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Sample records for iii wfpc2 imaging

  1. Hubble Space Telescope WFPC-2 Imaging of Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Fesen, R A; Chevalier, R A; Borkowski, K J; Gerardy, C L; Lawrence, S S; Van den Bergh, S; Fesen, Robert A.; Morse, Jon A.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gerardy, Christopher L.; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Bergh, Sidney van den

    2001-01-01

    The young SNR Cassiopeia A was imaged with WFPC-2 through four filters selected to capture the complete velocity range of the remnant's main shell in several important emission lines. Primary lines detected were [O III] 4959,5007, [N II] 6583, [S II] 6716,6731 + [O II] 7319,7330 + [O I] 6300,6364, and [S III] 9069,9532. About 3/4th of the remnant's main shell was imaged in all four filters. Considerable detail is observed in the reverse-shocked ejecta with typical knot scale lengths of 0.2"-0.4" (1 - 2 x 10^16 cm). Both bright and faint emission features appear highly clumped. Large differences in [S III] and [O III] line intensities indicating chemical abundance differences are also seen, particularly in knots located along the bright northern limb and near the base of the northeast jet. A line of curved overlapping filament in the remnant's northwestern rim appears to mark the location of the remnant's reverse shock front in this region. Finger-like ejecta structures elsewhere suggest cases where the revers...

  2. High Resolution WFPC2 Imaging of IRAS 09104+4109

    CERN Document Server

    Armus, L; Neugebauer, G

    1999-01-01

    With a infrared luminosity of nearly 10^13 Lsuns, IRAS 09104+4109 is the most luminous galaxy with z<0.5 in the IRAS All Sky Survey. A radio-loud Seyfert 2 type optical spectrum, a cD host galaxy in a rich cluster, and a massive cooling flow make IRAS 09104+4109 unique among ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Cannibalized cluster members and the cooling intercluster medium may contribute both the fuel and the dust needed to re-radiate the power of IRAS 09104+4109 into the far-infrared. We have imaged IRAS 09104+4109 in the WFPC2 F622W, F814W, and FR680N filters on the HST to obtain rest frame 4300A, 5700A, and [OIII] emission line images on sub-kpc scales. IRAS 09104+4109 displays a complex morphology on the smallest scales, with radiating filaments, an asymmetric [OIII] nebula, and a number of very faint, irregular blue objects surrounding the cD galaxy. We discuss the nature and possible interplay between the enshrouded QSO nucleus, the cD host galaxy and the irregular cluster.

  3. HST/WFPC2 snapshot imaging of symbiotic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Brocksopp, C; Eyres, S P S

    2003-01-01

    The results of a HST/WFPC2 snapshot imaging survey of selected symbiotic stars in 1999/2000 are presented. Seven sources - HD 149427 (PC 11), PU Vul, RT Ser, He2-104 (Southern Crab), V1329 Cyg (HBV 475), V417 Cen, AS 201 - were observed in filters F218W (ultraviolet continuum), F502N ([OIII]lambda 4959,5007) and F656N (Halpha); an eighth source, RS Oph, was observed in F437N ([OIII]lambda 4363), F502N and F656N. The presence of extended emission was detected in He2-104, V1329 Cyg and possibly HD 149427. In He2-104 we detected the [OIII] and Halpha counterparts to the inner lobes found in [NII] by Corradi et al. For V1329 Cyg, comparison with previously published HST/FOC results indicates expanding ejecta which may be associated with an ejection event in 1982 (+/-2 years) at a velocity of 260 +/- 50 km/s in the plane of the sky and at an assumed distance of 3.4kpc. We also present previously unpublished radio images of HD 149427, which we have obtained from the archives of the Australia Telescope Compact Array...

  4. The Planet Pipeline: data curation and mining of Solar System images from WFPC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Max

    2010-09-01

    With the removal of the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 {WFPC2} in May 2009, during Hubble Space Telescope {HST} Servicing Mission 4 {SM4}, came the end of a remarkable scientific tour-de-force. The collection of WFPC2 Solar System observations is enormous and diverse: on the order of 10,000 individual exposures spanning over 15 years. It includes long-term monitoring of planetary surfaces and atmospheres, targeted and serendipitous observations of moons, and many cometary targets-of-opportunity. Some of these observations were taken to support the planning of other NASA and ESA planetary missions, and to complement the data they obtain. The standard HST data pipelines, which calibrate and combine images, are largely optimized for the processing of fixed-target data. Moving-target data cannot be simply combined and cleaned, due to the rapid motion and rotation of the targets. New multi-extension FITS formats and recent improvements to basic WFPC2 calibrations means that the entire data set can now be reduced better than ever before. We propose to take full advantage of this by creating a comprehensive, uniformly processed, well documented, and searchable collection of Solar System data. Our "planet pipeline" will populate the image headers with information unique to planetary data, to produce a truly science-ready collection of WFPC2 Solar System imaging data. Our final data products will be ingested into the Multimission Archive at Space Telescope {MAST}, as High Level Science Products {HLSP}. We will conduct new scientific analyses of our own, but we expect our data products to enable a wide range of analyses by other researchers for many years to come, and form an essential piece of Hubble's archival legacy.

  5. WFPC2 Polarization Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biretta, J.; McMaster, M.

    1997-12-01

    We derive a detailed calibration for WFPC2 polarization data which is accurate to about 1.5%. We begin by computing polarizer flats, and show how they are applied to data. A physical model for the polarization effects of the WFPC2 optics is then created using Mueller matricies. This model includes corrections for the instrumental polarization (diattenuation and phase retardance) of the pick-off mirror, as well as the high cross-polarization transmission of the polarizer filter. We compare this model against the on-orbit observations of polarization calibrators, and show it predicts relative counts in the different polarizer/aperture settings to 1.5% RMS accuracy. We then show how this model can be used to calibrate GO data, and present two WWW tools which allow observers to easily calibrate their data. Detailed examples are given illustrationg the calibration and display of WFPC2 polarization data. In closing we describe future plans and possible improvements.

  6. The serendipitous discovery of a group or cluster of young galaxies at z = 2.40 in deep Hubble space telescope WFPC2 images

    CERN Document Server

    Pascarelle, S M; Driver, S P; Ostrander, E J; Keel, W C; Pascarelle, Sebastian M; Windhorst, Rogier A; Driver, Simon P; Ostrander, Eric J; Keel, William C

    1995-01-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a group or cluster of young galaxies at z\\simeq2.40 in a 24-orbit HST/WFPC2 exposure of the field around the weak radio galaxy 53W002. Potential cluster members were identified on ground-based narrow-band redshifted Ly\\alpha images and confirmed via spectroscopy. In addition to the known weak radio galaxy 53W002 at z=2.390, two other objects were found to have excess narrow-band Ly\\alpha emission at z\\simeq2.40. Both have been spectroscopically confirmed, and one clearly contains a weak AGN. They are located within one arcminute of 53W002, or \\sim0.23h_{100}^{-1}Mpc (q_o=0.5) at z\\simeq2.40, which is the physical scale of a group or small cluster of galaxies. Profile fitting of the WFPC2 images shows that the objects are very compact, with scale lengths \\simeq0\\farcs 1 (\\simeq0.39h_{100}^{-1}kpc), and are rather faint (luminosities < L*), implying that they may be sub-galactic sized objects. We discuss these results in the context of galaxy and cluster evolution and...

  7. The morphological mix of field galaxies to I=24.25 magnitudes (b=26 magnitudes) from a deep Hubble space telescope WFPC2 image

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, S P; Ostrander, E J; Keel, W C; Griffiths, R E; Ratnatunga, K U; Driver, Simon P; Windhorst, Rogier A; Ostrander, Eric J; Keel, William C; Griffiths, Richard E; Ratnatunga, Kavan U

    1995-01-01

    We determine the morphological mix of field galaxies down to m_{I}\\simeq 24.25 mag (m_{B}\\sim 26.0 mag) from a single ultradeep HST WFPC2 image in both the V_{606} and I_{814} filters. In total, we find 227 objects with m_{I}\\le 24.5 mag and classify these into three types: ellipticals (16%), early-type spirals (37%) and late-type spirals/Irregulars (47%). The differential number counts for each type are compared to simple models in a standard flat cosmology. We find that both the elliptical and early-type spiral number counts are well described by {\\it little or no}-evolution models, but only when normalized at b_{J} = 18.0 mag. Given the uncertainties in the luminosity function (LF) normalization, both populations are consistent with a mild evolutionary scenario based on a normal/low rate of star-formation. This constrains the end of the last {\\it major} star-formation epoch in the giant galaxy populations to z\\geq 0.8. Conversely, the density of the observed late-type/Irregular population is found to be a ...

  8. Theoretical isochrones in several photometric systems I. Johnson-Cousins-Glass, HST/WFPC2, HST/NICMOS, Washington, and ESO Imaging Survey filter sets

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, L; Bressan, A; Chiosi, C; Groenewegen, M A T; Marigo, P; Salasnich, B; Weiss, A

    2002-01-01

    We provide tables of theoretical isochrones in several photometric systems. To this aim, the following steps are followed: (1) First, we re-write the formalism for converting synthetic stellar spectra into tables of bolometric corrections. The resulting formulas can be applied to any photometric system, provided that the zero-points are specified by means of either ABmag, STmag, VEGAmag, or a standard star system that includes well-known spectrophotometric standards. Interstellar absorption can be considered in a self-consistent way. (2) We assemble an extended and updated library of stellar intrinsic spectra. It is mostly based on non-overshooting ATLAS9 models, suitably extended to both low and high effective temperatures. This offers an excellent coverage of the parameter space of Teff, logg, and [M/H]. We briefly discuss the main uncertainties and points still deserving more improvement. (3) From the spectral library, we derive tables of bolometric corrections for Johnson-Cousins-Glass, HST/WFPC2, HST/NIC...

  9. WFPC2 Observations of the Hubble Deep Field-South

    CERN Document Server

    Casertano, S; Dickinson, M; Ferguson, H C; Fruchter, A S; González-Lopezlira, R A; Heyer, I; Hook, R N; Levay, Z G; Lucas, R A; Mack, J; Makidon, R B; Mutchler, M Y; Smith, T E; Stiavelli, M; Wiggs, M S; Williams, R E; Casertano, Stefano; Mello, Duilia de; Dickinson, Mark; Ferguson, Henry C; Fruchter, Andrew S; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A; Heyer, Inge; Hook, Richard N; Levay, Zolt; Lucas, Ray A; Mack, Jennifer; Makidon, Russell B; Mutchler, Max; Stiavelli, Massimo; Wiggs, Michael S; Williams, Robert E

    2000-01-01

    The Hubble Deep Field-South observations targeted a high-galactic-latitude field near QSO J2233-606. We present WFPC2 observations of the field in four wide bandpasses centered at roughly 300, 450, 606, and 814 nm. Observations, data reduction procedures, and noise properties of the final images are discussed in detail. A catalog of sources is presented, and the number counts and color distributions of the galaxies are compared to a new catalog of the HDF-N that has been constructed in an identical manner. The two fields are qualitatively similar, with the galaxy number counts for the two fields agreeing to within 20%. The HDF-S has more candidate Lyman-break galaxies at z > 2 than the HDF-N. The star-formation rate per unit volume computed from the HDF-S, based on the UV luminosity of high-redshift candidates, is a factor of 1.9 higher than from the HDF-N at z ~ 2.7, and a factor of 1.3 higher at z ~ 4.

  10. WF/PC2 Cycle 6 Photometric CAL Monitor Uv/opt Std

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Brad

    1996-07-01

    A UV spectrophotometric standard star is observed in a variety of filters and cameras to monitor the photometric stability and quantum efficiency of WFPC2 from the FUV to near-IR; the F555W PC image will provide a focus monitor. Throughput of the filters will be measured via aperture photometry and tracked over time, to monitor the long term performance of the instrument, check for changes, and verify the success of the decontamination.

  11. WF/PC2 Cycle 5 Photometric CAL Monitor Uv/opt Std

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Christopher

    1995-07-01

    A UV spectrophotometric standard star is observed in a variety of filters and cameras to monitor the photometric stability and quantum efficiency of WFPC2 from the FUV to near-IR; the F555W PC image will provide a focus monitor. Throughput of the filters will be measured via aperture photometry and tracked over time, to monitor the long term performance of the instrument, check for changes, and verify the success of the decontamination.

  12. WF/PC2 Cycle 7 Photometric Monitor Uv/opt Std

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Brad

    1997-07-01

    A UV spectrophotometric standard star is observed in a variety of filters and cameras to monitor the photometric stability and quantum efficiency of WFPC2 from the FUV to near-IR; the F555W, F439W, and F814W PC images will provide a focus monitor. Throughput of the filters will be measured via aperture photometry and tracked over time, to monitor the long term performance of the instrument, check for changes, and verify the success of the decontamination.

  13. A Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 Investigation of the Disk-Halo Interface in NGC891

    CERN Document Server

    Rossa, J

    2004-01-01

    We present deep narrowband observations with high spatial resolution of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas in the halo of NGC891, obtained with the WFPC2 on-board the HST. Our H-alpha observations, centered on the northern part of NGC891, reveal an extended gaseous halo, which fills almost the entire field of view of our WFPC2 observation. The majority of the H-alpha emission is diffuse. Several discrete features (e.g., filaments) are visible as well. Some of the filaments reach distances of up to 2.2 kpc above the galactic plane, and are extremely collimated, even at high galactic latitudes. We compare the morphology of these filaments with theoretical models, which describe possible transport mechanisms in a general way. We also investigate extraplanar dust features, which are best visible in unsharp-masked images of our broadband F675W image, and we compare them to the spatial distribution of DIG filaments. Individual dust features, however, are not spatially correlated with diffuse ionized gas counterparts, ...

  14. HST/WFPC2 observations of the core of KjPn 8

    CERN Document Server

    López, J A; Rodríguez, L F; Vázquez, R A; Steffen, W; Bryce, M

    2000-01-01

    Narrow-band images of the core of the extraordinary poly-polar planetary nebula KjPn 8 have been obtained with the WFPC2 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Spasmodic bipolar ejections, in changing directions have occurred over thousands of years to create KjPn 8. The central star is finally revealed in these observations and its compact nebular core is resolved into a remarkably young, aprox. 500 years old, elliptical ring. The highest speed bipolar outflows are perpendicular to this central ring which is identified as the latest event in the creation of this nebula. The formation history of KjPn 8 has involved two distinct planetary nebula-like events, probably originating froma a binary core evolution with components of similar mass.

  15. The Hourglass as seen with HST/WFPC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Úbeda, L.; Barbá, R.-H.; MacKenty, J. W.; Arias, J. I.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.

    2015-05-01

    We present a multi-filter HST/WFPC2 UV-optical study of the Hourglass region in M8. We have extracted the stellar photometry of the sources in the area and obtained the separations and position angles of the Herschel 36 multiple system: for Herschel 36 D we detect a possible orbital motion between 1995 and 2009. We have combined our data with archival IUE spectroscopy and measured the Herschel 36 extinction law, obtaining a different result from that of http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989ApJ...345..245C {Cardelli et al. (1989)} due to the improvement in the quality of the optical-NIR data, in agreement with the results of http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A&A...564A..63M {Maíz Apellániz et al. (2014)}. A large fraction of the UV flux around Herschel 36 arises from the Hourglass and not directly from the star itself. In the UV the Hourglass appears to act as a reflection nebula located behind Herschel 36 along the line of sight. Finally, we also detect three new Herbig-Haro objects and the possible anisotropic expansion of the Hourglass Nebula.

  16. The Hourglass as seen with HST/WFPC2

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Barbá, R H; MacKenty, J W; Arias, J I; de Castro, A I Gómez

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-filter HST/WFPC2 UV-optical study of the Hourglass region in M8. We have extracted the stellar photometry of the sources in the area and obtained the separations and position angles of the Herschel 36 multiple system: for Herschel 36 D we detect a possible orbital motion between 1995 and 2009. We have combined our data with archival IUE spectroscopy and measured the Herschel 36 extinction law, obtaining a different result from that of Cardelli et al. (1989) due to the improvement in the quality of the optical-NIR data, in agreement with the results of Ma\\'iz Apell\\'aniz et al. (2014). A large fraction of the UV flux around Herschel 36 arises from the Hourglass and not directly from the star itself. In the UV the Hourglass appears to act as a reflection nebula located behind Herschel 36 along the line of sight. Finally, we also detect three new Herbig-Haro objects and the possible anisotropic expansion of the Hourglass Nebula.

  17. Optical Counterparts of Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources identified from Archival Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2

    CERN Document Server

    Ptak, A; Van der Marel, R; Roye, E; Heckman, T; Towne, B

    2006-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of archival HST WFPC2 ``Association'' data sets that correlate with the Chandra positions of a set of 44 ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) of nearby galaxies. We have improved the Chandra-HST relative astrometry whenever possible. Disparate numbers of potential ULX counterparts are found, and in some cases none are found. The lack of or low number of counterparts in some cases may be due to insufficient depth in the WFPC2 images. Particularly in late-type galaxies, the HST image in the ULX region was often complex or crowded. We therefore address various scenarios for the nature of the ULX since it is not known which, if any, of the sources found are true counterparts. The optical luminosities of the sources are typically in the range 10^4-6 L_sun. In several cases color information is available, with the colors roughly tending to be more red in early-type galaxies. This suggests that, in general, the (potential) counterparts found in early-type galaxies are likely to be old...

  18. HST/WFPC2 Color-Magnitude Diagrams for Globular Clusters in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Rich, R M; Cacciari, C; Federici, L; Pecci, F F; Djorgovski, S G

    2005-01-01

    We report new HST/WFPC2 photometry for 10 globular clusters (GC) in M31 observed in F5555W(V) and F814W(I). Additionally we have reanalyzed HST archival data of comparable quality for 2 more GCs. Extraordinary care is taken to account for the effects of blended stellar images and required field subtraction. We thus reach 1 mag fainter than the horizontal branch (HB) even in unfavorable cases. We present the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and discuss their main features also in comparison with the properties of the Galactic GCs. This analysis is augmented with CMDs previously obtained and discussed by Fusi Pecci et al. (1996) on 8 other M31 clusters. We report the following significant results: 1. The locus of the red giant branches give reliable metallicity determinations which compare generally very well with ground-based integrated spectroscopic and photometric measures, as well as giving good reddening estimates. 2. The HB morphologies show the same behavior with metallicity as the Galactic GCs, with indi...

  19. QLWFPC2: Parallel-Processing Quick-Look WFPC2 Stellar Photometry Based on the Message Passing Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighell, K. J.

    2004-07-01

    I describe a new parallel-processing stellar photometry code called QLWFPC2 (http://www.noao.edu/staff/mighell/qlwfpc2) which is designed to do quick-look analysis of two entire WFPC2 observations from the Hubble Space Telescope in under 5 seconds using a fast Beowulf cluster with a Gigabit-Ethernet local network. This program is written in ANSI C and uses MPICH implementation of the Message Passing Interface from the Argonne National Laboratory for the parallel-processing communications, the CFITSIO library (from HEASARC at NASA's GSFC) for reading the standard FITS files from the HST Data Archive, and the Parameter Interface Library (from the INTEGRAL Science Data Center) for the IRAF parameter-file user interface. QLWFPC2 running on 4 processors takes about 2.4 seconds to analyze the WFPC2 archive datasets u37ga407r.c0.fits (F555W; 300 s) and u37ga401r.c0.fits (F814W; 300 s) of M54 (NGC 6715) which is the bright massive globular cluster near the center of the nearby Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The analysis of these HST observations of M54 lead to the serendipitous discovery of more than 50 new bright variable stars in the central region of M54. Most of the candidate variables stars are found on the PC1 images of the cluster center --- a region where no variables have been reported by previous ground-based studies of variables in M54. This discovery is an example of how QLWFPC2 can be used to quickly explore the time domain of observations in the HST Data Archive.

  20. Revised bolometric corrections and interstellar extinction coefficients for the ACS and WFPC2 photometric systems

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, L; Williams, B; de Jong, R; Gallart, C; Monelli, M; Groenewegen, M A T; Holtzman, J A; Olsen, K A G; Seth, A C; Weisz, D R

    2008-01-01

    We present extensive tables of bolometric corrections and interstellar extinction coefficients for the WFPC2 and ACS (both WFC and HRC) photometric systems. They are derived from synthetic photometry applied to a database of spectral energy distributions covering a large range of effective temperatures, surface gravity, and metal content. Carbon stars are also considered. The zero-points take into consideration the new high-accuracy Vega fluxes from Bohlin. These tables are employed to transform Padova isochrones into WFPC2 and ACS photometric systems using interstellar extinction coefficients on a star-to-star basis. All data are available either in tabular form or via an interactive web interface in the case of the isochrones. Preliminary tables for the WFC3 camera are also included in the database.

  1. WF/PC2 Cycle 4 Photometric CAL Monitor 1: Uv/opt Std.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, Mark

    1994-01-01

    A UV spectrophotometric standard star (GRW+70d5824) is observed using the photometric (F336W, F439W, F555W, F675W and F814W), and UV (F160BW, F170W, F218W and F255W) filter sets, to monitor the photometric stability and quantum efficiency of WFPC2 from the FUV to near-IR. The observations are to be scheduled once every four weeks.

  2. WF/PC2 Cycle 4 Photometric CAL Monitor 1: Uv/opt Std - Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, Mark

    1994-01-01

    A UV spectrophotometric standard star (GRW+70d5824) is observed using the photometric (F336W, F439W, F555W, F675W and F814W), and UV (F160BW, F170W, F218W and F255W) filter sets, to monitor the photometric stability and quantum efficiency of WFPC2 from the FUV to near-IR. The observations are to be scheduled once every four weeks.

  3. WFPC2 Observations of Leo A A Predominantly Young Galaxy within the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstoy, E; Cole, A A; Hössel, J G; Saha, A; Dohm-Palmer, R C; Skillman, E D; Mateo, M; Hurley-Keller, D A; Tolstoy, Eline; Mateo, Mario

    1998-01-01

    The unprecedented detail of the WFPC2 colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar population of Leo A presented here allows us to determine a new distance and an accurate star formation history for this extremely metal-poor Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy. From the position of the red clump, the helium-burning blue loops and the tip of the red giant branch, we obtain a distance modulus, m-M=24.2+/-0.2, or 690 +/- 60 kpc, which places Leo A firmly within the Local Group. Our interpretation of these features in the WFPC2 CMDs at this new distance based upon extremely low metallicity (Z=0.0004) theoretical stellar evolution models suggests that this galaxy is predominantly young, i.e. <2 Gyr old. A major episode of star formation 900 - 1500 Gyr ago can explain the red clump luminosity and also fits in with our interpretation of the number of anomalous Cepheid variable stars seen in this galaxy. We cannot rule out the presence of an older, underlying globular cluster age stellar population with these ...

  4. HST/WFPC2 Study of the Trapezium Cluster: the Influence of Circumstellar Disks on the Initial Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Robberto, M; Carrillo, G M; Beckwith, S V W; Makidon, R B; Panagia, N

    2004-01-01

    We have performed the first measures of mass accretion rates in the core of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Four adjacent fields centered on the Trapezium stars have been imaged in the U- and B-bands using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. In this paper we focus our attention on a group of 40 stars with known spectral types and complete UBVI WFPC2 photometry. Approximately three quarters of the sources show excess luminosity in the U-band, that we attribute to mass accretion. The known correlation between the U-band excess and the total accretion luminosity allows us to estimate the accretion rates. Overall, mass accretion rates appear lower than those measured by other authors in the Orion flanking fields or in Taurus-Auriga. Mass accretion rates remain low even in the vicinity of the birth line of Palla & Stahler, suggesting that in the core of the Trapezium cluster disk accretion has been recently depressed by an external mechanism. We suggest that the UV radiation genera...

  5. Deep HST-WFPC2 photometry of NGC 288. II. The Main Sequence Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, M; Montegriffo, P; Messineo, M; Monaco, L; Rood, R T; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Montegriffo, Paolo; Messineo, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The Main Sequence Luminosity Function (LF) of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 288 has been obtained using deep WFPC2 photometry. We have employed a new method to correct for completeness and fully account for bin-to-bin migration due to blending and/or observational scatter. The effect of the presence of binary systems in the final LF is quantified and is found to be negligible. There is a strong indication of the mass segregation of unevolved single stars and clear signs of a depletion of low mass stars in NGC 288 with respect to other clusters. The results are in good agreement with the prediction of theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of NGC 288 that take into account the extreme orbital properties of this cluster.

  6. Interpretation of Impact Features on the Surface of the WFPC-2 Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Kou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    An examination of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) radiator assembly was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during the summer of 2009. Immediately apparent was the predominance of impact features resident only in the thermal paint layer; similar phenomenology was observed during a prior survey of the WFPC-1 radiator. As well, larger impact features displayed spallation zones, darkened areas, and other features not encountered in impacts onto bare surfaces. Whereas the characterization of impact features by depth and diameter on unpainted surfaces has been long established, the mitigation provided by the painted layer presented a challenge to further analysis of the WFPC-2 features; a literature search revealed no systematic characterization of the ballistic limit equations of painted or coated surfaces. In order to characterize the impactors responsible for the observed damage, an understanding of the cratering and spallation phenomenology of the painted surface was required. To address that challenge, NASA sponsored a series of hypervelocity calibration shots at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). This effort required the following activities: the production, painting, and artificial ageing of test coupons in a manner similar to the actual radiator; the determination of the test matrix parameters projectile diameter and material (mass density), impact velocity, and impact angle, so as to enable both an adequate characterization of the impact by projectile and impact geometry and support hydrocode modeling to fill in and extend the applicability of the calibration shots; the selection of suitable projectiles; logistics; and an analysis of feature characteristics upon return of the coupons. This paper reports the results of the test campaign and presents ballistic limit equations for painted surfaces. We also present initial results of our interpretation methodologies.

  7. Deep HST-WFPC2 photometry of NGC 288. I. Binary Systems and Blue Stragglers

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, M; Messineo, M; Monaco, L L; Rood, R T

    2001-01-01

    We present the first results of a deep WFPC2 photometric survey of the loose galactic globular cluster NGC 288. The fraction of binary systems is estimated from the color distribution of objects near the Main Sequence (MS) with a method analogous to that introduced by Rubenstein & Bailyn(1997). We have unequivocally detected a significant population of binary systems which has a radial distribution that has been significantly influenced by mass segregation. In the inner region of the cluster (r 1 r_h), f_b must be less than 0.10, and the most likely value is 0.0, independently of the adopted F(q). The detected population of binaries is dominated by primordial systems. The specific frequency of Blue Straggler Stars (BSS) is exceptionally high, suggesting that the BSS production mechanism via binary evolution can be very efficient. A large population of BSS is possible even in low density environments if a sufficient reservoir of primordial binaries is available. The observed distribution of BSS in the Colo...

  8. Deep Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 Photometry of NGC 288. I. Binary Systems and Blue Stragglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellazzini, Michele; Fusi Pecci, Flavio; Messineo, Maria; Monaco, Lorenzo; Rood, Robert T.

    2002-03-01

    We present the first results of a deep WFPC2 photometric survey of the loose galactic globular cluster NGC 288. The fraction of binary systems is estimated from the color distribution of objects near the main sequence (MS) with a method analogous to that introduced by Rubenstein & Bailyn. We have unequivocally detected a significant population of binary systems with a radial distribution that has been significantly influenced by mass segregation. In the inner region of the cluster (r=1rh), fb must be less than 0.10, and the most likely value is 0.0, independently of the adopted F(q). The detected population of binaries is dominated by primordial systems. The specific frequency of blue stragglers (BSs) is exceptionally high, suggesting that the BS production mechanism via binary evolution can be very efficient. A large population of BSs is possible even in low-density environments if a sufficient reservoir of primordial binaries is available. The observed distribution of BSs in the color-magnitude diagram is not compatible with a rate of BS production that has been constant in time, if it is assumed that all the BSs are formed by the merging of two stars. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with proposal GO-6804.

  9. The Metal-rich Globular Cluster NGC6553 Observations with WFPC2, STIS, and NICMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, S F; Elson, R A W; Johnson, R A; Santiago, B; Sigurdsson, S; Tanvir, N R; Beaulieu, Sylvie F.; Gilmore, Gerard; Elson, Rebecca A.W.; Johnson, Rachel A.; Santiago, Basilio; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Tanvir, Nial

    2001-01-01

    We present a HST study of the metal-rich globular cluster NGC6553 using WFPC2, NICMOS and STIS. Our primary motivation is to calibrate the STIS broad-band LP magnitude against $V_{555}$ and $I_{814}$ magnitudes for stars of known metallicity and absolute (visual) magnitude, for application to our study of LMC globular clusters. NGC6553 has been shown in earlier studies to have a very unusual colour-magnitude diagram, so we also use our data to investigate the reddening, distance, luminosity function and structure of this cluster. We deduce a higher metallicity and smaller distance modulus than did some previous studies, but emphasise that very large patchy extinction on small angular scales prohibits accurate determination of the parameters of this cluster. The horizontal branch of NGC6553 in ($V,V-I$) is tilted at an angle close to that of the reddening vector. We show that extinction does not, however, explain the tilt, which is presumably a metallicity effect. The colour-magnitude diagram shows an apparent...

  10. The 2008 Passage of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA as Observed from Hubble/WFPC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Orton, G. S.; Tsavaris, I.

    2008-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope data of the passage of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and Oval BA were acquired on May 15, June 28 (near closest approach), and July 8. Wind fields were measured from Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) data with 10-hour separations before and after closest approach, and within the GRS with 40-minute separations on all three dates. Color information was also derived using 8 narrowband WFPC2 filters from 343 to 673-nm on all three dates. We will present the results of principal components and wind analyses and discuss unique features seen in this data set. In addition, we will highlight any changes observed in the GRS, Oval BA and their surroundings as a result of the passage, including the movement of a smaller red anticyclone from west of the GRS, around its southern periphery, and to the east of the GRS.

  11. The 2008 Passage of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA as Observed from Hubble/WFPC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Orton, G. S.; Tsavaris, I.

    2008-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope data of the passage of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and Oval BA were acquired on May 15, June 28 (near closest approach), and July 8. Wind fields were measured from Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) data with 10-hour separations before and after closest approach, and within the GRS with 40-minute separations on all three dates. Color information was also derived using 8 narrowband WFPC2 filters from 343 to 673-nm on all three dates. We will present the results of principal components and wind analyses and discuss unique features seen in this data set. In addition, we will highlight any changes observed in the GRS, Oval BA and their surroundings as a result of the passage, including the movement of a smaller red anticyclone from west of the GRS, around its southern periphery, and to the east of the GRS.

  12. Toward High-Precision Astrometry with WFPC2. I. Deriving an Accurate PSF

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J; Anderson, Jay; King, Ivan R.

    2000-01-01

    The first step toward doing high-precision astrometry is the measurement of individual stars in individual images, a step that is fraught with dangers when the images are undersampled. The key to avoiding systematic positional error in undersampled images is to determine an extremely accurate point-spread function (PSF). We apply the concept of the {\\it effective} PSF, and show that in images that consist of pixels it is the ePSF, rather than the often-used instrumental PSF, that embodies the information from which accurate star positions and magnitudes can be derived. We show how, in a rich star field, one can use the information from dithered exposures to derive an extremely accurate effective PSF by iterating between the PSF itself and the star positions that we measure with it. We also give a simple but effective procedure for representing spatial variations of the HST PSF. With such attention to the PSF, we find that we are able to measure the position of a single reasonably bright star in a single image...

  13. Photoluminescence profile imaging of Eu(III), Tb(III) and Eu(III)/Tb(III)-doped yttrium oxide nanosheets and nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Insu [Department of Chemistry, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712749 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jun-Gill, E-mail: jgkang@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305764 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Youngku, E-mail: youngkusohn@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Eu(III), Tb(III) and Eu(III)/Tb(III)-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanosheets and nanorods were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis and post-thermal treatment. Their morphology, crystallinity, photoluminescence and UV–visible absorption profiles were fully examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) crystallography, photoluminescence imaging and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. The as-prepared samples commonly showed the crystal structure of Y{sub 4}O(OH){sub 9}NO{sub 3}, which crystallized to cubic phase Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} after 550 °C-thermal annealing. The sharp emissions of Eu(III) between 580 and 720 nm were attributed to {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub J} (J=0,1,2,3,4) transitions, and those of Tb(III) between 450 and 720 nm were attributed to {sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub J} (J=6,5,4,3) transitions. Energy transfer from Tb(III) to Eu(III) was confirmed by the photoluminescence decay dynamics. In the cubic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure, Eu(III) was embedded at the C{sub 2} symmetry site and dominated by the {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition. Conversely, Tb(III) was oxidized to non-luminescent Tb(IV) in the cubic structure. - Highlights: • Eu(III), Tb(III)-doped and codoped Y complex nanorods and nanosheets prepared by a hydrothermal method. • Eu(III), Tb(III)-doped and codoped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods and nanosheets prepared by a post-annealing method. • Photoluminescence imaging profiles were fully obtained. • Tb(III) oxidized to Tb(IV) upon thermal annealing in cubic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix.

  14. Gd(III) functionalized gold nanorods for multimodal imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongmei; Yuan, Qinghai; Zhang, Baohua; Ai, Kelong; Zhang, Pengguo; Lu, Lehui

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel noncovalent method for producing Gd(III)-functionalized gold nanorods as multimodal contrast agents for MRI and CT imaging. The ligand is connected to the surface of the gold nanorods by a noncovalent bond making the Gd(III) ions directly accessible to water molecules, and resulting in a longitudinal relaxivity as high as 21.3 mM(-1) s(-1). In addition, compared with spherical gold nanoparticles, gold nanorods have more binding sites for Gd(III) ions due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. Benefiting from the advantages of the new type of carry material and the novel fabrication approach, the multimodal imaging probes exhibit a high longitudinal relaxivity r(1) on the order of 1.1 × 10(7) mM(-1) s(-1) on a per-particle basis, which is 24 times higher than that of Gd(III)-ion-functionalized spherical gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, CT imaging shows that such nanoprobes could induce an efficient contrast enhancement when the gold concentration is at least equal to 1.31 mg ml(-1). These results demonstrate that the as-prepared Gd functionalized gold nanorods could provide a new and versatile platform for the development of multimodal imaging probes.

  15. Deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of Sextans A. III. The star formation history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolphin, AE; Saha, A; Skillman, ED; Dohm-Palmer, RC; Tolstoy, E; Cole, AA; Gallagher, JS; Hoessel, JG; Mateo, M

    2003-01-01

    We present a measurement of the star formation history of Sextans A, based on WFPC2 photometry that is 50% complete to V = 27.5 (M-V similar to +1.9) and I = 27.0. The star formation history and chemical enrichment history have been measured through modeling of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We

  16. Imaging assessment of isolated lesions affecting cranial nerve III; Avaliacao por imagem das lesoes isoladas do III par craniano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos [Colegio Brasileiro de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem (CBR), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: cidbh@cidbh.com.br; Martins, Jose Carlos Tadeu [Sociedade Brasileira de Neuroradiologia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-05-15

    The aim of this study is to review the anatomy and main pathologic conditions affecting cranial nerve III using imaging studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging methods are essential in the evaluation of patients with suspected lesions of the oculomotor nerve once signs and symptoms are unspecific and a large number of diseases can affect cranial nerve III. A brief review of the literature is also presented. (author)

  17. The CLEO-III Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mountain, R J; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Azfar, F; Coan, T E; Efimov, A; Fadeev, V; Kopp, S E; Kubota, Y; Lipeles, E; Majumder, G; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A; Staeck, J; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Volobuev, I P

    1999-01-01

    The CLEO-III Detector upgrade for charged particle identification is discussed. The RICH design uses solid LiF crystal radiators coupled with multi-wire chamber photon detectors, using TEA as the photosensor, and low-noise Viking readout electronics. Results from our beam test at Fermilab are presented.

  18. Multimedia Content Based Image Retrieval Iii: Local Tetra Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja G S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Content Based Image Retrieval methods face several challenges while presentation of results and precision levels due to various specific applications. To improve the performance and address these problems a novel algorithm Local Tetra Pattern (LTrP is proposed which is coded in four direction instead of two direction used in Local Binary Pattern (LBP, Local Derivative Pattern (LDP andLocal Ternary Pattern(LTP.To retrieve the images the surrounding neighbor pixel value is calculated by gray level difference, which gives the relation between various multisorting algorithms using LBP, LDP, LTP and LTrP for sorting the images. This method mainly uses low level features such as color, texture and shape layout for image retrieval.

  19. Holographic Dual to Conical Defects III: Improved Image Method

    CERN Document Server

    Aref'eva, I Ya; Tikhanovskaya, M D

    2016-01-01

    The geodesics prescription in holographic approach in Lorentzian signature is valid only for geodesics which connect spacelike-separated points at the boundary, since there is no timelike geodesics which reach the boundary. There is also no straightforward analytic Euclidean continuation for a general background, such as e. g. moving particle in AdS. We propose an improved geodesic image method for two-point Lorentzian correlators which is valid for arbitrary time intervals in case of the bulk spacetime deformed by point particles. We illustrate that our prescription is consistent with the case when the analytic continuation exists and with the quasigeodesics prescription used in previous work. We also discuss some other applications of the improved image method, such as holographic entanglement entropy and multiple particles in AdS3.

  20. Resolving the Shocks in Radio Galaxy Nebulae: Hubble Space Telescope and Radio Imaging of 3C 171, 3C 277.3, and PKS 2250-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilak, Avanti; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Tadhunter, Clive; Wills, Karen; Morganti, Raffaella; Baum, Stefi A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Dallacasa, Daniele

    2005-12-01

    We present the results of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 medium-band and narrowband imaging and Very Large Array and MERLIN2 radio imaging of three powerful radio galaxies: 3C 171, 3C 277.3, and PKS 2250-41. We obtained images of the rest frame [O III] λ5007 and [O II] λ3727 line emission using the linear ramp filters on WFPC2. The correlations of the emission-line morphology and the [O III]/[O II] line ratios with the radio emission seen in ground-based observations are clarified by the HST imaging. We confirm that the radio lobes and hot spots are preferentially associated with lower ionization gas. The galaxy 3C 171 exhibits high surface brightness emission-line gas mainly along the radio source axis. The lowest ionization gas is seen at the eastern hot spot. In 3C 277.3 there is bright high-ionization gas (and continuum) offset just to the east of the radio knot K1. Our observations are consistent with previous work suggesting that this emission is produced by precursor gas ionized by the shock being driven into the cloud by the deflected radio jet. In PKS 2250-41 we resolve the emission-line arc that wraps around the outer rim of the western lobe. The lower ionization [O II] emission is nested just interior to the higher ionization [O III] emission, suggesting that we have resolved the cooling region behind the bow shock. We also detect possible continuum emission from the secondary hot spot. Thus, our observations support the hypothesis that in these sources the interaction between the expanding radio source and the ambient gas strongly influences the morphology, kinematics, and ionization of the gas. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program 6657 (principal investigator C. Tadhunter).

  1. Optimisation of Arsenic (III by Colorimetric Incorporated with Image Processing Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hoong Leong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic contamination has caused a remarkable impact on the contamination of soil and groundwater in many counties. Consequently, determination of inorganic arsenic on site is very crucial especially arsenic (III which is more toxic than arsenic (V. Thus, a more rapid, simple and ecofriendly approach was developed in this study to determine arsenic (III by incorporation of image processing technique into colorimetric method. The effects of various factors were evaluated by a 24 full factorial design with a blocking factor. The mass ratio of sulfamic acid to zinc powder was the most significant factor affected red, green and blue (RGB color values and followed by reaction period. The optimum conditions for the detection were found to be using 1 g of sulfamic acid and 0.5 g of zinc powder at 5 minutes. This work also demonstrates that the developed method is able to detect arsenic (III rapidly and easily.

  2. LOFAR tied-array imaging of Type III solar radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Morosan, D E; Zucca, P; Fallows, R; Carley, E P; Mann, G; Bisi, M M; Kerdraon, A; Konovalenko, A A; MacKinnon, A L; Rucker, H O; Thidé, B; Magdalenić, J; Vocks, C; Reid, H; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Bregman, J; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hassall, T E; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pietka, G; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Stewart, A; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2014-01-01

    The Sun is an active source of radio emission which is often associated with energetic phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), the Sun has not been imaged extensively because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio telescopes. Here, the combined high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) was used to study solar Type III radio bursts at 30-90 MHz and their association with CMEs. The Sun was imaged with 126 simultaneous tied-array beams within 5 solar radii of the solar centre. This method offers benefits over standard interferometric imaging since each beam produces high temporal (83 ms) and spectral resolution (12.5 kHz) dynamic spectra at an array of spatial locations centred on the Sun. LOFAR's standard interferometric output is currently limited to one image per second. Over a period of 30 minutes, multiple Type III radio bursts were observed, a number of which were found to be located at high...

  3. Gd(III)-DOTA-modified sonosensitive liposomes for ultrasound-triggered release and MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Suk Hyun; Na, Kyunga; Lee, Seul A.; Cho, Sun Hang; Seong, Hasoo; Shin, Byung Cheol

    2012-08-01

    Ultrasound-sensitive (sonosensitive) liposomes for tumor targeting have been studied in order to increase the antitumor efficacy of drugs and decrease the associated severe side effects. Liposomal contrast agents having Gd(III) are known as a nano-contrast agent system for the efficient and selective delivery of contrast agents into pathological sites. The objective of this study was to prepare Gd(III)-DOTA-modified sonosensitive liposomes (GdSL), which could deliver a model drug, doxorubicin (DOX), to a specific site and, at the same time, be capable of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The GdSL was prepared using synthesized Gd(III)-DOTA-1,2-distearoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine lipid. Sonosensitivity of GdSL to 20-kHz ultrasound induced 33% to 40% of DOX release. The relaxivities ( r 1) of GdSL were 6.6 to 7.8 mM-1 s-1, which were higher than that of MR-bester®. Intracellular uptake properties of GdSL were evaluated according to the intensity of ultrasound. Intracellular uptake of DOX for ultrasound-triggered GdSL was higher than that for non-ultrasound-triggered GdSL. The results of our study suggest that the paramagnetic and sonosensitive liposomes, GdSL, may provide a versatile platform for molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery.

  4. The Sombrero Galaxy III Ionised gas and dust in the central 200 pc

    CERN Document Server

    Emsellem, E; Emsellem, Eric; Ferruit, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of new 3D TIGER spectroscopic observations and archived HST/WFPC2 and NICMOS images of the central region of M 104. The [NII]+Ha images reveal the presence of a nuclear spiral structure, and the gaseous kinematics in the central arcsecond shows evidence for kinematical decoupling of the central peak. A straight nuclear dust lane, with a weak symmetric counterpart, is seen in the V-I and V-H colour maps. These results hint for the presence of a strong nuclear bar, that would be located inside the inner Linblad resonance of the large-scale bar discussed by Emsellem (1995).

  5. Imaging Spectrophotometry of the Jet/ISM Interaction in IC5063

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, G.; Schuft, B.; Morse, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2004-01-01

    IC5063 is a somewhat dusty z=0.0110 S0 galaxy with a Seyfert 2 nucleus. It has a triple radio source that spans 3 arcsec, mostly blueshifted H I absorption that spans 700 km/s, and ionization cones that extend for more than 2 arcmins. We obtained fully sampled [O III]\\lambda5007 grids at 0."9 and 70 km/s FWHM resolution using the Rutgers Fabry-Perot system on the Blanco 4m telescope. Complementary long-slit spectra using the RC spectrograph on the Blanco, and Taurus Tunable Filter spectral images in H\\alpha and [N II]\\lambda6583, were also obtained to assess gaseous ionization conditions. We present the results of our analysis, and correlate spectral structures to those visible in archival WFPC2 images. We find that, in the region near the radio triple, gaseous ionization and line velocity width is tightly correlated, in excellent quantitative agreement with the high-velocity shock regime in the diagnostic emission-line ratio diagrams of Dopita & Sutherland. We separate kinematically gas in normal disk rotation that is illuminated by the AGN in the ionization cones from that agitated mechanically by the jet, and assess the energy input from both processes.

  6. LOFAR tied-array imaging of Type III solar radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosan, D. E.; Gallagher, P. T.; Zucca, P.; Fallows, R.; Carley, E. P.; Mann, G.; Bisi, M. M.; Kerdraon, A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Rucker, H. O.; Thidé, B.; Magdalenić, J.; Vocks, C.; Reid, H.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Conway, J. E.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J. P.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pietka, G.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D.; Serylak, M.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B. W.; Stewart, A.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission which is often associated with energetic phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (benefits over standard interferometric imaging since each beam produces high temporal (~83 ms) and spectral resolution (12.5 kHz) dynamic spectra at an array of spatial locations centred on the Sun. LOFAR's standard interferometric output is currently limited to one image per second. Results: Over a period of 30 min, multiple Type III radio bursts were observed, a number of which were found to be located at high altitudes (~4 R⊙ from the solar center at 30 MHz) and to have non-radial trajectories. These bursts occurred at altitudes in excess of values predicted by 1D radial electron density models. The non-radial high altitude Type III bursts were found to be associated with the expanding flank of a CME. Conclusions: The CME may have compressed neighbouring streamer plasma producing larger electron densities at high altitudes, while the non-radial burst trajectories can be explained by the deflection of radial magnetic fields as the CME expanded in the low corona. Movie associated to Fig. 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of IC 1613. II. The star formation history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skillman, ED; Tolstoy, E; Cole, AA; Dolphin, AE; Saha, A; Gallagher, JS; Dohm-Palmer, RC; Mateo, M

    2003-01-01

    We have taken deep images of an outlying field in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 with the WFPC2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the standard broadband F555W (V, 8 orbits) and F814W (I,16 orbits) filters. The photometry reaches to V=27.7 (M-V=+3.4) and I=27.1 (M-I=+2.8) at the 50

  8. Relationship between Class III malocclusion and hyoid bone displacement during swallowing: a cine-magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Gokce, Sila Mermut; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Gorgulu, Serkan; Karacay, Seniz; Akca, Eralp; Olmez, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Objective The displacement of the hyoid bone (HB) is a critical biomechanical component of the swallowing function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the swallowing-induced vertical and horizontal displacements of the HB in subjects with 2 different magnitudes of skeletal Class III malocclusion, by means of real-time, balanced turbo-field-echo (B-TFE) cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Methods The study population comprised 19 patients with mild skeletal Class III malocclusion, 16 with seve...

  9. A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -polymer for liver magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Xue, Rong; You, Tianyan; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui

    2015-07-01

    A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -copolymer (ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd) has been developed as a potential liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd consisted of a poly (aspartic acid-co-leucine) unit bound with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (Gd-DOTA) via the linkage of ethylenediamine. In vitro, the biodegradable experiment and cytotoxicity assay showed the biodegradability and biocompatibility of this gadolinium-polymer. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd presented an increase in relaxivity of 2.4 times than the clinical Gd-DOTA. In vivo, gadolinium (III)-copolymer was mainly accumulated in the liver, and it could be excreted via the renal and hepatobiliary mechanism. The average enhancement of ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd (60.71±5.93%, 50-80 min) in liver was 2.62-fold greater than that of Gd-DOTA (23.16±3.55%, 10-30 min). ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd could be as a potential liver MRI contrast agent with a long time-window.

  10. Aerosol extinction profiles at 525 nm and 1020 nm derived from ACE imager data: comparisons with GOMOS, SAGE II, SAGE III, POAM III, and OSIRIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vanhellemont

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment mission is dedicated to the retrieval of a large number of atmospheric trace gas species using the solar occultation technique in the infrared and UV/visible spectral domain. However, two additional solar disk imagers (at 525 nm and 1020 nm were added for a number of reasons, including the retrieval of aerosol and cloud products. In this paper, we present first comparison results for these imager aerosol/cloud optical extinction coefficient profiles, with the ones derived from measurements performed by 3 solar occultation instruments (SAGE II, SAGE III, POAM III, one stellar occultation instrument (GOMOS and one limb sounder (OSIRIS. The results indicate that the ACE imager profiles are of good quality in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere, although the aerosol extinction for the visible channel at 525 nm contains a significant negative bias at higher altitudes, while the relative differences indicate that ACE profiles are almost always too high at 1020 nm. Both problems are probably related to ACE imager instrumental issues.

  11. Retention of 99mTc-DMSA(III) and 99mTc-nanocolloid in different syringes affects imaging quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauwens, Matthias; Pooters, Ivo; van der Pol, Jochen; Mottaghy, Felix M; van Kroonenburgh, Marinus

    2014-04-01

    (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid [DMSA(III)] and colloidal human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-nanocolloid) are widely used radiopharmaceuticals. Recently, in our institution we encountered image quality problems in DMSA scans after changing the brand of syringes we were using, which triggered us to look into the adsorption properties of syringes from different brands for (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) and (99m)Tc-nanocolloid. We also describe a clinical case in which adsorption of (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) caused inferior imaging quality. DMSA and nanocolloid were labeled with (99m)Tc following manufacturer guidelines. After synthesis, syringes with (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) and (99m)Tc-nanocolloid were stored for 15, 30, 60, and 120 min. We evaluated Luer Lock syringes manufactured by different brands such as Artsana, Henke-Sass-Wolf, B. Braun Medical N.V., CODAN Medizinische Geräte GmbH & Co KG, Becton Dickinson and Company, and Terumo Europe. Adsorption of (99m)Tc-DMSA(III) and (99m)Tc-nanocolloid was acceptably low for all syringes (image quality--for example, in DMSA scans using pediatric radiopharmaceutical doses. It is advised to check the compatibility of any radiopharmaceutical with syringes as an integral part of the quality assurance program.

  12. Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with Europium(III) DO3A as a Bimodal Imaging Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Sophie; Bloemen, Maarten; Vander Elst, Luce; Laurent, Sophie; Verbiest, Thierry; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2016-03-18

    A new prototype consisting of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles decorated with europium(III) ions encapsulated in a DO3A organic scaffold was designed as a platform for further development of bimodal contrast agents for MRI and optical imaging. The USPIO nanoparticles act as negative MRI contrast agents, whereas the europium(III) ion is a luminophore that is suitable for use in optical imaging detection. The functionalized USPIO nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR, and TXRF analysis, and a full investigation of the relaxometric and optical properties was conducted. The typical luminescence emission of europium(III) was observed and the main red emission wavelength was found at 614 nm. The relaxometric study of these ultrasmall nanoparticles showed r2 values of 114.8 mM(-1) Fes(-1) at 60 MHz, which is nearly double the r2 relaxivity of Sinerem(®).

  13. Dynamics of the Globular Cluster NGC 665 with WFPC2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ding; CHEN Li; WANG Jia-Ji

    2004-01-01

    @@ We have used the Hubble Space Telescope observations to measure proper motion of the globular cluster NGC6656 (M22) with respect to the background bulge stars and its internal velocity dispersion profile. Based on the proper motion of the cluster, its space velocity (II, (-) , W) = (184 ± 3, 209 ±14, 132 ± 15) km s- 1 and galactic orbit are also obtained. The central velocity dispersion in radial and tangential components of the internal motion of cluster stars is 16.99 km s-1. We derive the mass-to-light ratio M/ LV ~ 3.3 ± 0.2, which is relatively higher than the previous results.

  14. Turn-on fluorogenic and chromogenic detection of Fe(III) and its application in living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, Gandhi; Sathiyaraja, Vijayaraj; Chellappa, Duraisamy, E-mail: dcmku123@gmail.com

    2014-01-15

    Two rhodamine-based sensors RDI-1, RDI-2 was designed and synthesized by incorporation of the rhodamine 6G fluorophore and 2-formyl imidazole as the recognizing unit via the imine linkages. RDI-1, RDI-2 exhibits very high selectivity and an excellent sensitivity towards Fe(III) ions in aqueous buffer solution on compared with other probes. The color change from colorless to pink and turn-on fluorescence after binding with iron (III) was observed. Based on jobs plot and ESI-MS studies, the 1:1 binding mode was proposed. Live cell imaging experiments with each probe showed that these probes widely applicable to detect Fe{sup 3+} in living cells. -- Highlights: • Two rhodamine based probes was synthesized and used to recognize iron (III). • The chemosensors can be applied to detect iron(III) ions by color and turn-on fluorescent changes. • The very low detection limit was reported. • The applicability of these probes for live cell fluorescence imaging was studied.

  15. Prototypes of Lanthanide(III) Agents Responsive to Enzymatic Activities in Three Complementary Imaging Modalities: Visible/Near-Infrared Luminescence, PARACEST-, and T1-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiefang; Bonnet, Célia S; Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Lacerda, Sara; Chauvin, Thomas; Retailleau, Pascal; Szeremeta, Frederic; Badet, Bernard; Petoud, Stéphane; Tóth, Éva; Durand, Philippe

    2016-03-09

    We report first prototypes of responsive lanthanide(III) complexes that can be monitored independently in three complementary imaging modalities. Through the appropriate choice of lanthanide(III) cations, the same reactive ligand can be used to form complexes providing detection by (i) visible (Tb(3+)) and near-infrared (Yb(3+)) luminescence, (ii) PARACEST- (Tb(3+), Yb(3+)), or (iii) T1-weighted (Gd(3+)) MRI. The use of lanthanide(III) ions of different natures for these imaging modalities induces only a minor change in the structure of complexes that are therefore expected to have a single biodistribution and cytotoxicity.

  16. Silica nanoparticles for micro-particle imaging velocimetry: fluorosurfactant improves nanoparticle stability and brightness of immobilized iridium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David J; Dore, Valentina; Rogers, Nicola J; Mole, Thomas K; Nash, Gerard B; Angeli, Panagiota; Pikramenou, Zoe

    2013-11-26

    To establish highly luminescent nanoparticles for monitoring fluid flows, we examined the preparation of silica nanoparticles based on immobilization of a cyclometalated iridium(III) complex and an examination of the photophysical studies provided a good insight into the Ir(III) microenvironment in order to reveal the most suitable silica nanoparticles for micro particle imaging velocimetry (μ-PIV) studies. Iridium complexes covalently incorporated at the surface of preformed silica nanoparticles, [Ir-4]@Si500-Z, using a fluorinated polymer during their preparation, demonstrated better stability than those without the polymer, [Ir-4]@Si500, as well as an increase in steady state photoluminescence intensity (and therefore particle brightness) and lifetimes which are increased by 7-fold compared with nanoparticles with the same metal complex attached covalently throughout their core, [Ir-4]⊂Si500. Screening of the nanoparticles in fluid flows using epi-luminescence microscopy also confirm that the brightest, and therefore most suitable particles for microparticle imaging velocimetry (μ-PIV) measurements are those with the Ir(III) complex immobilized at the surface with fluorosurfactant, that is [Ir-4]@Si500-Z. μ-PIV studies demonstrate the suitability of these nanoparticles as nanotracers in microchannels.

  17. Gadolinium(III-DOTA Complex Functionalized with BODIPY as a Potential Bimodal Contrast Agent for MRI and Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Ceulemans

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and characterization of a novel gadolinium(III DOTA complex functionalized with a boron-dipyrromethene derivative (BODIPY is described. The assembly of the complex relies on azide diazotransfer chemistry in a copper tube flow reactor. The azide thus formed is coupled directly with an alkyne via click chemistry, resulting into a paramagnetic and luminescent gadolinium(III complex. Luminescent data and relaxometric properties of the complex have been evaluated, suggesting the potential applicability of the complexes as a bimodal contrast agent for magnetic resonance and optical imaging. The complex displays a bright emission at 523 nm with an absorption maximum of 507 nm and high quantum yields of up to 83% in water. The proton relaxivity of the complex measured at 310 K and at frequencies of 20 and 60 MHz had the values of 3.9 and 3.6 s−1·mM−1, respectively.

  18. Radiolabeled novel mAb 4G1 for immunoSPECT imaging of EGFRvIII expression in preclinical glioblastoma xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xujie; Dong, Chengyan; Shi, Jiyun; Ma, Teng; Jin, Zhongxia; Jia, Bing; Liu, Zhaofei; Shen, Li; Wang, Fan

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor mutant III (EGFRvIII) is exclusively expressed in tumors, such as glioblastoma, breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, but never in normal organs. Increasing evidence suggests that EGFRvIII has clinical significance in glioblastoma prognosis due to its enhanced tumorigenicity and chemo/radio resistance, thus the development of an imaging approach to early detect EGFRvIII expression with high specificity is urgently needed. To illustrate this point, we developed a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody 4G1 through mouse immunization, cell fusion and hybridoma screening and then confirmed its specificity and affinity by a serial of assays. Following biodistribution and small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging of 125I-4G1 in EGFRvIII positive/negative tumor-bearing mice were performed and evaluated to verify the tumor accumulation of this radiotracer. The biodistribution indicated that 125I-4G1 showed prominent tumor accumulation at 24 h post-injection, which reached maximums of 11.20 ± 0.75% ID/g and 13.98 ± 0.57% ID/g in F98npEGFRvIII and U87vIII xenografts, respectively. In contrast, 125I-4G1 had lower tumor accumulation in F98npEGFR and U87MG xenografts. Small animal SPECT/CT imaging revealed that 125I-4G1 had a higher tumor uptake in EGFRvIII-positive tumors than that in EGFRvIII-negative tumors. This study demonstrates that radiolabeled 4G1 can serve as a valid probe for the imaging of EGFRvIII expression, and would be valuable into the clinical translation for the diagnosis, prognosis, guiding therapy, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of tumors. PMID:28031526

  19. Hybrid image and signal processing III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 23, 24, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casasent, D.P.; Tescher, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    The present conference discusses the optical Gabor and wavelet transforms for image analysis, image segmentation via optical wavelets, semidifferential invariants, object labeling via convolution, tactile pattern recognition with complex linear morphology, a hybrid six-degree-of-freedom tracking system, and a hazard detection/avoidance sensor for NASA planetary landers. Also discussed are layered optical processing architectures, optoelectronic wide-world personality ROMs for high-speed control, a GaAs-based photorefractive time-integrating correlator, multispectral lossy data compression using vector quantization, broad vector quantization for transform image coding, and a mixed vendor computer architecture for precision image analysis.

  20. Cell-permeable Ln(III) chelate-functionalized InP quantum dots as multimodal imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiuk, Graeme J; Tamang, Sudarsan; Imbert, Daniel; Poillot, Cathy; Giardiello, Marco; Tisseyre, Céline; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Fries, Pascal Henry; de Waard, Michel; Reiss, Peter; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2011-10-25

    Quantum dots (QDs) are ideal scaffolds for the development of multimodal imaging agents, but their application in clinical diagnostics is limited by the toxicity of classical CdSe QDs. A new bimodal MRI/optical nanosized contrast agent with high gadolinium payload has been prepared through direct covalent attachment of up to 80 Gd(III) chelates on fluorescent nontoxic InP/ZnS QDs. It shows a high relaxivity of 900 mM(-1) s(-1) (13 mM(-1 )s(-1) per Gd ion) at 35 MHz (0.81 T) and 298 K, while the bright luminescence of the QDs is preserved. Eu(III) and Tb(III) chelates were also successfully grafted to the InP/ZnS QDs. The absence of energy transfer between the QD and lanthanide emitting centers results in a multicolor system. Using this convenient direct grafting strategy additional targeting ligands can be included on the QD. Here a cell-penetrating peptide has been co-grafted in a one-pot reaction to afford a cell-permeable multimodal multimeric MRI contrast agent that reports cellular localization by fluorescence and provides high relaxivity and increased tissue retention with respect to commercial contrast agents.

  1. Most Detailed Image of the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This new Hubble image -- one among the largest ever produced with the Earth-orbiting observatory -- shows the most detailed view so far of the entire Crab Nebula ever made. The Crab is arguably the single most interesting object, as well as one of the most studied, in all of astronomy. The image is the largest image ever taken with Hubble's WFPC2 workhorse camera. The Crab Nebula is one of the most intricately structured and highly dynamical objects ever observed. The new Hubble image of the Crab was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and is the highest resolution image of the entire Crab Nebula ever made.

  2. Use of modulated excitation signals in medical ultrasound. Part III: High frame rate imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Thanassis; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    For pt.II, see ibid., vol.52, no.2, p.192-207 (2005). This paper, the last from a series of three papers on the application of coded excitation signals in medical ultrasound, investigates the possibility of increasing the frame rate in ultrasound imaging by using modulated excitation signals...... of 5, if a slight decrease in image quality can be accepted. The use of synthetic transmit aperture imaging is also considered, and it is here shown that Hadamard spatial encoding in transmit with FM emission signals can be used to increase the frame rate by 12 to 25 times with either a slight...... or no reduction in signal-to-noise ratio and image quality. By using these techniques, a complete ultrasound-phased array image can be created using only two emissions....

  3. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation of Bosniak category III or IV cystic renal tumors: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Hyun Moo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of image-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of cystic renal tumors. Between November 2005 and August 2007, computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound-guided RF ablation was performed in nine patients with 14 Bosniak category III (n = 5) or IV (n = 9) cystic renal tumors using an internally cooled RF ablation system. We evaluated the number of sessions, cycles and duration of energy application, treatment results, lesion size change, and complications. Together the cystic renal tumors required 15 sessions and 23 cycles of energy application. The duration of energy application per one tumor ablation ranged from 1 to 12 min (mean 6 min). The last follow-up CT indicated complete coagulation of 14/14 (100%) lesions. None of these tumors had recurred within 1-19 months (mean 8 months). The maximum diameter of the cystic renal tumors was significantly reduced from 2.5 {+-} 0.6 cm before ablation to 1.7 {+-} 0.7 cm at the last follow-up CT (P < 0.01). Complications were pneumothorax (n = 2), inguinal paresthesia (n = 1), and arteriovenous fistula (n = 1). Image-guided RF ablation is an effective treatment for Bosniak category III or IV cystic renal tumors, which might need relatively shorter duration of energy application than purely solid renal tumors of the same size. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Lens Nuclear Density Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT with a Liquid Optics Interface: Correlation between OCT Images and LOCS III Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Na Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantify whole lens and nuclear lens densities using anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (OCT with a liquid optics interface and evaluate their correlation with Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III lens grading and corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA. Methods. OCT images of the whole lens and lens nucleus of eyes with age-related nuclear cataract were analyzed using ImageJ software. The lens grade and nuclear density were represented in pixel intensity units (PIU and correlations between PIU, BCVA, and LOCS III were assessed. Results. Forty-seven eyes were analyzed. The mean whole lens and lens nuclear densities were 26.99 ± 5.23 and 19.43 ± 6.15 PIU, respectively. A positive linear correlation was observed between lens opacities (R2 = 0.187, p<0.01 and nuclear density (R2 = 0.316, p<0.01 obtained from OCT images and LOCS III. Preoperative BCVA and LOCS III were also positively correlated (R2 = 0.454, p<0.01. Conclusions. Whole lens and lens nuclear densities obtained from OCT correlated with LOCS III. Nuclear density showed a higher positive correlation with LOCS III than whole lens density. OCT with a liquid optics interface is a potential quantitative method for lens grading and can aid in monitoring and managing age-related cataracts.

  5. Snow crystal imaging using scanning electron microscopy: III. Glacier ice, snow and biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Wergin, W.P.; Erbe, E.F.; Josberger, E.G.

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe metamorphosed snow, glacial firn, and glacial ice obtained from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State, USA. Biotic samples consisting of algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and ice worms (a species of oligochaetes) were also collected and imaged. In the field, the snow and biological samples were mounted on copper plates, cooled in liquid nitrogen, and stored in dry shipping containers which maintain a temperature of -196??C. The firn and glacier ice samples were obtained by extracting horizontal ice cores, 8 mm in diameter, at different levels from larger standard glaciological (vertical) ice cores 7.5 cm in diameter. These samples were cooled in liquid nitrogen and placed in cryotubes, were stored in the same dry shipping container, and sent to the SEM facility. In the laboratory, the samples were sputter coated with platinum and imaged by a low-temperature SEM. To image the firn and glacier ice samples, the cores were fractured in liquid nitrogen, attached to a specimen holder, and then imaged. While light microscope images of snow and ice are difficult to interpret because of internal reflection and refraction, the SEM images provide a clear and unique view of the surface of the samples because they are generated from electrons emitted or reflected only from the surface of the sample. In addition, the SEM has a great depth of field with a wide range of magnifying capabilities. The resulting images clearly show the individual grains of the seasonal snowpack and the bonding between the snow grains. Images of firn show individual ice crystals, the bonding between the crystals, and connected air spaces. Images of glacier ice show a crystal structure on a scale of 1-2 mm which is considerably smaller than the expected crystal size. Microscopic air bubbles, less than 15 ??m in diameter, clearly marked the boundaries between these crystal-like features. The life forms associated with the glacier were

  6. SHARP - III: First Use Of Adaptive Optics Imaging To Constrain Cosmology With Gravitational Lens Time Delays

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Geoff C F; Wong, Kenneth C; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Chiueh, Tzihong; Halkola, Aleksi; Hu, I Shing; Auger, Matthew W; Koopmans, Leon V E; Lagattuta, David J; McKean, John P; Vegetti, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of the Hubble constant are critical for testing our current standard cosmological model and revealing possibly new physics. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, each strong gravitational lens system with measured time delays can allow one to determine the Hubble constant with an uncertainty of $\\sim 7\\%$. Since HST will not last forever, we explore adaptive-optics (AO) imaging as an alternative that can provide higher angular resolution than HST imaging but has a less stable point spread function (PSF) due to atmospheric distortion. To make AO imaging useful for time-delay-lens cosmography, we develop a method to extract the unknown PSF directly from the imaging of strongly lensed quasars. In a blind test with two mock data sets created with different PSFs, we are able to recover the important cosmological parameters (time-delay distance, external shear, lens mass profile slope, and total Einstein radius). Our analysis of the Keck AO image of the strong lens system RXJ1...

  7. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope, III: MIRIM, The MIRI Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, P; Lagage, P -O; Amiaux, J; Augueres, J -L; Bauwens, E; Blommaert, J A D L; Chen, C H; Detre, O H; Dicken, D; Dubreuil, D; Galdemard, Ph; Gastaud, R; Glasse, A; Gordon, K D; Gougnaud, F; Guillard, P; Justtanont, K; Krause, O; Leboeuf, D; Longval, Y; Martin, L; Mazy, E; Moreau, V; Olofsson, G; Ray, T P; Reess, J -M; Renotte, E; Ressler, M E; Ronayette, S; Salasca, S; Scheithauer, S; Sykes, J; Thelen, M P; Wells, M; Wright, D; Wright, G S

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe the MIRI Imager module (MIRIM), which provides broad-band imaging in the 5 - 27 microns wavelength range for the James Webb Space Telescope. The imager has a 0"11 pixel scale and a total unobstructed view of 74"x113". The remainder of its nominal 113"x113" field is occupied by the coronagraphs and the low resolution spectrometer. We present the instrument optical and mechanical design. We show that the test data, as measured during the test campaigns undertaken at CEA-Saclay, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, and at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, indicate that the instrument complies with its design requirements and goals. We also discuss the operational requirements (multiple dithers and exposures) needed for optimal scientific utilization of the MIRIM.

  8. Development of a radiothallium (III) labeled porphyrin complex as a potential imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Y.; Feizi, S.; Shadanpour, N. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School (AMIRS); Jalilian, A.R. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab.

    2013-07-01

    Since {sup 201}Tl is widely used in SPECT and porphyrins are important biological carriers, we tried to obtain a stable complex between thallium and porphyrins. The thallium porphyrin complex was synthesized by reaction of {sup 201}Tl(III) with porphyrin at 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (H2PFPP) for 60 min at 100 C. The complex was analysed via TLC and HPLC stability (in the final formulation and human serum) and the partition coefficient of the complex was determined. The biodistribution of the labeled compound in vital organs of wild-type rats was investigated. The complex was prepared with high radiochemical purity (> 99% ITLC, > 99% HPLC, specific activity: 13-14 GBq/mmol) (log P = 1.92). The stability of the Tl{sup +3}-complex seems to be low since the complex or free thallium is rapidly cleared through the kidneys and the liver. (orig.)

  9. Photoluminescence Imaging of SiO{sub 2} Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu(III) and SiO{sub 2} Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb(III) Core-Shell Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Insu; Kang, Jungill; Sohn, Youngku [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    We uniformly coated Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-doped yttrium oxide onto the surface of SiO{sub 2} spheres and then characterized them by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction crystallography and UV-Visible absorption. 2D and 3D photoluminescence image map profiles were reported for the core-shell type structure. Red emission peaks of Eu(III) were observed between 580 to 730 nm and assigned to {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 0 - 4) transitions. The green emission peaks of Tb(III) between 450 and 650 nm were attributed to the {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 6, 5, 4, 3) transitions. For annealed samples, Eu(III) ions were embedded at a C{sub 2} symmetry site in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which was accompanied by an increase in luminescence intensity and redness, while Tb(III) was changed to Tb(IV), which resulted in no green emission.

  10. Imaging performance of annular apertures. III - Apodization and modulation transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1979-01-01

    Apodization functions with decreasing transmission and their opposite, functions with increasing transmission, are investigated for various central obstruction ratios. The resultant modulation transfer functions are presented for various transmission functions and central obstruction ratios. Conclusions applicable to the improvement of imaging performance are discussed.

  11. NIR-to-NIR Two-Photon Scanning Laser Microscopy Imaging of Single Nanoparticles Doped by Yb(III) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdolle, Adrien; D'Aléo, Anthony; Philippot, Cécile; Baldeck, Patrice L; Guyot, Yannick; Dubois, Fabien; Ibanez, Alain; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Maury, Olivier

    2016-01-04

    The photophysical and nonlinear optical properties of water-soluble chromophore-functionalised tris-dipicolinate complexes [LnL3](3-) (Ln=Yb and Nd) are thoroughly studied, revealing that only the Yb(III) luminescence can be sensitized by a two-photon excitation process. The stability of the complex in water is strongly enhanced by embedding in dispersible organosilicate nanoparticles (NPs). Finally, the spectroscopic properties of [NBu4]3 [YbL3] are studied in solution and in the solid state. The high brightness of the NPs allows imaging them as single objects using a modified two-photon microscopy setup in a NIR-to-NIR configuration.

  12. STUDIES OF NGC 6720 WITH CALIBRATED HST/WFC3 EMISSION-LINE FILTER IMAGES. III. TANGENTIAL MOTIONS USING ASTRODRIZZLE IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dell, C. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Box 1807-B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Henney, W. J. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michaoacan (Mexico); Peimbert, M., E-mail: cr.odell@vanderbilt.edu [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo, Postal 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-06-01

    We have been able to compare with astrometric precision AstroDrizzle processed images of NGC 6720 (the Ring Nebula) made using two cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope. The time difference of the observations was 12.925 yr. This large time base allowed the determination of tangential velocities of features within this classic planetary nebula. Individual features were measured in [N II] images as were the dark knots seen in silhouette against background nebular [O III] emission. An image magnification and matching technique was also used to test the accuracy of the usual assumption of homologous expansion. We found that homologous expansion does apply, but the rate of expansion is greater along the major axis of the nebula, which is intrinsically larger than the minor axis. We find that the dark knots expand more slowly than the nebular gas, that the distance to the nebula is 720 pc {+-}30%, and that the dynamic age of the Ring Nebula is about 4000 yr. The dynamic age is in agreement with the position of the central star on theoretical curves for stars collapsing from the peak of the asymptotic giant branch to being white dwarfs.

  13. The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey. III. A Faint White Dwarf Companion Orbiting HD 114174

    CERN Document Server

    Crepp, Justin R; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Gianninas, Alexandros; Kilic, Mukremin; Wright, Jason T

    2013-01-01

    The nearby Sun-like star HD 114174 exhibits a strong and persistent Doppler acceleration indicating the presence of an unseen distant companion. We have acquired high-contrast imaging observations of this star using NIRC2 at Keck and report the direct detection of the body responsible for causing the "trend". HD 114174 B has a projected separation of 692+/-9 mas (18.1 AU) and is 10.75+/-0.12 magnitudes (contrast of 5x10{-5}) fainter than its host in the K-band, requiring aggressive point-spread function subtraction to identify. Our astrometric time baseline of 1.4 years demonstrates physical association through common proper motion. We find that the companion has absolute magnitude, M_J=13.97+/-0.11, and colors, J-K= 0.12+/-0.16 mag. These characteristics are consistent with an ~T3 dwarf, initially leading us to believe that HD 114174 B was a substellar object. However, a dynamical analysis that combines radial velocity measurements with available imaging data indicates a minimum mass of m=0.260+/-0.010Msun. ...

  14. Photoluminescence imaging of Eu(III) doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods on a Si substrate deposited by an electrospray technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Weon Gyu; Park, Miso; Kim, Jinhyoung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sang Woo [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Insu [Department of Chemistry, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Youngku, E-mail: youngkusohn@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-28

    Eu(III)-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods were deposited onto a Si substrate by an electrospray technique and the photoluminescence imaging profiles of the electrospray film and powder form were compared. The electrospray method enabled generation of a uniform monolayer film without much clustering of nanorods. Strong emission peaks were observed between 580 and 730 nm in response to an indirect excitation transition and assigned to {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 0–4) transitions of Eu(III) ions embedded at the C{sub 2} symmetry site in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. No emission in response to the direct excitation transition of Eu(III) ions was observed, while light was emitted from the Eu(III)-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. Taken together, these findings indicate that the electrospray technique could be very useful for generating thin films for displays and sensors. - Highlights: • Eu(III)-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorod was synthesized by a hydrothermal method. • Eu(III)-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorod was deposited onto a Si substrate by electrospray technique. • Photoluminescence (PL) imaging was obtained for electrospray and powder samples. • For electrospray film, PL was only observed by an indirect excitation unlike power. • Interfacial electronic structures were examined before and after annealing.

  15. Gadolinium(III)-Chelated Silica Nanospheres Integrating Chemotherapy and Photothermal Therapy for Cancer Treatment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mingjing; Wang, Pengyang; Kou, Yu; Wang, Jing; Liu, Jing; Li, Yanhui; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2015-11-18

    The combination of therapy and diagnosis has been emerging as a promising strategy for cancer treatment. To realize chemotherapy, photothermal therapy, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in one system, we have synthesized a new magnetic nanoparticle (Gd@SiO2-DOX/ICG-PDC) integrating doxorubicin (DOX), indocyanine green (ICG), and gadolinium(III)-chelated silica nanospheres (Gd@SiO2) with a poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDC) coating. PDC coating serves as a polymer layer to protect from quick release of drugs from the nanocarriers and increase cellular uptake. The DOX release from Gd@SiO2-DOX/ICG-PDC depends on pH and temperature. The process will be accelerated in the acidic condition than in a neutral pH 7.4. Meanwhile, upon laser irradiation, the photothermal effects promote DOX release and improve the therapeutic efficacy compared to either DOX-loaded Gd@SiO2 or ICG-loaded Gd@SiO2. Moreover, MRI results show that the Gd@SiO2-PDC nanoparticles are safe T1-type MRI contrast agents for imaging. The Gd@SiO2-PDC nanoparticles loaded with DOX and ICG can thus act as a promising theranostic platform for multimodal cancer treatment.

  16. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapadula, Giuseppe; Bourdolle, Adrien; Allouche, Florian; Conley, Matthew P.; Maron, Laurent; Lukens, Wayne W.; Guyot, Yannick; Andraud, Chantal; Brasselet, Sophie; Copé; ret, Christophe; Maury, Olivier; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-01-12

    Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were prepared by implanting ca. 180 4,4 diethylaminostyryl 2,2 bipyridine (DEAS) Yb(III) complexes on the surface of 12 nm silica nanoparticles. The surface complexes ([DEAS Ln SiO2], Ln =Y,Yb) were characterized using IR, solid state NMR, UV Vis, EXAFS spectroscopies in combination with the preparation and characterization of similar molecular analogues by analytical techniques (IR, solution NMR, UV Vis, X ray crystallography) as well as DFT calculations. Starting from the partial dehydroxylation of the silica at 700 C on high vacuum having 0.8 OH.nm 2, the grafting of Ln(N(SiMe3)2)3 generate ≤SiO Ln(N(SiMe3)2)2, which upon thermal step and coordination of the DEAS chromophore yields (≤SiO)3Ln(DEAS). Surface and molecular analogues display similar properties, in terms of DEAS binding constants absorption maxima and luminescence properties (intense emission band assigned to a ligand centered CT fluorescence and life time) in the solid state, consistent with the molecular nature of the surface species. The densely functionalized nanoparticles can be dispersed via ultra-sonication in small ca. 15-20 nm aggregates (1 to 6 elementary particles) that were detected using two photon microscopy imaging at 720 nm excitation, making them promising nano objects for bio imaging.

  17. Self-aggregated dinuclear lanthanide(III) complexes as potential bimodal probes for magnetic resonance and optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Nonat, Aline; Rolla, Gabriele A; Esteban-Gómez, David; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Charbonnière, Loïc J; Botta, Mauro; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2013-08-26

    Homodinuclear lanthanide complexes (Ln = La, Eu, Gd, Tb, Yb and Lu) derived from a bis-macrocyclic ligand featuring two 2,2',2''-(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triyl)triacetic acid chelating sites linked by a 2,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine spacer (H2L(3)) were prepared and characterized. Luminescence lifetime measurements recorded on solutions of the Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes indicate the presence of one inner-sphere water molecule coordinated to each metal ion in these complexes. The overall luminescence quantum yields were determined (ϕ H2O = 0.01 for [Eu2(L(3))] and 0.50 for [Tb2(L(3))] in 0.01 M TRIS/HCl, pH 7.4; TRIS = tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane), pointing to an effective sensitization of the metal ion by the bispyrazolylpyridyl unit of the ligand, especially with Tb. The nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles recorded for [Gd2(L(3))] are characteristic of slowly tumbling systems, showing a low-field plateau and a broad maximum around 30 MHz. This suggests the occurrence of aggregation of the complexes giving rise to slowly rotating species. A similar behavior is observed for the analogous Gd(III) complex containing a 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridyl spacer ([Gd2(L(1))]). The relaxivity of [Gd2(L(3))] recorded at 0.5 T and 298 K (pH 6.9) amounts to 13.7 mM(-1)  s(-1). The formation of aggregates has been confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments, which provided mean particle sizes of 114 and 38 nm for [Gd2(L(1))] and [Gd2(L(3))], respectively. TEM images of [Gd2(L(3))] indicate the formation of nearly spherical nanosized aggregates with a mean diameter of about 41 nm, together with some nonspherical particles with larger size.

  18. Toward the Development of Group III-V Photodetectors and Imaging Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenden, Dennis K.

    2003-01-01

    A collaboration between researchers at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) (Code 718.1) and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) on the development of gallium nitride (GaN) based photodetectors has been in existence since July 1994. This collaboration, based on APL undertaking the material growth and GSFC undertaking the device processing, has led to discrete GaN photoconductive detectors with superior characteristics to those of similar devices reported in the literature and, more recently, to the development of state-of-the art 256x256 imaging arrays with the pixels indium bump-bonded to a silicon readout circuit (RIOC). The object of this proposal is to continue the collaboration for the period 1998-2002 by outlining a program of work at the APL on the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of GaN and related materials for UV detector applications. In particular, emphasis will be placed on the optimization of growth on 2 in diameter substrates, on the growth of In(sub x)Ga(1-x)N and Al(sub x)Ga(1-x)N alloy structures to produce devices with a wider range of tailored cut-off wavelengths, and on the growth of pn-junction structures for photovoltaic devices.

  19. Atomic scale images of acceptors in III-V semiconductors. Band bending, tunneling paths and wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, S.

    2007-10-26

    This thesis reports measurements of single dopant atoms in III-V semiconductors with low temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). It investigates the anisotropic spatial distribution of acceptor induced tunneling processes at the {l_brace}110{r_brace} cleavage planes. Two different tunneling processes are identified: conventional imaging of the squared acceptor wave function and resonant tunneling at the charged acceptor. A thorough analysis of the tip induced space charge layers identifies characteristic bias windows for each tunnel process. The symmetry of the host crystal's band structure determines the spatial distribution of the tunneling paths for both processes. Symmetry reducing effects at the surface are responsible for a pronounced asymmetry of the acceptor contrasts along the principal [001] axis. Uniaxial strain fields due to surface relaxation and spin orbit interaction of the tip induced electric field are discussed on the basis of band structure calculations. High-resolution STS studies of acceptor atoms in an operating p-i-n diode confirm that an electric field indeed changes the acceptor contrasts. In conclusion, the anisotropic contrasts of acceptors are created by the host crystal's band structure and concomitant symmetry reduction effects at the surface. (orig.)

  20. ESO Imaging Survey. Hubble Deep Field South Optical-Infrared Observations, Data Reduction and Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Da Costa, L N; Rengelink, R B; Zaggia, S R; Benoist, C; Erben, T; Wicenec, A; Scodeggio, M; Olsen, L F; Guarnieri, M D; Deul, E; D'Odorico, S; Hook, R N; Moorwood, A F M; Slijkhuis, R

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents ground-based data obtained from deep optical and infrared observations of the HST Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) field carried out at the ESO 3.5 New Technology Telescope (NTT). These data were taken as part of the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) program, a public survey coordinated by ESO and member states, in preparation for the first year of operation of the VLT. Deep CCD images are available for five optical passbands, reaching 2 sigma limiting magnitudes of U_AB~27.0, B_AB~26.5, V_AB~26, R_AB~26, I_AB~25, covering a region of ~25 square arcmin, which includes the HST WPFC2 field. The infrared observations cover a total area of ~42 square arcmin and include both the HST WFPC2 and STIS fields. The observations of the WFPC2 region were conducted in JHKs passbands, reaching J_AB~25, and H_AB and K_AB~24.0. Due to time constraints, the adjacent field, covering the STIS field, has been observed only in R, I and JHKs, while no observations were conducted covering the NIC3 field. This paper describ...

  1. Nanozeolite-LTL with Gd(III) deposited in the large and Eu(III) in the small cavities as a magnetic resonance optical imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Florian; Zhang, Wuyuan; Brichart, Thomas; Tillement, Olivier; Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva; Peters, Joop A; Djanashvili, Kristina

    2014-03-17

    The immense structural diversity of more than 200 known zeolites is the basis for the wide variety of applications of these fascinating materials ranging from catalysis and molecular filtration to agricultural uses. Despite this versatility, the potential of zeolites in medical imaging has not yet been much exploited. In this work a novel strategy is presented to selectively deposit different ions into distinct framework locations of zeolite-LTL (Linde type L) and it is demonstrated that the carefully ion-exchanged Gd/Eu-containing nanocrystals acquire exceptional magnetic properties in combination with enhanced luminescence. This smart exploitation of the framework structure yields the highest relaxivity density (13.7 s(-1)  L g(-1) at 60 MHz and 25 °C) reported so far for alumosilicates, rendering these materials promising candidates for the design of dual magnetic resonance/optical imaging probes, as demonstrated in preliminary phantom studies.

  2. Discrimination between glioma grades II and III in suspected low-grade gliomas using dynamic contrast-enhanced and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anna; Fahlström, Markus; Rostrup, Egill;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used in the pre-operative assessment of brain tumours. The aim of this prospective study was to identify the perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion imaging...... that could best discriminate between grade II and III gliomas. METHODS: MRI (3 T) including morphological ((T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1-weighted (T1W)+Gd)) and perfusion (DCE and DSC) sequences was performed in 39 patients with newly diagnosed suspected low-grade glioma after...

  3. Far-Ultraviolet Imaging of the Hubble Deep Field North: Star Formation in Normal Galaxies at z<1

    CERN Document Server

    Teplitz, H I; Brown, T M; Chary, R; Colbert, J W; Conselice, C J; De Mello, D F; Dickinson, M; Ferguson, H C; Gardner, J P; Menanteau, F; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging of the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) taken with the Solar Blind Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS/SBC) and the FUV MAMA detector of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The full WFPC2 deep field has been observed at 1600 Angstroms. We detect 134 galaxies and one star down to a limit of FUV_{AB} ~ 29. All sources have counterparts in the WFPC2 image. Redshifts (spectroscopic or photometric) for the detected sources are in the range 0

  4. Implementation of Strategies to Improve the Reliability of III-Nitride Photodetectors towards the Realization of Visible and Solar-Blind Imaging Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, John J.

    isolates conductive pathways in III-Nitrides using an electrochemical etch and novel foam passivation technique. Establishing improved photodiode performance and device reliability, 4x4 and 8x8 arrays of GaN p-i-n photodiodes were demonstrated and integrated with external circuitry to generate image patterns using 360nm illumination. This work represents significant progress towards the realization of reliable III-Nitride UV detectors arrays and future directions are proposed in order to demonstrate large-scale arrays for high-resolution ultraviolet imaging.

  5. The Star Formation History of Leo T from Hubble Space Telescope Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, Daniel R; Dolphin, Andrew E; Martin, Nicolas F; de Jong, Jelte T A; Holtzman, Jon A; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Gilbert, Karoline M; Williams, Benjamin F; Bell, Eric F; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N Wyn

    2012-01-01

    We present the star formation history (SFH) of the faintest known star-forming galaxy, Leo T, based on imaging taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). The HST/WFPC2 color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Leo T is exquisitely deep, extending ~ 2 magnitudes below the oldest main sequence turnoff, permitting excellent constraints on star formation at all ages. We use a maximum likelihood CMD fitting technique to measure the SFH of Leo T assuming three different sets of stellar evolution models: Padova (solar-scaled metallicity) and BaSTI (both solar-scaled and alpha-enhanced metallicities). The resulting SFHs are remarkably consistent at all ages, indicating that our derived SFH is robust to the choice of stellar evolution model. From the lifetime SFH of Leo T, we find that 50% of the total stellar mass formed prior to z ~ 1 (7.6 Gyr ago). Subsequent to this epoch, the SFH of Leo T is roughly constant until the most recent ~ 25 Myr, where the SFH shows an abrupt drop. This de...

  6. Dynamical Evolution of Globular Cluster Systems formed in Galaxy Mergers: Deep HST/ACS Imaging of Old and Intermediate-Age Globular Clusters in NGC 3610

    CERN Document Server

    Goudfrooij, P; Gilmore, D; Whitmore, B C; Goudfrooij, Paul; Schweizer, Francois; Gilmore, Diane; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    2007-01-01

    (ABRIDGED) The ACS camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope has been used to obtain deep images of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 3610, a well-established dissipative galaxy merger remnant. These observations supersede previous WFPC2 images which revealed the presence of a population of metal-rich globular clusters (GCs) of intermediate age (~1.5-4 Gyr). We detect a total of 580 GC candidates, 46% more than from the previous WFPC2 images. The new photometry strengthens the significance of the previously found bimodality of the color distribution of GCs. Peak colors in V-I are 0.93 +/-0.01 and 1.09 +/- 0.01 for the blue and red subpopulations, respectively. The luminosity function (LF) of the inner 50% of the metal-rich (`red') population of GCs differs markedly from that of the outer 50%. In particular, the LF of the inner 50% of the red GCs shows a flattening consistent with a turnover that is about 1.0 mag fainter than the turnover of the blue GC LF. This is consistent with predictions of recent models o...

  7. Binge eating disorder, anxiety, depression and body image in grade III obesity patients Compulsão alimentar periódica, ansiedade, depressão e imagem corporal em pacientes com obesidade grau III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel R Matos

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of Binge Eating Disorder (BED or Binge Eating episodes (BINGE, anxiety, depression and body image disturbances in severely obese patients seeking treatment for obesity. METHOD: We assessed 50 patients (10M and 40F with Body Mass Index (BMI between 40 and 81.7 Kg/m² (mean 52.2±9.2 Kg/m² and aging from 18 to 56 years (mean 38.5±9.7. Used instruments: Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns ¾ Revised (QEWP-R for BED or BINGE assessment, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI for depressive symptoms, State - Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-TRAIT and STAI-STATE for anxiety and Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ for body image assessments. RESULTS: In this population BED and BINGE frequencies were 36% and 54%, respectively. Symptoms of depression were detected in 100% while severe symptomatology was found in 84% of the cases. The frequency of anxiety as a trait was 70%, as a state, 54% and 76% of all patients reported discomfort regarding body image. The frequency of BED was higher in patients with higher anxiety scores as a personality trait (>40 but not as a state (46% vs. 13%; p140 in the BSQ assessment. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate a high frequency of binge eating episodes, severe depressive symptoms, anxiety and concern with body image in grade III obesity patients.INTRODUÇÃO: O objetivo desse trabalho é avaliar a freqüência de transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica (TCAP, episódios de compulsão alimentar periódica (CAP, ansiedade, depressão e distúrbios na imagem corporal em pacientes com obesidade grau III que procuram tratamento para obesidade. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 50 pacientes (10M e 40F com Índice de Massa Corporal (IMC de 40 a 81,7 Kg/m² (média =52,2±9,2 Kg/m² e idade entre 18 e 56 anos (média de 38,5±9,7. Instrumentos utilizados: Questionário sobre Padrões de Alimentação e Peso ("Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns - Revised" - QEWP

  8. Reconstructing HST Images of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrs, A. D.; Bank, S.; Gerhardt, H.; Makhoul, K.

    2003-12-01

    We present reconstructions of images of 22 large main belt asteroids that were observed by Hubble Space Telescope with the Wide-Field/Planetary cameras. All images were restored with the MISTRAL program (Mugnier, Fusco, and Conan 2003) at enhanced spatial resolution. This is possible thanks to the well-studied and stable point spread function (PSF) on HST. We present some modeling of this process and determine that the Strehl ratio for WF/PC (aberrated) images can be improved to 130 ratio of 80 We will report sizes, shapes, and albedos for these objects, as well as any surface features. Images taken with the WFPC-2 instrument were made in a variety of filters so that it should be possible to investigate changes in mineralogy across the surface of the larger asteroids in a manner similar to that done on 4 Vesta by Binzel et al. (1997). Of particular interest are a possible water of hydration feature on 1 Ceres, and the non-observation of a constriction or gap between the components of 216 Kleopatra. Reduction of this data was aided by grant HST-GO-08583.08A from the Space Telescope Science Institute. References: Mugnier, L.M., T. Fusco, and J.-M. Conan, 2003. JOSA A (submitted) Binzel, R.P., Gaffey, M.J., Thomas, P.C., Zellner, B.H., Storrs, A.D., and Wells, E.N. 1997. Icarus 128 pp. 95-103

  9. A unique iridium(III) complex-based chemosensor for multi-signal detection and multi-channel imaging of hypochlorous acid in liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feiyue; Liang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenzhu; Wang, Yong-Lei; Wang, Haolu; Mohammed, Yousuf H; Song, Bo; Zhang, Run; Yuan, Jingli

    2017-01-15

    Although hypochlorous acid (HOCl) has long been associated with a number of inflammatory diseases in mammalian bodies, the functions of HOCl in specific organs at abnormal conditions, such as liver injury, remain unclear due to its high reactivity and the lack of effective methods for its detection. Herein, a unique Ir(III) complex-based chemosensor, Ir-Fc, was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of HOCl. Ir-Fc was designed by incorporating a ferrocene (Fc) quencher to a Ir(III) complex through a HOCl-responsive linker. In the presence of HOCl, the fast cleavage of Fc moiety in less than 1s led to the enhancement of photoluminescence (PL) and electrochemical luminescence (ECL), by which the concentration of HOCl was determined by both PL and ECL analysis. Taking advantages of excellent properties of Ir(III) complexes, optical and electrochemical analyses of the response of Ir-Fc towards HOCl were fully investigated. Followed by the measurements of low cytotoxicity of Ir-Fc by MTT analysis, one-photon (OP), two-photon (TP) and lifetime imaging experiments were conducted to visualise the generation of HOCl in live microphage and HepG2 cells, and in zebrafish and mouse, respectively. Furthermore, the generation and distribution of HOCl in liver cells and liver injury of zebrafish and mouse were investigated. The results demonstrated the applicability of Ir-Fc as an effective chemosensor for imaging of HOCl generation in mitochondria of cells and liver injury in vivo, implying the potential of Ir-Fc for biomedical diagnosis and monitoring applications.

  10. Impact of Consolidation Radiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma With Negative Post-Chemotherapy Radiologic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorth, Jennifer A., E-mail: jennifer.dorth@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Cancer Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Diehl, Louis F.; Beaven, Anne W. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Coleman, R. Edward [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: While consolidation radiation therapy (i.e., RT administered after chemotherapy) is routine treatment for patients with early-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the role of consolidation RT in stage III-IV DLBCL is controversial. Methods and Materials: Cases of patients with stage III-IV DLBCL treated from 1991 to 2009 at Duke University, who achieved a complete response to chemotherapy were reviewed. Clinical outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared between patients who did and did not receive RT, using the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Seventy-nine patients were identified. Chemotherapy (median, 6 cycles) consisted of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP; 65%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP; 22%); or other (13%). Post-chemotherapy imaging consisted of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (73%); gallium with CT (14%); or CT only (13%). Consolidation RT (median, 25 Gy) was given to involved sites of disease in 38 (48%) patients. Receipt of consolidation RT was associated with improved in-field control (92% vs. 69%, respectively, p = 0.028) and event-free survival (85% vs. 65%, respectively, p = 0.014) but no difference in overall survival (85% vs. 78%, respectively, p = 0.15) when compared to patients who did not receive consolidation RT. On multivariate analysis, no RT was predictive of increased risk of in-field failure (hazard ratio [HR], 8.01, p = 0.014) and worse event-free survival (HR, 4.3, p = 0.014). Conclusions: Patients with stage III-IV DLBCL who achieve negative post-chemotherapy imaging have improved in-field control and event-free survival with low-dose consolidation RT.

  11. SHARP - III. First use of adaptive-optics imaging to constrain cosmology with gravitational lens time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Geoff C.-F.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Chiueh, Tzihong; Halkola, Aleksi; Hu, I. Shing; Auger, Matthew W.; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Lagattuta, David J.; McKean, John P.; Vegetti, Simona

    2016-11-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of the Hubble constant are critical for testing our current standard cosmological model and revealing possibly new physics. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, each strong gravitational lens system with measured time delays can allow one to determine the Hubble constant with an uncertainty of ˜7 per cent. Since HST will not last forever, we explore adaptive-optics (AO) imaging as an alternative that can provide higher angular resolution than HST imaging but has a less stable point spread function (PSF) due to atmospheric distortion. To make AO imaging useful for time-delay-lens cosmography, we develop a method to extract the unknown PSF directly from the imaging of strongly lensed quasars. In a blind test with two mock data sets created with different PSFs, we are able to recover the important cosmological parameters (time-delay distance, external shear, lens-mass profile slope, and total Einstein radius). Our analysis of the Keck AO image of the strong lens system RXJ 1131-1231 shows that the important parameters for cosmography agree with those based on HST imaging and modelling within 1σ uncertainties. Most importantly, the constraint on the model time-delay distance by using AO imaging with 0.09 arcsec resolution is tighter by ˜50 per cent than the constraint of time-delay distance by using HST imaging with 0.09 arcsec when a power-law mass distribution for the lens system is adopted. Our PSF reconstruction technique is generic and applicable to data sets that have multiple nearby point sources, enabling scientific studies that require high-precision models of the PSF.

  12. Gemini Planet Imager Observational Calibrations III: Empirical Measurement Methods and Applications of High-Resolution Microlens PSFs

    OpenAIRE

    Ingraham, Patrick; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Perrin, Marshall D.; Wolff, Schuyler G.; Draper, Zachary H.; Maire, Jerome; Marchis, Franck; Fesquet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The newly commissioned Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) combines extreme adaptive optics, an advanced coronagraph, precision wavefront control and a lenslet-based integral field spectrograph (IFS) to measure the spectra of young extrasolar giant planets between 0.9-2.5 um. Each GPI detector image, when in spectral model, consists of ~37,000 microspectra which are under or critically sampled in the spatial direction. This paper demonstrates how to obtain high-resolution microlens PSFs and discusses ...

  13. Orchiectomy and radiotherapy for stage I-II testicular seminoma: a prospective evaluation of short-term effects on body image and sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortel, Ruud C; Ghidey Alemayehu, Wendim; Incrocci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Orchiectomy followed by infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy is a common treatment for stage I-II testicular seminoma. Long-term effects of orchiectomy and radiotherapy for testicular seminomas on body image and sexual function have been reported; however, few data are available on short-term effects. Patients are usually of reproductive age and sexually active; therefore, short-term effects on body image and sexual function should also be studied. To prospectively evaluate short-term effects of orchiectomy and radiotherapy on body image and sexual function in testicular seminoma patients. Questionnaires on body image and sexual function were prospectively distributed to all testicular seminoma patients treated between 1999 and 2013. The questionnaire distributed prior to radiotherapy was returned by 161 patients; 133 (82%) returned the second after 3 months, and 120 (75%) completed the questionnaire after 6 months. Body image and sexual function as assessed by a Dutch questionnaire on body image and sexuality after radiotherapy and orchiectomy. Median age was 36 years (range 18-70). After orchiectomy, 48% expressed fertility concerns, and 61% reported their body had changed. Six months after treatment, erectile rigidity was significantly decreased compared with prior to radiotherapy (P = 0.016), and 23% reported decreased sexual interest, activity, and pleasure. Changes in body image were significantly associated with decreased sexual interest, pleasure, and erectile function. Even though 45% reported that treatment negatively affected their sexual life, the number of sexually active patients remained stable at 91%. [Correction added on 12 November 2014, after first online publication: 'prior radiotherapy' was corrected to 'prior to radiotherapy'.] Short-term effects of treatment included fertility concerns and changes in body image. Reported erectile rigidity was significantly decreased after 6 months, as were sexual interest, activity, and pleasure. Disease and

  14. Rapid misfit dislocation characterization in heteroepitaxial III-V/Si thin films by electron channeling contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnevale, Santino D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210 (United States); Deitz, Julia I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210 (United States); Carlin, John A. [Institute for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Picard, Yoosuf N.; De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ringel, Steven A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210 (United States); Institute for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Grassman, Tyler J., E-mail: grassman.5@osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is used to characterize misfit dislocations in heteroepitaxial layers of GaP grown on Si(100) substrates. Electron channeling patterns serve as a guide to tilt and rotate sample orientation so that imaging can occur under specific diffraction conditions. This leads to the selective contrast of misfit dislocations depending on imaging conditions, confirmed by dynamical simulations, similar to using standard invisibility criteria in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The onset and evolution of misfit dislocations in GaP films with varying thicknesses (30 to 250 nm) are studied. This application simultaneously reveals interesting information about misfit dislocations in GaP/Si layers and demonstrates a specific measurement for which ECCI is preferable versus traditional plan-view TEM.

  15. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  16. SHARP - III. First use of adaptive-optics imaging to constrain cosmology with gravitational lens time delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Geoff C. -F; Suyu, Sherry H.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Chiueh, Tzihong; Halkola, Aleksi; Hu, I. Shing; Auger, Matthew W.; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Lagattuta, David J.; McKean, John P.; Vegetti, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of the Hubble constant are critical for testing our current standard cosmological model and revealing possibly new physics. With Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, each strong gravitational lens system with measured time delays can allow one to determine the Hubb

  17. Design of Gd(III)-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents: static and transient zero-field splitting contributions to the electronic relaxation and their impact on relaxivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmelouka, Meriem; Borel, Alain; Moriggi, Loick; Helm, Lothar; Merbach, André E

    2007-02-01

    A multiple-frequency (9.4-325 GHz) and variable-temperature (276-320 K) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on low molecular weight gadolinium(III) complexes for potential use as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents has been performed. Peak-to-peak linewidths Delta Hpp and central magnetic fields have been analyzed within the Redfield approximation taking into account the static zero-field splitting (ZFS) up to the sixth order and the transient ZFS up to the second order. Longitudinal electronic relaxation is dominated by the static ZFS contribution at low magnetic fields (B 1.5 T). Whereas the static ZFS clearly depends on the nature of the chelating ligand, the transient ZFS does not. For the relatively fast rotating molecules studied water proton relaxivity is mainly limited by the fast rotation and electronic relaxation has only a marked influence at frequencies below 30 MHz. From our EPR results we can conclude that electronic relaxation will have no influence on the efficiency of Gd(III)-based MRI contrast agents designed for studies at very high magnetic fields (B > 3T).

  18. Coumarin-Based Fluorescent Probes for Dual Recognition of Copper(II and Iron(III Ions and Their Application in Bio-Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpo García-Beltrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two new coumarin-based “turn-off” fluorescent probes, (E-3-((3,4-dihydroxybenzylideneamino-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS1 and (E-3-((2,4-dihydroxybenzylideneamino-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS2, were synthesized and their detection of copper(II and iron(III ions was studied. Results show that both compounds are highly selective for Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions over other metal ions. However, BS2 is detected directly, while detection of BS1 involves a hydrolysis reaction to regenerate 3-amino-7-hydroxycoumarin (3 and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, of which 3 is able to react with copper(II or iron(III ions. The interaction between the tested compounds and copper or iron ions is associated with a large fluorescence decrease, showing detection limits of ca. 10−5 M. Preliminary studies employing epifluorescence microscopy demonstrate that Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions can be imaged in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the tested probes.

  19. Coumarin-based fluorescent probes for dual recognition of copper(II) and iron(III) ions and their application in bio-imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Beltrán, Olimpo; Cassels, Bruce K; Pérez, Claudio; Mena, Natalia; Núñez, Marco T; Martínez, Natalia P; Pavez, Paulina; Aliaga, Margarita E

    2014-01-13

    Two new coumarin-based "turn-off" fluorescent probes, (E)-3-((3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)amino)-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS1) and (E)-3-((2,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)amino)-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS2), were synthesized and their detection of copper(II) and iron(III) ions was studied. Results show that both compounds are highly selective for Cu²⁺ and Fe³⁺ ions over other metal ions. However, BS2 is detected directly, while detection of BS1 involves a hydrolysis reaction to regenerate 3-amino-7-hydroxycoumarin (3) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, of which 3 is able to react with copper(II) or iron(III) ions. The interaction between the tested compounds and copper or iron ions is associated with a large fluorescence decrease, showing detection limits of ca. 10⁻⁵ M. Preliminary studies employing epifluorescence microscopy demonstrate that Cu²⁺ and Fe³⁺ ions can be imaged in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the tested probes.

  20. Novel (99m)Tc(III) Complexes [(99m)TcCl(CDO)(CDOH)2B-R] (CDOH2 = Cyclohexanedione Dioxime) Useful as Radiotracers for Heart Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Fang, Wei; Liu, Shuang

    2016-11-16

    In this study, we evaluated seven new (99m)Tc(III) complexes [(99m)TcCl(CDO)(CDOH)2B-R] ((99m)Tc-2Fboroxime: R = 2-formylfuran-3-yl (2F); (99m)Tc-3Fboroxime: R = furan-3-yl (3F); (99m)Tc-5Fboroxime: R = 5-formyfuran-2-yl (5F); (99m)Tc-HPboroxime: R = 6-hydroxylpyridin-2-yl (HP); (99m)Tc-MPYboroxime: R = 5-methoxypyridin-3-yl (MPY); (99m)Tc-PMboroxime: R = 1,5-pyrimidin-3-yl (PM); and (99m)Tc-4PYboroxime: R = pyridin-4-yl (4PY)) for their potential as heart imaging agents. All new (99m)Tc(III) radiotracers except (99m)Tc-2Fboroxime were prepared with high radiochemical purity (RCP > 95%). The low RCP (∼75%) for (99m)Tc-2Fboroxime is most likely caused by steric hindrance from the 3-formyl group. Biodistribution and imaging studies were performed in SD rats. Planar image quantification was performed to compare their myocardial retention times. We found that the myocardial washout curves of new (99m)Tc(III) radiotracers were best fitted the biexponential decay function. The AUC (area under the curve) values followed the general trend: (99m)Tc-5Fboroxime (129 ± 6) > (99m)Tc-3Fboroxime (114 ± 11) > (99m)Tc-Teboroxime (104 ± 16) > (99m)Tc-MPYboroxime (92 ± 18) > (99m)Tc-4PYboroxime (77 ± 10) > (99m)Tc-PMboroxime (68 ± 14) ≈ (99m)Tc-HPboroxime (62 ± 14). The 2 min heart uptake values from biodistribution studies follow the ranking order of (99m)Tc-5Fboroxime (3.75 ± 0.15%ID/g) ≈ (99m)Tc-MPYboroxime (3.73 ± 0.24%ID/g) > (99m)Tc-PMboroxime (3.47 ± 0.15%ID/g) ≈ (99m)Tc-3Fboroxime ≈ (3.25 ± 0.77%ID/g). The 5 min heart uptake of (99m)Tc-5Fboroxime (3.91 ± 0.09%ID/g) was almost identical to its 2 min heart uptake (3.75 ± 0.15%ID/g), and its 15 min heart uptake value (2.83 ± 0.08%ID/g) compared well to the 2 min heart uptake of (99m)Tc-Teboroxime (3.00 ± 0.37%ID/g). It took ∼5 min for (99m)Tc-5Fboroxime to approach the 1 min heart uptake value of (99m)Tc-Teboroxime (∼3.5% ID/g) and ∼9.5 min to reach the 2 min heart uptake value of (99m

  1. Bis(o-methylserotonin)-containing iridium(III) and ruthenium(II) complexes as new cellular imaging dyes: synthesis, applications, and photophysical and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Cristina; Silva López, Carlos; Faza, Olalla Nieto; Fernández-Lodeiro, Javier; Diniz, Mario; Bastida, Rufina; Capelo, Jose Luis; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and scope of a new versatile emissive molecular probe functionalized with a 1,10-phenanthroline moiety containing methylserotonin groups as binding sites for metal ion recognition. The synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of the in vitro imaging capability of the iridium(III) and ruthenium(II) complexes [Ir(ppy)2(N-N)](+) and [Ru(bpy)2(N-N)](2+), in which ppy is 2-phenylpyridine, bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and N-N is a 1,10-phenanthroline ligand functionalized with two methylserotonin groups to serve as binding sites for metal ion recognition, is reported. The uptake of these compounds by living freshwater fish (Carassius auratus) was studied by fluorescence microscopy, and the cytotoxicity of ligand N-N and [Ru(bpy)2(N-N)](2+) in this species was also investigated.

  2. Exoplanet Imaging with a Phase-induced Amplitude Apodization Coronagraph III. Hybrid Approach: Optical Design and Diffraction Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pluzhnik, E A; Galicher, R; Guyon, O; Martinache, F; Ridgway, S T; Woodruff, R A

    2005-01-01

    Properly apodized pupils can deliver point spread functions (PSFs) free of Airy rings, and are suitable for high dynamical range imaging of extrasolar terrestrial planets (ETPs). To reach this goal, classical pupil apodization (CPA) unfortunately requires most of the light gathered by the telescope to be absorbed, resulting in poor throughput and low angular resolution. Phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) of the telescope pupil (Guyon 2003) combines the advantages of classical pupil apodization (particularly low sensitivity to low order aberrations) with full throughput, no loss of angular resolution and little chromaticity, which makes it, theoretically, an extremely attractive coronagraph for direct imaging of ETPs. The two most challenging aspects of this technique are (1) the difficulty to polish the required optics shapes and (2) diffraction propagation effects which, because of their chromaticity, can decrease the spectral bandwidth of the coronagraph. We show that a properly designed hybrid syst...

  3. Development of Gd(III) porphyrin-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbin, Tania [Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, INSERM U825, CHU Purpan, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, UMR CNRS 8182, ECBB, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Spearman, Peter [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing, University of Kingston, Penrhyn Road Kingston upon Thames Surrey KT1 2EE, London (United Kingdom); Benderbous, Soraya, E-mail: soraya.benderbous@univ-tlse3.fr [Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, INSERM U825, CHU Purpan, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa, E-mail: hafsa.korri-youssoufi@u-psud.fr [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, UMR CNRS 8182, ECBB, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] conjugated with chitosan nanoparticles has been developed. The chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized following an ionic gelation method and the conditions optimized to generate small nanoparticles (CNs) with a narrow size distribution of 35–65 nm. The gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] was loaded into chitosan nanoparticles by passive adsorption. The interaction of chitosan with Gd(TPyP) has been examined by UV–visible, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicate the successful association of Gd(TPyP) without any structural distortion throughout the chitosan nanoparticles. The potential of Gd(TPyP)-CNs as MRI contrast agent has been investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-vitro. Relaxivities of Gd(TPyP)-CNs obtained from T{sub 1}-weighted images, increased with Gd concentration and attained an optimum r{sub 1} of 38.35 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, which is 12-fold higher compared to commercial Gd-DOTA (~ 4 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 3T). The combination of such strong MRI contrast with the known properties of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy and biocompatibility of chitosan, presents a new perspective in using these compounds in cancer theranostics. - Highlights: • Synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles with small size • Study of loading properties with gadolinium porphyrins • In vitro properties of the conjugated complex as contrast agent for MRI imaging • Comparison of MRI properties with commercial contrast agent Gd-DOTA.

  4. Development of Gd(III) porphyrin-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbin, Tania; Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène; Spearman, Peter; Benderbous, Soraya; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa

    2015-01-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] conjugated with chitosan nanoparticles has been developed. The chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized following an ionic gelation method and the conditions optimized to generate small nanoparticles (CNs) with a narrow size distribution of 35-65 nm. The gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] was loaded into chitosan nanoparticles by passive adsorption. The interaction of chitosan with Gd(TPyP) has been examined by UV-visible, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicate the successful association of Gd(TPyP) without any structural distortion throughout the chitosan nanoparticles. The potential of Gd(TPyP)-CNs as MRI contrast agent has been investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-vitro. Relaxivities of Gd(TPyP)-CNs obtained from T1-weighted images, increased with Gd concentration and attained an optimum r1 of 38.35 mM(-1) s(-1), which is 12-fold higher compared to commercial Gd-DOTA (~4 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3T). The combination of such strong MRI contrast with the known properties of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy and biocompatibility of chitosan, presents a new perspective in using these compounds in cancer theranostics.

  5. Kinetics of formation for lanthanide (III) complexes of DTPA-(Me-Trp)2 used as imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Anjani K; Sinha, Deepa; Datta, Anupama; Kakkar, Dipti; Mishra, Anil K

    2011-05-01

    Diethlenetriamine-N,N,N'N''N''-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-bis (amide) analogs have been synthesized and evaluated as a potential biomedical imaging agents. Imaging and biodistribution studies were performed in mice that showed a significant accumulation of DTPA analogs in brain. The stability and protonation constants of the complexes formed between the ligand [DTPA-(Me-Trp)(2)] and Gd(3+), Eu(3+), and Cu(2+) have been determined by pH potentiometry (Gd(3+), Eu(3+)) and spectrophotometry (Cu(2+)) at 25 °C and at constant ionic strength maintained by 0.10 M KCl. The kinetic inertness of Gd [DTPA-(Me-Trp)(2)] was characterized by the rates of exchange reactions with Zn(2+) and Eu(3+). In the Eu(3+) exchange, a second-order [H(+)] dependence was found for the pseudo-first-order rate constant [k(0) = (4.5 ± 1.2) × 10(-6)/s; k(1) = 0.58 ± 0.1 /M/s, k(2) = (6.6 ± 0.2) × 10(4) /M(2)/s, k(3) = (4.8 ± 0.8) × 10(-4) /M/s]. In the Eu(3+) exchange, at pH DTPA-(Me-Trp)(2)] is more inert than GdDTPA(2-), the most commonly used MRI contrast agent (t(1/2) = 127 h). High kinetic stability is an important requirement for the Gd complexes used as contrast enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Fast pixelated sensors for radiation detection and imaging based on quantum confined structures in III/V semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, M.; Biasiol, G.; Cautero, G.; Menk, R. H.; Plaisier, J. R.; Antonelli, M.

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve the characterisation of the delivered beams in many types of photon sources, innovative beam profilers based on III/V semiconductor materials (InGaAs/InAlAs) have been deeply investigated. Owing to a tunable and direct band gap these devices allow radiation detection in a wide spectral range. In order to increase the sensitivity of the device in radiation detection charge amplification on the sensor level is implemented. This is obtained by exploiting In0.75Ga0.25As/In0.75Al0.25As quantum wells (QW) hosting a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) through molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Internal charge-amplification mechanism can be achieved for very low applied voltages, while the high carrier mobility allows the design of very fast photon detectors with sub-nanosecond response times. This technology has been preliminarily exploited to fabricate prototype beam profilers with a strip geometry (with 50-μm-wide strips). Tests were carried out both with conventional X-ray tubes and at the Elettra synchrotron facility. The results testify how these profilers are capable of reconstructing the shape of the beam, as well as estimating the position of the beam centroid with a precision of about 400 nm. Further measurements with different samples of decreasing thickness have shown how this precision could be further improved by an optimised microfabrication. For this reason a new design, based on a membrane-photodetector, is proposed. Results regarding the spatial resolution as function of the sensor thickness will be presented and discussed.

  7. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. III. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 1629 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Baker, Anna; Roberts, Sarah; Ciardi, David R.

    2017-02-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results of our search for stars nearby 1629 Kepler planet candidate hosts. With survey sensitivity to objects as close as ∼0.″15, and magnitude differences Δm ≤slant 6, we find 223 stars in the vicinity of 206 target KOIs; 209 of these nearby stars have not been previously imaged in high resolution. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 12.6 % +/- 0.9 % at separations between 0.″15 and 4.″0. Particularly interesting KOI systems are discussed, including 26 stars with detected companions that host rocky, habitable zone candidates and five new candidate planet-hosting quadruple star systems. We explore the broad correlations between planetary systems and stellar binarity, using the combined data set of Baranec et al. and this paper. Our previous 2σ result of a low detected nearby star fraction of KOIs hosting close-in giant planets is less apparent in this larger data set. We also find a significant correlation between detected nearby star fraction and KOI number, suggesting possible variation between early and late Kepler data releases.

  8. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey III: Adaptive Optics Imaging of 1629 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Carl; Morton, Tim; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Baker, Anna; Roberts, Sarah; Ciardi, David R

    2016-01-01

    The Robo-AO \\textit{Kepler} Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every \\textit{Kepler} planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We present in this paper the results of our search for stars nearby 1629 \\textit{Kepler} planet candidate hosts. With survey sensitivity to objects as close as $\\sim$0.15" and magnitude differences $\\Delta$m$\\le$6, we find 223 stars in the vicinity of 206 target KOIs; 209 of these nearby stars have not previously been imaged in high resolution. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for \\textit{Kepler} planet candidates of 12.6\\%$\\pm$0.9\\% out to a separation of 4.0". Particularly interesting KOI systems are discussed, including 23 stars with detected companions which host rocky, habitable zone candidates, and five new candidate planet-hosting quadruple star systems. We explore the broad correlations between planetary systems...

  9. Influence of Stellar Multiplicity On Planet Formation. III. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Kepler Stars With Gas Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ji; Horch, Elliott P; Xie, Ji-Wei

    2015-01-01

    As hundreds of gas giant planets have been discovered, we study how these planets form and evolve in different stellar environments, specifically in multiple stellar systems. In such systems, stellar companions may have a profound influence on gas giant planet formation and evolution via several dynamical effects such as truncation and perturbation. We select 84 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) with gas giant planet candidates. We obtain high-angular resolution images using telescopes with adaptive optics (AO) systems. Together with the AO data, we use archival radial velocity data and dynamical analysis to constrain the presence of stellar companions. We detect 59 stellar companions around 40 KOIs for which we develop methods of testing their physical association. These methods are based on color information and galactic stellar population statistics. We find evidence of suppressive planet formation within 20 AU by comparing stellar multiplicity. The stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars is 0$^{+5...

  10. Difference Image Analysis of the OGLE-II Bulge Data. III. Catalog of 200,000 Candidate Variable Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, P R; Szymanski, M H; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Zebrun, K

    2002-01-01

    We present the first edition of a catalog of variable stars from OGLE-II Galactic Bulge data covering 3 years: 1997-1999. Typically 200-300 I band data points are available in 49 fields between -11 and 11 degrees in galactic longitude, totaling roughly 11 square degrees in sky coverage. Photometry was obtained using the Difference Image Analysis (DIA) software and tied to the OGLE data base with the DoPhot package. The present version of the catalog comprises 221,801 light curves. In this preliminary work the level of contamination by spurious detections is still about 10%. Parts of the catalog have only crude calibration, insufficient for distance determinations. The next, fully calibrated, edition will include the data collected in year 2000. The data is accessible via FTP. Due to the data volume, we also distribute DAT tapes upon request.

  11. Improvement in fingerprint detection using Tb(III)-dipicolinic acid complex doped nanobeads and time resolved imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Frank M; Knupp, Gerd; Officer, Simon

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis and application of lanthanide complex doped nanobeads used as a luminescent fingerprint powder. Due to their special optical properties, namely a long emission lifetime, sharp emission profiles and large Stokes shifts, luminescent lanthanide complexes are useful for discriminating against signals from background emissions. This is a big advantage because latent fingerprints placed on multicoloured fluorescent surfaces are difficult to develop with conventional powders. The complex of 2,6-dipicolinic acid (DPA) and terbium ([Tb(DPA)3](3-)) is used for this purpose. Using the Stöber process, this complex is incorporated into a silica matrix forming nanosized beads (230-630nm). It is shown that the [Tb(DPA)3](3-) is successfully incorporated into the beads and that these beads exhibit the wanted optical properties of the complex. A phenyl functionalisation is applied to increase the lipophilicity of the beads and finally the beads are used to develop latent fingerprints. A device for time resolved imaging was built to improve the contrast between developed fingerprint and different background signals, whilst still detecting the long lasting luminescence of the complex. The developed fingerprint powder is therefore promising to develop fingerprints on multicoloured fluorescent surfaces.

  12. The DEEP Groth Strip Galaxy Redshift Survey. III. Redshift Catalog and Properties of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, B J; Faber, S M; Willmer, C N A; Vogt, N P; Simard, L; Gebhardt, K; Im, M; Koo, D C; Sarajedini, V L; Wu, K L; Forbes, D A; Gronwall, C; Groth, E J; Illingworth, G D; Kron, R G; Rhodes, J; Szalay, A S; Takamiya, M; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Willmer, Christopher N.A.; Vogt, Nicole P.; Simard, Luc; Gebhardt, Karl; Im, Myungshin; Sarajedini, Vicki L.; Wu, Katherine L.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Gronwall, Caryl; Groth, Edward J.; Rhodes, Jason

    2004-01-01

    The Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe (DEEP) is a series of spectroscopic surveys of faint galaxies, targeted at the properties and clustering of galaxies at redshifts z ~ 1. We present the redshift catalog of the DEEP 1 GSS pilot phase of this project, a Keck/LRIS survey in the HST/WFPC2 Groth Survey Strip. The redshift catalog and data, including reduced spectra, are publicly available through a Web-accessible database. The catalog contains 658 secure galaxy redshifts with a median z=0.65, and shows large-scale structure walls to z = 1. We find a bimodal distribution in the galaxy color-magnitude diagram which persists to z = 1. A similar color division has been seen locally by the SDSS and to z ~ 1 by COMBO-17. For red galaxies, we find a reddening of only 0.11 mag from z ~ 0.8 to now, about half the color evolution measured by COMBO-17. We measure structural properties of the galaxies from the HST imaging, and find that the color division corresponds generally to a structural division. Most red galaxi...

  13. The CASTLES Imaging Survey of Gravitational Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, C. Y.; Falco, E. E.; Lehar, J.; Impey, C. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; McLeod, B. A.; Rix, H.-W.

    1997-12-01

    The CASTLES survey (Cfa-Arizona-(H)ST-Lens-Survey) is imaging most known small-separation gravitational lenses (or lens candidates), using the NICMOS camera (mostly H-band) and the WFPC2 (V and I band) on HST. To date nearly half of the IR imaging survey has been completed. The main goals are: (1) to search for lens galaxies where none have been directly detected so far; (2) obtain photometric redshift estimates (VIH) for the lenses where no spectroscopic redshifts exist; (3) study and model the lens galaxies in detail, in part to study the mass distribution within them, in part to identify ``simple" systems that may permit accurate time delay estimates for H_0; (3) measure the M/L evolution of the sample of lens galaxies with look-back time (to z ~ 1); (4) determine directly which fraction of sources are lensed by ellipticals vs. spirals. We will present the survey specifications and the images obtained so far.

  14. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  15. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF LEO T FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Zucker, Daniel B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109 (Australia); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Martin, Nicolas F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); De Jong, Jelte T. A. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 Leiden (Netherlands); Holtzman, Jon A. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger St., Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn, E-mail: dweisz@astro.washington.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-01

    We present the star formation history (SFH) of the faintest known star-forming galaxy, Leo T, based on deep imaging taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). The HST/WFPC2 color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Leo T is exquisitely deep, extending {approx}2 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, permitting excellent constraints on star formation at all ages. We use a maximum likelihood CMD fitting technique to measure the SFH of Leo T assuming three different sets of stellar evolution models: Padova (solar-scaled metallicity) and BaSTI (both solar-scaled and {alpha}-enhanced metallicities). The resulting SFHs are remarkably consistent at all ages, indicating that our derived SFH is robust to the choice of stellar evolution model. From the lifetime SFH of Leo T, we find that 50% of the total stellar mass formed prior to z {approx} 1 (7.6 Gyr ago). Subsequent to this epoch, the SFH of Leo T is roughly constant until the most recent {approx}25 Myr, where the SFH shows an abrupt drop. This decrease could be due to a cessation of star formation or stellar initial mass function sampling effects, but we are unable to distinguish between the two scenarios. Overall, our measured SFH is consistent with previously derived SFHs of Leo T. However, the HST-based solution provides improved age resolution and reduced uncertainties at all epochs. The SFH, baryonic gas fraction, and location of Leo T are unlike any of the other recently discovered faint dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, and instead bear strong resemblance to gas-rich dwarf galaxies (irregular or transition), suggesting that gas-rich dwarf galaxies may share common modes of star formation over a large range of stellar mass ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }).

  16. The Bright Ages Survey. I. Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, J W; Rich, R M; Frogel, J A; Salim, S; Teplitz, H; Colbert, James W.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Salim, Samir; Teplitz, Harry

    2006-01-01

    This is the first paper in a series presenting and analyzing data for a K-selected sample of galaxies collected in order to identify and study galaxies at moderate to high redshift in rest-wavelength optical light. The sample contains 842 objects over 6 separate fields covering 75.6 arcmin^2 down to K=20-20.5. We combine the K-band with UBVRIzJH multi-band imaging, reaching depths of R~26. Two of the fields studied also have deep HST WFPC2 imaging, totaling more than 60 hours in the F300W, F450W, F606W, and F814W filters. Using artificial galaxy modeling and extraction we measure 85% completeness limits down to K=19.5-20, depending on the field examined. The derived K-band number counts are in good agreement with previous studies. We find a density for Extremely Red Objects(EROs; R-K>5) of 1.55+/-0.16 arcmin^{-2} for K<19.7, dominated by the 1714+5015 field (centered on 53w002), with an ERO number density more than 3 times that of the other sample fields. If we exclude the counts for 1714+5015, our density...

  17. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  18. Tomo III

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Memorias, histórico, físicas, crítico, apologéticas de la América Meridional con unas breves advertencias y noticias útiles, a los que de orden de Su Majestad, hubiesen de viajar y describir aquellas vastas regiones. Reino Animal. Tomo III. Por un anónimo americano en Cádiz por los años de 1757. Primera Parte Prólogo Artículo 1°De los cuadrúpedos útiles al hombre a varios usos y a su sustento. Vaca Caballos Carneros de la tierra, especie de camellos Vicuña Guanacos Puercos monteses Artículo 2...

  19. Image modeling of compact starburst clusters: I. R136

    CERN Document Server

    Khorrami, Zeinab; Chesneau, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Continuous progress in data quality from HST, recent multiwavelength high resolution spectroscopy and high contrast imaging from ground adaptive optics on large telescopes need modeling of R136 to understand its nature and evolutionary stage. To produce the best synthesized multiwavelength images of R136 we need to simulate the effect of dynamical and stellar evolution, mass segregation and binary stars fraction on the survival of young massive clusters with the initial parameters of R136 in the LMC, being set to the present knowledge of this famous cluster. We produced a series of 32 young massive clusters using the NBODY6 code. Each cluster was tracked with adequate temporal samples to follow the evolution of R136 during its early stages. To compare the NBODY6 simulations with observational data, we created the synthetic images from the output of the code. We used the TLUSTY and KURUCZ model atmospheres to produce the fluxes in HST/ WFPC2 filters. GENEVA isochrones were used to track the evolution of stars....

  20. Detection of a Dark Substructure through Gravitational Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Vegetti, S; Bolton, A; Treu, T; Gavazzi, R

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of a dark substructure through direct gravitational imaging - undetected in the HST-WFPC2 F606W image - in the gravitational lens galaxy of SLACS SDSSJ0946+1006 (the "Double Einstein Ring"). The detection is based on a Bayesian grid reconstruction of the two-dimensional surface density of the galaxy inside an annulus around its Einstein radius (few kpc). The detection of a small mass concentration in the surface density maps has a strong statistical significance. We confirm this detection by modeling the system including a parametric mass model with a tidally truncated pseudo-Jaffe density profile; in that case the substructure mass is M_sub=(3.51+-0.15)x10^9 Msun, located at (-0.651+-0.038,1.040+-0.034)'', precisely where also the surface density map shows a strong convergence peak (Bayes factor dlog(E)=-128.0; equivalent to a ~16-sigma detection). The result is robust under substantial changes in the model and the data-set (e.g. PSF, pixel number and scale, source and potential regul...

  1. Removing cosmic-ray hits from multiorbit HST Wide Field Camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; Franklin, Barbara E.; Neuschaefer, Lyman W.

    1994-01-01

    We present an optimized algorithm that removes cosmic rays ('CRs') from multiorbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field/Planetary Camera ('WF/PC') images. It computes the image noise in every iteration from the WF/PC CCD equation. This includes all known sources of random and systematic calibration errors. We test this algorithm on WF/PC stacks of 2-12 orbits as a function of the number of available orbits and the formal Poissonian sigma-clipping level. We find that the algorithm needs greater than or equal 4 WF/PC exposures to locate the minimal sky signal (which is noticeably affected by CRs), with an optimal clipping level at 2-2.5 x sigma(sub Poisson). We analyze the CR flux detected on multiorbit 'CR stacks,' which are constructed by subtracting the best CR filtered images from the unfiltered 8-12 orbit average. We use an automated object finder to determine the surface density of CRS as a function of the apparent magnitude (or ADU flux) they would have generated in the images had they not been removed. The power law slope of the CR 'counts' (gamma approximately = 0.6 for N(m) m(exp gamma)) is steeper than that of the faint galaxy counts down to V approximately = 28 mag. The CR counts show a drop off between 28 less than or approximately V less than or approximately 30 mag (the latter is our formal 2 sigma point source sensitivity without spherical aberration). This prevents the CR sky integral from diverging, and is likely due to a real cutoff in the CR energy distribution below approximately 11 ADU per orbit. The integral CR surface density is less than or approximately 10(exp 8)/sq. deg, and their sky signal is V approximately = 25.5-27.0 mag/sq. arcsec, or 3%-13% of our NEP sky background (V = 23.3 mag/sq. arcsec), and well above the EBL integral of the deepest galaxy counts (B(sub J) approximately = 28.0 mag/sq. arcsec). We conclude that faint CRs will always contribute to the sky signal in the deepest WF/PC images. Since WFPC2 has approximately 2.7x

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of new salicylaldehyde-2-picolinylhydrazone Schiff base compounds of Ru(II), Rh(III) and Ir(III) as in vitro antitumor, antibacterial and fluorescence imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palepu, Narasinga Rao; Nongbri, S L; Premkumar, J Richard; Verma, Akalesh Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Kaushik; Joshi, S R; Forbes, Scott; Mozharivskyj, Yurij; Thounaojam, Romita; Aguan, K; Kollipara, Mohan Rao

    2015-06-01

    Reaction of salicylaldehyde-2-picolinylhydrazone (HL) Schiff base ligand with precursor compounds [{(p-cymene)RuCl2}2] 1, [{(C6H6)RuCl2}2] 2, [{Cp*RhCl2}2] 3 and [{Cp*IrCl2}2] 4 yielded the corresponding neutral mononuclear compounds 5-8, respectively. The in vitro antitumor evaluation of the compounds 1-8 against Dalton's ascites lymphoma (DL) cells by fluorescence-based apoptosis study and by their half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values revealed the high antitumor activity of compounds 3, 4, 5 and 6. Compounds 1-8 render comparatively lower apoptotic effect than that of cisplatin on model non-tumor cells, i.e., peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The antibacterial evaluation of compounds 5-8 by agar well-diffusion method revealed that compound 6 is significantly effective against all the eight bacterial species considered with zone of inhibition up to 35 mm. Fluorescence imaging study of compounds 5-8 with plasmid circular DNA (pcDNA) and HeLa RNA demonstrated their fluorescence imaging property upon binding with nucleic acids. The docking study with some key enzymes associated with the propagation of cancer such as ribonucleotide reductase, thymidylate synthase, thymidylate phosphorylase and topoisomerase II revealed strong interactions between proteins and compounds 5-8. Conformational analysis by density functional theory (DFT) study has corroborated our experimental observation of the N, N binding mode of ligand. Compounds 5-8 exhibited a HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital)-LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) energy gap 2.99-3.04 eV. Half-sandwich ruthenium, rhodium and iridium compounds were obtained by treatment of metal precursors with salicylaldehyde-2-picolinylhydrazone (HL) by in situ metal-mediated deprotonation of the ligand. Compounds under investigation have shown potential antitumor, antibacterial and fluorescence imaging properties. Arene ruthenium compounds exhibited higher activity compared to that of Cp

  3. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  4. Synthesis and stability test of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab as SPECT-MRI molecular imaging agent for diagnosis of HER-2 positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardiani Rahmania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonivasive diagnosis of cancer can be provided by molecular imaging using hybrid modality to obtain better sensitivity, specificity and depiction localization of the disease. In this study, we developed a new molecular imaging agent, radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab in the form of 147Gd-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab, that can be both target-specific radiopharmaceutical in SPECT as well as targeted contrast agent in MRI for the purpose of diagnosis of HER-2 positive breast cancer. 147Gd radionuclide emits γ-rays that can be used in SPECT modality, but because of technical constraint, 147Gd radionuclide was simulated by its radioisotope, 153Gd. Gd-DOTA complex has also been known as good MRI contrast agent. PAMAM G3.0 is useful to concentrate Gd-DOTA compelexes in large quantities, thus minimizing the number of trastuzumab molecules used. Trastuzumab is human monoclonal antibody that can spesifically interact with HER-2. Synthesis of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab was initiated by conjugating DOTA NHS ester ligand with PAMAM G3.0 dendrimer. The DOTA-PAMAM G3.0 produced was conjugated to trastuzumab molecule and labeled with 153Gd. Characterization DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab immunoconjugate was performed using HPLC system equipped with SEC. The formation of immunoconjugate was indicated by the shorter retention time (6.82 min compared to that of trastuzumab (7.06 min. Radiochemical purity of radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab was >99% after purification process by PD-10 desalting column. Radiogadolinium(III-DOTA-PAMAM G3.0-trastuzumab compound was stable at room temperature and at 2–8 0C as indicated by its radiochemical purity 97.6 ± 0.5%–99.1 ± 0.5% after 144 h storage.

  5. Medicina por Imágenes: la visión globalizada. Parte III: la visión desde el Derecho Image Based Medicine: the global vision. Part III: Legal Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carestia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La visión globalizada del diagnóstico por imágenes es una puesta al día, creemos que necesaria, de los caracteres más relevantes de esta bellísima disciplina. Está dirigida a quienes todavía no han decidido su camino y están finalizando sus carreras de grado -médica o técnica-, pero también a aquellos que ya han comenzado la residencia; y quizá también para quienes habiendo recorrido ya un largo trayecto, conservan un espíritu crítico y una mirada joven. A la luz del nuevo milenio, y cuando se han cumplido veinticinco años de su reconocimiento como especialidad por parte de la comunidad médica de nuestro país, los autores examinamos esta visión que no se conforma con la mirada unilateral del radiólogo sino que busca también la proveniente de otros saberes y ciencias. Por ello, se incluye una aproximación desde el derecho -sobre un tema puntual-, se tratan los aspectos educacionales y se incorporan la mirada desde el área técnica, la perspectiva de la filosofía y la bioética y las visiones desde la psicología, desde la gestión de los recursos humanos y los aspectos de ciencia y tecnología, entre otras.The global vision of diagnostic imaging is a necessary update, we think, of the most relevant characters of this beautiful discipline. It is directed to those advanced students of Medicine and Radiology Technique career who have not yet decided their future activity but also to the already graduated who are just beginning their residence training programs; and maybe to those who keep a critical spirit and a young glance, in spite of the chronological age. At daybreak of the millennium and when we are assisting to the twenty five anniversary of its origin and recognition as a new speciality inside the medical community in our country, we the authors, have selected not only the unique vision of the radiologist but also the vision of other fields of knowledge and sciences. So because of this we develop the legal view on

  6. Simple Fabrication of Gd(III)-DTPA-Nanodiamond Particles by Chemical Modification for Use as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takako; Ohana, Tsuguyori; Yabuno, Hajime; Kasai, Rumiko; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Hasebe, Terumitsu

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a simple and useful process for fabricating nanodiamond (ND) particles modified with an organogadolinium moiety by chemical modification for their use as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The introduction of the organogadolinium moiety on the surface of the ND particles was performed by the condensation of ND and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) followed by treatment with GdCl3. The modified surfaces were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy analyses. MRI experiments on the Gd-DTPA-ND particles indicated their high signal intensity on T1-weighted images.

  7. Estimation and Mapping Forest Attributes Using “k Nearest Neighbor” Method on IRS-P6 LISS III Satellite Image Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Eslam Bonyad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we explored the utility of k Nearest Neighbor (kNN algorithm to integrate IRS-P6 LISS III satellite imagery data and ground inventory data for application in forest attributes (DBH, trees height, volume, basal area, density and forest cover type estimation and mapping. The ground inventory data was based on a systematic-random sampling grid and the numbers of sampling plots were 408 circular plots in a plantation in Guilan province, north of Iran. We concluded that kNN method was useful tool for mapping at a fine accuracy between 80% and 93.94%. Values of k between 5 and 8 seemed appropriate. The best distance metrics were found Euclidean, Fuzzy and Mahalanobis. Results showed that kNN was accurate enough for practical applicability for mapping forest areas.

  8. Development of Ultra-Low Noise, High Performance III-V Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIPs) for Focal Plane Array Staring Image Sensor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    omem . 0o70,88 PUNK t~fq b iet fat tht ccle0l1oM of •.ea •as•fa" o0110 8 Itod =0* " 𔄂•1• 8 ao.. .1. nCfa OW totf for *Wct 811. 481JruftlC0 . Wo l...aperture sizes . Detailed results are depicted in Section 3.4. 1 5. Completed noise characterization on four different types of III-V QWIPs. From the...quantum well dopant density, biaxial strain strength, and structure parameters, the PSL-QWIPs can be used for 8-14 pm long-wavelength large size focal plane

  9. Evaluation of 4-[18F]fluorobenzoyl-FALGEA-NH2 as a positron emission tomography tracer for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation variant III imaging in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denholt, Charlotte Lund; Binderup, Tina; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése;

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the radiosynthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the novel small peptide radioligand, 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoyl-Phe-Ala-Leu-Gly-Glu-Ala-NH(2,) ([(18)F]FBA-FALGEA-NH(2)) as a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging of the cancer specific epidermal growth factor...

  10. Cell cycle profiling by image and flow cytometry: The optimised protocol for the detection of replicational activity using 5-Bromo-2′-deoxyuridine, low concentration of hydrochloric acid and exonuclease III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konečný, Petr; Frydrych, Ivo; Koberna, Karel

    2017-01-01

    The approach for the detection of replicational activity in cells using 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine, a low concentration of hydrochloric acid and exonuclease III is presented in the study. The described method was optimised with the aim to provide a fast and robust tool for the detection of DNA synthesis with minimal impact on the cellular structures using image and flow cytometry. The approach is based on the introduction of breaks into the DNA by the low concentration of hydrochloric acid followed by the subsequent enzymatic extension of these breaks using exonuclease III. Our data showed that the method has only a minimal effect on the tested protein localisations and is applicable both for formaldehyde- and ethanol-fixed cells. The approach partially also preserves the fluorescence of the fluorescent proteins in the HeLa cells expressing Fluorescent Ubiquitin Cell Cycle Indicator. In the case of the short labelling pulses that disabled the use of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine because of the low specific signal, the described method provided a bright signal enabling reliable recognition of replicating cells. The optimized protocol was also successfully tested for the detection of trifluridine, the nucleoside used as an antiviral drug and in combination with tipiracil also for the treatment of some types of cancer. PMID:28426799

  11. Cell cycle profiling by image and flow cytometry: The optimised protocol for the detection of replicational activity using 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, low concentration of hydrochloric acid and exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligasová, Anna; Konečný, Petr; Frydrych, Ivo; Koberna, Karel

    2017-01-01

    The approach for the detection of replicational activity in cells using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, a low concentration of hydrochloric acid and exonuclease III is presented in the study. The described method was optimised with the aim to provide a fast and robust tool for the detection of DNA synthesis with minimal impact on the cellular structures using image and flow cytometry. The approach is based on the introduction of breaks into the DNA by the low concentration of hydrochloric acid followed by the subsequent enzymatic extension of these breaks using exonuclease III. Our data showed that the method has only a minimal effect on the tested protein localisations and is applicable both for formaldehyde- and ethanol-fixed cells. The approach partially also preserves the fluorescence of the fluorescent proteins in the HeLa cells expressing Fluorescent Ubiquitin Cell Cycle Indicator. In the case of the short labelling pulses that disabled the use of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine because of the low specific signal, the described method provided a bright signal enabling reliable recognition of replicating cells. The optimized protocol was also successfully tested for the detection of trifluridine, the nucleoside used as an antiviral drug and in combination with tipiracil also for the treatment of some types of cancer.

  12. Candidates for Intracluster Planetary Nebulae in the Virgo Cluster based on the Suprime-Cam Narrow-Band Imaging in O[III] and Halpha

    CERN Document Server

    Okamura, S; Arnaboldi, M; Freeman, K C; Ando, H; Doi, M; Furusawa, H; Gerhard, O E; Hamabe, M; Kimura, M; Kajino, T; Komiyama, Yu; Miyazaki, S; Nakata, F; Napolitano, N R; Ouchi, M; Pannella, M; Sekiguchi, M; Shimasaku, K; Yagi, M

    2002-01-01

    We have identified 38 candidates of intracluster planetary nebulae (ICPNe) in a $34'\\times27'$ field in the core of the Virgo cluster based on the Suprime-Cam imaging through two narrow-band filters centered at the redshifted wavelengths of the [OIII]$\\lambda=5007\\AA$ and the Halpha \\lambda=6563\\AA lines. Broad-band images in V and R bands are used to check for any emissions in the adjacent continuum. We describe the method briefly and present the list of intracluster planetary nebulae candidates, together with their finding charts. The ICPN candidates show a highly inhomogeneous distribution, which may suggest an association with the M86-M84 subcluster. Fraction of diffuse intracluster light with respect to total light in galaxies is estimated to be about 10%, leading to an estimate of about 20% for the baryon fraction. Spectroscopic follow up and a wider survey are critical to reveal the nature of intracluster stellar population.

  13. Parallel high resolution imaging of diffuse objects in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy

    1996-07-01

    The Magellanic Clouds, because of their well-determined distance and small extinction, allow an unprecedented opportunity to observe many ISM phenomena occurring in a whole galaxy. The HST resolution {0.1" = 0.025 pc} offers detail hitherto poorly studied in the extragalactic context on the morphology and spatial relationships in various ISM processes associated with the evolution of Population I and Population II systems. This long term {11 cycles} parallel program exploits these opportunities by obtaining WFPC2 images of appropriate targets that are accessible at the same time as primary pointings. The number of priority parallel observations per Cycle is estimated at 20; and our intent is to accumulate a significant archive of Magellanic Cloud direct images over the life of the program. The parallel targets, to be specified in crafting rules executed as part of the Phase II planning of each HST Cycle, will include {or search for} compact H II regions and young clusters, proto-stellar and maser regions, reflection nebulae, Herbig-Haro objects, stellar ejecta, SNR and wind-driven shells, shells, planetary nebulae and Very Low Excitation nebulae. The observations will be primarily in the Balmer lines and the stronger forbidden lines, with supplemental continuum images.

  14. STARING INTO THE WINDS OF DESTRUCTION: HST/NICMOS IMAGES OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7027

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    elongated region of gas and dust cast off by the star. This gas (appearing as white) has a temperature of several tens of thousands of degrees Fahrenheit. The object has two 'cones' of cool molecular hydrogen gas (the red material) glowing in the infrared. The gas has been energized by ultraviolet light from the star - a process known as fluorescence. Most of the material shed by the star remains outside of the bright regions. It is invisible in this image because the layers of material in and near the bright regions are still shielding it from the central star's intense radiation. NGC 7027 is one of the smallest objects of its kind to be imaged by the Hubble telescope. However, the region seen here is approximately 14,000 times the average distance between Earth and the sun. THE INFRARED AND VISIBLE LIGHT VIEW -- This visible and infrared light picture of NGC 7027 (on the right) provides a more complete view of how this planetary nebula is being shaped, revealing steps in its evolution. This image is composed of three exposures, one from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and two from NICMOS. The blue represents the WFPC2 image; the green and red, NICMOS exposures. The white is emission from the hot gas surrounding the central star; the red and pink represent emission from cool molecular hydrogen gas. In effect, the colors represent the three layers in the material ejected by the dying star. Each layer depicts a change in temperature, beginning with a hot, bright central region, continuing with a thin boundary zone where molecular hydrogen gas is glowing and being destroyed, and ending with a cool, blue outer region of molecular gas and dust. NICMOS has allowed astronomers to clearly see the transition layer from hot, glowing atomic gas to cold molecular gas. The origin of the newly seen filamentary structures is not yet understood. The transition region is clearly seen as the pink- and red-colored cool molecular hydrogen gas. An understanding of the atomic and

  15. HST/ACS Lyman alpha imaging of the nearby starburst ESO338-IG04

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, M; Mas-Hesse, J M; Kunth, D; Leitherer, C; Petrosian, A

    2005-01-01

    ESO338-IG04 is a well known, local, luminous Blue Compact Galaxy. It has a complex morphology and contains a central young starburst with compact young star clusters. The galaxy was imaged using HST/ACS in the Lyman alpha line and continuum. Using the Starburst99 synthetic spectra and other imaging data from HST/WFPC2 we developed a technique that allows us to make the first photometrically valid continuum subtraction for the LYa line. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the models of LYa escape being regulated by kinematical properties of the interstellar medium. The line-only image shows LYa in both emission and absorption. Notably, emission is seen from central bright young clusters and is in spatial agreement with the features present in a longslit spectrum taken with HST/STIS. Diffuse LYa emission regions are seen surrounding the central starburst where photons escape after one or more resonant scatterings in HI. These regions dominate the total LYa output. Photometry reveals a total LYa flux o...

  16. Retrospective quality control review of FDG scans in the imaging sub-study of PALETTE EORTC 62072/VEG110727: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hristova, Ivalina [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boellaard, Ronald [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogel, Wouter [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix [Maastricht University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Sandra [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Schoeffski, Patrick [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of General Medical Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, Department of Oncology, KU Leuven (Belgium); Sanfilippo, Roberta [Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Dewji, Raz [GlaxoSmithKline, Oncology R and D, Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Graaf, Winette van der [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    {sup 18}F-Labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can detect early changes in tumour metabolism and may be a useful quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) for prediction of disease stabilization, response and duration of progression-free survival (PFS). Standardization of imaging procedures is a prerequisite, especially in multicentre clinical trials. In this study we reviewed the quality of FDG scans and compliance with the imaging guideline (IG) in a phase III clinical trial. Forty-four cancer patients were enrolled in an imaging sub-study of a randomized international multicentre trial. FDG scan had to be performed at baseline and 10-14 days after treatment start. The image transmittal forms (ITFs) and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) [1] standard headers were analysed for compliance with the IG. Mean liver standardized uptake values (LSUV{sub mean}) were measured as recommended by positron emission tomography (PET) Response Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 (PERCIST) [2]. Of 88 scans, 81 were received (44 patients); 36 were properly anonymized; 77/81 serum glucose values submitted, all but one within the IG. In 35/44 patients both scans were of sufficient visual quality. In 22/70 ITFs the reported UT differed by >1 min from the DICOM headers (max. difference 1 h 4 min). Based on the DICOM, UT compliance for both scans was 31.4 %. LSUV{sub mean} was fairly constant for the 11 patients with UT compliance: 2.30 ± 0.33 at baseline and 2.27 ± 0.48 at follow-up (FU). Variability substantially increased for the subjects with unacceptable UT (11 patients): 2.27 ± 1.04 at baseline and 2.18 ± 0.83 at FU. The high attrition number of patients due to low compliance with the IG compromised the quantitative assessment of the predictive value for early response monitoring. This emphasizes the need for better regulated procedures in imaging departments, which may be achieved by education of involved personnel or efforts towards regulations. LSUV{sub mean} could be

  17. WFPC2 observations of star clusters in the Magellanic clouds; 1, the LMC globular cluster Hodge 11

    CERN Document Server

    Mighell, K J; Shara, M M; Fall, S M

    1996-01-01

    We present our analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observations in F555W (broadband V) and F450W (broadband B) of the globular cluster Hodge 11 in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy. The resulting V vs. (B-V) color-magnitude diagram reaches 2.4 mag below the main-sequence turnoff (which is at V_TO = 22.65 +- 0.10 mag or M_V^TO = 4.00 +- 0.16 mag). Comparing the fiducial sequence of Hodge 11 with that of the Galactic globular cluster M92, we conclude that, within the accuracy of our photometry, the age of Hodge 11 is identical to that of M92 with a relative age-difference uncertainty ranging from 10% to 21%. Provided that Hodge 11 has always been a part of the Large Magellanic Cloud and was not stripped from the halo of the Milky Way or absorbed from a cannibalized dwarf spheroidal galaxy, then the oldest stars in the Large Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way appear to have the same age.

  18. An Astrometric Analysis of eta Carinae’s Eruptive History Using HST WF/PC2 and ACS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-11

    et al.(1995)] Cox, P., Mezger, P. G., Sievers , A., Najarro, F., Bronfman, L., Kreysa, E., & Haslam, G. 1995, A&A, 297, 168 [Currie et al.(1996...Thackeray, A. D. 1978, ApJ, 219, 498 [Walborn(1995)] Walborn, N. R. 1995, Revista Mexicana de Astronomia y As- trofisica Conference Series, 2, 51

  19. Rapid microwave synthesis of N-doped carbon nanodots with high fluorescence brightness for cell imaging and sensitive detection of iron (III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Lu, Jingbo; Zhou, Xiaoli; Guo, Chunyan; Wang, Chuanhu

    2017-02-01

    We rapidly prepared N-doped photoluminescent carbon nanodots (CNDs) with the one-step microwave irradiation method using diammonium hydrogen citrate as the carbon source. The as-prepared CNDs possessed quasispherical morphology and a high quantum yield of about 26.8%, which was higher than the CNDs obtained by most other microwave-assisted methods. Moreover, the luminescent CNDs could be efficiently uptaken by BGC-823 cells and CT26.WT cells, and exhibited low cytotoxicity and favorable biocompatibility, making them suitable candidates for cell imaging. In addition, the CNDs could be utilized for Fe3+ ions sensitive detection with a detection limit of 180 nM.

  20. [Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrot, A; Drapé, J L; Godefroy, D; Dupont, A M; Pessis, E; Sarazin, L; Minoui, A

    1997-01-01

    The panoply of imaging techniques useful in podology is essentially limited to X-rays. Standard "standing" and "lying" X-rays furnish most of the required information. Arthrography is sometimes performed, in particular for trauma or tumour of the ankle. CT scan and MRI make a decisive contribution in difficult cases, notably in fractures and in small fractures without displacement. The two latter techniques are useful in tendon, ligament and muscular disorders, where echography is also informative. Rigorous analysis of radiographies and a good knowledge of foot disorders make these imaging techniques efficacious.

  1. The solar chromosphere at high resolution with IBIS: III. Comparison of Ca II K and Ca II 854.2 nm imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Reardon, K P; Cauzzi, G

    2008-01-01

    Filtergrams obtained in Ca II H, Ca II K and H-alpha are often employed as diagnostics of the solar chromosphere. However, the vastly disparate appearance between the typical filtergrams in these different lines calls into question the nature of what is actually being observed. We investigate the lack of obvious structures of magnetic origin such as fibrils and mottles in on-disk Ca II H and K images by directly comparing a temporal sequence of classical Ca II K filtergrams with a co-spatial and co-temporal sequence of spectrally resolved Ca II 854.2 images obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS), considering the effect of both the spectral and spatial smearing. We find that the lack of fine magnetic structuring in Ca II K filtergrams, even with the narrowest available filters, is due to observational effects. Signatures of fibrils remain however in the temporal evolution of the filtergrams, in particular with the evidence of magnetic shadows around the network elements. The Ca II ...

  2. Absolute Calibration and Characterization of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. III. An Asteroid-based Calibration of MIPS at 160 microns

    CERN Document Server

    Stansberry, J A; Bhattacharya, B; Engelbracht, C W; Rieke, G H; Marleau, F R; Fadda, D; Frayer, D T; Noriega-Crespo, A; Wachter, S; Young, E T; Müller, T G; Kelly, D M; Blaylock, M; Henderson, D; Neugebauer, G; Beeman, J W; Haller, E E

    2007-01-01

    We describe the absolute calibration of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 160 micron channel. After the on-orbit discovery of a near-IR ghost image that dominates the signal for sources hotter than about 2000 K, we adopted a strategy utilizing asteroids to transfer the absolute calibrations of the MIPS 24 and 70 micron channels to the 160 micron channel. Near-simultaneous observations at all three wavelengths are taken, and photometry at the two shorter wavelengths is fit using the Standard Thermal Model. The 160 micron flux density is predicted from those fits and compared with the observed 160 micron signal to derive the conversion from instrumental units to surface brightness. The calibration factor we derive is 41.7 MJy/sr/MIPS160 (MIPS160 being the instrumental units). The scatter in the individual measurements of the calibration factor, as well as an assesment of the external uncertainties inherent in the calibration, lead us to adopt an uncertainty of 5.0 MJy/sr/MIPS160 (12%) for the ...

  3. CyberStorm III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.; et al

    2010-01-01

    Projectteam Cyber Storm III - De Verenigde Staten organiseerden de afgelopen jaren een reeks grootschalige ICT-crisisoefeningen met de naam Cyber Storm. Cyber Storm III is de derde oefening in de reeks. Het scenario van Cyber Storm III staat in het teken van grootschalige ICT-verstoringen, waarbij n

  4. Ways of creation of environment of healthy image of life in higher educational establishments of III-IV levels of accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boltenkova O.N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the questions of healthy creation environment of a healthy image of life in higher educational institutions are investigated. 436 students took part in an experiment. The condition of students' health in quantitative and diagnostic aspects is analyzed. The basic components of health, their subjective and objective character are examined. The contents of such components of health, as spiritual, physical, mental and social is defined. Were guided the documents, which regulate physical education in a higher educational institution, the role various educational, extra curriculum activities both independent forms and way of increase of quality of their organization is investigated. The idea of necessity of inclusion of each student in conscientions educational activity on a basis student-oriented, axiological and acmeological approaches is expressol.

  5. A novel colorimetric and turn-on fluorescent chemosensor for iron(III) ion detection and its application to cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Aoheng; Wang, Hongqing; Wang, Yuyuan; Huang, Qiao; Zhang, Qin

    2016-11-01

    A novel rhodamine-based dual probe Rh-2 for trivalent ferric ions (Fe3 +) was successfully designed and synthesized, which exhibited a highly sensitive and selective recognition towards Fe3 + with an enhanced fluorescence emission in methanol-water media (v/v = 7/3, pH = 7.2). The probe Rh-2 could be applied to the determination of Fe3 + with a linear range covering from 3.0 × 10- 7 to 1.4 × 10- 5 M and a detection limit of 1.24 × 10- 8 M. Meanwhile, the binding ratio of Rh-2 and Fe3 + was found to be 1:1. Most importantly, the fluorescence and color signal changes of the Rh-2 solution were specific to Fe3 + over other commonly coexistent metal ions. Moreover, the probe Rh-2 has been used to image Fe3 + in living cells with satisfying results.

  6. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for focal liver lesions in Chinese patients:a multicenter, open-label, phase III study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-Su Zeng; Hui-Yi Ye; Liang Guo; Wei-Jun Peng; Jian-Ping Lu; Gao-Jun Teng; Yi Huan; Ping Li; Jian-Rong Xu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contrast agents help to improve visibility in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, owing to the large interstitial spaces of the liver, there is a reduction in the natural contrast gradient between lesions and healthy tissue. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the liver-specific MR imaging contrast agent gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) in Chinese patients. METHODS: This  was  a  single-arm,  open-label,  multicenter study  in  patients  with  known  or  suspected  focal  liver  lesions referred for contrast-enhanced MR imaging. MR imaging was performed in 234 patients before and after a single intravenous bolus of Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.025 mmol/kg body weight). Images were  evaluated  by  clinical  study  investigators  and  three independent,  blinded  radiologists.  The  primary  efficacy endpoint was sensitivity in lesion detection. RESULTS: Gd-EOB-DTPA  improved  sensitivity  in  lesion detection  by  9.46%  compared  with  pre-contrast  imaging  for the average of the three blinded readers (94.78% vs 85.32% for Gd-EOB-DTPA  vs  pre-contrast,  respectively).  Improvements in  detection  were  more  pronounced  in  lesions  less  than  1 cm.  Gd-EOB-DTPA  improved  diagnostic  accuracy  in  lesion classification. CONCLUSIONS: This  open-label  study  demonstrated  that Gd-EOB-DTPA improves diagnostic sensitivity in liver lesions, particularly  in  those  smaller  than  1  cm.  Gd-EOB-DTPA  also significantly  improves  the  diagnostic  accuracy  in  lesion classification,  and  furthermore,  Gd-EOB-DTPA  is  safe  in Chinese patients with liver lesions.

  7. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Military Operations in Urban Terrain; Defense-Wide Mission Support; Air Mobility; and Space Launch Orbital Support. For military users, the GPS III...program provides Precise Positioning Service (PPS) to military operations and force enhancement. It also provides increased anti-jam power to the earth ...to be modified . On January 31, 2016, USD(AT&L) signed the GPS III revised APB. This Change 1 to the APB was due to both cost and schedule breaches

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Images of Red Mergers: How Dry are They?

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, K E

    2008-01-01

    Mergers between red galaxies are observed to be common in the nearby Universe, and are thought to be the dominant mechanism by which massive galaxies grow their mass at late times. These ``dry'' mergers can be readily identified in very deep ground based images, thanks to their extended low surface brightness tidal features. However, ground-based images lack the required resolution to determine the morphologies of the merging galaxies, and to measure the amount of dust and associated gas. We present HST/ACS and WFPC2 observations of a sample of 31 bulge-dominated red-sequence galaxies at z~0.1, comprised of ongoing mergers, merger remnants, and undisturbed galaxies. Nearly all galaxies have early-type morphologies and most are well-fit by r^1/4 law surface brightness profiles. We find that only 10% of the galaxies show evidence for the presence of dust. The amount of cold gas (or its upper limit) is calculated from the mean color-excess, assuming a simple relation between gas mass and dust mass. The gas mass ...

  9. Halpha3: an Halpha imaging survey of HI selected galaxies from ALFALFA. III. Nurture shapes up the Hubble sequence in the Great Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Fossati, Matteo; Dotti, Massimo; Fumagalli, Michele; Boselli, Alessandro; Gutierrez, Leonel; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2013-01-01

    We present the analysis of Halpha3, an Halpha imaging survey of galaxies selected from the HI ALFALFA Survey in the Coma Supercluster. By using the Halpha line as a tracer of the "instantaneous" star formation, complemented with optical colors from SDSS we explore the hypothesis that a morphological sequence of galaxies of progressively earlier type, lower gas-content exists in the neighborhood of the Coma cluster, with specific star formation activity decreasing with increasing local galaxy density and velocity dispersion. In the dwarf regime (8.5<\\log(M*)< 9.5) we identify a 4-step sequence of galaxies with progressively redder colors, i.e. of decreasing specific star formation, from (1) HI-rich Late-Type Galaxies belonging to the blue-cloud exhibiting extended plus nuclear star formation, (2) HI-poor LTGs with nuclear star formation only, (3) HI-poor galaxies with no star formation either extended or nuclear, but with nuclear Post-Star-Burst signature,(4) Early-type Galaxies in the red-sequence, with...

  10. Highly fluorescent carbon dots as selective and sensitive "on-off-on" probes for iron(III) ion and apoferritin detection and imaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cuiping; Wang, Ru; Wang, Keying; Xu, Huiting; Sui, Meirong; Li, Jingjing; Xu, Kai

    2016-09-15

    Highly blue luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) with a fluorescence quantum yield of 42.3% were prepared by an efficient one-step pyrolytic route from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and urea. The as-synthesized N-CDs were demonstrated as an effective fluorescent probe for label-free, selective and sensitive recognition of Fe(3+) with a linear range of 0.5μM to 2mM and a detection limit of 13.6nM due to Fe(3+)-quenched fluorescence (turn-off). The quenched fluorescence could be turned on after the addition of apoferritin owing to the removal of ferric species from the surface of N-CDs by apoferritin, making complex N-CDs/Fe(3+) a selective apoferritin probe with a linear range of 0.1-25μM and a detection limit as low as 2.6nM. In addition, the application of this novel N-CDs-based probe for imaging Fe(3+) ions and apoferritin in living cells suggest that this sensing system has great potential applications in biosensing, bioimaging, and many other fields.

  11. The 2008 outburst in the Young Stellar System Z CMa. III - Multi-epoch high-angular resolution images and spectra of the components in near-infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnefoy, M; Dougados, C; Kospal, A; Benisty, M; Duchene, G; Bouvier, J; Garcia, P J V; Whelan, E; Antoniucci, S; Podio, L

    2016-01-01

    Z CMa is a complex pre-main sequence binary with a current separation of 100 mas, known to consist of an FU Orionis star (SE component) and an embedded Herbig Be star (NW component). Immediately when the late-2008 outburst of Z CMa was announced to the community, we initiated a high angular resolution imaging campaign with VLT/NaCo, Keck/NIRC2, VLT/SINFONI, and Keck/OSIRIS which aimed at characterizing the outburst of both components of the system in the near-infrared. We confirm that the NW star dominates the system flux in the 1.1-3.8 microns range and is responsible for the photometric outburst. We extract the first medium-resolution (R=2000-4000) near-infrared (1.1-2.4 microns) spectra of the individual components during and after the outburst. The SE component has a spectrum typical of FU Orionis objects. The NW component spectrum is characteristic of embedded outbursting protostars and EX Or objects. It displays numerous emission lines during the outburst whose intensity correlates with the system activ...

  12. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family...... and renamed as MT-III. In this study we have raised polyclonal antibodies in rabbits against recombinant rat MT-III (rMT-III). The sera obtained reacted specifically against recombinant zinc-and cadmium-saturated rMT-III, and did not cross-react with native rat MT-I and MT-II purified from the liver of zinc...... injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize...

  13. Angulação dos caninos em indivíduos portadores de má oclusão de Classe I e de Classe III: análise comparativa através de um novo método utilizando imagens digitalizadas Canine angulation in Class I and Class III individuals: a comparative analysis with a new method using digital images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyana Ramos Azevedo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar as angulações mesiodistais das coroas dos caninos em indivíduos portadores de má oclusão de Classe III, comparando-os a indivíduos Classe I. MÉTODOS: foram empregadas medidas tomadas em fotografias digitalizadas de modelos de gesso e transportadas para um programa gráfico para leitura das medidas (Image Tool. Tais procedimentos foram repetidos para avaliação do erro do método casual (fórmula de Dahlberg e para a análise da reprodutibilidade através da Correlação intraclasse. A amostra constituiu-se de 57 pacientes com dentição permanente completa e não tratados ortodonticamente, dividida em dois grupos, de acordo com a má oclusão apresentada: o grupo I foi constituído por 33 pacientes portadores de má oclusão de Classe I, sendo 16 do sexo masculino e 17 do feminino, com média de idades de 27 anos; o grupo II era representado por 24 pacientes portadores de má oclusão de Classe III, 20 do sexo masculino e 4 do feminino, com média de idades de 22 anos. RESULTADOS: o erro casual mostrou-se com uma variação de 1,54 a 1,96 graus para a angulação dos caninos. A análise estatística revelou que o método apresenta uma excelente reprodutibilidade (pOBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the mesiodistal angulation of canine crowns in individuals with Class III malocclusion in comparison with Class I individuals. METHODS: Measurements were taken from digital photographs of plaster models and imported into an imaging program (Image Tool. These procedures were repeated to assess random method error (Dahlberg's formula, and analyze reproducibility by intraclass correlation. The sample consisted of 57 patients with complete permanent dentition, untreated orthodontically and divided into two groups according to their malocclusion: Group I consisted of 33 patients with Class I malocclusion, 16 males and 17 females, mean age 27 years; Group II comprised 24 patients with Class III malocclusion, 20 males and

  14. The Extragalactic Distance Scale Key Project III. Teh discovery of Cephids and a New Distance to M101 Using the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelson, Daniel D.; Madore, Barry

    1994-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 29 cephid variables in the galaxy M101 after using the original Wide Field Camera (WFC 1) and the new Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC 2) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), to observe a field in M101 at 14 independent epochs in F555W.

  15. An HST Imaging Survey of Low-Mass Stars in the Chamaeleon I Star Forming region

    CERN Document Server

    Robberto, M; Da Rio, N; Apai, D; Pascucci, I; Ricci, L; Goddi, C; Testi, L; Palla, F; Bacciotti, F

    2012-01-01

    We present new HST/WFPC2 observations of 20 fields centered around T Tauri stars in the Chamaeleon I star forming region. Images have been obtained in the F631N ([OI]6300A), F656N (Ha) and F673N ([SII]6716A+6731A) narrow-band filters, plus the Johnson V-band equivalent F547M filter. We detect 31 T Tauri stars falling within our fields. We discuss the optical morphology of 10 sources showing evidence of either binarity, circumstellar material, or mass loss. We supplement our photometry with a compilation of optical, infrared and sub-millimeter data from the literature, together with new sub-mm data for three objects, to build the Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) of 19 single sources. Using an SED model fitting tool, we self-consistently estimate a number of stellar and disk parameters, while mass accretion rates are directly derived from our Ha photometry. We find that bolometric luminosities derived from dereddened optical data tend to be underestimated in systems with high alpha(2-24} IR spectral index, s...

  16. AAT Imaging and Microslit Spectroscopy in the Southern Hubble Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Glazebrook, K; Mann, R G; Monbleau, D; Oliver, S; Verma, A; Boyle, Brian; Glazebrook, Karl; Mann, Robert G.; Monbleau, Davienne; Oliver, Sebastian; Verma, Aprajita

    2006-01-01

    We present a deep photometric (B- and R-band) catalog and an associated spectroscopic redshift survey conducted in the vicinity of the Hubble Deep Field South. The spectroscopy yields 53 extragalactic redshifts in the range 0images complete to R<24 and spectroscopy is 50% complete at R=23. There is now strong evidence for a rich cluster at z\\simeq 0.58 flanking the WFPC2 field which is consistent with a known absorber of the bright QSO in this field. We find that photometric redshifts of z<1 galaxies in this field based on HST data are accurate to \\sigma_z/(1+z)=0.03 (albeit with small number statistics). The observations were carried out as a community service for Hubble Deep Field science, to demonstrate the first use of the `nod & shuffle' technique with a classical multi-object spectrograph and to test the use of `microslits' for ultra-high mu...

  17. The HST Survey of BL~Lacertae Objects. IV. Infrared Imaging of Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Scarpa, R; Padovani, P; O'Dowd, M; Scarpa, Riccardo; Padovani, Paolo; O'Dowd, Matthew; Calzetti, Daniela

    2000-01-01

    The HST NICMOS Camera 2 was used for H-band imaging of 12 BL Lacertae objects taken from the larger sample observed with the WFPC2 in the R band (Urry et al. 2000; Scarpa et al. 2000). Ten of the 12 BL Lacs are clearly resolved, and the detected host galaxies are large, bright ellipticals with average H-band absolute magnitude M=-26.2+-0.45 mag and effective radius 10+-5 kpc. The rest-frame integrated color of the host galaxies is on average R-H=2.3+-0.3, consistent with the value for both radio galaxies and normal, non-active elliptical galaxies, and indicating the dominant stellar population is old. The host galaxies tend to be bluer in their outer regions than in their cores, with average color gradient Delta(R-H)/Delta(log r)=-0.2 mag, again consistent with results for normal non-active elliptical galaxies. The infrared Kormendy relation, derived for the first time for BL Lac host galaxies, is m(e) = 3.8*log(R)+14.8 (where m(e) is the surface brightness at the effective radius R), fully in agreement with ...

  18. The Hubble Space Telescope Survey of BL Lacertae Objects. IV. Infrared Imaging of Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Urry, C. Megan; Padovani, Paolo; Calzetti, Daniela; O'Dowd, Matthew

    2000-11-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Camera 2 was used for H-band imaging of 12 BL Lacertae objects taken from the larger sample observed with the WFPC2 in the R band by Urry and coworkers and Scarpa and coworkers. Ten of the 12 BL Lacs are clearly resolved, and the detected host galaxies are large, bright ellipticals with average absolute magnitude =-26.2+/-0.45 mag and effective radius =10+/-5 kpc. The rest-frame integrated color of the host galaxies is on average =2.3+/-0.3, consistent with the value for both radio galaxies and normal, nonactive elliptical galaxies and indicating that the dominant stellar population is old. The host galaxies tend to be bluer in their outer regions than in their cores, with average color gradient Δ(R-H)/Δlogr=-0.2 mag, again consistent with results for normal nonactive elliptical galaxies. The infrared Kormendy relation, derived for the first time for BL Lac host galaxies, is μe=3.8logre+14.8, fully in agreement with the relation for normal ellipticals. The close similarity between BL Lac host galaxies and normal ellipticals suggests that the active nucleus has surprisingly little effect on the host galaxy. This supports a picture in which all elliptical galaxies harbor black holes that can be actively accreting for some fraction of their lifetime.

  19. Possible Recovery of SN 1961V In Hubble Space Telescope Archival Images

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dyk, S D; Li, W; Dyk, Schuyler D. Van; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong

    2002-01-01

    SN 1961V in NGC 1058 was originally classified by Fritz Zwicky as a ``Type V'' supernova. However, it has been argued that SN 1961V was not a genuine supernova, but instead the superoutburst of an eta Carinae-like luminous blue variable star. In particular, Filippenko et al. (1995, AJ, 110, 2261) used pre-refurbishment HST WFPC images and the known radio position of SN 1961V to conclude that the star survived the eruption and is likely coincident with a V \\~ 25.6 mag, V-I ~ 1.9 mag object. Recently, Stockdale et al. (2001, AJ, 122, 283) recovered the fading SN 1961V at radio wavelengths and argue that its behavior is similar that of some Type II supernovae. We have analyzed post-refurbishment archival HST WFPC2 data and find that the new radio position is still consistent with the Filippenko et al. object, which has not changed in brightness or color, but is also consistent with an adjacent, fainter (I ~ 24.3 mag) and very red (V-I > 1.0 mag) object. We suggest that this fainter object could be the survivor o...

  20. Deep Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of IC 1613 II. The Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Skillman, E D; Cole, A A; Dolphin, A E; Saha, A; Gallagher, J S; Dohm-Palmer, R C; Mateo, M; Skillman, Evan D.; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Saha, Abhijit; Mateo, Mario

    2003-01-01

    We present deep HST WFPC2 imaging of the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613. The photometry is the deepest to date for an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) is analyzed using three different methods to derive a star formation history (SFH). All three find an enhanced star formation rate (SFR), from 3 to 6 Gyr ago, and similar age-metallicity relationships (AMR). A comparison of the newly observed outer field with an earlier studied central field of IC 1613 shows that the SFR in the outer field has been significantly depressed during the last Gyr. This implies that the optical scale length of the galaxy has been decreasing with time and that comparison of galaxies at intermediate redshift with present day galaxies should take this effect into account. We find strong similarities between IC 1613 and the more distant Milky Way dSph companions in that all are dominated by star formation at intermediate ages. In particular, the SFH and AMR for IC 1613 and Leo I are...

  1. Deep ACS Imaging in the Globular Cluster NGC 6397: The Cluster Color Magnitude Diagram and Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Richer, Harvey B; Hurley, Jarrod; Anderson, Jay; King, Ivan; Davis, Saul; Fahlman, Gregory G; Hansen, Brad M S; Kalirai, Jason; Paust, Nathaniel; Rich, R Michael; Shara, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    We present the CMD from deep HST imaging in the globular cluster NGC 6397. The ACS was used for 126 orbits to image a single field in two colors (F814W, F606W) 5 arcmin SE of the cluster center. The field observed overlaps that of archival WFPC2 data from 1994 and 1997 which were used to proper motion (PM) clean the data. Applying the PM corrections produces a remarkably clean CMD which reveals a number of features never seen before in a globular cluster CMD. In our field, the main sequence stars appeared to terminate close to the location in the CMD of the hydrogen-burning limit predicted by two independent sets of stellar evolution models. The faintest observed main sequence stars are about a magnitude fainter than the least luminous metal-poor field halo stars known, suggesting that the lowest luminosity halo stars still await discovery. At the bright end the data extend beyond the main sequence turnoff to well up the giant branch. A populous white dwarf cooling sequence is also seen in the cluster CMD. Th...

  2. Novel (99m)Tc(III)-azide complexes [(99m)Tc(N3)(CDO)(CDOH)2B-R] (CDOH2=cyclohexanedione dioxime) as potential radiotracers for heart imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Zheng, Yumin; Avcibasi, Ugur; Liu, Shuang

    2016-11-01

    In this study, novel (99m)Tc(III)-azide complexes [(99m)Tc(N3)(CDO)(CDOH)2B-R] ((99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3: R=IS; (99m)Tc-MPboroxime-N3: R=MP; (99m)Tc-PAboroxime-N3: R=PA; (99m)Tc-PYboroxime-N3: R=PY; and (99m)Tc-Uboroxime-N3: R=5U) were evaluated as heart imaging agents. Complexes [(99m)Tc(N3)(CDO)(CDOH)2B-R] (R=IS, MP, PA, PY and 5U) were prepared by ligand exchange between NaN3 and [(99m)TcCl(CDO)(CDOH)2B-R]. Biodistribution and imaging studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Image quantification was performed to compare their initial heart uptake and myocardial retention. (99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3, (99m)Tc-PYboroxime-N3 and (99m)Tc-Uboroxime-N3 were prepared with high RCP (93-98%) while the RCP of (99m)Tc-MPboroxime-N3 and (99m)Tc-PAboroxime-N3 was 80-85%. The myocardial retention curves of (99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3, (99m)Tc-PYboroxime-N3 and (99m)Tc-Uboroxime-N3 were best fitted to the bi-exponential decay function. The half-time of the fast component was 1.6±0.4min for (99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3, 0.7±0.1min for (99m)Tc-PYboroxime-N3 and 0.9±0.4min for (99m)Tc-Uboroxime-N3. The 2-min heart uptake from biodistribution studies followed the ranking order of (99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3 (3.60±0.68%ID/g)>(99m)Tc-PYboroxime-N3 (2.35±0.37%ID/g)≫(99m)Tc-Uboroxime-N3 (1.29±0.06%ID/g). (99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3 had the highest 2-min heart uptake among (99m)Tc radiotracers revaluated in SD rats. High quality SPECT images were obtained with the right and left ventricular walls being clearly delineated. The best image acquisition window was 0-5min for (99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3. Both azide coligand and boronate caps had significant impact on the heart uptake and myocardial retention of complexes [(99m)Tc(N3)(CDO)(CDOH)2B-R]. Among the radiotracers evaluated in SD rats, (99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3 has the highest initial heart uptake with the heart retention comparable to that of (99m)Tc-Teboroxime. (99m)Tc-ISboroxime-N3 is a promising alternative to (99m)Tc-Teboroxime for SPECT MPI. Copyright

  3. NICMOS Narrow-band Images of OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Angela S. B.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, E. F.; Kaufman, M. J.; Hollenbach, D. J.; O'Dell, C. R.; Young, E. T.; Chen, H.

    1998-01-01

    We present images of a 90in. x 90in. field centered on BN in OMC-1, taken with the Near-Infrared Camera and MultiObject Spectrograph (NICMOS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The observed lines are H2 1-0 S(l), Pa, [FeII] 1.64 pm, and the adjacent continua. The region is rich in interesting structures. The most remarkable are the streamers or "fingers" of H2 emission which extend from 15in. to 50in. from IRc2, seen here in unprecedented detail. Unlike the northern H2 fingers, the inner fingers do not exhibit significant [FeII] emission at theirdips, which we suggest is due to lower excitation. These observations also show that the general morphology of the Pa and [FeII] emission (both imaged for the first time in this region) bears a striking resemblance to that of the Ha and [SII] emission previously observed with WFPC2. This implies that these IR and optical lines are produced by radiative excitation on the surface of the molecular cloud. The Pa morphology of HH 202 is also very similar to its H a and [OIII] emission, again suggesting that the Pa in this object is photo-excited by the Trapezium, as has been suggested for the optical emission. We find evidence of shock-excited [FeII] in HH 208, where it again closely follows the morphology of [SII]. There is also H2 coincident with the [SII] and [FeII] emission, which may be associated with HH 208. Finally, we note some interesting continuum features: diffuse "tails" trailing from IRc3 and IRc4, more extensive observations of the "crescent" found by Stolovy, et al. (1998), and new observations of a similar oval object nearby. We also find a "V"-shaped region which may be the boundary of a cavity being cleared by IRc2.

  4. High resolution imaging of NGC 2346 with GSAOI/GeMS: disentangling the planetary nebula molecular structure to understand its origin and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Manchado, Arturo; Villaver, Eva; Garcia-Segura, Guillermo; Shaw, Richard A; Garcia-Hernandez, D A

    2015-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution ($\\approx$ 60--90 milliarcseconds) images of the molecular hydrogen emission in the Planetary Nebula (PN) NGC 2346. The data were acquired during the System Verification of the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System + Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager. At the distance of NGC 2346, 700 pc, the physical resolution corresponds to $\\approx$ 56 AU, which is slightly higher than that an [N II] image of NGC 2346 obtained with HST/WFPC2. With this unprecedented resolution we were able to study in detail the structure of the H$_2$ gas within the nebula for the first time. We found it to be composed of knots and filaments, which at lower resolution had appeared to be a uniform torus of material. We explain how the formation of the clumps and filaments in this PN is consistent with a mechanism in which a central hot bubble of nebular gas surrounding the central star has been depressurized, and the thermal pressure of the photoionized region drives the fragmentation of the swep...

  5. The type III manufactory

    CERN Document Server

    Palcoux, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Using unusual objects in the theory of von Neumann algebra, as the chinese game Go or the Conway game of life (generalized on finitely presented groups), we are able to build, by hands, many type III factors.

  6. The SLUGGS Survey: The globular cluster systems of three early-type galaxies using wide-field imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Kartha, Sreeja S; Spitler, Lee R; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Arnold, Jacob A; Brodie, Jean P

    2013-01-01

    We present the results from a wide-field imaging study of globular cluster (GC) systems in three early-type galaxies. Combinations of Subaru/Suprime-Cam, CFHT/MegaCam and HST/WFPC2/ACS data were used to determine the GC system properties of three highly flattened galaxies NGC 720, NGC 1023 and NGC 2768. This work is the first investigation of the GC system in NGC 720 and NGC 2768 to very large galactocentric radius ($\\sim$ 100 kpc). The three galaxies have clear blue and red GC subpopulations. The radial surface densities of the GC systems are fitted with Sersic profiles, and detected out to 15, 8 and 10 galaxy effective radii respectively. The total number of GCs and specific frequency are determined for each GC system. The ellipticity of the red subpopulation is in better agreement with the host galaxy properties than is the blue subpopulation, supporting the traditional view that metal-rich GCs are closely associated with the bulk of their host galaxies' field stars, while metal-poor GCs reflect a distinct...

  7. Synthesis and characterization of [M(III)(PS)2(L)] mixed-ligand compounds (M = Re, 99Tc; PS = phosphinothiolate; L = dithiocarbamate) as potential models for the development of new agents for SPECT imaging and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarese, N; Morellato, N; Venzo, A; Refosco, F; Dolmella, A; Bolzati, C

    2013-06-03

    The synthesis and characterization of a new series of neutral, six-coordinated mixed-ligand compounds [M(III)(PS)2(L)] (M = Re; (99)Tc), where PS is bis(arylalkyl)- or trialkylphosphinothiolate and L is dithiocarbamate, are reported. Stable [M(III)(PS)2(L)] complexes were easily synthesized, in good yield, starting from precursors where the metal was in different oxidation states (III, V, and VII), involving ligand-exchange and/or redox-substitution reactions. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, positive-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray diffraction analysis. All complexes are constituted by the presence of the [M(III)(PS)2](+) moiety, where two phosphinothiolate ligands are tightly bound to the metal and the remaining two positions are saturated by a dithiocarbamate chelate, also carrying bulky bioactive molecules [e.g., (2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine]. X-ray analyses were performed on crystalline specimens of four different Re/(99)Tc compounds sharing a distorted trigonal-prismatic geometry, with a P2S4 coordination donor set. The possibility of easily preparing these [M(III)(PS)2(L)] complexes, starting from the corresponding permetalate anions, in mild reaction conditions and in high yield, lays the first stone to the preparation of a new series of M(III)-based (M = (99m)Tc/(188)Re) compounds potentially useful in theragnostic applications.

  8. Evolution of Class III treatment in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Peter; Moon, Won

    2015-07-01

    Angle, Tweed, and Moyers classified Class III malocclusions into 3 types: pseudo, dentoalveolar, and skeletal. Clinicians have been trying to identify the best timing to intercept a Class III malocclusion that develops as early as the deciduous dentition. With microimplants as skeletal anchorage, orthopedic growth modification became more effective, and it also increased the scope of camouflage orthodontic treatment for patients who were not eligible for orthognathic surgery. However, orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery remains the only option for patients with a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion or a craniofacial anomaly. Distraction osteogenesis can now be performed intraorally at an earlier age. The surgery-first approach can minimize the length of time that the malocclusion needs to worsen before orthognathic surgery. Finally, the use of computed tomography scans for 3-dimensional diagnosis and treatment planning together with advances in imaging technology can improve the accuracy of surgical movements and the esthetic outcomes for these patients.

  9. Wizlaw III og minnesangen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Artikel om den sidste slaviske Rügenfyrste, Wizlaw III (1265/68-1325), der traditionelt har været identificeret med minnesangeren Wizlaw den Unge. Om de bevarede sange og om minnesangens rolle ved det rügenske fyrstehof.......Artikel om den sidste slaviske Rügenfyrste, Wizlaw III (1265/68-1325), der traditionelt har været identificeret med minnesangeren Wizlaw den Unge. Om de bevarede sange og om minnesangens rolle ved det rügenske fyrstehof....

  10. III-V microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nougier, JP

    1991-01-01

    As is well known, Silicon widely dominates the market of semiconductor devices and circuits, and in particular is well suited for Ultra Large Scale Integration processes. However, a number of III-V compound semiconductor devices and circuits have recently been built, and the contributions in this volume are devoted to those types of materials, which offer a number of interesting properties. Taking into account the great variety of problems encountered and of their mutual correlations when fabricating a circuit or even a device, most of the aspects of III-V microelectronics, from fundamental p

  11. Standards in neurosonology. Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Wojczal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler. Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity.

  12. Standards in neurosonology. Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity).

  13. Boosting of Image Denoising Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Yaniv; Elad, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a generic recursive algorithm for improving image denoising methods. Given the initial denoised image, we suggest repeating the following "SOS" procedure: (i) (S)trengthen the signal by adding the previous denoised image to the degraded input image, (ii) (O)perate the denoising method on the strengthened image, and (iii) (S)ubtract the previous denoised image from the restored signal-strengthened outcome. The convergence of this process is studied for the K-SVD image ...

  14. Calculus III essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Calculus III includes vector analysis, real valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integrations, vector fields, and infinite series.

  15. Antithrombin III: biodistribution in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knot, E A; de Jong, E; ten Cate, J W; Gie, L K; van Royen, E A

    1987-12-18

    Five healthy volunteers were injected intravenously with 73-90 uCi purified human 131I-Antithrombin III (AT III), specific biological activity 5.6 U/mg. The tracer data were analysed using a three compartment model. The plasma radioactivity half life was 66.2 +/- 1.2 (sem) h, the fractional catabolic rate constant of the plasma pool was 0.025 +/- 0.002 (sem) h-1. These data were comparable with those described in the literature. Because of the difficulty in translating the mathematical analysis of various compartments into the biological model, biodistribution was monitored by a gamma camera linked to a DEC PDP 11/34 computer system. Dynamic and static images were obtained at fixed time intervals following the injection of 131I-AT III. Whole body scanning at intervals between the time of injection (t = 0) and t = 24.5 h showed 131I-AT III distribution over the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and great vessels. Dynamic scanning was performed over the heart, spleen and liver. Overlayed frames in the first ten minutes after the 131I-AT III injection showed the following radioactivity expressed as percentage of the injected dose; 5.9% +/- 0.3 (sem) over the heart, 10.6% +/- 0.9 (sem) over the liver and 1.1% +/- 0.1 (sem) over the spleen. A slower decline of the radioactivity between t = 0 and t = 24 h; (19%) was measured over the liver compared with the radioactivity disappearance over the heart region. This shows, in combination with the fact that the radioactivity disappearance over the heart was identical with the radioactivity decline measured in the plasma samples that retention of 131I-AT III occurred in the liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. CRBLASTER: A Parallel-Processing Computational Framework for Embarrassingly Parallel Image-Analysis Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighell, Kenneth John

    2010-10-01

    The development of parallel-processing image-analysis codes is generally a challenging task that requires complicated choreography of interprocessor communications. If, however, the image-analysis algorithm is embarrassingly parallel, then the development of a parallel-processing implementation of that algorithm can be a much easier task to accomplish because, by definition, there is little need for communication between the compute processes. I describe the design, implementation, and performance of a parallel-processing image-analysis application, called crblaster, which does cosmic-ray rejection of CCD images using the embarrassingly parallel l.a.cosmic algorithm. crblaster is written in C using the high-performance computing industry standard Message Passing Interface (MPI) library. crblaster uses a two-dimensional image partitioning algorithm that partitions an input image into N rectangular subimages of nearly equal area; the subimages include sufficient additional pixels along common image partition edges such that the need for communication between computer processes is eliminated. The code has been designed to be used by research scientists who are familiar with C as a parallel-processing computational framework that enables the easy development of parallel-processing image-analysis programs based on embarrassingly parallel algorithms. The crblaster source code is freely available at the official application Web site at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Removing cosmic rays from a single 800 × 800 pixel Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 image takes 44 s with the IRAF script lacos_im.cl running on a single core of an Apple Mac Pro computer with two 2.8 GHz quad-core Intel Xeon processors. crblaster is 7.4 times faster when processing the same image on a single core on the same machine. Processing the same image with crblaster simultaneously on all eight cores of the same machine takes 0.875 s—which is a speedup factor of 50.3 times faster than the

  17. Methods of Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D; Gottschalk, Alexander; Sostman, H Dirk; Chenevert, Thomas L; Fowler, Sarah E; Goodman, Lawrence R; Hales, Charles A; Hull, Russell D; Kanal, Emanuel; Leeper, Kenneth V; Nadich, David P; Sak, Daniel J; Tapson, Victor F; Wakefield, Thomas W; Weg, John G; Woodard, Pamela K

    2008-11-01

    In this work, the methods of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III) are described in detail. PIOPED III is a multicenter collaborative investigation sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The purpose is to determine the accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A composite reference standard based on usual diagnostic methods for PE is used. All images will be read by 2 blinded and study-certified central readers. Patients with no PE according to the composite reference test will be randomized to undergo gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography. This procedure will reduce the proportion of patients with negative tests at no loss in evaluation of sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Anomalia de Classe III

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Projeto de Pós-Graduação/Dissertação apresentado à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Medicina Dentária Introdução: A anomalia de classe III, é uma má oclusão que afeta os indivíduos psicologicamente, pois hoje em dia, a estética é socialmente valorizada. Deste modo, o diagnóstico deve ser executado precocemente para que os indivíduos portadores desta anomalia, possam ser acompanhados desde criança, pelos profissionais área da Medicina...

  19. Stability constants of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III) and Dy(III) complexes with N-(2-hydroxyphenyl) p-toluene sulphonamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, S.C.; Mathur, K.C. (Jodhpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-01-01

    The dissociation constants of the ligand and stability constants of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III) and Dy(III) complexes with N-(2-hydroxyphenyl) p-toluene sulphonamide have been determined potentiometrically using Calvin-Bjerrum pH titration technique at 30 +- 1deg C and ..mu.. = 0.1 M (NaClO/sub 4/) in aqueous medium. The stability constants of these metal complexes are found to follow the order Dy > Tb > Gd > Sm > Nd > Pr > La.

  20. Population III Hypernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smidt, Joseph; Even, Wesley; Wiggins, Brandon; Johnson, Jarrett L; Fryer, Chris L

    2014-01-01

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. But until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic lighthouses at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25 - 50 M$_{\\odot}$ hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10 - 15 to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and z = 4 - 5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, a superluminous event will occur that may be se...

  1. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wiggins, Brandon K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: dwhalen1999@gmail.com [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  2. Fast ejendom III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Hansen, Carsten

    Bogen er det tredje bind af tre planlagte bind om fast ejendom: I Overdragelsen, II Bolighandlen og III Ejerbeføjelsen. Fremstillingens giver et grundigt overblik over centrale områder af en omfattende regulering af fast ejendom, med angivelse af litteratur, hvor læseren kan søge yderligere...... oplysning. En ejer af fast ejendom er på særdeles mange områder begrænset i sin råden sammenlignet med ejeren af et formuegode i almindelighed. Fremstillingen tager udgangspunkt i ejerens perspektiv (fremfor samfundets eller myndighedernes). Både den privatretlige og offentligretlige regulering behandles......, eksempelvis ejendomsdannelsen, servitutter, naboretten, hævd, zoneinddelingen, den fysiske planlægning, beskyttelse af natur, beskyttelse af kultur, forurening fra fast ejendom, erstatning for forurening, jordforurening, ekspropriation, byggeri og adgang til fast ejendom....

  3. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Hamchaoui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO32], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m. adopting an octahedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m. exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octahedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO32]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO32]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4+ cations and the O atoms of the framework.

  4. Oxymatrinium tetrachloridoferrate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong He

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, (C15H25N2O2[FeCl4], contains a tetrachloridoferrate(III anion and a oxymatrinium cation [oxymatrine is (4R,7aS,13aR,13bR,13cS-dodecahydro-1H,5H,10H-dipyrido[2,1-f:3′,2′,1′-ij][1,6]naphthyridin-10-one 4-oxide]. The conformation of oxymatrine is similar to that of matrine with one ring having a half-chair conformation, while the others have chair conformations. Chiral chains of cations along the c axis are formed by O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  5. III.— Documents

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    III/1 inventaire de l’orangerie du château d’Ivry, 1770 • Inventaire après décès du marquis de Béringhen (extrait), AN M.C. LXXXVIII, 723, 28 février 1770 « [f° 113 v°] Dudit jour samedi seize du présent mois de juin huit heures du matin à même requête qualité et preuve que dessus, ainsi que le tout a été ci-devant établi, va être par les conseillers du roi notaires au Châtelet de Paris [f° 114 r°] soussignés procédé à la continuation du présent inventaire de la manière et ainsi qu’il suit. S...

  6. Pseudo Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance "modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow," some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  7. Semiconducting III-V compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Hilsum, C; Henisch, Heinz R

    1961-01-01

    Semiconducting III-V Compounds deals with the properties of III-V compounds as a family of semiconducting crystals and relates these compounds to the monatomic semiconductors silicon and germanium. Emphasis is placed on physical processes that are peculiar to III-V compounds, particularly those that combine boron, aluminum, gallium, and indium with phosphorus, arsenic, and antimony (for example, indium antimonide, indium arsenide, gallium antimonide, and gallium arsenide).Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins with an assessment of the crystal structure and binding of III-V compounds, f

  8. Lanthanide ion (III) complexes of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaminophosphonate for dual biosensing of pH with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Ali, Meser M; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Relaxivity-based magnetic resonance of phosphonated ligands chelated with gadolinium (Gd(3+)) shows promise for pH imaging. However instead of monitoring the paramagnetic effect of lanthanide complexes on the relaxivity of water protons, biosensor (or molecular) imaging with magnetic resonance is also possible by detecting either the nonexchangeable or the exchangeable protons on the lanthanide complexes themselves. The nonexchangeable protons (e.g. -CHx, where 3 ≥ x ≥ 1) are detected using a three-dimensional chemical shift imaging method called biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS), whereas the exchangeable protons (e.g. -OH or -NHy , where 2 ≥ y ≥ 1) are measured with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast. Here we tested the feasibility of BIRDS and CEST for pH imaging of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaminophosphonate (DOTA-4AmP(8-)) chelated with thulium (Tm(3+) ) and ytterbium (Yb(3+)). BIRDS and CEST experiments show that both complexes are responsive to pH and temperature changes. Higher pH and temperature sensitivities are obtained with BIRDS for either complex when using the chemical shift difference between two proton resonances vs using the chemical shift of a single proton resonance, thereby eliminating the need to use water resonance as reference. While CEST contrast for both agents is linearly dependent on pH within a relatively large range (i.e. 6.3-7.9), much stronger CEST contrast is obtained with YbDOTA-4AmP(5-) than with TmDOTA-4AmP(5-). In addition, we demonstrate the prospect of using BIRDS to calibrate CEST as new platform for quantitative pH imaging.

  9. Maxwell Optics III. Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, S A

    2002-01-01

    A new formalism of beam-optics and polarization has been recently presented, based on an exact matrix representation of the Maxwell equations. This is described in Part-I and Part-II. In this Part, we present the application of the above formalism to the specific example of the axially symmetric graded index fiber. This formalism leads to the wavelength-dependent modifications of the six aberrations present in the traditional prescriptions and further gives rise to the remaining three aberrations permitted by the axial symmetry. Besides, it also gives rise to a wavelength-dependent image rotation. The three extra aberrations and the image rotation are not found in any of the traditional approaches.

  10. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  11. Smart Image Enhancement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Rahman, Zia-ur (Inventor); Woodell, Glenn A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Contrast and lightness measures are used to first classify the image as being one of non-turbid and turbid. If turbid, the original image is enhanced to generate a first enhanced image. If non-turbid, the original image is classified in terms of a merged contrast/lightness score based on the contrast and lightness measures. The non-turbid image is enhanced to generate a second enhanced image when a poor contrast/lightness score is associated therewith. When the second enhanced image has a poor contrast/lightness score associated therewith, this image is enhanced to generate a third enhanced image. A sharpness measure is computed for one image that is selected from (i) the non-turbid image, (ii) the first enhanced image, (iii) the second enhanced image when a good contrast/lightness score is associated therewith, and (iv) the third enhanced image. If the selected image is not-sharp, it is sharpened to generate a sharpened image. The final image is selected from the selected image and the sharpened image.

  12. Aquaporin Inhibition by Gold(III) Compounds : New Insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, Ana Paula; Ciancetta, Antonella; Batista de Almeida, Andreia; Marrone, Alessandro; Re, Nazzareno; Soveral, Graca; Casini, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane water/glycerol channels with essential roles in biological systems, as well as being promising targets for therapy and imaging. Using a stopped-flow method, a series of gold(III), platinum(II) and copper(II) complexes bearing nitrogen donor ligands, such as 1,10-phenat

  13. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  14. Visualization and mathematics III

    CERN Document Server

    Polthier, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    This research book on Mathematical Visualization contains state of the art presentations on visualization problems in mathematics, on fundamental mathematical research in computer graphics, and on software frameworks for the application of visualization to real-world problems. All contributions were written by leading experts in the field and peer-refereed by an international editorial team. The book grew out of the third international workshop "Visualization and Mathematics", which was held from May 22-25, 2002 in Berlin. The themes of the book cover important recent developments on - Geometry and Combinatorics of Meshes - Discrete Vector Fields and Topology - Geometric Modelling - Image Based Visualization - Software Environments and Applications - Education and Communication The variety of topics makes the book a suitable resource for researchers, lecturers, and practitioners; http://www-sfb288.math.tu-berlin.de/vismath/

  15. An HST Imaging Survey of Low-mass Stars in the Chamaeleon I Star-forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberto, M.; Spina, L.; Da Rio, N.; Apai, D.; Pascucci, I.; Ricci, L.; Goddi, C.; Testi, L.; Palla, F.; Bacciotti, F.

    2012-09-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 observations of 20 fields centered around T Tauri stars in the Chamaeleon I star-forming region. Images have been obtained in the F631N ([O I] λ6300), F656N (Hα), and F673N ([S II] λλ6716, 6731) narrow-band filters, plus the Johnson V-band equivalent F547M filter. We detect 31 T Tauri stars falling within our fields. We discuss the optical morphology of 10 sources showing evidence of either binarity, circumstellar material, or mass loss. We supplement our photometry with a compilation of optical, infrared, and submillimeter (sub-mm) data from the literature, together with new sub-mm data for three objects, to build the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 19 single sources. Using an SED model fitting tool, we self-consistently estimate a number of stellar and disk parameters, while mass accretion rates are directly derived from our Hα photometry. We find that bolometric luminosities derived from dereddened optical data tend to be underestimated in systems with high α2-24 IR spectral index, suggesting that disks seen nearly edge-on may occasionally be interpreted as low-luminosity (and therefore more evolved) sources. On the other hand, the same α2-24 IR spectral index, a tracer of the amount of dust in the warmer layers of the circumstellar disks, and the mass accretion rate appear to decay with the isochronal stellar age, suggesting that the observed age spread (sime 0.5-5 Myr) within the cluster is real. Our sample contains a few outliers that may have dissipated their circumstellar disks on a shorter timescale.

  16. Celestine III and the North

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Kjersgaard

    2008-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår pave Cølestin IIIs forhold til de nordiske kongeriger i perioden 1191-1198. Artiklen viser, at paven, som i forskningen traditionelt år har stået i skyggen af sin berømte, energiske og især: yngre efterfølger, Innocens III, har været på forkant med udviklingen i de nordiske rig...

  17. Deep Advanced Camera for Surveys Imaging in the Globular Cluster NGC 6397: the Cluster Color-Magnitude Diagram and Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Harvey B.; Dotter, Aaron; Hurley, Jarrod; Anderson, Jay; King, Ivan; Davis, Saul; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Kalirai, Jason; Paust, Nathaniel; Rich, R. Michael; Shara, Michael M.

    2008-06-01

    We present the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) from deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging in the globular cluster NGC 6397. The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) was used for 126 orbits to image a single field in two colors (F814W, F606W) 5' SE of the cluster center. The field observed overlaps that of archival WFPC2 data from 1994 and 1997 which were used to proper motion (PM) clean the data. Applying the PM corrections produces a remarkably clean CMD which reveals a number of features never seen before in a globular cluster CMD. In our field, the main-sequence stars appeared to terminate close to the location in the CMD of the hydrogen-burning limit predicted by two independent sets of stellar evolution models. The faintest observed main-sequence stars are about a magnitude fainter than the least luminous metal-poor field halo stars known, suggesting that the lowest-luminosity halo stars still await discovery. At the bright end the data extend beyond the main-sequence turnoff to well up the giant branch. A populous white dwarf cooling sequence is also seen in the cluster CMD. The most dramatic features of the cooling sequence are its turn to the blue at faint magnitudes as well as an apparent truncation near F814W = 28. The cluster luminosity and mass functions were derived, stretching from the turnoff down to the hydrogen-burning limit. It was well modeled with either a very flat power-law or a lognormal function. In order to interpret these fits more fully we compared them with similar functions in the cluster core and with a full N-body model of NGC 6397 finding satisfactory agreement between the model predictions and the data. This exercise demonstrates the important role and the effect that dynamics has played in altering the cluster initial mass function.

  18. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections - III. [O iii] bolometric corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Alison; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Brotherton, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    We present quasar bolometric corrections using the [O III] λ 5007 narrow emission line luminosity based on the detailed spectral energy distributions of 53 bright quasars at low to moderate redshift (0.0345 diversity, introduces scatter into the L_{[O III]}-Liso relationship. We found that the {[O III]} bolometric correction can be significantly improved by adding a term including the equivalent width ratio R_{Fe II} ≡ EW_{{Fe II}}/EW_{Hβ }, which is an EV1 indicator. Inclusion of R_{Fe II} in predicting Liso is significant at nearly the 3σ level and reduces the scatter and systematic offset of the luminosity residuals. Typically, {[O III]} bolometric corrections are adopted for Type 2 sources where the quasar continuum is not observed and in these cases, R_{Fe II} cannot be measured. We searched for an alternative measure of EV1 that could be measured in the optical spectra of Type 2 sources but were unable to identify one. Thus, the main contribution of this work is to present an improved {[O III]} bolometric correction based on measured bolometric luminosities and highlight the EV1 dependence of the correction in Type 1 sources.

  19. Photoluminescence profiles and fast/slow annealing effects of Eu(III)/Tb(III)-codoped silica phosphor materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Jung; Choi, Young In; Kang, Jun-Gill; Sohn, Youngku

    2016-05-01

    A silica (SiO2) nanoparticle matrix was codoped with luminescent Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions using a modified Stöber method. The effects of fast and slow thermal annealing on photoluminescence profile imaging were examined. Slow annealing treatment suppressed more quenching sites than fast thermal annealing to further increase the photoluminescence signals. The photoluminescence signals observed between 450 and 720 nm were assigned to the (5)D(0)  → (7)F(J) (J = 0,1,2,3,4) of Eu(III) and the (5)D(4)  → (7)F(J) (J = 6,5,4,3) transitions of Tb(III). Photoluminescence was largely sensitized by indirect excitation and was much stronger than that generated by direct excitation. The Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions were doped at lower symmetry sites in the silica matrix. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Spectrophotometric and pH-Metric Studies of Ce(III, Dy(III, Gd(III,Yb(III and Pr(III Metal Complexes with Rifampicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Sonar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The metal-ligand and proton-ligand stability constant of Ce(III, Dy(III, Gd(III,Yb(III and Pr(III metals with substituted heterocyclic drug (Rifampicin were determined at various ionic strength by pH metric titration. NaClO4 was used to maintain ionic strength of solution. The results obtained were extrapolated to the zero ionic strength using an equation with one individual parameter. The thermodynamic stability constant of the complexes were also calculated. The formation of complexes has been studied by Job’s method. The results obtained were of stability constants by pH metric method is confirmed by Job’s method.

  1. The START III bargaining space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  2. Conference on Fractals and Related Fields III

    CERN Document Server

    Seuret, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume provides readers with an overview of the most recent developments in the mathematical fields related to fractals, including both original research contributions, as well as surveys from many of the leading experts on modern fractal theory and applications. It is an outgrowth of the Conference of Fractals and Related Fields III, that was held on September 19-25, 2015 in île de Porquerolles, France. Chapters cover fields related to fractals such as harmonic analysis, multifractal analysis, geometric measure theory, ergodic theory and dynamical systems, probability theory, number theory, wavelets, potential theory, partial differential equations, fractal tilings, combinatorics, and signal and image processing. The book is aimed at pure and applied mathematicians in these areas, as well as other researchers interested in discovering the fractal domain.

  3. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  4. Constraining C iii] Emission in a Sample of Five Luminous z = 5.7 Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiani; Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Stark, Daniel P.; Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D.; Robertson, Brant E.; Siana, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations have suggested that the C iii]λ 1907/1909 emission lines could be alternative diagnostic lines for galaxies in the reionization epoch. We use the F128N narrowband filter on the Hubble Space Telescope’s (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) to search for C iii] emission in a sample of five galaxies at z = 5.7 in the Subaru Deep Field and the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field. Using the F128N narrowband imaging, together with the broadband imaging, we do not detect C iii] emission for the five galaxies with {J}{AB} ranging from 24.10 to 27.00 in our sample. For the brightest galaxy J132416.13+274411.6 in our sample (z = 5.70, {J}{AB}=24.10), which has a significantly higher signal to noise, we report a C iii] flux of 3.34+/- 1.81× {10}-18 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2, which places a stringent 3σ upper limit of 5.43× {10}-18 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 on C iii] flux and 6.57 Å on the C iii] equivalent width. Using the stacked image, we put a 3σ upper limit on the mean C iii] flux of 2.55× {10}-18 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 and a 3σ upper limit on the mean C iii] equivalent width of 4.20 Å for this sample of galaxies at z = 5.70. Combined with strong C iii] detection reported among high-z galaxies in the literature, our observations suggest that the equivalent widths of C iii] from galaxies at z > 5.70 exhibit a wide range of distribution. Our strong limits on C iii] emission could be used as a guide for future observations in the reionization epoch.

  5. Trigger efficiencies at BES III

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, N; Liu, Z A; Jin, D P; Xu, H; Gong, W X; Wang, K; Cao, G F

    2010-01-01

    Trigger efficiencies at BES III were determined for both the J/psi and psi' data taking of 2009. Both dedicated runs and physics datasets are used; efficiencies are presented for Bhabha-scattering events, generic hadronic decay events involving charged tracks, dimuon events and psi' -> pi+pi-J/psi, J/psi -> l+l- events (l an electron or muon). The efficiencies are found to lie well above 99% for all relevant physics cases, thus fulfilling the BES III design specifications.

  6. First Stars III Conference Summary

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Brian W; Heger, Alexander; Abel, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of the formation, life, and death of Population III stars, as well as the impact that these objects had on later generations of structure formation, is one of the foremost issues in modern cosmological research and has been an active area of research during the past several years. We summarize the results presented at "First Stars III," a conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics. This conference, the third in a series, took place in July 2007 at the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, U.S.A.

  7. A study of the stability of Jovian winds from HST images: 1995 - 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Melendo, E.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2000-10-01

    The resolution of the best WFPC-2 HST Jupiter images was 200 kmpix-1, which is close to the maximum resolution obtained by the narrow angle cameras on board Voyager 1 and 2, 160 kmpix-1. This property of the best HST Jupiter imaging spanning a whole Jovian rotation, encouraged the use of correlation techniques to obtain a series of high resolution zonal wind profiles with a velocity data scatter similar to that obtained from Voyager images. This approach provided a unique opportunity to study the Jovian winds during a time span of 4 years, which is about 12 times longer than the 4 month lapse between the two Voyager flybys in 1979, 16 years later, and before the Cassini encounter at the end of 2000. A total of six series of wind profiles from October 5, 1995 to July 16, 1998, in the 410nm, 889nm, and 953nm bands were obtained with an average velocity scatter between 5 and 6 m/s. Jovian winds were also explored up to planetographic latitudes close to +80 degrees north and -70 degrees south. Results show the presence of two previously unknown jets over +60N and at least an additional one to the south of 60S degrees latitude. Wind profiles obtained at different wavelengths were also virtually indistinguishable, suggesting a negligible influence of a possible height effect. One of the most conspicuous results is the strong general stability displayed by the wind profile during the four year span, although the jet stream at 26S showed important alterations in shape. Comparing the HST wind profiles with the Voyager 2 wind profile obtained in violet light by S. Limaye (Icarus, Vol. 65, 335, 1986), slight latitude differences up to 1.5 degrees latitude are suggested for the location of some westerly and easterly jet streams, specially in the planet's northern hemisphere. Important changes also occurred in the eastward jets at 6S and 23N degrees of latitude. This work was supported by E. Duran Foundation and Gobierno Vasco PI 034/97.

  8. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  9. 一种肝脏类生物相容性氨基酸共聚物磁共振成像造影剂%A Biocompatible Gadolinium (III)-Poly (Aspartic Acid-Co-Phenylalanine) for Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖研; 湛游洋; 薛蓉; 李晓晶; 裴奉奎; 冯江华; 占博涵

    2015-01-01

    A new biocompatible gadolinium (III)-macromolecule (AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd) was developed as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Poly (aspartic acid-co- phenylalanine) was synthesized, modified via ethylenediamine, conjugated with 1,4,7,10- tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and finally chelated gadolinium (III), yielding gadolinium (III)-based macromolecule (AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd). The hemolytic tests showed the hemocompatibility of this gadolinium (III)-based macromolecular conjugate.In vitro, AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd could be degraded, when it was incubated with cathepsin B in phosphate buffered solution (pH = 5.5). TheT1-relaxivity (15.95 mmol–1·L·s–1) of AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd was 2.9 times of that (5.59 mmol–1·L·s–1) of the clinical MRI contrast agent (Gd-DOTA) at 1.5 T and 25℃. The liver enhancement of AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd was 63.5±6.1% during the maximum enhancement time (50-80 min), which was much better than that of Gd-DOTA (24.2±2.9%, 10-30 min). AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd was expected to be a potential liver MRI contrast agent.%一种新型的以天门冬氨酸-苯丙氨酸共聚物为载体的大分子生物相容性材料(AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd)被制备出来作为磁共振成像造影剂.首先合成了天门冬氨酸-苯丙氨酸共聚物,之后利用乙二胺将1,4,7,10-四氮杂环十二烷-1,4,7,10-四乙酸(DOTA)连接到共聚物上,最后将钆离子通过配位的作用方式连接到 DOTA 上,最终得到大分子AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd.体外溶血性试验表明AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd具有较好的血液相容性.在pH =5.5的组织蛋白酶B的磷酸缓冲液中,AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd能够降解.AP- EDA-DOTA-Gd的体外弛豫效率(15.95 mmol–1×L×s–1)为目前临床应用的Gd-DOTA (5.59 mmol–1×L×s–1)的2.9倍.大鼠肝脏成像实验结果表明,AP-EDA-DOTA-Gd对于肝组织的成像增强对比度为63.5±6.1%远高于Gd-DOTA (24.2±2.9%).

  10. The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J C; Ayad, R; Azfar, F; Dambasuren, E; Efimov, A; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Anderson, S; Smith, A; Kubota, Y; Lipeles, E; Coan, T E; Staeck, J; Fadeev, V; Volobuev, I P

    1999-01-01

    We are constructing a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) for the CLEO III upgrade for precision charged hadron identification. The RICH uses plane and sawtooth LiF crystals as radiators, MWPCs as photon detectors with TEA as the photo-sensitive material, and low-noise Viking readout electronics. Results of a beam test of the first two out of total 30 sectors are presented.

  11. EXCEDE Technology Development III: First Vacuum Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Hix, Troy T; Bendek, Eduardo; Thomas, Sandrine J; Lynch, Dana H; Mihara, Roger; Irwin, J Wes; Duncan, Alan L; Greene, Thomas P; Guyon, Olivier; Kendrick, Richard L; Smith, Eric H; Witteborn, Fred C; Schneider, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the third in the series on the technology development for the EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer) mission concept, which in 2011 was selected by NASA's Explorer program for technology development (Category III). EXCEDE is a 0.7m space telescope concept designed to achieve raw contrasts of 1e6 at an inner working angle of 1.2 l/D and 1e7 at 2 l/D and beyond. This will allow it to directly detect and spatially resolve low surface brightness circumstellar debris disks as well as image giant planets as close as in the habitable zones of their host stars. In addition to doing fundamental science on debris disks, EXCEDE will also serve as a technological and scientific precursor for any future exo-Earth imaging mission. EXCEDE uses a Starlight Suppression System (SSS) based on the PIAA coronagraph, enabling aggressive performance. We report on our continuing progress of developing the SSS for EXCEDE, and in particular (a) the reconfiguration of our system into a more fli...

  12. Mechatronic systems and materials III

    CERN Document Server

    Gosiewski, Zdzislaw

    2009-01-01

    This very interesting volume is divided into 24 sections; each of which covers, in detail, one aspect of the subject-matter: I. Industrial robots; II. Microrobotics; III. Mobile robots; IV. Teleoperation, telerobotics, teleoperated semi-autonomous systems; V. Sensors and actuators in mechatronics; VI. Control of mechatronic systems; VII. Analysis of vibration and deformation; VIII. Optimization, optimal design; IX. Integrated diagnostics; X. Failure analysis; XI. Tribology in mechatronic systems; XII. Analysis of signals; XIII. Measurement techniques; XIV. Multifunctional and smart materials;

  13. The Negotiation of Basel III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm

    2015-01-01

    While the Basel Accords of 1988 and 2004 (Basel I and Basel II) ostensibly set out to regulate bank risk at the international level, they were effectively in the grip of neoliberal beliefs in the self-regulating potential of free markets. In 2009–2011, the Basel Accords were revised once more wit...... agency, the empirical argument is substantiated through textual–intertextual analysis of the rhetorical circulation of affective signs in the Basel III negotiations....

  14. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  15. Antithrombin III and the nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, K A; Stoffersen, E

    1979-05-01

    Plasma and urinary antithrombin III (AT-III) was measured in 15 cases of nephrotic syndrome. Plasma AT-III correlated well with serum albumin, but poorly with proteinuria, whereas urinary AT-III correlated well to proteinuria. The plasma AT-III level had a mean similar to 25 healthy controls, but the range was significantly wider. A case with nephrotic syndrome and left renal vein thrombosis is reported. The urinary output of AT-III rose and the plasma level fell with the activity of the disease. Although AT-III and albumin have similar molecule weight, their renal clearance was found to be different. It is suggested that urinary loss of AT-III plays a role in the hypercoagulable state sometimes found in the nephrotic syndrome.

  16. The Many Worlds of Hugh Everett III

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    A review of Peter Byrne's biography of Hugh Everett III, "The Many Worlds of Hugh Everett III: Multiple Universes, Mutual Assured Destruction, and the Meltdown of a Nuclear Family", (Oxford University Press, 2010).

  17. Effect of Class III bone anchor treatment on airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tung; De Clerck, Hugo; Wilson, Michael; Golden, Brent

    2015-07-01

    To compare airway volumes and minimum cross-section area changes of Class III patients treated with bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) versus untreated Class III controls. Twenty-eight consecutive skeletal Class III patients between the ages of 10 and 14 years (mean age, 11.9 years) were treated using Class III intermaxillary elastics and bilateral miniplates (two in the infra-zygomatic crests of the maxilla and two in the anterior mandible). The subjects had cone beam computed tomographs (CBCTs) taken before initial loading (T1) and 1 year out (T2). Twenty-eight untreated Class III patients (mean age, 12.4 years) had CBCTs taken and cephalograms generated. The airway volumes and minimum cross-sectional area measurements were performed using Dolphin Imaging 11.7 3D software. The superior border of the airway was defined by a plane that passes through the posterior nasal spine and basion, while the inferior border included the base of the epiglottis to the lower border of C3. From T1 to T2, airway volume from BAMP-treated subjects showed a statistically significant increase (1499.64 mm(3)). The area in the most constricted section of the airway (choke point) increased slightly (15.44 mm(2)). The airway volume of BAMP patients at T2 was 14136.61 mm(3), compared with 14432.98 mm(3) in untreated Class III subjects. Intraexaminer correlation coefficients values and 95% confidence interval values were all greater than .90, showing a high degree of reliability of the measurements. BAMP treatment did not hinder the development of the oropharynx.

  18. Neutron imaging systems utilizing lithium-containing semiconductor crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold

    2017-04-25

    A neutron imaging system, including: a plurality of Li-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor crystals arranged in an array, wherein III represents a Group III element and VI represents a Group VI element; and electronics operable for detecting and a charge in each of the plurality of crystals in the presence of neutrons and for imaging the neutrons. Each of the crystals is formed by: melting the Group III element; adding the Li to the melted Group III element at a rate that allows the Li and Group III element to react, thereby providing a single phase Li-III compound; and adding the Group VI element to the single phase Li-III compound and heating. Optionally, each of the crystals is also formed by doping with a Group IV element activator.

  19. A determination of H-0 with the class gravitational lens B1608+656. II. Mass models and the Hubble constant from lensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, LVE; Fassnacht, CD

    1999-01-01

    We present mass models of the four-image gravitational lens system B1608 + 656, based on information obtained through VLBA imaging, VLA monitoring, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 and NICMOS imaging. We have determined a mass model for the lens galaxies that reproduces (1) all image positions

  20. Optical properties of the Eu(III)-La(III)-complex-doped polyolefine film and rod samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogreb, Roman; Popov, Oleg; Lirtsman, Vlad; Pyshkin, Oleg; Kazachkov, Alexander; Musin, Albina; Finkelshtein, Binyamin; Shmukler, Yuri; Davidov, Dan; Bormashenko, Edward

    2005-04-01

    The work is devoted to luminescent properties of trivalent lanthanide complexes dispersed in thermoplastic host matrices. Polyethylene-based film and polypropylene-based rod both doped with these complexes were manufactured using an extrusion technique. Two kinds of dopants were used: Eu(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-1,10-phenanthroline complex (Eu(III)) and Eu(III)-La(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex (Eu(III)-La(III)). Comparison was made between these samples regarding absorption, excitation, emission and a lifetime of luminescence. Dependence of emission intensity on the excitation energy was determined. Emission spectra of the films were studied at room and helium temperatures. Optical properties of Eu(III) samples are different from Eu(III)-La(III) samples. Significant difference in spectra of these two types of samples may be attributed to the La(III) action.

  1. Development of demographic norms for four new WAIS-III/WMS-III indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Taylor, Michael J; Woodward, Todd S; Heaton, Robert K

    2006-06-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been developed: the WAIS-III General Ability Index, the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index, and the two alternate Immediate and Delayed Memory Indexes. The purpose of this study was to develop demographically corrected norms for the four new indexes using the standardization sample and education oversample from the WAIS-III and WMS-III. These norms were developed using the same methodology as the demographically corrected norms made available in the WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant.

  2. Transformational III-V Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Nour, Maha A.

    2014-04-01

    Flexible electronics using III-V materials for nano-electronics with high electron mobility and optoelectronics with direct band gap are attractive for many applications. This thesis describes a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process for transforming traditional III-V materials based electronics into flexible one. The thesis reports releasing 200 nm of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) from 200 nm GaAs / 300 nm Aluminum Arsenide (AlAs) stack on GaAs substrate using diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF). This process enables releasing a single top layer compared to peeling off all layers with small sizes at the same time. This is done utilizing a network of release holes that contributes to the better transparency (45 % at 724 nm wavelengths) observed. Fabrication of metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAPs) on GaAs is followed by releasing it to have devices on flexible 200 nm GaAs. Similarly, flexible GaSb and InP fabrication process is also reported to transform traditional electronics into large-area flexible electronics.

  3. Nanodiamond-Gadolinium(III) Aggregates for Tracking Cancer Growth In Vivo at High Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammohan, Nikhil; MacRenaris, Keith W; Moore, Laura K; Parigi, Giacomo; Mastarone, Daniel J; Manus, Lisa M; Lilley, Laura M; Preslar, Adam T; Waters, Emily A; Filicko, Abigail; Luchinat, Claudio; Ho, Dean; Meade, Thomas J

    2016-12-14

    The ability to track labeled cancer cells in vivo would allow researchers to study their distribution, growth, and metastatic potential within the intact organism. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is invaluable for tracking cancer cells in vivo as it benefits from high spatial resolution and the absence of ionizing radiation. However, many MR contrast agents (CAs) required to label cells either do not significantly accumulate in cells or are not biologically compatible for translational studies. We have developed carbon-based nanodiamond-gadolinium(III) aggregates (NDG) for MR imaging that demonstrated remarkable properties for cell tracking in vivo. First, NDG had high relaxivity independent of field strength, a finding unprecedented for gadolinium(III) [Gd(III)]-nanoparticle conjugates. Second, NDG demonstrated a 300-fold increase in the cellular delivery of Gd(III) compared to that of clinical Gd(III) chelates without sacrificing biocompatibility. Further, we were able to monitor the tumor growth of NDG-labeled flank tumors by T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging for 26 days in vivo, longer than was reported for other MR CAs or nuclear agents. Finally, by utilizing quantitative maps of relaxation times, we were able to describe tumor morphology and heterogeneity (corroborated by histological analysis), which would not be possible with competing molecular imaging modalities.

  4. Observing Jupiter's polar stratospheric haze with HST/STIS. An HST White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Grodent, Denis; Nichols, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this HST white paper is to demonstrate that it is possible to monitor Jupiter's polar haze with HST/STIS without breaking the ground screening limit for bright objects. This demonstration rests on a thorough simulation of STIS output from an existing image obtained with HST/WFPC2. It is shown that the STIS NUV-MAMA + F25CIII filter assembly provides a count rate per pixel ~11 times smaller than that obtained for one pixel of WFPC2 WF3 CCD + F218W corresponding filter. This ratio is sufficiently large to cope with the bright solar light scattered by Jupiter's atmosphere, which was a lesser concern for WFPC2 CCD safety. These STIS images would provide unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution observations of small-scale stratospheric aerosol structures, possibly associated with Jupiter's complex FUV aurora.

  5. High Relaxivity Gd(III)–DNA Gold Nanostars: Investigation of Shape Effects on Proton Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotz, Matthew W.; Culver, Kayla S. B.; Parigi, Giacomo; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Luchinat, Claudio; Odom, Teri W.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium(III) nanoconjugate contrast agents (CAs) have distinct advantages over their small-molecule counterparts in magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to increased Gd(III) payload, a significant improvement in proton relaxation efficiency, or relaxivity (r1), is often observed. In this work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a nanoconjugate CA created by covalent attachment of Gd(III) to thiolated DNA (Gd(III)–DNA), followed by surface conjugation onto gold nanostars (DNA–Gd@stars). These conjugates exhibit remarkable r1 with values up to 98 mM−1 s−1. Additionally, DNA–Gd@stars show efficient Gd(III) delivery and biocompatibility in vitro and generate significant contrast enhancement when imaged at 7 T. Using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion analysis, we attribute the high performance of the DNA–Gd@stars to an increased contribution of second-sphere relaxivity compared to that of spherical CA equivalents (DNA–Gd@spheres). Importantly, the surface of the gold nanostar contains Gd(III)–DNA in regions of positive, negative, and neutral curvature. We hypothesize that the proton relaxation enhancement observed results from the presence of a unique hydrophilic environment produced by Gd(III)–DNA in these regions, which allows second-sphere water molecules to remain adjacent to Gd(III) ions for up to 10 times longer than diffusion. These results establish that particle shape and second-sphere relaxivity are important considerations in the design of Gd(III) nanoconjugate CAs. PMID:25723190

  6. Figuras III, de Gerard Genette

    OpenAIRE

    Castany Prado, Bernat

    2008-01-01

    Borges decía que son clásicos aquellos libros que uno conoce antes de haberlos leído. Quizás en este sentido (sin duda en muchos otros) podemos afirmar que Figuras III, de Gérard Genette ,es un clásico. Se trata, sin embargo, de un libro de lectura lenta y, en ocasiones, confusa que quizás sea necesario resumir y sistematizar. El propósito de esta reseña, claro está, no es sustituir la lectura individual del mismo, sino , en todo caso, como si de una guía de viajes se tratase, introducir y an...

  7. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  8. Characterization of ribonuclease III from Brucella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Xian; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Fang; Yang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Chen, Huan-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a highly conserved endonuclease, which plays pivotal roles in RNA maturation and decay pathways by cleaving double-stranded structure of RNAs. Here we cloned rncS gene from the genomic DNA of Brucella melitensis, and analyzed the cleavage properties of RNase III from Brucella. We identified Brucella-encoding small RNA (sRNA) by high-throughput sequencing and northern blot, and found that sRNA of Brucella and Homo miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA) can be bound and cleaved by B.melitensis ribonuclease III (Bm-RNase III). Cleavage activity of Bm-RNase III is bivalent metal cations- and alkaline buffer-dependent. We constructed several point mutations in Bm-RNase III, whose cleavage activity indicated that the 133th Glutamic acid residue was required for catalytic activity. Western blot revealed that Bm-RNase III was differently expressed in Brucella virulence strain 027 and vaccine strain M5-90. Collectively, our data suggest that Brucella RNase III can efficiently bind and cleave stem-loop structure of small RNA, and might participate in regulation of virulence in Brucella.

  9. Malocclusion class III treatment in teething decidua.

    OpenAIRE

    Chávez Sevillano, Manuel Gustavo; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Pediátrica, Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.

    2014-01-01

    According as age increases, growth decreases and Class III skeletal patterns become more stable. The objective of Class III malocclusion’s treatment in primary dentition is to get a favorable environment to achieve a better dentofacial development. This article’s objective is to give a theorical summary about treatment of Class III malocclusions in primary dentition, and to present a case report. A medida que aumenta la edad, la cuantía de crecimiento disminuye y las clases III esquelética...

  10. Comparative adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) on TPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Q H; Zhao, X L; Ma, X X; Yang, Y B; Wu, W S; Zheng, G D; Wang, D L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative adsorption behaviors of Eu(III) and Am(III) on thorium phosphate diphosphate (TPD), i.e., Th4(PO4)4P2O7, have been studied using a batch approach and surface complexation model (SCM) in this study. The results showed that Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption increased to a large extent with the increase in TPD dose. Strong pH-dependence was observed in both Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption processes, suggesting that inner-sphere complexes (ISCs) were possibly responsible for the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III). Meanwhile, the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) decreased to a different extent with the increase in ion strength, which was possibly related to outer-sphere complexes and/or ion exchange. In the presence of fulvic acid (FA), the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) showed high enhancement mainly due to the ternary surface complexes of TPD-FA-Eu(3+) and TPD-FA-Am(3+). The SCM showed that one ion exchange (≡S3Am/Eu) and two ISCs (≡(XO)2Am/EuNO3 and ≡(YO)2Am/EuNO3) seemed more reasonable to quantitatively describe the adsorption edges of both Eu(III) and Am(III). Our findings obviously showed that Eu(III) could be a good analogue to study actinide behaviors in practical terms. However, it should be kept in mind that there are still obvious differences between the characteristics of Eu(III) and Am(III) in some special cases, for instance, the complex ability with organic matter and adsorption affinity to a solid surface.

  11. Heterotrimetallic coordination polymers: {Cu(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} chains and {Ni(II)Ln(III)Fe(III)} layers: synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Maria-Gabriela; Visinescu, Diana; Andruh, Marius; Marino, Nadia; Armentano, Donatella; Cano, Joan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2015-03-27

    The use of the [Fe(III) (AA)(CN)4](-) complex anion as metalloligand towards the preformed [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) or [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) heterometallic complex cations (AA=2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenathroline (phen); H2 valpn=1,3-propanediyl-bis(2-iminomethylene-6-methoxyphenol)) allowed the preparation of two families of heterotrimetallic complexes: three isostructural 1D coordination polymers of general formula {[Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (H2O)3 (μ-NC)2 Fe(III) (phen)(CN)2 {(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3}]NO3 ⋅7 H2O}n (Ln=Gd (1), Tb (2), and Dy (3)) and the trinuclear complex [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2 )3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ]⋅NO3 ⋅H2O⋅CH3 CN (4) were obtained with the [Cu(II) (valpn)Ln(III)](3+) assembling unit, whereas three isostructural heterotrimetallic 2D networks, {[Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) (ONO2 )2 (H2 O)(μ-NC)3 Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)]⋅2 H2 O⋅2 CH3 CN}n (Ln=Gd (5), Tb (6), and Dy (7)) resulted with the related [Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III) ](3+) precursor. The crystal structure of compound 4 consists of discrete heterotrimetallic complex cations, [Cu(II) (valpn)La(III) (OH2)3 (O2 NO)(μ-NC)Fe(III) (phen)(CN)3 ](+), nitrate counterions, and non-coordinate water and acetonitrile molecules. The heteroleptic {Fe(III) (bipy)(CN)4} moiety in 5-7 acts as a tris-monodentate ligand towards three {Ni(II) (valpn)Ln(III)} binuclear nodes leading to heterotrimetallic 2D networks. The ferromagnetic interaction through the diphenoxo bridge in the Cu(II)-Ln(III) (1-3) and Ni(II)-Ln(III) (5-7) units, as well as through the single cyanide bridge between the Fe(III) and either Ni(II) (5-7) or Cu(II) (4) account for the overall ferromagnetic behavior observed in 1-7. DFT-type calculations were performed to substantiate the magnetic interactions in 1, 4, and 5. Interestingly, compound 6 exhibits slow relaxation of the magnetization with maxima of the out-of-phase ac signals below 4.0 K in the lack of a dc field, the values of the pre

  12. Mechanisms of Sb(III) Photooxidation by the Excitation of Organic Fe(III) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2016-07-05

    Organic Fe(III) complexes are widely distributed in the aqueous environment, which can efficiently generate free radicals under light illumination, playing a significant role in heavy metal speciation. However, the potential importance of the photooxidation of Sb(III) by organic Fe(III) complexes remains unclear. Therefore, the photooxidation mechanisms of Sb(III) were comprehensively investigated in Fe(III)-oxalate, Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-fulvic acid (FA) solutions by kinetic measurements and modeling. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) was observed in an Fe(III)-oxalate solution over the pH range of 3 to 7. The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as an ·OH scavenger quenched the Sb(III) oxidation, suggesting that ·OH is an important oxidant for Sb(III). However, the incomplete quenching of Sb(III) oxidation indicated the existence of other oxidants, presumably an Fe(IV) species in irradiated Fe(III)-oxalate solution. In acidic solutions, ·OH may be formed by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4) with H2O2, but a hypothetical Fe(IV) species may be generated by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4)2(2-) with H2O2 at higher pH. Kinetic modeling provides a quantitative explanation of the results. Evidence for the existence of ·OH and hypothetical Fe(IV) was also observed in an irradiated Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-FA system. This study demonstrated an important pathway of Sb(III) oxidation in surface waters.

  13. Synthesis and in vitro microbial evaluation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) metal complexes of vitamin B6 drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Metal complexes of pyridoxine mono hydrochloride (vitamin B6) are prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes are investigated. Some physical properties, conductivity, analytical data and the composition of the four pyridoxine complexes are discussed. The elemental analysis shows that the formed complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) with pyridoxine are of 1:2 (metal:PN) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are brown in color and possess high melting points. These complexes are partially soluble in hot methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. Elemental analysis data, spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis. and florescence), effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons and the proton NMR suggest the structures. However, definite particle size is determined by invoking the X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained suggested that pyridoxine reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its phenolate oxygen and the oxygen of the adjacent group at the 4‧-position. The molar conductance measurements proved that the pyridoxine complexes are electrolytic in nature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the pyridoxine and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.; Kobeasy, Mohamed I.

    2015-05-01

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E∗, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  15. Iron(III) spin crossover compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koningsbruggen, PJ; Maeda, Y; Oshio, H

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, selected results obtained so far on Fe(III) spin crossover compounds are summarized and discussed. Fe(III) spin transition materials of ligands containing chalcogen donor atoms are considered with emphasis on those of N,N-disubstituted-dithiocarbamates, N,N-disubstituted-XY-carbamat

  16. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis III gamma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside lysosomes, including mucolipidosis III gamma , are called lysosomal storage disorders. The signs and symptoms of mucolipidosis III gamma are most likely due to the shortage of digestive enzymes inside lysosomes and the effects these enzymes have outside the cell. Learn more ...

  17. Explorations: Title III ESEA Programs in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa State Dept. of Public Instruction, Des Moines.

    Seventy projects funded by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title III, and providing the funds to public school districts to demonstrate the feasibility of educational innovations, are described in this document about Iowa Title III exemplary programs. Projects are subdivided according to planning grants, operational grants, guidance…

  18. Genes, genetics, and Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, F; Wong, R W K; Rabie, A B M

    2010-05-01

    To present current views that are pertinent to the investigation of the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion. Class III malocclusion is thought to be a polygenic disorder that results from an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental factors. However, research on family pedigrees has indicated that Class III malocclusion might also be a monogenic dominant phenotype. Recent studies have reported that genes that encode specific growth factors or other signaling molecules are involved in condylar growth under mechanical strain. These genes, which include Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH), parathyroid-hormone like hormone (PTHLH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and variations in their levels of expression play an important role in the etiology of Class III malocclusion. In addition, genome-wide scans have revealed chromosomal loci that are associated with Class III malocclusion. It is likely that chromosomal loci 1p36, 12q23, and 12q13 harbor genes that confer susceptibility to Class III malocclusion. In a case-control association study, we identified erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 (EPB41) to be a new positional candidate gene that might be involved in susceptibility to mandibular prognathism. Most of the earlier studies on the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion have focused on the patterns of inheritance of this phenotype. Recent investigations have focused on understanding the genetic variables that affect Class III malocclusion and might provide new approaches to uncovering the genetic etiology of this phenotype.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VI photometry of globular cluster systems (Goudfrooij+, 2003)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudfrooij, P.; Strader, J.; Brenneman, L.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Minniti, D.; Huizinga, J. E.

    2003-09-01

    Observations were made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) aboard HST as part of General Observer program 6685. The data consist of multiple images through the F555W and F814W filters. Our program was supplemented by archival images of a few sample galaxies (NGC 4565 and NGC 4594), taken from other HST programs. (7 data files).

  20. Subcellular location of horseradish peroxidase in horseradish leaves treated with La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yaxin; Wang, Lihong; Huang, Xiaohua; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Zhou, Qing; Guo, Shaofen

    2008-11-01

    The agricultural application of rare-earth elements (REEs) would promote REEs inevitably to enter in the environment and then to threaten the environmental safety and human health. Therefore, the distribution of the REEs ion, (141)Ce(III) and effects of La(III), Ce(III) and Tb(III) on the distribution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in horseradish mesophyll cells were investigated with electron microscopic radioautography and transmission electron microscopic cytochemistry. It was found for the first time that REEs ions can enter into the mesophyll cells, deposit in both extra and intra-cellular. Compared to the normal condition, after the horseradish leaves treated with La(III) or Tb(III), HRP located on the tonoplast is decreased and HRP is mainly located on the cell wall, while HRP is mainly located on the plasma membrane after the horseradish leaves were treated with Ce(III). This also indicated that REEs ions may regulate the plant growth through changing the distribution of enzymes.

  1. Renal Tubular Mitochondrial Abnormalities in Complex II/III Respiratory Chain Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Joel; Ashoor, Isa; Craver, Randall

    2017-06-01

    Defects in the respiratory chain may present with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. In this "Images in Pathology" discussion we correlate the clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural findings in a 12-year-old male with a complex II/III respiratory chain deficiency and kidney dysfunction.

  2. Mechanisms of Eu(III) and Cm(III) Association With Chlorella Vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with Chlorella vulgaris and cellulose was studied by a batch method, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The kinetics study performed by a batch method showed that the maximum adsorption of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on C. vulgaris was attained within three minutes of contact time, and afterwards the percentage adsorption decreased with time due to exudates released from C. vulgaris with affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). TRLFS showed that the short-term adsorption of Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was attributed to their coordination with the cell wall components comprised of cellulose. TRLFS also demonstrated that Eu(III) coordinated with the functional groups of cellulose very weakly in spite of the large distribution coefficients observed. EXAFS analysis showed the local structure around the Eu(III) adsorbed on cellulose and with C. vulgaris was similar. These results indicate that the reactions both at cell surfaces through the adsorption as well as in solution phases through chelation with the exudates are important in estimating the environmental behavior of Eu(III) and Cm(III) in aqueous environments.

  3. Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with Bacillus subtilis and Halobacterium salinarum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Takuo; Kimura, Takaumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Zenko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Francis, Arokiasamy J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2002-11-01

    Adsorption behavior of Eu(III) and Cm(III) by Bacillus subtilis and Halobacterium salinarum was investigated. Both microorganisms showed almost identical pH dependence on the distribution ratio (K{sub d}) of the metals examined, i.e., K{sub d} of Eu(III) and Cm(III) increased with an increase of pH. The coordination state of Eu(III) adsorbed on the microorganisms was studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The coordination states of Eu(III) adsorbed on the B. subtilis and H. salinarum was of different characteristics. H. salinarum exhibited more outer-spherical interaction with Eu(III) than B. subtilis. (author)

  4. Lanthanide(III and Yttrium(III Complexes of Benzimidazole-2-Acetic Acid: Synthesis, Characterisation and Effect of La(III Complex on Germination of Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and characterisation of lanthanide(III and yttrium(III nitrate complexes of benzimidazole-2-acetic acid (HBIA are reported. The complexes have been characterised by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic studies, IR, 1 H NMR, UV-visible, EPR, and TG/DTA studies. They have the stoichiometry [ Ln 3 ( BIA 2 ( NO 3 7 ( H 2 O 4 ]⋅3 H 2 O where Ln=La(III, Pr(III, Nd(II, Sm(III, Eu(III, Gd(III, Tb(III, Dy(III, and Y(III. The effect of La(III complex on germination, coleoptile, and root length of two local varieties of wheat DWR-195 and GW-349 for different treatment periods has been investigated. The complex was found to exhibit enhanced activity, compared to HBIA or metal salt alone at lower treatment periods.

  5. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) in the presence of different Fe(III) species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang; Hu, Xingyun

    2016-05-01

    The toxicity and mobility of antimony (Sb) are strongly influenced by the redox processes associated with Sb. Dissolved iron (Fe) is widely distributed in the environment as different species and plays a significant role in Sb speciation. However, the mechanisms of Sb(III) oxidation in the presence of Fe have remained unclear because of the complexity of Fe and Sb speciation. In this study, the mechanisms of Sb(III) photooxidation in the presence of different Fe species were investigated systematically. The photooxidation of Sb(III) occurred over a wide pH range, from 1 to 10. Oxygen was not a predominant or crucial factor in the Sb(III) oxidation process. The mechanism of Sb(III) photooxidation varied depending on the Fe(III) species. In acidic solution (pH 1-3), dichloro radicals (radCl2-) and hydroxyl radicals (radOH) generated by the photocatalysis of FeCl2+ and FeOH2+ were the main oxidants for Sb(III) oxidation. Fe(III) gradually transformed into the colloid ferric hydroxide (CFH) and ferrihydrite in circumneutral and alkaline solutions (pH 4-10). Photooxidation of Sb(III) occurred through electron transfer from Sb(III) to Fe(III) along with the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) through a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) process. The photocatalysis of different Fe(III) species may play an important role in the geochemical cycle of Sb(III) in surface soil and aquatic environments.

  6. The lipid composition of Legionella dumoffii membrane modulates the interaction with Galleria mellonella apolipophorin III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Reszczyńska, Emilia; Luchowski, Rafał; Kania, Magdalena; Gisch, Nicolas; Waldow, Franziska; Mak, Paweł; Danikiewicz, Witold; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), an insect homologue of human apolipoprotein E (apoE), is a widely used model protein in studies on protein-lipid interactions, and anti-Legionella activity of Galleria mellonella apoLp-III has been documented. Interestingly, exogenous choline-cultured Legionella dumoffii cells are considerably more susceptible to apoLp-III than non-supplemented bacteria. In order to explain these differences, we performed, for the first time, a detailed analysis of L. dumoffii lipids and a comparative lipidomic analysis of membranes of bacteria grown without and in the presence of exogenous choline. (31)P NMR analysis of L. dumoffii phospholipids (PLs) revealed a considerable increase in the phosphatidylcholine (PC) content in bacteria cultured on choline medium and a decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content in approximately the same range. The interactions of G. mellonella apoLp-III with lipid bilayer membranes prepared from PLs extracted from non- and choline-supplemented L. dumoffii cells were examined in detail by means of attenuated total reflection- and linear dichroism-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the kinetics of apoLp-III binding to liposomes formed from L. dumoffii PLs was analysed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy using fluorescently labelled G. mellonella apoLp-III. Our results indicated enhanced binding of apoLp-III to and deeper penetration into lipid membranes formed from PLs extracted from the choline-supplemented bacteria, i.e. characterized by an increased PC/PE ratio. This could explain, at least in part, the higher susceptibility of choline-cultured L. dumoffii to G. mellonella apoLp-III.

  7. The mass distribution of Population III stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, M.; Casey, A. R.; Gilmore, G.; Heger, A.; Chan, C.

    2017-06-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars are uniquely informative on the nature of massive Population III stars. Modulo a few elements that vary with stellar evolution, the present-day photospheric abundances observed in EMP stars are representative of their natal gas cloud composition. For this reason, the chemistry of EMP stars closely reflects the nucleosynthetic yields of supernovae from massive Population III stars. Here we collate detailed abundances of 53 EMP stars from the literature and infer the masses of their Population III progenitors. We fit a simple initial mass function (IMF) to a subset of 29 of the inferred Population III star masses, and find that the mass distribution is well represented by a power-law IMF with exponent α = 2.35^{+0.29}_{-0.24}. The inferred maximum progenitor mass for supernovae from massive Population III stars is M_{max} = 87^{+13}_{-33} M⊙, and we find no evidence in our sample for a contribution from stars with masses above ˜120 M⊙. The minimum mass is strongly consistent with the theoretical lower mass limit for Population III supernovae. We conclude that the IMF for massive Population III stars is consistent with the IMF of present-day massive stars and there may well have formed stars much below the supernova mass limit that could have survived to the present day.

  8. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Yelampalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  9. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelampalli, M R; Rachala, M R

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  10. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Pu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Rao, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, WA (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University, Florida (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Pu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(III) species are lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other trivalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is mainly used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  11. III-V semiconductor materials and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, R J

    1989-01-01

    The main emphasis of this volume is on III-V semiconductor epitaxial and bulk crystal growth techniques. Chapters are also included on material characterization and ion implantation. In order to put these growth techniques into perspective a thorough review of the physics and technology of III-V devices is presented. This is the first book of its kind to discuss the theory of the various crystal growth techniques in relation to their advantages and limitations for use in III-V semiconductor devices.

  12. [Napoleon III's urogenital disease (1808-1873)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androutsos, G

    2000-02-01

    We tried through this paper to reconstitute the evolution of the urologic illness of Napoleon III, last emperor of France, the first symptoms of which appeared many years before the fatal war of 1870, which led to the dismembering of France. In this connection, we present Napoleon III's physicians and his cures, along with the diagnostic and therapeutic errors. The case of Napoleon III is a typical example of the influence the bad health of a sovereign can exercise on the destiny of his country.

  13. Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Body Image Developing a positive body image and a healthy mental attitude is crucial to ... on for tips to have a healthy body image. Topics About body image When you look in ...

  14. Extraction chromatographic separation of Am(III) and Eu(III) by TPEN-immobilized gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshita, K. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 157-8550 (Japan); Ogata, T.; Oaki, H.; Inaba, Y. [Solutions Research Organization, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Mori, A. [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Yaita, T. [Tokai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaragi 319-1195 (Japan); Koyama, S.I. [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency. 4002 Narita, Oarai-cho, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    A TPEN derivative with 4 vinyl groups, N,N,N',N' -tetrakis-(4-propenyloxy-2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPPEN) was synthesized for the separation of trivalent minor actinides (Am(III)) and lanthanides (Eu(III)). A co-polymer gel with TPPEN and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) showed a high separation factor of Am(III) over Eu(III) (SF[Am/Eu]), which was evaluated to be 26 at pH=5. Thin film of NIPA-TPPEN gel (average thickness: 2-40 nm) was immobilized on the pore surface in porous silica particles (particle diameter : 50 μm, average pore diameter : 50 and 300 nm) and a chromatographic column (diameter: 6 mm, height: 11 mm) packed with the gel-coated particles was prepared. A small amount of weakly acidic solution (pH=4) containing Am(III) and Eu(III) was supplied in the column and the elution tests of Am(III) and Eu(III) were carried out. Eu(III) was recovered separately by a weakly acidic eluent (pH=4) at 313 K and Am(III) by a highly acidic eluent (pH=2) at 298 K. These results suggest that the contentious separation of minor actinides and lanthanides is attainable by a new extraction chromatographic process with two columns adjusted to 298 K and 313 K. (authors)

  15. Sorption behavior of europium(III) and curium(III) on the cell surfaces of microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Yoshida, Z. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan); Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J. [Environmental Sciences Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the association of europium(III) and curium(III) with the microorganisms Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, and Halobacterium halobium. We determined the kinetics and distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Eu(III) and Cm(III) sorption at pH 3-5 by batch experiments, and evaluated the number of water molecules in the inner-sphere (N{sub H{sub 2}O}) and the degree of strength of ligand field (R{sub E/M}) for Eu(III) by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Exudates from C. vulgaris, Halomonas sp., and H. halobium had an affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). The log K{sub d} of Eu(III) and Cm(III) showed that their sorption was not fully due to the exchange with three protons on the functional groups on cell surfaces. The halophilic microorganisms (Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, H. halobium) showed almost no pH dependence in log K{sub d}, indicating that an exchange with Na{sup +} on the functional groups was involved in their sorption. The {delta}N{sub H{sub 2}O} (= 9 - N{sub H{sub 2}O}) for Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was 1-3, while that for the other microorganisms was over 3, demonstrating that the coordination of Eu(III) with C. vulgaris was predominantly an outer-spherical process. The R{sub E/M} for Eu(III) on halophilic microorganisms was 2.5-5, while that for non-halophilic ones was 1-2.5. This finding suggests that the coordination environment of Eu(III) on the halophilic microorganisms is more complicated than that on the other three non-halophilic ones. (orig.)

  16. PREFACE: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemmerer, D.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Europhysics Conference `Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III' (NPA3) took place from 26 31 March 2007 in Dresden, Germany, hosted by Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The present special issue of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics contains all peer-reviewed contributions to the proceedings of this conference. NPA3 is the third conference in the Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics series of conferences devoted to the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics. The first and second editions of the series were held in 2002 and 2005 in Debrecen, Hungary. NPA3 has been organized under the auspices of the Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society as its XXI Divisional Conference. The conference marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark paper B2FH published in 1957 by E M Burbidge, G R Burbidge, W A Fowler and F Hoyle. A public lecture by Claus Rolfs (Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany) commemorated the progress achieved since 1957. NPA3 aimed to bring together experimental and theoretical nuclear physicists, astrophysicists and astronomers to address the important part played by nuclear physics in current astrophysical problems. A total of 130 participants from 71 institutions in 26 countries attended the conference, presenting 33 invited and 38 contributed talks and 25 posters on six subject areas. The astrophysical motivation and the nuclear tools employed to address it are highlighted by the titles of the subject areas: Big Bang Nucleosynthesis Stellar Nucleosynthesis and Low Cross Section Measurement Explosive Nucleosynthesis and Nuclear Astrophysics with Photons Nuclei far from Stability and Radioactive Ion Beams Dense Matter in Neutron Stars and Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Neutrinos in Nuclear Astrophysics The presentations and discussions proved that Nuclear Astrophysics is a truly interdisciplinary subject. The remarkable progress in astronomical observations achieved in recent years is matched by advances in

  17. Extraction and separation of Nd(III), Sm(III), Dy(III), Fe(III), Ni(II), and Cs(I) from concentrated chloride solutions with N,N,N',N'-tetra(2-ethylhexyl) diglycolamide as new extractant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.A. Mowafy; D. Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using N,N,N',N'-tetra(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (TEHDGA) in 75 vol.% n-dodecane-25 vol.% n-octanol as agents for the extraction and separation of Nd(III), Sm(III), Dy(III), Fe(III), Ni(II), and Cs(I) from concentrated chlo-ride solution was investigated. Different extraction behaviors were obtained towards rare earth elements (REE) studied and Fe(III), Ni(II) and Cs(I). Efficient separation of Nd(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) from Fe(III), Ni(II), and Cs(I) was achieved by TEHDGA, depending on the HCl, HNO3 or H2SO4 concentration. A systematic investigation was carried out on the detailed extraction prop-erties of Nd(III), Sm(III), and Dy(III) with TEHDGA from chloride media. The IR spectra of the extracted species were investi-gated.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis III alpha/beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions mucolipidosis III alpha/beta mucolipidosis III alpha/beta Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mucolipidosis III alpha/beta is a disorder that affects many parts ...

  19. Three-dimensional evaluation of facial morphology in children aged 5-6 years with a Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krneta, Bojana; Primožič, Jasmina; Zhurov, Alexei; Richmond, Stephen; Ovsenik, Maja

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate facial morphology in 25 Class III and 46 non-Class III children aged 5-6 years using three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging; 3D facial images were obtained, two average facial templates were constructed for the non-Class III male and female groups, each individual face was superimposed on the corresponding average template and group comparisons were evaluated (facial height, facial convexity, mandibular position and facial surface morphology). Differences between parameters were evaluated by using an analysis of variance and colour deviation maps. The results showed that Class III children had less mid-face prominence and a concave facial profile when compared to non-Class III children (P = 0.002 and P = 0.018). The position of the pg point in the z-axis just failed to reach statistical significance when comparing the two groups (P = 0.051). A vertical analysis showed no statistical significance between the groups, when evaluating middle (n-sn) and lower (sn-pg) facial height. Coincidence of the Class III faces to normal templates with a tolerance set as 0.5 mm was low (less than 30%). The soft tissue characteristics of a Class III face differ significantly from the non-Class III face in the mid-face region and in the facial profile. A 3D laser imaging method evaluated and identified morphological characteristics of Class III children in deciduous dentition, which could in the future become an important diagnostic tool in small children. The most important clinical advantage of this study is the non-invasiveness of the method.

  20. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves.

  1. Sorption of indium (III) onto carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, F J; Lopez, F A; Rodriguez, O; Martinez-Ramirez, S; Garcia-Diaz, I

    2016-08-01

    Indium has numerous applications in different industrial sectors and is not an abundant element. Therefore appropriate technology to recover this element from various process wastes is needed. This research reports high adsorption capacity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for In(III). The effects of pH, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of MWCNT on In(III) adsorption were investigated and discussed in detail. The pH increases improves the adsorption capacity for In(III). The Langmuir adsorption model is the best fit with the experimental data. For the kinetic study, the adsorption onto MWCNT could be fitted to pseudo second-order. The adsorption of indium(III) can be described to a mechanism which consists of a film diffusion controlled process. Metal desorption can be achieved with acidic solutions.

  2. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  3. Tris(η5-cyclopentadienylhafnium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Burlakov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, [Hf(C5H53], three cyclopentadienyl ligands surround the HfIII atom in a trigonal–planar geometry. The molecule lies on a sixfold inversion axis.

  4. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  5. Mode III effects on interface delamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Hutchinson, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    mode III has an effect. Subsequently, the focus is on crack growth along an interface between an elastic-plastic solid and an elastic substrate. The analyses are carried out for conditions of small-scale yielding, with the fracture process at the interface represented by a cohesive zone model. Due......For crack growth along an interface between dissimilar materials the effect of combined modes I, II and III at the crack-tip is investigated. First, in order to highlight situations where crack growth is affected by a mode III contribution, examples of material configurations are discussed where...... to the mismatch of elastic properties across the interface the corresponding elastic solution has an oscillating stress singularity, and this solution is applied as boundary conditions on the outer edge of the region analyzed. For several combinations of modes I, II and III crack growth resistance curves...

  6. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S

    2014-07-15

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were estimated from the DTG curves.

  7. Isolatable organophosphorus(III)-tellurium heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheider, Andreas; Chivers, Tristram; Schön, Oliver; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Athukorala Arachchige, Kasun S; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Woollins, J Derek

    2014-01-13

    A new structural arrangement Te3 (RP(III) )3 and the first crystal structures of organophosphorus(III)-tellurium heterocycles are presented. The heterocycles can be stabilized and structurally characterized by the appropriate choice of substituents in Tem (P(III) R)n (m=1: n=2, R=OMes* (Mes*=supermesityl or 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl); n=3, R=adamantyl (Ad); n=4, R=ferrocene (Fc); m=n=3: R=trityl (Trt), Mesor by the installation of a P(V) 2 N2 anchor in RP(III) [TeP(V) (tBuN)(μ-NtBu)]2 (R=Ad, tBu).

  8. CRONICA: FIESTA FUNERAL: LUMBALÚ PARA BATA III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Luis Muñoz Vélez

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo se inspira en las conversaciones con Paulino Salgado Valdez. Entrevistas con Batata III en Bogotá, 1998 y en Cartagena en el 2000 en el marco del Encuentro de los países andinos. Batata III nace el 29 de mayo de 1927 en el Palenque de San Basilio en el departamento de Bolívar, muere en Bogotá el viernes 23 de enero del 2004.

  9. Me-3,2-HOPO Complexes of Near Infra-Red (NIR) Emitting Lanthanides: Efficient Sensitization of Yb(III) and Nd(III) in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Dodani, Sheel; Jocher, Christoph; D' Aleo, Anthony; Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-11-10

    The synthesis, X-ray structure, solution stability, and photophysical properties of several trivalent lanthanide complexes of Yb(III) and Nd(III) using both tetradentate and octadentate ligand design strategies and incorporating the 1-methyl-3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (Me-3,2-HOPO) chelate group are reported. Both the Yb(III) and Nd(III) complexes have emission bands in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) region, and this luminescence is retained in aqueous solution ({Phi}{sub tot}{sup Yb} {approx} 0.09-0.22%). Furthermore, the complexes demonstrate very high stability (pYb {approx} 18.8-21.9) in aqueous solution, making them good candidates for further development as probes for NIR imaging. Analysis of the low temperature (77 K) photophysical measurements for a model Gd(III) complex were used to gain an insight into the electronic structure, and were found to agree well with corresponding TD-DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G{sup ++}(d,p) level of theory for a simplified model monovalent sodium complex.

  10. Population III stars around the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Komiya, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop~III) stars, born of the primordial gas. Pop~III stars with masses below $0.8 M_\\odot$ should survive to date though are not observed yet, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [Fe/H]$ < -5$ in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop~III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop~III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from the surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press--Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop~III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars are also escap...

  11. Efficient removal of trace antimony(III) through adsorption by hematite modified magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Chao; Ma, Zhiyao; Tong, Meiping, E-mail: tongmeiping@pku.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sb(III) adsorption capacity of MNP@hematite was twice that of commercial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • pH, ionic strength, coexisting anions and NOM did not inhibit Sb(III) removal. • MNP@hematite could remove trace Sb(III) and As(III) from water simultaneously. • Efficient removal of Sb(III) from real tap water was achieved. • MNP@hematite could be easily recycled with a magnet and could be used repeatedly. - Abstract: Hematite coated magnetic nanoparticle (MNP@hematite) was fabricated through heterogeneous nucleation technique and used to remove trace Sb(III) from water. Powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and alternating gradient magnetometry were utilized to characterize the prepared adsorbent. TEM image showed that MNP@hematite particles were spherical with size of 10–30 nm. With saturation magnetization of 27.0 emu/g, MNP@hematite particles could be easily separated from water with a simple magnetic process in short time (5 min). At initial concentration of 110 μg/L, Sb(III) was rapidly decreased to below 5 μg/L by MNP@hematite in 10 min. Sb(III) adsorption capacity of MNP@hematite was 36.7 mg/g, which was almost twice that of commercial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The removal of trace Sb(III) was not obviously affected by solution pH (over a wide range from 3 to 11), ionic strength (up to 100 mM), coexisting anions (chloride, nitrate, sulfate, carbonate, silicate, and phosphate, up to 10 mM) and natural organic matters (humic acid and alginate, up to 8 mg/L as TOC). Moreover, MNP@hematite particles were able to remove Sb(III) and As(III) simultaneously. Trace Sb(III) could also be effectively removed from real tap water by MNP@hematite. The magnetic adsorbent could be recycled and used repeatedly.

  12. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from α-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K.; Pandey, Om P.

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H 2O] n have been obtained (where Ln = La(III) or Pr(III); L = barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 °C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr 3+.

  13. THE METHOD OF REMOVAL YTTRIUM (III AND YTTERBIUM (III FROM DILUTE AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lobacheva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yttrium (III and ytterbium (III cations ion flotation from diluted aqueous solutions in the presence of chloride ions using sodium dodecyl sulfate as collector agent were studied. Y (III and Yb (III distribution and recovery coefficients as a function of aqueous phase рН value at different sodium chloride concentrations were received. Yttrium (III and ytterbium (III chloro and hydroxo complexes instability constants were calculated. The calculation of separation coefficient at рН specified values depending on chloride ion concentration was conducted. Maximum separation coefficient was observed when chloride concentration of 0.01 M is 50 at рН 7.8. Ksep is minimal in nitrate medium ans is 3 at рН 7.0. At sodium chloride concentration of 0.05 М Ksep is 9 at рН 7.8.

  14. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample.

  15. Cyanido-bridged Fe(III)-Mn(III) heterobimetallic materials built from Mn(III) Schiff base complexes and di- or tri-cyanido Fe(III) precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Tapas; Pichon, Céline; Ababei, Rodica; Mathonière, Corine; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2012-03-19

    The reaction of [Fe(III)L(CN)(3)](-) (L being bpca = bis(2-pyridylcarbonyl)amidate, pcq = 8-(pyridine-2-carboxamido)quinoline) or [Fe(III)(bpb)(CN)(2)](-) (bpb = 1,2-bis(pyridine-2-carboxamido)benzenate) ferric complexes with Mn(III) salen type complexes afforded seven new bimetallic cyanido-bridged Mn(III)-Fe(III) systems: [Fe(pcq)(CN)(3)Mn(saltmen)(CH(3)OH)]·CH(3)OH (1), [Fe(bpca)(CN)(3)Mn(3-MeO-salen)(OH(2))]·CH(3)OH·H(2)O (2), [Fe(bpca)(CN)(3)Mn(salpen)] (3), [Fe(bpca)(CN)(3)Mn(saltmen)] (4), [Fe(bpca)(CN)(3)Mn(5-Me-saltmen)]·2CHCl(3) (5), [Fe(pcq)(CN)(3)Mn(5-Me-saltmen)]·2CH(3)OH·0.75H(2)O (6), and [Fe(bpb)(CN)(2)Mn(saltmen)]·2CH(3)OH (7) (with saltmen(2-) = N,N'-(1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylene)bis(salicylideneiminato) dianion, salpen(2-) = N,N'-propylenebis(salicylideneiminato) dianion, salen(2-) = N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato) dianion). Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies were carried out for all these compounds indicating that compounds 1 and 2 are discrete dinuclear [Fe(III)-CN-Mn(III)] complexes while systems 3-7 are heterometallic chains with {-NC-Fe(III)-CN-Mn(III)} repeating units. These chains are connected through π-π and short contact interactions to form extended supramolecular networks. Investigation of the magnetic properties revealed the occurrence of antiferromagnetic Mn(III)···Fe(III) interactions in 1-4 while ferromagnetic Mn(III)···Fe(III) interactions were detected in 5-7. The nature of these Mn(III)···Fe(III) magnetic interactions mediated by a CN bridge appeared to be dependent on the Schiff base substituent. The packing is also strongly affected by the nature of the substituent and the presence of solvent molecules, resulting in additional antiferromagnetic interdinuclear/interchain interactions. Thus the crystal packing and the supramolecular interactions induce different magnetic properties for these systems. The dinuclear complexes 1 and 2, which possess a paramagnetic S(T) = 3/2 ground state, interact

  16. Transform image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghagolzadeh, Sabzali; Ersoy, Okan K.

    1992-03-01

    Blockwise transform image enhancement techniques are discussed. Previously, transform image enhancement has usually been based on the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) applied to the whole image. Two major drawbacks with the DFT are high complexity of implementation involving complex multiplications and additions, with intermediate results being complex numbers, and the creation of severe block effects if image enhancement is done blockwise. In addition, the quality of enhancement is not very satisfactory. It is shown that the best transforms for transform image coding, namely, the scrambled real discrete Fourier transform, the discrete cosine transform, and the discrete cosine-III transform, are also the best for image enhancement. Three techniques of enhancement discussed in detail are alpha- rooting, modified unsharp masking, and filtering motivated by the human visual system response (HVS). With proper modifications, it is observed that unsharp masking and HVS- motivated filtering without nonlinearities are basically equivalent. Block effects are completely removed by using an overlap-save technique in addition to the best transform.

  17. Luminescense properties of new complexes of Eu(III) and Tb(III) with heterotopic ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patroniak, Violetta; Hnatejko, Zbigniew; Grochowska, Agnieszka M.; Stefankiewicz, Artur R.

    2006-07-01

    As a result of coordination between ligands L and L' and europium(III) and terbium(III) ions, the new architectures were formed. The formulae of the complexes have been assigned on the basis of the spectroscopic data in solution and microanalyses. The europium complexes show excellent luminescence properties with high quantum yield ( 1b-Eu 3L2) and effective intramolecular energy transfer from the ligand to the Eu(III) ions.

  18. Methods of Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III)

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Paul D.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Sostman, H. Dirk; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Kanal, Emanuel; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Nadich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J.; Tapson, Victor F; Wakefield, Thomas W.; Weg, John G.

    2008-01-01

    The methods of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III) are described in detail. PIOPED III is a multicenter collaborative investigation sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The purpose is to determine the accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (Gd-MRA) in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography (Gd-MRV) for the diagnosis for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A composite reference standard bas...

  19. Image and video compression for multimedia engineering fundamentals, algorithms, and standards

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Yun Q

    2008-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals Introduction Quantization Differential Coding Transform Coding Variable-Length Coding: Information Theory Results (II) Run-Length and Dictionary Coding: Information Theory Results (III) Part II: Still Image Compression Still Image Coding: Standard JPEG Wavelet Transform for Image Coding: JPEG2000 Nonstandard Still Image Coding Part III: Motion Estimation and Compensation Motion Analysis and Motion Compensation Block Matching Pel-Recursive Technique Optical Flow Further Discussion and Summary on 2-D Motion Estimation Part IV: Video Compression Fundam

  20. WISC-III e WAIS-III na avaliação da inteligência de cegos WISC-III/WAIS-III en ciegos WISC-III and WAIS-III in intellectual assessment of blind people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth do Nascimento

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Diante da escassez de pesquisas nacionais e de testes psicológicos destinados a avaliar pessoas cegas, desenvolveu-se um estudo psicométrico com as escalas verbais dos testes WISC-III e WAIS-III. Após as adaptações de alguns estímulos e das instruções, os testes foram aplicados em crianças (N = 120 e adultos (N = 52 residentes em Belo Horizonte. Os resultados indicaram que as escalas verbais modificadas apresentam uma boa consistência interna (alfa> 0,80. Além disso, a investigação da validade fatorial identifica a presença clara de apenas um componente. Este componente explica 81% e 64% para o WISC-III e WAIS-III, respectivamente. Conclui-se que as adaptações a que se procedeu não afetaram a estrutura fatorial das escalas. Deste modo, os profissionais poderão utilizar as escalas modificadas para avaliar a inteligência de pessoas cegas.Frente a la escasez de investigaciones nacionales asi como la ausencia de tests psicológicos que evaluen personas ciegas, se ha desarrollado un estudio psicometrico com la escalas verbales del WISC-III y WAIS-III. Posteriormente a las adaptaciones de algunos estímulos y de las instrucciones, las escalas fueron aplicadas a una muestra de niños (n=120 y de adultos (n=52 residentes en la ciudad de Belo Horizonte-Brasil. Los resultados indican que las escalas verbales modificadas presentan una alta fiabilidad (alpha >0,80 asi como la presencia clara de un unico componente responsable por 81% y 64% de la variancia del WIC-III e WAIS-III respectivamente. Se ha concluido que las modificaciones efectuadas no han comprometido la estructura factorial de las escalas verbales. Por tanto, los profesionales psicólogos pueden utilizar las escalas modificadas para la evaluación de la inteligencia de personas portadoras de ceguera.Owing to the almost lack of a national research on psychological testing for the evaluation of blind people, a psychometric study has been developed with the WISC-III and WAIS-III

  1. The Aggregates in LB Films of Schiff base Aluminium (III) Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The surface pressure-area (p -A) isotherm of Schiff base aluminium (III), tris (2-hydroxy-5-nitro-N-dodecyl-benzylideneaminato) aluminium (III) (denoted as Al(TA12)3), on pure water subphase was investigated. The molecular area, 0.48 nm2 , is one-third of expected value that indicated the aggregation took place. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of Al(TA12)3 was transferred and characterized. The AFM image confirmed the formation of aggregates.

  2. Diagnosis of Chiari III malformation by second trimester fetal MRI with postnatal MRI and CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alice B.; Glenn, Orit A. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gupta, Nalin [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurosurgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Otto, Carl [California Pacific Medical Center, Department of Perinatology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    We report a case of Chiari III malformation diagnosed by fetal MRI. Ultrasound (US) performed at a gestational age of 18 weeks demonstrated a posterior skull base cyst. Repeat US at 19 weeks demonstrated neural tissue in the cyst, consistent with an encephalocele. MR imaging at 23 weeks confirmed the presence of an occipital encephalocele, demonstrated additional bony defect in the upper cervical spine, and identified abnormal morphology and position of the brainstem consistent with the diagnosis of Chiari III. Postnatal MRI and CT confirmed the fetal MRI findings and demonstrate the utility of fetal MRI in the early evaluation of songraphically detected posterior fossa abnormalities. (orig.)

  3. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  4. A Shape Based Image Search Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aratrika Sarkar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an interactive application we have developed based on shaped-based image retrieval technique. The key concepts described in the project are, imatching of images based on contour matching; iimatching of images based on edge matching; iiimatching of images based on pixel matching of colours. Further, the application facilitates the matching of images invariant of transformations like i translation ; ii rotation; iii scaling. The key factor of the system is, the system shows the percentage unmatched of the image uploaded with respect to the images already existing in the database graphically, whereas, the integrity of the system lies on the unique matching techniques used for optimum result. This increases the accuracy of the system. For example, when a user uploads an image say, an image of a mango leaf, then the application shows all mango leaves present in the database as well other leaves matching the colour and shape of the mango leaf uploaded.

  5. A1BG and C3 are overexpressed in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III

    Science.gov (United States)

    CANALES, NORMA ANGÉLICA GALICIA; MARINA, VICENTE MADRID; CASTRO, JORGE SALMERÓN; JIMÉNEZ, ALFREDO ANTÚNEZ; MENDOZA-HERNÁNDEZ, GUILLERMO; McCARRON, ELIZABETH LANGLEY; ROMAN, MARGARITA BAHENA; CASTRO-ROMERO, JULIETA IVONE

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze sera proteins in females with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, grade III (CIN III) and in healthy control females, in order to identify a potential biomarker which detects lesions that have a greater probability of cervical transformation. The present study investigated five sera samples from females who were Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) 16+ and who had been histopathologically diagnosed with CIN III, as well as five sera samples from healthy control females who were HPV-negative. Protein separation was performed using two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and the proteins were stained with Colloidal Coommassie Blue. Quantitative analysis was performed using ImageMaster 2D Platinum 6.0 software. Peptide sequence identification was performed using a nano-LC ESIMS/MS system. The proteins with the highest Mascot score were validated using western blot analysis in an additional 55 sera samples from the control and CIN III groups. The eight highest score spots that were found to be overexpressed in the CIN III sera group were identified as α-1-B glycoprotein (A1BG), complement component 3 (C3), a pro-apolipoprotein, two apolipoproteins and three haptoglobins. Only A1BG and C3 were validated using western blot analysis, and the bands were compared between the two groups using densitometry analysis. The relative density of the bands of A1BG and C3 was found to be greater in all of the serum samples from the females with CIN III, compared with those of the individuals in the control group. In summary, the present study identified two proteins whose expression was elevated in females with CIN III, suggesting that they could be used as biomarkers for CIN III. However, further investigations are required in order to assess the expression of A1BG and C3 in different pre-malignant lesions. PMID:25009667

  6. A photometric survey for Lyalpha-HeII dual emitters: Searching for Population III stars in high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nagao, Tohru; Maiolino, Roberto; Grady, Celestine; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew; Motohara, Kentaro; Murayama, Takashi; Schaerer, Daniel; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    We present a new photometric search for high-z galaxies hosting Population III (PopIII) stars based on deep intermediate-band imaging observations obtained in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF), by using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. By combining our new data with the existing broad-band and narrow-band data, we searched for galaxies which emit strongly both in Ly_alpha and in HeII 1640 (``dual emitters'') that are promising candidates for PopIII-hosting galaxies, at 3.93 2 Msun/yr was found by our photometric search in 4.03 x 10^5 Mpc^3 in the SDF. This result disfavors low feedback models for PopIII star clusters, and implies an upper-limit of the PopIII SFR density of SFRD_PopIII < 5 x 10^-6 Msun/yr/Mpc^3. This new selection method to search for PopIII-hosting galaxies should be useful in future narrow-band surveys to achieve the first observational detection of PopIII-hosting galaxies at high redshifts.

  7. Inability of positive phase II clinical trials of investigational treatments to subsequently predict positive phase III clinical trials in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob J; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Patel, Akash J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Park, Minjeong; Yuan, Ying; A Kent, Thomas; de Groot, John F

    2017-07-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, but effective therapies are lacking. With the scarcity of positive phase III trials, which are increasing in cost, we examined the ability of positive phase II trials to predict statistically significant improvement in clinical outcomes of phase III trials. A PubMed search was conducted to identify phase III clinical trials performed in the past 25 years for patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma. Trials were excluded if they did not examine an investigational chemotherapy or agent, if they were stopped early owing to toxicity, if they lacked prior phase II studies, or if a prior phase II study was negative. Seven phase III clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 4 phase III clinical trials in recurrent glioblastoma met the inclusion criteria. Only 1 (9%) phase III study documented an improvement in overall survival and changed the standard of care. The high failure rate of phase III trials demonstrates the urgent need to increase the reliability of phase II trials of treatments for glioblastoma. Strategies such as the use of adaptive trial designs, Bayesian statistics, biomarkers, volumetric imaging, and mathematical modeling warrant testing. Additionally, it is critical to increase our expectations of phase II trials so that positive findings increase the probability that a phase III trial will be successful.

  8. Synthetic, structural and antifungal studies of coordination compounds of Ru(III, Rh(III and Ir(III with tetradentate Schiff bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANKITA SRIVASTAVA

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of octahedral Ru(III, Rh(III and Ir(III complexes have been prepared with tetradentate Schiff bases derived by condensing isatin with 1,2-diaminoethane, 1,3-diaminopropane, 1,4-diaminobutane, 1,2-diaminobenzene and 1,3-diaminobenzene. The obtained complexes were characterized on the basis of their elemental analyses, magnetic moment, conductance, IR, electronic, 1HNMR and FAB mass spectra, as well as thermal analyses. The Ru(III complexes are low spin paramagnetic, while Rh(III and Ir(III behave as diamagnetic complexes. The IR spectral data revealed that all the Schiff bases behave as tetradentate and are coordinated to Ru(III, Rh(III and Ir(III via nitrogen and oxygen. Antifungal studies of the ligands as well as their complexes were carried out by the agar plate method.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope First Observations of the Brightest Stars in the Virgo Galaxy M100 = NGC 4321

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, W. L.; Madore, B. F.; Stetson, P. B.; Hughes, S. M. G.; Holtzman, J. A.; Mould, J. R.; Trauger, J. T.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Ballester, G. E.; Burrows, C. J.; Casertano, S.; Clarke, J. T; Crisp, D.; Ferrarese, L.; Ford, H.; Graham, J. A.; Griffiths, R. E.; Hester, J. J.; Hill, R.; Hoessel, J. G.; Huchra, J.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Scowen, P. A.; Sparks, B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    As part of both the Early Release Observations fromthe Hubble Space Telescope and the Key PRoject on the Extragalctic Distance Scale, we have obtained multi-wavelength BVR WFPC2 images for the face-on Virgo cluster spiral galaxy M11 = NGC 4321.

  10. The color-magnitude relation in CL 1358+62 at z=0.33 : Evidence for significant evolution in the S0 population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dokkum, PG; Franx, M; Kelson, DD; Illingworth, GD; Fisher, D; Fabricant, D

    1998-01-01

    We use a large, multicolor mosaic of HST WFPC2 images to measure the colors and morphologies of 194 spectroscopically confirmed members of the rich galaxy cluster CL 1358 + 62 at z = 0.33. We study the color-magnitude (CM) relation as a function of radius in the cluster to a limit of 416 from the ce

  11. The central star of the Planetary Nebula NGC 6537

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, [No Value

    2000-01-01

    The fact that Space Telescope WFPC2 images of the planetary nebula NGC 6537 fail to show the central star is used to derive a limit to its magnitude: it is fainter than a magnitude of 22.4 in the visible. This is used to derive a lower limit to the temperature of the star. The Zanstra temperature is

  12. Weak lensing analysis of C1 1358+62 using Hubble Space Telescope observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, H; Franx, M; Kuijken, K; Squires, G

    1998-01-01

    We report on the detection of weak gravitational lensing of faint, distant background objects by Cl 1358+62, a rich cluster of galaxies at a redshift of z = 0.33. The observations consist of a large, multicolor mosaic of Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images. The number density of approximately 50 bac

  13. The spatial distribution of star and cluster formation in M 51

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepmaker, R.A.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.; Anders, P.; Larsen, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. We study the connection between spatially resolved star formation and young star clusters across the disc of M 51. Methods. We combine star cluster data based on B, V, and I-band Hubble Space Telescope ACS imaging, together with new WFPC2 U-band photometry to derive ages, masses, and extinctio

  14. Indexing Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on access to digital image collections by means of manual and automatic indexing. Contains six sections: (1) Studies of Image Systems and their Use; (2) Approaches to Indexing Images; (3) Image Attributes; (4) Concept-Based Indexing; (5) Content-Based Indexing; and (6) Browsing in Image Retrieval. Contains 105 references. (AEF)

  15. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  16. Population III Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, K.; Sakamoto, T.; Mészáros, P.

    Population III stars are theoretically expected to be prominent around redshifts z ˜ 20, consisting of mainly very massive stars (VMSs) with M_* ∼ 100;M_⊙, but there is no direct observational evidence for these objects. They may produce collapsar gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with jets driven by magnetohydrodynamic processes, whose total isotropic-equivalent energy could be as high as E_iso ∼ 1057;erg over a cosmological-rest-frame duration of t_d ∼ 104;s, depending on the progenitor mass. The detection of a burst with such a high total energy and a long duration would be a strong evidence for a VMS progenitor. We calculate the prompt emission and afterglow spectra of such Pop. III GRBs based on the standard models, and show that they will be detectable with the Swift BAT/XRT and Fermi LAT instruments. We also show that the late-time radio afterglows of Pop. III GRBs for typical parameters, despite the large distances, can be very bright: ≃ 140;mJy at 1;GHz, which may lead to a constraint on the Pop. III GRB rate from the current radio survey data, and ≃ 2.4;mJy at 70;MHz, which implies that Pop. III GRB radio afterglows could be interesting background source candidates for 21 cm absorption line detections.

  17. Radiotracer Imaging of Sediment Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, W. W.; O'Neil, J. P.; Boutchko, R.; Nico, P. S.; Druhan, J. L.; Vandehey, N. T.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear medical PET and SPECT cameras routinely image radioactivity concentration of gamma ray emitting isotopes (PET - 511 keV; SPECT - 75-300 keV). We have used nuclear medical imaging technology to study contaminant transport in sediment columns. Specifically, we use Tc-99m (T1/2 = 6 h, Eγ = 140 keV) and a SPECT camera to image the bacteria mediated reduction of pertechnetate, [Tc(VII)O4]- + Fe(II) → Tc(IV)O2 + Fe(III). A 45 mL bolus of Tc-99m (32 mCi) labeled sodium pertechnetate was infused into a column (35cm x 10cm Ø) containing uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment from the Rifle, CO site. A flow rate of 1.25 ml/min of artificial groundwater was maintained in the column. Using a GE Millennium VG camera, we imaged the column for 12 hours, acquiring 44 frames. As the microbes in the sediment were inactive, we expected most of the iron to be Fe(III). The images were consistent with this hypothesis, and the Tc-99m pertechnetate acted like a conservative tracer. Virtually no binding of the Tc-99m was observed, and while the bolus of activity propagated fairly uniformly through the column, some inhomogeneity attributed to sediment packing was observed. We expect that after augmentation by acetate, the bacteria will metabolically reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), leading to significant Tc-99m binding. Imaging sediment columns using nuclear medicine techniques has many attractive features. Trace quantities of the radiolabeled compounds are used (micro- to nano- molar) and the half-lives of many of these tracers are short (Image of Tc-99m distribution in a column containing Rifle sediment at four times.

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  19. Teachers' Guide to Music Appreciation III A and III B in the Senior High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. Mark; Dawkins, Barbara R.

    This guide to music appreciation courses was developed for use in senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida. Music Appreciation III A examines the development of music, from the Gothic period through the Classical period. Music Appreciation III B examines the development of music from the Romantic period through the 1970s.…

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetism of iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinates with pyridinemethanols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrecký, Róbert; Pavlik, Ján; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Dlháň, Ľubor; Koman, Marian; Boča, Roman; Moncoľ, Ján

    2014-11-01

    Four ionic iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinato complexes of the formula (2-pymeH) [FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ[FeIII(H2O)2Cl(dipic)]ṡ2H2O, (3-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ1.5H2O, (4-pymeH)[FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O and (4-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O, where H2dipic = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, 2-pyme = 2-pyridinemethanol, 3-pyme = 3-pyridinemethanol, 4-pyme = 4-pyridinemethanol, have been prepared and characterized by the single-crystal X-ray structure analysis, infrared spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The magnetic data were fitted to a zero-field splitting model revealing a slight magnetic anisotropy for Mn(III) systems. The molecular field correction was consistently formulated and included in the analysis for both, magnetic susceptibility and magnetization data.

  1. Coronal type III radio bursts and their X-ray flare and interplanetary type III counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Hamish A S

    2016-01-01

    Type III bursts and hard X-rays are both produced by flare energetic electron beams. The link between both emissions has been investigated in many previous studies, but no statistical studies have compared both coronal and interplanetary type III bursts with X-ray flares. Using coronal radio events above 100 MHz exclusively from type III bursts, we revisited long-standing questions: Do all coronal type III bursts have X-ray counterparts. What correlation, if any, occurs between radio and X-ray intensities. What X-ray and radio signatures above 100 MHz occur in connection with interplanetary type III bursts below 14 MHz. We analysed data from 2002 to 2011 starting with coronal type III bursts above 100 MHz. We used RHESSI X-ray data greater than 6 keV to make a list of 321 events that have associated type III bursts and X-ray flares, encompassing at least 28 percent of the initial sample of type III events. We examined the timings, intensities, associated GOES class, and any interplanetary radio signature. For...

  2. Validation of Ozone Profiles Retrieved from SAGE III Limb Scatter Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Didier F.; Taha, Ghassan

    2007-01-01

    Ozone profiles retrieved from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) limb scatter measurements are compared with correlative measurements made by occultation instruments (SAGE II, SAGE III and HALOE [Halogen Occultation Experiment]), a limb scatter instrument (Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System [OSIRIS]) and a series of ozonesondes and lidars, in order to ascertain the accuracy and precision of the SAGE III instrument in limb scatter mode. The measurement relative accuracy is found to be 5-10% from the tropopause to about 45km whereas the relative precision is found to be less than 10% from 20 to 38km. The main source of error is height registration uncertainty, which is found to be Gaussian with a standard deviation of about 350m.

  3. Tracking Type III Radio Burst Sources in the Solar Corona by Heliographic Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.

    We present the preliminary results of heliographic measurements of solar type III radio bursts in the low-frequency range (16.5-33 MHz) using the UTR-2 radio heliograph. The radio astronomy tools permit us to obtain two-dimensional spatial structures of burst sources in dependence of frequency and time. Each heliogram consists of 40 pixels (beams) as a result of the serial sweep in UV-plane wherein signals of each beam are recorded in a dynamic spectrum with both high temporal (˜ 2.482 ms) and top spectral (˜ 4 kHz) resolutions. The rate of output heliograph is one image per 3 seconds. Over a session in April, 2013 many type III radio and IIIb-III bursts were observed. On the heliograms the source motion direction in the upper corona is clearly detectable. The heliogram features are discussed.

  4. Psychometric Testing of the FACES III with Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Bette; Dingmann, Colleen; Cuevas, Elizabeth; Meehan, Maurita

    2010-01-01

    This study tests the validity and reliability of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale III (FACES III) in two samples of rural adolescents. The underlying theory is the linear 3-D circumplex model. The FACES III was administered to 1,632 adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 in two counties in a rural western state. The FACES III Scale and the…

  5. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  6. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  7. Image Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accredited Practices EER Endowment for Education & Research Journal Image Gallery Click each image to enlarge. Fetal nose/lips Fetal nose, upper ... in the third trimester of pregnancy; the ultrasound image shows the chest of each fetus with the ...

  8. Image Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Laura Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    In large datasets, it is time consuming or even impossible to pick out interesting images. Our proposed solution is to find statistics to quantify the information in each image and use those to identify and pick out images of interest.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of neodymium (III) and praeseodymium (III) compounds in molten chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, H.; Sharrad, C. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M139PL (United Kingdom); Claux, B.; Soucek, P.; Malmbeck, R. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A novel spectroscopic furnace has been developed for the in situ acquisition of UV-visible absorption spectra in high temperature molten salts. The furnace has been used to obtain spectra of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) trichloride in LiCl-KCl eutectic at 450 Celsius degrees over various Ln(III) concentrations. The major absorption peaks for both for Nd(III) and Pr(III) in the UV-visible region of the spectrum have been identified and the molar absorbances quantified for each of these absorption maxima. The neodymium and praseodymium were then precipitated by adding respectively, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}O to the salt and monitored using UV-visible spectroscopy. In both cases the precipitate has been identified as the relevant LnOCl by powder XRD. (authors)

  10. SAGE III aerosol extinction validation in the Arctic winter: comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Thomason

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10–20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020 nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of ~30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  11. SAGE III Aerosol Extinction Validation in the Arctic Winter: Comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, L. W.; Poole, L. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10-20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020-nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of approx. 30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  12. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  13. Luminescence studies of Sm(III) and Cm(III) complexes in NaSCN/DHDECMP extraction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, D Y; Kimura, T

    1999-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) studies of Sm(III) and Cm(III) complexes in the NaSCN/DHDECMP solvent extraction system were carried out. Luminescence lifetimes were measured to determine the number of water molecules coordinated to Sm(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), and Cm(III) in the sodium thiocyanate solution and in the DHDECMP phase. The hydration number of Sm(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), and Cm(III) in the sodium thiocyanate solution decreased linearly with increasing sodium thiocyanate concentration. The hydration numbers of Sm(III), Dy(III), and Cm(III) in the DHDECMP phase decreased with increasing sodium thiocyanate concentration. The water molecules in the inner coordination sphere of Sm(III) and Dy(III) extracted into the DHDECMP were not completely removed at low sodium thiocyanate concentration but decreased with increasing sodium thiocyanate concentration. However, in the case of Cm(III) extracted into the DHDECMP phase from the sodium thiocyanate solution, there was no water in the inner coordination sphe...

  14. News and Views: IYA Twitters too; Goodbye WFPC2; ESA and NASA join up for Mars; Ammonia map shows hot spots; A Centre for science; Twitter to see the ISS; IYA2009 on Flickr

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    At the end of June, the European and US space agencies agreed to work together to set up a framework for exploration of Mars. Both bodies have been under pressure; international collaboration is seen as the best way forward. The ESA MetOp satellite has provided the data for researchers to produce the first global map of ammonia emissions. The map shows high production over areas of intensive agriculture, as well as sources not previously known.

  15. Exceptional Oxygen Sensing Properties of New Blue Light-Excitable Highly Luminescent Europium(III) and Gadolinium(III) Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Borisov, Sergey M.; Fischer, Roland; Saf, Robert; Klimant, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    New europium(III) and gadolinium(III) complexes bearing 8-hydroxyphenalenone antenna combine efficient absorption in the blue part of the spectrum and strong emission in polymers at room temperature. The Eu(III) complexes show characteristic red luminescence whereas the Gd(III) dyes are strongly phosphorescent. The luminescence quantum yields are about 20% for the Eu(III) complexes and 50% for the Gd(III) dyes. In contrast to most state-of-the-art Eu(III) complexes the new dyes are quenched v...

  16. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology.

  17. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III) and As(III)/Sb(III)-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Li, Mingshun; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III)]/antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing strain. The As(III) oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III) oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III) oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III) oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III) oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III) oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III), ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III) and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III) oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III) and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III) oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III) would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III) stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  18. Interpreting change on the WAIS-III/WMS-III in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, G L

    2001-02-01

    Clinicians should note that there is considerable variability in the reliabilities of the index and subtest scores derived from the third editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III). The purpose of this article is to review these reliabilities and to illustrate how they can be used to interpret change in patients' performances from test to retest. The WAIS-III IQ and Index scores are consistently the most reliable scores, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The most internally consistent WAIS-III subtests are Vocabulary, Information, Digit Span, Matrix Reasoning, and Arithmetic. Information and Vocabulary have the highest test-retest reliability. On the WMS-III, the Auditory Immediate Index, Immediate Memory Index, Auditory Delayed Index, and General Memory Index are the most reliable, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The Logical Memory I and Verbal Paired Associates I subtests are the most reliable. Data from three clinical groups (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, chronic alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia) were extracted from the Technical Manual [Psychological Corporation (1997). WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual. San Antonio: Harcourt Brace] for the purpose of calculating reliable change estimates. A table of confidence intervals for test-retest measurement error is provided to help the clinician determine if patients have reliably improved or deteriorated on follow-up testing.

  19. Isolation, characterization, and stability of discretely-sized nanolipoprotein particles assembled with apolipophorin-III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas O Fischer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs are discoidal, nanometer-sized particles comprised of self-assembled phospholipid membranes and apolipoproteins. NLPs assembled with human apolipoproteins have been used for myriad biotechnology applications, including membrane protein solubilization, drug delivery, and diagnostic imaging. To expand the repertoire of lipoproteins for these applications, insect apolipophorin-III (apoLp-III was evaluated for the ability to form discretely-sized, homogeneous, and stable NLPs. METHODOLOGY: Four NLP populations distinct with regards to particle diameters (ranging in size from 10 nm to >25 nm and lipid-to-apoLp-III ratios were readily isolated to high purity by size exclusion chromatography. Remodeling of the purified NLP species over time at 4 degrees C was monitored by native gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography, and atomic force microscopy. Purified 20 nm NLPs displayed no remodeling and remained stable for over 1 year. Purified NLPs with 10 nm and 15 nm diameters ultimately remodeled into 20 nm NLPs over a period of months. Intra-particle chemical cross-linking of apoLp-III stabilized NLPs of all sizes. CONCLUSIONS: ApoLp-III-based NLPs can be readily prepared, purified, characterized, and stabilized, suggesting their utility for biotechnological applications.

  20. Constraining the Statistics of Population III Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the ten minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 AU. We find a binary fraction of approx. 36, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 AU. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at approx. < 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the ten minihaloes, approx. 50 are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and 50 of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming disks. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  1. Alkylcobalt(III) compounds with ammine ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Pauli

    2005-01-01

    Amminecobalt(III) compounds with a coordinated primary alkyl group (ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl, 2-phenylethyl, 3-aminopropyl) have been prepared using monoalkylhydrazines as alkylating agents. The identities have been established using solution 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis...

  2. Exploring Flipped Classroom Instruction in Calculus III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.; Quint, Christa; Norris, Scott A.; Carr, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In an undergraduate Calculus III class, we explore the effect of "flipping" the instructional delivery of content on both student performance and student perceptions. Two instructors collaborated to determine daily lecture notes, assigned the same homework problems, and gave identical exams; however, compared to a more traditional…

  3. ESEA III Evaluation and Dissemination: An Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balyeat, Ralph R.; Norman, C. Douglas

    This study surveyed evaluation and dissemination/diffusion practices of ESEA III projects funded in the 1969 fiscal year, which projects are nearing the end of their operations as federally supported programs. The study attempted to discover if (1) the projects were evaluated in accordance with generally accepted procedures, (2) the project…

  4. Naturintegration i Vandmiljøplan III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. M.; Fredshavn, J. R.; Krabbe, D.

    Denne rapport er udarbejdet som en del af forarbejdet til Vandmiljøplan III. På foranledning af Fødevareministeriet og Skov- og Naturstyrelsen er der nedsat en teknisk undergruppe, F-7, til at beskrive tiltag, der ud over at mindske næringssalttilførsel til vandområder fra landbrugs-drift også vil...

  5. FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present document describes key discussion points and outcomes of a Society of Toxicology (SOT) Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Workshop, entitled FutureTox III1,2 that was held in Crystal City, Virginia, November 19-20, 2015. The workshop built on the many lessons l...

  6. Exploring Flipped Classroom Instruction in Calculus III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.; Quint, Christa; Norris, Scott A.; Carr, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In an undergraduate Calculus III class, we explore the effect of "flipping" the instructional delivery of content on both student performance and student perceptions. Two instructors collaborated to determine daily lecture notes, assigned the same homework problems, and gave identical exams; however, compared to a more traditional…

  7. De Nederlandstalige WAIS-III na hernormering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravenzwaaij, D.; Hamel, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the validity of the Dutch version of the WAIS-III after re-norming is assessed. The structure of the factorial design, the subtest-intercorrelations, the convergent validity, the criterion validity and the new test norms are used as indicators. It is concluded that the validity of the

  8. DRDC Support to Exercise Cyber Storm III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    d’intervention fédéraux portant sur les incidents cybernétiques sont encore relativement peu élaborés et insuffisamment développés et un examen des plans examinés...9 2.7 CSIII Ethics Protocol...30 Annex C .. Exercise Cyber Storm III Ethics

  9. Naturintegration i Vandmiljøplan III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. M.; Fredshavn, J. R.; Krabbe, D.

    Denne rapport er udarbejdet som en del af forarbejdet til Vandmiljøplan III. På foranledning af Fødevareministeriet og Skov- og Naturstyrelsen er der nedsat en teknisk undergruppe, F-7, til at beskrive tiltag, der ud over at mindske næringssalttilførsel til vandområder fra landbrugs-drift også vil...

  10. Early cephalometric characteristics in Class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Costa Farias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early identification of craniofacial morphological characteristics allows orthopedic segmented interventions to attenuate dentoskeletal discrepancies, which may be partially disguised by natural dental compensation. To investigate the morphological characteristics of Brazilian children with Class III malocclusion, in stages I and II of cervical vertebrae maturation and compare them with the characteristics of Class I control patients. METHODS: Pre-orthodontic treatment records of 20 patients with Class III malocclusion and 20 control Class I patients, matched by the same skeletal maturity index and sex, were selected. The craniofacial structures and their relationships were divided into different categories for analysis. Angular and linear measures were adopted from the analyses previously described by Downs, Jarabak, Jacobson and McNamara. The differences found between the groups of Class III patients and Class I control group, both subdivided according to the stage of cervical vertebrae maturation (I or II, were assessed by analysis of variance (ANOVA, complemented by Bonferroni's multiple mean comparisons test. RESULTS: The analysis of variance showed statistically significant differences in the different studied groups, between the mean values found for some angular (SNA, SNB, ANB and linear variables (Co - Gn, N - Perp Pog, Go - Me, Wits, S - Go, Ar - Go. CONCLUSION: Assessed children displaying Class III malocclusion show normal anterior base of skull and maxilla, and anterior positioning of the mandible partially related to increased posterior facial height with consequent mandibular counterclockwise rotation.

  11. Colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.; Velikov, K. P.; Philipse, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Ferric pyrophosphate is a widely used material in the area of mineral fortification but its synthesis and properties in colloidal form are largely unknown. In this article, we report on the synthesis and characterisation of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate particles with potential for application a

  12. Sex Bias, Diagnosis, and DSM-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Sandra; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-five clinical psycholgists independently diagnosed 18 written case histories on the basis of 110 DSM-III categories. Females were rated significantly more histrionic than males exhibiting identical histrionic symptoms, but males were not rated as more antisocial than females. The findings suggest that vague diagnostic descriptions promote…

  13. Weill receives Edward A. Flinn III award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann, Robert C.; Weill, Daniel F.

    Daniel F. Weill was awarded the Flinn III Award at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 8 December 2002, in San Francisco, California. The award is given to an individual who personifies the Union's motto of unselfish cooperation in research through their facilitating, coordinating, and implementing activities.

  14. Development of novel technologies to enhance performance and reliability of III-Nitride avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Puneet Harischandra

    Solar-blind ultraviolet avalanche photodiodes are an enabling technology for applications in the fields of astronomy, communication, missile warning systems, biological agent detection and particle physics research. Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are capable of detecting low-intensity light with high quantum efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio without the need for external amplification. The properties of III-N materials (GaN and AlGaN) are promising for UV photodetectors that are highly efficient, radiation-hard and capable of visible-blind or solar-blind operation without the need for external filters. However, the realization of reliable and high performance III-N APDs and imaging arrays has several technological challenges. The high price and lack of availability of bulk III-N substrates necessitates the growth of III-Ns on lattice mismatched substrates leading to a high density of dislocations in the material that can cause high leakage currents, noise and premature breakdown in APDs. The etched sidewalls of III-N APDs and high electric fields at contact edges are also detrimental to APD performance and reliability. In this work, novel technologies have been developed and implemented that address the issues of performance and reliability in III-Nitride based APDs. To address the issue of extended defects in the bulk of the material, a novel pulsed MOCVD process was developed for the growth of AlGaN. This process enables growth of high crystal quality AlxGa1-xN with excellent control over composition, doping and thickness. The process has also been adapted for the growth of high quality III-N materials on silicon substrate for devices such as high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). A novel post-growth defect isolation technique is also discussed that can isolate the impact of conductive defects from devices. A new sidewall passivation technique using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials was developed for III-N APDs that is effective in

  15. Image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der F.; Spreeuwers, L.J.; Blanken, H.M.; Vries de, A.P.; Blok, H.E.; Feng, L

    2007-01-01

    The field of image processing addresses handling and analysis of images for many purposes using a large number of techniques and methods. The applications of image processing range from enhancement of the visibility of cer- tain organs in medical images to object recognition for handling by industri

  16. Image city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities.......Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities....

  17. Two cases of missed Salter-Harris III coronal plane fracture of the lateral femoral condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Sanjeev; Henry, Patrick; Behrens, Fred

    2008-02-01

    Coronal plane fractures of the lateral femoral condyle can be difficult to diagnose, especially in children with open physis. Two adolescents who sustained this uncommon Salter-Harris III fracture of the knee were misdiagnosed after initial clinical examination and standard x-rays. Oblique x-rays, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were valuable in arriving at the correct diagnosis and in decision making.

  18. Potentiometric studies on the complex formation of some Ln(III) ions with 4-nitrocatechol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuyan, B.C.; Dubey, S.N. (Kurukshetra Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-07-01

    The interaction of La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Ho(III) and Y(III) with 4-nitrocatechol has been investigated potentiometrically in aqueous medium at 25deg and at ionic strengths of 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2M (KNO/sub 3/). The proton-ligand formation constants and metal-ligand formation constants have been calculated using the Calvin-Bjerrum titration technique as modified by Irving and Rossotti. The thermodynamic formation constants have also been determined. The order of stabilities of the lanthanide complexes with the above ligand is found to be: La(III) < Ce(III) approximately Pr(III) < Nd(III) < Sm(III) < Gd(III) < Y(III) < Tb(III) < Dy(III) < Ho(III).

  19. Evaluation of bone marrow by opposed phase T1-weighted images and enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Tanabe, Yoshihiro; Miyashita, Tsuguhiro; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Horiuchi, Junichi; Nomura, Takeo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    We investigated bone marrow in a control group, cases of aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients by examining T1-weighted (T1W1), short T1 inversion recovery (STIR), opposed phase T1W1 (op-T1W1) and Gd-DTPA enhanced op-T1W1 images obtained by 0.5 T MRI. Bone marrow was classified into four types based on MR findings. Normal marrow showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and STIR images without enhancement (I). Fatty marrow, which showed high intensity on T1W1 and op-T1W1 images was observed in aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients (II). Hematopoietic marrow (III) showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and enhanced, while active hematopoietic marrow (IV) revealed high intensity on both STIR and op-T1W1 images and was enhanced following Gd-DTPA infusion. Aplastic anemia of moderate grade included types II, III and IV. Enhanced MR was needed to differentiate between types I and III since both types showed low intensity on op-T1W1 images. Furthermore, type IV was considered as hyperplastic compared with type III. Enhanced MR and op-T1W1 images were useful in evaluating hematopoiesis of bone marrow. (author).

  20. Inhibition of HTLV-III by exogenous oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodchild, J.; Zamecnik, P.C.

    1989-02-21

    A method is described of detecting the presence of HTLV-III virus in a sample by demonstrating inhibition of replication of the virus in cells which are normally killed by the HTLV-III virus after the cells have been (a) combined with the sample and an oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication and capable of hybridizing with at least the highly conserved region, the highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome being a nucleotide sequence present in the genomes of HTLV-III isolates and the oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication being complementary to a region of the HTLV-III genome.

  1. Computational Intelligence in Image Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Siarry, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Computational intelligence based techniques have firmly established themselves as viable, alternate, mathematical tools for more than a decade. They have been extensively employed in many systems and application domains, among these signal processing, automatic control, industrial and consumer electronics, robotics, finance, manufacturing systems, electric power systems, and power electronics. Image processing is also an extremely potent area which has attracted the atten­tion of many researchers who are interested in the development of new computational intelligence-based techniques and their suitable applications, in both research prob­lems and in real-world problems. Part I of the book discusses several image preprocessing algorithms; Part II broadly covers image compression algorithms; Part III demonstrates how computational intelligence-based techniques can be effectively utilized for image analysis purposes; and Part IV shows how pattern recognition, classification and clustering-based techniques can ...

  2. Photothermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotko, Dmitry; Antonishina, Elena

    1995-02-01

    An automated image analysis system with two imaging regimes is described. Photothermal (PT) effect is used for imaging of a temperature field or absorption structure of the sample (the cell) with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. In a cell study PT-technique enables imaging of live non-stained cells, and the monitoring of the cell shape/structure. The system includes a dual laser illumination unit coupled to a conventional optical microscope. A sample chamber provides automated or manual loading of up to 3 samples and cell positioning. For image detection a 256 X 256 10-bit CCD-camera is used. The lasers, scanning stage, and camera are controlled by PC. The system provides optical (transmitted light) image, probe laser optical image, and PT-image acquisition. Operation rate is 1 - 1.5 sec per cell for a cycle: cell positioning -- 3 images acquisition -- image parameters calculation. A special database provides image/parameters storage, presentation, and cell diagnostic according to quantitative image parameters. The described system has been tested during live and stained blood cell studies. PT-images of the cells have been used for cell differentiation. In experiments with the red blood cells (RBC) that originate from normal and anaemia blood parameters for disease differentiation have been found. For white blood cells in PT-images the details of cell structure have found that absent in their optical images.

  3. Hydroxo-bridged dicopper(II,III) and -(III,III) complexes: models for putative intermediates in oxidation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvagar, Mohammad Reza; Solntsev, Pavlo V; Lim, Hyeongtaek; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O; Solomon, Edward I; Cramer, Christopher J; Tolman, William B

    2014-05-21

    A macrocyclic ligand (L(4-)) comprising two pyridine(dicarboxamide) donors was used to target reactive copper species relevant to proposed intermediates in catalytic hydrocarbon oxidations by particulate methane monooxygenase and heterogeneous zeolite systems. Treatment of LH4 with base and Cu(OAc)2·H2O yielded (Me4N)2[L2Cu4(μ4-O)] (1) or (Me4N)[LCu2(μ-OH)] (2), depending on conditions. Complex 2 was found to undergo two reversible 1-electron oxidations via cyclic voltammetry and low-temperature chemical reactions. On the basis of spectroscopy and theory, the oxidation products were identified as novel hydroxo-bridged mixed-valent Cu(II)Cu(III) and symmetric Cu(III)2 species, respectively, that provide the first precedence for such moieties as oxidation catalysis intermediates.

  4. Designing hydrophobic sheet protected Eu(III)-tetracycline complex using long chain unsaturated fatty acid: Efficient ‘antenna effect’ in aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Swarna Kamal; Sanyal, Sagarika; Samanta, Sugata; Ghosh, Sanjib, E-mail: pchemsg@gmail.com

    2015-04-15

    We have designed a novel ternary system consisting of Tetracycline hydrochloride (TC), Eu(III) and unsaturated long chain fatty acid (Oleic acid, α-Linolenic acid) in aqueous buffer at physiological pH of 7.2. The systems exhibit highly efficient ‘antenna effect’ of Eu(III) compared to that observed in the binary system of TC and Eu(III) [Eu{sub 3}TC]. Transients of Eu(III) emission in aqueous buffer and D{sub 2}O buffer show that the number of water molecules, coordinated directly to the Eu(III) ion, decreases from 12 in Eu{sub 3}TC to 2 in the ternary system using oleic acid. The micelle formed by the bent conformation of the unsaturated oleic acid provides a hydrophobic sheet on all sides of Eu{sub 3}TC complex protecting Eu(III) from interacting with O–H oscillator. The simple biocompatible system could be used for imaging purpose, and biomedical assay. - Highlights: • A ternary system containing a ligand, oleic acid and Eu(III) has been developed. • The system exhibits enhanced ‘antenna effect’ in aqueous medium at pH=7.2. • This may help design a useful biosensor/imaging technique using Eu(III)

  5. Extraction and separation studies of Ga(III, In(III and Tl(III using the neutral organophosphorous extractant, Cyanex-923

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. DHADKE

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The neutral extractant, Cyanes-923 has been used for the extraction and separation of gallium(III, indium(III and thallium(III from acidic solution. These metal ions were found to be quantitatively extracted with Cyanex-923 in toluene in the pH range 4.5–5.5, 5.0–6.5 and 1.5–3.0, respectively, and from the organic phase they can be stripped with 2.0 mol dm-3 HNO3, 3.0 mol dm-3 HNO3 and 3.0 mol dm-3 HCl, respectively. The effect of pH equilibration period, diluents, diverse ions and stripping agents on the extraction of Ga(III, In(III and Tl(III has been studied. The stroichiometry of the extracted species of these metal ions was determined on the basis of the slope analysis method. The reaction proceed by solvation and the probable extracted species found were [MCl3. 3Cyanex-923] [where M = Ga(III or In(III ] and [HTlCl4. 3Cyanex-923]. Based on these results a sequential procedure for the separation of Ga(III, In(III and Tl(III from each other was developed.

  6. A XAFS study of plain and composite iron(III) and chromium(III) hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassiopi, N; Pinakidou, F; Katsikini, M; Antipas, G S E; Christou, C; Xenidis, A; Paloura, E C

    2014-09-01

    Reduction of hexavalent Cr(VI) to the trivalent state is the common strategy for remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated waters and soils. In the presence of Fe the resulting compounds are usually mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) phases, while, under iron-free conditions, reduction leads to formation of plain Cr(III) hydroxides. Environmental stability of these compounds depends on their structure and is important to understand how different precipitation conditions affect the local atomic order of resulting compounds and thus their long term stability. In current study, typical Cr(VI) environmental remediation products, i.e. plain and mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides, were synthesized by hydrolysis and redox reactions and their structure was studied by X ray diffraction and X ray absorption fine structure techniques. Plain Cr(III) hydroxide was found to correspond to the molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O and was identified as crystalline in XRD. However, the same compound when examined by EXAFS did not exhibit any clear local order in the range of EXAFS detectable distances, i.e. between 0 and 5Å. Namely, EXAFS spectroscopy detected only contribution from the first nearest neighboring (Cr-O) shell, suggesting that CrO6 octahedra interconnection is loose, in accordance with the suggested anti-bayerite structure of this compound. Mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) systems resembled 2-line ferrihydrite irrespective of the synthesis route. Analysis of Fe-K-EXAFS and Cr-K-EXAFS spectra indicated that FeO6 octahedra are bonded by sharing both edges and corners, while CrO6 octahedra seem to prefer edge sharing linkage. EXAFS data also suggest that Fe-Cr hydroxide produced by hydrolysis presents a better arrangement of CrO6 octahedra compared to the redox product.

  7. Ovicidal and insect sterilizing activity of some iron (III) and cobalt (III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, M.; Datta, S.; Koner, D.; Bhattacharya, P.K.; Gangopadhya, A.; Dey, K.

    1985-01-01

    Ovicidal and insect sterilizing activity of some newly synthesized cobalt (III) and iron (III) complexes were examined on the early fifth instar nymphs of Dysdercus Koenigii. Initial mortality after treatment was negligible and maximum number of adults emerged without any morphogenic defects. Several adults in each treatment were paired and their reproductive potential up to two consecutive generations was studied. Some significant results have been obtained as a result of this study.

  8. Conservative compensatory Angle Class III malocclusion treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Costa Sobral

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Angle's Class III malocclusion is a dental discrepancy in a sagittal view that may appear or not with an important skeletal discrepancy. Facial esthetics may be affected by this skeletal discrepancy and it is one of the most common complaints of patients who seek orthodontic treatment. Class III treatment, in adults, may be done by compensatory tooth movement, in simple cases, or through an association between orthodontics and orthognathic surgery, in more severe cases. OBJECTIVE: This article describes a non-extraction compensatory Class III treatment case, applying the Tweed-Merrifield mechanical principles with headgear (J-Hook in the mandibular arch. This case was presented at the V Brazilian Association of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (ABOR Meeting, it was evaluated by members of Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and obtained third place in the general classification.INTRODUÇÃO: a má oclusão de Classe III se caracteriza por uma desarmonia dentária anteroposterior, podendo estar ou não acompanhada por discrepâncias esqueléticas. A estética facial pode se apresentar comprometida, em maior ou menor grau, a depender da magnitude da discrepância, constituindo um dos principais fatores motivadores da procura por tratamento ortodôntico. O tratamento da Classe III em pacientes adultos pode ser realizado mediante compensação dentária, nos casos mais simples, ou, em situações mais severas, mediante a associação entre Ortodontia e Cirurgia Ortognática. OBJETIVO: o presente artigo objetiva relatar um caso clínico caracterizado por uma má oclusão de Classe III de Angle, tratado de forma compensatória, com extração dos terceiros molares inferiores, mediante a utilização de aparelhagem extrabucal na arcada inferior (J-hook, aplicando-se princípios da técnica de Tweed-Merrifield. Esse caso foi apresentado no 5º Congresso da Associação Brasileira de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (ABOR, na categoria

  9. Evaluation Report for the ESEA Title III Project, South Bronx Multi-Purpose Supplementary Educational Center (SOMPSEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Robert D.

    This is a report of an evaluation of the South Bronx Multi-Purpose Supplementary Educational Center (SOMPSEC). The primary objectives of SOMPSEC, funded under Title III, Elementary and Secondary Education Act were: (1) to enhance the self-image of minority-group students, (2) to encourage development of their artistic talent, and (3) to increase…

  10. Industrial fuel gas demonstration plant program. Current working estimate. Phase III and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) executed a contract with Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division (MLGW) which requires MLGW to perform process analysis, design, procurement, construction, testing, operation, and evaluation of a plant which will demonstrate the feasibility of converting high sulfur bituminous coal to industrial fuel gas with a heating value of 300 +- 30 Btu per standard cubic foot (SCF). The demonstration plant is based on the U-Gas process, and its product gas is to be used in commercial applications in Memphis, Tenn. The contract specifies that the work is to be conducted in three phases. The Phases are: Phase I - Program Development and Conceptual Design; Phase II - Demonstration Plant Final Design, Procurement and Construction; and Phase III - Demonstration Plant Operation. Under Task III of Phase I, a Cost Estimate for the Demonstration Plant was completed as well as estimates for other Phase II and III work. The output of this Estimate is presented in this volume. This Current Working Estimate for Phases II and III is based on the Process and Mechanical Designs presented in the Task II report (second issue) and the 12 volumes of the Task III report. In addition, the capital cost estimate summarized in the appendix has been used in the Economic Analysis (Task III) Report.

  11. Mutual separation of americium(III) and europium(III) using glycolamic acid and thioglycolamic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suneesh, A.S.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Syamala, K.V.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2012-07-01

    The extractants, bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamicacid (HDEHDGA) and bis(2-ethylhexy)thiodiglycolamic acid (HDEHSDGA) were synthesized and characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, mass and IR spectroscopy. The extraction behaviour of {sup (152+154})Eu(III) and {sup 241}Am(III) from nitric acid medium by a solution of HDEHDGA (or HDEHSDGA) in n-dodecane (n-DD) was studied for the mutual separation of actinides and lanthanides. The effect of various parameters such as the pH, concentrations of HDEHDGA, HDEHSDGA, sodium nitrate, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) on the separation factor (SF) of americium(III) over europium(III) and vice versa was studied, and the conditions needed for the preferential separation were optimised. The results show that HDEHDGA exhibits higher extraction for {sup (152+154)}Eu(III) and HDEHSDGA shows the superior selectivity for {sup 241}Am(III). (orig.)

  12. BES-III distributed computing status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, S. D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Korenkov, V. V.; Li, W. D.; Lin, T.; Ma, Z. T.; Nicholson, C.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Suo, B.; Trofimov, V. V.; Tsaregorodtsev, A. U.; Uzhinskiy, A. V.; Yan, T.; Yan, X. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Zhemchugov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The BES-III experiment at the Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing, China) is aimed at the precision measurements in e+e- annihilation in the energy range from 2.0 till 4.6 GeV. The world's largest samples of J/psi and psi' events and unique samples of XYZ data have been already collected. The expected increase of the data volume in the coming years required a significant evolution of the computing model, namely shift from a centralized data processing to a distributed one. This report summarizes a current design of the BES-III distributed computing system, some of key decisions and experience gained during 2 years of operations.

  13. Gold(III) complexes in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Pedro Ivo da Silva; Deflon, Victor M; Abram, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    A number of gold(III) compounds has been designed with the objective of overcoming the disadvantages associated with the platinum-based drugs for cancer treatment. Compounds of a remarkable structural manifold show significant antiproliferative effects in vitro against a number of cancer cells, including cisplatin resistant ones. The target of most of them is, unlike that of cisplatin, not the DNA. Although the mechanisms of action displayed by the gold compounds in biological media are still under investigation, many studies show evidence that the cellular targets are mitochondria-based. Recent advances in gold(III) medicinal chemistry also recommend such compounds for other pharmacological applications such as the treatment of viral or parasitic diseases. The radioactive isotopes (198)Au and (199)Au present potential in radiotherapy.

  14. Solar Neutrino Measurement at SK-III

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, B S

    2009-01-01

    The full Super-Kamiokande-III data-taking period, which ran from August of 2006 through August of 2008, yielded 298 live days worth of solar neutrino data with a lower total energy threshold of 4.5 MeV. During this period we made many improvements to the experiment's hardware and software, with particular emphasis on its water purification system and Monte Carlo simulations. As a result of these efforts, we have significantly reduced the low energy backgrounds as compared to earlier periods of detector operation, cut the systematic errors by nearly a factor of two, and achieved a 4.5 MeV energy threshold for the solar neutrino analysis. In this presentation, I will present the preliminary SK-III solar neutrino measurement results.

  15. Iron (III) chloride doping of CVD graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi; Fang, Wenjing; Hsu, Allen L; Kong, Jing

    2014-10-03

    Chemical doping has been shown as an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. We present the results of our investigations into doping large area chemical vapor deposition graphene using Iron (III) Chloride (FeCl(3)). It is shown that evaporating FeCl(3) can increase the carrier concentration of monolayer graphene to greater than 10(14) cm(-2) and achieve resistances as low as 72 Ω sq(-1). We also evaluate other important properties of the doped graphene such as surface cleanliness, air stability, and solvent stability. Furthermore, we compare FeCl(3) to three other common dopants: Gold (III) Chloride (AuCl(3)), Nitric Acid (HNO(3)), and TFSA ((CF(3)SO(2))(2)NH). We show that compared to these dopants, FeCl(3) can not only achieve better sheet resistance but also has other key advantages including better solvent stability.

  16. Rare earth(III) complexes for the development of new magnetic and luminescent probes; Complexes de lanthanides(III) pour le developpement de nouvelles sondes magnetiques et luminescentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonat, A

    2007-10-15

    The simultaneous optimisation of the molecular parameters determining the relaxivity (number of coordinated water molecules, water-exchange, rotation dynamics of the whole complex, electronic relaxation, Gd(III)-proton distance) is essential to prepare efficient contrast agents. The aim of this work is on the one hand to design and study complexes with a high number of bound water molecules and to understand the influence of the coordination sphere on the stability and on the electronic relaxation and on the other hand, to use the ligand as a chromophore for the development of luminescent probes for biomedical imaging. We present the structure, the stability and the relaxivity of Gd(III) complexes of two series of tripodal ligands containing picolinate units based either on the 1,4,7-tri-aza-cyclononane ring or on a tertiary amine. These complexes show high relaxivity in water and in serum and can establish a non covalent interaction with serum albumin. The interpretation of the water proton relaxivity with the help of new relaxometric methods based on an auxiliary probe solute has allowed us to show that both the presence of the picolinate groups and the 1,4,7-tri-aza-cyclononane framework can lead to Gd(III) complexes with favourable electronic relaxation properties. This ligands have also been used for Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexation leading to strong luminescence in visible light. Other complexes derived from 8-hydroxyquinoline unit which display a very high luminescence in infrared are also studied. (author)

  17. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate neuroscient...... of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself....

  18. Nota a Ovidio, Tr. III 2, 23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulogio F. Baeza Angulo

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at proving the correct reading of quod in Ovid Tr. III 2, 23, basing it on the context and especially in mss. Ei mihi, quod totiens nostri pulsata sepulcri ianua, sub nullo tempore aperta fuit! Cur ego tot gladios fugi totiensque minata obruit infelix nulla procella caput? _______________________________ 23 quod codd. Heinsius def. Housman 1916, 131-132: quo Owen Ehwald-Levy Luck: quam K

  19. Objectives and methodology of BIOBADASER phase iii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Piedra, Carlos; Hernández Miguel, M Victoria; Manero, Javier; Roselló, Rosa; Sánchez-Costa, Jesús Tomás; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Campos, Cristina; Cuende, Eduardo; Fernández-Lopez, Jesús Carlos; Bustabad, Sagrario; Martín Domenech, Raquel; Pérez-Pampín, Eva; Del Pino-Montes, Javier; Millan-Arcineas, Ana Milena; Díaz-González, Federico; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús

    2017-09-18

    Describe the objectives, methods and results of the first year of the new version of the Spanish registry of adverse events involving biological therapies and synthetic drugs with an identifiable target in rheumatic diseases (BIOBADASER III). Multicenter prospective registry of patients with rheumatic inflammatory diseases being treated with biological drugs or synthetic drugs with an identifiable target in rheumatology departments in Spain. The main objective of BIOBADASER Phase III is the registry and analysis of adverse events; moreover, a secondary objective was added consisting of assessing the effectiveness by means of the registry of activity indexes. Patients in the registry are evaluated at least once every year and whenever they experience an adverse event or a change in treatment. The collection of data for phase iii began on 17 December 2015. During the first year, 35 centers participated. The number of patients included in this new phase in December 2016 was 2,664. The mean age was 53.7 years and the median duration of treatment was 8.1 years. In all, 40.4% of the patients were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequent adverse events were infections and infestations. BIOBADASER Phase III has been launched to adapt to a changing pharmacological environment, with the introduction of biosimilars and small molecules in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. This new stage is adapted to the changes in the reporting of adverse events and now includes information related to activity scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. Co(II)4, Co(II)7, and a Series of Co(II)2Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) Coordination Clusters: Search for Single Molecule Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Ritwik; Sikdar, Yeasin; Thuijs, Annaliese E; Christou, George; Goswami, Sanchita

    2016-10-03

    We report herein the syntheses and investigation of the magnetic properties of a Co(II)4 compound, a series of trinuclear Co(II)2Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) complexes, and a Co(II)7 complex. The homometallic Co(II)4 core was obtained from the reaction of Ln(NO3)3·xH2O/Co(NO3)2·6H2O/H2vab/Et3N in a 0.5:0.5:1:2 ratio in methanol. Variation in synthetic conditions was necessary to get the desired Co(II)-Ln(III) complexes. The Co(II)-Ln(III) assembly was synthesized from Ln(NO3)3·xH2O/Co(OAc)2·4H2O/H2vab/NaOMe in a 0.4:0.5:1:1 ratio in methanol. The isostructural Co(II)2Ln(III) complexes have a core structure with the general formula [Co2Ln(Hvab)4(NO3)](NO3)2·MeOH·H2O, (where H2vab = 2-[(2-hydroxymethyl-phenylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol) with simultaneous crystallization of Co(II)7 complex in each reaction. The magnetic investigation of these complexes reveals that both homometallic complexes and four Co(II)-Ln(III) complexes (except Co(II)-Nd(III)) display behavior characteristic of single molecule magnets.

  1. Mechanistic insights into type III restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-01-01

    Type III restriction-modification (R-M) enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in indirectly repeated, head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location next to only one of the two sites. However, cleavage of sites that are not in head-to-head orientation have been observed to occur under certain reaction conditions in vitro. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites prior to cleavage. Type III R-M enzymes comprise two subunits, Res and Mod that form a homodimeric Mod2 and a heterotetrameric Res2Mod2 complex. The Mod subunit in M2 or R2M2 complex recognizes and methylates DNA while the Res subunit in R2M2 complex is responsible for ATP hydrolysis, DNA translocation and cleavage. A vast majority of biochemical studies on Type III R-M enzymes have been undertaken using two closely related enzymes, EcoP1I and EcoP15I. Divergent opinions about how the long-distance interaction between the recognition sites exist and at least three mechanistic models based on 1D- diffusion and/or 3D- DNA looping have been proposed.

  2. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  3. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) - III

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions - III (NESARC-III) is a nationally representative survey of 46,500 adult Americans that collected...

  4. Pangad õhutavad III pensionisambaga liituma / Toivo Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tänavsuu, Toivo

    2004-01-01

    Pangad peavad III pensionisambaga liitumist hädavajalikuks neile, kes soovivad oma elustandardit pensionile minnes säilitada. Pankade prognoose III sambaga liitumise kohta käesolevaks aastaks. Lisa: Pensioniks kogumine

  5. Pangad õhutavad III pensionisambaga liituma / Toivo Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tänavsuu, Toivo

    2004-01-01

    Pangad peavad III pensionisambaga liitumist hädavajalikuks neile, kes soovivad oma elustandardit pensionile minnes säilitada. Pankade prognoose III sambaga liitumise kohta käesolevaks aastaks. Lisa: Pensioniks kogumine

  6. Single-molecule magnet behavior and magnetocaloric effect in ferromagnetically coupled Ln(III)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Dy(III) and Gd(III)) linear complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Carlos; Titos-Padilla, Silvia; Hänninen, Mikko M; Navarrete, R; Mota, A J; Evangelisti, Marco; Ruiz, José; Colacio, Enrique

    2014-11-17

    New types of linear tetranuclear Ln(III)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Dy (1), Gd (2)) complexes have been prepared using the multidentate ligand N,N'-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)-1,3-diaminobenzene, which has two sets of NO and OO' coordination pockets that are able to selectively accommodate Ni(II) and Ln(III) ions, respectively. The X-ray structure analysis reveals that the Ni(II) ions are bridged by phenylenediimine groups forming a 12-membered metallacycle in the central body of the complex, whereas the Ln(III) ions are located at both sides of the metallacycle and linked to the Ni(II) ions by diphenoxo bridging groups. Phenylenediimine and diphenoxo bridging groups transmit ferromagnetic exchange interactions between the two Ni(II) ions and between the Ni(II) and the Ln(III) ions, respectively. Complex 1 shows slow relaxation of the magnetization at zero field and a thermal energy barrier Ueff = 7.4 K with HDC = 1000 Oe, whereas complex 2 exhibits an S = 9 ground state and significant magnetocaloric effect (-ΔSm = 18.5 J kg(-1) K(-1) at T = 3 K and ΔB = 5 T).

  7. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Li, Pangpang; Ma, Jianping; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-01

    A few heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metalate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii) were simply prepared via the metathesis reaction of MCl3 (THF)m (m = 1-2) and K[3,5-R2dp] ([3,5-R2dp](-) = 3,5-di-substituent-1,2,4-diazaphospholide; R = tBu, Ph) in a varied ratio (1 : 3, 1 : 4, and 1 : 5, respectively) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran. All the complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H}, IR, and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis despite their paramagnetism (excluding La(iii) complexes). The structures of the complexes were found to feature varied coordination modes. The magnetic properties of several compounds were studied by magnetic susceptibility, and the complexes presented the magnetic moments close to or lower than the theoretical values for the free ions in the trivalent oxidation states (Pr(3+), Nd(3+)).

  8. Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  9. Musculoskeletal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Baur-Melnyk, A.; Glaser, C. [Univ. of Munich-Grosshadern Campus (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2008-07-01

    The book covers on musculoskeletal imaging epidemiology and imaging signs for the following topics: tumours, inflammatory diseases, degenerative diseases, metabolic disorders, developmental disorders, osteonecrosis, intra-articular lesions, ligament and tendon injuries, fractures and dislocations.

  10. CURRENT SITUATION OF MEDICINE III AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Describe the current situation of the area Medicine III of CAPES and detect challenges for the next four years of evaluation. Methods: The area's documents and reports of meetings were read from 2004 to 2013 Medicine III Capes as well as reports and evaluation form of each Postgraduate Program (PPG of the area and the sub-page of the area from the Capes website. The data relating to the evaluation process, the assessment form and faculty, student and scientific production data of all of Post-Graduate Programs of Medicine III were computed and analyzed. From these data were detected the challenges of the area for the next four years (2013-2016. Results: Among the 3,806 PPG, Medicine III had 41 PPG during last triennial evaluation and progressed from 18% to 43% of PPG very good or more concept (triennium 2001-2003 and 2010-2012. Most PPG were located in the South-East region (32, three in the South and two in the North-East. There was no PPG in North or Central-West regions. In 2013 and 2014 there were four approved Professional Master Degree Programs and one Master (M and Doctorate (PhD. The average of permanent professors was 558 teachers with about three students/professor. The number of PhD graduates has increased as well as the reason PhD/MD. The proportion of in high impact periodicals (A1, A2, B1 and B2 jumped from 30% to 50% demonstrating positive community response to the policy area. The challenges identified were: decrease regional asymmetry, increase the number of masters and doctors of excellence, reassessment of Brazilian journals, stimulate and set internationalization indicators, including post-doctors and definition of its indicators, the PPG nucleation analysis, PPG 3x3, include primary and secondary education, professional master and indicators of technological scientific production and solidarity. Conclusion: Medicine III has been scientifically consolidated and their scientific researchers demonstrated maturity

  11. Microwave imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorino, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the most relevant theoretical and algorithmic aspects of modern microwave imaging approaches Microwave imaging-a technique used in sensing a given scene by means of interrogating microwaves-has recently proven its usefulness in providing excellent diagnostic capabilities in several areas, including civil and industrial engineering, nondestructive testing and evaluation, geophysical prospecting, and biomedical engineering. Microwave Imaging offers comprehensive descriptions of the most important techniques so far proposed for short-range microwave imaging-in

  12. Class - III malocclusion: Genetics or environment? A twins study

    OpenAIRE

    Jena A; Duggal R; Mathur V; Parkash H

    2005-01-01

    Etiology of class-III malocclusion is generally believed to be genetic. A wide range of environmental factors have been suggested as contributing factors for the development of class-III malocclusion. Twin study is one of the most effective methods available for investigating genetically determined variables of malocclusion. Discordancy for class-III malocclusion is a frequent finding in dizygotic twins. However, class-III malocclusion discordancy in monozygotic twins is a rare finding. The p...

  13. Sulfur passivation techniques for III-V wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael James

    The use of direct wafer bonding in a multijunction III-V solar cell structure requires the formation of a low resistance bonded interface with minimal thermal treatment. A wafer bonded interface behaves as two independent surfaces in close proximity, hence a major source of resistance is Fermi level pinning common in III-V surfaces. This study demonstrates the use of sulfur passivation in III-V wafer bonding to reduce the energy barrier at the interface. Two different sulfur passivation processes are addressed. A dry sulfur passivation method that utilizes elemental sulfur vapor activated by ultraviolet light in vacuum is compared with aqueous sulfide and native oxide etch treatments. Through the addition of a sulfur desorption step in vacuum, the UV-S treatment achieves bondable surfaces free of particles contamination or surface roughening. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of the sulfur treated GaAs surfaces find lower levels of oxide and the appearance of sulfide species. After 4 hrs of air exposure, the UV-S treated GaAs actually showed an increase in the amount of sulfide bonded to the semiconductor, resulting in less oxidation compared to the aqueous sulfide treatment. Large area bonding is achieved for sulfur treated GaAs / GaAs and InP / InP with bulk fracture strength achieved after annealing at 400 °C and 300 °C respectively, without large compressive forces. The electrical conductivity across a sulfur treated 400 °C bonded n-GaAs/n-GaAs interface significantly increased with a short anneal (1-2 minutes) at elevated temperatures (50--600 °C). Interfaces treated with the NH4OH oxide etch, on the other hand, exhibited only mild improvement in accordance with previously published studies in this area. TEM and STEM images revealed similar interfacial microstructure changes with annealing for both sulfur treated and NH4OH interfaces, whereby some areas have direct semiconductor-semiconductor contact without any interfacial layer. Fitting the

  14. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  15. Proof Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidron, Ivy; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a proof image is often an important stage in a learner's construction of a proof. In this paper, we introduce, characterize, and exemplify the notion of proof image. We also investigate how proof images emerge. Our approach starts from the learner's efforts to construct a justification without (or before) attempting any…

  16. 76 FR 60511 - Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Amendment of Marine Safety Manual, Volume III AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... Offshore Units. The policy is currently found in Chapter 16 of the Marine Safety Manual, Volume III. The... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose Chapter 16 of Volume III of the Marine Safety...

  17. 25 CFR 502.4 - Class III gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Class III gaming. 502.4 Section 502.4 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.4 Class III gaming. Class III gaming means all forms of gaming that are not class I gaming or...

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  19. Organocatalytic Site-Selective Acylation of 10-Deacetylbaccatin III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Masanori; Ninomiya, Ryo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Furuta, Takumi; Yamada, Takeshi; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Kawabata, Takeo

    2016-07-01

    Organocatalytic site-selective diversification of 10-deacetylbaccatin III, a key natural product for the semisynthesis of taxol, has been achieved. Various acyl groups were selectively introduced into the C(10)-OH of 10-deacetylbaccatin III. The C(10)-OH selective acylation was also applied to acylative site-selective dimerization of 10-deacetylbaccatin III to provide the structurally defined dimer.

  20. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antithrombin III (AT III) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties. We assessed the benefits and harms of AT III in critically ill patients. METHODS: We searched from inception to 27 August 2015 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CAB, BIOSIS and CINAHL. We included randomized cont...

  1. Korean Cultural Influences on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsalus, Ae-Jung Chang; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of Korean culture on the results of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) by comparing profiles of 147 Korean and 132 American college students. Results indicate that MCMI-III personality profile differences exist between Korean and American college students. Discusses implications for mental health…

  2. Low-energy neutrino observation at Super-Kamiokande-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Y [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo, 456 Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka-cho, Hida-shi, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)], E-mail: takeuchi@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-07-15

    Super-Kamiokande-III (SK-III) has been started its observation in July 2006. The main targets of low-energy neutrinos are the solar neutrinos and the diffuse supernova neutrino background. In this paper, the current status of the solar neutrino observation in SK-III is reported.

  3. Korean Cultural Influences on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsalus, Ae-Jung Chang; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of Korean culture on the results of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) by comparing profiles of 147 Korean and 132 American college students. Results indicate that MCMI-III personality profile differences exist between Korean and American college students. Discusses implications for mental health…

  4. Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

  5. Interaction of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with mucin. A key component of the human mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the potential health risks caused by the ingestion of lanthanides (Ln) and actinides (An), investigations into the chemical behavior of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. Mucin is an important part of the protective mucosa layer in the digestive system. We have recently reported that mucin interacts strongly with Eu(III) and Cm(III), representatives of Ln(III) and An(III), respectively, under in vivo conditions. In order to investigate the complexation behavior of this protein with Ln(III)/An(III), TRLFS measurements were performed on Eu(III)/Cm(III)-mucin solutions with different protein concentrations and at different pH. The results indicate the formation of at least two independent mucin species. At higher pH, the formation of hydroxide species was also observed.

  6. Analysis of DNA modified by cerium (III, lanthanum (III and gadolinium (III ions by using of raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Kohoutkova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lanthanides are at the present group of heavy metals, which are at the centre of interest, especially because of their ability to interact with DNA and similarity with calcium(III ions, which play crucial role in many cell processes. On basis of DNA interactions, anti–cancerogenic potential is established. In our work, we were focused on interactions of chosen lanthanides – lanthanum, cerium and gadolinium – with DNA. Results of our experiments demonstrate ability of lanthanides to form DNA adducts.

  7. WAIS-III and WMS-III performance in chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilp, John G; Corbera, Kathy; Slavov, Iordan; Taylor, Michael J; Sackeim, Harold A; Fallon, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the nature and degree of intellectual and memory deficits in chronic Lyme disease. In this study, 81 participants with rigorously diagnosed chronic Lyme disease were administered the newest revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III), and compared to 39 nonpatients. On the WAIS-III, Lyme disease participants had poorer Full Scale and Performance IQ's. At the subtest level, differences were restricted to Information and the Processing Speed subtests. On the WMS-III, Lyme disease participants performed more poorly on Auditory Immediate, Immediate, Auditory Delayed, Auditory Recognition Delayed, and General Memory indices. Among WMS-III subtests, however, differences were restricted to Logical Memory (immediate and delayed) and Family Pictures (delayed only), a Visual Memory subtest. Discriminant analyses suggest deficits in chronic Lyme are best characterized as a combination of memory difficulty and diminished processing speed. Deficits were modest, between one-third and two-thirds of a standard deviation, consistent with earlier studies. Depression severity had a weak relationship to processing speed, but little other association to test performance. Deficits in chronic Lyme disease are consistent with a subtle neuropathological process affecting multiple performance tasks, although further work is needed to definitively rule out nonspecific illness effects.

  8. Interactions Between Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates During Microbial Reduction 2: Natural Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, T.; Griffin, A. M.; Gorski, C. A.; Shelobolina, E. S.; Xu, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Roden, E. E.

    2016-04-19

    Dissimilatory microbial reduction of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates (Fe(III)-phyllosilicates) is an important process in anoxic soils, sediments, and subsurface materials. Although various studies have documented the relative extent of microbial reduction of single-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates, detailed information is not available on interaction between these two processes in situations where both phases are available for microbial reduction. The goal of this research was to use the model dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium (DIRB) Geobacter sulfurreducens to study Fe(III)-oxide vs. Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction in a range of subsurface materials and Fe(III)-oxide stripped versions of the materials. Low temperature (12K) Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to infer changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate). A Fe partitioning model was employed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. The results showed that in most cases Fe(III)- oxide utilization dominated (70-100 %) bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, and that electron transfer from oxide-derived Fe(II) played only a minor role (ca. 10-20 %) in Fe partitioning. In addition, the extent of Fe(III)-oxide reduction was positively correlated to surface area-normalized cation exchange capacity and the phyllosilicate-Fe(III)/total Fe(III) ratio, which suggests that the phyllosilicates in the natural sediments promoted Fe(III)-oxide reduction by binding of oxide-derived Fe(II), thereby enhancing Fe(III)-oxide reduction by reducing or delaying the inhibitory effect that Fe(II) accumulation on oxide and DIRB cell surfaces has on Fe(III)-oxide reduction. In general our results suggest that although Fe(III)-oxide reduction is likely to dominate bulk Fe(III) reduction in most subsurface sediments, Fe

  9. Synthesis, Characterization of La(III, Nd(III, and Er(III Complexes with Schiff Bases Derived from Benzopyran-4-one and Thier Fluorescence Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida L. El-Ansary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Schiff bases, L1, L2, and L3, are synthesized from the condensation of 5,7-dihydroxy-6-formyl-2-methylbenzopyran-4-one (L with 2-aminopyridine (1, p-phenylenediamine (2, and o-phenylenediamine (3. The prepared Schiff bases react with lanthanum (III, neodymium (III, and erbium (III nitrate to give complexes with stoichiometric ratio (1 : 1 (ligand : metal. The binuclear complexes of Er(III with L3 and the three metal ions with L2 are separated. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption, and infrared, 1H-NMR spectral studies. The presence of hydrated and coordinated water molecules is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal degradation studies show that the final product is the metal oxide. The luminescence properties of the Nd(III and Er(III complexes in dimethylformamide (DMF solutions were investigated.

  10. CURRENT SITUATION OF MEDICINE III AND CHALLENGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-01-01

    Describe the current situation of the area Medicine III of CAPES and detect challenges for the next four years of evaluation. The area's documents and reports of meetings were read from 2004 to 2013 Medicine III Capes as well as reports and evaluation form of each Postgraduate Program (PPG) of the area and the sub-page of the area from the Capes website. The data relating to the evaluation process, the assessment form and faculty, student and scientific production data of all of Post-Graduate Programs of Medicine III were computed and analyzed. From these data were detected the challenges of the area for the next four years (2013-2016). Among the 3,806 PPG, Medicine III had 41 PPG during last triennial evaluation and progressed from 18% to 43% of PPG very good or more concept (triennium 2001-2003 and 2010-2012). Most PPG were located in the South-East region (32), three in the South and two in the North-East. There was no PPG in North or Central-West regions. In 2013 and 2014 there were four approved Professional Master Degree Programs and one Master (M) and Doctorate (PhD). The average of permanent professors was 558 teachers with about three students/professor. The number of PhD graduates has increased as well as the reason PhD/MD. The proportion of in high impact periodicals (A1, A2, B1 and B2) jumped from 30% to 50% demonstrating positive community response to the policy area. The challenges identified were: decrease regional asymmetry, increase the number of masters and doctors of excellence, reassessment of Brazilian journals, stimulate and set internationalization indicators, including post-doctors and definition of its indicators, the PPG nucleation analysis, PPG 3x3, include primary and secondary education, professional master and indicators of technological scientific production and solidarity. Medicine III has been scientifically consolidated and their scientific researchers demonstrated maturity reaching a high level and matched to areas of greatest

  11. The Image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2015-01-01

    We pick up the world and form it through the images we shape and seek out. Internal and external images intervene. We go out into the world with our images and the world enters us through its images. The body is the intermediate link for the images, which come to and from us. We are not only...... sensing subjects; we are constantly symbolizing and getting hold of our sensoric affects through imagery. To see and sense is in itself a way of articulating. We cannot stop it. The images must come out – in dreams, in concrete pictures, constructed or not, in phantasms, in sound images, in the metaphors...... of words, in bodily expressions, in sensations of textures, and in synesthetic sensing. The world is perceived from the inside though the body and we have the possibility to look at it from the outside through the images, which are made from this material. The Image-Currency, The Indefinite Image, The Self-Image...

  12. Extraction behaviour of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium in TEHDGA-HDEHP impregnated resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saipriya, G.; Kumar, T. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Facilities, Kalpakkam (India). Kalpakkam Reprocessing Plant; Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, P.K.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2016-07-01

    The extraction behaviour of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium was studied in the solvent impregnated resins containing extractants such as tetra-bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (TEHDGA) or bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) or mixture of TEHDGA+HDEHP. The rate of extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 M nitric acid and the effect of various parameters, such as the concentration of nitric acid in aqueous phase and concentration of TEHDGA and HDEHP in resin phase, on the distribution coefficient of Am(III) and Eu(III) was studied. The distribution coefficient of Am(III) and Eu(III) in HDEHP-impregnated resin decreased and that in TEHDGA-impregnated resin increased, with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. However, in (TEHDGA+HDEHP) - impregnated resin, synergic extraction was observed at lower nitric acid concentration and antagonism at higher nitric acid concentration. The mechanism of Am(III) and Eu(III) extraction in the combined resin was investigated by slope analysis method. The extraction of various metal ions present in the fast reactor simulated high-level liquid waste was studied. The separation factor of Am(III) over Eu(III) was studied using citrate-buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solution.

  13. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  14. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  15. Solvent extraction-separation of La(III), Eu(III) and Er(III) ions from aqueous chloride medium using carbamoyl-carboxylic acid extractants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reyhaneh Safarbali; Mohammad Reza Yaftian; Abbasali Zamani

    2016-01-01

    N,N-dibutyldiglycol amic acid (HLI) and N,N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (HLI) were synthesized and characterized by con-ventional spectroscopic methods. These molecules were examined as extractants for extraction-separation of La(III), Eu(III) and Er(III), as representative ions of light, middle and heavy rare earths, from aqueous chloride solutions. The analysis of the extraction equilibria revealed that the extracted species of lanthanum and europium ions by both of the extractants had a 1:3 metal to ligand ratio. It was suggested that erbium ions were extracted into the organic phase via the formation of Er(LI or I)2Cl complexes. The effect of the organic diluents on the extraction-separation efficiency of the studied rare earths by HLI and HLI was investigated by comparing the results obtained in dichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride. Regardless to the diluent used, the order of selectivity presented by the investigated extractants was Er(III)>Eu(III)>La(III). It is noteworthy that, a significant enhancement in separation of the studied rare earths by the extractants was achieved in their competitive extraction experiments with respect to that obtained in single component extraction experiments. Applicability of the extractants for the removal of rare earth ions from spent Ni-MH batteries was tested by removal of La(III), Eu(III) and Er(III) ions from simulated leach solution of such batteries.

  16. Fishy fishes: the typicality of object stimuli used to assess children's language in the Reynell Development Language Scales--III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrnyk, Corinne; Meints, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies show clear evidence that children display typicality effects during early word learning. However, little is known of the typicality of stimuli used by standardized language tests to assess children's language development. To examine the typicality of stimuli used by the Reynell Developmental Language Scales-III (RDLS-III), a standardized language assessment that measures children's language abilities. Two sets of items were compared: RDLS-III items and a set of Matching items that had previously been judged to be highly typical exemplars. Experiment 1 asked adults to rate images of RDLS-III items and the set of Matching items for typicality; while Experiment 2 asked adults to choose the 'best exemplar' from these sets of items. Experiment 3 used Intermodal Preferential Looking (IPL) to examine 4-year-olds' looking behaviour towards both the RDLS-III items and Matching stimuli. In supplement of Experiment 3, Experiment 4 asked children to indicate the better exemplar using a forced-choice pointing method. Both adults and children preferred the Matching, more typical items. This is the first study to demonstrate that stimuli used for assessing early language development in the RDLS-III are not judged to be typical by children or adults. It highlights the differences in stimuli and discusses the potential consequences of stimulus choice in the assessment early language. © 2012 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  17. The role of Ce(III) in BZ oscillating reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Paulo A.; Varela, Hamilton; Faria, Roberto B.

    2012-03-01

    Herein we present results on the oscillatory dynamics in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Ce(III)/Ce(IV) system in batch and also in a CSTR. We show that Ce(III) is the necessary reactant to allow the emergence of oscillations. In batch, oscillations occur with Ce(III) and also with Ce(IV), but no induction period is observed with Ce(III). In a CSTR, no oscillations were found using a freshly prepared Ce(IV), but only when the cerium-containing solution was aged, allowing partial conversion of Ce(IV) to Ce(III) by reaction with acetone.

  18. The Solar Radio Imaging Array (SIRA) microsatellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M.

    2003-04-01

    SIRA, the Solar Imaging Radio Array, will be a constellation of about 16 microsats designed to image radio sources in the solar corona and heliosphere using aperture synthesis techniques. These images will permit the mapping and tracking of CME-driven shocks (type II radio bursts) and solar flare electrons (type III radio bursts) as a function of time from near the sun to 1 AU. Two dimensional imaging of the CME-driven shock front is important for determination of space weather effects of CMEs, whereas imaging of the ubiquitous type III bursts will permit the derivation of density maps in the outer corona and solar wind. This will be the first mission to image the heliosphere (and the celestial sphere) with good angular resolution at frequencies below the ionospheric cutoff (~10 MHz). In this presentation, we highlight the ways in which SIRA is complementary to LOFAR and FASR.

  19. Kuosheng Mark III containment analyses using GOTHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ansheng, E-mail: samuellin1999@iner.gov.tw; Chen, Yen-Shu; Yuann, Yng-Ruey

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The Kuosheng Mark III containment model is established using GOTHIC. • Containment pressure and temperature responses due to LOCA are presented. • The calculated results are all below the design values and compared with the FSAR results. • The calculated results can be served as an analysis reference for an SPU project in the future. -- Abstract: Kuosheng nuclear power plant in Taiwan is a twin-unit BWR/6 plant, and both units utilize the Mark III containment. Currently, the plant is performing a stretch power uprate (SPU) project to increase the core thermal power to 103.7% OLTP (original licensed thermal power). However, the containment response in the Kuosheng Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was completed more than twenty-five years ago. The purpose of this study is to establish a Kuosheng Mark III containment model using the containment program GOTHIC. The containment pressure and temperature responses under the design-basis accidents, which are the main steam line break (MSLB) and the recirculation line break (RCLB) accidents, are investigated. Short-term and long-term analyses are presented in this study. The short-term analysis is to calculate the drywell peak pressure and temperature which happen in the early stage of the LOCAs. The long-term analysis is to calculate the peak pressure and temperature of the reactor building space. In the short-term analysis, the calculated peak drywell to wetwell differential pressure is 140.6 kPa for the MSLB, which is below than the design value of 189.6 kPa. The calculated peak drywell temperature is 158 °C, which is still below the design value of 165.6 °C. In addition, in the long-term analysis, the calculated peak containment pressure is 47 kPa G, which is below the design value of 103.4 kPa G. The calculated peak values of containment temperatures are 74.7 °C, which is lower than the design value of 93.3 °C. Therefore, the Kuosheng Mark III containment can maintain the integrity after

  20. Poly[hexaaquatri-μ-malonato-didysprosium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Dy2(C3H2O43(H2O6]n, forms a coordination polymeric structure comprising hydrated dysprosium ions and malonate ligands. In the asymmetric unit, there are one dysprosium ion, one and a half malonate ligands, and three water molecules. Each DyIII atom is coordinated by six O atoms from four malonate ligands and by three water molecules, and displays a tricapped trigonal–prismatic coordination geometry. The malonate ligands adopt two types of coordination mode, linking dysprosium centres to form a three-dimensional coordination polymer. The extensive network of hydrogen bonds in this polymer enhances the structural stability.

  1. Silicon photonics III systems and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, David

    2016-01-01

    This book is volume III of a series of books on silicon photonics. It reports on the development of fully integrated systems where many different photonics component are integrated together to build complex circuits. This is the demonstration of the fully potentiality of silicon photonics. It contains a number of chapters written by engineers and scientists of the main companies, research centers and universities active in the field. It can be of use for all those persons interested to know the potentialities and the recent applications of silicon photonics both in microelectronics, telecommunication and consumer electronics market.

  2. Synthetic Stellar Clusters for Pop III

    CERN Document Server

    Raimondo, G; Cassisi, S; Castellani, V

    1999-01-01

    We present preliminary results of an incoming theoretical work concerning the integrated properties of the Population III clusters of stars. On the basis of synthetic Color-Magnitude Diagrams, we provide a grid of optical and near-IR colors of Simple Stellar Populations with very low metallicity (Z=10$^{-10}$ and Z=10$^{-6}$) and age which spans from 10 Myr to 15 Gyr. A comparison with higher metallicities up to 0.006 is also shown, disclosing sizable differences in the CMD morphology, integrated colors and Spectral Energy Distribution (SED).

  3. Kaiser Ferdinand III. (1608–1657)

    OpenAIRE

    HENGERER, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Ferdinand III. inherited the Thirty Years' war from its father, Ferdinand II.. In the centre of his reign, the war ended in 1648 with the Peace of Westphalia and thereby the long time of the confessional arguments going along with denomination questions. The Peace of Westphalia was at the same time an important stage in the decay of the alliance of the Spanish and Austrian Habsburger which had emerged under Karl of the V. and which had polarised Europe about for one century. Now the Peace hel...

  4. Alimentos industrializados congelados gama III y IV

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    El presente estudio tiene como objetivo, indagar sobre el consumo, el grado de información y contenido de sodio, grasas saturadas y colesterol de los principales alimentos congelados Gama III y V consumidos por los encuestados. A partir de esto, se realiza una encuesta de frecuencia de consumo y preguntas varias a 250 personas de entre 30 a 60 años, que concurren a cuatro supermercados de la ciudad de Mar del Plata, para determinar el conocimiento por parte de los encuestados e...

  5. Recombinant human antithrombin III: rhATIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    GTC Biotherapeutics (formerly Genzyme Transgenics Corporation) is developing a transgenic form of antithrombin III known as recombinant human antithrombin III [rhATIII]. It is produced by inserting human DNA into the cells of goats so that the targeted protein is excreted in the milk of the female offspring. The transgenic goats have been cloned in collaboration with the Louisiana State University Agriculture Center. GTC Biotherapeutics is conducting clinical trials of rhATIII in coagulation disorders. rhATIII is believed to be both safer and more cost-effective than the currently available plasma-derived product. rhATIII is also being investigated in cancer and acute lung injury. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, originally a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation, changed its name to GTC Biotherapeutics in June 2002; it is no longer a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation. GTC Biotherapeutics is seeking partners for the commercialisation of rhATIII. Restructuring of GTC Biotherapeutics to support its commercialisation programmes was announced in February 2004. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation was developing rhATIII in association with Genzyme General (Genzyme Corporation) in the ATIII LLC joint venture, but in November 2000 a letter of intent was signed for the reacquisition of the rights by Genzyme Transgenics Corporation. It was announced in February 2001 that this reacquisition was not going to be completed and that the development of rhATIII was to continue with ATIII LLC. However, in July 2001, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired all the rights in the transgenic antithrombin III programme. SMI Genzyme Ltd, a joint venture between Sumitomo Metal Industries, Japan, and Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, USA, was set up to fund development of transgenic antithrombin III in Asia. However, in October 2000, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired, from Sumitomo Metal Industries, the rights to its technology for production of medicines from milk in 18 Asian countries

  6. Research in collegiate mathematics education III

    CERN Document Server

    Arcavi, A; Kaput, Jim; Dubinsky, Ed; Dick, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Volume III of Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education (RCME) presents state-of-the-art research on understanding, teaching, and learning mathematics at the post-secondary level. This volume contains information on methodology and research concentrating on these areas of student learning: Problem solving. Included here are three different articles analyzing aspects of Schoenfeld's undergraduate problem-solving instruction. The articles provide new detail and insight on a well-known and widely discussed course taught by Schoenfeld for many years. Understanding concepts. These articles fe

  7. III Astronomy School: the world of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivielso, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Astronomy School is an activity organized by the Centro de Estudios de Física del Cosmos de Aragón. It is celebrated every year at the end of the summer or the beginning of autumn with the purpose of bringing Astronomy and Astrophysics to the population from an educational and a training point of view. Its III Edition, held in October 2013, has been financed by the Spanish Astronomical Society and was focused on stellar physics. This contribution describes the School and the results.

  8. Semiconductors A(III)B(VI): Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhundov, G. A.; Abdullaev, G. B.; Guseynov, G. D.; Mekhtiyev, R. F.; Aliyeva, M. Kh.

    1993-11-01

    Semiconductors A(III) B(VI) crystallize in laminated or chain structures and contain nine valence electrons in each molecule. Connection in the layers and the chains is predominantly covalent, and Van der Waal between the layers and the chains. Calculated data of the energy spectrum of these compounds are absent, and the available experimental studies are insufficient for understanding of the zone structures. We have obtained and studied single crystals of GaS, GaSe, GaTe, InSe, and TiSe.

  9. NNMSM type-II and -III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); University of Tokyo, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Takahashi, Ryo [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We suggest two types of extension of the standard model, which are the so-called next to new minimal standard model type-II and -III. They can achieve gauge coupling unification as well as suitable dark matter abundance, small neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, inflation, and dark energy. The gauge coupling unification can be realized by introducing two or three extra new fields, and they could explain charge quantization. We also show that there are regions in which the vacuum stability, coupling perturbativity, and correct dark matter abundance can be realized with current experimental data at the same time. (orig.)

  10. Treatment of Class III with Facemask Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha Pattanaik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Class III malocclusion is one of the most difficult problems to treat in the mixed dentition. It has a multifactorial etiology involving both genetic and environmental causes. The dental and skeletal effects of maxillary protraction with a facemask are well documented in several studies. Although treatment in the late mixed or early permanent dentition can be successful, results are generally better in the deciduous or early mixed dentition. The following case shows early treatment of a young patient with severe sagittal and transverse discrepancy of the maxilla and mandible, using a facemask.

  11. Spectroscopic studies on unexpected complex azides of lanthanum(III) and neodymium(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popitsch, A.; Mautner, A.; Fritzer, H. P.

    Solid azides of the types Cs 3La(N 3) 6, Cs 2Nd(N 3) 5, and Cs 4Nd(N 3) 7 can be prepared by metathetical reactions under special precautions. Electronic spectra in diffuse reflectance, infrared and Raman spectra, and magnetic susceptibilities versus temperature and field strength were measured on microcrystalline samples. The data of these new compounds are primarily discussed in view of vibrational properties of the azide ion N 3-, as ligand and in relation to first insights into the nature of the metal-nitrogen bonds within the coordination polyhedra of La(III) and Nd(III).

  12. As origens da III Internacional Comunista The origins of the III Communist International

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard Carone

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available O texto analisa o rico processo histórico (de finais do século XIX e primeiras duas décadas do XX de lutas de classes e de ideologia do movimento socialista, que culminará com a fundação da III Internacional Comunista. This texts analyses the rich historical process (from the end of the 19th century to the first two decades of the 20th century of the class conflict and idealogy of the socialist movement, which will end up with the institution of the III Communist International.

  13. Structure of Co(III and Fe(III transition metal ions in aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Mohammed

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydration structures of Co(III and Fe(III ions have been investigated by Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC simulations using only ion-water pair interaction potentials and by including up to three body correction terms. The hydration structures were evaluated in terms of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers and angular distributions. The structural parameters obtained by including three-body correction terms are in good agreement with experimental values proving that many-body effects play a crucial role in the description of the hydration structure of these highly charged ions.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of bioactive carboxyamide with trinuclear lanthanide (III) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bibhesh K.; Prakash, Anant; Adhikari, Devjani

    2009-10-01

    Complexes of La(III), Sm(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III) with bioactive carboxyamide ligands N',N″-bis(3-caboxy-1-oxophenelenyl)2-amino-N-arylbenzamidine have been synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. Mass spectrum explains the successive degradation of the molecular species in solution and justifies ML complexes. Vibrational spectra indicate coordination of Ln(III) with amide and carboxylate oxygen of the ligand along with nitrate ions. The magnetic moment of Sm(III) and Eu(III) complexes showed slightly higher-values which originated due to low J- J separation leading to thermal population of next higher energy J levels and susceptibility due to first order Zeeman effect. The strong luminescence emitting peaks at 587 nm for Eu(III) and 543 nm for Tb(III) can be observed, which could be attributed to the ligand have an enhanced effect to the luminescence intensity of the Eu(III) and Tb(III). The thermal behaviour of complexes shows that water molecules and nitrate ion are removed in first step followed by the removal of two molecules of nitrate ions and then decomposition of the ligand molecule in subsequent step. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were computed from the thermal data using Coats and Redferm method, which confirm first order kinetics.

  15. Imaging Biomarkers or Biomarker Imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Mitterhauser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since biomarker imaging is traditionally understood as imaging of molecular probes, we highly recommend to avoid any confusion with the previously defined term “imaging biomarkers” and, therefore, only use “molecular probe imaging (MPI” in that context. Molecular probes (MPs comprise all kinds of molecules administered to an organism which inherently carry a signalling moiety. This review highlights the basic concepts and differences of molecular probe imaging using specific biomarkers. In particular, PET radiopharmaceuticals are discussed in more detail. Specific radiochemical and radiopharmacological aspects as well as some legal issues are presented.

  16. Prospects of III-Vs for Logic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.P. Gomes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The increasing challenges for further scaling down of Si CMOS require the study of alternative channel materials. This paper highlights the significance of III-V compound semiconductor materials in order to face the looming fate of Si CMOS technology. The potential advantages of using III-Vs as channel materials for future III-V CMOS is its outstanding transport properties that have been widely accepted in high frequency RF applications. However, many significant challenges in front of III-V digital technology needs to be overcome before III-V CMOS becomes feasible for next generation high speed and low power logic applications. But it may be that this situation is changing given recent progress in the fabrication of high-mobility III-Vs based heterostructure electronic devices for logic applications to fulfill the needs towards the everyday evolving III-V CMOS technology.

  17. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts.

  18. Recent studies of transform image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghagolzadeh, Sabzali; Ersoy, Okan K.

    1992-06-01

    Blockwise transform image enhancement techniques are discussed. It is shown that the best transforms for transform image coding, namely, the scrambled real discrete Fourier transform, the discrete cosine transform, and the discrete cosine-III transform, are also the best for image enhancement. Three techniques of enhancement discussed in detail are alpha- rooting, modified unsharp masking, and filtering motivated by the human visual system response (HVS). With proper modifications, it is observed that unsharp masking and HVS- motivated filtering without nonlinearities are basically equivalent. Block effects are completely removed by using an overlap-save technique in addition to the best transform.

  19. Mass segregation in rich clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud - III. Implications for the initial mass function

    CERN Document Server

    De Grijs, R; MacKey, A D; Wilkinson, M I; Beaulieu, S F; Johnson, R A; Santiago, B X

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of core radii of rich clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) systematically increases in both upper limit and spread with increasing cluster age. Cluster-to-cluster variations in the stellar initial mass function (IMF) have been suggested as an explanation. We discuss the implications of the observed degree of mass segregation in our sample clusters for the shape of the initial mass function. Our results are based on Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 observations of six rich star clusters in the LMC, selected to include three pairs of clusters of similar age, metallicity, and distance from the LMC centre, and exhibiting a large spread in core radii between the clusters in each pair. All clusters show clear evidence of mass segregation: (i) their luminosity function slopes steepen with increasing cluster radius, and (ii) the brighter stars are characterized by smaller core radii. For all sample clusters, both the slope of the luminosity function in the cluster centres and the degree of mass s...

  20. Radioactivity backgrounds in ZEPLIN-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, H. M.; Akimov, D. Yu.; Barnes, E. J.; Belov, V. A.; Bewick, A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A.; Deviveiros, L.; Edwards, B.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Kalmus, G. E.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Lüscher, R.; Majewski, P.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Neves, F.; Paling, S. M.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Preece, R.; Quenby, J. J.; Reichhart, L.; Scovell, P. R.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N.; Smith, N. J. T.; Smith, P. F.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Sumner, T. J.; Thorne, C.; Walker, R. J.

    2012-03-01

    We examine electron and nuclear recoil backgrounds from radioactivity in the ZEPLIN-III dark matter experiment at Boulby. The rate of low-energy electron recoils in the liquid xenon WIMP target is 0.75 ± 0.05 events/kg/day/keV, which represents a 20-fold improvement over the rate observed during the first science run. Energy and spatial distributions agree with those predicted by component-level Monte Carlo simulations propagating the effects of the radiological contamination measured for materials employed in the experiment. Neutron elastic scattering is predicted to yield 3.05 ± 0.5 nuclear recoils with energy 5-50 keV per year, which translates to an expectation of 0.4 events in a 1 yr dataset in anti-coincidence with the veto detector for realistic signal acceptance. Less obvious background sources are discussed, especially in the context of future experiments. These include contamination of scintillation pulses with Cherenkov light from Compton electrons and from β activity internal to photomultipliers, which can increase the size and lower the apparent time constant of the scintillation response. Another challenge is posed by multiple-scatter γ-rays with one or more vertices in regions that yield no ionisation. If the discrimination power achieved in the first run can be replicated, ZEPLIN-III should reach a sensitivity of ˜1 × 10-8pb · yr to the scalar WIMP-nucleon elastic cross-section, as originally conceived.

  1. ARIES-III divertor engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research, Solana Beach, CA (United States); Grotz, S.; Hasan, M.A.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Sze, D.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Herring, J.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valenti, M.; Steiner, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Plasma Dynamics Lab.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the engineering design of the ARIES-III double- null divertor. The divertor coolant tubes are made from W-3Re alloy and cooled by subcooled flow boiling of organic coolant. A coating of 4 mm thick tungsten is plasma sprayed onto the divertor surface. This W layer can withstand the thermal deposition of a few disruptions. At a maximum surface heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}, a conventional divertor design can be used. The divertor surface is contoured to have a constant heat flux of 5.4 MW/m{sup 2}. The net erosion of the W-surface was found to be negligible at about 0.1 mm/year. After 3 years of operation, the W-3Re alloy ARIES-III divertor can be disposed of as Class A waste. In order to control the prompt dose release at site boundary to less than 200 Rem, isotopic tailoring of the W-alloy will be needed.

  2. Class III peroxidases in plant defence reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, L; Gómez Ros, L V; Belchi-Navarro, S; Bru, R; Ros Barceló, A; Pedreño, M A

    2009-01-01

    When plants are attacked by pathogens, they defend themselves with an arsenal of defence mechanisms, both passive and active. The active defence responses, which require de novo protein synthesis, are regulated through a complex and interconnected network of signalling pathways that mainly involve three molecules, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET), and which results in the synthesis of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Microbe or elicitor-induced signal transduction pathways lead to (i) the reinforcement of cell walls and lignification, (ii) the production of antimicrobial metabolites (phytoalexins), and (iii) the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Among the proteins induced during the host plant defence, class III plant peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; hydrogen donor: H(2)O(2) oxidoreductase, Prxs) are well known. They belong to a large multigene family, and participate in a broad range of physiological processes, such as lignin and suberin formation, cross-linking of cell wall components, and synthesis of phytoalexins, or participate in the metabolism of ROS and RNS, both switching on the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed host cell death at the infection site associated with limited pathogen development. The present review focuses on these plant defence reactions in which Prxs are directly or indirectly involved, and ends with the signalling pathways, which regulate Prx gene expression during plant defence. How they are integrated within the complex network of defence responses of any host plant cell will be the cornerstone of future research.

  3. Parallel Reconstruction of CLEO III Data

    CERN Document Server

    Sharp, G J; Sharp, Gregory J.; Jones, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    Reconstruction of one run of CLEO III raw data can take up to 9 days to complete using a single processor. This is an administrative nightmare, and even minor failures result in reprocessing the entire run, which wastes time, money and CPU power. We leveraged the ability of the CLEO III software infrastructure to read and write multiple file formats to perform reconstruction of a single run using several CPUs in parallel. Using the Sun Grid Engine and some Perl scripts, we assign roughly equal-sized chunks of events to different CPUs. The Raw data are read from an Objectivity/DB database, but the reconstruction output is written to a temporary file, not the database. This takes about 6 hours. Once all the chunks have been analyzed, they are gathered together in event-number order and injected into Objectivity/DB. This process takes an additional 6 to 18 hours, depending on run size. A web-based monitoring tool displays the status of reconstruction. Many benefits accrue from this process, including a dramatic ...

  4. Type III Societies (Apparently) Do Not Exist

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Whether technological societies remain small and planet-bound like our own, or ultimately span across galaxies is an open question in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. Societies that engineer on a galactic scale are classified as Type III on Kardashev's scale. I argue that Type III societies can take the form of blackboxes, entire galaxies veiled in an opaque screen. A blackbox has a temperature that is just above that of the cosmic microwave background. The screen can be made from artificial dust pervading the galaxy. I show that there is enough material in galaxies to build blackboxes if the dust is fashioned into dipole antennas. The thermal emission of a blackbox makes it a bright microwave source. I examine the Planck Catalog of Compact Sources to constrain the abundance of blackboxes. None of the 100 GHz sources has the spectrum expected of a blackbox. The null result rules out shrouded galaxy clusters out to z ~ 1 and shrouded Milky Ways out to (comoving) 700 Mpc. The reach of th...

  5. Cubic III-nitrides: potential photonic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onabe, K.; Sanorpim, S.; Kato, H.; Kakuda, M.; Nakamura, T.; Nakamura, K.; Kuboya, S.; Katayama, R.

    2011-01-01

    The growth and characterization of some cubic III-nitride films on suitable cubic substrates have been done, namely, c- GaN on GaAs by MOVPE, c-GaN and c-AlGaN on MgO by RF-MBE, and c-InN and c-InGaN (In-rich) on YSZ by RFMBE. This series of study has been much focused on the cubic-phase purity as dependent on the respective growth conditions and resulting electrical and optical properties. For c-GaN and c-InN films, a cubic-phase purity higher than 95% is attained in spite of the metastable nature of the cubic III-nitrides. However, for c-AlGaN and c-InGaN films, the cubic-phase purity is rapidly degraded with significant incorporation of the hexagonal phase through stacking faults on cubic {111} faces which may be exposed on the roughened growing or substrate surface. It has been shown that the electron mobilities in c-GaN and c-AlGaN films are much related to phase purity.

  6. Zinc in a +III oxidation state

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Devleena

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of Group 12 elements, such as Zn, Cd, and Hg existing in an oxidation state of +III or higher and hence transforming them into transition metals has fascinated chemists for decades. It took nearly 20 years before experiment could confirm the theoretical prediction that Hg indeed can exist in an oxidation state of +IV. While this unusual property of Hg is attributed to the relativistic effects, Zn being much lighter than Hg has not been expected to have an oxidation state higher than +II. Using density functional theory we show that an oxidation state of +III for Zn can be realized by choosing specific ligands with large electron affinities. We demonstrate this by a systematic study of the interaction of Zn with F, BO2, and AuF6 ligands whose electron affinities are progressively higher, namely, 3.4 eV, 4.5 eV, and 8.6 eV, respectively. Discovery of higher oxidation states of elements can help in the formulation of new reactions and hence in the development of new chemistry.

  7. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  8. Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Electronic Imagery, Inc.'s ImageScale Plus software, developed through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Kennedy Space Flight Center for use on space shuttle Orbiter in 1991, enables astronauts to conduct image processing, prepare electronic still camera images in orbit, display them and downlink images to ground based scientists for evaluation. Electronic Imagery, Inc.'s ImageCount, a spin-off product of ImageScale Plus, is used to count trees in Florida orange groves. Other applications include x-ray and MRI imagery, textile designs and special effects for movies. As of 1/28/98, company could not be located, therefore contact/product information is no longer valid.

  9. Performance characteristics of postacute traumatic brain injury patients on the WAIS-III and WMS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, B N; Fichtenberg, N L; Liethen, P C; Czarnota, M A; Stucky, K

    2001-12-01

    Publication of the third editions of the Wechsler intelligence and memory batteries in 1997 created a need for research identifying Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition/Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III/WMS-III) profile patterns associated with neuropathology. The WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual offers data on various diagnostic groups, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). Hawkins (1998) employed Technical Manual data to propose certain diagnostic guidelines. In order to validate the conclusions put forth by Hawkins as they apply to brain injury, we examined WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles in an independent sample of 46 TBI cases. As expected, the WAIS-III Processing Speed Index (PSI) was more sensitive to brain injury than other WAIS-III composites; and specific WAIS-III scores were stronger than certain WMS-III scores. On the other hand, the predicted relationship for WMS-III auditory and visual indexes was not found. The lack of specificity for TBI of the proposed index comparisons confirms the need to validate such hypotheses in independent samples.

  10. Neuroblastoma imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Sebastian; Ley-Zaporozhan, J.; Schenk, J.P. [Univ. Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Radiology; Guenther, P. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Division of Pediatric Surgery; Deubzer, H.E.; Witt, O. [Children' s Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Oncology; German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Pediatric Oncology

    2011-03-15

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor of the sympathetic nervous system which represents one of the most common malignancies in early childhood. Its clinical and biological behavior show a remarkable heterogeneity, ranging from spontaneous regression to inexorable progression with a fatal outcome. This review summarizes the clinical risk stratification and treatment options. An extensive overview of the role of imaging during the course of the disease and typical imaging findings in all imaging modalities are demonstrated. (orig.)

  11. Cerenkov Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial...

  12. Karen Horney's "resigned person" heralds DSM-III-R's borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, R J

    1993-01-01

    It is shown here that what Karen Horney called the resignation solution to the problem of basic anxiety leads to psychopathology very similar to DSM-III-R's borderline personality disorder (BPD). Both the "resigned person" and the borderline personality show instability of self-image, social relationships, and mood, and live out the associated deficits with similar styles. While not specifically using the term "splitting", Horney showed how alternating expansive and self-effacing trends can coexist in the resigned person, and how these oscillations in self-other-world constitution influence the resigned person's behavior in a way similar to borderline splitting. Horney's descriptive and psychodynamic analysis of the resignation phenomenon elaborates and gives additional credibility to DSM-III-R's BPD as a diagnostic category.

  13. A single dose of peripherally infused EGFRvIII-directed CAR T cells mediates antigen loss and induces adaptive resistance in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Donald M; Nasrallah, MacLean P; Desai, Arati; Melenhorst, Jan J; Mansfield, Keith; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Brem, Steven; Maloney, Eileen; Shen, Angela; Isaacs, Randi; Mohan, Suyash; Plesa, Gabriela; Lacey, Simon F; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Zheng, Zhaohui; Levine, Bruce L; Okada, Hideho; June, Carl H; Brogdon, Jennifer L; Maus, Marcela V

    2017-07-19

    We conducted a first-in-human study of intravenous delivery of a single dose of autologous T cells redirected to the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) mutation by a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We report our findings on the first 10 recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) patients treated. We found that manufacturing and infusion of CAR-modified T cell (CART)-EGFRvIII cells are feasible and safe, without evidence of off-tumor toxicity or cytokine release syndrome. One patient has had residual stable disease for over 18 months of follow-up. All patients demonstrated detectable transient expansion of CART-EGFRvIII cells in peripheral blood. Seven patients had post-CART-EGFRvIII surgical intervention, which allowed for tissue-specific analysis of CART-EGFRvIII trafficking to the tumor, phenotyping of tumor-infiltrating T cells and the tumor microenvironment in situ, and analysis of post-therapy EGFRvIII target antigen expression. Imaging findings after CART immunotherapy were complex to interpret, further reinforcing the need for pathologic sampling in infused patients. We found trafficking of CART-EGFRvIII cells to regions of active GBM, with antigen decrease in five of these seven patients. In situ evaluation of the tumor environment demonstrated increased and robust expression of inhibitory molecules and infiltration by regulatory T cells after CART-EGFRvIII infusion, compared to pre-CART-EGFRvIII infusion tumor specimens. Our initial experience with CAR T cells in recurrent GBM suggests that although intravenous infusion results in on-target activity in the brain, overcoming the adaptive changes in the local tumor microenvironment and addressing the antigen heterogeneity may improve the efficacy of EGFRvIII-directed strategies in GBM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with isatin thiosemicarbazones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K.; Pandey, Om P.

    2005-09-01

    Ten new lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes of the general formula Na[La(L) 2H 2O] (Ln = La(III) or Pr(III); LH 2 = thiosemicarbazones) derived from the condensation of isatin with 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazide, 4-(4-chlorophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-nitrophenyl) thiosemicarbazide, 4-(2-bromophenyl) thiosemicarbazide and 4-(2-methylphenyl) thiosemicarbazide, have been synthesized in methanol in presence of sodium hydroxide. The XRD spectra of the complexes were monitored to verify complex formation. The complexes have also been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies. Thermal studies of these complexes have been carried out in the temperature range 25-800 °C using TG, DTG and DTA techniques. All these complexes decompose gradually with the formation of Ln 2O 3 as the end product. The Judd-ofelt intensity parameter, oscillator strength, transition probability, stimulated emission cross section for different transitions of Pr 3+ for 4-phenyl thiosemicarbazones have been calculated.

  15. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  16. III-nitride monolithic LED covering full RGB color gamut

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghoroury, Hussein S.; Chuang, Chih-Li; Kisin, Mikhail V.

    2016-03-01

    We present numerical simulation of III-nitride monolithic multi-color LED covering full red-green-blue (RGB) color gamut. The RGB LED structure was grown at Ostendo Technologies Inc. and has been used in Ostendo proprietary Quantum Photonic Imager (QPI) device. Active region of our RGB LED incorporates specially designed intermediate carrier blocking layers (ICBLs) controlling transport of each type of carriers and subsequent carrier injection redistribution among the optically active quantum wells (QWs) with different emission wavelengths. ICBLs are proved to be essential elements of multi-color LED active region design requiring optimization both in material composition and doping level. Strong interdependence between ICBL parameters and active QW characteristics presents additional challenge to multi-color LED design. Combination of several effects was crucial for adequate simulation of RGB LED color control features. Standard drift-diffusion transport model has been appended with rate equations for dynamic QW-confined carrier populations which appear severely off-balanced from corresponding mobile carrier subsystems. QW overshoot and Auger-assisted QW depopulation were also included into the carrier kinetic model thus enhancing the non-equilibrium character of QW confined populations and supporting the mobile carrier transport across the MQW active region. For device simulation we use COMSOL-based program suit developed at Ostendo Technologies Inc.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassiopi, N; Vaxevanidou, K; Christou, C; Karagianni, E; Antipas, G S E

    2014-01-15

    Chromium is a common contaminant of soils and aquifers and constitutes a major environmental problem. In nature, chromium usually exists in the form of two oxidation states, trivalent, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous for biota and for the aquatic environment, and hexavalent, Cr(VI) which is toxic, carcinogenic and very soluble. Accordingly, the majority of wastewater and groundwater treatment technologies, include a stage where Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), in order to remove chromium from the aqueous phase and bind the element in the form of environmentally stable solid compounds. In the absence of iron the final product is typically of the form Cr(OH)3·xH2O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe(1-x)Crx(OH)3 phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fex,Cr1-x)(OH)3 hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH)3. We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH)3·3H2O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH)3(am) phase. Mixed Fe0.75Cr0.25(OH)3 hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH)3, and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) hydroxides are more effective enhancers of groundwater quality, in comparison to the plain amorphous or crystalline Cr(III) hydroxides, the latter found to have a solubility typically higher than 50μg/l (maximum EU permitted Cr level in drinking water), while the amorphous Cr(OH)3(am) phase was within the drinking water threshold in the range 5.7hydroxides studied were of extended stability in the 4.8

  18. Synthesis, characterization and stability of Cr(III) and Fe(III) hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papassiopi, N.; Vaxevanidou, K.; Christou, C.; Karagianni, E.; Antipas, G.S.E., E-mail: gantipas@metal.ntua.gr

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Fe(III)–Cr(III) hydroxides enhance groundwater quality better than pure Cr(III) compounds. • Crystalline Cr(OH){sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O was unstable, with a solubility higher than 50 μg/l. • Amorphous Cr(OH){sub 3}(am) was stable with a solubility lower than 50 μg/l in the range 5.7 < pH < 11. • For mixed Fe{sub 0.75}Cr{sub 0.25}(OH){sub 3}, the stability region was extended to 4.8 < pH < 13.5. -- Abstract: Chromium is a common contaminant of soils and aquifers and constitutes a major environmental problem. In nature, chromium usually exists in the form of two oxidation states, trivalent, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous for biota and for the aquatic environment, and hexavalent, Cr(VI) which is toxic, carcinogenic and very soluble. Accordingly, the majority of wastewater and groundwater treatment technologies, include a stage where Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III), in order to remove chromium from the aqueous phase and bind the element in the form of environmentally stable solid compounds. In the absence of iron the final product is typically of the form Cr(OH){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O whereas in the presence of iron the precipitate is a mixed Fe{sub (1−x)}Cr{sub x}(OH){sub 3} phase. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterisation and stability of mixed (Fe{sub x},Cr{sub 1−x})(OH){sub 3} hydroxides as compared to the stability of Cr(OH){sub 3}. We established that the plain Cr(III) hydroxide, abiding to the approximate molecular formula Cr(OH){sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O, was crystalline, highly soluble, i.e. unstable, with a tendency to transform into the stable amorphous hydroxide Cr(OH){sub 3}(am) phase. Mixed Fe{sub 0.75}Cr{sub 0.25}(OH){sub 3} hydroxides were found to be of the ferrihydrite structure, Fe(OH){sub 3}, and we correlated their solubility to that of a solid solution formed by plain ferrihydrite and the amorphous Cr(III) hydroxide. Both our experimental results and thermodynamic calculations indicated that mixed Fe(III)–Cr(III

  19. Interpolation Technique in Computed Tomography Image Visualisation(Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Tripathi

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available An interpolation technique has been developed for generation of enlarged dataset from a limited one-dimesional acquired dataset for improving the image quality in quick-scan tomography. The effectiveness of the technique has been tested using data acquired from the first-generation. The CT images generated using this technique have been compared with the CT images generated from the acquired dataset for the same number of projections. The image quality has been improved on account of (i enhancement of features, (ii reduction in reconstruction artifacts, and (iii magnification of the image without pixelisation.

  20. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III, Al(III, and Cr(III Metal Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirandeep Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ=0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III, Al(III, and Cr(III metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication and transferrin (the main Fe(III binding protein in plasma. Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one.

  1. Synthesis of Imine-Naphthol Tripodal Ligand and Study of Its Coordination Behaviour towards Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Baral, Minati

    2014-01-01

    A hexadentate Schiff base tripodal ligand is synthesized by the condensation of tris (2-aminoethyl) amine with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like UV-VIS, IR, NMR, MASS, and elemental analysis. The solution studies by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods are done at 25 ± 1°C, µ = 0.1 M KCl, to calculate the protonation constants of the ligand and formation constants of metal complexes formed by the ligand with Fe(III), Al(III), and Cr(III) metal ions. The affinity of the ligand towards Fe(III) is compared with deferiprone (a drug applied for iron intoxication) and transferrin (the main Fe(III) binding protein in plasma). Structural analysis of the ligand and the metal complexes was done using semiempirical PM6 method. Electronic and IR spectra are calculated by semiempirical methods and compared with experimental one.

  2. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  3. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  4. Cerenkov imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L J; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial structures. Imaging can basically be done using a sensitive camera optimized for low-light conditions, and it has a better resolution than any other nuclear imaging modality. CLI has been shown to effectively diagnose disease with regularly used PET isotope ((18)F-FDG) in clinical setting. Cerenkov luminescence tomography, Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy, and intraoperative Cerenkov imaging have also been explored with positive conclusions expanding the current range of applications. Cerenkov has also been used to improve PET imaging resolution since the source of both is the radioisotope being used. Smart imaging agents have been designed based on modulation of the Cerenkov signal using small molecules and nanoparticles giving better insight of the tumor biology. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta;

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  6. Expression of EGFRvIII in Glioblastoma: Prognostic Significance Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Montano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII is associated with increased proliferation of glioma cells. However, the impact of EGFRvIII on survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM has not been definitively established. In the present study, we prospectively evaluated 73 patients with primary GBM treated with surgical resection and standard radio/chemotherapy. The EGFRvIII was assessed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (PCR, O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT promoter methylation was assessed by methylation-specific PCR, and phosphatase and tension homolog (PTEN expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. In 14 patients of this series, who presented with tumor recurrence, EGFRvIII was determined by real-time PCR. Sensitivity to temozolomide (TMZ was assessed in vitro on GBM neurosphere cell cultures with different patterns of EGFRvIII expression. Age 60 years or younger, preoperative Karnofsky Performance Status score of 70 or higher, recursive partitioning analysis score III and IV, methylated MGMT, and Ki67 index of 20% or less were significantly associated with longer overall survival (OS; P = .0069, P =.0035, P = .0007, P = .0437, and P = .0286, respectively. EGFRvIII identified patients with significantly longer OS (P = .0023 and the association of EGFRvIII/Ki67 of 20% or less, EGFRvIII/normal PTEN, EGFRvIII/methylated MGMT, and EGFRvIII/normal PTEN/methylated MGMT identified subgroups of GBM patients with better prognosis. In recurred GBMs, EGFRvIII expression was approximately two-fold lower than in primary tumors. In vitro, the EGFRvIII-negative GBM neurosphere cells were more resistant to TMZ than the positive ones. In conclusion, in contrast with previous studies, we found that EGFRvIII is associated with prolonged survival of GBM patients treated with surgery and radio/chemotherapy. Depletion of EGFRvIII in recurrent GBMs as well as differential sensitivity to TMZ in vitro indicates that

  7. Augmented corticotomy-assisted presurgical orthodontics of class III malocclusions: a cephalometric and cone-beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Shen, Guofang; Fang, Bing; Yu, Hongbo; Wu, Yong

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate mandibular incisor decompensation and the surrounding periodontal status with augmented corticotomy-assisted presurgical orthodontics of class III patients. Fifty-six surgical class III patients were enrolled in this study, 26 of whom chose augmented corticotomy-assisted presurgical orthodontics (G1), and 30 chose conventional procedures (G2). Cone-beam computed tomography images and lateral cephalograms were obtained from each patient before and after presurgical orthodontics. Measurements of variables were compared using Student t tests and separate variance estimation t tests. The amount of mandibular incisor decompensation and the increase in labial alveolar bone thickness in G1 were greater than those in G2 during presurgical orthodontics (P orthodontics for class III patients compared with traditional procedures.

  8. Image Inpainting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kondekar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Inpainting refers to the art of restoring lost parts of image and reconstructing them based on the background information i.e Image inpainting is the process of reconstructing lost or deteriorated parts of images using information from surrounding areas. In fine art museums, inpainting of degraded paintings is traditionally carried out by professional artists and usually very time consuming.The purpose of inpainting is to reconstruct missing regions in a visually plausible manner so that it seems reasonable to the human eye. There have been several approaches proposed for the same. This paper gives an overview of different Techniques of Image Inpainting.The proposed work includes the overview of PDE based inpainting algorithm and Texture synthesis based inpainting algorithm. This paper presents a brief survey on comparative study of these two techniques used for Image Inpainting.

  9. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  10. Medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology almost 25 years ago, non-invasive imaging has become firmly established as an essential tool in the diagnosis of disease. Fully three-dimensional imaging of internal organs is now possible, b and for studies which explore the functional status of the body. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function are available, and scanners which combine anatomical and functional imaging in a single device are under development. Such techniques have been made possible through r ecent technological and mathematical advances. This series of lectures will review both the physical basis of medical imaging techniques using X-rays, gamma and positron emitting radiosiotopes, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and the mathematical methods used to reconstruct three-dimentional distributions from projection data. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simple radiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo biochemistry. They ...

  11. Potassium tetracyanidoaurate(III monohydrate: a redetermination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Matsushita

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title metal complex salt, K[Au(CN4]·H2O, has been redetermined using X-ray diffraction data at 173 K in order to improve the precision. The previous determination was based on neutron diffraction data [Bertinotti & Bertinotti (1970. Acta Cryst. B26, 422–428]. The title compound crystallizes in the space group P212121 with one potassium cation, one [Au(CN4]− anion and one water molecule in the asymmetric unit. The AuIII atom lies on a general position and has an almost square-planar coordination sphere defined by four cyanide ligands. Interactions between the potassium cation and N atoms of the complex anion, as well as O—H...N hydrogen bonds, lead to the formation of a three-dimensional framework structure.

  12. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J

    2011-07-15

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease.

  13. AUTOCLASS III - AUTOMATIC CLASS DISCOVERY FROM DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, P. C.

    1994-01-01

    The program AUTOCLASS III, Automatic Class Discovery from Data, uses Bayesian probability theory to provide a simple and extensible approach to problems such as classification and general mixture separation. Its theoretical basis is free from ad hoc quantities, and in particular free of any measures which alter the data to suit the needs of the program. As a result, the elementary classification model used lends itself easily to extensions. The standard approach to classification in much of artificial intelligence and statistical pattern recognition research involves partitioning of the data into separate subsets, known as classes. AUTOCLASS III uses the Bayesian approach in which classes are described by probability distributions over the attributes of the objects, specified by a model function and its parameters. The calculation of the probability of each object's membership in each class provides a more intuitive classification than absolute partitioning techniques. AUTOCLASS III is applicable to most data sets consisting of independent instances, each described by a fixed length vector of attribute values. An attribute value may be a number, one of a set of attribute specific symbols, or omitted. The user specifies a class probability distribution function by associating attribute sets with supplied likelihood function terms. AUTOCLASS then searches in the space of class numbers and parameters for the maximally probable combination. It returns the set of class probability function parameters, and the class membership probabilities for each data instance. AUTOCLASS III is written in Common Lisp, and is designed to be platform independent. This program has been successfully run on Symbolics and Explorer Lisp machines. It has been successfully used with the following implementations of Common LISP on the Sun: Franz Allegro CL, Lucid Common Lisp, and Austin Kyoto Common Lisp and similar UNIX platforms; under the Lucid Common Lisp implementations on VAX/VMS v5

  14. Chapitre III. La descente aux enfers

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Descendons maintenant, au propre et au figuré, dans cet univers transitoire qui sépare la liberté des chaînes et le soleil des ombres, ce lieu redoutable où se brisent les âmes ou les vies, descendons à la maison des morts, où nous attend la vision, augmentée par une simplification caricaturale, des vices et des faiblesses d’une société et de ses hommes. III.1. LES LIEUX ET LA ROUTINE Et d’abord, fixons-en le triste décor. Il est changeant, assujetti aux vicissitudes financières de l’Inquisit...

  15. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses - BH), and wet flue gas desulfurization systems (WFGD). Development work concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, with an emphasis on the control of mercury. The AECDP project is jointly funded by the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO), and Babcock and Wilcox, a McDermott company (B and W). This report discusses results of all three phases of the AECDP project with an emphasis on Phase III activities. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on characterization of the emissions of mercury and other air toxics and the control of these emissions for typical operating conditions of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP's and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals, (2) particulate control devices (ESPs and baghouses) effectively remove the particulate-phase mercury, but the particulate-phase mercury was only a small fraction of the total for the coals tested, (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however, for certain applications, system enhancements can be required to achieve

  16. TRIGA Mark-III reactor dismantling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, U. S.; Lee, B. J.; Paik, S. T.; Jung, K. J. [TRIGA Research Reactor D and D Project Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    The activation assessment of the main parts of the TRIGA Mark-III (KRR-2) was estimated to effectively dismantle the activated and contaminated areas. All of the method and the order for decommissioning the KRR-2 have been chosen as a result of the examination of the physical structure and radiological conditions of the reactor component. These decommissioning methods and orders were reviewed as part of the Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) studies for the project. Radiological assessment is also done to protect the workers and the environment from the dismantling work. License documents were submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) at the end of 1998. Practical work of the D and D will start at the end of 1999 once the government issues the license. Radiation protection plan was also set up to control the workers and environment. This paper summarized the main lines of those studies. (author)

  17. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Sachin

    2011-01-01

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease. PMID:21636980

  18. Conformal submanifold geometry I-III

    CERN Document Server

    Burstall, Francis E

    2010-01-01

    In Part I, we develop the notions of a Moebius structure and a conformal Cartan geometry, establish an equivalence between them; we use them in Part II to study submanifolds of conformal manifolds in arbitrary dimension and codimension. We obtain Gauss-Codazzi-Ricci equations and a conformal Bonnet theorem characterizing immersed submanifolds of the conformal n-sphere. These methods are applied in Part III to study constrained Willmore surfaces, isothermic surfaces, Guichard surfaces and conformally-flat submanifolds with flat normal bundle, and their spectral deformations, in arbitrary codimension. The high point of these applications is a unified theory of Moebius-flat submanifolds, which include Guichard surfaces and conformally flat hypersurfaces.

  19. The ROTSE-III Robotic Telescope System

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlof, Carl W; Casperson, D E; Epps, H W; Kehoe, R; Marshall, S L; McGowan, K E; McKay, T A; Phillips, M A; Rykoff, E S; Schier, J A; Smith, D A; Vestrand, W T; Wozniak, P R; Wren, J A

    2002-01-01

    The observation of a prompt optical flash from GRB990123 convincingly demonstrated the value of autonomous robotic telescope systems. Pursuing a program of rapid follow-up observations of gamma-ray bursts, the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) has developed a next-generation instrument, ROTSE-III, that will continue the search for fast optical transients. The entire system was designed as an economical robotic facility to be installed at remote sites throughout the world. There are seven major system components: optics, optical tube assembly, CCD camera, telescope mount, enclosure, environmental sensing & protection and data acquisition. Each is described in turn in the hope that the techniques developed here will be useful in similar contexts elsewhere.

  20. Tris(N,N′-diisopropylbenzamidinatocerium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dröse

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Ce(C13H19N23], was obtained in moderate yield (67% by treatment of anhydrous cerium trichloride with three equivalents of Li[PhC(NiPr2] in tetrahydrofuran. It is the first homoleptic lanthanide complex of this amidinate ligand. The central CeIII ion is coordinated by three chelating benzamidinate anions in a distorted octahedral fashion, with Ce—N distances in the narrow range 2.482 (2–2.492 (2 Å. The dihedral angles between the phenyl rings and the chelating N—C—N units are in the range 73.3–87.9°, thus preventing conjugation between the two π-systems. The molecule is located on a twofold rotation axis, and one of the phenyl rings is equally disordered over two alternative symmetry-equivalent positions around this axis.

  1. Type III apical transportation of root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv P Mantri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural accidents leading to complications such as canal transportation have been ascribed to inapt cleaning and shaping concepts. Canal transportation is an undesirable deviation from the natural canal path. Herewith a case of apical transportation of root canal resulting in endodontic retreatment failure and its management is presented. A healthy 21-year-old young male presented discomfort and swelling associated with painful endodontically retreated maxillary incisor. Radiograph revealed periradicular radiolucency involving underfilled 11 and overfilled 12. Insufficiently obturated 11 exhibited apical transportation of canal. This type III transportation was treated by periradicular surgery and repair using white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Comfortable asymptomatic patient presented uneventful healing at third and fourth month recall visits. A decrease in the size of radiolucency in radiograph supported the clinical finding. In the present case, MTA is useful in repairing the transportation defect. The result of these procedures is predictable and successful.

  2. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B

    2016-01-01

    , bleeding events, the effect on sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and the length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in hospital in general.  Search methods: We searched the following databases from inception to 27 August 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials...... data and resolved any disagreements by discussion. We presented pooled estimates of the intervention effects on dichotomous outcomes as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We performed subgroup analyses to assess risk of bias, the effect of AT III in different populations (sepsis......). For participants with severe sepsis and DIC the RR for mortality was non-significant, 0.95 (95% Cl 0.88 to 1.03, I2 statistic = 0%, fixed-effect model, 12 trials, 2858 participants, moderate quality of evidence). We conducted 14 subgroup and sensitivity analyses with respect to the different domains of risk...

  3. The NATO III 5 MHz Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcan, A.; Bloch, M.

    1981-01-01

    A high performance 5 MHz distribution system is described which has extremely low phase noise and jitter characteristics and provides multiple buffered outputs. The system is completely redundant with automatic switchover and is self-testing. Since the 5 MHz reference signals distributed by the NATO III distribution system are used for up-conversion and multiplicative functions, a high degree of phase stability and isolation between outputs is necessary. Unique circuit design and packaging concepts insure that the isolation between outputs is sufficient to quarantee a phase perturbation of less than 0.0016 deg when other outputs are open circuited, short circuited or terminated in 50 ohms. Circuit design techniques include high isolation cascode amplifiers. Negative feedback stabilizes system gain and minimizes circuit phase noise contributions. Balanced lines, in lieu of single ended coaxial transmission media, minimize pickup.

  4. Cyanide- and phenoxo-bridged heterobimetallic Fe(III)-Mn(III) complexes: Synthesis, crystal structures and magnetic properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Daopeng Zhang; Ping Wang; Kexun Chen; Xia Chen

    2014-11-01

    By employing two -tricyanidoiron(III) precursors [Ph4P][FeIII(pcq)(CN)3] and [Ph4P][FeIII (pzq)(CN)3] as building blocks and a salen-tpye Schiff-basemanganese (III) compound as assembling segment, two tetranuclear cyanide- and phenoxo- bridged heterobimetallic Fe(III)-Mn(III) complexes {[Mn(saltmen)] [Fe(pcq)(CN)3]}2·2CH3OH (1) and {[Mn(saltmen)] [Fe(pzq)(CN)3]}2·2CH3OH (2) (pcq = 8-(pyridine-2-carboxamido, pzq = 8-(pyrazine-2-carboxamido, saltmen2− = N,N′-(1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylene)bis(salicylideneaminato) dianion) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and X-ray structure determination. Single x-ray analysis reveals their isostructural cyanide-bridged Fe(III)-Mn(III) binuclear structure. The binuclear entity is self-complementary through phenoxo oxygen from the neighbouring complex, giving cyanide- and phenoxo- bridged tetranuclear structure. Furthermore, under the help of the intermolecular - interaction, these two complexes can be constructed into 1D infinite chain supramolecular structure. Investigation over magnetic susceptibilities reveals the overall ferromagnetic coupling between the adjacent Fe(III) and Mn(III) ions bridged by cyanide group with = 5.34 cm-1 and 5.55 cm-1 for complexes 1 and 2, respectively.

  5. Diglycolamic acid anchored on polyamine matrix for the mutual separation of Eu(III) and Am(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suneesh, A.S.; Syamala, K.V.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2016-04-01

    Diglycolamic acid was anchored on a polyamine matrix and the product (PA-DGAH) was characterized by ion-exchange capacity measurement, TG-DTA and FT-IR spectroscopy. The extraction behavior of Am(III) and Eu(III) in PA-DGAH was studied from dilute nitric acid medium to examine the feasibility using the anchored adsorbent for their mutual separation. The effect of various parameters such as the duration of equilibration, concentration of europium, nitric acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) in aqueous phase on the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) of Am(III) and Eu(III) was studied. The distribution coefficient decreased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. Rapid extraction of metal ions in the initial stages of equilibration followed by the establishment of equilibrium occurred within 4 h. The data on the rate of uptake of Am(III) and Eu(III) were fitted into pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order rate equation. The extraction isotherm was fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models and the apparent europium extraction capacity was determined. The mechanism of extraction was elucidated and the conditions needed for efficient separation of Am(III) from Eu(III) was optimized using DTPA. The study indicated the possibility of using PA-DGAH for the separation of Eu(III) from Am(III) with high separation factors.

  6. Expression of anti-neuroexcitation peptide III of scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch BmK ANEP III in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y B; Huang, T T; Lai, L L; Zhou, J; Yang, W Y; Zhang, J H

    2011-01-01

    Anti-neuroexcitation peptide III of Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK ANEP III) has better anti-epileptic and anticonvulsive effects in the test animal models. The present study is aimed at developing transgenic tomato and tobacco lines overproducing the ANEP III protein. Using the molecular cloning technique, the plant expression vector pBI-ANEP III was constructed successfully. The ANEP III expression cassette included a double CaMV 35S promoter with omega enhancers, the ANEP III gene with the Kozak sequence, the ER retention signal and the NOS terminator. Recombinant plasmids were transferred into Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105 by freeze-thaw transformation methods. By the Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disc transformation method, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) lines were transformed. Transformants were screened and confirmed by PCR, RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. It was demonstrated that the ANEP III gene was successfully expressed in the genomic DNA of transgenic plants. The ANEP III protein was detected by immunofluorescence analysis, and the results confirmed the high amount of ANEP III protein, being 0.81 and 1.08% of total soluble proteins in transgenic tobacco and tomato. The study of plants with high expression levels of ANEP III has an important theoretical and practical significance and provides valuable information for establishing a new, economical and effective system for industrial protein production.

  7. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W.R.; Mazurek, M.; Waber, H.N. [Univ. of Berne (Switzerland). Institutes of Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Rock-Water Interaction Group (GGWW); Arlinger, J.; Erlandson, A.C.; Hallbeck, L.; Pedersen, K. [Goeteborg University (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Boehlmann, W.; Fritz, P.; Geyer, S.; Geyer, W.; Hanschman, G.; Kopinke, F.D.; Poerschmann, J. [Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany); Chambers, A.V.; Haworth, A.; Ilett, D.; Linklater, C.M.; Tweed, C.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N.; Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Reeder, S.; Rochelle, C.A.; Smith, B.; Wetton, P.D.; Wragg, J. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Clark, I.D. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Hodginson, E.; Hughes, C.R. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hyslop, E.K. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Karlsson, F. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E. [Univ. of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Lagerblad, B. [Cement Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Longworth, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology; Pitty, A.F. [Private consultant, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Smellie, J.A.T. [ed.] [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH){sub 2} type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the `alkali disturbed zone` of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  8. MAQARIN natural analogue study: phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, W.R.; Mazurek, M.; Waber, H.N. [Univ. of Berne (Switzerland). Institutes of Geology, Mineralogy and Petrology, Rock-Water Interaction Group (GGWW); Arlinger, J.; Erlandson, A.C.; Hallbeck, L.; Pedersen, K. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Boehlmann, W.; Fritz, P.; Geyer, S.; Geyer, W.; Hanschman, G.; Kopinke, F.D.; Poerschmann, J. [Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany); Chambers, A.V.; Haworth, A.; Ilett, D.; Linklater, C.M.; Tweed, C.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N.; Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Reeder, S.; Rochelle, C.A.; Smith, B.; Wetton, P.D.; Wragg, J. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth (United Kingdom); Clark, I.D. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Hodginson, E.; Hughes, C.R. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hyslop, E.K. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Karlsson, F. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Khoury, H.N.; Salameh, E. [Univ. of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Lagerblad, B. [Cement Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Longworth, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology; Pitty, A.F. [Private consultant, Norwich (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [QuantiSci Ltd, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom); Smellie, J.A.T. [ed.] [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    This report represents the conclusion to Phase III of the Maqarin Natural Analogue Study. The main thrust was to establish the origin and chemistry of the Western Springs hyper alkaline groundwaters (Na/K enriched Ca(OH){sub 2} type) and to study their interaction with rocks of different compositions, as natural analogues to key processes that might occur at an early stage within the `alkali disturbed zone` of cementitious repositories in different host rocks. Whilst earlier studies at Maqarin were very much site-specific and process-oriented, Phase III provided a regional perspective to the geological evolution of the Maqarin region. This was made possible by greater field access which allowed a more systematic structural and geomorphological study of the area. This has resulted in a greater understanding of the age and spatial relationships concerning formation of the cement zones through spontaneous combustion of the Bituminous Marls, and the subsequent formation of high pH groundwaters at the Eastern and Western Springs locations. At the Western Springs locality, hydrochemical and hydrogeological evaluation of new and published data (plus access to unpublished data), together with detailed mineralogical and geochemical studies, helped to clarify the very earliest stage of cement leachate/host rock interaction. The data were used also to test coupled flow/transport codes developed to assess the long-term evolution of a cementitious repository. Additional objectives addressed include: a) rock matrix diffusion, b) the occurrence and chemical controls on zeolite composition, e) the occurrence and chemical controls on clay stability, and d) the role of microbes, organics and colloids in trace element transport. The Maqarin site now provides a consistent picture explaining the origin of the hyperalkaline groundwaters, and is therefore a unique location for the examination of the mechanisms and processes associated with cementitious repositories. Application of these

  9. Class III malocclusion with severe anteroposterior discrepancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Maria Deon Rizzatto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at reporting the clinical case of a patient with Class III skeletal malocclusion with severe maxillary deficiency, producing a reduced midface associated with severe mandibular prognathism. The pre-surgical orthodontic preparation was composed mainly by dentoalveolar expansion and repositioning of the incisors in the lower arch. Then, a combined maxillary and mandibular orthognathic surgery was performed. The treatment objectives were achieved, with significant improvement in facial esthetics and occlusion, followed by post-treatment stability. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO, as part of the requirements for obtaining the title of Diplomate by BBO.O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso clínico de um paciente portador de má oclusão de Classe III esquelética com acentuada deficiência maxilar, causando redução do terço médio da face, associada a severo prognatismo mandibular. O preparo ortodôntico pré-cirúrgico foi composto, principalmente, pela expansão dentoalveolar da maxila e o reposicionamento dos incisivos na arcada inferior. Depois, foi realizada a cirurgia ortognática combinada maxilomandibular. Os objetivos do tratamento foram atingidos, com significativa melhora da oclusão e da estética facial, seguida de estabilidade pós-tratamento. Esse caso foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.

  10. Detection of COL III in Parchment by Amino Acid Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Poulsen Sommer, Dorte; Larsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Cultural heritage parchments made from the reticular dermis of animals have been subject to studies of deterioration and conservation by amino acid analysis. The reticular dermis contains a varying mixture of collagen I and III (COL I and III). When dealing with the results of the amino acid...... analyses, till now the COL III content has not been taken into account. Based on the available amino acid sequences we present a method for determining the amount of COL III in the reticular dermis of new and historical parchments calculated from the ratio of Ile/Val. We find COL III contents between 7...... and 32 % in new parchments and between 0.2 and 40 % in the historical parchments. This is consistent with results in the literature. The varying content of COL III has a significant influence on the uncertainty of the amino acid analysis. Although we have not found a simple correlation between the COL...

  11. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  12. Salter-Harris type III fractures of the distal femur: plain radiographs can be deceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, William C; Owens, Richard F; Wall, Eric J

    2010-09-01

    Salter-Harris (SH) III fractures of the distal femur, although rare, can have devastating effects. The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare the intra-articular fracture displacement measured on plain x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scan and (2) report the outcomes of patients with a SH III fracture of the distal femur. All SH III distal femur fractures treated at a large Children's Hospital with a Level I Pediatric Trauma Center between 1995 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 14 patients (average age: 13 y, 11 mo; range: 7 y, 8 mo to 17 y, 11 mo) with an average follow-up time of 21.50 months (range: 2 to 47 mo) were included in this study. Fracture displacement on plain x-ray was compared with the fracture displacement measured on MRI or CT scan. The average time between the initial plain x-ray and MRI or CT scan was 37.48 days (range: 3 h to 6 mo). Plain x-rays significantly underestimated the displacement of SH III fractures versus MRI or CT scan. Six patients who had both plain x-ray and MRI or CT scan had a measured displacement of 0.42 mm and 2.70 mm, respectively (paired Student t test, P=0.005). Ten of the 14 patients (71%) had no physical limitations and full knee motion at their most recent follow-up visit. The treatment of 4 patients (29%) was changed based on the findings of the additional MRI or CT scan. This study and earlier studies have shown a high rate of poor results with SH III fractures of the distal femur. This type of fracture pattern is extremely unstable and the true displacement is often underestimated by x-rays. Thus, it is strongly recommended that an MRI or CT scan be obtained on every SH III fracture of the distal femur. Moreover, any SH III fracture visible on plain radiographs should be treated with open reduction, internal fixation. Level IV.

  13. Orthodontic treatment alternative to a class III subdivision malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Janson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Class III malocclusions are considered one of the most complex and difficult orthodontic problems to diagnose and treat. Skeletal and/or dental asymmetries in patients presenting with Class III malocclusions can worsen the prognosis. Recognizing the dentoalveolar and skeletal characteristics of subdivision malocclusions and their treatment possibilities is essential for a favorable nonsurgical correction. Therefore, this article presents a nonsurgical asymmetric extraction approach to Class III subdivision malocclusion treatment which can significantly improve the occlusal and facial discrepancies.

  14. Wide-bandgap III-Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    Jun-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Wide-bandgap III - Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation The views...Report: Wide-bandgap III - Nitride based Second Harmonic Generation Report Title It was demonstrated that GaN, AlGaN and AlN lateral polar structures can...research have been socialized to the III - Nitride Optoelectronics Center of Excellence (ARL SEDD) and to the 2013 ARO Staff Research Symposium and at

  15. Associations of Europium(III) with gram-negative bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kimura, T. [Department of Materials Science, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739- 8526 (Japan); Francis, A.J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Migration of radionuclides in the environment is greatly affected by bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment and can preferentially bind radionuclides because of the presence of the cell envelop consisting of two membrane bilayers with an intervening thin peptidoglycan layer, where carboxyl and phosphate functional groups are mainly involved in metal cation adsorption. In this study, we investigated the association of Eu(III) with four Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens, Alcaligenes faecalis, Shewanella putrefaciens, and Paracoccus denitrificans. Europium(III) is a good analogue of Am(III) and Cm(III). The association of Eu(III) with the bacteria were determined by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The kinetics study showed that the Eu(III) adsorption on the bacteria proceeded rapidly. The Eu(III) adsorption on P. fluorescens at pH 3, A. faecalis and P. denitrificans at pHs 3, 4, and 5, and S. putrefaciens at pHs 4 and 5 reached a maximum within 5 minutes after contact. For P. denitrificans, the percent adsorption of Eu(III) decreased after the maximum percent adsorption was attained, which suggests the existence of exudates with an affinity with Eu(III). TRLFS showed that the coordination of Eu(III) on these bacteria is multi-dentate through an inner-spherical process. The ligand field of Eu(III) on P. denitrificans was as strong as the ones observed for halo-philic microorganisms, while that of P. fluorescens, A. faecalis, and S. putrefaciens was the typical one observed for non-halo-philic microorganisms. The coordination environment of Eu(III) on the bacteria differed from each other, though they are categorized as Gram-negative bacteria with the similar cell wall components. (authors)

  16. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Gregory W.; Kravitz, Neal D.

    2014-01-01

    The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable o...

  17. Immunohistochemical analysis of type III collagen expression in the lingual mucosa of rats during organogenesis of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi; Asami, Tomoichiro; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Aoyagi, Hidekazu

    2008-07-01

    We examined the distribution of immunofluorescence due to immunostaining of type III collagen, differential interference contrast (DIC) images and images obtained in the transmission mode after toluidine blue staining by laser-scanning microscopy of semi-ultrathin sections of epoxy resin-embedded samples, during morphogenesis of the filiform papillae, keratinization of the lingual epithelium, and myogenesis of the rat tongue. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was distributed widely in the mesenchymal connective tissue in fetuses on day 15 after conception (E15), at which time the lingual epithelium was composed of one or two layers of cuboidal cells and the lingual muscle was barely recognizable. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was clearly detected on the lamina propria in fetuses on E17 and E19, and it was relatively distinct just beneath the lingual epithelium. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was sparsely distributed on the connective tissue around the developing lingual muscle. In fetuses on E19, the epithelium became clearly stratified and squamous. At postnatal stages from newborn (P0) to postnatal day 14 (P14), keratinization of the lingual epithelium advanced gradually with the development of filiform papillae. On P0, myogenesis of the tongue was almost completed. The intensity of the fluorescence immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen at postnatal stages was almost same as that on E19. The immunoreactivity around the fully mature muscle was relatively distinct between P0 and P14. Thus, type III collagen appeared in conjunction with the morphogenesis of filiform papillae and the keratinization of the lingual epithelium as well as in the connective tissue that surrounded the lingual muscle during myogenesis of the rat tongue.

  18. Diagnosing the Source Region of a Solar Burst on 26 September 2011 by Using Microwave Type-III Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, B. L.; Karlický, M.; Mészárosová, H.; Kashapova, L.; Huang, J.; Yan, Y.; Kontar, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    We report a peculiar and interesting train of microwave Type-III pair bursts in the impulsive rising phase of a solar flare on 26 September 2011. The observations include radio spectrometers at frequencies of 0.80 - 2.00 GHz from the Ondřejov radiospectrograph in the Czech Republic (ORSC), hard X-ray from the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Space Telescope ( Fermi/GRB), EUV images from the Sun Watcher using APS detectors and image Processing instrument onboard the Project for Onboard Autonomy 2 (SWAP/PROBA2), and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO/HMI). By using a recently developed method (Tan et al., Res. Astron. Astrophys. 16, 82, 2016a), we diagnosed the plasma density, temperature, plasma-β, magnetic field near the source region, the energy of energetic electrons, and the distance between the acceleration region and the emission start sites of Type-III bursts. From the diagnostics, we find that i) The plasma density, temperature, magnetic field, and the distance between the acceleration region and the emission start sites have almost no obvious variations during the period of Type-III pair trains, while the energy of electrons has an obvious peak value that is consistent with the hard X-ray emission. ii) The plasma-β is much higher than unity, showing a highly dynamic process near the emission start site of Type-III bursts. iii) Although the reversed-slope Type-III branches drift more slowly by one order of magnitude than that of the normal Type-IIIs, the related descending and ascending electrons still could have energy of the same order of magnitude. These facts indicate that both the ascending and descending electrons are possibly accelerated by a similar mechanism and in a small source region. These diagnostics can help us to understand the physics in the source region of solar bursts.

  19. Evaluation of XD/A Plus and ST8G films for cephalometric radiography with Grenex G8 and BH-III screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakoh, M; Farman, A G; Scarfe, W C; Shibuya, H; Nishikawa, K; Kuroyanagi, K

    1997-02-01

    Sensitometric properties, clinical image quality, and patient dose requirements are important considerations when selecting film for cephalometrics. Two recently released films, XD/A Plus and ST 8G green sensitive films, were studied. The films were each combined with Grenex G8 (Fuji Medical) green-fluorescing matched and BH-III (Kasei Optonix) blue-fluorescing mismatched intensifying screens. The density response and resolution for each screen-film combination were evaluated by use of the characteristic curve and modulation transfer function. The kilovoltage settings providing clinically acceptable images were assessed individually by 12 observers. Clinically acceptable images for each combination were also compared, and the skin entrance doses in the temporomandibular joint region were determined. The average contrast at the most effective density range was found to be slightly higher for the BH-III group than for the G8 group. The modulation transfer function for the BH-III group was inferior to that for the G8 screens. There were no significant differences in diagnostically acceptable image quality among the four combinations; nevertheless the BH-III screen group required two to three times more exposure than the G8 screen group. XD/A Plus and ST8G films provide acceptable image detail for cephalometrics. To minimize the patient dose they should be used with green-emitting screens.

  20. The electrophysiologic profile of Dejerine-Sottas disease (HMSN III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstead, T J; Kuntz, N L; Miller, R G; Daube, J R

    1990-07-01

    Electrophysiologic studies in 11 patients with Dejerine-Sottas disease (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III, HMSN III) showed median and ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities less than 6 m/sec in all but 1 patient. Marked temporal dispersion without conduction block was present in all patients. Uniform slowing in adjacent motor nerves was consistent with other studies of inherited neuropathies, although marked temporal dispersion may make HMSN III more difficult to distinguish from acquired neuropathies than other hereditary conditions. The electrophysiologic features of HMSN III patients were significantly different from a series of patients with other hereditary neuropathies chosen because of very slow nerve conduction velocity.

  1. Reliability of the Brazilian WAIS-III in Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Andre Goettems Bastos; Bruna Monego Gomes; Denise Ruschel Bandeira; Clarissa Marceli Trentini

    2011-01-01

    La tercera edición de la Escala de Inteligencia de Wechsler para Adultos (WAIS-III) ha sido ampliamente estudiada desde que fue desarrollado por primera vez. El WAIS-III es ampliamente uilizada en la evaluación psicológica en Brasil y en otros países de Latinoamérica. La WAIS-III ha demostrado tener buenas propiedades psicométricas, pero su confiabilidad no ha sido evaluada en muestras clinicas en Brasil. Este estudio evaluó la fiabilidad de la WAIS-III en una muestra de pacientes con depresi...

  2. Cr(III REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet MAHRAMANLIOĞLU

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Cr (III on the adsorbent produced from lignite coal was studied as a function of time, amount of adsorbent, pH and temperature. Cr (III adsorption data obeyed Freundlich, Langmuir and Lagergren equations. The values of ?H0, ?S0 and ?G0 were calculated. The results showed that adsorption is endothermic. The negative free energy values indicate that the process of Cr (III adsorption is spontaneous and favoured at high temperatures. The adsorption of Cr (III in the presence of different cations was also studied at 200 C. The results were correlated with the ionic potential of cations.

  3. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  4. Spectral Properties of AGN with Very Weak [O III] Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacevic, J.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectral properties of a sample of 58 Active GalacticNuclei (AGN spectra, in which emission [O~III] $lambdalambda$4959, 5007 AA lines are weak or totally absent, are analyzed. In order to investigate thephysical reason for the [O~III] emission suppression, the spectral propertiesof the weak [O~III] spectra sample are compared with the same properties of asample of 269 spectra with the strong [O~III] lines. The spectra are obtainedfrom Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS Database. It is found that the objectswith the weak or absent [O~III] $lambdalambda$4959, 5007 AA linesgenerally have the high continuum luminosities (log($lambda$L$_{5100}$ $>$45, that they are very rare at smaller redshifts ($z <$ 0.3 and that theyusually have strong starburst influence. From the sample with weak or absent[O~III] lines, two boundary subgroups may be distinguished: the subgroup witha strong H$beta$ narrow component and subgroup with a very weak or negligibleH$beta$ narrow component. The physical causes for the [O~III] linessuppressing are probably different in these two subgroups: the [O~III] linesare absent in objects with strong narrow H$beta$ probably because of strongstarburst (SB activity, which produces high density of the gas, while in theobjects with the negligible narrow H$beta$, the reason for [O~III] and narrowH$beta$ suppression may be a low covering factor.

  5. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alex.chroneos@open.ac.uk [Engineering and Innovation, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Tahini, H. A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); PSE Division, KAUST, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Schwingenschlögl, U., E-mail: udo.schwingenschlogl@kaust.edu.sa [PSE Division, KAUST, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Grimes, R. W., E-mail: r.grimes@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-14

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III{sub V}{sup q}) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V{sub III}{sup q}) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III{sub V}{sup q} defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V{sub III}{sup q} under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  6. Autism Symptoms Related to Tyrosinemia Type III: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Yolga Tahiroğlu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The published literature on tyrosinemia type III consists of only a few case reports. In this report, we present a patient with tyrosinemia type III, autism, and mental retardation. This patient’s speech improved and his autistic symptoms lessened on a tyrosine-restricted diet, although his mental retardation remained unchanged. This is the first published report of a patient with tyrosinemia type III and autism. This observation is significant due to the paucity of published information about tyrosinemia type III. Turk Jem 2008; 12: 55-6

  7. Blocking Metal Accretion onto Population III Stars by Stellar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shuta J.; Chiaki, Gen; Tominaga, Nozomu; Susa, Hajime

    2017-08-01

    Low-mass population III (PopIII) stars of ≲ 0.8 {M}⊙ could survive up until the present. The nondetection of low-mass PopIII stars in our Galaxy has already put a stringent constraint on the initial mass function (IMF) of PopIII stars, suggesting that PopIII stars have a top-heavy IMF. On the other hand, some claim that the lack of such stars stems from metal enrichment of their surfaces by the accretion of heavy elements from the interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate the effects of the stellar wind on metal accretion onto low-mass PopIII stars because accretion of the local ISM onto the Sun is prevented by the solar wind, even for neutrals. The stellar wind and radiation of low-mass PopIII stars are modeled based on knowledge of nearby low-mass stellar systems, including our Sun. We find that low-mass PopIII stars traveling across the Galaxy form a stellar magnetosphere in most of their life. Once the magnetosphere is formed, most of the neutral interstellar particles are photoionized before reaching the stellar surface and are blown away by the wind. Especially, the accretion abundance of iron will be reduced by a factor of constraining the IMF of PopIII stars.

  8. Class - III malocclusion: Genetics or environment? A twins study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Etiology of class-III malocclusion is generally believed to be genetic. A wide range of environmental factors have been suggested as contributing factors for the development of class-III malocclusion. Twin study is one of the most effective methods available for investigating genetically determined variables of malocclusion. Discordancy for class-III malocclusion is a frequent finding in dizygotic twins. However, class-III malocclusion discordancy in monozygotic twins is a rare finding. The purpose of this study of monozygotic twins is to assess the genetic and environmental components of variation within the cranio-dento-facial complex.

  9. Characterization of the biochemical properties of Campylobacter jejuni RNase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nabila; Saramago, Margarida; Matos, Rute G; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2013-11-25

    Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne bacterial pathogen, which is now considered as a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis. The information regarding ribonucleases in C. jejuni is very scarce but there are hints that they can be instrumental in virulence mechanisms. Namely, PNPase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) was shown to allow survival of C. jejuni in refrigerated conditions, to facilitate bacterial swimming, cell adhesion, colonization and invasion. In several microorganisms PNPase synthesis is auto-controlled in an RNase III (ribonuclease III)-dependent mechanism. Thereby, we have cloned, overexpressed, purified and characterized Cj-RNase III (C. jejuni RNase III). We have demonstrated that Cj-RNase III is able to complement an Escherichia coli rnc-deficient strain in 30S rRNA processing and PNPase regulation. Cj-RNase III was shown to be active in an unexpectedly large range of conditions, and Mn2+ seems to be its preferred co-factor, contrarily to what was described for other RNase III orthologues. The results lead us to speculate that Cj-RNase III may have an important role under a Mn2+-rich environment. Mutational analysis strengthened the function of some residues in the catalytic mechanism of action of RNase III, which was shown to be conserved.

  10. Retinal imaging and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindne

  11. COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lafon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present specific capabilities and limitations of the use of color digital images in a characterization process. The whole process is investigated, from the acquisition of digital color images to the analysis of the information relevant to various applications in the field of material characterization. A digital color image can be considered as a matrix of pixels with values expressed in a vector-space (commonly 3 dimensional space whose specificity, compared to grey-scale images, is to ensure a coding and a representation of the output image (visualisation printing that fits the human visual reality. In a characterization process, it is interesting to regard color image attnbutes as a set of visual aspect measurements on a material surface. Color measurement systems (spectrocolorimeters, colorimeters and radiometers and cameras use the same type of light detectors: most of them use Charge Coupled Devices sensors. The difference between the two types of color data acquisition systems is that color measurement systems provide a global information of the observed surface (average aspect of the surface: the color texture is not taken into account. Thus, it seems interesting to use imaging systems as measuring instruments for the quantitative characterization of the color texture.

  12. Layout and first results of the nanotomography endstation at the P05 beamline at PETRA III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogurreck, M.; Greving, I.; Beckmann, F.; Wilde, F.; Müller, M. [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz–Zentrum Geesthacht (Germany); Marschall, F.; Vogt, H.; Last, A. [Institute of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Rosario, J. J. do [Institute of Advanced Ceramics, Technical University Hamburg–Harburg (Germany); Leib, E. W. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht operates the P05 Imaging Beamline at the DESY storage ring PETRA III. This beamline is dedicated to micro- and nanotomography with two endstations. This paper will present the nanotomography endstation layout and first results obtained from commissioning and test experiments. First tests have been performed with CRLs as X-ray objectives and newly developed rolled X-ray prism lenses as condenser optics. This setup allows a resolution of 100 nm half period with an effective detector pixel size of 15nm. A first tomograph of a photonic glass sample was measured in early 2014.

  13. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    OpenAIRE

    Aihara, Hiroaki; Allende Prieto, Carlos; An, Deokkeun; Anderson, Scott F.; Aubourg, Éric; Balbinot, Eduardo; Beers, Timothy C.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, W.N.

    2011-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in 2008 August, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Lyα forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around ~8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes five-band imaging of roughly 5...

  14. Bismalonamides (BISMA) as new extractants for Am(III) and Eu(III) from aqueous high-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murillo, M.T.; Almaraz, M.; Sanchez-Quesada, J.; Segura, M.; Iglesias-Sanchez, J.C.; Mendoza, J. de; Prados, P. [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Organica; Espartero, A.G. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Bismalonamides 1-8 and bisthiomalonamides 9-13 were synthesised and studied as extracting agents for Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid solutions into organic solvents. Bismalonamides 7a and 7g display higher distribution coefficients in chlorinated solvents than single malonamide DMDOHEMA, suggesting that bismalonamides could preorganise the binding groups around the cation more efficiently. Additionally, back-extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from a loaded organic solution of 7g in (50: 50){sub %} {sub vol} TPH/1-octanol mixture allowed to recover 99% of the initially extracted Am(III) and Eu(III) after three times of contact with fresh 0.01 mol/L nitric acid solutions. (orig.)

  15. Oxalate complexation with aluminum(III) and iron(III) at moderately elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, C.D.; Janecky, D.R.; Clark, D.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bennett, P.C. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1992-05-01

    To add to our understanding of the weathering of rocks in organic rich environments such as sedimentary brines and oil field waters, we have examined the temperature dependent complexation of aluminum with oxalate. Raman vibrational studies show that even the association constant for the highly charged Al(ox){sub 3}{sup 3{minus}} unexpectedly increases with moderate temperature increases to 80{degrees}C. To evaluate the potential importance of these Al-oxalate species in complex natural systems, temperature dependent competition experiments Fe(III) and Al(III) for oxalate have been initiated. Similar to aluminum, ferric oxalates show increases in association constants at higher temperatures. In competition experiments, the first association constant for Fe(ox){sup +} increases faster than that for Al(ox){sup +} to 90{degrees}C.

  16. Image registration

    CERN Document Server

    Goshtasby, A Ardeshir

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a thorough and detailed guide to image registration, outlining the principles and reviewing state-of-the-art tools and methods. The book begins by identifying the components of a general image registration system, and then describes the design of each component using various image analysis tools. The text reviews a vast array of tools and methods, not only describing the principles behind each tool and method, but also measuring and comparing their performances using synthetic and real data. Features: discusses similarity/dissimilarity measures, point detectors, feature extr

  17. Image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    The paper touches upon indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Different conceptions of what subject indexing means are described as a basis for defining an operational subject indexing strategy for images. The methodology is based on the art historian Erwin Panofsky...... of signs and connotation as meanings relating to feelings or associations. A joint methodology is suggested between the two researchers and the methodology is implemented in analyzing press photos. Fields of application discussed include the messages in an image and the linking between information running....... The empirical analysis demonstrates how the results can be applied as the foundation for a semantic model....

  18. Image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    The paper touches upon indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Different conceptions of what subject indexing means are described as a basis for defining an operational subject indexing strategy for images. The methodology is based on the art historian Erwin Panofsky...... of signs and connotation as meanings relating to feelings or associations. A joint methodology is suggested between the two researchers and the methodology is implemented in analyzing press photos. Fields of application discussed include the messages in an image and the linking between information running...

  19. IMAGE ENHANCEMENT USING IMAGE FUSION AND IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    Arjun Nelikanti

    2015-01-01

    Principle objective of Image enhancement is to process an image so that result is more suitable than original image for specific application. Digital image enhancement techniques provide a multitude of choices for improving the visual quality of images. Appropriate choice of such techniques is greatly influenced by the imaging modality, task at hand and viewing conditions. This paper will provide a combination of two concepts, image fusion by DWT and digital image processing techniques. The e...

  20. Three-dimensional computed tomographic evaluation of Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis with an external device in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wery, M F; Nada, R M; van der Meulen, J J; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-03-01

    There is little anteroposterior growth of the midface in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who are followed up over time without intervention. A Le Fort III with distraction osteogenesis can be done to correct this. This is a controlled way in which to achieve appreciable stable advancement of the midface without the need for bone grafting, but the vector of the movement is not always predictable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 3-dimensional effect of Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis with an external frame. Ten patients (aged 7-19 years) who had the procedure were included in the study. The le Fort III procedure and the placement of the external frame were followed by an activation period and then a 3-month retention period. Computed tomographic (CT) images taken before and after operation were converted and loaded into 3-dimensional image rendering software and compared with the aid of a paired sample t test and a colour-coded qualitative analysis. Comparison of the CT data before and after distraction indicated that the amount of midface advancement was significant. Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis is an effective way to advance the midface. However, the movement during osteogenesis is not always exactly in the intended direction, and a secondary operation is often necessary. Three-dimensional evaluation over a longer period of time is necessary.