; Sheehan, P.; McCarthy, D.; Follette, K.; Moustakas, J.; Alaniz, M.; Beaumont, C.; Batterman, T.; Black, E.; Bowers, T.; Cryder, M.; Davis, C.; Dawsey, R.; Douglas, E.; Gordon, S.; Gramze, S.; Greiner, M.; Hart, K.; Holt, A.; Hu, J.; Ingebretsen, C.; Iyer, D.; Josephson, R.; Kapko, A.; Keane, J.; Kimberlin, T.; Kinman, S.; Klusmeyer, J.; Kolderup, E.; Kresina, K.; Madden, M.; Meiman, E.; Miniconi, S.; Morton, A.; Neumann, K.; Noguerra, T.; Regester, B.; Regester, J.; Rosenthal, M.; Schlingman, A.; Schlingman, W.; Schlingman, W.; Smith, A.; Svoboda, B.; Watson, L.; Whitesell, R.

    2016-06-01

    We report spectroscopic classification of AT2016cvv (also known as PTSS-16ijc), discovered 2016 June 16.709 UT by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS) in CGCG 280-024 (z=0.044571; Falco et al. 1999, PASP 111, 438, via NED), through inspection of an optical spectrum (range 370-690 nm, resolution 0.8 nm) obtained with the 2.3-m Bok telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph) at Kitt Peak on 2016 June 19.347 UT. Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) and GELATO (Harutyunyan et al. 2008, A & A, 488, 383) finds convincing spectral matches with a number of normal Type-Ia supernovae a few days before maximum light.

  10. Spectroscopic Classification of AT2016cvw as a normal Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D. C.; Sheehan, P.; McCarthy, D.; Follette, K.; Moustakas, J.; Alaniz, M.; Beaumont, C.; Batterman, T.; Black, E.; Bowers, T.; Cryder, M.; Davis, C.; Dawsey, R.; Douglas, E.; Gordon, S.; Gramze, S.; Greiner, M.; Hart, K.; Holt, A.; Hu, J.; Ingebretsen, C.; Iyer, D.; Josephson, R.; Kapko, A.; Keane, J.; Kimberlin, T.; Kinman, S.; Klusmeyer, J.; Kolderup, E.; Kresina, K.; Madden, M.; Meiman, E.; Miniconi, S.; Morton, A.; Neumann, K.; Noguerra, T.; Regester, B.; Regester, J.; Rosenthal, M.; Schlingman, A.; Schlingman, W.; Schlingman, W.; Smith, A.; Svoboda, B.; Watson, L.; Whitesell, R.

    2016-06-01

    We report spectroscopic classification of AT2016cvw (also known as PTSS-16ipw), discovered 2016 June 18.813 UT by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS) in MCG +02-58-008 (z=0.038877; Huchra et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 26, via NED), through inspection of an optical spectrum (range 370-690 nm, resolution 0.8 nm) obtained with the 2.3-m Bok telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph) at Kitt Peak on 2016 June 20.423 UT. Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) and GELATO (Harutyunyan et al. 2008, A & A, 488, 383) finds convincing spectral matches with a number of normal Type-Ia supernovae roughly 3 days before maximum light.

  11. Detection strategies for a supernova gravitational wave burst in a network of interferometric detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, N; Bizouard, M A; Brisson, V; Cavalier, F; Davier, M; Hello, P; Kreckelberg, S; Porter, E K; Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelberg, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-01-01

    Trying to detect the gravitational wave (GW) signal emitted by a type II supernova is a main challenge for the GW community. Indeed, the corresponding waveform is not accurately modeled as the supernova physics is very complex; in addition, all the existing numerical simulations agree on the weakness of the GW emission, thus restraining the number of sources potentially detectable. Consequently, triggering the GW signal with a confidence level high enough to conclude directly to a detection is very difficult, even with the use of a network of interferometric detectors. On the other hand, one can hope to take benefit from the neutrino and optical emissions associated to the supernova explosion, in order to discover and study GW radiation in an event already detected independently. This article aims at presenting some realistic scenarii for the search of the supernova GW bursts, based on the present knowledge of the emitted signals and on the results of network data analysis simulations. Both the direct search ...

  12. The Nearby Supernova Factory: Toward A High-Precision Spectro-Photometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nearby Supernova Factory; Copin, Y.; Buton, C.; Gangler, E.; Smadja, G.; Pecontal, E.; Rigaudier, G.; Antilogus, P.; Bailey, S.; Pain, R.; Pereira, R.; Wu, C.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bongard, S.; Childress, M.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Runge, K.; Thomas, R.; Weaver, B.; Baltay, C.; Bauer, A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Scalzo, R.

    2007-07-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international project to discover and study a large sample of type Ia supernovae in the redshift range 0.03 < z < 0.08. Follow-up spectro-photometric observations are performed using the dedicated Supernovae Integral-Field Spectrograph, mounted since 2004 on 2.2 m UH telescope. The goal is to acquire for each supernova and over its full life-time (more than 10 epochs) high spectro-photometric quality spectra over the extended optical range (320-1000 nm).I will present the current status of the SNfactory project, from search efficiency to first scientific results, with an emphasis on the spectro-photometric calibration issues and achievements.

  13. Type Ia supernova rate at a redshift of ~ 0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Blanc, G; Alard, C; Albert, J N; Aldering, G; Amadon, A; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Balland, C; Bareyre, P; Beaulieu, J P; Charlot, X; Conley, A; Coutures, C; Dahlen, T; Derue, F; Fan, X; Ferlet, R; Folatelli, G; Fouqué, P; Garavini, G; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Goobar, A; Gould, A; Graff, D; Gros, M; Haïssinski, J; Hamadache, C; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; De Kat, J; Kent, S; Kim, A; Lasserre, T; Le Guillou, Laurent; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Mouchet, M; Newberg, H; Nobili, S; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Prévôt, L; Rahal, Y R; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Spiro, M; Tisserand, P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Walton, N A; Zylberajch, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the type Ia rate measurement based on two EROS supernova search campaigns (in 1999 and 2000). Sixteen supernovae identified as type Ia were discovered. The measurement of the detection efficiency, using a Monte Carlo simulation, provides the type Ia supernova explosion rate at a redshift ~ 0.13. The result is $0.125^{+0.044+0.028}_{-0.034-0.028} h_{70}^2$ SNu where 1 SNu = 1 SN / $10^{10} L_{sun}^B$ / century. This value is compatible with the previous EROS measurement (Hardin et al. 2000), done with a much smaller sample, at a similar redshift. Comparison with other values at different redshifts suggests an evolution of the type Ia supernova rate.

  14. Type Ia supernova rate at a redshift of ~;0.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, G.; Afonso, C.; Alard, C.; Albert, J.N.; Aldering, G.; Amadon, A.; Andersen, J.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, E.; Balland, C.; Bareyre,P.; Beaulieu, J.P.; Charlot, X.; Conley, A.; Coutures, C.; Dahlen, T.; Derue, F.; Fan, X.; Ferlet, R.; Folatelli, G.; Fouque, P.; Garavini, G.; Glicenstein, J.F.; Goldman, B.; Goobar, A.; Gould, A.; Graff, D.; Gros,M.; Haissinski, J.; Hamadache, C.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.M.; deKat, J.; Kent, S.; Kim, A.; Lasserre, T.; LeGuillou, L.; Lesquoy, E.; Loup, C.; Magneville, C.; Marquette, J.B.; Maurice, E.; Maury, A.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Mouchet, M.; Newberg, H.; Nobili, S.; Palanque-Delabrouille,N.; Perdereau, O.; Prevot, L.; Rahal, Y.R.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Spiro, M.; Tisserand, P.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Vigroux,L.; Walton, N.A.; Zylberajch, S.

    2004-05-11

    We present the type Ia rate measurement based on two EROS supernova search campaigns (in 1999 and 2000). Sixteen supernovae identified as type Ia were discovered. The measurement of the detection efficiency, using a Monte Carlo simulation, provides the type Ia supernova explosion rate at a redshift {approx} 0.13. The result is 0.125{sub -0.034-0.028}{sup +0.044+0.028} h{sub 70}{sup 2} SNu where 1 SNu = 1 SN/10{sup 10} L{sub {circle_dot}}{sup B}/century. This value is compatible with the previous EROS measurement (Hardin et al. 2000), done with a much smaller sample, at a similar redshift. Comparison with other values at different redshifts suggests an evolution of the type Ia supernova rate.

  15. Lightest exoplanet yet discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Well-known exoplanet researcher Michel Mayor today announced the discovery of the lightest exoplanet found so far. The planet, "e", in the famous system Gliese 581, is only about twice the mass of our Earth. The team also refined the orbit of the planet Gliese 581 d, first discovered in 2007, placing it well within the habitable zone, where liquid water oceans could exist. These amazing discoveries are the outcome of more than four years of observations using the most successful low-mass-exoplanet hunter in the world, the HARPS spectrograph attached to the 3.6-metre ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. ESO PR Photo 15a/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Photo 15b/09 A planet in the habitable zone ESO PR Video 15a/09 ESOcast 6 ESO PR Video 15b/09 VNR A-roll ESO PR Video 15c/09 Zoom-in on Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15d/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15e/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 d ESO PR Video 15f/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 system ESO PR Video 15g/09 The radial velocity method ESO PR Video 15h/09 Statement in English ESO PR Video 15i/09 Statement in French ESO PR Video 15j/09 La Silla Observatory "The holy grail of current exoplanet research is the detection of a rocky, Earth-like planet in the ‘habitable zone' -- a region around the host star with the right conditions for water to be liquid on a planet's surface", says Michel Mayor from the Geneva Observatory, who led the European team to this stunning breakthrough. Planet Gliese 581 e orbits its host star - located only 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra ("the Scales") -- in just 3.15 days. "With only 1.9 Earth-masses, it is the least massive exoplanet ever detected and is, very likely, a rocky planet", says co-author Xavier Bonfils from Grenoble Observatory. Being so close to its host star, the planet is not in the habitable zone. But another planet in this system appears to be. From previous observations -- also obtained with the HARPS spectrograph

  16. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  17. Cosmological Inference from Host-Selected Type Ia Supernova Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Syed A.; Mould, Jeremy; Lidman, Chris; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Hardin, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    We compare two Type Ia supernova samples that are drawn from a spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernova sample: a host-selected sample in which SNe Ia are restricted to those that have a spectroscopic redshift from the host; and a broader, more traditional sample in which the redshift could come from either the SN or the host. The host-selected sample is representative of SN samples that will use the redshift of the host to infer the SN redshift, long after the SN has faded from view. We find that SNe Ia that are selected on the availability of a redshift from the host differ from SNe Ia that are from the broader sample. The former tend to be redder, have narrower light curves, live in more massive hosts, and tend to be at lower redshifts. We find that constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, w, and the matter density, ΩM, remain consistent between these two types of samples. Our results are important for ongoing and future supernova surveys, which unlike previous supernova surveys, will have limited real-time follow-up to spectroscopically classify the SNe they discover. Most of the redshifts in these surveys will come from the hosts.

  18. A new statistical model for Population III supernova rates: discriminating between ΛCDM and WDM cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magg, Mattis; Hartwig, Tilman; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2016-11-01

    With new observational facilities becoming available soon, discovering and characterizing supernovae from the first stars will open up alternative observational windows to the end of the cosmic dark ages. Based on a semi-analytical merger tree model of early star formation, we constrain Population III supernova rates. We find that our method reproduces the Population III supernova rates of large-scale cosmological simulations very well. Our computationally efficient model allows us to survey a large parameter space and to explore a wide range of different scenarios for Population III star formation. Our calculations show that observations of the first supernovae can be used to differentiate between cold and warm dark matter models and to constrain the corresponding particle mass of the latter. Our predictions can also be used to optimize survey strategies with the goal to maximize supernova detection rates.

  19. A New Statistical Model for Population III Supernova Rates: Discriminating Between $\\Lambda$CDM and WDM Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Magg, Mattis; Glover, Simon C O; Klessen, Ralf S; Whalen, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    With new observational facilities becoming available soon, discovering and characterising supernovae from the first stars will open up alternative observational windows to the end of the cosmic dark ages. Based on a semi-analytical merger tree model of early star formation we constrain Population III supernova rates. We find that our method reproduces the Population III supernova rates of large-scale cosmological simulations very well. Our computationally efficient model allows us to survey a large parameter space and to explore a wide range of different scenarios for Population III star formation. Our calculations show that observations of the first supernovae can be used to differentiate between cold and warm dark matter models and to constrain the corresponding particle mass of the latter. Our predictions can also be used to optimize survey strategies with the goal to maximize supernova detection rates.

  20. Supernova olivine from cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2005-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (olivine (forsterite 83) grains olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  1. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Allam, S; Althouse, W E; Amanullah, R; Annis, J; Astier, Pierre; Aumeunier, M; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Barrelet, E; Basa, S; Bebek, C; Bergström, L; Bernstein, G; Bester, M; Besuner, B; Bigelow, B; Blandford, R; Bohlin, R; Bonissent, A; Bower, C; Brown, M; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Cole, D; Commins, Eugene D; Craig, W; Davis, T; Dawson, K; Day, C; De Harveng, M; De Jongh, F; Deustua, S; Diehl, H; Dobson, T; Dodelson, S; Ealet, A; Ellis, R; Emmet, W; Figer, D; Fouchez, D; Frerking, M; Frieman, J A; Fruchter, A; Gerdes, D; Gladney, L; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D; Heetderks, H; Hoff, M; Holland, S; Huffer, M; Hui, L; Huterer, D; Jain, B; Jelinsky, P; Juramy, C; Karcher, A; Kent, S; Kahn, S; Kim, A; Kolbe, W; Krieger, B; Kushner, G; Kuznetsova, N; Lafever, R; Lamoureux, J; Lampton, M; Lefèvre, O; Lebrun, V; Levi, M; Limon, P; Lin, H; Linder, E; Loken, S; Lorenzon, W; Malina, R; Marian, L; Marriner, J P; Marshall, P; Massey, R; Mazure, A; McGinnis, B; McKay, T; McKee, S; Miquel, R; Mobasher, B; Morgan, N; Mortsell, E; Mostek, N; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nakajima, R; Nugent, P; Olus, H; Pain, R; Palaio, N; Pankow, D; Peoples, John; Perlmutter, S; Peterson, D; Prieto, E; Rabinowitz, D; Réfrégier, A; Rhodes, J; Roe, N; Rusin, D; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Seiffert, M; Sholl, M; Shukla, H; Smadja, G; Smith, R M; Smoot, George F; Snyder, J; Spadafora, A; Stabenau, F; Stebbins, A; Stoughton, C; Szymkowiak, A; Tarle, G; Taylor, K; Tilquin, A; Tomasch, A; Tucker, D; Vincent, D; Von der Lippe, H; Walder, J P; Wang, G; Weinstein, A; Wester, W; White, M

    2005-01-01

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a companion White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties lead to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. SNAP has achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction.

  2. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays. Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images. To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer wavelengths. Since the amount

  3. Classification of SN 2016gmg (=PTSS-16opy), as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Xin, Yuxin; Chang, Liang; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Yang, Zesheng; Li, Bin; Xu, Zhijian; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan

    2016-09-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-900 nm) of SN 2016gmg (=PTSS-16opy), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS: http://119.78.210.3/ptss2/), on UT Sep. 29.55 2016 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  4. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017cne as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Yang, Zesheng; Li, Bin; Tan, Hanjie; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Meng, Xianmin; Wang, J.; Jia, Junjun; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 360-840 nm) of SN 2017cne (=PTSS-17ntl),discovered by PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Mar.31.76 2017 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  5. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017ejd (=PTSS-17tal) as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Zhang, Kaicheng; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Tan, Hanjie; Li, Bin; Xu, Zhijian; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Jia, Junjun; Zhang, Tianmeng; Xiao, Jujia Zhang Feng; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-05-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 360-850 nm) of SN 2017ejd(=PTSS-17tal), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS,http://www.cneost.org/ptss/ ), on UT May 30.7 2017 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  6. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2016jdw as a Type Ib Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Yu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Rui, Liming; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie

    2016-12-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-900 nm) of SN 2016jdw (=PTSS-16sjp), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS), on UT Dec.30.9 2016 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  7. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017mt as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Xin, Yuxin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Rui, Liming; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Xiao, Feng; Zhang, Tianmeng

    2017-01-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 370-870 nm) of SN 2017mt, discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS), on UT Jan.27.9 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  8. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017dgi (=PTSS-17qjg) as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Tan, Hanjie; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Yang, Qian; Wu, Xuebin; Jia, Junjun; Zhang, Tianmeng; Yang, Zesheng; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 390-830 nm) of SN 2017dgi (=PTSS-17qjg),discovered by PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Apr.23.56 2017 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  9. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017bke as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Zhang, Xiliang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Bin; Xu, Zhijian; Tan, Hanjie; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Rui, Liming; ), Zesheng Yang

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-880 nm) of SN 2017bke (=PTSS-17hcz),discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.25.7 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  10. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017mu as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Xin, Yuxin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Rui, Liming; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Yang, Hanjie Tan Zesheng; Song, Hao

    2017-01-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-800 nm) of SN 2017mu (=PTSS-17dgm), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS), on UT Jan.26.7 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  11. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017ckc as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Bin; Yang, Zesheng; Tan, Hanjie; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 370-880 nm) of SN 2017ckc (=PTSS-17nip), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Apr.06.82 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  12. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017aap as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Xin, Yuxin; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Yang, Zesheng

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-830 nm) of SN 2017aap (=PTSS-17die), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.02.9 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  13. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017ckp as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Bin; Yang, Zesheng; Tan, Hanjie; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-900 nm) of SN 2017ckp (=PTSS-17npa), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Apr.05.82 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  14. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017aas as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Lu, Kaixin; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Yang, Zesheng

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-830 nm) of SN 2017aas (=PTSS-17dib),discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.04.86 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  15. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017auu as a Young Type II Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Lun, Baoli; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Yang, Zesheng

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-860 nm) of SN 2017auu (=PTSS-17fhy),discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.16.5 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  16. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017ms as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Zheng, Xiangming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Rui, Liming; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Xiao, Feng; Zhang, Tianmeng

    2017-01-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 330-870 nm) of SN 2017ms(= PTSS-17dfc), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS), on UT Jan.23.88 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  17. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017ckc as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Bin; Yang, Zesheng; Tan, Hanjie; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 370-880 nm) of SN 2017ckc (=PTSS-17nip), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Apr.06.82 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  18. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017ckp as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Bin; Yang, Zesheng; Tan, Hanjie; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-900 nm) of SN 2017ckp (=PTSS-17npa), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Apr.05.82 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  19. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017cne as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Yang, Zesheng; Li, Bin; Tan, Hanjie; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Meng, Xianmin; Wang, J.; Jia, Junjun; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 360-840 nm) of SN 2017cne (=PTSS-17ntl),discovered by PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Mar.31.76 2017 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  20. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; C. Becker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS S...

  1. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017aap as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Xin, Yuxin; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Yang, Zesheng

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-830 nm) of SN 2017aap (=PTSS-17die), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.02.9 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  2. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017aas as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Lu, Kaixin; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Yang, Zesheng

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-830 nm) of SN 2017aas (=PTSS-17dib),discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.04.86 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  3. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017auu as a Young Type II Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Lun, Baoli; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Yang, Zesheng

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-860 nm) of SN 2017auu (=PTSS-17fhy),discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.16.5 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  4. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017bke as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jujia; Zhang, Xiliang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Bin; Xu, Zhijian; Tan, Hanjie; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Rui, Liming; ), Zesheng Yang

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-880 nm) of SN 2017bke (=PTSS-17hcz),discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.25.7 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  5. An extremely luminous X-ray outburst at the birth of a supernova

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soderberg, A.M.; Berger, E.; Page, K.L.; Schady, P.; Parrent, J.; Pooley, D.; Wang, X.Y.; Ofek, E.O.; Cucchiara, A.; Rau, A.; Waxman, E.; Simon, J.D.; Bock, D.C.J.; Milne, P.A.; Page, M.J.; Barentine, J.C.; Barthelmy, S.D.; Beardmore, A.P.; Bietenholz, M.F.; Brown, P.; Burrows, A.; Burrows, D.N.; Byrngelson, G.; Cenko, S.B.; Chandra, P.; Cummings, J.R.; Fox, D.B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gehrels, N.; Immler, S.; Kasliwal, M.; Kong, A.K.H.; Krimm, H.A.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Maccarone, T.J.; Mészáros, P.; Nakar, E.; O'Brien, P.T.; Overzier, R.A.; de Pasquale, M.; Racusin, J.; Rea, N.; York, D.G.

    2008-01-01

    Massive stars end their short lives in spectacular explosions—supernovae—that synthesize new elements and drive galaxy evolution. Historically, supernovae were discovered mainly through their 'delayed' optical light (some days after the burst of neutrinos that marks the actual event), preventing obs

  6. Supernova 1987A: The Supernova of a Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Supernova 1987A, the brightest supernova since Kepler's in 1604, was detected 30 years ago at a distance of 160 000 light years in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. Visible with the naked eye and detected with the full range of technology constructed since Kepler's time, SN 1987A has continued to be a rich source of empirical information to help understand supernova explosions and their evolution into supernova remnants. While the light output has faded by a factor of 10 000 000 over those 30 years, instrumentation, like the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array has continued to improve so that this supernova continues to be visible in X-rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared light and in radio emission. In this review, I will sketch what has been learned from these observations about the pre-supernova star and its final stages of evolution, the explosion physics, the energy sources for emission, and the shock physics as the expanding debris encounters the circumstellar ring that was created about 20 000 years before the explosion. Today, SN 1987A is making the transition to a supernova remnant- the energetics are no longer dominated by the radioactive elements produced in the explosion, but by the interaction of the expanding debris with the surrounding gas. While we are confident that the supernova explosion had its origin in gravitational collapse, careful searches for a compact object at the center of the remnant place upper limits of a few solar luminosities on that relic. Support for HST GO programs 13401 and 13405 was provided by NASA through grants from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  7. Magnetar-Powered Supernovae in Two Dimensions. I. Superluminous Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, S. E.; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the radiation emitted by a rapidly rotating magnetar embedded in a young supernova can greatly amplify its luminosity. These one-dimensional studies have also revealed the existence of an instability arising from the piling up of radiatively accelerated matter in a thin dense shell deep inside the supernova. Here we examine the problem in two dimensions and find that, while instabilities cause mixing and fracture this shell into filamentary structures that red...

  8. Negative tone imaging (NTI) with KrF: extension of 248nm IIP lithography to under sub-20nm logic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Sun; Kim, Yura; Kim, Jahee; Heo, Sujeong; Youn, Bumjoon; Seo, Jaekyung; Yoon, Kwang-Sub; Choi, Byoung-il

    2013-03-01

    One of the most prospective alternative lithography ways prior to EUV implementation is the reverse imaging by means of a negative tone development (NTD) process with solvent-based developer. Contact and trench patterns can be printed in CAR (Chemically amplified resist) using a bright field mask through NTD development, and can give much better image contrast (NILS) than PTD process. Not only for contact or trench masks, but also pattering of IIP (Ion Implantation) layers whose mask opening ratio is less than 20% may get the benefit of NTD process, not only in the point of aerial imaging, but also in achievement of vertical resist profile, especially for post gate layers which have complex sub_topologies and nitride substrate. In this paper, we present applications for the NTD technique to IIP (Ion Implantation) layer lithography patterning, via KrF exposure, comparing the performance to that of the PTD process. Especially, to extend 248nm IIP litho to sub-20nm logic device, optimization of negative tone imaging (NTI) with KrF exposure is the main focus in this paper. With the special resin system designed for KrF NTD process, even sub 100nm half-pitch trench pattern can be defined with enough process margin and vertical resist profiles can be also obtained on the nitride substrate with KrF exposure.

  9. NASA Scientists Witness a Supernova Cosmic Rite of Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    wind, comprising energetic ions, was shed by the progenitor star thousands to million of years before the explosion. If this were from the interstellar medium, it would be much denser than this stellar wind. NOAO Optical Image of SN 1970G NOAO Optical Image of SN 1970G Immler and Kuntz next studied the density profiles of all other supernovae that have been detected over the past two decades. Sure enough, the low-density circumstellar matter from the stellar wind was the source of X-rays, not the interstellar medium. Immler said that historical supernova remnants such as Cassiopeia A, which exploded some 320 years ago, also show no signs of activity from the interstellar medium. This is more than just a name game, more than hypothetically changing SN 1970G to SNR 1970G. "We have to rethink this notion that a shock wave from the supernova crashes into the interstellar medium to create a supernova remnant," said Immler. "The luminous supernova remnants that we see can be created without the need of a dense interstellar medium. In fact, our study showed that all supernovae detected in X-rays over the past 25 years live in a low-density environment." SN 1970G is located in the galaxy M101, also called the Pinwheel Galaxy, a stunning spiral galaxy about 22 million light years away in the constellation Ursa Major, home of the Big Dipper. Although the galaxy itself is visible from dark skies with binoculars, telescopes cannot resolve much structure in SN 1970G, unlike for supernova remnants in our Milky Way galaxy. Discovered with an optical telescope in 1970, SN 1970G was not seen with X-ray telescopes until the 1990s. Immler's work at NASA Goddard is supported through the Universities Space Research Association. Kuntz is supported through University of Maryland, Baltimore County. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the Agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and

  10. The Vela Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.

    We wish to obtain both emission and absorption line observations of the Vela Supernova remnant. The filament we wish to study in emission is the brightest filament in the SNR, so it will provide a spectrum twice the quality of any in existence. It is also located at the edge of an unusual bulge in the SNR, and it can be used to test the level of departure from pressure equilibrium in the remnant, which is useful as a test of evaporative models of SNR evolution. The absorption line studies will look for evidence of the drastically unstable behavior of shocks above 150 km/s predicted by Innes and Giddings. Four of the stars studied by Jenkins, Silk and Wallerstein showed marginal evidence for two positive or two negative high velocity components. If these multiple velocity components are confirmed, they support the secondary shock predictions of Innes and Giddings.

  11. Neutrinos and nucleosynthesis in supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, U [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Departamento de Fisica de Altas EnergIas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM). Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); D' Olivo, J C [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Departamento de Fisica de Altas EnergIas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM). Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Cabral-Rosetti, L G [Departamento de Posgrado, Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigacion y Docencia en Educacion Tecnica (CIIDET), Av. Universidad 282 Pte., Col. Centro, A. Postal 752, C.P. 76000, Santiago de Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2006-05-15

    The type II supernova is considered as a candidate site for the production of heavy elements. The nucleosynthesis occurs in an intense neutrino flux, we calculate the electron fraction in this environment.

  12. The Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background

    CERN Document Server

    Beacom, John F

    2010-01-01

    The Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) is the weak glow of MeV neutrinos and antineutrinos from distant core-collapse supernovae. The DSNB has not been detected yet, but the Super-Kamiokande (SK) 2003 upper limit on the electron antineutrino flux is close to predictions, now quite precise, based on astrophysical data. If SK is modified with dissolved gadolinium to reduce detector backgrounds and increase the energy range for analysis, then it should detect the DSNB at a rate of a few events per year, providing a new probe of supernova neutrino emission and the cosmic core-collapse rate. If the DSNB is not detected, then new physics will be required. Neutrino astronomy, while uniquely powerful, has proven extremely difficult -- only the Sun and the nearby Supernova 1987A have been detected to date -- so the promise of detecting new sources soon is exciting indeed.

  13. Type Ia Supernovae and the discovery of the Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Clocchiatti, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    I present a review of the research and analysis paths that converged to make Type Ia SNe the most mature cosmological distance estimator of the present time. The narrative starts with the first works in the early decades of the 20th century and finishes with the more recent results. The review was written by a member of the High Z Supernova Search Team, the international group of astronomers that discovered Cosmic Acceleration in 1998. This result, confirmed by the Supernova Cosmology Project in 1999, received an impressive string of recognition culminating with the current Nobel prize in Physics. The review is presented thinking of physicists with a strong interest in Cosmology, who might have pondered why was that, after decades of not being able to agree upon the rate of cosmic expansion, astronomers were so quick to concur on cosmic acceleration.

  14. Toward a Standard Model of Core Collapse Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzacappa, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the current status of core collapse supernova models and the future developments needed to achieve significant advances in understanding the supernova mechanism and supernova phenomenology, i.e., in developing a supernova standard model.

  15. Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Della Valle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se revisa el estatus observacional de la conexi on Supernova (SN/Estallido de Rayos-Gamma (GRB. Recientes (y no tan recientes observaciones de GRBs largos sugieren que una fracci on signi cativa de ellos (pero no todos est an asociados con supernovas brillantes del tipo Ib/c. Estimaciones actuales de las tasas de producci on de GRBs y SNs dan una raz on para GRB/SNe-Ibc en el rango 0:4%

  16. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, N; Jackman, C H; Cannizzo, J K; Mattson, B J; Chen, W; Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan

    2003-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time, improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma-ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma-rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion roughly to double the ``biologically active'' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova mu...

  17. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  18. Spectroscopic Properties of Star-Forming Host Galaxies and Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals in a Nearly Unbiased Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Andrea, Chris B. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); et al.

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.

  19. A Systematic Study of Mid-Infrared Emission from Core-Collapse Supernovae with SPIRITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Dosovitz Fox, Ori; Lau, Ryan M.; Smith, Nathan; Williams, Robert E.; Jencson, Jacob; Perley, Daniel A.; Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert D.; Johansson, Joel; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Masci, Frank J.; Cody, Ann Marie; Prince, Thomas Allen; SPIRITS

    2017-01-01

    Late-time mid-infrared emission from core-collpase supernovae tells stories of circumstellar interaction and dust formation. We present a systematic study of mid-infrared emission from 141 nearby supernovae observed with Spitzer/IRAC as part of the ongoing SPIRITS survey. We detect 8 Type Ia and 36 core-collapse SNe. While all SNe-Ia fade away within 3 years post explosion, about 20% of SNe-II remain detectable. Five SNe-II are detected two decades after discovery (SN 1974E, 1979C, 1980K, 1986J, and 1993J). From the two-band photometry, we can fit for IR luminosity and temperature, and the inferred dust mass assuming that all mid-IR emission comes from an optically thin shell of warm dust. We derive warm dust masses between 10-6 and 10-2 \\msol and dust color temperatures between 200 and 1280 K. This observed warm dust could be pre-existing or newly created. We note that either case represents a lower limit to the dust mass because cooler dust may be present. We present three case studies of extreme SNe. SN 2011ja (II-P) was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion with increasing hot dust mass, suggesting either an episode of dust formation or intensifying CSM interactions heating up pre-existing dust. SN 2014bi (II-P) showed a factor of 10 decrease in dust mass over one month suggesting either dust destruction or reduced dust heating. The IR luminosity of SN 2014C (Ib) stays constant over 800 days, possibly due to strong CSM interaction with H rich shell, which is rare among stripped-envelope SNe. The observations suggest that this CSM shell originated from an LBV-like eruption roughly 100 years pre-explosion. The observed diversity demonstrates the power of mid-IR observations of a large sample of SNe.

  20. Type-Ia Supernova Rates to Redshift 2.4 from CLASH: the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, O; Maoz, D; Riess, A G; Jha, S W; Postman, M; Dahlen, T; Holoien, T W -S; McCully, C; Patel, B; Strolger, L -G; Benitez, N; Coe, D; Jouvel, S; Medezinski, E; Molino, A; Nonino, M; Bradley, L; Koekemoer, A; Balestra, I; Blondin, S; Cenko, S B; Clubb, K I; Dickinson, M E; Filippenko, A V; Frederiksen, T F; Garnavich, P; Hjorth, J; Jones, D O; Leibundgut, B; Matheson, T; Mobasher, B; Rosati, P; Silverman, J M; U, V; Jedruszczuk, K; Li, C; Lin, K; Mirmelstein, M; Neustadt, J; Ovadia, A; Rogers, E H

    2013-01-01

    We present the supernova (SN) sample and Type-Ia SN (SN Ia) rates from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have imaged 25 galaxy-cluster fields and parallel fields of non-cluster galaxies. We report a sample of 27 SNe discovered in the parallel fields. Of these SNe, ~11 are classified as SN Ia candidates, including four SN Ia candidates at redshifts z > 1.2. We measure volumetric SN Ia rates to redshift 1.8 and add the first upper limit on the SN Ia rate in the range 1.8 99% significance level.

  1. Discover: What Is Public Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Undergraduate Network Membership Contact Discover What is Public Health? Public health protects and improves the health of individuals, families, communities, and populations, locally and globally. Public health is personal. Public health professionals focus on preventing ...

  2. Discovering Natural Laws by Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴轶华

    1989-01-01

    A polynomial algorithm.called Reduction,is presented to discover natural laws by analysing a set of experimental data.instead of a heuristic exploration which,when adopted in BACON,can only lead to rediscovering simple laws.A complex law with multiple variables involved can be discovered by reducing it to a search.This search is so efficient that it does not need any backtracking and is able to cover most of possible laws.A reduction-based discovery system,called DISCOVER 2.0,was developed with a flexible knowledge base and an ability of dealing with imperfect data.The system has been verified to be valid computationally,practically,and theoretically,by discovering a great number o complex laws,and can be also viewed as a leaming engine embodied in any intelligent systems to improve their performance by obtaining a general rule from the accumulated data.

  3. Discovering Relationships Involving Baravelle Spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2006-01-01

    This article details an exploration of Baravelle spirals as visual representations of infinite geometric series, focusing on a variety of strategies used by preservice teachers in discovering patterns and investigating relationships of variables.

  4. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  5. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: VI. The Volumetric Type Ia Supernova Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Barbary, K; Amanullah, R; Brodwin, M; Connolly, N; Dawson, K S; Doi, M; Eisenhardt, P; Faccioli, L; Fadeyev, V; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Hattori, T; Hsiao, E; Huang, X; Ihara, Y; Kashikawa, N; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Kowalski, M; Lidman, C; Lubin, L; Meyers, J; Morokuma, T; Oda, T; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Ripoche, P; Rosati, P; Rubin, D; Schlegel, D J; Spadafora, A L; Stanford, S A; Strovink, M; Suzuki, N; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Yasuda, N

    2011-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate out to z ~ 1.6 from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. In observations spanning 189 orbits with the Advanced Camera for Surveys we discovered 29 SNe, of which approximately 20 are SNe Ia. Twelve of these SNe Ia are located in the foregrounds and backgrounds of the clusters targeted in the survey. Using these new data, we derive the volumetric SN Ia rate in four broad redshift bins, finding results consistent with previous measurements at z > 1 and strengthening the case for a SN Ia rate that is equal to or greater than ~0.6 x 10^-4/yr/Mpc^3 at z ~ 1 and flattening out at higher redshift. We provide SN candidates and efficiency calculations in a form that makes it easy to rebin and combine these results with other measurements for increased statistics. Finally, we compare the assumptions about host-galaxy dust extinction used in different high-redshift rate measurements, finding that different assumptions may induce sig...

  6. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: evolution, explosion, light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Hirschi, Raphael; Frohlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T; Noebauer, Ulrich M; van Rossum, Daniel R; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-01-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 and 250 solar masses) at relatively high metallicity (Z=0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce r...

  7. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: evolution, explosion, light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2017-01-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered, the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study, we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light-curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light-curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  8. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: Evolution, explosion, light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-10-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  9. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Chen; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Hogan, Craig J; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C; Prieto, Jose Luis; Riess, Adam G; Richmond, Michael W; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Yasuda, Naoki; Assef, Roberto J; Barentine, John; Bender, Ralf; Blandford, Roger D; Bremer, Malcolm; Brewington, Howard; Collins, Chris A; Crotts, Arlin; Dembicky, Jack; Eastman, Jason; Edge, Alastair; Elson, Ed; Eyler, Michael E; Filippenko, Alexei V; Foley, Ryan J; Frank, Stephan; Goobar, Ariel; Harvanek, Michael; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Kahn, Steven; Ketzeback, William; Kleinman, Scott J; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Krzesiński, Jurek; Leloudas, Giorgos; Long, Daniel C; Lucey, John; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMillan, Russet J; Morgan, Christopher W; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nitta, Atsuko; Ostman, Linda; Pan, Kaike; Romer, A Kathy; Saurage, Gabrelle; Schlesinger, Katie; Snedden, Stephanie A; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Watson, Linda C; Watters, Shannon; Wheeler, J Craig; York, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05 - 0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existi...

  10. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

    2008-03-25

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

  11. Light-echo spectroscopy of historic Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Oliver

    Young Galactic supernova remnants are unique laboratories for supernova physics. Due to their proximity they provide us with the most detailed view of the outcome of a supernova. However, the exact spectroscopic types of their original explosions have been undetermined so far -hindering to link the wealth of multi-wavelength knowledge about their remnants with the diverse population of supernovae. Light echoes, reflektions of the brilliant supernova burst of light by interstellar dust, provide a unique opportunity to reobserve today -with powerful scientific instruments of the 21st century -historic supernova exlosions even after hundreds of years and to conclude on their nature. We report on optical light-echo spectroscopy of two famous Galactic supernovae: Tycho Brahe's SN 1572 and the supernova that created the Cassiopeia A remnant around the year 1680. These observations finally recovered the missing spectroscopic classifications and provide new constraints on explosion models for future studies.

  12. Supernova Physics at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Ankowski, Artur; Benhar, Omar; Chen, Sun; Cherry, John; Cui, Yanou; Friedland, Alexander; Gil-Botella, Ines; Haghighat, Alireza; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Huber, Patrick; Kneller, James; Laha, Ranjan; Li, Shirley; Link, Jonathan; Lovato, Alessandro; Macias, Oscar; Mariani, Camillo; Mezzacappa, Anthony; O'Connor, Evan; O'Sullivan, Erin; Rubbia, Andre; Scholberg, Kate; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2016-01-01

    The DUNE/LBNF program aims to address key questions in neutrino physics and astroparticle physics. Realizing DUNE's potential to reconstruct low-energy particles in the 10-100 MeV energy range will bring significant benefits for all DUNE's science goals. In neutrino physics, low-energy sensitivity will improve neutrino energy reconstruction in the GeV range relevant for the kinematics of DUNE's long-baseline oscillation program. In astroparticle physics, low-energy capabilities will make DUNE's far detectors the world's best apparatus for studying the electron-neutrino flux from a supernova. This will open a new window to unrivaled studies of the dynamics and neutronization of a star's central core in real time, the potential discovery of the neutrino mass hierarchy, provide new sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model, and evidence of neutrino quantum-coherence effects. The same capabilities will also provide new sensitivity to `boosted dark matter' models that are not observable in traditional direc...

  13. A Supernova's Shockwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe's most massive stars. In death, these volatile creatures blast tons of energetic waves into the cosmos, destroying much of the dust surrounding them. This false-color composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of one such explosion. The remnant, called N132D, is the wispy pink shell of gas at the center of this image. The pinkish color reveals a clash between the explosion's high-energy shockwaves and surrounding dust grains. In the background, small organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are shown as tints of green. The blue spots represent stars in our galaxy along this line of sight. N132D is located 163,000 light-years away in a neighboring galaxy called, the Large Magellanic Cloud. In this image, infrared light at 4.5 microns is mapped to blue, 8.0 microns to green and 24 microns to red. Broadband X-ray light is mapped purple. The infrared data were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer, while the X-ray data were captured by Chandra.

  14. The Shape of Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What causes the tremendous explosions of superluminous supernovae? New observations reveal the geometry of one such explosion, SN 2015bn, providing clues as to its source.A New Class of ExplosionsImage of a type Ia supernova in the galaxy NGC 4526. [NASA/ESA]Supernovae are powerful explosions that can briefly outshine the galaxies that host them. There are several different classifications of supernovae, each with a different physical source such as thermonuclear instability in a white dwarf, caused by accretion of too much mass, or the exhaustion of fuel in the core of a massive star, leading to the cores collapse and expulsion of its outer layers.In recent years, however, weve detected another type of supernovae, referred to as superluminous supernovae. These particularly energetic explosions last longer months instead of weeks and are brighter at their peaks than normal supernovae by factors of tens to hundreds.The physical cause of these unusual explosions is still a topic of debate. Recently, however, a team of scientists led by Cosimo Inserra (Queens University Belfast) has obtained new observations of a superluminous supernova that might help address this question.The flux and the polarization level (black lines) along the dominant axis of SN 2015bn, 24 days before peak flux (left) and 28 days after peak flux (right). Blue lines show the authors best-fitting model. [Inserra et al. 2016]Probing GeometryInserra and collaborators obtained two sets of observations of SN 2015bn one roughly a month before and one a month after the superluminous supernovas peak brightness using a spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope in Chile. These observations mark the first spectropolarimetric data for a superluminous supernova.Spectropolarimetry is the practice of obtaining information about the polarization of radiation from an objects spectrum. Polarization carries information about broken spatial symmetries in the object: only if the object is perfectly symmetric can it

  15. Photometric Identification of Young Stripped-Core Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Maoz, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Foley, Ryan J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method designed to identify the spectral type of young (less than ~30 days after explosion) and nearby (z < ~0.05) supernovae (SNe) using their broad-band colors. In particular, we show that stripped-core SNe (i.e., hydrogen deficient core-collapse events, spectroscopically defined as SNe Ib and SNe Ic, including broad-lined SN 1998bw-like events) can be clearly distinguished from other types of SNe. Using the full census of nearby SNe discovered during the year 2002, we estimate...

  16. Simulation tool of a Supernova search with VST

    OpenAIRE

    Calvi, R.; Cappellaro, E; Botticella, M. T.; Riello, M.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the estimate of SN rates for all types as a function of redshift has been proposed and accepted a three years SN search with the VST telescope. To help planning an optimal strategy for the search, we have developed a simulation tool used to predict the numbers of Supernovae of different types which are expected to be discovered in a magnitude-limited survey. In our simulation a most important ingredient has been the determination of the K-correction as function of redshift for ever...

  17. Discovery and classification of 17 new supernovae by the Palomar Transient Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ami, S.; Badenes, C.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Matheson, T.; Xu, D.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R.; Yaron, O.; Stenberg, A.; Green, Y.; Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Cooke, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Law, N.; Levitan, D.; Ofek, E. O.; Poznanski, D.; Palomar Transient Factory

    2010-10-01

    We report the discovery and spectroscopic classification of 17 new supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf ). The supernovae were discovered and classified by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope. Spectroscopy was undertaken with the R-C spectrograph mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the Mayall 4-m telescope at Kitt Peak Observatory on UT 2010 October 8-10 by Ben- Ami, Badenes, Kulkarni, and Matheson.

  18. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017ghm as a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinko, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Wang, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z.; Xiang, D.; Rui, L.; Lin, H.; Xu, Z.; Li, B.; Zhao, H.; Wang, L.; Tan, H.; Zhang, J.

    2017-09-01

    An optical spectrum (range 360-680 nm) of SN 2017ghm (=PTSS-17uyml), discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), was obtained with the new "Low Resolution Spectrograph-2" (LRS2) on the 10m Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory by S. Rostopchin on 2017 Aug 31.17 UT. The spectrum is consistent with that of a heavily reddened Type Ia supernova (with Av > 2.3 mag) around maximum light.

  19. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  20. Characterising Dark Energy through supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Tamara M

    2016-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are a powerful cosmological probe, that gave the first strong evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. Here we provide an overview of how supernovae can go further to reveal information about what is causing the acceleration, be it dark energy or some modification to our laws of gravity. We first summarise the many different approaches used to explain or test the acceleration, including parametric models (like the standard model, LambdaCDM), non-parametric models, dark fluid models such as quintessence, and extensions to standard gravity. We also show how supernova data can be used beyond the Hubble diagram, to give information on gravitational lensing and peculiar velocities that can be used to distinguish between models that predict the same expansion history. Finally, we review the methods of statistical inference that are commonly used, making a point of separating parameter estimation from model selection.

  1. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  2. Standardization of type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Coelho, Rodrigo C V; Reis, Ribamar R R; Siffert, Beatriz B

    2014-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been intensively investigated due to its great homogeneity and high luminosity, which make it possible to use them as standardizable candles for the determination of cosmological parameters. In 2011, the physics Nobel prize was awarded for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae. This is a pedagogical article, aimed at those starting their study of that subject, in which we dwell on some topics related to the analysis of SNe Ia and their use in luminosity distance estimators. Here we investigate their spectral properties and light curve standardization, paying careful attention to the fundamental quantities directly related to the SNe Ia observables. Finally, we describe our own step-by-step implementation of a classical light curve fi?tter, the stretch, applying it to real data from the Carnegie Supernova Project.

  3. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  4. Emission and Absorption Study of the Vela Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.

    The combination of emission and absorption studies of the shocked gas in a supernova remnant can provide information not available from either study by itself, especially relating to the liberation of refractory elements from interstellar grains in the cooling zone behind the shock and the effects of departures from steady flow. No such combined studies have been attempted due to the need for a hot, bright background star behind supernova remnant nebulosity bright enough for emission line observations. Wallerstein and Balick have discovered a suitable patch of nebulosity in the Vela Supernova Remnant adjacent to the B3 III star HD 72088. IUE spectra of the star show a 94 km/s component in C IV and Si IV in absorption, and the optical spectra of Wallerstein and Balick show strong high excitation emission lines close to the star. We wish to obtain IUE spectra of the nebulosity as close to the star as possible and further high dispersion spectra of the star to improve the signal-tonoise.

  5. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  6. Magnetar-Powered Supernovae in Two Dimensions. I. Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the radiation emitted by a rapidly rotating magnetar embedded in a young supernova can greatly amplify its luminosity. These one-dimensional studies have also revealed the existence of an instability arising from the piling up of radiatively accelerated matter in a thin dense shell deep inside the supernova. Here we examine the problem in two dimensions and find that, while instabilities cause mixing and fracture this shell into filamentary structures that reduce the density contrast, the concentration of matter in a hollow shell persists. The extent of the mixing depends upon the relative energy input by the magnetar and the kinetic energy of the inner ejecta. The light curve and spectrum of the resulting supernova will be appreciably altered, as will the appearance of the supernova remnant, which will be shellular and filamentary. A similar pile up and mixing might characterize other events where energy is input over an extended period by a centrally concentrated source, e.g...

  7. The Red Supergiant Progenitor of Supernova 2012aw (PTF12bvh) in Messier 95

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Poznanski, Dovi; Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverio, Kathryn; Stockton, Alan; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We report on the direct detection and characterization of the probable red supergiant progenitor of the intermediate-luminosity Type II-Plateau (II-P) supernova (SN) 2012aw in the nearby (10.0 Mpc) spiral galaxy Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351). We have identified the star in both Hubble Space Telescope images of the host galaxy, obtained 17-18 yr prior to the explosion, and near-infrared ground-based images, obtained 6-12 yr prior to the SN. The luminous supergiant showed evidence for substantial circumstellar dust, manifested as excess line-of-sight extinction. The effective total-to-selective ratio of extinction to the star was R'_V \\approx 4.35, which is significantly different from that of diffuse interstellar dust (i.e., R_V=3.1), and the total extinction to the star was therefore, on average, A_V \\approx 3.1 mag. We find that the observed spectral energy distribution for the progenitor star is consistent with an effective temperature of 3600 K (spectral type M3), and that the star therefore had a bolometric ...

  8. The importance of 56Ni in shaping the light curves of type II supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nakar, Ehud; Katz, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    What intrinsic properties shape the light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe)? To address this question we derive observational measures that are robust (i.e., insensitive to detailed radiative transfer) and constrain the contribution from 56Ni, as well as a combination of the ejecta mass, progenitor radius, and explosion energy. By applying our methods to a sample of type II SNe from the literature we find that 56Ni contribution is often significant. It is typically the source of about 20% of the radiated energy during the photospheric phase, and in extreme cases it even dominates. We find that the 56Ni relative contribution is anti-correlated with the luminosity decline rate, while it is not significantly correlated with other properties of the light curve. When added to other clues, this in turn suggests that the flat plateaus often observed in type II SNe are not a generic feature of the cooling envelope emission, and that without 56Ni many of the SNe that are classified as II-P would have shown a decline ...

  9. A Systematic Study of Mid-Infrared Emission from Core-Collapse Supernovae with SPIRITS

    CERN Document Server

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Fox, Ori D; Lau, Ryan; Smith, Nathan; Williams, Robert; Jencson, Jacob; Perley, Daniel; Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert; Johansson, Joel; Masci, Frank; Cody, Ann Marie; Prince, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic study of mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from 141 nearby supernovae (SNe) observed with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on Spitzer.These SNe reside in one of the 190 galaxies within 20 Mpc drawn from the ongoing SPIRITS program. We detect 8 Type Ia SNe and 36 core-collapse SNe. All Type I SNe become undetectable within 3 years of explosion. About 22$\\pm$11% of Type II SNe continue to be detected at late-times. Dust luminosity, temperature, and a lower liit on mass are obtained by fitting the SED using photometry with IRAC bands 1 and 2. The mass estimate does not distinguish between pre-existing and newly produced dust. We observe warm dust masses between $10^{-2}$ and $10^{-6}$ $\\rm M_{\\odot}$ and dust temperatures from 200 K to 1280 K.We present detailed case studies of two extreme Type II-P SNe: SN 2011ja and 2014bi. SN 2011ja was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion accompanied by the growing dust mass. This suggests either an episode of dust formation or an...

  10. A Massive Shell of Supernova-formed Dust in SNR G54.1+0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Slane, Patrick; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Raymond, John C.

    2017-02-01

    While theoretical models of dust condensation predict that most refractory elements produced in core-collapse supernovae (SNe) efficiently condense into dust, a large quantity of dust has so far only been observed in SN 1987A. We present an analysis of observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Herschel Space Observatory, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and AKARI of the infrared shell surrounding the pulsar wind nebula in the supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. We attribute a distinctive spectral feature at 21 μm to a magnesium silicate grain species that has been invoked in modeling the ejecta-condensed dust in Cas A, which exhibits the same spectral signature. If this species is responsible for producing the observed spectral feature and accounts for a significant fraction of the observed infrared continuum, we find that it would be the dominant constituent of the dust in G54.1+0.3, with possible secondary contributions from other compositions, such as carbon, silicate, or alumina grains. The total mass of SN-formed dust required by this model is at least 0.3 M ⊙. We discuss how these results may be affected by varying dust grain properties and self-consistent grain heating models. The spatial distribution of the dust mass and temperature in G54.1+0.3 confirms the scenario in which the SN-formed dust has not yet been processed by the SN reverse shock and is being heated by stars belonging to a cluster in which the SN progenitor exploded. The dust mass and composition suggest a progenitor mass of 16–27 M ⊙ and imply a high dust condensation efficiency, similar to that found for Cas A and SN 1987A. The study provides another example of significant dust formation in a Type IIP SN explosion and sheds light on the properties of pristine SN-condensed dust.

  11. Expansion of Kes 73, A Shell Supernova Remnant Containing a Magnetar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2017-09-01

    Of the 30 or so Galactic magnetars, about 8 are in supernova remnants (SNRs). One of the most extreme magnetars, 1E 1841‑045, is at the center of the SNR Kes 73 (G27.4+0.0), whose age is uncertain. We measure its expansion using three Chandra observations over 15 years, obtaining a mean rate of 0.023 % +/- 0.002 % yr‑1. For a distance of 8.5 kpc, we obtain a shell velocity of 1100 km s‑1 and infer a blast wave speed of 1400 km s‑1. For Sedov expansion into a uniform medium, this gives an age of 1800 years. Derived emission measures imply an ambient density of about 2 cm‑3 and an upper limit on the swept-up mass of about 70 {M}ȯ , with lower limits of tens of {M}ȯ , confirming that Kes 73 is in an advanced evolutionary stage. Our spectral analysis shows no evidence for enhanced abundances as would be expected from a massive progenitor. Our derived total energy is 1.9× {10}51 erg, giving a very conservative lower limit to the magnetar’s initial period of about 3 ms, unless its energy was lost by non-electromagnetic means. We see no evidence of a wind-blown bubble as would be produced by a massive progenitor, or any evidence that the progenitor of Kes 73/1E 1841‑045 was anything but a normal red supergiant producing a Type IIP supernova, though a short-lived stripped-envelope progenitor cannot be absolutely excluded. Kes 73's magnetar thus joins SGR 1900+14 as magnetars resulting from relatively low-mass progenitors.

  12. Close Binary Progenitors and Ejected Companions of Thermonuclear Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, S.; Kupfer, T.; Heber, U.; Nemeth, P.; Ziegerer, E.; Irrgang, A.; Schindewolf, M.; Marsh, T. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Barlow, B. N.; Bloemen, S.

    2017-03-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes, which can be formed by common envelope ejection. Close sdB binaries with massive white dwarf (WD) companions are potential progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae type Ia (SN Ia). We discovered such a progenitor candidate as well as a candidate for a surviving companion star, which escapes from the Galaxy. More candidates for both types of objects have been found by cross-matching known sdB stars with proper motion and light curve catalogues. We found 72 sdO/B candidates with high Galactic restframe velocities, 12 of them might be unbound to our Galaxy. Furthermore, we discovered the second-most compact sdB+WD binary known. However, due to the low mass of the WD companion, it is unlikely to be a SN Ia progenitor.

  13. A Search for New Candidate Super-Chandrasekhar-Mass Type Ia Supernovae in the Nearby Supernova Factory Dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Scalzo, The Nearby Supernova Factory: R; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Cellier-Holzem, F; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Guy, J; Hsiao, E Y; Kerschhaggl, M; Kowalski, M; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Runge, K; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Thomas, R C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C

    2012-01-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of five type Ia supernovae discovered by the Nearby Supernova Factory selected to be spectroscopic analogues of the candidate super-Chandrasekhar-mass events SN 2003fg and SN 2007if. Their spectra are characterized by hot, highly ionized photospheres near maximum light, for which SN 1991T supplies the best phase coverage among available close spectral templates. Like SN 2007if, these supernovae are overluminous (-19.5 < M_V < -20) and the velocity of the Si II 6355 absorption minimum is consistent with being constant in time from phases as early as a week before, and up to two weeks after, $B$-band maximum light. We interpret the velocity plateaus as evidence for a reverse-shock shell in the ejecta formed by interaction at early times with a compact envelope of surrounding material, as might be expected for SNe resulting from the mergers of two white dwarfs. We use the bolometric light curves and line velocity evolution of these SNe to estimate important pa...

  14. Discovering High Fashion in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MARTHA; KANG; MCGILL

    2006-01-01

    Nothing beats bargaining in a Beijing clothes market. As an American student, it's a completely novel experience, a great way to practice your Chinese, and gives you the feeling of discovering the real Beijing. The atmosphere is so different from shopping experiences in the United States. It seems here that it must be authentic con

  15. Are Supernovae Recorded in Indigenous Astronomical Traditions?

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2014-01-01

    Novae and supernovae are rare astronomical events that would have had an influence on the sky-watching peoples who witnessed them. Although several bright novae/supernovae have been visible during recorded human history, there are many proposed but no confirmed accounts of supernovae in oral traditions or material culture. Criteria are established for confirming novae/supernovae in oral and material culture, and claims from around the world are discussed to determine if they meet these criteria. Australian Aboriginal traditions are explored for possible descriptions of novae/supernovae. Although representations of supernovae may exist in Indigenous traditions, and an account of a nova in Aboriginal traditions has been confirmed, there are currently no confirmed accounts of supernovae in Indigenous oral or material traditions.

  16. Discovery potential for supernova relic neutrinos with slow liquid scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Hanyu; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-01-01

    The detection of supernova relic neutrinos would provide a key support for our current understanding of stellar and cosmological evolution, and precise measurements of them would further give us an insight of the profound universe. In this paper we study the potential to detect supernova relic neutrinos using linear alkyl benzene, LAB, as a slow liquid scintillator, which features a good separation of Cherenkov and scintillation lights, thus providing a new ability in particle identification. We also address key issues of current experiments, including 1) the charged current background of atmospheric neutrinos in water Cherenkov detectors, and 2) the neutral current background of atmospheric neutrinos in typical liquid scintillator detectors. With LAB, a kiloton-scale detector, like the SNO, KamLAND, and the future Jinping neutrino detectors, with $\\mathcal{O}$(10) years of data, would have the sensitivity to discover supernova relic neutrinos, which is comparable to large-volume water Cherenkov, typical liqu...

  17. Discovery potential for supernova relic neutrinos with slow liquid scintillator detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hanyu; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2017-06-01

    Detection of supernova relic neutrinos could provide key support for our current understanding of stellar and cosmological evolution, and precise measurements of these neutrinos could yield novel insights into the universe. In this paper, we studied the detection potential of supernova relic neutrinos using linear alkyl benzene (LAB) as a slow liquid scintillator. The linear alkyl benzene features good separation of Cherenkov and scintillation lights, thereby providing a new route for particle identification. We further addressed key issues in current experiments, including (1) the charged current background of atmospheric neutrinos in water Cherenkov detectors and (2) the neutral current background of atmospheric neutrinos in typical liquid scintillator detectors. A kiloton-scale LAB detector at Jinping with O(10) years of data could discover supernova relic neutrinos with a sensitivity comparable to that of large-volume water Cherenkov detectors, typical liquid scintillator detectors, and liquid argon detectors.

  18. The SHOES Program: Supernovae and HO for the Dark Energy Equation of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Adam G.; Macri, L.

    2007-12-01

    The present uncertainty in the value of the Hubble constant (resulting in an uncertainty in OmegaM) and the paucity of Type Ia supernovae at redshifts exceeding 1 are leading obstacles to determining the nature of dark energy. We conducted a single, integrated set of observations in Cycle 15 to provide a 40% improvement in constraints on dark energy. This program observed known Cepheids in six reliable hosts of Type Ia supernovae with NICMOS, to reduce the uncertainty in H0 by a factor of two because of the smaller dispersion along the instability strip, the diminished extinction, and the weaker metallicity dependence in the infrared. In parallel with ACS, at the same time the NICMOS observations were underway, we discovered and followed a sample of Type Ia supernovae at z > 1. Together, these measurements, along with prior constraints from WMAP, should provide a significant improvement in our ability to distinguish between a static, cosmological constant and dynamical dark energy.

  19. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  20. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  1. Strange matter, detonations and supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O.G.; Horvath, J.E.; Vucetich, H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a possible scenario driven by QCD deconfinement in a high density nuclear matter medium. Some expected consequences for type II supernovae explosions are also given, particularly, the output energy that might be enough to account for the observed events.

  2. How to Find Gravitationally Lensed Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Daniel A.; Nugent, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that are multiply imaged by gravitational lensing can extend the SN Ia Hubble diagram to very high redshifts (z ≳ 2), probe potential SN Ia evolution, and deliver high-precision constraints on H0, w, and Ωm via time delays. However, only one, iPTF16geu, has been found to date, and many more are needed to achieve these goals. To increase the multiply imaged SN Ia discovery rate, we present a simple algorithm for identifying gravitationally lensed SN Ia candidates in cadenced, wide-field optical imaging surveys. The technique is to look for supernovae that appear to be hosted by elliptical galaxies, but that have absolute magnitudes implied by the apparent hosts’ photometric redshifts that are far brighter than the absolute magnitudes of normal SNe Ia (the brightest type of supernovae found in elliptical galaxies). Importantly, this purely photometric method does not require the ability to resolve the lensed images for discovery. Active galactic nuclei, the primary sources of contamination that affect the method, can be controlled using catalog cross-matches and color cuts. Highly magnified core-collapse SNe will also be discovered as a byproduct of the method. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, we forecast that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope can discover up to 500 multiply imaged SNe Ia using this technique in a 10 year z-band search, more than an order of magnitude improvement over previous estimates. We also predict that the Zwicky Transient Facility should find up to 10 multiply imaged SNe Ia using this technique in a 3 year R-band search—despite the fact that this survey will not resolve a single system.

  3. The volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae at z ˜ 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajs, S.; Sullivan, M.; Smith, M.; Levan, A.; Karpenka, N. V.; Edwards, T. D. P.; Walker, C. R.; Wolf, W. M.; Balland, C.; Carlberg, R.; Howell, D. A.; Lidman, C.; Pain, R.; Pritchet, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.

    2017-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) at z ˜ 1.0, measured using archival data from the first four years of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We develop a method for the photometric classification of SLSNe to construct our sample. Our sample includes two previously spectroscopically identified objects, and a further new candidate selected using our classification technique. We use the point-source recovery efficiencies from Perrett et al. and a Monte Carlo approach to calculate the rate based on our SLSN sample. We find that the three identified SLSNe from SNLS give a rate of 91^{+76}_{-36} SNe yr-1 Gpc-3 at a volume-weighted redshift of z = 1.13. This is equivalent to 2.2^{+1.8}_{-0.9}× 10^{-4} of the volumetric core-collapse supernova rate at the same redshift. When combined with other rate measurements from the literature, we show that the rate of SLSNe increases with redshift in a manner consistent with that of the cosmic star formation history. We also estimate the rate of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts based on the events discovered by the Swift satellite, and show that it is comparable to the rate of SLSNe, providing further evidence of a possible connection between these two classes of events. We also examine the host galaxies of the SLSNe discovered in SNLS, and find them to be consistent with the stellar-mass distribution of other published samples of SLSNe.

  4. Early Radio and X-Ray Observations of the Youngest nearby Type Ia Supernova PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, Derek B.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, Bradley; de Bruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; Law, Nicholas M.; Poznanski, Dovi; Shara, Michael

    2012-01-01

    On 2011 August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion

  5. Olmesartan Prevents Microalbuminuria in db/db Diabetic Mice Through Inhibition of Angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1-Induced Podocyte Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Gu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Blockage of the renin-angiotensin II system (RAS prevents or delays albuminuria in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of the angiotensin receptor blocker olmesartan on albuminuria in a murine model of diabetic nephropathy. Methods: Male db/db diabetic mice were fed with placebo or 20 mg/kg olmesartan by daily gavage for 12 weeks. Conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes were treated with glucose, angiotensin II, olmesartan or p38 inhibitor s8307 in different experimental conditions after differentiation. Results: Olmesartan reduced albuminuria in db/db mice without change in body weight and glycemia. The increase of apoptotic cells and decrease of podocytes in the diabetic glomerulus were prevented by olmesartan. Moreover, olmesartan restored silent mating type information regulation 1 (SIRT1 expression in diabetic glomeruli. Furthermore, olmesartan treatment suppressed p38 phosphorylation but did not restore adenosine 5‘-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation in the diabetic glomerulus. In vitro study revealed that olmesartan prevented angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1 induced podocyte apoptosis, but it only slightly prevented high glucose/AMPK/SIRT1 induced podocyte apoptosis. In addition, the p38 inhibitor s8307 reversed SIRT1 expression and angiotensin II induced podocyte apoptosis. Conclusions: Olmesartan reduced albuminuria in diabetic nephropathy through inhibiting angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1 triggered podocyte apoptosis.

  6. Olmesartan Prevents Microalbuminuria in db/db Diabetic Mice Through Inhibition of Angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1-Induced Podocyte Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junhui; Yang, Ming; Qi, Na; Mei, Shuqin; Chen, Jiejian; Song, Shuwei; Jing, Ying; Chen, Meihan; He, Liangliang; Sun, Lijun; Hu, Huimin; Li, Lin; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Wu, Ming; Mei, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of the renin-angiotensin II system (RAS) prevents or delays albuminuria in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of the angiotensin receptor blocker olmesartan on albuminuria in a murine model of diabetic nephropathy. Male db/db diabetic mice were fed with placebo or 20 mg/kg olmesartan by daily gavage for 12 weeks. Conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes were treated with glucose, angiotensin II, olmesartan or p38 inhibitor s8307 in different experimental conditions after differentiation. Olmesartan reduced albuminuria in db/db mice without change in body weight and glycemia. The increase of apoptotic cells and decrease of podocytes in the diabetic glomerulus were prevented by olmesartan. Moreover, olmesartan restored silent mating type information regulation 1 (SIRT1) expression in diabetic glomeruli. Furthermore, olmesartan treatment suppressed p38 phosphorylation but did not restore adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in the diabetic glomerulus. In vitro study revealed that olmesartan prevented angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1 induced podocyte apoptosis, but it only slightly prevented high glucose/AMPK/SIRT1 induced podocyte apoptosis. In addition, the p38 inhibitor s8307 reversed SIRT1 expression and angiotensin II induced podocyte apoptosis. Olmesartan reduced albuminuria in diabetic nephropathy through inhibiting angiotensin II/p38/SIRT1 triggered podocyte apoptosis. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Radio emission from Supernovae and High Precision Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Torres, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    corrections, agree well within one standard deviation. In summary, our astrometric results demonstrate the feasibility of using phase-delay difference techniques (single-frequency or dual-frequency) for sources separated by as far as 15(deg) on the sky. This opens the avenue for the extension of the technique on a global scale with the aim of building up a quasi-inertial reference frame (of submilliarcsecond accuracy) based on extragalactic radio sources. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the study of the radio emission of the Type II supernova SN 1993J, whose relative proximity (it exploded in the Galaxy M81, at a distance of 10 million of light-years) has allowed us to observe it with VLBI at different radio frequency bands since June 1993. This radio supernova is the best studied one so far and thus a perfect laboratory to test supernova radio emission models. Early VLBI observations of this supernova by our group allowed us to discover the shell structure of SN 1993J--likely common to all supernovae--the youngest ever discovered in a supernova. Subsequently, our VLBI observations showed SN 1993J to be self-similarly expanding and, more recently, we used our VLBI observations at 3.6 and 6 cm in the period 6 through 42 months after explosion to show that the supernova expansion is decelerating, its size following a power-law with time (R t^m; m=0.86 +- 0.02). Our measurement of the expansion index yields estimates of the density of both supernova ejecta and circumstellar material in standard supernova explosion models. In particular, the density of the circumstellar material seems to be following a power-law less steep than usual (rhocs r^{-s}, with s approx. 1.66 instead of the standard s=2). Our VLBI observations also showed that the supernova radio emission comes from a shell of width 30% of the outer radius. In this thesis, we describe a numerical code that simulates synchrotron radio emission from a supernova. We assume that the supernova is self

  8. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Finley, David A.; Fischer, John A.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kim, Alex G.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E.; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C.; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Cunha, Carlos E.; Costa, Luiz N. da; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Evrard, August E.; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrés A.; Romer, A. Kathy; Sánchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flávia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R.; Wester, William

    2016-11-08

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  9. Perspectives on Core-Collapse Supernova Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse theory brings together many facets of high-energy and nuclear astrophysics and the numerical arts to present theorists with one of the most important, yet frustrating, astronomical questions: "What is the mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions?" A review of all the physics and the fifty-year history involved would soon bury the reader in minutiae that could easily obscure the essential elements of the phenomenon, as we understand it today. Moreover, much remains to be discovered and explained, and a complicated review of an unresolved subject in flux could grow stale fast. Therefore, in this paper I describe what I think are various important facts and perspectives that may have escaped the attention of those interested in this puzzle. Furthermore, I attempt to describe the modern theory's physical underpinnings and briefly summarize the current state of play. In the process, I identify a few myths (as I see them) that have crept into modern discourse. However, there is much more to do ...

  10. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ravi R; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D'Andrea, Chris B; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J; Nichol, Robert C; Finley, David A; Fischer, John A; Foley, Ryan J; Kim, Alex G; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M C; Abdalla, Filipe B; Benoit-Levy, Aurelien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Cunha, Carlos E; da Costa, Luiz N; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F; Evrard, August E; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A G; Marshall, Jennifer L; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andres A; Romer, A Kathy; Sanchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E C; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R; Wester, William

    2016-01-01

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated alg...

  11. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Finley, David A.; Fischer, John A.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kim, Alex G.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E.; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C.; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Cunha, Carlos E.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Evrard, August E.; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrés A.; Romer, A. Kathy; Sánchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flávia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R.; Wester, William

    2016-12-01

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, and so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate “hostless” SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  12. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ravi R.; et al.

    2016-04-20

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  13. Discovering Network Structure Beyond Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Adilson E Motter

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes chara...

  14. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Inserra, C.; McCrum, M.; Kotak, R.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Chen, T.-W.; Smith, K.; Young, D. R.; Sim, S. A.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Tonry, J. L.; Huber, M. E.; Rest, A.; Pastorello, A.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Mattila, S.; Kankare, E.; Kangas, T.; Leloudas, G.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Narayan, G.; Stubbs, C. W.; Foley, R. J.; Lunnan, R.; Soderberg, A.; Sanders, N.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kirshner, R. P.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Botticella, M. T.; Gezari, S.; Urata, Y.; Rodney, S.; Riess, A. G.; Scolnic, D.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K.; Flewelling, H. A.; Magnier, E. A.; Kaiser, N.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, J.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Waters, C.

    2013-10-01

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 1044 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of `pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10-6 times that of the core-collapse rate.

  15. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, M; Smartt, S J; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Chen, T-W; Smith, K; Young, D R; Sim, S A; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Tonry, J L; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Pastorello, A; Tomasella, L; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Kangas, T; Leloudas, G; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Stubbs, C W; Foley, R J; Lunnan, R; Soderberg, A; Sanders, N; Milisavljevic, D; Margutti, R; Kirshner, R P; Elias-Rosa, N; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Taubenberger, S; Botticella, M T; Gezari, S; Urata, Y; Rodney, S; Riess, A G; Scolnic, D; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H A; Magnier, E A; Kaiser, N; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Waters, C

    2013-10-17

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10(44) ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of (56)Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to (56)Fe via (56)Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10(-6) times that of the core-collapse rate.

  16. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholl, M; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Chen, T -W; Smith, K; Young, D R; Sim, S A; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Tonry, J L; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Pastorello, A; Tomasella, L; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Kangas, T; Leloudas, G; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Stubbs, C W; Foley, R J; Lunnan, R; Soderberg, A; Sanders, N; Milisavljevic, D; Margutti, R; Kirshner, R P; Elias-Rosa, N; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Taubenberger, S; Botticella, M T; Gezari, S; Urata, Y; Rodney, S; Riess, A G; Scolnic, D; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H A; Magnier, E A; Kaiser, N; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Waters, C

    2013-01-01

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10^44 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-30 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae...

  17. A relativistic type Ibc supernova without a detected gamma-ray burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, A M; Chakraborti, S; Pignata, G; Chevalier, R A; Chandra, P; Ray, A; Wieringa, M H; Copete, A; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Barthelmy, S D; Bietenholz, M F; Chugai, N; Stritzinger, M D; Hamuy, M; Fransson, C; Fox, O; Levesque, E M; Grindlay, J E; Challis, P; Foley, R J; Kirshner, R P; Milne, P A; Torres, M A P

    2010-01-28

    Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) mark the explosive death of some massive stars and are a rare sub-class of type Ibc supernovae. They are distinguished by the production of an energetic and collimated relativistic outflow powered by a central engine (an accreting black hole or neutron star). Observationally, this outflow is manifested in the pulse of gamma-rays and a long-lived radio afterglow. Until now, central-engine-driven supernovae have been discovered exclusively through their gamma-ray emission, yet it is expected that a larger population goes undetected because of limited satellite sensitivity or beaming of the collimated emission away from our line of sight. In this framework, the recovery of undetected GRBs may be possible through radio searches for type Ibc supernovae with relativistic outflows. Here we report the discovery of luminous radio emission from the seemingly ordinary type Ibc SN 2009bb, which requires a substantial relativistic outflow powered by a central engine. A comparison with our radio survey of type Ibc supernovae reveals that the fraction harbouring central engines is low, about one per cent, measured independently from, but consistent with, the inferred rate of nearby GRBs. Independently, a second mildly relativistic supernova has been reported.

  18. SLOW-SPEED SUPERNOVAE FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY: TWO CHANNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Christopher J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Piro, Anthony L. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; Ben-Ami, Sagi [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Howell, D. Andrew [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Broida Hall, Mail Code 9530, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Goobar, Ariel [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bloom, Joshua S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Laher, Russ R.; Masci, Frank; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, M/S 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hook, Isobel M. [Department of Physics (Astrophysics), University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Jönsson, Jakob [Savantic AB, Rosenlundsgatan 50, SE-118 63 Stockholm (Sweden); Matheson, Thomas [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719-4933 (United States); and others

    2015-01-20

    Since the discovery of the unusual prototype SN 2002cx, the eponymous class of Type I (hydrogen-poor) supernovae with low ejecta speeds has grown to include approximately two dozen members identified from several heterogeneous surveys, in some cases ambiguously. Here we present the results of a systematic study of 1077 Type I supernovae discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory, leading to nine new members of this peculiar class. Moreover, we find there are two distinct subclasses based on their spectroscopic, photometric, and host galaxy properties: ''SN 2002cx-like'' supernovae tend to be in later-type or more irregular hosts, have more varied and generally dimmer luminosities, have longer rise times, and lack a Ti II trough when compared to ''SN 2002es-like'' supernovae. None of our objects show helium, and we counter a previous claim of two such events. We also find that the occurrence rate of these transients relative to Type Ia supernovae is 5.6{sub −3.8}{sup +22}% (90% confidence), lower compared to earlier estimates. Combining our objects with the literature sample, we propose that these subclasses have two distinct physical origins.

  19. An Extremely Luminous X-ray Outburst Marking the Birth of a Normal Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Soderberg, A M; Page, K; Schady, P; Parrent, J; Pooley, D; Wang, X -Y; Ofek, E; Cucchiara, A; Rau, A; Waxman, E; Simón, J; Bock, D; Milne, P; Page, M; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A; Bietenholz, M; Brown, P; Burrows, A; Burrows, D N; Byrngelson, G; Cenko, S B; Chandra, P; Cummings, J; Fox, D B; Gal-Yam, A; Gehrels, N; Immler, S; Kasliwal, M; Kong, A; Krimm, H; Kulkarni, S R; Mészáros, P; Nakar, E; O'Brien, P; de Pasquale, M; Racusin, J; Rea, N

    2008-01-01

    The most massive stars in the universe end their lives in luminous supernova explosions that lead to the formation of neutron stars and black holes and impact star formation and galaxy evolution. For nearly a century, supernovae have been discovered solely through their bright optical emission, delaying initial observations to several days after the explosion. As a result, the details of the core collapse explosion mechanism, as well as the nature of some supernova progenitors, remain a matter of intense debate. Here we report our serendipitous discovery of a normal type Ibc supernova at the time of explosion, marked by an extremely luminous X-ray outburst. We interpret the outburst as the break-out of the supernova shock through a dense wind surrounding the compact (radius of ~10^11 cm) progenitor star. This conclusion is supported by our extensive radio and ultraviolet/optical observations from 0.1 to 30 days post-explosion. Equally important, the inferred rate of X-ray outbursts agrees with the core-collap...

  20. X-Ray Studies of Supernova Remnants: A Different View of Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent data sets accumulated on young, ejecta dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I will review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first...

  1. ASASSN-16km: Discovery of A Supernova in ESO 197-G 010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. S.; Prieto, J. L.; Ricci, C.; Oh, K.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Shappee, B. J.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.

    2016-09-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a Type Ia supernova in the galaxy ESO 197-G 010. ASASSN-16km (AT 2016ggb) was discovered in images obtained on UT 2016-09-12.34 at V~16.3 mag. We also detect the object in images obtained on UT 2016-09-13.15 (V~16.2), UT 2016-09-10.15 (V~16.3), UT 2016-09-09.15 (V~16.6), UT 2016-09-05.110 (V~17.1), and UT 2016-09-02.41 (V~17.6).

  2. ASASSN-16of: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 087-IG 041

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.; Masi, G.; Post, R. S.; Stone, G.

    2016-12-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 087-IG 041. ASASSN-16of (AT 2016iqx) was discovered in images obtained on UT 2016-12-01.28 at V 16.7 mag. We also detect the object in images obtained on UT 2016-11-30.35 (V 16.8), UT 2016-11-28.28 (V 16.7), UT 2016-11-24.27 (V 17.0), UT 2016-11-22.23 (V 16.6), and UT 2016-11-19.34 (V 17.1).

  3. Type IA supernova spectroscopy analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chen

    2009-06-01

    Supernovae (SNe) have played an important role in the recent dramatic development of observational cosmology. They possess homogeneous observable properties, and thus approximate "standard candles", allowing them to be precise, luminosity distance indicators. Over the last decade, the observed sample of supernovae (SNe) has increased by more than an order of magnitude. Further advances will no longer be limited by statistical errors, but rather by the control of systematic uncertainties, associated with source diversity and evolution. Over 500 SNe Ia have been discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) -- II SN Survey during the three fall seasons from 2005 to 2007. We combine spectroscopic and photometric data to explore reducing these systematic errors. One challenge is to remove accurately the host galaxy light from the observed spectra. We have developed an effective host-subtraction tool using a composite color-constrained PCA+template-fitting program. We have applied this technique to more than 700 spectra from SNe with redshifts up to 0.4 obtained from the SDSS-II SN Survey and more than 200 spectra from low-z SNe at redshifts less than 0.01 obtained from the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) SN archive. We have also developed an automatic method to quantify spectral features of SNe Ia and applied it to the CfA and SDSS-II samples. By comparing the time series of the spectral features between these two samples, we have found no sign of cosmological evolution. We have, however, found evidence for luminosity-dependent differences in the Mg II 4300, Si II 4000, Si II 5800, and Si II 6150 lines. This should be useful for cosmological studies.

  4. Supernova neutrino detection in LAr TPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Botella, Ines, E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-10

    The neutrino burst from a core collapse supernova can provide information about the explosion mechanism and the mechanisms of proto neutron star cooling but also about the intrinsic properties of the neutrino such as flavor oscillations. One important question is to understand to which extent can the supernova and the neutrino physics be decoupled in the observation of a single supernova. The possibility to probe the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the type of mass hierarchy from the detection of supernova neutrinos with liquid argon detectors is summarized in this paper. Moreover, a quantitative study about the possibility to constrain the supernova parameters is presented. A very massive liquid argon detector ({approx} 100 kton) is needed to perform accurate measurements of these parameters. In addition, these detectors could also provide information on the {nu}{sub e} component of the diffuse supernova neutrino background.

  5. Finding Distances to Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are known as standard candles due to their consistency, allowing us to measure distances based on their brightness. But what if these explosions arent quite as consistent as we thought? Due scientific diligence requires careful checks, so a recent study investigates whether the metallicity of a supernovas environment affects the peak luminosity of the explosion.Metallicity Dependence?Type Ia supernovae are incredibly powerful tools for determining distances in our universe. Because these supernovae are formed by white dwarfs that explode when they reach a uniform accreted mass, the supernova peak luminosity is thought to be very consistent. This consistency allows these supernovae to be used as standard candles to measure distances to their host galaxies.But what if that peak luminosity is affected by a factor that we havent taken into account? Theorists have proposed that the luminosities of Type Ia supernovae might depend on the metallicity of their environments with high-metallicity environments suppressing supernova luminosities. If this is true, then we could be systematically mis-measuring cosmological distances using these supernovae.Testing AbundancesSupernova brightnesses vs. the metallicity of their environments. Low-metallicity supernovae (blue shading) and high-metallicity supernovae (red shading) have an average magnitude difference of ~0.14. [Adapted from Moreno-Raya et al. 2016]A team led by Manuel Moreno-Raya, of the Center for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain, has observed 28 Type Ia supernovae in an effort to test for such a metallicity dependence. These supernovae each have independent distance measurements (e.g., from Cepheids or the Tully-Fisher relation).Moreno-Raya and collaborators used spectra from the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope to estimate oxygen abundances in the region where each of these supernovae exploded. They then used these measurements to determine if metallicity of the local region

  6. VLBI observations of young Type II supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Marcaide, J M

    2005-01-01

    We give an overview of circumstellar interaction in young Type II supernovae, as seen through the eyes of very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. The resolution attained by such observations (best than 1 mas) is a powerful tool to probe the interaction that takes place after a supernova goes off. The direct imaging of a supernova permits, in principle, to estimate the deceleration of its expansion, and to obtain information on the eject and circumstellar density profiles, as well as estimates of the magnetic field intensity and relativistic particle energy density in the supernova. Unfortunately, only a handful of radio supernovae are close and bright enough as to permit their study with VLBI. We present results from our high-resolution observations of the nearby Type II radio supernovae SN1986J and SN2001gd.

  7. Improvements to type Ia supernova models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Clare M.

    Type Ia Supernovae provided the first strong evidence of dark energy and are still an important tool for measuring the accelerated expansion of the universe. However, future improvements will be limited by systematic uncertainties in our use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles. Using Type Ia supernovae for cosmology relies on our ability to standardize their absolute magnitudes, but this relies on imperfect models of supernova spectra time series. This thesis is focused on using data from the Nearby Supernova Factory both to understand current sources of uncertainty in standardizing Type Ia supernovae and to develop techniques that can be used to limit uncertainty in future analyses. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  8. An Intensive HST Survey for z>1 Supernovae by Targeting Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, K S; Amanullah, R; Barbary, K; Barrientos, L F; Brodwin, M; Connolly, N; Dey, A; Doi, M; Donahue, M; Eisenhardt, P; Ellingson, E; Faccioli, L; Fadeev, V; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; González, A H; Goobar, A; Gude, A; Hattori, T; Hoekstra, H; Huang, X; Ihara, Y; Jannuzi, B T; Johnston, D; Kashikawa, K; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Kowalski, M; Lidman, C; Linder, E V; Lubin, L; Meyers, J; Morokuma, T; Munshi, F; Mullis, C; Oda, T; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Pritchard, T; Rhodes, J; Rosati, P; Rubin, D; Schlegel, D J; Spadafora, A; Stanford, S A; Stanishev, V; Stern, D; Strovink, M; Suzuki, N; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Wagner, M; Wang, L; Yasuda, N; Yee, H K C

    2009-01-01

    We present a new survey strategy to discover and study high redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By targeting massive galaxy clusters at 0.90.95, nine of which were in galaxy clusters. This strategy provides a SN sample that can be used to decouple the effects of host galaxy extinction and intrinsic color in high redshift SNe, thereby reducing one of the largest systematic uncertainties in SN cosmology.

  9. The Scientific Potential of Supernova Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliaroli, G.; Vissani, F.

    2013-04-15

    Thanks to recent theoretical progresses and to the test bench of SN1987A, it has been possible to improve our ability to extract information from the future observations. In this paper we discuss a parameterized model of the neutrino emission. Two applications of this model are considered: 1) the investigation of the scientific potential of a future supernova for the study of the astrophysical parameters; 2) the expectations regarding the diffuse supernova neutrino background, namely, the relic supernova neutrinos.

  10. Magnetares como fuentes para potenciar supernovas superluminosas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersten, M. C.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetars have been proposed as one of the possible sources to power the light curve of super-luminous supernovae. We have included the energy deposited by a hypothetical magnetar in our one-dimensional hydrodynamical code, and analyzed the dynamical effect on the supernova ejecta. In particular, we present a model for SN 2011kl, the first object associated with a ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst. Finally, we show its effect on the light curves of hydrogen rich supernovae.

  11. Discovering evolution equations with applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKibben, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Most existing books on evolution equations tend either to cover a particular class of equations in too much depth for beginners or focus on a very specific research direction. Thus, the field can be daunting for newcomers to the field who need access to preliminary material and behind-the-scenes detail. Taking an applications-oriented, conversational approach, Discovering Evolution Equations with Applications: Volume 2-Stochastic Equations provides an introductory understanding of stochastic evolution equations. The text begins with hands-on introductions to the essentials of real and stochast

  12. Who discovered the magnetocaloric effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic body changes its thermal state when subjected to a changing magnetic field. In particular, if done under adiabatic conditions, its temperature changes. For the past 15 years the magnetocaloric effect has been the focus of significant research due to its possible application for efficient...... refrigeration near room temperature. At the same time, it has become common knowledge within the magnetic refrigeration research community that the magnetocaloric effect was discovered by the German physicist E. Warburg in 1881. We re-examine the original literature and show that this is a misleading reading...

  13. Rapid OT discovered by MASTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanutsa, P.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Lipunov, V.; Denisenko, D.; Tiurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Belinski, A.; Shatskiy, N.; Chazov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnih, I.; Popov, A.; Bourdanov, A.; Punanova, A.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Konstantinov, E.; Chuvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V.; Gress, O.; Parkhomenko, A.; Tlatov, A.; Dormidontov, D.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Y.; Varda, D.; Sinyakov, E.; Shumkov, V.; Shurpakov, S.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.

    2012-09-01

    OT MASTER J005552.55+261100.8 discovery MASTER-Amur auto-detection system discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 00h 55m 52.55s +26d 11m 00.8s on 2012-08-30.77359 UT by two tube simultaneously during 3 min exposition. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 14.2m (limit 18.0m). There is no minor planet at this place. There is no known satellite around 4 degrees at this time. There is one non star object NBKY021338 (jmag~ 22.3) in the Guide Star Catalog with 3.6 arcsec offset.

  14. Interface dynamos in supernova progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G; Thomas, J H; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason T.; Thomas, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Observational evidence for anisotropy in supernovae (SN) and their phenomenological connection to jetted sources such as gamma-ray bursts^Mhave revived considerations of the role magnetohydrodynamic outflows might play therein. Understanding the types of dynamos that might operate in supernova progenitors is therefore relevant. In contrast to previous work, here we study an ``interface dynamo'' for the conditions of a rapidly rotating neutron star surrounded by a convective envelope. Such dynamos have been studied for the Sun, naked white dwarfs,and post-AGB stars, where analogous configurations of strong shear layers surrounded by convective envelopes are present. The interface dynamo provides estimates of large-scale poloidal and toroidal fields, whose product enters the Poynting flux. Because the poloidal field is much weaker than the toroidal magnetic field, the actual average Poynting flux is lower than rough estimates which invoke the only the magnitude of the total magnetic energy. The lower value is s...

  15. Cosmology from Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Perlmutter, S; Deustua, S; Fabbro, S; Goldhaber, Gerson; Groom, D E; Kim, A G; Kim, M Y; Knop, R A; Nugent, P; Pennypacker, C R; Goobar, A; Pain, R; Hook, I M; Lidman, C E; Ellis, Richard S; Irwin, M J; McMahon, R G; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Walton, N A; Schaefer, B; Boyle, B J; Filippenko, A V; Matheson, T; Fruchter, A S; Panagia, N; Newberg, H J M; Couch, W J

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reports on first evidence for a low-mass-density/positive-cosmological-constant universe that will expand forever, based on observations of a set of 40 high-redshift supernovae. The experimental strategy, data sets, and analysis techniques are described. More extensive analyses of these results with some additional methods and data are presented in the more recent LBNL report #41801 (Perlmutter et al., 1998; accepted for publication in Ap.J.), astro-ph/9812133 . This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory reprint is a reduction of a poster presentation from the Cosmology Display Session #85 on 9 January 1998 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington D.C. It is also available on the World Wide Web at http://supernova.LBL.gov/ This work has also been referenced in the literature by the pre-meeting abstract citation: Perlmutter et al., B.A.A.S., volume 29, page 1351 (1997).

  16. Environmental impact of Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Dubner, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of a supernovae (SN) represents the sudden injection of about 10^51 ergs of thermal and mechanical energy in a small region of space, causing the formation of powerful shock waves that propagate through the interstellar medium at speeds of several thousands of km/s. These waves sweep, compress and heat the interstellar material that they encounter, forming the supernova remnants. Their evolution over thousands of years change forever, irreversibly, not only the physical but also the chemical properties of a vast region of space that can span hundreds of parsecs. This contribution briefly analyzes the impact of these explosions, discussing the relevance of some phenomena usually associated with SNe and their remnants in the light of recent theoretical and observational results.

  17. Connecting supernovae with their environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany, L.

    2017-03-01

    We present MUSE observations of galaxy NGC 7469 from its Science Verification to show how powerful is the combination of high-resolution wide-field integral field spectroscopy with both photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova (SN) explosions. Using STARLIGHT and H II explorer, we selected all H II regions of the galaxy and produced 2-dimensional maps of the Hα equivalent width, average luminosity-weighted stellar age, and oxygen abundance. We measured deprojected galactocentric distances for all H II regions, and radial gradients for all above-mentioned parameters. We positioned the type Ia SN2008ec in the Branch et al. diagram, and finally discussed the characteristics of the SN parent H II region compared to all other H II regions in the galaxy. In a near future, the AMUSING survey will be able to reproduce this analysis and construct statistical samples to enable the characterization of the progenitors of different supernova types.

  18. An Update on Radio Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Montes, Marcos J.; Panagia, Nino

    The radio emission from supernovae (SNe) is nonthermal synchrotron radiation of high brightness temperature, with a ``turn-on'' delay at longer wavelengths, power-law decline after maximum with index beta, and spectral index alpha asymptotically decreasing with time to a final, optically thin value. Radio supernovae (RSNe) are best described by the Chevalier (1982) ``mini-shell'' model, with modifications by Weiler \\etal\\ (1990). RSNe observations provide a valuable probe of the SN circumstellar environment and constraints on progenitor masses. We present a progress report on a number of recent RSNe, as well as on new behavior from RSNe 1979C and 1980K, and on RSNe as potential distance indicators. In particular, we present updated radio light curves for SN 1993J in M81.

  19. Evidence for Nearby Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez, N; Canelles, M; Benitez, Narciso; Maiz-Apellaniz, Jesus; Canelles, Matilde

    2002-01-01

    Supernova explosions are one of the most energetic--and potentially lethal--phenomena in the Universe. Scientists have speculated for decades about the possible consequences for life on Earth of a nearby supernova, but plausible candidates for such an event were lacking. Here we show that the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, a group of young stars currently located at~130 parsecs from the Sun, has generated 20 SN explosions during the last 11 Myr, some of them probably as close as 40 pc to our planet. We find that the deposition on Earth of 60Fe atoms produced by these explosions can explain the recent measurements of an excess of this isotope in deep ocean crust samples. We propose that ~2 Myr ago, one of the SNe exploded close enough to Earth to seriously damage the ozone layer, provoking or contributing to the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary marine extinction.

  20. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.S.

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of {approximately} 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for {gamma}-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of {approximately} 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches {approximately} 60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  1. Understanding Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, A

    2004-01-01

    I summarize, in the form of an extended abstract, the ongoing efforts at the University of Arizona (and in collaboration) to understand core-collapse supernovae theoretically. Included are short discussions of 1D (SESAME) and 2D (VULCAN/2D) codes and results, as well as discussions of the possible role of rotation. Highlighted are recent developments in multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics and the essential physics of the neutrino-driven mechanism.

  2. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Douglas Scott [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of ~ 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for γ-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of ~ 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches ~60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  3. Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2010-01-01

    We review the main observational and theoretical facts about acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays in supernova remnants, discussing the arguments in favor and against a connection between cosmic rays and supernova remnants, the so-called supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of 1) magnetic field amplification, 2) acceleration of nuclei heavier than hydrogen, 3) presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. The status of the supernova-cosmic ray connection in the time of Fermi-LAT and Cherenkov telescopes is also discussed.

  4. Dark Energy and Termonuclear Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domíngez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Straniero, O.; Höflich, P.

    2008-12-01

    Nowadays it is widely accepted that the current Universe is dominated by dark energy and exotic matter, the so called StandardModel of Cosmoloy or CDM model. All the available data (Thermonuclear Supernovae, Cosmic Microwave Background, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Large Scale Structure, etc.) are compatible with a flat Universe made by ~70% of dark energy. Up to now observations agree that dark energy may be the vacuum energy (or cosmological constant) although improvements are needed to constrain further its equation of state. In this context, the cosmic destiny of the Universe is no longer linked to its geometry but to the nature of dark energy; it may be flat and expand forever or collapse. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today; it may open new roads of knowledge and led to unify gravity with the other fundamental interactions in nature. It is expected that astronomical data will continue to provide directions to theorists and experimental physicists. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have played a fundamental role, showing the acceleration of the expansion rate of the Universe a decade ago, and up to now they are the only astronomical observations that provide a direct evidence of the acceleration. However, in order to determine the source of the dark energy term it is mandatory to improve the precision of supernovae as distance indicators on cosmological scale.

  5. OH Masers and Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Wardle, Mark

    2012-01-01

    OH(1720 MHz) masers are created by the interaction of supernova remnants with molecular clouds. These masers are pumped by collisions in warm, shocked molecular gas with OH column densities in the range 10^{16}--10^{17} cm^{-2}. Excitation calculations suggest that inversion of the 6049 MHz OH line may occur at the higher column densities that have been inferred from main-line absorption studies of supernova remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. OH(6049 MHz) masers have therefore been proposed as a complementary indicator of remnant-cloud interaction. This motivated searches for 6049 MHz maser emission from supernova remnants using the Parkes 63 m and Effelsberg 100 m telescopes, and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. A total of forty-one remnants have been examined by one or more of these surveys, but without success. To check the accuracy of the OH column densities inferred from the single-dish observations we modelled OH absorption at 1667 MHz observed with the Very Large Array towards three supernov...

  6. A spitzer space telescope study of SN 2002hh: An infrared echo from a type llP supernova

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meikle, W. P. S.; Mattila, S.; Gerardy, C. L.;

    2006-01-01

    Stars: Supernovae: General, supernovae: individual (NGC 6946), Stars: Supernovae: Individual: Alphanumeric: SN 2002hh Udgivelsesdato: May 22......Stars: Supernovae: General, supernovae: individual (NGC 6946), Stars: Supernovae: Individual: Alphanumeric: SN 2002hh Udgivelsesdato: May 22...

  7. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Filippenko, Alexei V; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Jha, Saurabh W; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Molla, Mercedes; Nichol, Robert C; Nordin, Jakob; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J Craig; Ostman, Linda; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z \\lesssim 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04+1.61-0.95 % of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used t...

  8. The VLT Measures the Shape of a Type Ia Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    -mode FORS1 instrument to observe SN 2001el , a Type Ia supernova that was discovered in September 2001 in the galaxy NGC 1448, cf. PR Photo 24a/03 at a distance of 60 million light-years. Observations obtained about a week before this supernova reached maximum brightness around October 2 revealed polarisation at levels of 0.2-0.3% ( PR Photo 24b/03 ). Near maximum light and up to two weeks thereafter, the polarisation was still measurable. Six weeks after maximum, the polarisation had dropped below detectability. This is the first time ever that a normal Type Ia supernova has been found to exhibit such clear-cut evidence of asymmetry . Looking deeper into the supernova Immediately following the supernova explosion, most of the expelled matter moves at velocities around 10,000 km/sec. During this expansion, the outermost layers become progressively more transparent. With time one can thus look deeper and deeper into the supernova. The polarisation measured in SN 2001el therefore provides evidence that the outermost parts of the supernova (which are first seen) are significantly asymmetric . Later, when the VLT observations "penetrate" deeper towards the heart of the supernova, the explosion geometry is increasingly more symmetric. If modeled in terms of a flattened spheroidal shape, the measured polarisation in SN 2001el implies a minor-to-major axis ratio of around 0.9 before maximum brightness is reached and a spherically symmetric geometry from about one week after this maximum and onward. Cosmological implications One of the key parameters on which Type Ia distance estimates are based is the optical brightness at maximum. The measured asphericity at this moment would introduce an absolute brightness uncertainty (dispersion) of about 10% if no correction were made for the viewing angle (which is not known). While Type Ia supernovae are by far the best standard candles for measuring cosmological distances, and hence for investigating the so-called dark energy, a small

  9. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  10. Cygnus Loop Supernova Blast Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This is an image of a small portion of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, which marks the edge of a bubble-like, expanding blast wave from a colossal stellar explosion, occurring about 15,000 years ago. The HST image shows the structure behind the shock waves, allowing astronomers for the first time to directly compare the actual structure of the shock with theoretical model calculations. Besides supernova remnants, these shock models are important in understanding a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from winds in newly-formed stars to cataclysmic stellar outbursts. The supernova blast is slamming into tenuous clouds of insterstellar gas. This collision heats and compresses the gas, causing it to glow. The shock thus acts as a searchlight revealing the structure of the interstellar medium. The detailed HST image shows the blast wave overrunning dense clumps of gas, which despite HST's high resolution, cannot be resolved. This means that the clumps of gas must be small enough to fit inside our solar system, making them relatively small structures by interstellar standards. A bluish ribbon of light stretching left to right across the picture might be a knot of gas ejected by the supernova; this interstellar 'bullet' traveling over three million miles per hour (5 million kilometres) is just catching up with the shock front, which has slowed down by ploughing into interstellar material. The Cygnus Loop appears as a faint ring of glowing gases about three degrees across (six times the diameter of the full Moon), located in the northern constellation, Cygnus the Swan. The supernova remnant is within the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and is 2,600 light-years away. The photo is a combination of separate images taken in three colors, oxygen atoms (blue) emit light at temperatures of 30,000 to 60,000 degrees Celsius (50,000 to 100,000 degrees Farenheit). Hydrogen atoms (green) arise throughout the region of shocked gas. Sulfur atoms (red) form when the gas cools to

  11. A Spitzer Space Telescope Study of SN 2003gd: Still No Direct Evidence that Core-Collapse Supernovae are Major Dust Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Meikle, W P S; Pastorello, A; Gerardy, C L; Kotak, R; Sollerman, J; Van Dyk, S D; Farrah, D; Filippenko, A V; Höflich, P; Lundqvist, P; Pozzo, M; Wheeler, J C

    2007-01-01

    We present a new, detailed analysis of late-time mid-infrared (IR) observations of the Type II-P supernova (SN) 2003gd. At about 16 months after the explosion, the mid-IR flux is consistent with emission from 4 x 10^(-5) M(solar) of newly condensed dust in the ejecta. At 22 months emission from point-like sources close to the SN position was detected at 8 microns and 24 microns. By 42 months the 24 micron flux had faded. Considerations of luminosity and source size rule out the ejecta of SN 2003gd as the main origin of the emission at 22 months. A possible alternative explanation for the emission at this later epoch is an IR echo from pre-existing circumstellar or interstellar dust. We conclude that, contrary to the claim of Sugerman et al. (2006, Science, 313, 196), the mid-IR emission from SN 2003gd does not support the presence of 0.02 M(solar) of newly formed dust in the ejecta. There is, as yet, no direct evidence that core-collapse supernovae are major dust factories.

  12. Molecules and dust in Cas A: I - Synthesis in the supernova phase and processing by the reverse shock in the clumpy remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Biscaro, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We study the chemistry of the Type IIb supernova ejecta that led to the Cas A supernova remnant to assess the chemical type and quantity of dust that forms and evolves in the remnant phase. We later model a dense oxygen-rich ejecta knot that is crossed by the reverse shock in Cas A to study the evolution of the clump gas phase and the possibility to reform dust clusters in the post-reverse shock gas. Methods: A chemical network including all processes efficient at high gas temperatures and densities is considered. The formation of key bimolecular species (CO, SiO) and dust clusters is described. Stiff, coupled, ordinary, differential equations are solved for the conditions pertaining to both the SN ejecta and the post-reverse shock gas. Results: We find that the ejecta of Type IIb SNe are unable to form large amounts of molecules and dust clusters as opposed to their Type II-P counterparts because of their diffuse ejecta. The gas density needs to be increased by several orders of magnitude to allow the ...

  13. Statistical design and optimization of single cell oil production from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by an oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula sp. IIP-33 using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhu, Sheetal; Dasgupta, Diptarka; Akhter, Jawed; Kanaujia, Pankaj; Suman, Sunil K; Agrawal, Deepti; Kaul, Savita; Adhikari, Dilip K; Ghosh, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    Single cell oil production from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula sp. IIP-33 was analyzed using a two stage statistical design approach based on Response Surface Methodology. Variables like pentose sugar, (NH4)2SO4, KH2PO4, yeast extract, pH and temperature were found to influence lipid production significantly. Under optimized condition in a shake flask, yield of lipid was 2.1199 g with fat coefficient of 7.09 which also resembled ~99% similarity to model predicted lipid production. In this paper we are presenting optimized results for production of non polar lipid which could be later deoxygenated into hydrocarbon. A qualitative analyses of selective lipid samples yielded a varying distribution of free acid ranging from C6 to C18, majoring C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1 under different fermentation conditions.

  14. Potent new greenhouse gas discovered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-02-01

    Discovery of a new greenhouse gas by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany, is reported. The newly detected compound --trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride -- is of industrial origin and is considered to be the most potent greenhouse gas identified to date. Its source remains a mystery, but is believed to be related to SF{sub 6}, a compound used in in high voltage electrical equipment to suppress sparks, in protecting metals during a melting process, in tennis balls, car tires and running shoes. In the past it has also been used as a noise barrier in double glazed window panes. The molecule is extremely resistant to the natural self-cleaning property of the atmosphere, has a long lifetime -- somewhere between several hundred and several thousand years. The gas was discovered during expeditions to Antarctica while extracting air samples from a thick firm layer of snow.

  15. Discovering Network Structure Beyond Communities

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, Takashi; 10.1038/srep00151

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes characterized by common network properties, including but not limited to communities of densely connected nodes. Without any prior information about the nature of the groups, the method simultaneously identifies the number of groups, the group assignment, and the properties that define these groups. The results of applying our method to real networks suggest the possibility that most group structures lurk undiscovered in the fast-growing inventory of social, biological, and technological networks of scientific interest.

  16. Discovering network structure beyond communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes characterized by common network properties, including but not limited to communities of densely connected nodes. Without any prior information about the nature of the groups, the method simultaneously identifies the number of groups, the group assignment, and the properties that define these groups. The results of applying our method to real networks suggest the possibility that most group structures lurk undiscovered in the fast-growing inventory of social, biological, and technological networks of scientific interest.

  17. DNA studies of newly synthesized heteroleptic platinum(II) complexes [Pt(bpy)(iip)](2+) and [Pt(bpy)(miip)](2.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Burak; Tekin, Ishak Ozel; Sengul, Abdurrahman; Yildiz, Ufuk; Kocak, Izzet; Sevinc, Nergis

    2016-04-01

    Two new mono-nuclear heteroleptic platinum(II) complexes, [Pt(bpy)(iip)](PF6)2 (1) and [Pt(bpy)(miip)](PF6)2·2H2O (2) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; iip is 2-(imidazo-4-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1,10] phenanthroline; miip is 2-(1-methylimidazo-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1, 10] phenanthroline), have been synthesized and fully characterized by CHN analysis, electrospray ionization and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, FT-IR (ATR), and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Cytotoxicity, ability to inhibit DNA transcription and DNAse activity of the complexes were studied. The DNA-binding behaviors of both complexes have also been studied by spectroscopic methods, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurements. Both complexes showed cytotoxic properties and 2 was more cytotoxic than 1. DNA transcription was inhibited upon increasing concentrations of both complexes. The complex 2 was found to be a better inhibitor than 1. The same pattern can be seen in the DNAse profile of the complexes. In addition, 2 was found to promote cleavage of pBR322 DNA at a lower concentration than 1. The spectroscopic, electrochemical and viscometric results indicate that both complexes show some degree of binding to DNA in an intercalative mode, resulting in intrinsic binding constants K b = 3.55 ± 0.6 × 10(4) M(-1) and 7.01 ± 0.9 × 10(4) M(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The difference in the DNA-binding affinities of 1 and 2 may presumably be explained by the methylated imidazole nitrogen atom that makes the compound more hydrophobic and gives better intercalative binding ability to DNA's hydrophobic environment.

  18. Supernova remnants: the X-ray perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants are beautiful astronomical objects that are also of high scientific interest, because they provide insights into supernova explosion mechanisms, and because they are the likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. X-ray observations are an important means to study these objects. And i

  19. Single Degenerate Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bours, Madelon; Toonen, Silvia; Nelemans, Gijs

    2013-01-01

    There is a general agreement that Type Ia supernovae correspond to the thermonuclear runaway of a white dwarf (WD) in a compact binary. The details of these progenitor systems are still unclear. Using the population synthesis code SeBa and several assumption for the WD retention efficiency, we estimate the delay times and supernova rates for the single degenerate scenario.

  20. Supernova constraints on neutrino mass and mixing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srubabati Goswami

    2000-01-01

    In this article I review the constraints on neutrino mass and mixing coming from type-II supernovae. The bounds obtained on these parameters from shock reheating, -process nucleosynthesis and from SN1987A are discussed. Given the current constraints on neutrino mass and mixing the effect of oscillations of neutrinos from a nearby supernova explosion in future detectors will also be discussed.

  1. Cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    Supernovae are among the most energetic events in the Universe. During the event, they expel their material with enormous speeds into the surroundings. In addition, supernovae are thought to transfer a sizable fraction of their energy into just a few particles: cosmic rays. These cosmic rays acquire

  2. Snapping Supernovae at z>1.7

    CERN Document Server

    Aldering, G; Kowalski, M; Linder, E V; Perlmutter, S; Aldering, Greg; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric V.; Perlmutter, Saul

    2006-01-01

    We examine the utility of very high redshift Type Ia supernovae for cosmology and systematic uncertainty control. Next generation space surveys such as the Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will obtain thousands of supernovae at z>1.7, beyond the design redshift for which the supernovae will be exquisitely characterized. We find that any z\\gtrsim2 standard candles' use for cosmological parameter estimation is quite modest and subject to pitfalls; we examine gravitational lensing, redshift calibration, and contamination effects in some detail. The very high redshift supernovae - both thermonuclear and core collapse - will provide copious interesting information on star formation, environment, and evolution. However, the new observational systematics that must be faced, as well as the limited expansion of SN-parameter space afforded, does not point to high value for 1.7

  3. Supernova shock breakout from a red supergiant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Justham, Stephen; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C; Bell, Tony; Röser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma S; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2008-07-11

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. Such events are usually only detected at least a few days after the star has exploded. Observations of the supernova SNLS-04D2dc with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope reveal a radiative precursor from the supernova shock before the shock reached the surface of the star and show the initial expansion of the star at the beginning of the explosion. Theoretical models of the ultraviolet light curve confirm that the progenitor was a red supergiant, as expected for this type of supernova. These observations provide a way to probe the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the internal structures of their progenitor stars.

  4. Supernovae and Cosmology with Future European Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Hook, I M

    2012-01-01

    Prospects for future supernova surveys are discussed, focusing on the ESA Euclid mission and the European Extremely Large Telescope(E-ELT), both expected to be in operation around the turn of the decade. Euclid is a 1.2m space survey telescope that will operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and has the potential to find and obtain multi-band lightcurves for thousands of distant supernovae. The E-ELT is a planned general-purpose ground-based 40m-class optical-IR telescope with adaptive optics built in, which will be capable of obtaining spectra of Type Ia supernovae to redshifts of at least four. The contribution to supernova cosmology with these facilities will be discussed in the context of other future supernova programs such as those proposed for DES, JWST, LSST and WFIRST.

  5. Astronomers Make "Movie" of Radio Images Showing Supernova Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Astronomers using an international network of radio telescopes have produced a "movie" showing details of the expansion of debris from an exploding star. Their sequence of images constitutes the best determination yet made of the details of a new supernova remnant, and already has raised new questions about such events. The scientists used radio telescopes in Europe and the United States, including the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), to make very high- resolution images of Supernova 1993J, which was discovered by a Spanish amateur astronomer on March 28, 1993 in the galaxy M81, some 11 million light-years distant in the constellation Ursa Major. Their results are reported in the December 1 issue of the journal Science. The "movie" is based on five images of the supernova, made during 1993 and 1994. The work was done by: Jon Marcaide and Eduardo Ros of the University of Valencia, Spain; Antxon Alberdi of the Special Laboratory for Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics of Madrid, Spain and the Institute of Astrophysics at Andalucia, Spain; Philip Diamond of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM; Irwin Shapiro of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA; Jose-Carlos Guirado, Dayton Jones and Robert Preston of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA; Thomas Krichbaum and Arno Witzel of the Max-Planck Institute for Radioastronomy in Bonn, Germany; Franco Mantovani of the Institute of Radioastronomy in Bologna, Italy; Antonio Rius of the Special Laboratory for Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics of Madrid, Spain and the Center for Advanced Studies at Blanes, Spain; Richard Schilizzi of the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe and Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands; Corrado Trigilio of the Institute of Radioastronomy in Noto, Italy; and Alan Whitney of the MIT- Haystack Observatory in Massachusetts. The capability to make such high-quality images with widely

  6. Not Color Blind Using Multiband Photometry to Classify Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, D; Maoz, D; Filippenko, A V; Leonard, D C; Matheson, T; Poznanski, Dovi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Maoz, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Large numbers of supernovae (SNe) have been discovered in recent years, and many more will be found in the near future. Once discovered, further study of a SN and its possible use as an astronomical tool (e.g., a distance estimator) require knowledge of the SN type. Current classification methods rely almost solely on the analysis of SN spectra to determine their type. However, spectroscopy may not be possible or practical when SNe are faint, very numerous, or discovered in archival studies. We present a classification method for SNe based on the comparison of their observed colors with synthetic ones, calculated from a large database of multi-epoch optical spectra of nearby events. We discuss the capabilities and limitations of this method. For example, type Ia SNe at redshifts z 100 days) stages. Broad-band photometry through standard Johnson-Cousins UBVRI filters can be useful to classify SNe up to z ~ 0.6. The use of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u'g'r'i'z' filters allows extending our classification m...

  7. Spectroscopy of Type Ia Supernovae by the Carnegie Supernova Project

    CERN Document Server

    Folatelli, Gastón; Phillips, Mark M; Hsiao, Eric; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Castellón, Sergio; Hamuy, Mario; Krzeminski, Wojtek; Roth, Miguel; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Burns, Christopher R; Freedman, Wendy L; Madore, Barry F; Murphy, David; Persson, S E; Prieto, José L; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Krisciunas, Kevin; Anderson, Joseph P; Förster, Francisco; Maza, José; Pignata, Giuliano; Rojas, P Andrea; Boldt, Luis; Salgado, Francisco; Wyatt, Pamela; E., Felipe Olivares; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sako, Masao

    2013-01-01

    This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further s...

  8. Carnegie Supernova Project: Observations of Type IIn Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Phillips, M M; Anderson, J P; Boldt, L; Campillay, A; Castellón, S; Contreras, C; Folatelli, G; Hamuy, M; Heinrich-Josties, E; Krzeminski, W; Morrell, N; Burns, C R; Freedman, W L; Madore, B F; Persson, S E; Suntzeff, N B

    2013-01-01

    The observational diversity displayed by various Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) is explored and quantified. In doing so a more coherent picture ascribing the variety of observed SNe IIn types to particular progenitor scenarios is sought. Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) optical and near-infrared light curves and visual-wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIn SNe 2005kj, 2006aa, 2006bo, 2006qq and 2008fq are presented. Combined with previously published observations of the Type IIn SNe 2005ip and 2006jd (Stritzinger et al. 2012), the full CSP sample is used to derive physical parameters which describe the nature of the interaction between the expanding SN ejecta and the circum-stellar material (CSM). For each SN of our sample we find counterparts, identifying objects similar to SNe 1994W (SN 2006bo), 1998S (SN 2008fq) and 1988Z (SN 2006qq). We present the unprecedented initial u-band plateau of SN 2006aa, and its peculiar late-time luminosity and temperature evolution. For each SN, assuming the CSM was formed b...

  9. Statistics of Galactic Supernova Remnants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wen Xu; Xi-Zhen Zhang; Jin-Lin Han

    2005-01-01

    We collected the basic parameters of 231 supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy, namely, distances (d) from the Sun, linear diameters (D), Galactic heights (Z), estimated ages (t), luminosities (L), surface brightness (∑) and flux densities (Si) at 1-GHz frequency and spectral indices (α). We tried to find possible correlations between these parameters. As expected, the linear diameters were found to increase with ages for the shell-type remnants, and also to have a tendency to increase with the Galactic heights. Both the surface brightness and luminosity of SNRs at 1-GHz tend to decrease with the linear diameter and with age. No other relations between the parameters were found.

  10. Petascale Supernova Simulation with CHIMERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University; Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Dirk, Charlotte [Florida Atlantic University

    2007-01-01

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. We describe some ma jor algorithmic facets of the code and briefly discuss some recent results. The multi-physics nature of the problem, and the specific implementation of that physics in CHIMERA, provide a rather straightforward path to effective use of multi-core platforms in the near future.

  11. Petascale supernova simulation with CHIMERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, O E B [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6008 (United States); Bruenn, S W [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, J M [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Hix, W R [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Mezzacappa, A [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Dirk, C J [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. We describe some major algorithmic facets of the code and briefly discuss some recent results. The multi-physics nature of the problem, and the specific implementation of that physics in CHIMERA, provide a rather straightforward path to effective use of multi-core platforms in the near future.

  12. Shell-type Supernova Remnants

    OpenAIRE

    Völk, H.

    2006-01-01

    The role of Supernova Remnants (SNRs) for the production of the Galactic Cosmic Rays is reviewed from the point of view of theory and very high energy gamma-ray experiments. The point is made that theory can describe young SNRs very well, if the evidence from the synchrotron emission is used to empirically determine several parameters of the theory, and thus theory can predict the relative contributions of hadronic and leptonic gamma rays at TeV energies. This is exemplified for several objec...

  13. Exploring the Outer Solar System with the ESSENCE Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, A.C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Arraki, K.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Kaib, N.A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Aguilera, C.; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Blackman, J.W.; /Australian Natl. U., Canberra; Blondin, S.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Challis, P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Clocchiatti, A.; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol.; Covarrubias, R.; /Kyushu Sangyo U.; Damke, G.; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Davis, T.M.; /Bohr Inst. /Queensland U.; Filippenko, A.V.; /UC, Berkeley; Foley, R.J.; /UC, Berkeley; Garg, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hicken, M.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Jha, S.; /Harvard U. /SLAC; Kirshner, R.P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Krisciunas, K.; /Notre Dame U. /Texas A-M; Leibundgut, B.; /Munich, Tech. U. /UC, Berkeley /NOAO, Tucson /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Fermilab /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /Chile U., Santiago /Ohio State U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Munich, Tech. U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Texas A-M /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.

    2011-11-10

    We report the discovery and orbital determination of 14 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the ESSENCE Supernova Survey difference imaging data set. Two additional objects discovered in a similar search of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey database were recovered in this effort. ESSENCE repeatedly observed fields far from the solar system ecliptic (-21{sup o} < {beta} < -5{sup o}), reaching limiting magnitudes per observation of I {approx} 23.1 and R {approx} 23.7. We examine several of the newly detected objects in detail, including 2003 UC{sub 414}, which orbits entirely between Uranus and Neptune and lies very close to a dynamical region that would make it stable for the lifetime of the solar system. 2003 SS{sub 422} and 2007 TA{sub 418} have high eccentricities and large perihelia, making them candidate members of an outer class of TNOs. We also report a new member of the 'extended' or 'detached' scattered disk, 2004 VN{sub 112}, and verify the stability of its orbit using numerical simulations. This object would have been visible to ESSENCE for only {approx}2% of its orbit, suggesting a vast number of similar objects across the sky. We emphasize that off-ecliptic surveys are optimal for uncovering the diversity of such objects, which in turn will constrain the history of gravitational influences that shaped our early solar system.

  14. Suzaku spectra of a Type II Supernova Remnant Kes 79

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Tamotsu; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports results of a Suzaku observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 79 (G33.6+0.1). The X-ray spectrum is best fitted by a two-temperature model: a non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma and a collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma. The NEI plasma is spatially confined within the inner radio shell with kT~0.8 keV, while the CIE plasma is found in more spatially extended regions associated with the outer radio shell with kT~0.2 keV and solar abundance. Therefore, the NEI plasma is attributable to the SN ejecta and the CIE plasma is forward shocked interstellar medium. In the NEI plasma, we discovered K-shell line of Al, Ar and Ca for the first time. The abundance pattern and estimated mass of the ejecta are consistent with the core-collapse supernova explosion of a ~30-40 solar mass progenitor star. An Fe line with center energy of ~6.4 keV is also found in the southeast (SE) portion of the SNR, a close peripheral region around dense molecular clouds. One possibility is that the lin...

  15. Discovery of A Large Cavity around the Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuepeng; Yang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    We present large-field (3x2 deg^2) and high-sensitivity CO(1-0) molecular line observations toward the Tycho's supernova remnant, using the 13.7-meter radio telescope of the Purple Mountain Observatory. Based on the CO observations, we discover a large cavity around the remnant, with radii of about 0.3x0.6 deg (or ~13x27 pc at a distance of 2.5 kpc), which is further supported by the complementary infrared images from the space telescopes. The observed CO line broadenings and asymmetries in the surrounding clouds, the infrared pillar-like structures found around the remnant, in concert with enhanced 12CO(2-1)/(1-0) intensity ratio detected in previous studies, indicate strong interaction of the large cavity with a wind in the region. After excluding the scenario of a large bubble produced by bright massive stars, we consider that the large cavity could be most likely explained by the accretion wind from the progenitor system of the Tycho's supernova. The CO gas kinematics indicates that the large cavity is ex...

  16. Type Iax Supernovae: A New Class of Stellar Explosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, P. J.; Chornock, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax are spectrosc......We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax...... are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 M_V,peak > -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between...... luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications...

  17. Radio polarization observations of large supernova remnants at 6cm

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L; Sun, X H; Reich, W; Xiao, L; Reich, P; Xu, J W; Shi, W B; Fuerst, E; Wielebinski, R

    2013-01-01

    We have observed 79 supernova remnants (SNRs) with the Urumqi 25m telescope at 6cm during the Sino-German 6cm polarization survey of the Galactic plane. We measured flux densities of SNRs at 6cm, some of which are the first measurements or the data at highest frequencies, so that we can determine or improve spectra of SNRs. Our observations have ruled out the suggested spectral breaks or spectral flattening of a few SNRs, and confirmed the spectral break of S147. Combined our 6cm maps with 11cm and 21cm maps from the Effelsberg 100m telescope, we calculated the spectral index maps of several large SNRs. For many remnants, we obtained for the first time polarization images, which show the intrinsic magnetic field structures at 6 cm. We disapproved three "remnants", OA184, G192.8-1.1 and G16.8-1.1, which show a thermal spectrum and no polarization. We have discovered two large supernova remnant, G178.2-4.2 and G25.1-2.3, from the 6cm survey maps.

  18. Rapidly Decaying Supernova 2010X: A Candidate ".Ia" Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Quimby, Robert M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Nugent, Peter; Poznanski, Dovi; Jacobsen, Janet; Sternberg, Assaf; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Rich, Douglas J.; Burke, Paul F.; Brimacombe, Joseph; Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert; Bildsten, Lars; Shen, Ken; Cenko, S. Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S.; Hsiao, Eric; Law, Nicholas M.; Gehrels, Neil; Immler, Stefan; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahnh; McKenna, Dan

    2010-11-01

    We present the discovery, photometric, and spectroscopic follow-up observations of SN 2010X (PTF 10bhp). This supernova decays exponentially with τ d = 5 days and rivals the current recordholder in speed, SN 2002bj. SN 2010X peaks at M r = -17 mag and has mean velocities of 10,000 km s-1. Our light curve modeling suggests a radioactivity-powered event and an ejecta mass of 0.16 M sun. If powered by Nickel, we show that the Nickel mass must be very small (≈0.02 M sun) and that the supernova quickly becomes optically thin to γ-rays. Our spectral modeling suggests that SN 2010X and SN 2002bj have similar chemical compositions and that one of aluminum or helium is present. If aluminum is present, we speculate that this may be an accretion-induced collapse of an O-Ne-Mg white dwarf. If helium is present, all observables of SN 2010X are consistent with being a thermonuclear helium shell detonation on a white dwarf, a ".Ia" explosion. With the 1 day dynamic-cadence experiment on the Palomar Transient Factory, we expect to annually discover a few such events.

  19. RAPIDLY RISING TRANSIENTS IN THE SUPERNOVA—SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA GAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93111 (United States); Wolf, William M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bildsten, Lars; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Katz, Boaz [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Hardin, Delphine; Astier, Pierre; Balland, Cristophe [LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and University of Paris VI and VII, F-75005 Paris (France); Prajs, Szymon; Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Perley, Daniel A. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Svirski, Gilad [Racah Institute for Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lidman, Chris [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Carlberg, Ray G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Conley, Alex, E-mail: iarcavi@lcogt.net [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-389 (United States); and others

    2016-03-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t{sub rise} ≈ 10 days) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M{sub peak} ≈ −20)—one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey. The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as an SN II due to broad Hα emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Hα (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si ii (as seen in SNe Ia), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM), and magnetar spin down cannot readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a “Type 1.5 SN” scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help to better determine their nature.

  20. Arp 299-A: More than "just" a prolific supernova factory

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Torres, Miguel A; Romero-Canizales, Cristina; Bondi, Marco; Polatidis, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    We present partial results from our monitoring of the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy IC 694 (=Arp 299-A) at radio wavelengths, aimed at discovering recently exploded CCSNe, as well as to determine their rate of explosion, which carries crucial information on star formation rates and starburst scenarios at work. Two epochs of eEVN observations at 5.0 GHz, taken in 2008, revealed the presence of a rich cluster of compact radio emitting sources in the central 150 pc of the nuclear starburst in Arp 299A. The large brightness temperatures observed for the compact sources indicate a non-thermal origin for the observed radio emission, implying that most, if not all, of those sources were young radio supernovae (RSNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs). More recently, contemporaneous EVN observations at 1.7 and 5.0 GHz taken in 2009 have allowed us to shed light on the compact radio emission of the parsec-scale structure in the nucleus of Arp 299-A. Namely, our EVN observations have shown that one of the compact V...

  1. Photometric selection of high-redshift type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, M; Perrett, K; Nugent, P; Astier, Pierre; Aubourg, E; Balam, D; Basa, S; Carlberg, R; Conley, A; Fabbro, S; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hook, I; Lafoux, H; Neill, J D; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pritchet, C; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Taillet, R; Aldering, G; Baumont, S; Bronder, J; Filiol, M; Knop, R; Perlmutter, S; Tao, C

    2005-01-01

    We present a method for selecting high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) located via rolling SN searches. The technique, using both color and magnitude information of events from only 2-3 epochs of multi-band real-time photometry, is able to discriminate between SNe Ia and core collapse SNe. Furthermore, for the SNe Ia, the method accurately predicts the redshift, phase and light-curve parameterization of these events based only on pre-maximum-light data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique on a simulated survey of SNe Ia and core-collapse SNe, where the selection method effectively rejects most core-collapse SNe while retaining SNe Ia. We also apply the selection code to real-time data acquired as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). During the period May 2004 to January 2005 in the SNLS, 440 SN candidates were discovered of which 70 were confirmed spectroscopically as SNe Ia and 15 as core-collapse events. For this test dataset, the selection technique ...

  2. The Population of Supernova Remnants in M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Kuntz, K. D.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2017-08-01

    The nearby, actively star-forming, nearly face-on spiral galaxy, M51 (NGC 5194/5), has been the site of four supernovae since 1941. As a result it should have a rich population of young supernova remnants (SNRs). Here we describe a search for optical SNRs in M51 among the 298 X-ray sources discovered inside the D25 contour in deep Chandra observations. The search uses interference filter images obtained with the WFC3 on Hubble Space Telescope and more recent images from GMOS on Gemini North. Of 80 emission nebulae identified in the HST images as SNR candidates based on elevated [SII]: Ha ratios compared to HII regions, 40 have X-ray counterparts. The diameters of the SNRs and SNR candidates detected with HST are systematically smaller than seen in SNR populations of other galaxies at comparable distances. However, this is most likely an instrumental effect, which our ongoing analysis of the new GMOS images will correct. At that point, we will be able to make of fair multi-wavelength comparison of the SNR population in M51 with other nearby, actively star-forming spiral galaxies, such as M83 and NGC6946.

  3. Long-rising Type II supernovae from PTF and CCCP

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Fremling, C; Migotto, K; Gal-Yam, A; Armen, S; Duggan, G; Ergon, M; Filippenko, A V; Fransson, C; Hosseinzadeh, G; Kasliwal, M M; Laher, R R; Leloudas, G; Leonard, D C; Lunnan, R; Masci, F J; Moon, D -S; Silverman, J M; Wozniak, P R

    2016-01-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar H-rich event with a long-rising (LR) light curve (LC), stemming from a compact blue supergiant star (BSG). Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature. We present new data for a sample of 6 LR Type II SNe (SNe II), 3 of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and 3 observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge the family of LR SNe II, characterizing their properties. Spectra, LCs, and host-galaxies (HG) of these SNe are presented. Comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events are shown, with emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and HG metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband LC. By modeling the early-time LCs with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these SNe and other progenitor parameters. We present PTF12kso, a LR SN II with the largest...

  4. Progress on multi-waveband observations of supernova remnants

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xuejuan; Lu, Fangjun; Tian, Wenwu

    2008-01-01

    The development of observational techniques has inriched our knowledge of supernova remnants. In this paper, we review the main progresses in the last decade, including new discoveries of supernova remnants and the associated (rare type of) pulsars, nucleosynthesis, the interaction between supernova remnants and molecular clouds, dust in the supernova remnants, shock physics, and cosmic ray accelerations.

  5. A Search for New Candidate Super-Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia Supernovae in the Nearby Supernova Factory Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, R.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Gangler, E.; Guy, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Nugent, P.; Paech, K.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Smadja, G.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wu, C.; Nearby Supernova Factory, The

    2012-09-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of five Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Nearby Supernova Factory selected to be spectroscopic analogs of the candidate super-Chandrasekhar-mass events SN 2003fg and SN 2007if. Their spectra are characterized by hot, highly ionized photospheres near maximum light, for which SN 1991T supplies the best phase coverage among available close spectral templates. Like SN 2007if, these supernovae are overluminous (-19.5 constant in time from phases as early as a week before, and up to two weeks after, B-band maximum light. We interpret the velocity plateaus as evidence for a reverse-shock shell in the ejecta formed by interaction at early times with a compact envelope of surrounding material, as might be expected for SNe resulting from the mergers of two white dwarfs. We use the bolometric light curves and line velocity evolution of these SNe to estimate important parameters of the progenitor systems, including 56Ni mass, total progenitor mass, and masses of shells and surrounding carbon/oxygen envelopes. We find that the reconstructed total progenitor mass distribution of the events (including SN 2007if) is bounded from below by the Chandrasekhar mass, with SN 2007if being the most massive. We discuss the relationship of these events to the emerging class of super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia, estimate the relative rates, compare the mass distribution to that expected for double-degenerate SN Ia progenitors from population synthesis, and consider implications for future cosmological Hubble diagrams.

  6. A SEARCH FOR NEW CANDIDATE SUPER-CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY DATA SET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalzo, R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Nugent, P., E-mail: rscalzo@mso.anu.edu.au [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Collaboration: Nearby Supernova Factory; and others

    2012-09-20

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of five Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Nearby Supernova Factory selected to be spectroscopic analogs of the candidate super-Chandrasekhar-mass events SN 2003fg and SN 2007if. Their spectra are characterized by hot, highly ionized photospheres near maximum light, for which SN 1991T supplies the best phase coverage among available close spectral templates. Like SN 2007if, these supernovae are overluminous (-19.5 < M{sub V} < -20) and the velocity of the Si II {lambda}6355 absorption minimum is consistent with being constant in time from phases as early as a week before, and up to two weeks after, B-band maximum light. We interpret the velocity plateaus as evidence for a reverse-shock shell in the ejecta formed by interaction at early times with a compact envelope of surrounding material, as might be expected for SNe resulting from the mergers of two white dwarfs. We use the bolometric light curves and line velocity evolution of these SNe to estimate important parameters of the progenitor systems, including {sup 56}Ni mass, total progenitor mass, and masses of shells and surrounding carbon/oxygen envelopes. We find that the reconstructed total progenitor mass distribution of the events (including SN 2007if) is bounded from below by the Chandrasekhar mass, with SN 2007if being the most massive. We discuss the relationship of these events to the emerging class of super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia, estimate the relative rates, compare the mass distribution to that expected for double-degenerate SN Ia progenitors from population synthesis, and consider implications for future cosmological Hubble diagrams.

  7. Identifying Hidden Supernova Remnants in M83 with the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Bradley; Stockdale, Christopher; Blair, William P.; Cowan, John J.; Godfrey, Leith; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Maddox, Larry A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Soria, Roberto; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2017-01-01

    We present results of our analysis of C and L band observations of the grand design spiral galaxy, M83 made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With recent optical (HST) and X-ray (Chandra) observations and utilizing the newly expanded bandwidth of the VLA, we are exploring the radio spectral properties of the historical radio point sources in M83 and have discovered more than 250 discrete radio sources. These observations allow us to probe the evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) and to find previously undiscovered SNRs. These observations represent the fourth epoch of deep VLA observations of M83. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities.

  8. Hot subdwarf stars and their connection to thermonuclear supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Geier, S; Ziegerer, E; Heber, U; Nemeth, P; Irrgang, A

    2016-01-01

    Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are evolved core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes, which can be formed by common envelope ejection. Close sdB binaries with massive white dwarf (WD) companions are potential progenitors of thermonuclear supernovae type Ia (SN Ia). We discovered such a progenitor candidate as well as a candidate for a surviving companion star, which escapes from the Galaxy. More candidates for both types of objects have been found by crossmatching known sdB stars with proper motion and light curve catalogues. The Gaia mission will provide accurate astrometry and light curves of all the stars in our hot subdwarf sample and will allow us to compile a much larger all-sky catalogue of those stars. In this way we expect to find hundreds of progenitor binaries and ejected companions.

  9. Far-Ultraviolet to Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of A Nearby Hydrogen Poor Superluminous Supernova Gaia16apd

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Lin; Gal-Yam, A; Brown, P; Blagorodnova, N; Ofek, E O; Lunnan, R; Cooke, J; Cenko, S B; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M

    2016-01-01

    We report the first maximum-light far-Ultraviolet to near-infrared spectra (1000A - 1.62um, rest) of a H-poor superluminous supernova, Gaia16apd. At z=0.1018, it is one of the closest and the UV brightest such events, with 17.4 (AB) magnitude in Swift UV band (1928A) at -11days pre-maximum. Assuming an exponential form, we derived the rise time of 33days and the peak bolometric luminosity of 3x10^{44}ergs^-1. At maximum light, the estimated photospheric temperature and velocity are 17,000K and 14,000kms^-1 respectively. The inferred radiative and kinetic energy are roughly 1x10^{51} and 2x10^{52}erg. Gaia16apd is extremely UV luminous, emitting 50% of its total luminosity at 1000 - 2500A. Compared to the UV spectra (normalized at 3100A) of well studied SN1992A (Ia), SN2011fe(Ia), SN1999em (IIP) and SN1993J (IIb), it has orders of magnitude more far-UV emission. This excess is interpreted primarily as a result of weaker metal line blanketing due to much lower abundance of iron-group elements in the outer eject...

  10. Asphericity, Interaction, and Dust in the Type II-P/II-L Supernova 2013EJ in Messier 74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauerhan, Jon C.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Johansson, Joel; Hu, Maokai; Fox, Ori D.; Wang, Lifan; Graham, Melissa L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Shivvers, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    SN 2013ej is a well-studied core-collapse supernova (SN) that stemmed from a directly identified red supergiant (RSG) progenitor in galaxy M74. The source exhibits signs of substantial geometric asphericity, X-rays from persistent interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), thermal emission from warm dust, and a light curve that appears intermediate between supernovae of Types II-P and II-L. The proximity of this source motivates a close inspection of these physical characteristics and their potential interconnection. We present multiepoch spectropolarimetry of SN 2013ej during the first 107 days and deep optical spectroscopy and ultraviolet through infrared photometry past ∼800 days. SN 2013ej exhibits the strongest and most persistent continuum and line polarization ever observed for a SN of its class during the recombination phase. Modeling indicates that the data are consistent with an oblate ellipsoidal photosphere, viewed nearly edge-on and probably augmented by optical scattering from circumstellar dust. We suggest that interaction with an equatorial distribution of CSM, perhaps the result of binary evolution, is responsible for generating the photospheric asphericity. Relatedly, our late-time optical imaging and spectroscopy show that asymmetric CSM interaction is ongoing, and the morphology of broad Hα emission from shock-excited ejecta provides additional evidence that the geometry of the interaction region is ellipsoidal. Alternatively, a prolate ellipsoidal geometry from an intrinsically bipolar explosion is also a plausible interpretation of the data but would probably require a ballistic jet of radioactive material capable of penetrating the hydrogen envelope early in the recombination phase. Finally, our latest space-based optical imaging confirms that the late interaction-powered light curve dropped below the stellar progenitor level, confirming the RSG star’s association with the explosion.

  11. Spectroscopic confirmation of a redshift 1.55 supernova host galaxy from the Subaru Deep Field Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Frederiksen, Teddy F; Hjorth, Jens; Maoz, Dan; Poznanski, Dovi

    2012-01-01

    The Subaru Deep Field (SDF) Supernova Survey discovered 10 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range $1.5

  12. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hayden, Brian T; Kessler, Richard; Frieman, Joshua A; Jha, Saurabh W; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Kasen, Daniel; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Sollerman, Jesper; Bassett, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well-observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 +/- 0.17 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous stud...

  13. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannicke, Anna; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Dinçel, Baha

    2016-07-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 % of the massive stars are a part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  14. Dark Matter Triggers of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Peter W; Varela, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ rules out primordial black holes with masses $\\sim 10^{19}$ gm - $10^{20}$ gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as $10^{24}$ gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range $10^{20}$ gm - $10^{22}$ gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism p...

  15. How supernovae launch galactic winds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Drummond; Quataert, Eliot; Martizzi, Davide; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2017-09-01

    We use idealized three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of global galactic discs to study the launching of galactic winds by supernovae (SNe). The simulations resolve the cooling radii of the majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) and thus self-consistently capture how SNe drive galactic winds. We find that SNe launch highly supersonic winds with properties that agree reasonably well with expectations from analytic models. The energy loading (η _E= \\dot{E}_wind/ \\dot{E}_SN) of the winds in our simulations are well converged with spatial resolution while the wind mass loading (η _M= \\dot{M}_wind/\\dot{M}_\\star) decreases with resolution at the resolutions we achieve. We present a simple analytic model based on the concept that SNRs with cooling radii greater than the local scaleheight break out of the disc and power the wind. This model successfully explains the dependence (or lack thereof) of ηE (and by extension ηM) on the gas surface density, star formation efficiency, disc radius and the clustering of SNe. The winds our simulations are weaker than expected in reality, likely due to the fact that we seed SNe preferentially at density peaks. Clustering SNe in time and space substantially increases the wind power.

  16. Type Ia Supernova Carbon Footprints

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, R C; Aragon, C; Antilogus, P; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Hsiao, E Y; Kerschhaggl, M; Kowalski, M; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Rubin, D; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C; Brown, P J; Milne, P A

    2011-01-01

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of 5 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 d relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II 6580 absorption "notches" in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the 5 SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibits high-velocity (v > 20,000 km/s) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broad band light curve/color behavior: Three of the 5 have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors, and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal-to-noise and phase, we ...

  17. Slow-Speed Supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory: Two Channels

    CERN Document Server

    White, Christopher J; Nugent, Peter E; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Goobar, Ariel; Piro, Anthony L; Bloom, Joshua S; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Laher, Russ R; Masci, Frank; Ofek, Eran O; Surace, Jason; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S Bradley; Hook, Isobel M; Jönsson, Jakob; Matheson, Thomas; Sternberg, Assaf; Quimby, Robert M; Yaron, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the unusual prototype SN 2002cx, the eponymous class of low-velocity, hydrogen-poor supernovae has grown to include at most another two dozen members identified from several heterogeneous surveys, in some cases ambiguously. Here we present the results of a systematic study of 1077 hydrogen-poor supernovae discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory, leading to nine new members of this peculiar class. Moreover we find there are two distinct subclasses based on their spectroscopic, photometric, and host galaxy properties: The "SN 2002cx-like" supernovae tend to be in later-type or more irregular hosts, have more varied and generally dimmer luminosities, have longer rise times, and lack a Ti II trough when compared to the "SN 2002es-like" supernovae. None of our objects show helium, and we counter a previous claim of two such events. We also find that these transients comprise 5.6+17-3.7% (90% confidence) of all SNe Ia, lower compared to earlier estimates. Combining our objects with the li...

  18. Slow-Speed Supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory: Two Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher J.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Goobar, Ariel; Piro, Anthony L.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, Stephen Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the unusual prototype SN 2002cx, the eponymous class of low-velocity, hydrogen-poor supernovae has grown to include at most another two dozen members identified from several heterogeneous surveys, in some cases ambiguously. Here we present the results of a systematic study of 1077 hydrogen-poor supernovae discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory, leading to nine new members of this peculiar class. Moreover we find there are two distinct subclasses based on their spectroscopic, photometric, and host galaxy properties: The "SN 2002cx-like" supernovae tend to be in later-type or more irregular hosts, have more varied and generally dimmer luminosities, have longer rise times, and lack a Ti II trough when compared to the \\SN 2002es-like" supernovae. None of our objects show helium, and we counter a previous claim of two such events. We also find that these transients comprise 5.6+17 -3:7% (90% confidence) of all SNe Ia, lower compared to earlier estimates. Combining our objects with the literature sample, we propose that these subclasses have two distinct physical origins.

  19. Supernova SN 2011fe from an exploding carbon-oxygen white dwarf star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Peter E; Sullivan, Mark; Cenko, S Bradley; Thomas, Rollin C; Kasen, Daniel; Howell, D Andrew; Bersier, David; Bloom, Joshua S; Kulkarni, S R; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard T; Maguire, Kate; Suzuki, Nao; Tarlton, James E; Pan, Yen-Chen; Bildsten, Lars; Fulton, Benjamin J; Parrent, Jerod T; Sand, David; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Bianco, Federica B; Dilday, Benjamin; Graham, Melissa L; Lyman, Joe; James, Phil; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Law, Nicholas M; Quimby, Robert M; Hook, Isobel M; Walker, Emma S; Mazzali, Paolo; Pian, Elena; Ofek, Eran O; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Poznanski, Dovi

    2011-12-14

    Type Ia supernovae have been used empirically as 'standard candles' to demonstrate the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe even though fundamental details, such as the nature of their progenitor systems and how the stars explode, remain a mystery. There is consensus that a white dwarf star explodes after accreting matter in a binary system, but the secondary body could be anything from a main-sequence star to a red giant, or even another white dwarf. This uncertainty stems from the fact that no recent type Ia supernova has been discovered close enough to Earth to detect the stars before explosion. Here we report early observations of supernova SN 2011fe in the galaxy M101 at a distance from Earth of 6.4 megaparsecs. We find that the exploding star was probably a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, and from the lack of an early shock we conclude that the companion was probably a main-sequence star. Early spectroscopy shows high-velocity oxygen that slows rapidly, on a timescale of hours, and extensive mixing of newly synthesized intermediate-mass elements in the outermost layers of the supernova. A companion paper uses pre-explosion images to rule out luminous red giants and most helium stars as companions to the progenitor.

  20. High-redshift supernova rates measured with the gravitational telescope A1689

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushevska, Tanja; Goobar, Ariel; Fabbro, Sebastien; Johansson, Joel; Kjellsson, Tor; Lidman, Chris; Paech, Kerstin; Richard, Johan; Dahle, Hakon; Ferretti, Raphael; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Limousin, Marceau; Nordin, Jakob; Stanishev, Vallery

    2016-01-01

    We present a ground-based near-infrared search for lensed supernovae behind the massive cluster Abell 1689 at z=0.18, one of the most powerful gravitational telescopes that nature provides. Our survey was based on multi-epoch $J$-band observations with the HAWK-I instrument on VLT, with supporting optical data from the Nordic Optical Telescope. Our search resulted in the discovery of five high-redshift, $0.671supernovae with magnifications in the range $\\Delta m$ = $-0.31$ to $-1.58$ mag, as calculated from lensing models in the literature. Thanks to the power of the lensing cluster, the survey had the sensitivity to detect supernovae up to very high-redshifts, $z$$\\sim$$3$, albeit for a limited region of space. We present a study of the core-collapse supernova rates for $0.4\\leq z< 2.9$, and find good agreement with both previous estimates, and the predictions from the star formation history. During our survey, we also discovered 2 type Ia supernov...

  1. G65.2+5.7: A Thermal Composite Supernova Remnant With a Cool Shell

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, R L; Petre, R

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents archival ROSAT PSPC observations of the G65.2+5.7 supernova remnant (also known as G65.3+5.7). Little material obscures this remnant and so it was well observed, even at the softest end of ROSAT's bandpass (~0.11 to 0.28 keV). These soft X-ray images reveal the remnant's centrally-filled morphology which, in combination with existing radio frequency observations, places G65.2+5.7 in the thermal composite (mixed morphology) class of supernova remnants. Not only might G65.2+5.7 be the oldest known thermal composite supernova remnant, but owing to its optically revealed cool, dense shell, this remnant supports the proposal that thermal composite supernova remnants lack X-ray bright shells because they have evolved beyond the adiabatic phase. These observations also reveal a slightly extended point source centered on RA = 19h 36m 46s, dec = 30deg 40' 07'' and extending 6.5 arcmin in radius in the band 67 map. The source of this emission has yet to be discovered, as there is no known pulsar at ...

  2. SHOES-Supernovae, HO, for the Equation of State of Dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Adam

    2006-07-01

    The present uncertainty in the value of the Hubble constant {resulting in anuncertainty in Omega_M} and the paucity of Type Ia supernovae at redshiftsexceeding 1 are now the leading obstacles to determining the nature of darkenergy. We propose a single, integrated set of observations for Cycle 15 thatwill provide a 40% improvement in constraints on dark energy. This programwill observe known Cepheids in six reliable hosts of Type Ia supernovae withNICMOS, reducing the uncertainty in H_0 by a factor of two because of thesmaller dispersion along the instability strip, the diminished extinction, andthe weaker metallicity dependence in the infrared. In parallel with ACS, atthe same time the NICMOS observations are underway, we will discover andfollow a sample of Type Ia supernovae at z > 1. Together, these measurements,along with prior constraints from WMAP, will provide a great improvement inHST's ability to distinguish between a static, cosmological constant anddynamical dark energy. The Hubble Space Telescope is the only instrument inthe world that can make these IR measurements of Cepheids beyond the LocalGroup, and it is the only telescope in the world that can be used to find andfollow supernovae at z > 1. Our program exploits both of these uniquecapabilities of HST to learn more about one of the greatest mysteries inscience.

  3. Hydrogen-rich supernovae beyond the neutrino-driven core-collapse paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreran, G.; Pumo, M. L.; Chen, T.-W.; Moriya, T. J.; Taddia, F.; Dessart, L.; Zampieri, L.; Smartt, S. J.; Benetti, S.; Inserra, C.; Cappellaro, E.; Nicholl, M.; Fraser, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Udalski, A.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Valenti, S.; Dimitriadis, G.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.; Smith, K. W.; Yaron, O.; Young, D. R.; Anderson, J. P.; Della Valle, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Gal-Yam, A.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kankare, E.; Pastorello, A.; Sollerman, J.; Turatto, M.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, D.; Skowron, J.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2017-10-01

    Type II supernovae are the final stage of massive stars (above 8 M⊙) which retain part of their hydrogen-rich envelope at the moment of explosion. They typically eject up to 15 M⊙ of material, with peak magnitudes of -17.5 mag and energies in the order of 1051 erg, which can be explained by neutrino-driven explosions and neutron star formation. Here, we present our study of OGLE-2014-SN-073, one of the brightest type II supernovae ever discovered, with an unusually broad lightcurve combined with high ejecta velocities. From our hydrodynamical modelling, we infer a remarkable ejecta mass of 60-16+42M⊙ and a relatively high explosion energy of 12 .4-5.9 +13 .0×1 051 erg. We show that this object belongs, along with a very small number of other hydrogen-rich supernovae, to an energy regime that is not explained by standard core-collapse neutrino-driven explosions. We compare the quantities inferred by the hydrodynamical modelling with the expectations of various exploding scenarios and attempt to explain the high energy and luminosity released. We find some qualitative similarities with pair-instability supernovae, although the prompt injection of energy by a magnetar seems to be a viable alternative explanation for such an extreme event.

  4. Discovery Prospects for a Biogenic Supernova Signature

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Shawn

    2010-01-01

    Within the universe, the astrophysical sites responsible for the production of radioactive 60Fe, of half life 2.62 Myr, are primarily confined to two: Type 1a supernovae and massive stars that end their lives as Type II supernovae. Approximately 2.8 Myr before the present, our planet was subjected to the debris of a supernova explosion. The terrestrial proxy for this event was the discovery of live atoms of 60Fe in a deep sea ferromanganese crust, from which the terrestrial flux of supernova 60Fe was deduced. The signature for this supernova event should also be contained in microfossils produced by magnetotactic bacteria extant at the time of the Earth-supernova interaction. Using estimates for the terrestrial supernova 60Fe flux, combined with our empirically derived microfossil concentrations of a deep sea drill core, we deduce a conservative estimate of the 60Fe fraction as 60Fe/Fe = 3.6 x 10^{-15}; this value sits comfortably within the sensitivity limit of present accelerator mass spectrometry capabilit...

  5. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    CERN Document Server

    Guillochon, James; Margutti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog, an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 20,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly-searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova's data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The se...

  6. Type Ia Supernova Modeling with Spectrophotometric Data from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Clare; Nearby Supernova Factory

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernova cosmology is currently limited by dispersion in standardized magnitudes, driven by a combination of calibration uncertainty and so-called ‘intrinsic dispersion.' This intrinsic dispersion is caused by supernova behavior that the current lightcurve fitters do not account for, and it can involve systematic trends. Using data from the Nearby Supernova Factory, we have developed an empirical model that captures a wider range of Type Ia supernova behavior and can be used to improve standardized magnitude dispersion. To do this, Gaussian Processes and Expectation Maximization Factor Analysis are used to generate spectral time series templates that can be combined linearly. Variations of this model are optimized, alternatively for supernova standardization or for maximum accuracy in the description of supernova spectral features. We present these models along with interpretation of the model components. Methods are discussed for the most efficient application of the models in cosmological surveys.

  7. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillochon, James; Parrent, Jerod; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog, an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 36,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova, which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova’s data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The setup we present here, which is based on open-source software maintained via git repositories hosted on github, enables anyone to download the entirety of the supernova data set to their home computer in minutes, and to make contributions of their own data back to the catalog via git. As the supernova data set continues to grow, especially in the upcoming era of all-sky synoptic telescopes, which will increase the total number of events by orders of magnitude, we hope that the catalog we have designed will be a valuable tool for the community to analyze both historical and contemporary supernovae.

  8. A Massive Shell of Supernova-Formed Dust in SNR G54.1+0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Borkowski, Kazimiera J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Slane, Patrick; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Raymond, John C.

    2017-01-01

    While theoretical models of dust condensation predict that most refractory elements produced in core-collapsesupernovae (SNe) efficiently condense into dust, a large quantity of dust has so far only been observed inSN1987A. We present an analysis of observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Herschel SpaceObservatory, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, and AKARI of the infrared shell surrounding thepulsar wind nebula in the supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. We attribute a distinctive spectral feature at 21 m to amagnesium silicate grain species that has been invoked in modeling the ejecta-condensed dust in Cas A, whichexhibits the same spectral signature. If this species is responsible for producing the observed spectral feature andaccounts for a significant fraction of the observed infrared continuum, we find that it would be the dominantconstituent of the dust in G54.1+0.3, with possible secondary contributions from other compositions, such ascarbon, silicate, or alumina grains. The total mass of SN-formed dust required by this model is at least 0.3Me. Wediscuss how these results may be affected by varying dust grain properties and self-consistent grain heating models.The spatial distribution of the dust mass and temperature in G54.1+0.3 confirms the scenario in which the SNformeddust has not yet been processed by the SN reverse shock and is being heated by stars belonging to a clusterin which the SN progenitor exploded. The dust mass and composition suggest a progenitor mass of 1627Me andimply a high dust condensation efficiency, similar to that found for Cas A and SN1987A. The study providesanother example of significant dust formation in a Type IIP SN explosion and sheds light on the properties ofpristine SN-condensed dust.

  9. Postexplosion hydrodynamics of supernovae in red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herant, Marc; Woosley, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    Shock propagation, mixing, and clumping are studied in the explosion of red supergiants as Type II supernovae using a two-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code. We show that extensive Rayleigh-Talor instabilities develop in the ejecta in the wake of the reverse shock wave. In all cases, the shell structure of the progenitor is obliterated to leave a clumpy, well-mixed supernova remnant. However, the occurrence of mass loss during the lifetime of the progenitor can significantly reduce the amount of mixing. These results are independent of the Type II supernova explosion mechanism.

  10. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional neutrino transport theory for core-collapse supernovae misses one key property of neutrinos: the left-handedness. The chirality of neutrinos modifies the hydrodynamic behavior at the macroscopic scale and leads to topological transport phenomena. We argue that such transport phenomena should play important roles in the evolution of core-collapse supernovae, and, in particular, lead to a tendency toward the inverse energy cascade from small to larger scales, which may be relevant to the origin of the supernova explosion.

  11. Object Classification at the Nearby Supernova Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, Rollin C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wong, D.

    2007-12-21

    We present the results of applying new object classification techniques to the supernova search of the Nearby Supernova Factory. In comparison to simple threshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as boosted decision trees, random forests, and support vector machines provide dramatically better object discrimination: we reduced the number of nonsupernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasing our supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will be crucial for maintaining a reasonable false positive rate in the automated transient alert pipelines of upcoming large optical surveys.

  12. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The conventional neutrino transport theory for core-collapse supernovae misses one key property of neutrinos: the left-handedness. The chirality of neutrinos modifies the hydrodynamic behavior at the macroscopic scale and leads to topological transport phenomena. We argue that such transport phenomena should play important roles in the evolution of core-collapse supernovae, and, in particular, lead to a tendency toward the inverse energy cascade from small to larger scales, which may be relevant to the origin of the supernova explosion.

  13. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  14. Neutrino scattering and flavor transformation in supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, John F; Friedland, Alexander; Fuller, George M; Vlasenko, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    We argue that the small fraction of neutrinos that undergo direction-changing scattering outside of the neutrinosphere could have significant influence on neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernova environments. We show that the standard treatment for collective neutrino flavor transformation is adequate at late times, but could be inadequate in the crucial shock revival/explosion epoch of core-collapse supernovae, where the potentials that govern neutrino flavor evolution are affected by the scattered neutrinos. Taking account of this effect, and the way it couples to entropy and composition, will require a new paradigm in supernova modeling.

  15. Radio Supernovae: Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I.) of Supernova Progenitor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-24

    ar X iv :0 90 2. 40 59 v1 [ as tr o- ph .H E ] 2 4 Fe b 20 09 Radio Supernovae : Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I.) of Supernova Progenitor...FEB 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radio Supernovae : Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I...of Supernova Progenitor Stars 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  16. Observational data on Galactic supernova remnants: II. The supernova remnants within l = 90°-270°

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guseinov O.H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have collected all the available data on Galactic supernova remnants given in the literature. The data of Galactic supernova remnants located in the Galactic longitude interval l=90° - 270° in all spectral bands are represented in this work. We have adopted distance values for the SNRs by examining these data. The data of various types on neutron stars connected to these supernova remnants are also represented. Remarks of some authors and by ourselves regarding the data and some properties of both the supernova remnants and the point sources are given.

  17. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: a different view of supernova explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-04-20

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research.

  18. Timing of 29 Pulsars Discovered in the PALFA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lyne, A G; Bogdanov, S; Ferdman, R; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Lynch, R; Allen, B; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Madsen, E; McKee, J; McLaughlin, M A; Parent, E; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Seymour, A; Siemens, X; Spitler, L G; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J; Wharton, R S; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery and timing observations of 29 distant long-period pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, confirmation and timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation and radiation properties. We have used multi-frequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of some of these pulsars. Most of the pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population, although four show some notable characteristics. PSRs J1907+0631 and J1925+1720 are young and are associated with supernova remnants or plerionic nebulae: J1907+0631 lies close to the center of SNR G40.5-0.5, while J1925+1720 is coincident with a high-energy Fermi gamma-ray source. One pulsar, J1932+1500, is in a surprisingly eccentric, 199-day binary orbit with a companion having a minimum mass of 0.33 solar masses. Several of the...

  19. Discovering Classes of Strongly Equivalent Logic Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y.; Lin, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we apply computer-aided theorem discovery technique to discover theorems about strongly equivalent logic programs under the answer set semantics. Our discovered theorems capture new classes of strongly equivalent logic programs that can lead to new program simplification rules that preserve strong equivalence. Specifically, with the help of computers, we discovered exact conditions that capture the strong equivalence between a rule and the empty set, between two rules, between t...

  20. Discovering Mobile Social Networks by Semantic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jason J.; Choi, Kwang Sun; Park, Sung Hyuk

    It has been important for telecommunication companies to discover social networks from mobile subscribers. They have attempted to provide a number of recommendation services, but they realized that the services were not successful. In this chapter, we present semantic technologies for discovering social networks. The process is mainly composed of two steps; (1) profile identification and (2) context understanding. Through developing a Next generation Contents dElivery (NICE) platform, we were able to generate various services based on the discovered social networks.