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Sample records for iii testing general

  1. 4 August 2011 - Austrian Head of Protocol, Directorate General III, Federal Ministry of Science and Research I. Friedrich (3rd from left) in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Benedkit, C. Wulz and C. Fabjan.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4 August 2011 - Austrian Head of Protocol, Directorate General III, Federal Ministry of Science and Research I. Friedrich (3rd from left) in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Benedkit, C. Wulz and C. Fabjan.

  2. Generalizing Boolean Satisfiability III: Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, H E; Hofer, D; Luks, E M; Parkes, A J; 10.1613/jair.1656

    2011-01-01

    This is the third of three papers describing ZAP, a satisfiability engine that substantially generalizes existing tools while retaining the performance characteristics of modern high-performance solvers. The fundamental idea underlying ZAP is that many problems passed to such engines contain rich internal structure that is obscured by the Boolean representation used; our goal has been to define a representation in which this structure is apparent and can be exploited to improve computational performance. The first paper surveyed existing work that (knowingly or not) exploited problem structure to improve the performance of satisfiability engines, and the second paper showed that this structure could be understood in terms of groups of permutations acting on individual clauses in any particular Boolean theory. We conclude the series by discussing the techniques needed to implement our ideas, and by reporting on their performance on a variety of problem instances.

  3. Testing General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    This lecture will present a review of the past and present tests of the General Relativity theory. The essentials of the theory will be recalled and the measurable effects will be listed and analyzed. The main historical confirmations of General Relativity will be described. Then, the present situation will be reviewed presenting a number of examples. The opportunities given by astrophysical and astrometric observations will be shortly discussed. Coming to terrestrial experiments the attention will be specially focused on ringlasers and a dedicated experiment for the Gran Sasso Laboratories, named by the acronym GINGER, will be presented. Mention will also be made of alternatives to the use of light, such as particle beams and superfluid rings.

  4. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample.

  5. Black hole based tests of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C.

    2016-03-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the Universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some important characteristics of general relativity include (but are not limited to) (i) only tensor gravitational degrees of freedom, (ii) the graviton is massless, (iii) no quadratic or higher curvatures in the action, and (iv) the theory is four-dimensional. Altering a characteristic leads to a different extension of general relativity: (i) scalar-tensor theories, (ii) massive gravity theories, (iii) quadratic gravity, and (iv) theories with large extra dimensions. Within each theory, we describe black hole solutions, their properties, and current and projected constraints on each theory using black hole based tests of gravity. We close this review by listing some of the open problems in model-independent tests and within each specific theory.

  6. A generalization of Bertrand's test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirali Tabatabai Adnani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most practical routine tests for convergence of a positive series makes use of the ratio test. If this test fails, we can use Rabbe's test. When Rabbe's test fails the next sharper criteria which may sometimes be used is the Bertrand's test. If this test fails,we can use a generalization of Bertrand's test and such tests can be continued in nitely. For simplicity, we call ratio test, Rabbe's test, Bertrand's test as the Bertrand's test of order 0, 1 and 2, respectively. In this paper, we generalize Bertrand's test in order k for natural k > 2. It is also shown that for any k, there exists a series such that the Bertrand's test of order fails, but such test of order k + 1 is useful, furthermore we show that there exists a series such that for any k, Bertrand's test of order k fails. The only prerequisite for reading this article is a standard knowledge of advanced calculus.

  7. Psychometric Testing of the FACES III with Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Bette; Dingmann, Colleen; Cuevas, Elizabeth; Meehan, Maurita

    2010-01-01

    This study tests the validity and reliability of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale III (FACES III) in two samples of rural adolescents. The underlying theory is the linear 3-D circumplex model. The FACES III was administered to 1,632 adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 in two counties in a rural western state. The FACES III Scale and the…

  8. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  9. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  10. EXCEDE Technology Development III: First Vacuum Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Hix, Troy T; Bendek, Eduardo; Thomas, Sandrine J; Lynch, Dana H; Mihara, Roger; Irwin, J Wes; Duncan, Alan L; Greene, Thomas P; Guyon, Olivier; Kendrick, Richard L; Smith, Eric H; Witteborn, Fred C; Schneider, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the third in the series on the technology development for the EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer) mission concept, which in 2011 was selected by NASA's Explorer program for technology development (Category III). EXCEDE is a 0.7m space telescope concept designed to achieve raw contrasts of 1e6 at an inner working angle of 1.2 l/D and 1e7 at 2 l/D and beyond. This will allow it to directly detect and spatially resolve low surface brightness circumstellar debris disks as well as image giant planets as close as in the habitable zones of their host stars. In addition to doing fundamental science on debris disks, EXCEDE will also serve as a technological and scientific precursor for any future exo-Earth imaging mission. EXCEDE uses a Starlight Suppression System (SSS) based on the PIAA coronagraph, enabling aggressive performance. We report on our continuing progress of developing the SSS for EXCEDE, and in particular (a) the reconfiguration of our system into a more fli...

  11. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyse experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable -- maximal energy of the scattered photons -- would experience a significant shift in the Earth's gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of res...

  12. Generalization of Selection Test Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, G. A.; Taylor, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    This is part three of a three-part series concerned with the empirical development of homogeneous families of insurance company jobs based on data from the Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ). This part involves validity generalizations within the job families which resulted from the previous research. (Editor/RK)

  13. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable – maximal energy of the scattered photons – would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  14. The General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Lucille

    The development and use of the GATB in the United States is presented by a Canadian author. The history of establishing the norms for the GATB is also discussed. The use of the GATB as a counseling and selection tool is outlined while another section of the article points out the advantages and disadvantages of the test battery. There are also…

  15. Null sex differences in general intelligence: evidence from the WAIS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Roberto; García, Luis F; Juan-Espinosa, Manuel; Abad, Francisco J

    2002-05-01

    There is an increasing number of studies claiming that the sex differences in general intelligence are "real." The empirical evidence is based on the summation of the standardized sex differences in several cognitive batteries. However, the scientific construct of general ability rests on the correlations among test scores, rather than on their summation. The latter (ability in general) is an arbitrary variable, not a scientific construct. General ability is not a function of any particular cognitive test, but a source of variance evidenced by the correlation between several diverse tests, each of which reflects general ability (g) to some extent, but also group factors and test specificity. Because there are important educational, economic, and social consequences of a group difference in general ability, it is especially germane to evaluate the possibility of an average sex difference in its proxy measures, such as IQ. The Spanish standardization of the WAIS-III is analyzed in the present study. The sample was made up of 703 females and 666 males, aged 15-94, drawn as a representative sample of the population in terms of educational level and geographical location. Although a male advantage of 3.6 IQ points is observed, the difference is in "ability in general," not in "general ability" (g). Given that the main ingredient of the strong association between IQ and a broad range of social correlates is g, and given that there is no sex difference in g, then the average IQ sex-difference favoring males must be attributed to specific group factors and test specificity.

  16. 49 CFR 232.211 - Class III brake tests-trainline continuity inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III brake tests-trainline continuity... § 232.211 Class III brake tests-trainline continuity inspection. (a) A Class III brake test shall be... configuration of the train has changed in certain ways. In particular, a Class III brake test shall be...

  17. 9 CFR 113.5 - General testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and the test may be repeated. (e) When new test methods are developed and approved by Animal and Plant... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General testing. 113.5 Section 113.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES...

  18. The CLEO-III RICH Detector and Beam Test Results

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J C; Ayad, R; Azfar, F; Dambasuren, E; Efimov, A; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Anderson, S; Smith, A; Kubota, Y; Lipeles, E; Coan, T E; Staeck, J; Fadeev, V; Volobuev, I P

    1999-01-01

    We are constructing a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) for the CLEO III upgrade for precision charged hadron identification. The RICH uses plane and sawtooth LiF crystals as radiators, MWPCs as photon detectors with TEA as the photo-sensitive material, and low-noise Viking readout electronics. Results of a beam test of the first two out of total 30 sectors are presented.

  19. Black Hole Based Tests of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent

    2016-01-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some impor...

  20. Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

  1. Generalized Burgers equations and Euler-Painlevé transcendents. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, P. L.; Nair, K. R. C.; Tikekar, V. G.

    1988-11-01

    It was proposed earlier [P. L. Sachdev, K. R. C. Nair, and V. G. Tikekar, J. Math. Phys. 27, 1506 (1986); P. L. Sachdev and K. R. C. Nair, ibid. 28, 977 (1987)] that the Euler-Painlevé equations y(d2y/dη2)+a(dy/dη)2 +f(η)y(dy/dη)+g(η)y2+b(dy/dη) +c=0 represent generalized Burgers equations (GBE's) in the same way as Painlevé equations represent the Korteweg-de Vries type of equations. The earlier studies were carried out in the context of GBE's with damping and those with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. In the present paper, GBE's with variable coefficients of viscosity and those with inhomogeneous terms are considered for their possible connection to Euler-Painlevé equations. It is found that the Euler-Painlevé equation, which represents the GBE ut+uβux=(δ/2)g(t)uxx, g(t)=(1+t)n, β>0, has solutions, which either decay or oscillate at η=±∞, only when -1Kamke [Differential Gleichungen : Lösungsmethoden und Lösungen (Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft, Leipzig, 1943)] and Murphy [Ordinary Differential Equations and their Solutions (Van Nostrand, Princeton, NJ, 1960)]. These latter equations arise from a wide range of physical applications and are of some historical interest as well. They are all special cases of a slightly generalized form of the Euler-Painlevé equation.

  2. Experimental studies and tests on An(III)/Ln(III) separation using the TODGA extractant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heres, Xavier; Sorel, Christian; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Cames, Beatrice; Hill, Clement; Bisel, Isabelle; Espinoux, Denis; Viallesoubranne, Carole; Baron, Pascal; Lorrain, Brigitte [CEA/DEN/MAR/DRCP, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols/Ceze (France)

    2009-06-15

    Minor actinide recycling by separation and transmutation is worldwide considered as one of the most promising strategies to reduce the inventory of radioactive waste, thus contributing to make nuclear energy more sustainable. One of the different options investigated at the CEA Marcoule and within the ACSEPT project (a European collaborative project partly funded by the 7. EURATOM Framework Program) to separate trivalent minor actinide (Am(III)-Cf(III)) from the fission and activation products contained in PUREX raffinates is the TODGA process, which consists in: 1. Co-extracting trivalent 4f and 5f elements from highly acidic PUREX raffinates by a mixture of TODGA (tetraoctyl-diglycolamide) and TBP (tributyl-phosphate), dissolved in HTP (hydrogenated tetra-propene). 2. Selectively stripping the trivalent minor actinides by a hydrophilic poly-aminocarboxylic acid used as a complexing agent in a buffered aqueous solution, while the trivalent lanthanides are kept in the organic solvent thanks to a sodium nitrate salting-out effect. 3. Stripping the lanthanides in a diluted nitric acid solution. The major difficulty of this TODGA separation process is to tune the pH in a very narrow range of operating conditions in the second step, because of the high sensitivity of the performances of the flow-sheet vs pH. This difficulty was however overcome. This paper describes the development of the TODGA process from experimental studies to hot test implementation in shielded cells of the ATALANTE facility, including (i) the optimization of the extraction system (both the formulation of the organic solvent and those of the aqueous scrubbing and stripping solutions), (ii) the implementation of a cold test in small scale mixer-settlers in the G1 facility (MARCEL loop), using a surrogate feed composed of major fission products, (iii) the validation of some steps of the process, using a surrogate feed, spiked with Am-241 and Eu-152, and similar laboratory contactors (medium activity

  3. Incremental Criterion Validity of the WJ-III COG Clinical Clusters: Marginal Predictive Effects beyond the General Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental validity of the clinical clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ-III ACH). All participants were children and adolescents (N = 4,722) drawn from the nationally representative WJ-III…

  4. Design and testing of the Series III AMTEC cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mital, R.; Sievers, R.K.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of the Series III (S3) Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) cell which is capable of high efficiency (15--25%) and high power density (100--150 W/kg). Compared to the Series 2 cell which is being developed primarily for space power systems, the Series III cell design provides a significantly higher beta{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) tube packing density around the heat source thereby increasing cell power and minimizing heat loss. The prototype S3 cell will have 96 BASE tubes and is expected to produce about 150 We. In this cell design the BASE tube assemblies are mounted on a cylindrical tube support plate. The BASE tubes are arranged like spokes on a wheel. The inner cylinder, concentric to the tube support plate, is the hot side of the cell and the outer cylinder is the condenser. Since the prototype S3 cell will be the first of its kind, an engineering cell with same dimensions as the prototype but with 24 BASE tubes was built first. The purpose of this cell was to identify and resolve structural, thermal, manufacturing and sodium management issues before launching into the build of a complete 96 BASE tube cell. The engineering cell has been successfully built and tested. The data of the engineering cells have been used to calibrate the SINDA/FLUINT code to predict the prototype cell performance more accurately. The build of the prototype 96 BASE tube cells is now in progress. This paper presents the design and development of the prototype S3 cell. The fabrication and testing of the first S3 engineering cell is discussed next. Based on the test data of the engineering cell, the anticipated thermal performance of the prototype cells predicted by the calibrated SINDA model are also presented.

  5. Differential Prediction Generalization in College Admissions Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinis, Herman; Culpepper, Steven A.; Pierce, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "differential prediction generalization" in the context of college admissions testing. Specifically, we assess the extent to which predicted first-year college grade point average (GPA) based on high-school grade point average (HSGPA) and SAT scores depends on a student's ethnicity and gender and whether this…

  6. Differential Prediction Generalization in College Admissions Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinis, Herman; Culpepper, Steven A.; Pierce, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "differential prediction generalization" in the context of college admissions testing. Specifically, we assess the extent to which predicted first-year college grade point average (GPA) based on high-school grade point average (HSGPA) and SAT scores depends on a student's ethnicity and gender and whether this…

  7. Towards a general theory of optimal testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pericchi, Luis R. G.; Pereira, Carlos A. B.

    2012-10-01

    In Pericchi and Pereira [1] it is argued against the traditional way on which testing is based on fixed significance level, either using p-values (with fixed levels of evidence, like the 5% rule) or α values. We instead, follow an approach put forward by [2], on which an optimal test is chosen by minimizing type I and type II errors. Morris DeGroot in his authoritative book [2], Probability and Statistics 2nd Edition, stated that it is more reasonable to minimize a weighted sum of Type I and Type II error than to specify a value of type I error and then minimize Type II error. He showed it beyond reasonable doubt, but only in the very restrictive scenario of simple VS simple hypothesis, and it is not clear how to generalize it. We propose here a very natural generalization for composite hypothesis, by using general weight functions in the parameter space. This was also the position taken by [3, 4, 5]. We show, in a parallel manner to DeGroot's proof and Pereira's discussion, that the optimal test statistics are Bayes Factors, when the weighting functions are priors with mass on the whole parameter space. On the other hand when the weight functions are point masses in specific parameter values of practical significance, then a procedure is designed for which the sum of Type I error and Type II error in the specified points of practical significance is minimized. This can be seen as bridge between Bayesian Statistics and a new version of Hypothesis testing, more in line with statistical consistency and scientific insight.

  8. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, M K; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J; Boyle, M; Campanelli, M; Hemberger, D A; Kidder, L E; Ossokine, S; Scheel, M A; Szilagyi, B; Teukolsky, S; Zlochower, Y

    2016-06-03

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 10^{13}  km. In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  9. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.

    2016-06-01

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 1013 km . In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  10. Recirculation pump discharge line break tests at ROSA-III for a boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Anoda, Y.; Kumamaru, H.; Nakamura, H.; Shiba, M.; Tasaka, K.

    1985-08-01

    Three loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests were conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-III test facility, which simulates boiling water reactor (BWR)/6-251 with a volumetric scaling factor of 1/424. The fundamental features of the recirculation pump discharge line break LOCA and the effects of break areas on the features are investigated. It has been confirmed experimentally that the LOCA phenomena in the discharge line break are analogous to those in the suction line break with the same effective choking flow area, which is a sum of the least choking flow areas along the break flow paths and controls the system pressure responses. In general, the maximum effective choking flow area is (A /SUB j/ + A /SUB p/ ) for discharge line breaks and (A /SUB j/ + A /SUB o/ ) for suction line breaks, where A /SUB j/ , A /SUB p/ , and A /SUB o/ are the flow areas of the jet pump drive nozzles, the main recirculation pump discharge nozzle, and the break, respectively. The similarity between the ROSA-III test and a BWR LOCA has been confirmed in the key phenomena by the analyses using the RELAP5/MOD1 code. An atypical behavior is observed in the fuel rod surface temperature transient in the early phase of blowdown due to the limitation of the ROSA-III initial core power.

  11. Testing for Spatial Isotropy Under General Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Arnab; Sherman, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Spatial modeling is typically composed of a specification of a mean function and a model for the correlation structure. A common assumption on the spatial correlation is that it is isotropic. This means that the correlation between any two observations depends only on the distance between those sites and not on their relative orientation. The assumption of isotropy is often made due to a simpler interpretation of correlation behavior and to an easier estimation problem under an assumed isotropy. The assumption of isotropy, however, can have serious deleterious effects when not appropriate. In this paper we formulate a test of isotropy for spatial observations located according to a general class of stochastic designs. Distribution theory of our test statistic is derived and we carry out extensive simulations which verify the efficacy of our approach. We apply our methodology to a data set on longleaf pine trees from an oldgrowth forest in the southern United States.

  12. Generalized F test and generalized deviance test in two-way ANOVA models for randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Juan; He, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting treatment effects in a randomized trial in the presence of an additional covariate. By reexpressing a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) model in a logistic regression framework, we derive generalized F tests and generalized deviance tests, which provide better power in detecting common location-scale changes of treatment outcomes than the classical F test. The null distributions of the test statistics are independent of the nuisance parameters in the models, so the critical values can be easily determined by Monte Carlo methods. We use simulation studies to demonstrate how the proposed tests perform compared with the classical F test. We also use data from a clinical study to illustrate possible savings in sample sizes.

  13. Co-norming the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Is there a test-order effect on IQ and memory scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J; Tulsky, D S

    2000-11-01

    Test-order effect on the WAIS-III and WMS-III scores was evaluated using the WMS-III standardization sample. Participants completed the standardization editions of the WAIS-III and WMS-III in one session, with the tests administered in roughly counterbalanced order. Repeated measure MANOVA analyses were conducted to determine if there was an overall test-order effect for subtest, index, or IQ scores. No significant test-order effects were found for either the WAIS-III index or IQ scores or for the WMS-III index scores. At the subtest level, the majority of the WAIS-III and WMS-III subtests did not show a significant test-order effect. The exceptions were Digit Span and Digit Symbol-Coding on the WAIS-III and Faces II and Logical Memory II on the WMS-III. Although statistically significant test-order effects were found on these subtests, the effect sizes were small. This study indicates that the test-order effect is not a potential threat to the internal validity of the WAIS-III and WMS-III normative data. The practical implications of the current study are discussed.

  14. Rare top decay $t\\rightarrow c\\gamma$ in general THDM-III

    CERN Document Server

    Gaitan-Lozano, R; de Oca, J H Montes

    2014-01-01

    We study the decay $t\\rightarrow c\\gamma$ with flavor-changing neutral interactions in scalar sector of the type III Two Higgs Doublet Model (THDM-III) with mixing between neutral scalar fields as a result of considering the most general scalar potential. The branching ratio of the decay $Br(t\\rightarrow c\\gamma)$ is calculated as function of the mixing parameters and masses of the neutral scalar fields. We obtain a $Br(t\\rightarrow c\\gamma)$ of the order of $10^{-8}$ for the considered regions of the mixing parameters. Finally, one upper bound for the possible events is estimated to be $n=18$ by assuming a expected luminosity of the order of 300 $fb^{-1}$.

  15. Measuring Test Measurement Error: A General Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Test-based accountability as well as value-added asessments and much experimental and quasi-experimental research in education rely on achievement tests to measure student skills and knowledge. Yet, we know little regarding fundamental properties of these tests, an important example being the extent of measurement error and its implications for…

  16. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-square-fits that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-square fits that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing o...

  17. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo, W.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-squares fit that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-squares fit that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing of radio pulsars and the increase in the number of observed systems. We demonstrate the power of this framework using simulated data sets that are representative of current observations.

  18. The rare decay $t \\to c \\gamma$ in the General 2HDM type III

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz, R A; Rodríguez, José Alberto; Diaz, Rodolfo A.

    2001-01-01

    We consider the branching ratio for the process $t \\to c \\gamma$ in the context of the General Two Higgs Doublet Model type III. We find that taking into account reasonable values for the parameter $\\tan \\beta$ is possible to get values of this branching ratio up to orders of magnitude lying in the range of sensitivity of near future top quark experiments. For values of $B(t \\to c \\gamma) \\sim 1-9 \\times 10^{-5}$, values between 8-15 for $\\tan \\beta$ are allowed.

  19. Gravitational tests of the generalized uncertainty principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scardigli, Fabio [American University of the Middle East, Department of Mathematics, College of Engineering, P.O. Box 220, Dasman (Kuwait); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Matematica, Milan (Italy); Casadio, Roberto [Alma Mater Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    We compute the corrections to the Schwarzschild metric necessary to reproduce the Hawking temperature derived from a generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), so that the GUP deformation parameter is directly linked to the deformation of the metric. Using this modified Schwarzschild metric, we compute corrections to the standard general relativistic predictions for the light deflection and perihelion precession, both for planets in the solar system and for binary pulsars. This analysis allows us to set bounds for the GUP deformation parameter from well-known astronomical measurements. (orig.)

  20. 77 FR 4203 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps, General...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Fluorescent Lamps, General Service Incandescent Lamps, and Incandescent Reflector Lamps AGENCY: Office of... the test procedures for general service fluorescent lamps (GSFLs), general service incandescent lamps (GSILs), and incandescent reflector lamps (IRLs). That proposed rulemaking serves as the basis for...

  1. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III: Psychometric properties and significance for application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Bucik

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the content, conceptual structure and methodological steps of the latest revision of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III, which is a highly functional and valuable vocabulary test that has been in use since 1959 in different language and cultural surroundings. On the case of the PPVT-III we are presenting the procedure of development and standardization of such vocabulary tests as well as its translation and adaptation from one language and cultural milieu to another. We also note the practical use of the PPVT-III for research purposes. In Slovenian language no vocabulary tests were developed or adapted so far; PPVT-III is presented in this context, too.

  2. Analysis of WISC-III, Stanford-Binet:IV, and academic achievement test scores in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L

    2003-06-01

    Nonverbal IQs were greater than verbal IQs for young children (3-7 years of age) on the Stanford-Binet:IV (n = 53). However, WISC-III verbal and nonverbal IQs were similar for older children, 6-15 years of age (n = 63). Stanford-Binet:IV profiles were generally consistent for the low-IQ ( or = 80) groups, with high scores on visual matching tests (Bead Memory and Quantitative Reasoning). The low- and high-WISC-III IQ groups both performed well relative to IQ on tests of lexical knowledge (Similarities, Information, and Vocabulary), but not on language comprehension and social reasoning (Comprehension). The low-IQ group did best on visuo-motor subtests (Object Assembly and Block Design), but the high-IQ group did not. The high-IQ group had significantly low scores on the Digit Span, Arithmetic, Coding, VMI, and WIAT Written Expression tests, suggesting attention and writing weaknesses.

  3. Making System Dynamics Cool III: New Hot Teaching & Testing Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruyt, E.

    2011-01-01

    This follow-up paper presents seven actual cases for testing and teaching System Dynamics developed and used between January 2010 and January 2011 for one of the largest System Dynamics courses (250+ students per year) at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. The cases presented in this

  4. The evaluation of MiL-Lx and Hybrid III Leg using Hybrid III and EUROSID2-re Anthropomorphic Test Devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pandelani, T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available the standard in automotive testing until the Hybrid III family of ATDs was introduced in 1987. The Hybrid III addressed deficiencies of the Hybrid II, mainly in the area of the neck performance and provided improved bio-fidelity. The Hybrid III ATD also... used a curved spine which better represented the occupant in a sitting position, as opposed to the original Hybrid II straight spine. The Hybrid III is still the standard in automotive crash testing; however, newer specialized ATDs...

  5. Army Enlisted Personnel Competency Assessment Program: Phase III Pilot Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Their contributions and active input played a significant role in the production of the final product and they share credit for the outcome. Of...Chain of Command 2 1 1 1 50% 100% Troop Leading Procedures 2 1 1 0 50% 0% Risk Management 2 1 1 1 50% 100% Principles of Discipline 2 1 2 1 100% 100...will make it easier to embed new items into an operational test to collect the necessary pilot data. Finally, we used a relatively unsystematic

  6. Progress of General Test Stand for Intensive Beam Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The general test stand for intensive beam cyclotron is one of the preliminary tasks of BRIF project at CIAE. The test stand, which actually is a small compact cyclotron with designed energy of 10 MeV,

  7. Latent Class Analysis of Differential Item Functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Mi-young Lee; Cohen, Allan S.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of latent class analysis for the detection of differences in item functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III). A two-class solution for a latent class model appeared to be defined in part by ability because Class 1 was lower in ability than Class 2 on both the PPVT-III and the…

  8. Generalized or abdominal obesity: which one better identifies cardiometabolic risk factors among children and adolescents? The CASPIAN III study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataie-Jafari, Asal; Heshmat, Ramin; Kelishadi, Roya; Ardalan, Gelayol; Mahmoudarabi, Minoosadat; Rezapoor, Aziz; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Asayesh, Hamid; Larijani, Bagher; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the association of generalized and abdominal obesity with cardiometabolic risk factors in children and adolescents. Data were obtained from a surveillance system entitled CASPIAN-III study in school students aged 10-18 years in Iran. Data of subjects with normal body mass index (BMI) or above (BMI ≥ 5th percentile) were analyzed. The associations of obesity with cardiometabolic risk factors were tested using logistic regression models. In the sample of 4641 children and adolescents, overweight/obese children were more likely to have metabolic syndrome and cardiometabolic risk factors compared with their normal weight counterparts. Among these parameters, elevated TG had the strongest association with degree of obesity (overweight: OR = 2.28 [95% CI 1.59-3.26]; obesity: OR = 5.63 [95% CI 4.27,7.43]). Combined generalized and abdominal obesity increased the risk of high blood pressure, elevated triglyceride and total cholesterol. Combined type of generalized and abdominal obesity is a predictor of cardiometabolic risk factors. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Could test length or order affect scores on letter number sequencing of the WAIS-III and WMS-III? Ruling out effects of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, D S; Zhu, J

    2000-11-01

    The Letter Number Sequencing subtest of the WAIS-III and WMS-III was administered at the end of the standardization edition of the WMS-III. It was not administered as part of the WAIS-III standardization battery. Nevertheless, the subtest was included in the published version of the WAIS-III. This study examines differences between examinees administered the Letter Number Sequencing subtest at three different times during a psychological battery: (1) as part of the published battery, (2) as part of the WMS-III when the WMS-III was administered as the first test in a sequence, and (3) as part of the WMS-III standardization when the WAIS-III was administered immediately preceding the WMS-III. The participants were 372 examinees ( n = 124 in each condition) who were matched on key demographic variables. A repeated measures MANOVA yielded no difference in subtest scores when administered in any of these conditions. The results show no evidence of fatigue or ordering effects on the Letter Number Sequencing subtest.

  10. Generalized M-Fluctuation Tests for Parameter Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Zeileis, Achim; Hornik, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    A general class of fluctuation tests for parameter instability in an M-estimation framework is suggested. The tests are based on partial sum processes of M-estimation scores for which functional central limit theorems are derived under the null hypothesis of parameter stability and local alternatives. Special emphasis is given to parameter instability in (generalized) linear regression models and it is shown that the introduced M-fluctuation tests contain a large number of parameter instabili...

  11. Comparative Evaluation of the Q3 and Hybrid III 3-Year-Old Dummies in Biofidelity and Static Out-of-Position Airbag Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliner, J; Athey, J; Baayoun, E; Byrnes, K; Elhagediab, A; Hultman, R; Jensen, J; Kim, A; Kostyniuk, G; Mertz, H; Prest, J; Rouhana, S; Scherer, R; Xu, L

    2000-11-01

    A comparison of the Q3 and Hybrid III 3-year-old crash test dummies is presented in this paper. The performance of the dummies were compared in sixty biofidelity tests, seventy-seven static out-of-position airbag tests and sixty-three calibration tests. Various time histories and other data pertaining to accelerations, deflections, forces and moments are compared. In addition, the ease of positioning, handling, and the durability of the dummies in various out-of-position test configurations was assessed. Both the Q3 and Hybrid III 3-year-old dummies were calibrated to their respective specifications. The Hybrid III 3-year-old met its calibration requirements, while the Q3 did not always meet its own calibration requirements. The calibration specifications of the Q3 dummy need to be re-examined and possibly refined. The biofidelity of the Q3 and Hybrid III 3-year-old dummies were evaluated in both frontal and lateral test modes. Each dummy was evaluated against its own and the other's specified requirements, when possible. In the frontal test mode, the Hybrid III 3-year-old acceptably met all of its requirements. The Q3 dummy did not meet all of its own frontal biofidelity requirements. Based on these results, the Hybrid III 3-year-old is more biofidelic for primarily frontal loading conditions. With respect to the lateral biofidelity specifications, neither the Hybrid III 3-year-old nor the Q3 dummy met the requirements for the thorax and pelvis tests performed. Both dummies met the head drop requirements. Neither dummy is recommended for lateral loading conditions. For lateral testing where only the head is impacted, the Hybrid III 3-year-old could be used. In general, the responses of both dummies were repeatable in both the frontal and lateral biofidelity tests performed. The Hybrid III 3-year-old and the Q3 dummies were evaluated in static out-of-position airbag tests with three different side airbag systems (two seat-mounted and one door-mounted system), and

  12. System structural test results - Six PODS III supports. [Passive Orbital Disconnect Struts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmley, Richard T.; Kittel, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Passive orbital disconnect struts can potentially reduce the support conductance a factor of 10 over state-of-the-art tension band nondisconnect supports and cut helium dewar weights in half for the same lifetime. A series of thermal and structural tests were performed to verify that this performance improvement is real. Structural tests on a PODS-III support system (consisting of six struts) is reported here. The results show the predicted performance improvements can be achieved and the PODS-III supports are ready for flight applications. For large tankage systems requiring higher side load capability, a PODS-IV version is currently being developed.

  13. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Boehmer, Christian G; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2009-01-01

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light, and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander, constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models. Hence Solar System tests represent very convenient and efficient tools to test the viability of the different black hole solutions in brane worl...

  14. 40 CFR 86.230-11 - Test sequence: general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test sequence: general requirements. 86.230-11 Section 86.230-11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.230-11 Test...

  15. 40 CFR 86.230-94 - Test sequence: general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test sequence: general requirements. 86.230-94 Section 86.230-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.230-94 Test...

  16. 14 CFR 33.57 - General conduct of block tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 33.57 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.57 General conduct of block tests. (a) The applicant may, in conducting the block tests, use separate engines of...

  17. 14 CFR 33.99 - General conduct of block tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 33.99 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.99 General conduct of block tests. (a) Each applicant may, in making a block test, use separate engines of identical design...

  18. The general relativistic instability supernova of a supermassive population III star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Almgren, Ann [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: kchen@ucolick.org [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The formation of supermassive Population III stars with masses ≳10,000 M{sub ☉} in primeval galaxies in strong ultraviolet backgrounds at z ∼ 15 may be the most viable pathway to the formation of supermassive black holes by z ∼ 7. Most of these stars are expected to live for short times and then directly collapse to black holes, with little or no mass loss over their lives. However, we have now discovered that non-rotating primordial stars with masses close to 55,000 M{sub ☉} can instead die as highly energetic thermonuclear supernovae powered by explosive helium burning, releasing up to 10{sup 55} erg, or about 10,000 times the energy of a Type Ia supernova. The explosion is triggered by the general relativistic contribution of thermal photons to gravity in the core of the star, which causes the core to contract and explosively burn. The energy release completely unbinds the star, leaving no compact remnant, and about half of the mass of the star is ejected into the early cosmos in the form of heavy elements. The explosion would be visible in the near infrared at z ≲ 20 to Euclid and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, perhaps signaling the birth of supermassive black hole seeds and the first quasars.

  19. Predicting scores of the Halstead Category Test with the WAIS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Jeffrey B; Retzlaff, Paul D; Dean, Raymond S

    2002-09-01

    The Halstead Category Test (HCT) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) are two of the most widely used neuropsychological tests. Often assessment conclusions are dependent upon the comparison of these measures. Therefore, it is crucial for clinicians to know how they relate to one another. This study examined the relationship between the HCT and the WAIS-III with undergraduate psychology students. Correlational analyses were conducted between HCT scores and WAIS-III subtests, Verbal and Performance IQ, and Full Scale IQ scores. Additionally, the new WAIS-III scales (Letter-Number Sequencing, Matrix Reasoning, and Symbol Search) were further examined. Regression analyses were run to develop predictor equations for the HCT using VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ. Finally, predictor tables were generated between the HCT and VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ to provide assessment of brain dysfunction for clinical use.

  20. Concordance between the CVLT and the WMS-III word lists test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Bradley D; Bayless, John D; Moser, David J; Meyers, John E; Paulsen, Jane S

    2004-03-01

    The California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) and the Word Lists Test (WLT) from the Wechsler Memory Scale-III are widely used tests of verbal learning and memory. To examine concordance between these popular tests, we administered both to a diagnostically diverse group of 25 patients. As expected, measures from the two tests were highly correlated, although level of concordance was not as high as might be expected. When diagnostic outcomes were discordant for free recall measures, the CVLT indicated impairment more often than did the WLT.

  1. Walking Versus Jogging in Stages III and IV of the Bruce Treadmill Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, D.; Schwane, J.

    Observations during research involving the Bruce Treadmill Test (BTMT) indicating that Stage III for females and Stage IV for males represented speeds which are intermediate between comfortable walking and confortable jogging for many subjects, prompted this study to determine ways to obtain more consistent group results. Twenty-eight subjects…

  2. Determination of students’ general test anxiety and their test anxiety concerning English classes

    OpenAIRE

    Çiğdem Hürsen; İbrahim Tekman

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the students’ general test anxiety and their test anxiety concerning English classes. The research was performed with 871 students. The results of the study reveal that students’ general test anxiety is in the boundaries of “rarely”. However, according to the results about students’ levels of test anxiety concerning English classes, their test anxiety level is in the boundaries of “sometimes”. Female students have a higher level of test anxiety and 15-18 ...

  3. A General Method for Module Automatic Testing in Avionics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Automatic Test Equipment (ATE systems are insufficient to cope with the challenges of testing more and more complex avionics systems. In this study, we propose a general method for module automatic testing in the avionics test platform based on PXI bus. We apply virtual instrument technology to realize the automatic testing and the fault reporting of signal performance. Taking the avionics bus ARINC429 as an example, we introduce the architecture of automatic test system as well as the implementation of algorithms in Lab VIEW. The comprehensive experiments show the proposed method can effectively accomplish the automatic testing and fault reporting of signal performance. It greatly improves the generality and reliability of ATE in avionics systems.

  4. On Washback of Testing to General English Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TangShengping; XuChongning

    2004-01-01

    The educational society identifies that important testing has on teaching and learning great effects which are referred to as washback, Although there is controversy about its benefi cialor harmful effect on teaching and learning, it is generally accepted that testing generates both negative and positive washback, By making a comparison between NMET (the

  5. Testing general relativity: from local to cosmological scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-12-28

    I summarize various tests of general relativity on astrophysical scales, based on the large-scale structure of the universe but also on other systems, in particular the constants of physics. I emphasize the importance of hypotheses on the geometric structures of our universe while performing such tests and discuss their complementarity as well as their possible extensions.

  6. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  7. 49 CFR 219.11 - General conditions for chemical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General conditions for chemical tests. 219.11 Section 219.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... for chemical tests. (a) Any employee who performs covered service for a railroad is deemed to...

  8. 40 CFR 59.650 - General testing provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... needed to measure emissions. (c) The specification for gasoline to be used for testing is given in 40 CFR 1065.710. Use the grade of gasoline specified for general testing. Blend this grade of gasoline with reagent grade ethanol in a volumetric ratio of 90.0 percent gasoline to 10.0 percent ethanol. You may...

  9. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Christian G [Department of Mathematics and Institute of Origins, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); De Risi, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli studi di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Bari, Via G. Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Harko, Tiberiu [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road (Hong Kong); Lobo, Francisco S N, E-mail: c.boehmer@ucl.ac.u, E-mail: giuseppe.derisi@ba.infn.i, E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.h, E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-21

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models.

  10. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III: Normative data for Spanish-speaking pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarrieta-Landa, L; Rivera, D; Ibáñez-Alfonso, J A; Albaladejo-Blázquez, N; Martín-Lobo, P; Delgado-Mejía, I D; Lara, L; Rabago Barajas, B V; Rodriguez Salgado, A M; Paredes Quispe, L A; Romero-García, I; Velázquez-Cardoso, J; García de la Cadena, C; Fernandez-Agis, I; Padilla-López, A; Hernández Agurcia, G P; Marín-Morales, A; Corral San José, A; Arango-Lasprilla, J C

    2017-09-16

    To generate normative data for the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III (PPVT-III) in Spanish-speaking pediatric populations. The sample consisted of 4,373 healthy children from nine countries in Latin America (Chile, Cuba, Ecuador, Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and Puerto Rico) and Spain. Each participant was administered the PPVT-III as part of a larger neuropsychological battery. PPVT-III scores were normed using multiple linear regressions and standard deviations of residual values. Age, age2, sex, and mean level of parental education (MLPE) were included as predictors in the analyses. The final multiple linear regression models showed main effects for age on all countries, such that scores increased linearly as a function of age. In addition, age2 had a significant effect in all countries, except Guatemala and Paraguay. Models showed that children whose parents had a MLPE >12 years of education obtained higher scores compared to children whose parents had MLPE ≤12 years in all countries, except for Cuba, Peru, and Puerto Rico. Sex affected scores for Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, and Spain. This is the largest Spanish speaking pediatric normative study in the world, and it will allow neuropsychologists from these countries have a more accurate interpretation of the PPVT-III when used in pediatric populations.

  11. 40 CFR 80.59 - General test fleet requirements for vehicle testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General test fleet requirements for... test fleet requirements for vehicle testing. (a) The test fleet must consist of only 1989-91 MY... test fleet shall have no fewer than 4,000 miles of accumulated mileage prior to being included in...

  12. Black Hole Spectroscopy: Testing General Relativity through Gravitational Wave Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, O; Krishnan, B; Finn, L S; Garrison, D; López-Aleman, R; Dreyer, Olaf; Kelly, Bernard; Krishnan, Badri; Finn, Lee Samuel; Garrison, David; Lopez-Aleman, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Assuming that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity in the strong field limit, can gravitational wave observations distinguish between black hole and other compact object sources? Alternatively, can gravitational wave observations provide a test of one of the fundamental predictions of general relativity? Here we describe a definitive test of the hypothesis that observations of damped, sinusoidal gravitational waves originated from a black hole or, alternatively, that nature respects the general relativistic no-hair theorem. For astrophysical black holes, which have a negligible charge-to-mass ratio, the black hole quasi-normal mode spectrum is characterized entirely by the black hole mass and angular momentum and is unique to black holes. In a different theory of gravity, or if the observed radiation arises from a different source (e.g., a neutron star, strange matter or boson star), the spectrum will be inconsistent with that predicted for general relativistic black holes. We give a statistica...

  13. General test plan redundant sensor strapdown IMU evaluation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, T.; Irwin, H. A.; Miyatake, Y.; Wedekind, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    The general test plan for a redundant sensor strapdown inertial measuring unit evaluation program is presented. The inertial unit contains six gyros and three orthogonal accelerometers. The software incorporates failure detection and correction logic and a land vehicle navigation program. The principal objective of the test is a demonstration of the practicability, reliability, and performance of the inertial measuring unit with failure detection and correction in operational environments.

  14. Input Range Testing for the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    This document contains a test plan for testing input values to the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). The plan includes four primary types of information, which rigorously define all tests that should be performed to validate that GMAT will accept allowable inputs and deny disallowed inputs. The first is a complete list of all allowed object fields in GMAT. The second type of information, is test input to be attempted for each field. The third type of information is allowable input values for all objects fields in GMAT. The final piece of information is how GMAT should respond to both valid and invalid information. It is VERY important to note that the tests below must be performed for both the Graphical User Interface and the script!! The examples are illustrated using a scripting perspective, because it is simpler to write up. However, the test must be performed for both interfaces to GMAT.

  15. Multiple Bifurcations and Chaos in a Discrete Prey-Predator System with Generalized Holling III Functional Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A prey-predator system with the strong Allee effect and generalized Holling type III functional response is presented and discretized. It is shown that the combined influences of Allee effect and step size have an important effect on the dynamics of the system. The existences of Flip and Neimark-Sacker bifurcations and strange attractors and chaotic bands are investigated by using the center manifold theorem and bifurcation theory and some numerical methods.

  16. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 104-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions. PMID:18039709

  17. 77 FR 50617 - Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping Program III; Revisions to General Tolerance Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... American Pistachio Growers trade association. III. Response to Comments In this section, EPA describes the... profitable minor crop. For these reasons, EPA concludes it would be appropriate to include Chinese jujube as.... EPA received one comment from the American Pistachio Growers trade association that supported...

  18. Computerized Classification Testing under the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Liu, Chen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM) has been recently developed to describe item responses to Likert items (agree-disagree) in attitude measurement. In this study, the authors (a) developed two item selection methods in computerized classification testing under the GGUM, the current estimate/ability confidence interval method and the cut…

  19. Testing Parametric versus Semiparametric Modelling in Generalized Linear Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Härdle, W.K.; Mammen, E.; Müller, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a generalized partially linear model E(Y|X,T) = G{X'b + m(T)} where G is a known function, b is an unknown parameter vector, and m is an unknown function.The paper introduces a test statistic which allows to decide between a parametric and a semiparametric model: (i) m is linear, i.e. m(

  20. Generalized Correlation Coefficient Based on Log Likelihood Ratio Test Statistic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hsiang-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I point out that both Joe’s and Ding’s strength statistics can only be used for testing the pair-wise independence, and I propose a novel G-square based strength statistic, called Liu’s generalized correlation coefficient, it can be used to detect and compare the strength of not only the pair-wise independence but also the mutual independence of any multivariate variables. Furthermore, I proved that only Liu’s generalized correlation coefficient is strictly increasing on its number of variables, it is more sensitive and useful than Cramer’s V coefficient, in other words, Liu generalized correlation coefficient is not only the G-square based strength statistic, but also an improved statistic for detecting and comparing the strengths of deferent associations of any two or more sets of multivariate variables, moreover, this new strength statistic can also be tested by G2.

  1. Testing General Relativity with Present and Future Astrophysical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pani, Paolo; Sperhake, Ulrich; Stein, Leo C; Wex, Norbert; Yagi, Kent; Baker, Tessa; Burgess, C P; Coelho, Flávio S; Doneva, Daniela; De Felice, Antonio; Ferreira, Pedro G; Freire, Paulo C C; Healy, James; Herdeiro, Carlos; Horbatsch, Michael; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Klein, Antoine; Kokkotas, Kostas; Kunz, Jutta; Laguna, Pablo; Lang, Ryan N; Li, Tjonnie G F; Littenberg, Tyson; Matas, Andrew; Mirshekari, Saeed; Okawa, Hirotada; Radu, Eugen; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Sathyaprakash, Bangalore S; Broeck, Chris Van Den; Winther, Hans A; Witek, Helvi; Aghili, Mir Emad; Alsing, Justin; Bolen, Brett; Bombelli, Luca; Caudill, Sarah; Chen, Liang; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Fujita, Ryuichi; Gao, Caixia; Gerosa, Davide; Kamali, Saeed; Silva, Hector O; Rosa, João G; Sadeghian, Laleh; Sampaio, Marco; Sotani, Hajime; Zilhao, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    One century after its formulation, Einstein's general relativity has made remarkable predictions and turned out to be compatible with all experimental tests. Most (if not all) of these tests probe the theory in the weak-field regime, and there are theoretical and experimental reasons to believe that general relativity should be modified when gravitational fields are strong and spacetime curvature is large. The best astrophysical laboratories to probe strong-field gravity are black holes and neutron stars, whether isolated or in binary systems. We review the motivations to consider extensions of general relativity. We present a (necessarily incomplete) catalog of modified theories of gravity for which strong-field predictions have been computed and contrasted to Einstein's theory, and we summarize our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of compact objects in these theories. We discuss current bounds on modified gravity from binary pulsar and cosmological observations, and we highlight the poten...

  2. DOE ETV-1 electric test vehicle. Phase III: performance testing and system evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1981-12-01

    The DOE ETV-1 represents the most advanced electric vehicle in operation today. Engineering tests have been conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in order to characterize its overall system performance and component efficiencies within the system environment. A dynamometer was used in order to minimize the ambient effects and large uncertainties present in track testing. Extensive test requirements have been defined and procedures were carefully controlled in order to maintain a high degree of credibility. Limited track testing was performed in order to corroborate the dynamometer results. Test results include an energy flow analysis through the major subsystems and incorporate and aerodynamic and rolling losses under cyclic and various steady speed conditions. A complete summary of the major output from all relevant dynamometer and track tests is also included as an appendix.

  3. DOE ETV-1 electric test vehicle. Phase III: performance testing and system evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1981-12-01

    The DOE ETV-1 represents the most advanced electric vehicle in operation today. Engineering tests have been conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in order to characterize its overall system performance and component efficiencies within the system environment. A dynamometer was used in order to minimize the ambient effects and large uncertainties present in track testing. Extensive test requirements have been defined and procedures were carefully controlled in order to maintain a high degree of credibility. Limited track testing was performed in order to corroborate the dynamometer results. Test results include an energy flow analysis through the major subsystems and incorporate and aerodynamic and rolling losses under cyclic and various steady speed conditions. A complete summary of the major output from all relevant dynamometer and track tests is also included as an appendix.

  4. Thurstonian models for sensory discrimination tests as generalized linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per B.; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2010-01-01

    Sensory discrimination tests such as the triangle, duo-trio, 2-AFC and 3-AFC tests produce binary data and the Thurstonian decision rule links the underlying sensory difference 6 to the observed number of correct responses. In this paper it is shown how each of these four situations can be viewed...... as a so-called generalized linear model. The underlying sensory difference 6 becomes directly a parameter of the statistical model and the estimate d' and it's standard error becomes the "usual" output of the statistical analysis. The d' for the monadic A-NOT A method is shown to appear as a standard...... linear contrast in a generalized linear model using the probit link function. All methods developed in the paper are implemented in our free R-package sensR (http://www.cran.r-project.org/package=sensR/). This includes the basic power and sample size calculations for these four discrimination tests...

  5. Genetic testing of the general population: ethical and informatic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K

    2000-01-01

    Whether we like it or not, genetic testing will almost certainly become routine medical practice within the next 25 years. Integrated circuit chips already exist that can perform 400 genetic tests simultaneously, thus greatly reducing the costs. At least one company is already working on a prototype for a handheld genetic tester that would allow primary care physicians to perform hundreds or thousands of genetic tests on a simple blood smear in just a few minutes. "Genetic report cards" for children are not very far off at all. The use of such widespread testing poses a variety of ethical dilemmas. One problem that has not been appreciated sufficiently, however, is the question of how to interpret the test results. Because of the ways the genes implicated in diseases are discovered and marketed, quantitative analysis of the tests can be extremely misleading. The difficulty is that we simply do not have sufficient information about variance in genetic and other factors in the general population to make accurate projections of a patient's risk, given the presence of a gene. This uncertainty is obscured, however, when we provide the patient with a numerical analysis of risk because it is well established that people tend to overestimate the information content of numerical projections. This situation is made far worse by the fact that we do not have enough adequately trained genetic counselors to handle the load that will soon be placed on them (and studies have shown that physicians are generally very poorly prepared to act as accurate sources of information on complex genetic issues). For these reasons, I argue that access to genetic testing should be treated the same way as access to new medical procedures and medications--namely, withheld from the general public until proven safe and effective in large-scale trials. This is certain to be an unpopular policy, but it seems the only way to prevent a great deal of abuse of genetic tests.

  6. PREFACE: III All-Russian Scientific and Practical Conference on Innovations in Non-Destructive Testing (SibTest 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This issue of the journal is devoted to the research and studies presented at the III All-Russian Scientific and Practical Conference on Innovations in Non-Destructive Testing SibTest. The conference was held in Altai, Russia, on 27-31 July 2015. The conference brought together experts from different countries and organizations who had a great opportunity to share knowledge during oral and poster presentations and to initiate discussions on topics that are of interest to the conference attendees. The conference aimed to discuss innovative methods and the application of advanced technologies in non-destructive testing. The conference also attempted to bring together university, academic and industrial science, to expand the co-operation of scientists from different countries in research and development and the commercialization of innovative technologies in non-destructive testing. The key themes of the conference were: ultrasonic and acoustic testing; electromagnetic and thermal testing; various types of radiation non-destructive testing; passive and active testing techniques. The conference organizers are the Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, Tomsk Polytechnic University, with the assistance of the Russian Society for Non-Destructive Testing and Technical Diagnostics, Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, National Research Tomsk State University, Moscow State Institute of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation.

  7. Ambiguous Tests of General Relativity on Cosmological Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Zuntz, Joe; Ferreira, Pedro; Skordis, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to testing General Relativity (GR) on linear scales using Parameterized Post-Friedmann (PPF) methods. It is generally assumed that the details of any given parameterization are unimportant if one uses it as a diagnostic for deviations from GR. In this brief report we show that this is not so by taking two particular parameterizations and analyzing a subset of the current cosmological data. We argue that any PPF approach should always be accompanied by a characterization of the class of modified gravity models it is seeking to approximate.

  8. Generalization of Rare Variant Association Tests for Longitudinal Family Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Li-Chu; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Bowden, Donald W; Chiu, Yen-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Given the functional relevance of many rare variants, their identification is frequently critical for dissecting disease etiology. Functional variants are likely to be aggregated in family studies enriched with affected members, and this aggregation increases the statistical power to detect rare variants associated with a trait of interest. Longitudinal family studies provide additional information for identifying genetic and environmental factors associated with disease over time. However, methods to analyze rare variants in longitudinal family data remain fairly limited. These methods should be capable of accounting for different sources of correlations and handling large amounts of sequencing data efficiently. To identify rare variants associated with a phenotype in longitudinal family studies, we extended pedigree-based burden (BT) and kernel (KS) association tests to genetic longitudinal studies. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) approaches were used to generalize the pedigree-based BT and KS to multiple correlated phenotypes under the generalized linear model framework, adjusting for fixed effects of confounding factors. These tests accounted for complex correlations between repeated measures of the same phenotype (serial correlations) and between individuals in the same family (familial correlations). We conducted comprehensive simulation studies to compare the proposed tests with mixed-effects models and marginal models, using GEEs under various configurations. When the proposed tests were applied to data from the Diabetes Heart Study, we found exome variants of POMGNT1 and JAK1 genes were associated with type 2 diabetes.

  9. Comparison of Hybrid III and THOR dummies in paired small overlap tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Becky C; Sherwood, Christopher P; Arbelaez, Raul A; Zuby, David S; Nolan, Joseph M

    2011-11-01

    The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is investigating small overlap crash test procedures for a possible consumer information program. Analysis of real-world small overlap crashes found a strong relationship between serious head and chest injuries and occupant compartment intrusion. The main sources of serious head injuries were from the A-pillar, dash panel, or door structure, suggesting head trajectories forward and outboard possibly bypassing the airbag. Chest injuries mainly were from steering wheel intrusion and seat belt loading. In developing this program, two test dummies were evaluated for predicting occupant injury risk: midsize male Hybrid III and THOR. In the collinear small overlap crash tests conducted here, results from the two dummies were similar. Both predicted a low risk of injury to the head and chest and sometimes a high risk of injury to the lower extremities. Head and torso kinematics also were similar between dummies. Other test scenarios might show larger differences between the dummies.

  10. Comparison of a timed motor test battery to the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, C.A.; Bloem, B.R.; Borm, G.F.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2008-01-01

    The most widely used scale currently available for the clinical evaluation of motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD)-the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III (UPDRS-III) -is time-consuming, subjective, and has suboptimal sensitivity. A brief timed motor test (TMT) battery could possib

  11. Multigroup Moderation Test in Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Dwi Mulyanto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Structured Component Analysis (GSCA is an alternative method in structural modeling using alternating least squares. GSCA can be used for the complex analysis including multigroup. GSCA can be run with a free software called GeSCA, but in GeSCA there is no multigroup moderation test to compare the effect between groups. In this research we propose to use the T test in PLS for testing moderation Multigroup on GSCA. T test only requires sample size, estimate path coefficient, and standard error of each group that are already available on the output of GeSCA and the formula is simple so the user does not need a long time for analysis.

  12. Generalized Hypergeometric Ensembles: Statistical Hypothesis Testing in Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Casiraghi, Giona; Scholtes, Ingo; Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Statistical ensembles define probability spaces of all networks consistent with given aggregate statistics and have become instrumental in the analysis of relational data on networked systems. Their numerical and analytical study provides the foundation for the inference of topological patterns, the definition of network-analytic measures, as well as for model selection and statistical hypothesis testing. Contributing to the foundation of these important data science techniques, in this article we introduce generalized hypergeometric ensembles, a framework of analytically tractable statistical ensembles of finite, directed and weighted networks. This framework can be interpreted as a generalization of the classical configuration model, which is commonly used to randomly generate networks with a given degree sequence or distribution. Our generalization rests on the introduction of dyadic link propensities, which capture the degree-corrected tendencies of pairs of nodes to form edges between each other. Studyin...

  13. Cosmological tests of general relativity with future tomographic surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Pogosian, Levon; Silvestri, Alessandra; Zylberberg, Joel

    2009-12-11

    Future weak lensing surveys will map the evolution of matter perturbations and gravitational potentials, yielding a new test of general relativity on cosmic scales. They will probe the relations between matter overdensities, local curvature, and the Newtonian potential. These relations can be modified in alternative gravity theories or by the effects of massive neutrinos or exotic dark energy fluids. We introduce two functions of time and scale which account for any such modifications in the linear regime. We use a principal component analysis to find the eigenmodes of these functions that cosmological data will constrain. The number of constrained modes gives a model-independent forecast of how many parameters describing deviations from general relativity could be constrained, along with w(z). The modes' scale and time dependence tell us which theoretical models will be better tested.

  14. Psychological distress in Rome III functional dyspepsia patients presenting for testing of gastric emptying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibaise, J K; Islam, R S; Dueck, A C; Roarke, M C; Crowell, M D

    2016-02-01

    There have been conflicting results from studies that have evaluated psychological disturbances in functional dyspepsia (FD). We conducted a comprehensive survey of psychological measures in patients undergoing gastric emptying testing (GET) in order to determine the relationship among psychological distress, gastric emptying, and dyspeptic symptoms. Consecutive patients referred for GET were prospectively enrolled. Details regarding patient characteristics, health care utilization, dyspeptic symptoms, quality of life, and psychological dysfunction were obtained. Depression, anxiety, somatization, stress, positive and negative affect, and alexithymia were queried using validated questionnaires. We compared those dyspeptic patients who met Rome III criteria for FD to those who did not meet these criteria. Two hundred and nine patients (160 female; mean age 46.6 years ± 17.3 years) participated. Around 151 patients (72%) met Rome III criteria for FD. In the entire group, a high level of depression, anxiety, somatization, and perceived stress was present compared to population norms. Health care seeking behavior and symptom severity were greater in those with FD and quality of life was lower compared to non-FD. Gastric emptying did not differentiate the two groups and similar degrees of psychological distress were present whether emptying was delayed or normal. In patients referred for GET, substantial psychological distress is present. The degree of distress was similar regardless of whether the patient met Rome III FD criteria or not. Further evaluation of psychological dysfunction in FD patients may lead to improved diagnosis and determination of the most appropriate treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Computerized Testing of Level III Associate Degree Nursing Students versus Paper and Pencil Testing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Shirna R.

    2014-01-01

    Computerized testing may be one solution to enhance performance on the curricular Health Education Systems Inc. (HESI) exam and the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Due to the integration of improved technological processes and procedures in healthcare for computerized documentation and electronicmedical records,…

  16. [Various aspects of cognitive activities of schizophrenics. III. Maladjustment assimilation/accommodation and generalization of reasoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, G; Azorin, J M; Vollrath, J L; Andréoli, A; Tissot, R

    1987-05-01

    Paranoid schizophrenics are unable to balance affirmation and negation. Using the terms of Jean Piaget, they therefore only partially achieve the "équilibrations majorantes" of level II and never those of level III. In their thinking, they have access to the "généralisations inductives" (often excessive ones), but rarely to the "généralisations constructives complétives". They do not have access to the "généralisations synthétisantes" or to the feeling that logic is necessary. They oscillate between the positivist need to measure or verify and absolute beliefs issued from magical thinking.

  17. CO2 Washout Testing Using Various Inlet Vent Configurations in the Mark-III Space Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona, F. Adam; Norcross, Jason; Conger, Bruce; Navarro, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Requirements for using a space suit during ground testing include providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout for the suited subject. Acute CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms including headache, dyspnea, lethargy and eventually unconsciousness or even death. Symptoms depend on several factors including inspired partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2), duration of exposure, metabolic rate of the subject and physiological differences between subjects. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis has predicted that the configuration of the suit inlet vent has a significant effect on oronasal CO2 concentrations. The main objective of this test was to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a variety of inlet vent configurations in the Mark-III suit across a range of workload and flow rates. Data and trends observed during testing along with refined CFD models will be used to help design an inlet vent configuration for the Z-2 space suit. The testing methodology used in this test builds upon past CO2 washout testing performed on the Z-1 suit, Rear Entry I-Suit (REI) and the Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit (EM-ACES). Three subjects performed two test sessions each in the Mark-III suit to allow for comparison between tests. Six different helmet inlet vent configurations were evaluated during each test session. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid. Suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to generate metabolic workloads of approximately 2000 and 3000 BTU/hr. Supply airflow rates of 6 and 4 actual cubic feet per minute (ACFM) were tested at each workload. Subjects wore an oronasal mask with an open port in front of the mouth and were allowed to breathe freely. Oronasal ppCO2 was monitored real-time via gas analyzers with sampling tubes connected to the oronasal mask. Metabolic rate was calculated from the total oxygen consumption and CO2 production measured by additional gas analyzers at the air outlet from the suit. Real-time metabolic rate measurements were

  18. Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using Various Inlet Vent Configurations in the Mark-III Space Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona, F. Adam; Norcross, Jason; Conger, Bruce; Navarro, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Requirements for using a space suit during ground testing include providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout for the suited subject. Acute CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms including headache, dyspnea, lethargy, and eventually unconsciousness or even death. Symptoms depend on several factors including inspired partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2), duration of exposure, metabolic rate of the subject, and physiological differences between subjects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has predicted that the configuration of the suit inlet vent has a significant effect on oronasal CO2 concentrations. The main objective of this test was to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a variety of inlet vent configurations in the Mark-III suit across a range of workload and flow rates. Data and trends observed during testing along with refined CFD models will be used to help design an inlet vent configuration for the Z-2 space suit. The testing methodology used in this test builds upon past CO2 washout testing performed on the Z-1 suit, Rear Entry I-Suit, and the Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit. Three subjects performed two test sessions each in the Mark-III suit to allow for comparison between tests. Six different helmet inlet vent configurations were evaluated during each test session. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid. Suited test subjects walked on a treadmill to generate metabolic workloads of approximately 2000 and 3000 BTU/hr. Supply airflow rates of 6 and 4 actual cubic feet per minute were tested at each workload. Subjects wore an oronasal mask with an open port in front of the mouth and were allowed to breathe freely. Oronasal ppCO2 was monitored real-time via gas analyzers with sampling tubes connected to the oronasal mask. Metabolic rate was calculated from the CO2 production measured by an additional gas analyzer at the air outlet from the suit. Real-time metabolic rate measurements were used to adjust the treadmill workload to meet

  19. An Application of Graphical Approach to Construct Multiple Testing Procedure in a Hypothetical Phase III Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naitee eTing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many multiple testing procedures (MTP have been developed in recent years. Among these new procedures, the graphical approach is flexible and easy to communicate with non-statisticians. A hypothetical Phase III clinical trial design is introduced in this manuscript to demonstrate how graphical approach can be applied in clinical product development. In this design, an active comparator is used. It is thought that this test drug under development could potentially be superior to this comparator. For comparison of efficacy, the primary endpoint is well established and widely accepted by regulatory agencies. However, an important secondary endpoint based on Phase II findings looks very promising. The target dose may have a good opportunity to deliver superiority to the comparator. Furthermore, a lower dose is included in case the target dose may demonstrate potential safety concerns. This Phase III study is designed as a non-inferiority trial with two doses, and two endpoints. This manuscript will illustrate how graphical approach is applied to this design in handling multiple testing issues.

  20. WAIS-III Matrix Reasoning test performance in a mixed clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, A T; Sanchez, P N; Rosenbaum, J G; Mahurin, R K; Davis, J M; Townes, B D

    1999-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between the Matrix Reasoning subtest (MRT) of the WAIS-III and a selected number of neuropsychological tests in a heterogeneous clinical sample of English-speaking American (n = 41), and non-English-speaking immigrant (n = 14) adults. A moderate association between the Halstead Category Test and the MRT (-.58) was found in the English-speaking sample. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant association between measures of verbal abstract reasoning and verbal fluency, and performance on the MRT. Among the immigrant sample, the MRT was also found to be significantly associated with verbal fluency task performance, as well as with the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. Correlational analyses therefore suggest a strong verbal mediation element in the MRT, and that labeling it a nonverbal task may be misleading.

  1. A general approach to testing multifaceted personality constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J G; Lehn, D A; Tedlie, J C

    1991-12-01

    Some personality characteristics are composed of multiple, distinct subcomponents (e.g., Type A, hardiness, attributional style, self-monitoring). The advantages and disadvantages of 3 typical approaches to testing these constructs are reviewed. An alternative approach based on structural equation modeling is then offered. This approach has many advantages over its alternatives, including the provision of an explicit test of the structure of the multifaceted construct, the simultaneous test of the effects of this general construct and the unique aspects of its subcomponents, and the explicit consideration of measurement error. Although the modeling approach does have limitations, these limitations are equally applicable to all of its alternatives. Indeed, the principal disadvantages of the modeling approach seem to be its statistical complexity and the lack of education regarding its proper use.

  2. Comparison of Hybrid III child test dummies to pediatric PMHS in blunt thoracic impact response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, D P; Crandall, J R; Bolton, J R; Bass, C R; Ouyang, J; Lau, S H

    2010-08-01

    The limited availability of pediatric biomechanical impact response data presents a significant challenge to the development of child dummies. In the absence of these data, the development of the current generation of child dummies has been driven by scaling of the biomechanical response requirements of the existing adult test dummies. Recently published pediatric blunt thoracic impact response data provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of these scaling methodologies. However, the published data include several processing anomalies and nonphysical features. These features are corrected by minimizing instrumentation and processing error to improve the fidelity of the individual force-deflection responses. Using these data, biomechanical impact response corridors are calculated for a 3-year-old child and a 6-year-old child. These calculated corridors differ from both the originally published postmortem human subject (PMHS) corridors and the impact response requirements of the current child dummies. Furthermore, the response of the Hybrid III 3-year-old test dummy in the same impact condition shows a similar deflection but a significantly higher force than the 3-year-old corridor. The response of the Hybrid III 6-year-old dummy, on the other hand, correlates well with the calculated 6-year-old corridor. The newly developed 3-year-old and 6-year-old blunt thoracic impact response corridors can be used to define data-driven impact response requirements as an alternative to scaling-driven requirements.

  3. Anxiety and Test Anxiety: General and Test Anxiety among College Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodero, Jeri Lyn

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the state, trait, and test anxiety scores of 145 college students with and without learning disabilities against categories such as demographics, general anxiety, test anxiety, and disability experience. This study used a questionnaire and compared answers among groups. The analysis indicated that students with learning…

  4. 42 CFR 84.99 - Man tests; testing conditions; general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man tests; testing conditions; general requirements. 84.99 Section 84.99 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.99...

  5. A general diagnostic model applied to language testing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Davier, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Probabilistic models with one or more latent variables are designed to report on a corresponding number of skills or cognitive attributes. Multidimensional skill profiles offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide, if the reported skills can be identified and distinguished reliably. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of computationally intensive estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo, since standard maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques were deemed infeasible. This paper presents a general diagnostic model (GDM) that can be estimated with standard ML techniques and applies to polytomous response variables as well as to skills with two or more proficiency levels. The paper uses one member of a larger class of diagnostic models, a compensatory diagnostic model for dichotomous and partial credit data. Many well-known models, such as univariate and multivariate versions of the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic item response theory model, the generalized partial credit model, as well as a variety of skill profile models, are special cases of this GDM. In addition to an introduction to this model, the paper presents a parameter recovery study using simulated data and an application to real data from the field test for TOEFL Internet-based testing.

  6. Testing for one Generalized Linear Single Order Parameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Niels Langager; Christensen, Tage Emil; Dyre, Jeppe

    work the order parameter may be chosen to have a non-exponential relaxation. The model predictions contradict the general consensus of the properties of viscous liquids in two ways: (i) The model predicts that following a linear isobaric temperature step, the normalized volume and entalpy relaxation...... functions are identical. This assumption conflicts with some (but not all) reports, utilizing the Tool-Narayanaswamy formalism to extrapolate from non-linear measurements to the linear regime. (ii) The model predicts that the theoretical "linear Prigogine-Defay" ratio is one. This ratio has never been...... responses or extrapolate from measurements of a glassy state away from equilibrium. Starting from a master equation description of inherent dynamics, we calculate the complex thermodynamic response functions. We device a way of testing for the generalized single order parameter model by measuring 3 complex...

  7. Testing consistency of general relativity with kinematic and dynamical probes

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we test consistency relations between a kinematic probe, the observational Hubble data, and a dynamical probe, the growth rates for cosmic large scale structure, which should hold if general relativity is the correct theory of gravity on cosmological scales. Moreover, we summarize the development history of parametrization in testings and make an improvement of it. Taking advantage of the Hubble parameter given from both parametric and non-parametric methods, we propose three equations and test two of them performed by means of two-dimensional parameterizations, including one using trigonometric functions we propose. As a result, it is found that the consistency relations satisfies well at $1\\sigma$ CL and trigonometric functions turn out to be efficient tools in parameterizations. Furthermore, in order to confirm the validity of our test, we introduce a model of modified gravity, DGP model and compare the testing results in the cases of $\\Lambda$CDM, "DGP in GR" and DGP model with mock data. It...

  8. Kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms: Testing gravitational-wave tests of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Samajdar, Anuradha; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We describe a variety of self-consistent modifications of the effective-one-body framework that yield kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveforms. These waveforms do not correspond to any particular modified theory of gravity, but offer parametrized deviations from general relativity in various regimes. They can thus be used to test the performance of various gravitational wave tests of general relativity (GR). As an example, we introduce the IMR consistency test, which tests for consistency between the estimations of the final mass and spin from the inspiral and merger-ringdown portions of a binary black hole waveform. We show that for reasonable source parameters and SNRs in Advanced LIGO, this test is able to detect a deviation from GR with high confidence for certain modifications of the GR energy flux that are not constrained by observations of the double pulsar. We also consider the performance of a parameterized test of GR on these kludge modified gravity waveforms.

  9. A superconducting gyroscope to test Einstein's general theory of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Schiff (1960) proposed a new test of general relativity based on measuring the precessions of the spin axes of gyroscopes in earth orbit. Since 1963 a Stanford research team has been developing an experiment to measure the two effects calculated by Schiff. The gyroscope consists of a uniform sphere of fused quartz 38 mm in diameter, coated with superconductor, electrically suspended and spinning at about 170 Hz in vacuum. The paper describes the proposed flight apparatus and the current state of development of the gyroscope, including techniques for manufacturing and measuring the gyro rotor and housing, generating ultralow magnetic fields, and mechanizing the readout.

  10. 40 CFR 92.124 - Test sequence; general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... restrictions which would be seen in use in a representative application. (ii) Inlet depression and exhaust.... (iii) The locations at which the inlet depression and exhaust backpressure are measured shall...

  11. Long Maximal Incremental Tests Accurately Assess Aerobic Fitness in Class II and III Obese Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, Stefano; Codecasa, Franco; Cornacchia, Mauro; Maestrini, Sabrina; Capodaglio, Paolo; Brunani, Amelia; Fanari, Paolo; Salvadori, Alberto; Malatesta, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min) (STest) and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min) (LTest)] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2) without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2) completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1) and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO) reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake V˙O2peak and peak heart rate (HRpeak) of each test. There were no significant differences in V˙O2peak (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1) and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm) between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between V˙O2peak (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001) and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001) during both tests. V˙O2peak and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity. PMID:25875746

  12. Long maximal incremental tests accurately assess aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, Stefano; Codecasa, Franco; Cornacchia, Mauro; Maestrini, Sabrina; Capodaglio, Paolo; Brunani, Amelia; Fanari, Paolo; Salvadori, Alberto; Malatesta, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min) (STest) and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min) (LTest)] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2) without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2) completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1) and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO) reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and peak heart rate (HRpeak) of each test. There were no significant differences in [Formula: see text] (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1) and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm) between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between [Formula: see text] (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001) and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001) during both tests. [Formula: see text] and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity.

  13. Long maximal incremental tests accurately assess aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lanzi

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min (STest and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min (LTest] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2 without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2 completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1 and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and peak heart rate (HRpeak of each test. There were no significant differences in [Formula: see text] (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1 and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between [Formula: see text] (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001 and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001 during both tests. [Formula: see text] and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity.

  14. Standard test method for plutonium assay by plutonium (III) diode array spectrophotometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the determination of total plutonium as plutonium(III) in nitrate and chloride solutions. The technique is applicable to solutions of plutonium dioxide powders and pellets (Test Methods C 697), nuclear grade mixed oxides (Test Methods C 698), plutonium metal (Test Methods C 758), and plutonium nitrate solutions (Test Methods C 759). Solid samples are dissolved using the appropriate dissolution techniques described in Practice C 1168. The use of this technique for other plutonium-bearing materials has been reported (1-5), but final determination of applicability must be made by the user. The applicable concentration range for plutonium sample solutions is 10–200 g Pu/L. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropria...

  15. LARES: A New Satellite Specifically Designed for Testing General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paolozzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that today several hundred operational satellites are orbiting Earth while many more either have already reentered the atmosphere or are no longer operational. On the 13th of February 2012 one more satellite of the Italian Space Agency has been successfully launched. The main difference with respect to all other satellites is its extremely high density that makes LARES not only the densest satellite but also the densest known orbiting object in the solar system. That implies that the nongravitational perturbations on its surface will have the smallest effects on its orbit. Those design characteristics are required to perform an accurate test of frame dragging and specifically a test of Lense-Thirring effect, predicted by General Relativity. LARES satellite, although passive, with 92 laser retroreflectors on its surface, was a real engineering challenge in terms of both manufacturing and testing. Data acquisition and processing are in progress. The paper will describe the scientific objectives, the status of the experiment, the special feature of the satellite and separation system including some manufacturing issues, and the special tests performed on its retroreflectors.

  16. The Schur algorithm for generalized Schur functions III : J-unitary matrix polynomials on the circle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpay, Daniel; Azizov, Tomas; Dijksma, Aad; Langer, Heinz

    2003-01-01

    The main result is that for J = ((1)(0) (0)(-1)) every J-unitary 2 x 2-matrix polynomial on the unit circle is an essentially unique product of elementary J-unitary 2 x 2-matrix polynomials which are either of degree 1 or 2k. This is shown by means of the generalized Schur transformation introduced

  17. LARES Satellite Thermal Forces and a Test of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, Richard; Brooks, Jason; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We summarize a laser-ranged satellite test of General Relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames, and then describe the modeling of an important perturbing effect, thermally induced forces, on the satellite. The frame dragging result is obtained by using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. It produces a result in agreement with the prediction of General Relativity: $\\mu = (0.994 \\pm 0.002) \\pm 0.05$, where $\\mu$ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its General Relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is the estimated systematic error. The thermal force model assumes heat flow from the sun (visual) and from Earth (IR) to the satellite core and to the fused silica reflectors on the satellite, and reradiation into space. For a roughly current epoch (days 1460 - 1580 after launch) we c...

  18. Testing general relativity using golden black-hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Abhirup; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K; Mishra, Chandra Kant; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter; Nichols, David A; Chen, Yanbei; Nielsen, Alex B; Berry, Christopher P L; London, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    The coalescences of stellar-mass black-hole binaries through their inspiral, merger, and ringdown are among the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. If a GW signal is observed with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the masses and spins of the black holes can be estimated from just the inspiral part of the signal. Using these estimates of the initial parameters of the binary, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be uniquely predicted making use of general-relativistic numerical simulations. In addition, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be independently estimated from the merger-ringdown part of the signal. If the binary black hole dynamics is correctly described by general relativity, these independent estimates have to be consistent with each other. We present a Bayesian implementation of such a test of general relativity, and outline the expected constraints from upcoming GW observations using the second-generation of ground-based GW detectors.

  19. OPTIS - A satellite test of Special and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, H.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Peters, A.; Schiller, S.

    OPTIS has been proposed as a small satellite platform in a high elliptical orbit (apogee 40,000 km, perigee 10,000 km) and is designed for high precision tests of foundations of Special and General Relativity. The experimental set-up consists of two ultrastable Nd:YAG lasers, two crossed optical resonators (monolithic cavities), an atomic clock, and an optical comb generator. OPTIS enables (1) a Michelson- Morley experiment to test the isotropy of light propagation (constancy of light speed, dc/c) with an accuracy of 1 part in 101 8 , (2) a Kennedey-Thorndike experiment to measure the independence of the light speed from the velocity of the laboratory in the order of 1 part in 101 6 , and (3) a test of the gravitational red shift by comparing the atomic clock and an optical clock on a precision level of 1 part in 104 . To avoid any influence from atmospheric drag, solar radiation, or earth albedo, the satellite needs drag free control, to depress the residual acceleration down to 10-14 m/s 2 in the frequency range between 100 to 1,000 Hz, and thermal control to stabilize the cavity temperature variation, dT/T, to 1 part in 107 during 100 s and to 1 part in 105 during 1 orbit.

  20. Econometrics and data of the 9 sector Dynamic General Equilibrium Model. Volume III. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, E.R.; Fraumeni, B.M.; Hudson, E.A.; Jorgenson, D.W.; Stoker, T.M.

    1981-03-01

    This report presents the econometrics and data of the 9 sector Dynamic General Equilibrium Model. There are two key components of 9DGEM - the model of household behavior and the model of produconcrneer behavior. The household model is concerned with decisions on consumption, saving, labor supply and the composition of consumption. The producer model is concerned with output price formation and determination of input patterns and purchases for each of the nine producing sectors. These components form the behavioral basis of DGEM. The remaining components are concerned with constraints, balance conditions, accounting, and government revenues and expenditures (these elements are developed in the report on the model specification).

  1. Testing psychometric properties of the 30-item general health questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; He, Hong-Gu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) given conflicting findings in the literature. A cross-sectional, nonexperimental research was used with a convenience sample of 271 American female health care professionals. Data were collected by using self-reported questionnaires. A series of exploratory factor analyses (EFAs), confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs), and structural equation modeling (SEM) were performed to examine underlying dimensions of the GHQ-30. Results from EFAs and CFAs revealed the three-factor composition (positive affect, anxiety, and depressed mood). All factor loadings were statistically significant, and one pair of error variance was allowed to be correlated. All factors contained questionnaire items with acceptable face validity and demonstrated good internal consistency reliability. Results from SEM further confirmed underlying constructs of the scale. To our knowledge, this is the first study that extensively tested the psychometric properties of the GHQ-30, taking both statistical and substantive issues into consideration.

  2. Gravitational waves astronomy: the ultimate test for Einstein's General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that Einstein's General Relativity (GR) achieved a great success and overcame lots of experimental tests. On the other hand, GR also showed some shortcomings and flaws which today advise theorists to ask if it is the definitive theory of gravity. In this review we show that, if advanced projects on the detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) will improve their sensitivity, allowing to perform a GWs astronomy, understanding if Einstein's GR is the correct and definitive theory of gravity will be possible. For this goal, accurate angular and frequency dependent response functions of interferometers for GWs arising from various Theories of Gravity, i.e. GR and Extended Theories of Gravity will have to be used. This review is founded on the Essay which won an Honorable Mention at the the 2009 Gravity Research Foundation Awards.

  3. A Time Domain Waveform for Testing General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Huwyler, Cédric; Jetzer, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational-wave parameter estimation is only as good as the theory the waveform generation models are based upon. It is therefore crucial to test General Relativity (GR) once data becomes available. Many previous works, such as studies connected with the ppE framework by Yunes and Pretorius, rely on the stationary phase approximation (SPA) to model deviations from GR in the frequency domain. As Fast Fourier Transform algorithms have become considerably faster and in order to circumvent possible problems with the SPA, we test GR with corrected time domain waveforms instead of SPA waveforms. Since a considerable amount of work has been done already in the field using SPA waveforms, we establish a connection between leading-order-corrected waveforms in time and frequency domain, concentrating on phase-only corrected terms. In a Markov Chain Monte Carlo study, whose results are preliminary and will only be available later, we will assess the ability of the eLISA detector to measure deviations from GR for signa...

  4. Cross-cultural effects on IQ test performance: a review and preliminary normative indications on WAIS-III test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth-Edwards, Ann B; Kemp, Ryan D; Rust, Annegret L; Muirhead, Joanne G L; Hartman, Nigel P; Radloff, Sarah E

    2004-10-01

    This article presents a review of cross-cultural influences on Wechsler IQ tests, together with a preliminary investigation into WAIS-III test performance (English administration) for a southern African sample (age range 19-30) stratified for white English first language and black African first language, level and quality of education. ('African language' is the term used to denote the indigenous languages of black populations in southern Africa). A two-way ANOVA revealed highly significant effects for both level and quality of education within the black African first language group. Scores for the white English and black African first language groups with advantaged education were comparable with the US standardization, whereas scores for black African first language participants with disadvantaged education were significantly lower than this. Thus indications from this research are that normative studies should take account of the influential variable of quality of education, in addition to level of education. Alternatively faulty conclusions may be drawn about the effects of ethnicity, with the potential for neuropsychological misdiagnosis.

  5. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) Acceptance Test Plan [Draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Edwin; Hughes, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The information presented in this Acceptance Test Plan document shows the current status of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). GMAT is a software system developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in collaboration with the private sector. The GMAT development team continuously performs acceptance tests in order to verify that the software continues to operate properly after updates are made. The GMAT Development team consists of NASA/GSFC Code 583 software developers, NASA/GSFC Code 595 analysts, and contractors of varying professions. GMAT was developed to provide a development approach that maintains involvement from the private sector and academia, encourages collaborative funding from multiple government agencies and the private sector, and promotes the transfer of technology from government funded research to the private sector. GMAT contains many capabilities, such as integrated formation flying modeling and MATLAB compatibility. The propagation capabilities in GMAT allow for fully coupled dynamics modeling of multiple spacecraft, in any flight regime. Other capabilities in GMAT inclucle: user definable coordinate systems, 3-D graphics in any coordinate system GMAT can calculate, 2-D plots, branch commands, solvers, optimizers, GMAT functions, planetary ephemeris sources including DE405, DE200, SLP and analytic models, script events, impulsive and finite maneuver models, and many more. GMAT runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. Both the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the GMAT engine were built and tested on all of the mentioned platforms. GMAT was designed for intuitive use from both the GUI and with an importable script language similar to that of MATLAB.

  6. Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics III. Multidimensional tests and the div B = 0 constraint

    CERN Document Server

    Price, D J

    2005-01-01

    In two previous papers (Price & Monaghan 2004a,b) (papers I,II) we have described an algorithm for solving the equations of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The algorithm uses dissipative terms in order to capture shocks and has been tested on a wide range of one dimensional problems in both adiabatic and isothermal MHD. In this paper we investigate multidimensional aspects of the algorithm, refining many of the aspects considered in papers I and II and paying particular attention to the code's ability to maintain the div B = 0 constraint associated with the magnetic field. In particular we implement a hyperbolic divergence cleaning method recently proposed by Dedner et al. (2002) in combination with the consistent formulation of the MHD equations in the presence of non-zero magnetic divergence derived in papers I and II. Various projection methods for maintaining the divergence-free condition are also examined. Finally the algorithm is tested against a wi...

  7. Validation of antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory exemplifies general key challenges in setting clinical breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Michael; Courvalin, Patrice; Böttger, Erik C

    2014-07-01

    This study critically evaluated the new European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines on the basis of a large set of disk diffusion diameters determined for clinical isolates. We report several paradigmatic problems that illustrate key issues in the selection of clinical susceptibility breakpoints, which are of general importance not only for EUCAST but for all guidelines systems, i.e., (i) the need for species-specific determinations of clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoffs (ECOFFs), (ii) problems arising from pooling data from various sources, and (iii) the importance of the antibiotic disk content for separating non-wild-type and wild-type populations.

  8. General Framework for Meta-Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M; Scott, Robert A; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Province, Michael A; Rotter, Jerome I; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée

    2016-04-01

    For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta-analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta-analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta-analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two-stage meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype-specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type-I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta-analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose-associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates.

  9. Personnel planning in general practices: development and testing of a skill mix analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eitzen-Strassel, Juliane; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Derckx, Emmy W C C; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2014-09-18

    General practitioners (GPs) have to match patients' demands with the mix of their practice staff's competencies. However, apart from some general principles, there is little guidance on recruiting new staff. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a method which would allow GPs or practice managers to perform a skill mix analysis which would take into account developments in local demand. The method was designed with a stepwise method using different research strategies. Literature review took place to detect available methods that map, predict, or measure patients' demands or needs and to fill the contents of the skill mix analysis. Focus groups and expert interviews were held both during the design process and in the first test stage. Both secondary data analysis as primary data collection took place to fill the contents of the tool. A pilot study in general practices tested the feasibility of the newly-developed method. The skill mix analysis contains both a quantitative and a qualitative part which includes the following sections: (i) an analysis of the current and the expected future demand; (ii) an analysis of the need to adjust skill mix; (iii) an overview about the functions of different provider disciplines; and (iv) a system to assess the input, assumed or otherwise, of each function concerning the 'catching up demand', the connection between supply and demand, and the introduction of new opportunities. The skill mix analysis shows an acceptable face and content validity and appears feasible in practice. The skill mix analysis method can be used as a basis to analyze and match, systematically, the demand for care and the supply of practice staff.

  10. Development and testing of commercial-scale, coal-fired combustion systems: Phase III. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Based on studies that indicated a large potential for significantly increased coal-firing in the commercial sector, the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsored a multi-phase development effort for advanced coal combustion systems. This Final Report presents the results of the last phase (Phase III) of a project for the development of an advanced coal-fired system for the commercial sector of the economy. The project performance goals for the system included dual-fuel capability (i.e., coal as primary fuel and natural gas as secondary fuel), combustion efficiency exceeding 99 percent, thermal efficiency greater than 80 percent, turndown of at least 3:1, dust-free and semi-automatic dry ash removal, fully automatic start-up with system purge and ignition verification, emissions performance exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and approaching those produced by oil-fired, Commercial-sized units, and reliability, safety, operability, maintainability, and service life comparable to oil-fired units. The program also involved a site demonstration at a large facility owned by Striegel Supply Company, a portion of which was leased to MTCI. The site, mostly warehouse space, was completely unheated and the advanced coal-fired combustion system was designed and sized to heat this space. Three different coals were used in the project, one low and one high sulfur pulverized Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, and a micronized low volatile, bituminous coal. The sorbents used were Pfizer dolomitic limestone and an Anvil lime. More than 100 hours of screening test`s were performed to characterize the system. The parameters examined included coal firing rate, excess air level, ash recycle rate, coal type, dolomitic limestone feed rate, and steam injection rate. These tests indicated that some additional modifications for coal burning in the system were required.

  11. Development and testing of commercial-scale, coal-fired combustion systems: Phase III. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Based on studies that indicated a large potential for significantly increased coal-firing in the commercial sector, the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsored a multi-phase development effort for advanced coal combustion systems. This Final Report presents the results of the last phase (Phase III) of a project for the development of an advanced coal-fired system for the commercial sector of the economy. The project performance goals for the system included dual-fuel capability (i.e., coal as primary fuel and natural gas as secondary fuel), combustion efficiency exceeding 99 percent, thermal efficiency greater than 80 percent, turndown of at least 3:1, dust-free and semi-automatic dry ash removal, fully automatic start-up with system purge and ignition verification, emissions performance exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and approaching those produced by oil-fired, Commercial-sized units, and reliability, safety, operability, maintainability, and service life comparable to oil-fired units. The program also involved a site demonstration at a large facility owned by Striegel Supply Company, a portion of which was leased to MTCI. The site, mostly warehouse space, was completely unheated and the advanced coal-fired combustion system was designed and sized to heat this space. Three different coals were used in the project, one low and one high sulfur pulverized Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, and a micronized low volatile, bituminous coal. The sorbents used were Pfizer dolomitic limestone and an Anvil lime. More than 100 hours of screening test`s were performed to characterize the system. The parameters examined included coal firing rate, excess air level, ash recycle rate, coal type, dolomitic limestone feed rate, and steam injection rate. These tests indicated that some additional modifications for coal burning in the system were required.

  12. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... pig. The requirements for general safety for inactivated influenza vaccine shall not be considered...

  13. The WISC-III and Raven Coloured Progressive Matrices Test: A Pilot Study of Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluever, Raymond C.; And Others

    The relationship between scores on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM) scores and subtest scores and IQs from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III) was studied for 28 children aged 6 to 11 years. Subjects had been referred to a university assessment center because they were believed to have exceptional learning…

  14. Test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III, dyskinesia scales, and timed motor tests in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: an argument against multiple baseline assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metman, Leo Verhagen; Myre, Brian; Verwey, Niek; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Arzbaecher, Jean; Sierens, Diane; Bakay, Roy

    2004-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The secondary objective was to assess the intra-rater reliability of standard timed motor tests and dyskinesia scales to determine the necessity of multiple baseline core evaluations before surgery for PD. We carried out two standardized preoperative core evaluations of patients with advanced PD scheduled to undergo deep brain stimulation. Patients were examined in the defined off and on conditions by the same rater. UPDRS-III, timed tests, and dyskinesia scores from the two evaluations were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Differences in UPDRS-III scores for the two visits were clinically and statistically nonsignificant, and the ICC was 0.9. Similarly, there were no significant differences in timed motor tests or dyskinesia scores, with a median ICC of 0.8. The results indicate that previous findings of high test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III in early untreated PD patients can now be extended to those with advanced disease complicated by motor fluctuations. In addition, test-retest reliability of dyskinesia scales and timed motor tests was high. Taken together, these findings challenge the need for multiple baseline assessments as currently stipulated in core assessment protocols for surgical intervention in PD.

  15. Propriedades psicométricas dos itens do teste WISC-III Propiedades psicométricas de los ítenes del subtest WISC-III Psychometric properties of WISC-III items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Marques de Figueiredo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available O aperfeiçoamento de um teste se dá através da seleção, substituição ou revisão de itens, e quando um item é analisado, aumenta a validade e precisão do teste. Este artigo trata da apresentação dos resultados relativos às propriedades psicométricas dos itens dos subtestes do WISC-III, referentes a dificuldade, discriminação e validade. O WISC-III é um instrumento amplamente utilizado no contexto da avaliação da inteligência, e conhecer a qualidade dos itens é essencial ao profissional que administra o teste. As análises foram efetuadas com base nas pontuações de 801 protocolos do teste, aplicados por ocasião da pesquisa de adaptação a um contexto brasileiro. As análises mostraram que os itens adaptados apresentaram características psicométricas adequadas, possibilitando a utilização do instrumento como meio confiável de diagnóstico.El perfeccionamiento de un teste ocurre por la selección, sustitución o revisión de ítenes y, cuando un item es analisado, aumenta la validez y fiabilidad del teste. Ese artículo trata de la presentación de los resultados relativos a las propiedades psicométricas de los ítenes del subtest WISC-III, referentes a la dificultad, a la discriminación y a la validez. El WISC-III es un instrumento muy utilizado en el contexto de la evaluación de la inteligencia, y conocer a la calidad de los ítenes es esencial al profesional que administra el teste. Los análisis fueron efectuados con base el los puntajes de 801 protocolos de registro del teste, aplicados por ocasión de encuesta de estandarización a un contexto brasileño. Los análisis enseñaron que los ítenes adaptados apuntaron características psicométricas adecuadas, permitiendo la utilización del instrumento como medio confiable de diagnóstico.The improvement of the quality of items by selection, substitution and review will increase a test's validity and reliability. Current essay will present results referring to

  16. Norm comparisons of the Spanish-language and English-language WAIS-III: Implications for clinical assessment and test adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funes, Cynthia M; Rodriguez, Juventino Hernandez; Lopez, Steven Regeser

    2016-12-01

    This study provides a systematic comparison of the norms of 3 Spanish-language Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales (WAIS-III) batteries from Mexico, Spain, and Puerto Rico, and the U.S. English-language WAIS-III battery. Specifically, we examined the performance of the 4 normative samples on 2 identical subtests (Digit Span and Digit Symbol-Coding) and 1 nearly identical subtest (Block Design). We found that across most age groups the means associated with the Spanish-language versions of the 3 subtests were lower than the means of the U.S. English-language version. In addition, we found that for most age ranges the Mexican subsamples scored lower than the Spanish subsamples. Lower educational levels of Mexicans and Spaniards compared to U.S. residents are consistent with the general pattern of findings. These results suggest that because of the different norms, applying any of the 3 Spanish-language versions of the WAIS-III generally risks underestimating deficits, and that applying the English-language WAIS-III norms risks overestimating deficits of Spanish-speaking adults. There were a few exceptions to these general patterns. For example, the Mexican subsample ages 70 years and above performed significantly better on the Digit Symbol and Block Design than did the U.S. and Spanish subsamples. Implications for the clinical assessment of U.S. Spanish-speaking Latinos and test adaptation are discussed with an eye toward improving the clinical care for this community. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Test of the child/adolescent Rome III criteria: agreement with physician diagnosis and daily symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, M A L; Squires, M; Blois-Martin, N; Leiby, A; Langseder, A

    2013-04-01

    Establishment of the Rome criteria advanced diagnosis of children with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. The criteria were overhauled in 2006, but these revisions were never systematically tested. The aim of the current study was to assess psychometric properties of the childhood Rome III criteria and determine how well they agree with physician diagnoses and daily symptoms. A total of N = 135 families from two pediatric gastroenterology clinics completed the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms (QPGS- RIII). Half of the families completed the QPGS-RIII again in 2 weeks, the other half completed 2-week daily diaries. Children above the age of 10 also provided data (N = 64). Physician diagnoses were obtained from the medical records. Diagnoses: The most common diagnoses per child/parent report were Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS; 43-47%) and Abdominal Migraine (26-36%). The most frequent physician diagnoses were Functional Constipation (FC; 53%) and Functional Abdominal Pain (FAP; 29%). Reliability: Moderate to substantial agreement was found between baseline and 2-week follow-up for most diagnoses (kappa = .19-.78) and between parent and child reports (kappa = -.04-.64). There was low agreement between QPGS-RIII and physician diagnosis (kappa =-.02-.34) as well as diaries (kappa = .06-30). The Rome criteria have reasonable test-retest reliability and seem to be inclusive, as the majority of children obtain a diagnosis. However, validity is still an issue: The Rome criteria do not overlap well with physician diagnosis or daily symptoms. These issues will need to be addressed in future revisions of the Rome criteria. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Modelling of FEBEX In-Situ Test. Task1 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E.E.; Alcoverro, J. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)] (comps.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 1 of DECOVALEX III was conceived as a benchmark exercise supported by all field and laboratory data generated during the performance of the FEBEX experiment designed to study thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical processes of the buffer and rock in the near field. The task was defined as a series of three successive blind prediction exercises (Parts A, B and C), which cover the behaviour of both the rock and bentonite barrier. Research teams participating in the FEBEX task were given, for each of the three parts, a set of field and laboratory data theoretically sufficient to generate a proper model and were asked to submit predictions, at given locations and time, for some of the measured variables. The merits and limitations of different modeling approaches were therefore established. The teams could perform additional calculations, once the actual 'solution' was disclosed. Final calculations represented the best approximation that a given team could provide, always within the general time constraints imposed by the General DECOVALEX III Organization. This report presents the works performed for Task 1. It contains the case definitions and evaluations of modelling results for Part A, B and C, and the overall evaluation of the works performed. The report is completed by a CD-ROM containing a set of final reports provided by the modeling teams participating in each of the three parts defined. These reports provide the necessary details to better understand the nature of the blind or final predictions included in this report. The report closes with a set of conclusions, which provides a summary of the main findings and highlights the lessons learned, some of which were summarized below. The best predictions of the water inflow into the excavated tunnel are found when the hydro geological model is properly calibrated on the basis of other known flow measurements in the same area. The particular idealization of the rock mass (equivalent

  19. Bank liquidity-stress testing and Basel III implementation in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Adam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the possibility of the implementation of the Basel III, namely the rules of banking sector. The population analyzed in this study comprises the 120 banks in Indonesia. The result shows that Indonesian banking sector has tremendous value if the Basel III standards is applied in Indonesia. Bank BCA has the lowest values with a score of 8.89 while Bank BRI has the highest value with a score of 9.68. This study concludes that the standard rules of Basel III would be able to be implemented in Indonesia.

  20. The influence of IQ stratification on WAIS-III/WMS-III FSIQ-general memory index discrepancy base-rates in the standardization sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, K A; Tulsky, D S

    2001-11-01

    Since memory performance expectations may be IQ-based, unidirectional base rate data for IQ-Memory Score discrepancies are provided in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual. The utility of these data partially rests on the assumption that discrepancy base rates do not vary across ability levels. FSIQ stratified base rate data generated from the standardization sample, however, demonstrate substantial variability across the IQ spectrum. A superiority of memory score over FSIQ is typical at lower IQ levels, whereas the converse is true at higher IQ levels. These data indicate that the use of IQ-memory score unstratified "simple difference" tables could lead to erroneous conclusions for clients with low or high IQ. IQ stratified standardization base rate data are provided as a complement to the "predicted difference" method detailed in the Technical Manual.

  1. A Review and Comparison of the Reliabilities of the MMPI-2, MCMI-III, and PAI Presented in Their Respective Test Manuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Edward A.; Streiner, David L.; Walfish, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a review of the literature to determine the most frequently used personality tests. Based on this review, internal consistency and test-retest reliability coefficients from the test manuals for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), and Personality…

  2. A Review and Comparison of the Reliabilities of the MMPI-2, MCMI-III, and PAI Presented in Their Respective Test Manuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Edward A.; Streiner, David L.; Walfish, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a review of the literature to determine the most frequently used personality tests. Based on this review, internal consistency and test-retest reliability coefficients from the test manuals for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), and Personality…

  3. Acceptance of genetic testing in a general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Hakonen, A; Hietala, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze effects of age, education and gender on acceptance of genetic testing. Subjects, n = 1967 aged 15-69, were a stratified random sample of the Finnish population. One thousand, one hundred and sixty nine subjects, 530 men and 639 women, returned the questionnaire....... The majority of the respondents approved of the availability of genetic testing. Young, aged 15-24, were more favourable towards testing and more willing to undergo suggested tests, but they were also more worried than others about the misuse of test results. Men aged 45-69 with only basic education were more...... in favour of mandatory genetic testing than other respondents. Respondents with university education were more critical towards genetic testing and expressed their worry about eugenics more often than other education groups. In conclusion, there are age, education and gender related differences...

  4. English Language Proficiency and Test Performance: An Evaluation of Bilingual Students with the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene; Ortiz, Samuel O.; Flanagan, Dawn P.; Chaplin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the findings of an exploratory empirical study that investigated the relationship between English Language Proficiency (ELP) on performance on the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities-Third Edition (WJ III) when administered in English to bilingual students of varying levels of ELP. Sixty-one second-grade…

  5. General-Purpose Heat Source Development: Safety Test Program. Postimpact evaluation, Design Iteration Test 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; George, T.G.

    1984-07-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source(GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ decay to thermoelectric elements. Because of the inevitable return of certain aborted missions, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive both re-entry and Earth impact. The Design Iteration Test (DIT) series is part of an ongoing test program. In the third test (DIT-3), a full GPHS module was impacted at 58 m/s and 930/sup 0/C. The module impacted the target at an angle of 30/sup 0/ to the pole of the large faces. The four capsules used in DIT-3 survived impact with minimal deformation; no internal cracks other than in the regions indicated by Savannah River Plant (SRP) preimpact nondestructive testing were observed in any of the capsules. The 30/sup 0/ impact orientation used in DIT-3 was considerably less severe than the flat-on impact utilized in DIT-1 and DIT-2. The four capsules used in DIT-1 survived, while two of the capsules used in DIT-2 breached; a small quantity (approx. = 50 ..mu..g) of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ was released from the capsules breached in the DIT-2 impact. All of the capsules used in DIT-1 and DIT-2 were severely deformed and contained large internal cracks. Postimpact analyses of the DIT-3 test components are described, with emphasis on weld structure and the behavior of defects identified by SRP nondestructive testing.

  6. 21 CFR 352.72 - General testing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... minimally; always tans well (moderate brown) (normal). V—Rarely burns; tans profusely (dark brown... advance by the investigator. From this panel, at least 20 subjects must produce valid data for analysis... exposure. (i) Rejection of test data. Test data shall be rejected if the exposure series fails to elicit...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1773-99 - Test sequence; general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... required for fuel-flexible and dual-fuel vehicles when operating on gasoline. Natural gas, hybrid electric and diesel-fueled vehicles shall also be exempt from 50 °F testing. (3) The following schedule... vehicle shall be approximately level during all phases of the test sequence to prevent abnormal fuel...

  8. 30 CFR 28.41 - Testing requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....41 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FUSES FOR USE WITH DIRECT CURRENT IN PROVIDING SHORT-CIRCUIT PROTECTION FOR TRAILING CABLES IN COAL MINES Construction, Performance, and Testing Requirements §...

  9. TECHNICAL REPORT ON STANDARDIZATION OF THE GENERAL APTITUDE TEST BATTERY, GENERAL WORKING POPULATION NORMS STUDY FOR PUERTO RICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    THE POSSIBILITY OF PREDICTIVE ERROR WHEN APPLYING U.S. MAINLAND NORMS FOR THE GENERAL APTITUDE TEST BATTERY TO THE EMPLOYMENT COUNSELING AND SELECTION PROCESS IN PUERTO RICO, PROMPTED A STUDY TO ESTABLISH LOCAL NORMS FOR THE SPANISH LANGUAGE VERSION, BATERIA GENERAL DE PRUEBAS DE APTITUD. A STRATIFIED QUOTA SAMPLE OF 1,500 PERSONS WAS SELECTED…

  10. Reading Test-taking Strategies in General Training IELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahede Nosrati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The significance of gaining a better understanding of how test-taking strategies are used has been recognized by researchers. Considering this fact, this study aimed at investigating the test-taking strategies which were employed by IELTS candidates in reading comprehension test. Besides, it tried to take into account the differences among strategies used for different tasks. In order to gather data, two instruments were employed: the think-aloud protocol, and an IELTS reading test. The obtained data were analyzed and interpreted qualitatively by the researcher. The findings indicated that candidates employed 15 different strategies which were categorized in 3 stages, pre-reading, reading, and post-reading stages. Furthermore, it was revealed that test-takers used certain strategies differently, depending on the type of the task. The findings provide a better understanding of strategy use among IELTS candidates and help teachers to improve their approaches toward teaching and learning goals. Keywords: Test-taking Strategy, Test-taker, Reading Comprehension, Language Learning Strategy, IELTS

  11. Development of deterioration models and tests of structural materials for nuclear containment structures(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The nuclear containment structures are very important infrastructures which require much cost for construction and maintenance. If these structures lose their functions and do not ensure their safety, great losses of human lives and properties will result. Therefore, the nuclear containment structures should secure appropriate safety and functions during these service lives. The nuclear concrete structures start to experience deterioration due to severe environmental condition, even though the concrete structures exhibit generally superior durability. It is, therefore, necessary to take appropriate actions at each stage of planning, design and construction to secure safety and functionability. Thorough examination of deterioration mechanism and comprehensive tests have been conducted to explore the durability characteristics of nuclear concrete structures. 88 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs. (Author)

  12. Detailed technical plan for Test Program Element-III (TPE-III) of the first wall/blanket shield engineering test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.

    1982-03-01

    The experimental requirements, test-bed design, and computational requirements are reviewed and updated. Next, in Sections 3, 4 and 5, the experimental plan, instrumentation, and computer plan, respectively, are described. Finally, Section 6 treats other considerations, such as personnel, outside participation, and distribution of results.

  13. 40 CFR 92.123 - Test procedure; general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.... Rust inhibitors and lubrication additives may be used, up to the levels recommended by the...

  14. A general detector testing system using cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Chengguang

    2013-01-01

    A cosmic ray hodoscope with two-dimensional spacial sensitivity and good time resolution has been developed. The system is designed to use the cosmic muons as probes to test the performances of charged particle sensitive detectors. This paper will present the structure of this system, the timing calibration and the resulted performance of this system. The results of the test of the prototype electron detector for LHAASO project are presented as well.

  15. Test Administrator's Gender Affects Female and Male Students' Self-Estimated Verbal General Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortner, Tuulia M.; Vormittag, Isabella

    2011-01-01

    Effects of test administrator's gender on test takers' self-estimated verbal general knowledge and de facto verbal general knowledge were investigated. Based on three theories previously applied in research dealing with the effects of test administrator's ethnicity, it was expected male and female test takers to show higher scores under female…

  16. General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test Program. Bullet/fragment test series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, T.G.; Tate, R.E.; Axler, K.M.

    1985-05-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide power for space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. Because a launch-pad or post-launch explosion is always possible, we need to determine the ability of GPHS fueled clads within a module to survive fragment impact. The bullet/fragment test series, part of the Safety Verification Test Plan, was designed to provide information on clad response to impact by a compact, high-energy, aluminum-alloy fragment and to establish a threshold value of fragment energy required to breach the iridium cladding. Test results show that a velocity of 555 m/s (1820 ft/s) with an 18-g bullet is at or near the threshold value of fragment velocity that will cause a clad breach. Results also show that an exothermic Ir/Al reaction occurs if aluminum and hot iridium are in contact, a contact that is possible and most damaging to the clad within a narrow velocity range. The observed reactions between the iridium and the aluminum were studied in the laboratory and are reported in the Appendix.

  17. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A(*).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Tim; Broderick, Avery E; Plewa, Philipp M; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-22

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A^{*} (Sgr A^{*}) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A^{*} with an uncertainty of ∼1.5  μas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  18. A Total Generalized Optimal Velocity Model and Its Numerical Tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen-xing; LIU Yun-cai

    2008-01-01

    A car-following model named total generalized optimal velocity model (TGOVM) was developed with a consideration of an arbitrary number of preceding vehicles before current one based on analyzing the previous models such as optimal velocity model (OVM), generalized OVM (GOVM) and improved GOVM (IGOVM). This model describes the physical phenomena of traffic flow more exactly and realistically than previous models. Also the performance of this model was checked out by simulating the acceleration and de- celeration process for a small delay time. On a single circular lane, the evolution of the traffic congestion was studied for a different number of headways and relative velocities of the preceding vehicles being taken into account. The simulation results show that TGOVM is reasonable and correct.

  19. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Johannsen, Tim; Plewa, Philipp M; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A* with an uncertainty of ~1.5 uas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  20. A new general pressure-analysis procedure for slug tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, A.M.M.; Onur, M.; Reynolds, A.C. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States))

    1993-12-01

    A new analysis procedure for determining formation flow capacity and skin factor from slug-test data is presented. The procedure arises from exact deconvolution equations that convert measured slug-test pressure data into equivalent pressure and pressure-derivative responses that would be obtained if the well were produced at a constant surface flow rate. The converted data then can be analyzed by use of existing wellbore-storage and skin type curves for the particular reservoir or well model represented by the field data. For cases where the slug test is short, the authors show that flow rate convolution can be incorporated to improve analysis reliability. The analysis procedures do not require direct knowledge of the sandface flow rate.

  1. 77 FR 11651 - Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... results, the agency is pursuing the development of an HIII-10C modification consisting of an abdominal.... Executive Summary II. Background a. 2005 NPRM b. Developments Since 2005 c. Summary of Decision III. Summary... 1. Labeling the Dummy as a ``Ten Year Old'' 2. Best Practices for Belt Routing 3. Abdominal...

  2. ROSA-III base test series for a large break loss-of-coolant accident in a boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasaka, K.; Abe, N.; Anoda, Y.; Koizumi, Y.; Shiba, M.

    1982-05-01

    The rig of safety assessment (ROSA)-III facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) boiling water reactor (BWR) system with an electrically heated core designed for integral loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and emergency core cooling system (ECCS) tests. It is confirmed from the experimental results obtained so far that the ROSA-III test facility can simulate major aspects of a BWR LOCA, such as boiling transition by lowering of the mixture level in the core, rewetting by the lower plenum flashing, and final quenching by the ECCS. The overall agreement between the calculated results by the RELAP5/ MOD0 code and the experimental results is good; however, the calculated lower plenum flashing rewetted the whole core and the calculated cladding temperature considerably underpredicts the measured value at the upper part of the core.

  3. 76 FR 56661 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps, General...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... energy efficiency, energy use, or estimated annual operating cost of a covered product during a... test procedures and offer the public an opportunity to present oral and written comments on them. (42 U...''), 10 CFR 430.23 (``Test procedures for the measurement of energy and water consumption''), 10 CFR...

  4. [The general practitioner and abnormal liver function tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, R

    1997-09-01

    In case of abnormal liver function tests, it's necessary to distinguish different situations, starting from this first data. We will successively consider: the high and moderate acute increases of aminotransferase, the chronic increases of aminotransferase, the isolated cholestase picture and the isolated increases of gamma GT or of bilirubine. We will finish with a partial survey about drug-induced liver diseases.

  5. 40 CFR 1060.501 - General testing provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... needed to measure emissions. (c) The specification for gasoline to be used for testing is given in 40 CFR... that requires a blend of gasoline and ethanol, blend this grade of gasoline with fuel-grade ethanol... 10.0 liters of fuel-grade ethanol with 90.0 liters of gasoline, you may assume the resulting...

  6. Bayesian inference and life testing plans for generalized exponential distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUNDU; Debasis; PRADHAN; Biswabrata

    2009-01-01

    Recently generalized exponential distribution has received considerable attentions.In this paper,we deal with the Bayesian inference of the unknown parameters of the progressively censored generalized exponential distribution.It is assumed that the scale and the shape parameters have independent gamma priors.The Bayes estimates of the unknown parameters cannot be obtained in the closed form.Lindley’s approximation and importance sampling technique have been suggested to compute the approximate Bayes estimates.Markov Chain Monte Carlo method has been used to compute the approximate Bayes estimates and also to construct the highest posterior density credible intervals.We also provide different criteria to compare two different sampling schemes and hence to ?nd the optimal sampling schemes.It is observed that ?nding the optimum censoring procedure is a computationally expensive process.And we have recommended to use the sub-optimal censoring procedure,which can be obtained very easily.Monte Carlo simulations are performed to compare the performances of the different methods and one data analysis has been performed for illustrative purposes.

  7. Estimating the Probability of Being the Best System: A Generalized Method and Nonparametric Hypothesis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Mendenhall , and Sheaffer [25]. For the remainder of this paper, however, we will make use of the Wilcoxon rank sum test for purposes of comparison with the...B. W. Silverman, Density Estimation for Statistics and Data Analysis, Chapman & Hall/CRC, 1986, p. 48. [25] D. D. Wackerly, W. Mendenhall III and R

  8. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE....1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the qualification...

  9. Robust Tests for Heteroscedasticity in a general Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Lebreton, Marie; Peguin-Feissolle, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This article studies the world stock markets integration for developed and emerging countries and investigate its effects on diversification. We test a partially segmented ICAPM using an asymmetric multivariate GARCH-in-Mean specification. Our results support the integration hypothesis and suggest that investors from all studied countries could expect statistically significant benefits from international diversification but that gains are considerably larger for emerging markets.

  10. Implementation of immunochemical faecal occult blood test in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Søgaard; Bro, Flemming; Hornung, Nete

    2016-01-01

    anvendelsen af immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) i almen praksis. iFOBT detekterer humant globin i fæces og indikerer gastrointestinal blødning. Studiet udgør en del af et ph.d.-studie, der bidrager med ny viden til at optimere udredningen af patienter med tarmkræft. Der er et stort behov...

  11. Testing a General Model on the Fear of Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    1991b) which was later reduced to three categories: 18 to 25, 26 to 35, and over 35. Cow unity Incivility Community incivility was measured by having... work of LaGrange, et al. (1992), who informed the necessary link between perceived incivilities , perceived crime seriousness, and fear. The test of the...the differential effects of victimization, perceived community incivilities , and perceived crime seriousness in the neighborhood on fear of crime at two

  12. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume III - Groundwater Recharge and Discharge Data Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    Volume III of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the data covering groundwater recharge and discharge. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  13. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  14. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  15. Quantitative test of general theories of the intrinsic laser linewidth

    CERN Document Server

    Cerjan, Alexander; Chong, Yidong; Johnson, Steven G; Stone, A Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We perform a first-principles calculation of the quantum-limited laser linewidth, testing the predictions of recently developed theories of the laser linewidth based on fluctuations about the known steady-state laser solutions against traditional forms of the Schawlow-Townes linewidth. The numerical study is based on finite-difference time-domain simulations of the semiclassical Maxwell-Bloch lasing equations, augmented with Langevin force terms, and thus includes the effects of dispersion, losses due to the open boundary of the laser cavity, and non-linear coupling between the amplitude and phase fluctuations ($\\alpha$ factor). We find quantitative agreement between the numerical results and the predictions of the noisy steady-state ab initio laser theory (N-SALT), both in the variation of the linewidth with output power, as well as the emergence of side-peaks due to relaxation oscillations.

  16. Management of stage III colon cancer in the elderly: Practice patterns and outcomes in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Shaila J; Nanji, Sulaiman; Brennan, Kelly; Karim, Safiya; Patel, Sunil V; Biagi, James J; Booth, Christopher M

    2017-08-01

    Clinical trials have established surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) as the standard management for stage III colon cancer; however, the extent to which these results apply to elderly patients in routine practice is unclear. This article describes the management and outcomes of elderly patients with stage III colon cancer. All cases of surgically resected colon cancer from 2002 to 2008 were identified with the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry. Pathology reports were obtained for a random sample (25% of all cases); those with stage III disease constituted the study population. The utilization of ACT, cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) in elderly patients (≥70 years) and nonelderly patients (colon cancer do not receive ACT. Although the effect size is smaller than that in younger patients, ACT is associated with improved long-term survival. Cancer 2017;123:2840-49. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  17. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn’t depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M. Robitaille, according to which the 2.7 K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7 K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein’s theory.

  18. A possible new test of general relativity with Juno

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, L

    2013-01-01

    The expansion in multipoles of the gravitational potential of a rotating body affects the orbital motion of a test particle orbiting it with long-term perturbations both at a classical and at a relativistic level. In this preliminary sensitivity analysis, we show that, for the first time, the J2 c^-2 effects could be measured by the ongoing Juno mission in the gravitational field of Jupiter during its yearlong science phase (10 November 2016-5 October 2017) thanks to its high eccentricity (e=0.947) and to the huge oblateness of Jupiter (J2=1.47 10^-2). The semi-major axis a and the perijove \\omega\\ of Juno are expected to be shifted by \\Delta a =700-900 m and \\Delta\\omega = 50-60 milliarcseconds, respectively, over 1-2 yr. A numerical analysis shows also that the expected J2c^-2 range-rate signal for Juno should be as large as 280 microns per second during a typical 6 h pass at its closest approach. Independent analyses previously performed by other researchers about the measurability of the Lense-Thirring ef...

  19. Generality of leaf trait relationships: A test across six biomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, P.B. [Univ. of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources; Ellsworth, D.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Walters, M.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Vose, J.M. [Forest Service, Otto, NC (United States). Coweeta Hydrological Lab.; Gresham, C. [Clemson Univ., Georgetown, SC (United States). Baruch Forest Inst.; Volin, J.C. [Florida Atlantic Univ., Davie, FL (United States). Div. of Science; Bowman, W.D. [Inst. of Arctic and Alpine Research, Boulder, CO (United States). Mountain Research Station]|[Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Evolutionary, Population, and Organismic Biology

    1999-09-01

    Convergence in interspecific leaf trait relationships across diverse taxonomic groups and biomes would have important evolutionary and ecological implications. Such convergence has been hypothesized to result from trade-offs that limit the combination of plant traits for any species. Here the authors address this issue by testing for biome differences in the slope and intercept of interspecific relationships among leaf traits: longevity, net photosynthetic capacity (A{sub max}), leaf diffusive conductance (G{sub S}), specific leaf area (SLA), and nitrogen (N) status, for more than 100 species in six distinct biomes of the Americas. The six biomes were: alpine tundra-subalpine forest ecotone, cold temperate forest-prairie ecotone, montane cool temperate forest, desert shrubland, subtropical forest, and tropical rain forest. Despite large differences in climate and evolutionary history, in all biomes mass-based leaf N (N{sub mass}), SLA, G{sub S}, and A{sub max} were positively related to one another and decreased with increasing leaf life span. The relationships between pairs of leaf traits exhibited similar slopes among biomes, suggesting a predictable set of scaling relationships among key leaf morphological, chemical, and metabolic traits that are replicated globally among terrestrial ecosystems regardless of biome or vegetation type. However, the intercept (i.e., the overall elevation of regression lines) of relationships between pairs of leaf traits usually differed among biomes. With increasing aridity across sites, species had greater A{sub max} for a given level of G{sub S} and lower SLA for any given leaf life span. Using principal components analysis, most variation among species was explained by an axis related to mass-based leaf traits (A{sub max}, N, and SLA) while a second axis reflected climate, G{sub S}, and other area-based leaf traits.

  20. Performance tests of an AGIPD 0.4 assembly at the beamline P10 of PETRA III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J.; Marras, A.; Klyuev, A.; Westermeier, F.; Trunk, U.; Graafsma, H.

    2013-06-01

    The Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD) is a novel detector system, currently under development by a collaboration of DESY, the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland, the University of Hamburg and the University of Bonn, and is primarily designed for use at the European XFEL. To verify key features of this detector, an AGIPD 0.4 test chip assembly was tested at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron at DESY. The test chip successfully imaged both the direct synchrotron beam and single 7.05 keV photons at the same time, demonstrating the large dynamic range required for XFEL experiments. X-ray scattering measurements from a test sample agree with standard measurements and show the chip's capability of observing dynamics at the microsecond time scale.

  1. Domain-General and Domain-Specific Creative-Thinking Tests: Effects of Gender and Item Content on Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.; Wu, Junbin

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the effects of gender and item content of domain-general and domain-specific creative-thinking tests on four subscale scores of creative-thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality, and elaboration). Chinese tenth-grade students (234 males and 244 females) participated in the study. Domain-general creative thinking was measured…

  2. Smoke Emission Tests on Series II and Series III Allison T56 Turboprop Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    Library Qantas Airways Limited Gas & Fuel Corporation of Vic, Manager Scientific Services SEC of Vic, Herman Research Laboratory, Library ■-WJMtfl’W...3. METHODS OF MEASURING SMOKE EMISSIONS 4. TESTS AT RICHMOND 5. RESULTS 6. DISCUSSION 6.1 Smoke Emission Tests 6.2 Fuel Analysis 7. CONCLUSIONS...tank for later analysis to determine physical and chemical properties, including aromatic content, of the fuel used during the tests, 5. RESULTS

  3. GALEN skin test study III: Minimum battery of test inhalent allergens needed in epidemiological studies in patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, P-J; Burbach, G; Heinzerling, L M

    2009-01-01

    Background: The number of allergens to be tested in order to identify sensitized patients is important in order to have the most cost-effective approach in epidemiological studies. Objective: To define the minimal number and the type of skin prick test (SPT) allergens required to identify a patient...... as sensitized using results of the new Pan-European GA(2)LEN skin prick test study. Method: In a large Pan-European multicenter (17 centers in 14 countries) patient based study, a standardized panel of 18 allergens has been prick tested using a standardized procedure. Conditional approach allowed to determine...... the allergens selection. Result: Among the 3034 patients involved, 1996 (68.2%) were sensitized to at least one allergen. Overall, eight allergens (grass pollen, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, birch pollen, cat dander, Artemisia, olive pollen, Blatella and Alternaria) allowed to identified more than 95...

  4. Quality assessment in in vivo NMR spectroscopy: III. Clinical test objects: design, construction, and solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J.; Keevil, S

    1995-01-01

    Based on the requirements of test protocols developed to evaluate clinical MRS single slice and volume localisation sequences, two clinical test objects, STO1 and STO2 have been developed. The properties of a range of potential construction materials have been assessed, demonstrating that the water...

  5. Aptitude Tests and Successful College Students: The Predictive Validity of the General Aptitude Test (GAT) in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb Hamad

    2015-01-01

    Aptitude tests should predict student success at the university level. This study examined the predictive validity of the General Aptitude Test (GAT) in Saudi Arabia. Data for 27420 students enrolled at Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University were analyzed. Of these students, 17565 were male students, and 9855 were female students. Multiple…

  6. Methodological factors in determining risk of dementia after TIA and stroke: (III) Applicability of cognitive tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendlebury, Sarah T; Klaus, Stephen P; Thomson, Ross J; Mehta, Ziyah; Wharton, Rose M; Rothwell, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cognitive assessment is recommended after stroke but there are few data on the applicability of short cognitive tests to the full spectrum of patients. We therefore determined the rates, causes and associates of untestability in a population-based study of all TIA and stroke. Methods Patients with TIA or stroke prospectively recruited (2002-2007) into the Oxford Vascular Study had ≥1 short cognitive test (mini-mental-state examination (MMSE), telephone interview of cognitive status (TICSM), Montreal cognitive assessment (MOCA), and abbreviated mental test score (AMTS)) at baseline and on follow-up to 5 years. Results Among 1097 consecutive assessed survivors (mean age/sd 74.8/12.1 years, 378 TIA), numbers testable with a short cognitive test at baseline, 1, 6, 12 and 60 months were 835/1097 (76%), 778/947 (82%), 756/857 (88%), 692/792 (87%) and 472/567 (83%) 88% (331/378) of assessed TIA patients were testable at baseline compared to only 46% (133/290) of major stroke (panarthria/hemiparesis=84 (32%), drowsiness=58 (22%) and acute confusion=11 (4%)) whereas sensory deficits caused relatively more problems with testing at later time points (24/63 (38%) at 5 years). Conclusions Substantial numbers of patients with TIA and stroke are untestable with short cognitive tests. Future studies should report data on untestable patients and those with problems with testing in whom the likelihood of dementia is high. PMID:26463688

  7. ITER ECRH Upper Launcher: Test plan for qualification of the Diamond Torus Window Prototype III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.schreck@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Aiello, Gaetano; Meier, Andreas; Strauss, Dirk [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gagliardi, Mario; Saibene, Gabriella [F4E, Antennas and Plasma Engineering, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Scherer, Theo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A qualification program for the ITER diamond torus window is being developed. • The testing program for the qualification of the bare diamond disk is defined. • First qualification tests show a very good quality of the diamond disk prototypes. - Abstract: The diamond window is part of the electron cyclotron heating upper launcher system for ITER. Together with the isolation valve it constitutes the primary vacuum boundary and it also acts as first tritium barrier. Therefore the window is classified as Safety/Protection Important Component (SIC/PIC) with the nuclear safety function “confinement”. As the diamond window unit is not entirely covered by standard codes, an ad-hoc qualification program needs to be defined, including analysis, prototyping and testing. In the framework of a contract with F4E, the test program for a diamond window prototype is being developed with the aim to prove its operability for normal, accidental and incidental conditions as identified in the ITER load specifications. Tests range from dielectric loss measurements for the bare Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond disk up to mechanical and vacuum tests for the complete window assembly. Finally mm-wave properties have to be characterized for the complete window. A clear definition of the testing requirements and of the acceptance criteria is necessary as well as a complete documentation of the process. This paper will present the development of the test plan for a window prototype, which is currently under manufacturing. First tests are directed to the characterization of the bare diamond disk with a focus on its dielectric properties.

  8. Stack test results at Phelps-Dodge Corporation, Ajo, Arizona. Volume III. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, J.

    1977-03-01

    Contents: Sampling schedules for simultaneous stack tests; Weight versus time curve for glass fiber filter; Sample calculation for statistical analysis; Individual process weight calculations; Individual filter, particulate and residue weight data.

  9. Head excursion of restrained human volunteers and hybrid III dummies in steady state rollover tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Edward; Hare, Barry; Hughes, Raymond; Lewis, Lance; Iiyama, Hiroshi; Curzon, Anne; Cooper, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    Seatbelts provide substantial benefits in rollover crashes, yet occupants still receive head and neck injuries from contacting the vehicle roof interior when the roof exterior strikes the ground. Prior research has evaluated rollover restraint performance utilizing anthropomorphic test devices (dummies), but little dynamic testing has been done with human volunteers to learn how they move during rollovers. In this study, the vertical excursion of the head of restrained dummies and human subjects was measured in a vehicle being rotated about its longitudinal roll axis at roll rates from 180-to-360 deg/sec and under static inversion conditions. The vehicle's restraint design was the commonly used 3-point seatbelt with continuous loop webbing and a sliding latch plate. This paper presents an analysis of the observed occupant motion and provides a comparison of dummy and human motion under similar test conditions. Thirty-five tests (eighteen static and seventeen dynamic) were completed using two different sizes of dummies and human subjects in both near and far-side roll directions. The research indicates that far-side rollovers cause the restrained test subjects to have greater head excursion than near-side rollovers, and that static inversion testing underestimates head excursion for far-side occupants. Human vertical head excursion of up to 200 mm was found at a roll rate of 220 deg/sec. Humans exhibit greater variability in head excursion in comparison to dummies. Transfer of seatbelt webbing through the latch plate did not correlate directly with differences in head excursion.

  10. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research: Phase II- Volume III-Truss Braced Wing Aeroelastic Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Allen, Timothy J.; Droney, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This Test Report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) Aeroelastic Test (Task 3.1) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, which includes the time period of February 2012 through June 2014. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Virginia Tech, and NextGen Aeronautics. The model was fabricated by NextGen Aeronautics and designed to meet dynamically scaled requirements from the sized full scale TBW FEM. The test of the dynamically scaled SUGAR TBW half model was broken up into open loop testing in December 2013 and closed loop testing from January 2014 to April 2014. Results showed the flutter mechanism to primarily be a coalescence of 2nd bending mode and 1st torsion mode around 10 Hz, as predicted by analysis. Results also showed significant change in flutter speed as angle of attack was varied. This nonlinear behavior can be explained by including preload and large displacement changes to the structural stiffness and mass matrices in the flutter analysis. Control laws derived from both test system ID and FEM19 state space models were successful in suppressing flutter. The control laws were robust and suppressed flutter for a variety of Mach, dynamic pressures, and angle of attacks investigated.

  11. Reliability of a Shuttle Run Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy Who Are Classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System Level III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bosma, Liesbeth; Takken, Tim

    2011-01-01

    For children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level III there is no running-based field test available to assess their cardiorespiratory fitness. The current study investigated whether a shuttle run test can be reliably (test-retest) performed in a group of children with…

  12. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  13. The dynamic version of the Bayley-III : Test results and the opinion of practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Linda; Ruiter, Selma; van der Meulen, Bieuwe; Ruijssenaars, Wied; Timmerman, Marieke

    2012-01-01

    When problems are suspected with the development of a child, developmental assessment is often carried out as part of the diagnostic process (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2001). The test scores obtained indicate the levels of functioning at that moment in time in the domains investigated. This in

  14. The dynamic version of the Bayley-III : Test results and the opinion of practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Linda; Ruiter, Selma; van der Meulen, Bieuwe; Ruijssenaars, Wied; Timmerman, Marieke

    2012-01-01

    When problems are suspected with the development of a child, developmental assessment is often carried out as part of the diagnostic process (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2001). The test scores obtained indicate the levels of functioning at that moment in time in the domains investigated. This in

  15. Standard and generalized McDonald-Kreitman test: a website to detect selection by comparing different classes of DNA sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Raquel; Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2008-07-01

    The McDonald and Kreitman test (MKT) is one of the most powerful and extensively used tests to detect the signature of natural selection at the molecular level. Here, we present the standard and generalized MKT website, a novel website that allows performing MKTs not only for synonymous and nonsynonymous changes, as the test was initially described, but also for other classes of regions and/or several loci. The website has three different interfaces: (i) the standard MKT, where users can analyze several types of sites in a coding region, (ii) the advanced MKT, where users can compare two closely linked regions in the genome that can be either coding or noncoding, and (iii) the multi-locus MKT, where users can analyze many separate loci in a single multi-locus test. The website has already been used to show that selection efficiency is positively correlated with effective population size in the Drosophila genus and it has been applied to include estimates of selection in DPDB. This website is a timely resource, which will presumably be widely used by researchers in the field and will contribute to enlarge the catalogue of cases of adaptive evolution. It is available at http://mkt.uab.es.

  16. The Study of Productivity Measurement and Incentive Methodology (Phase III - Paper Test). Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-14

    goal is to prepare an implementation report/ manual that guides others in execution of recommendations and alternative approaches identified in...be machine, assembly and/or test labor, a contractor can submit an IMIP to automate a manual process for simple, average and/or complex machine shop...structure has created the need to address both produccion and non-productxon costs. VAPO has, therefore, expanded the application of measurements

  17. Personnel planning in general practices: development and testing of a skill mix analysis method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eitzen-Strassel, J. von; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Derckx, E.W.C.C.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2014-01-01

    Background: General practitioners (GPs) have to match patients’ demands with the mix of their practice staff’s competencies. However, apart from some general principles, there is little guidance on recruiting new staff. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a method which would allow GPs

  18. Personnel planning in general practices : Development and testing of a skill mix analysis method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Eitzen-Strassel, J.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Derckx, E.W.C.C.; de Bakker, D.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) have to match patients’ demands with the mix of their practice staff’s competencies. However, apart from some general principles, there is little guidance on recruiting new staff. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a method which would allow GPs

  19. Comparing Recent Organizing Templates for Test Content between ACS Exams in General Chemistry and AP Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Two different versions of "big ideas" rooted content maps have recently been published for general chemistry. As embodied in the content outline from the College Board, one of these maps is designed to guide curriculum development and testing for advanced placement (AP) chemistry. The Anchoring Concepts Content Map for general chemistry…

  20. Comparing Recent Organizing Templates for Test Content between ACS Exams in General Chemistry and AP Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Two different versions of "big ideas" rooted content maps have recently been published for general chemistry. As embodied in the content outline from the College Board, one of these maps is designed to guide curriculum development and testing for advanced placement (AP) chemistry. The Anchoring Concepts Content Map for general chemistry…

  1. Comparing General and Special Education Preservice Teachers' Test Performance Using Traditional and Anchored Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, D. Michael; Langone, John

    2005-01-01

    Data comparing the effects of traditional lectures and instruction paired with video anchors on test scores of general education and special education preservice teachers are presented. The sample in both the experimental and control groups included a mixture of preservice teachers including those beginning a general education early childhood…

  2. Testing for Spanning with Futrures Contracts and Nontraded Assets : A General Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, T.E.; de Roon, F.A.; Werker, B.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper generalizes the notion of mean-variance spanning as de- ned in the seminal paper of Huberman & Kandel (1987) in three di- mensions.It is shown how regression techniques can be used to test for spanning for more general classes of utility functions, in case some as- sets are nontraded, and

  3. General considerations in testing and evaluating crop varieties for agroforestry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolita N. Ragus

    1993-01-01

    Introduction of new crops in agroforestry is often suggested as a way to improve productivity. This paper provides general guidelines in selecting companion plant combinations and general considerations in evaluating, testing, naming, maintaining genetic purity and distributing crop varieties to farmers.

  4. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. III.- September of 2001; Asesoria especializada en seguridad radiologica al hospital general Tula, PEMEX. III.- Septiembre de 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeles C, A.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J. A.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J

    2001-12-15

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  5. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, PEMEX. III.- September and October of 2002; Asesoria especializada en seguridad radiologica al hospital general Ciudad del Carmen, PEMEX. III.- Septiembre y Octubre de 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeles C, A.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J

    2003-02-15

    The Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  6. Disclosure of funding sources and conflicts of interest in phase III surgical trials: survey of ten general surgery journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridoux, Valérie; Moutel, Grégoire; Schwarz, Lilian; Michot, Francis; Herve, Christian; Tuech, Jean-Jacques

    2014-10-01

    Discussions regarding disclosure of funding sources and conflicts of interest (COI) in published peer-reviewed journal articles are becoming increasingly more common and intense. The aim of the present study was to examine whether randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in leading surgery journals report funding sources and COI. All articles reporting randomized controlled phase III trials published January 2005 through December 2010 were chosen for review from ten international journals. We evaluated the number of disclosed funding sources and COI, and the factors associated with such disclosures. From a review of 657 RCT from the ten journals, we discovered that presence or absence of a funding source and COI was disclosed by 47 % (309) and 25.1 % (165), respectively. Most articles in "International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)-affiliated journals" did not disclose COI. Disclosure of funding was associated with a journal impact factor >3 (51.7 vs 41.6 %; p journal being ICMJE-affiliated (49.3 vs 40 %; p journal not being affiliated with ICMJE (36.9 vs 21.3 %; p < 0.001). Of the published studies we investigated, over half did not disclose funding sources (i.e., whether or not there was a funding source), and almost three quarters did not disclose whether COI existed. Our findings suggest the need to adopt best current practices regarding disclosure of competing interests to fulfill responsibilities to readers and, ultimately, to patients.

  7. Considering the Use of General and Modified Assessment Items in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Adam E.; Albano, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    This article used several data sets from a large-scale state testing program to examine the feasibility of combining general and modified assessment items in computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for different groups of students. Results suggested that several of the assumptions made when employing this type of mixed-item CAT may not be met for…

  8. 42 CFR 84.206 - Particulate tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Particulate tests; respirators with filters... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.206 Particulate tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general. (a) Three respirators with cartridges containing, or...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1158 - Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with...-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1158 Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general. (a) Three respirators with cartridges containing,...

  10. General Multidecision Theory: Hypothesis Testing and Changepoint Detection with Applications to Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-19

    multiple DNA sequences Siegmund (2013). Motivated by these and other applications, we consider a general sequential detection problem where observations...Nikiforov, and M. Basseville, Sequential Analysis: Hypothe- sis Testing and Changepoint Detection ( Monographs on Statistics and Applied Probability...Hypothesis Testing and Changepoint Detection. Monographs on Statistics and Applied Probability. Chapman & Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, FL, 2014a. A. G

  11. 24 CFR 597.102 - Tests of pervasive poverty, unemployment and general distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tests of pervasive poverty... ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES: ROUND ONE DESIGNATIONS Area Requirements § 597.102 Tests of pervasive poverty, unemployment and general distress. (a) Pervasive poverty. Pervasive poverty shall be demonstrated by...

  12. 24 CFR 598.110 - Tests of pervasive poverty, unemployment and general distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tests of pervasive poverty... TWO AND THREE DESIGNATIONS Eligibility Requirements § 598.110 Tests of pervasive poverty, unemployment and general distress. (a) Pervasive poverty. Pervasive poverty is demonstrated by evidence that:...

  13. Reasoning Maps: A Generally Applicable Method for Characterizing Hypothesis-Testing Behaviour. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a generally applicable method for characterizing subjects' hypothesis-testing behaviour based on a synthesis that extends on previous work. Beginning with a transcript of subjects' speech and videotape of their actions, a Reasoning Map is created that depicts the flow of their hypotheses, tests, predictions, results, and…

  14. A multivariate family-based association test using generalized estimating equations : FBAT-GEE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, C; Silverman, SK; Xu, [No Value; Weiss, ST; Laird, NM

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we propose a multivariate extension of family-based association tests based on generalized estimating equations. The test can be applied to multiple phenotypes and to phenotypic data obtained in longitudinal studies without making any distributional assumptions for the phenotypic obser

  15. Reliability and Construct Validity of the 6-Minute Racerunner Test in Children and Youth with Cerebral Palsy, GMFCS Levels III and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Eline A M; Dallmeijer, Annet J; de Wolf, G Sander; Versteegt, Marieke; Schie, Petra E M van

    2017-05-01

    To determine the test-retest reliability and construct validity of a novel 6-Minute Racerunner Test (6MRT) in children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP) classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels III and IV. The racerunner is a step-propelled tricycle. The participants were 38 children and youth with CP (mean age 11 y 2 m, SD 3 y 7 m; GMFCS III, n = 19; IV, n = 19). Racerunner capability was determined as the distance covered during the 6MRT on three occasions. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), and smallest detectable differences (SDD) were calculated to assess test-retest reliability. The ICC for tests 2 and 3 were 0.89 (SDD 37%; 147 m) for children in level III and 0.91 for children in level IV (SDD 52%; 118 m). When the average of two separate test occasions was used, the SDDs were reduced to 26% (104 m; level III) and 37% (118 m; level IV). For tests 1 to 3, the mean distance covered increased from 345 m (SD 148 m) to 413 m (SD 137 m) for children in level III, and from 193 m (SD 100 m) to 239 m (SD 148 m) for children in level IV. Results suggest high test-retest reliability. However, large SDDs indicate that a single 6MRT measurement is only useful for individual evaluation when large improvements are expected, or when taking the average of two tests. The 6MRT discriminated the distance covered between children and youth in levels III and IV, supporting construct validity.

  16. Dual luminophor pressure-sensitive paint: III. Application to automotive model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouterman, Martin; Callis, James; Dalton, Larry; Khalil, Gamal; Mébarki, Youssef; Cooper, Kevin R.; Grenier, Michel

    2004-10-01

    Porphyrins play key roles in natural energy conversion systems, including photosynthesis and oxygen transport. Because of their chemical stability, unique optical properties and synthetic versatility, porphyrins are well suited as chemical sensors. One successful application is the use of platinum porphyrin (PtP) in pressure-sensitive paint (PSP). Oxygen in the film quenches luminescence, and oxygen pressure was initially monitored by measuring the ratio of I(wind-off)/I(wind-on). But this ratio is compromised if there is model motion and if the paint layer is inhomogeneous. Furthermore it requires careful monitoring and placement of light sources. Moreover, this method is seriously affected by temperature. The errors caused by model motion and temperature sensitivity are eliminated or greatly reduced using dual luminophor paint. This paper illustrates a successful application of a dual luminophor PSP in auto model testing. The PSP is made from an oxygen sensitive luminophor, Pt tetra(pentafluorophenyl)-porpholactone, which provides Isen, and Mg tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine, which provides temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) as the pressure-independent reference. The ratio PSP/TSP in the FIB polymer produced ideal PSP measurements with a very low-temperature dependence of -0.1% °C-1.

  17. Exploring the Incorporation of Executive Functions in Intelligence Testing: Factor Analysis of the WAIS-III and Traditional Tasks of Executive Functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aken, L. van; Kessels, R.P.C.; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Wiltink, M.; Heijden, P.T. van der; Egger, J.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – third edition (WAIS-III) and executive functions. The Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Stroop Color-Word Test were administered to a

  18. On the history of Ludwig von Bertalanffy's "General Systemology", and on its relationship to cybernetics - part III: convergences and divergences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drack, Manfred; Pouvreau, David

    2015-07-01

    Bertalanffy's so-called "general system theory" (GST) and cybernetics were and are often confused: this calls for clarification. In this article, Bertalanffy's conceptions and ideas are compared with those developed in cybernetics in order to investigate the differences and convergences. Bertalanffy was concerned with first order cybernetics. Nonetheless, his perspectivist epistemology is also relevant with regard to developments in second order cybernetics, and the latter is therefore also considered to some extent. W. Ross Ashby's important role as mediator between GST and cybernetics is analysed. The respective basic epistemological approaches, scientific approaches and inherent world views are discussed. We underline the complementarity of cybernetic and "organismic" trends in systems research within the unitary hermeneutical framework of "general systemology".

  19. The simulated features of heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation with a time-dependent drift model. III - General energy dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, M. S.; Le Roux, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The time-dependent cosmic-ray transport equation is solved numerically in an axially symmetric heliosphere. Gradient and curvature drifts are incorporated, together with an emulated wavy neutral sheet. This model is used to simulate heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation for the period 1985-1989 during which drifts are considered to be important. The general energy dependence of the modulation of Galactic protons is studied as predicted by the model for the energy range 1 MeV to 10 GeV. The corresponding instantaneous radial and latitudinal gradients are calculated, and it is found that, whereas the latitudinal gradients follow the trends in the waviness of the neutral sheet to a large extent for all energies, the radial gradients below about 200 MeV deviate from this general pattern. In particular, these gradients increase when the waviness decreases for the simulated period 1985-1987.3, after which they again follow the neutral sheet by increasing rapidly.

  20. A Score Type Test for General Autoregressive Models in Time Series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-hong Wu; Li-xing Zhu

    2007-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the goodness-of-fit test for the general autoregressive models in time series. By averaging for the weighted residuals, we construct a score type test which is asymptotically standard chi-squared under the null and has some desirable power properties under the alternatives. Specifically, the test is sensitive to alternatives and can detect the alternatives approaching, along a direction, the null at a rate that is arbitrarily close to n-1/2. Furthermore, when the alternatives are not directional, we construct asymptotically distribution-free maximin tests for a large class of alternatives. The performance of the tests is evaluated through simulation studies.

  1. Reference values for lung function tests: III. Carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (transfer factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neder J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO or transfer factor (TLCO is a particularly useful test of the appropriateness of gas exchange across the lung alveolocapillary membrane. With the purpose of establishing predictive equations for DLCO using a non-smoking sample of the adult Brazilian population, we prospectively evaluated 100 subjects (50 males and 50 females aged 20 to 80 years, randomly selected from more than 8,000 individuals. Gender-specific linear prediction equations were developed by multiple regression analysis with single breath (SB absolute and volume-corrected (VA DLCO values as dependent variables. In the prediction equations, age (years and height (cm had opposite effects on DLCOSB (ml min-1 mmHg-1, independent of gender (-0.13 (age + 0.32 (height - 13.07 in males and -0.075 (age + 0.18 (height + 0.20 in females. On the other hand, height had a positive effect on DLCOSB but a negative one on DLCOSB/VA (P<0.01. We found that the predictive values from the most cited studies using predominantly Caucasian samples were significantly different from the actually measured values (P<0.05. Furthermore, oxygen uptake at maximal exercise (VO2max correlated highly to DLCOSB (R = 0.71, P<0.001; this variable, however, did not maintain an independent role to explain the VO2max variability in the multiple regression analysis (P>0.05. Our results therefore provide an original frame of reference for either DLCOSB or DLCOSB/VA in Brazilian males and females aged 20 to 80 years, obtained from the standardized single-breath technique.

  2. Testing for sexually transmitted infections in general practice: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook Gary M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care is an important provider of sexual health care in England. We sought to explore the extent of testing for chlamydia and HIV in general practice and its relation to associated measures of sexual health in two contrasting geographical settings. Methods We analysed chlamydia and HIV testing data from 64 general practices and one genitourinary medicine (GUM clinic in Brent (from mid-2003 to mid-2006 and 143 general practices and two GUM clinics in Avon (2004. We examined associations between practice testing status, practice characteristics and hypothesised markers of population need (area level teenage conception rates and Index of Multiple Deprivation, IMD scores. Results No HIV or chlamydia testing was done in 19% (12/64 of general practices in Brent, compared to 2.1% (3/143 in Avon. In Brent, the mean age of general practitioners (GPs in Brent practices that tested for chlamydia or HIV was lower than in those that had not conducted testing. Practices where no HIV testing was done had slightly higher local teenage conception rates (median 23.5 vs. 17.4/1000 women aged 15-44, p = 0.07 and served more deprived areas (median IMD score 27.1 vs. 21.8, p = 0.05. Mean yearly chlamydia and HIV testing rates, in practices that did test were 33.2 and 0.6 (per 1000 patients aged 15-44 years in Brent, and 34.1 and 10.3 in Avon, respectively. In Brent practices only 20% of chlamydia tests were conducted in patients aged under 25 years, compared with 39% in Avon. Conclusions There are substantial geographical differences in the intensity of chlamydia and HIV testing in general practice. Interventions to facilitate sexually transmitted infection and HIV testing in general practice are needed to improve access to effective sexual health care. The use of routinely-collected laboratory, practice-level and demographic data for monitoring sexual health service provision and informing service planning should be more widely evaluated.

  3. Support for the revocation of general safety test regulations in biologics license applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dana M; Thorn, Jennifer M; Arch-Douglas, Katherine; Sperry, Justin B; Thompson, Bruce; Davis, Heather L; McCluskie, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently removed the requirement for a General Safety Test (GST) for biologics in the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 610.11). The GST, as well as abnormal toxicity (European Pharmacopeia) and innocuity tests (World Health Organization), were designed to test for extraneous toxic contaminants on each product lot intended for human use. Tests require one-week observations for general health and weight following injection of specified volumes of product batches into guinea pigs and mice. At the volumes specified, dose-related toxicity may result when the product is pharmacologically active in rodents. With vaccines, required doses may be > 3 logs higher than intended human dose on a weight-adjusted basis and if an immune modulatory adjuvant is included, systemic immune hyperactivation may cause toxicity. Herein, using the CpG/alum adjuvant combination we evaluated the different test protocols and showed their unsuitability for this adjuvant combination.

  4. Classical Tests of General Relativity: Brane-World Sun from Minimal Geometric Deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Casadio, Roberto; da Rocha, Roldao

    2015-01-01

    We consider a solution of the effective four-dimensional brane-world equations, obtained from the General Relativistic Schwarzschild metric via the principle of Minimal Geometric Deformation, and investigate the corresponding signatures stemming from the possible existence of a warped extra dimension. In particular, we derive bounds on an extra-dimensional parameter, closely related with the fundamental gravitational length, from the experimental results of the classical tests of General Relativity in the Solar system.

  5. Classical tests of general relativity: Brane-world Sun from minimal geometric deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, R.; Ovalle, J.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-05-01

    We consider a solution of the effective four-dimensional brane-world equations, obtained from the general relativistic Schwarzschild metric via the principle of minimal geometric deformation, and investigate the corresponding signatures stemming from the possible existence of a warped extra-dimension. In particular, we derive bounds on an extra-dimensional parameter, closely related with the fundamental gravitational length, from the experimental results of the classical tests of general relativity in the Solar system.

  6. Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part III: Sensitivity to Modeling Assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Laura D.; Randall, David A.

    1996-03-01

    The inclusion of cloud microphysical processes in general circulation models makes it possible to study the multiple interactions among clouds, the hydrological cycle, and radiation. The gaps between the temporal and spatial scales at which such cloud microphysical processes work and those at which general circulation models presently function force climate modelers to crudely parameterize and simplify the various interactions among the different water species (namely, water vapor, cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow) and to use adjustable parameters to which large-scale models can be highly sensitive. Accordingly, the authors have investigated the sensitivity of the climate, simulated with the Colorado State University general circulation model, to various aspects of the parameterization of cloud microphysical processes and its interactions with the cumulus convection and radiative transfer parameterizations.The results of 120-day sensitivity experiments corresponding to perpetual January conditions have been compared with those of a control simulation in order to 1 ) determine the importance of advecting cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow at the temporal and spatial scale resolutions presently used in the model; 2) study the importance of the formation of extended stratiform anvils at the tops of cumulus towers, 3) analyze the role of mixed-phase clouds in determining the partitioning among cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow and, hence, their impacts on the simulated cloud optical properties; 4) evaluate the sensitivity of the atmospheric moisture budget and precipitation rates to a change in the fall velocities of rain and snow; 5) determine the model's sensitivity to the prescribed thresholds of autoconversion of cloud water to rain and cloud ice to snow; and 6) study the impact of the collection of supercooled cloud water by snow, as well as accounting for the cloud optical properties of snow.Results are presented in terms of 30-day mean differences

  7. 40 CFR 53.35 - Test procedure for Class II and Class III methods for PM2.5 and PM-2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-volatile organic pollutants. (B) Test site B shall be in a western city such as Denver, Salt Lake City, or... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure for Class II and Class... Test procedure for Class II and Class III methods for PM2.5 and PM-2.5 (a) Overview. Class II and Class...

  8. A prospective study of low back pain in a general population. III. Medical service--work consequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, F

    1983-01-01

    Of participants with low back pain (LBP) at some time, about 60% said the pain had led them to consult their general practitioner, about 25% a specialist, and about 15% a chiropractor. About 30% had had an X-ray taken of their lumbar spine. Physiotherapy was the most common treatment given for the LBP. Manipulative therapy was the treatment which most often seemed to satisfy those with LBP although these cases might have been the milder acute attacks of LBP. Of the LBP complainers, 4.5% had been admitted to hospital and 1% operated on because of LBP. Work absence because of LBP occurred by 22.5% of the participants who were gainfully employed at some time. An additional 10% found it necessary to take special care on the job. Change of job or work function because of LBP was accomplished by 6.3%. Among those gainfully employed at the time of the examination, 6.7% had taken days-off within the past year because of LBP, an absence rate which corresponded to about two days per year per person. Previous, particularly recent use of medical services turned out to be a prognostic indicator for LBP in the follow-up year, while none of the work related parameters seemed to be good predictors, which may be because of the uncertainties related to these parameters.

  9. The overlooked potential of generalized linear models in astronomy - III. Bayesian negative binomial regression and globular cluster populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, R. S.; Hilbe, J. M.; Buelens, B.; Riggs, J. D.; Cameron, E.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Chies-Santos, A. L.; Killedar, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the third in a series illustrating the power of generalized linear models (GLMs) for the astronomical community, we elucidate the potential of the class of GLMs which handles count data. The size of a galaxy's globular cluster (GC) population (NGC) is a prolonged puzzle in the astronomical literature. It falls in the category of count data analysis, yet it is usually modelled as if it were a continuous response variable. We have developed a Bayesian negative binomial regression model to study the connection between NGC and the following galaxy properties: central black hole mass, dynamical bulge mass, bulge velocity dispersion and absolute visual magnitude. The methodology introduced herein naturally accounts for heteroscedasticity, intrinsic scatter, errors in measurements in both axes (either discrete or continuous) and allows modelling the population of GCs on their natural scale as a non-negative integer variable. Prediction intervals of 99 per cent around the trend for expected NGC comfortably envelope the data, notably including the Milky Way, which has hitherto been considered a problematic outlier. Finally, we demonstrate how random intercept models can incorporate information of each particular galaxy morphological type. Bayesian variable selection methodology allows for automatically identifying galaxy types with different productions of GCs, suggesting that on average S0 galaxies have a GC population 35 per cent smaller than other types with similar brightness.

  10. On possible a-priori "imprinting" of General Relativity itself on some tests aimed to test it

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effect of possible a-priori "imprinting" effects of general relativity itself on satellite/spaceraft-based tests of it. We deal with some performed or proposed time-delay ranging experiments in the Sun's gravitational field, and with the attempts to measure the Lense-Thirring effect with the LAGEOS satellites orbiting the Earth. It turns out that the "imprint" of general relativity on the Astronomical Unit and the solar gravitational constant GM_\\odot, not solved for in the so far performed spacecraft-based time-delay tests, induces an a-priori bias of the order of 10^-6 in typical solar system ranging experiments aimed to measuring the space curvature PPN parameter \\gamma. It is too small by one order of magnitude to be of concern for the performed Cassini experiment, but it would affect future planned or proposed tests aiming to reach a 10^-7-10^-9 accuracy in determining \\gamma. General relativity, neither modelled nor solved for in the GRACE-based models of the Earth's geopotential, "im...

  11. Predictive validity of a written knowledge test of skills for an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, A.W.M.; Jansen, J.J.; Zuithoff, P.; Dusman, H.; Tan, L.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the validity of a written knowledge test of skills for performance on an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice. METHODS: A randomly-selected sample of 47 trainees in general practice took a knowledge test of skills, a general knowledge test and an OSCE. The OSCE incl

  12. Microbial inhibition by pharmaceutical antibiotics in different soils--dose-response relations determined with the iron(III) reduction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele-Bruhn, Sören

    2005-04-01

    Soil contamination from pharmaceuticals is an emerging problem, though quantitative data on their microbial effects are lacking. Thus, nine pharmaceutical antibiotics were tested for their effects on the microbial iron(III) reduction in six different topsoils. Complete dose-response curves were obtained and best-fit by sigmoidal Logit, Weibull, Box-Cox Logit, and Box-Cox Weibull equations (r2 0.73-1.00). The derived effective doses (ED [micromol/kg soil]) for the different antibiotics increased in the order (average ED50 in parentheses) chlortetracycline (53) fenbendazole at doses up to 5,800 and 3,300 micromol/kg, respectively. Due to a strong soil adsorption, especially of the tetracyclines, the corresponding effective concentrations in the soil solution (EC50), derived from sorption experiments, were considerably smaller and ranged from 0.004 micromol/L (chlortetracycline) to 120 micromol/L (sulfapyridine). The effects of the antibiotics were governed by soil sorptive properties, especially the concentration of soil organic matter. The microbial inhibition was influenced indirectly by the soil pH, which affects the ionization status of the amphoteric antibiotics.

  13. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  14. Testing for association with multiple traits in generalized estimation equations, with application to neuroimaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiwei; Xu, Zhiyuan; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing need to develop and apply powerful statistical tests to detect multiple traits-single locus associations, as arising from neuroimaging genetics and other studies. For example, in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), in addition to genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), thousands of neuroimaging and neuropsychological phenotypes as intermediate phenotypes for Alzheimer's disease, have been collected. Although some classic methods like MANOVA and newly proposed methods may be applied, they have their own limitations. For example, MANOVA cannot be applied to binary and other discrete traits. In addition, the relationships among these methods are not well understood. Importantly, since these tests are not data adaptive, depending on the unknown association patterns among multiple traits and between multiple traits and a locus, these tests may or may not be powerful. In this paper we propose a class of data-adaptive weights and the corresponding weighted tests in the general framework of generalized estimation equations (GEE). A highly adaptive test is proposed to select the most powerful one from this class of the weighted tests so that it can maintain high power across a wide range of situations. Our proposed tests are applicable to various types of traits with or without covariates. Importantly, we also analytically show relationships among some existing and our proposed tests, indicating that many existing tests are special cases of our proposed tests. Extensive simulation studies were conducted to compare and contrast the power properties of various existing and our new methods. Finally, we applied the methods to an ADNI dataset to illustrate the performance of the methods. We conclude with the recommendation for the use of the GEE-based Score test and our proposed adaptive test for their high and complementary performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Generalization of Muscle Strength Capacities as Assessed From Different Variables, Tests, and Muscle Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuk, Ivan; Prebeg, Goran; Sreckovic, Sreten; Mirkov, Dragan M; Jaric, Slobodan

    2017-02-01

    Cuk, I, Prebeg, G, Sreckovic, S, Mirkov, DM, and Jaric, S. Generalization of muscle strength capacities as assessed from different variables, tests, and muscle groups. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 305-312, 2017-The muscle strength capacities to exert force under various movement conditions have been indiscriminately assessed from various strength tests and variables applied on different muscles. We tested the hypotheses that the distinctive strength capacities would be revealed (H1) through different strength tests, and (H2) through different strength variables. Alternatively, (H3) all strength variables independent of the selected test could depict the same strength capacity of the tested muscle. Sixty subjects performed both the standard strength test and the test of alternating contractions of 6 pairs of antagonistic muscles acting in different leg and arm joints. The dependent variables obtained from each test and muscle were the maximum isometric force and the rate of force development. A confirmatory principle component analysis set to 2 factors explained 31.9% of the total variance. The factor loadings discerned between the tested arm and leg muscles, but not between the strength tests and variables. An exploratory analysis applied on the same data revealed 6 factors that explained 60.1% of the total variance. Again, the individual factors were mainly loaded by different tests and variables obtained from the same pair of antagonistic muscles. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment of the muscle strength capacity of the tested individual should be based on a single strength test and variable obtained from a number of different muscles, than on a single muscle tested through different tests and variables. The selected muscles should act in different limbs and joints, while the maximum isometric force should be the variable of choice.

  16. General Atomic reprocessing pilot plant: description and results of initial testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    In June 1976 General Atomic completed the construction of a reprocessing head-end cold pilot plant. In the year since then, each system within the head end has been used for experiments which have qualified the designs. This report describes the equipment in the plant and summarizes the results of the initial phase of reprocessing testing.

  17. The whispered voice: The best test for screening for hearing impairment in general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhof, J.A.H.; Bock, G.H. de; Laat, J.A.P.M. de; Dap, R.; Schaapveld, K.; Springer, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    Hearling loss is an important health problem in the elderly which sometimes leads to social isolation. In a study with 62 patients, the diagnostic value of four simple tests for screening for hearing loss in general practice was examined. When paying attention to the loudness of the whispering, the

  18. The General Factor of Personality (GFP) and parental support: Testing a prediction from Life History Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, D. van der; Figueredo, A.J.; Leeuw, R.N.H. de; Scholte, R.H.J.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we tested whether the General Factor of Personality (GFP) is related to the level of parental support. The GFP is assumed to occupy the apex of the hierarchy of human personality structure and is believed to reflect a socially and sexually selected aggregate of behavioral chara

  19. General practitioners' needs for ongoing support for the interpretation of spirometry tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.P.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Akkermans, R.P.; Jacobs, A.; Bogart-Jansen, M.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although one out of three general practitioners (GPs) carries out spirometry, the diagnostic interpretation of spirometric test results appears to be a common barrier for GPs towards its routine application. METHODS: Multivariate cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey among 1

  20. The Gender-Linked Language Effect: An Empirical Test of a General Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulac, Anthony; Giles, Howard; Bradac, James J.; Palomares, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    The gender-linked language effect (GLLE) is a phenomenon in which transcripts of female communicators are rated higher on Socio-Intellectual Status and Aesthetic Quality and male communicators are rated higher on Dynamism. This study proposed and tested a new general process model explanation for the GLLE, a central mediating element of which…

  1. Hydroxychloroquine-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis with positive patch-testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ons Charfi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a severe cutaneous adverse reaction, mostly induced by drugs. Hydroxychloroquine have been rarely reported in literature as a causative drug of this reaction. We report a case of AGEP induced by hydroxychloroquine with systemic involvement and confirmed by positive patch testing.

  2. Lack of consensus on tests and criteria for generalized joint hypermobility, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remvig, Lars; Flycht, Lise; Christensen, Karl B;

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to register clinicians performance and opinion of importance of clinical tests for generalized joint hypermobility (GJH), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), and to reach a consensus among clinicians on crit...

  3. Next-generation Lunar Laser Retroreflectors for Precision Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocci, Emanuele; dell'Agnello, Simone; Delle Monache, Giovanni; Martini, Manuele; Contessa, Stefania; Porcelli, Luca; Tibuzzi, Mattia; Salvatori, Lorenzo; Patrizi, Giordano; Maiello, Mauro; Intaglietta, Nicola; Mondaini, Chiara; Currie, Douglas; Chandler, John; Bianco, Giuseppe; Murphy, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Since 1969, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflectors (CCRs) has supplied almost all significant tests of General Relativity (GR). When first installed in the 1970s, the Apollo CCRs geometry contributed only a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Today, because of lunar librations, this contribution dominates the error budget, limiting the precision of the experimental tests of gravitational theories. The new MoonLIGHT-2 (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests) apparatus is a new-generation LLR payload developed by the SCF_Lab (http://www.lnf.infn.it/esperimenti/etrusco/) at INFN-LNF in collaboration with the Maryland University. With the unique design of a single large CCR unaffected by librations, MoonLIGHT-2 can increase up to a factor 100 the precision of the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession and other General Relativity (GR) tests respect to Apollo CCRs. MoonLIGHT-2 is approved to be launched with the Moon Express mission MEX-1 and will be deployed on the Moon surface in 2018. MoonLIGHT-2 is also proposed for the Roscosmos mission Luna-27. To validate/optimize MoonLIGHT-2 for MEX-1, the SCF_Lab is carrying out a unique experimental test called SCF-Test: the concurrent measurement of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the CCR under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator and simulated space environment. We perform test of GR with current LLR data and also different GR simulation of the expected improvement in GR test provided by MoonLIGHT-2, using the Planetary Ephemeris Program in collaboration with CfA. Our ultimate goal is to improve GR tests by a factor up to 100, and provide constraints on the new gravitational theories like non-miminally coupled gravity and spacetime torision.

  4. Interferometric detection of gravitational waves: the definitive test for General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Even if Einstein's General Relativity achieved a great success and overcame lots of experimental tests, it also showed some shortcomings and flaws which today advise theorists to ask if it is the definitive theory of gravity. In this essay we show that, if advanced projects on the detection of Gravitational Waves (GWs) will improve their sensitivity, allowing to perform a GWs astronomy, accurate angular and frequency dependent response functions of interferometers for GWs arising from various Theories of Gravity, i.e. General Relativity and Extended Theories of Gravity, will be the definitive test for General Relativity. The papers which found this essay have been the world's most cited in the official Astroparticle Publication Review of ASPERA during the 2007 with 13 citations.

  5. Optimality of the Holm procedure among general step-down multiple testing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Alexander Y; Salzman, Peter

    2008-09-15

    We study the class of general step-down multiple testing procedures, which contains the usually considered procedures determined by a nondecreasing sequence of thresholds (we call them threshold step-down, or TSD, procedures) as a parametric subclass. We show that all procedures in this class satisfying the natural condition of monotonicity and controlling the family-wise error rate (FWER) at a prescribed level are dominated by one of them - the classical Holm procedure. This generalizes an earlier result pertaining to the subclass of TSD procedures (Lehmann and Romano, Testing Statistical Hypotheses, 3rd ed., 2005). We also derive a relation between the levels at which a monotone step-down procedure controls the FWER and the generalized FWER (the probability of k or more false rejections).

  6. A massive binary black-hole system in OJ287 and a test of general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Valtonen, M. J.; Lehto, H. J.; Nilsson, K.; Heidt, J.; Takalo, L. O.; Sillanpää, A.; Villforth, C.; Kidger, M.; Poyner, G.; Pursimo, T.; Zola, S.; Wu, J. -H.; Zhou, X.; Sadakane, K.; Drozdz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity have mostly been carried out in weak gravitational fields where the space-time curvature effects are first-order deviations from Newton's theory. Binary pulsars provide a means of probing the strong gravitational field around a neutron star, but strong-field effects may be best tested in systems containing black holes. Here we report such a test in a close binary system of two candidate black holes in the quasar OJ287. This quasar shows quasi-p...

  7. Generalized requirements and decompositions for the design of test parts for micro additive manufacturing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2015-01-01

    level decompositions for the design of test parts and the design of experiments to characterize micro additive manufacturing processes. While the test parts and the experiments described are still work in progress, the generic requirements derived from them can serve as a starting point for the design......The design of experimental test parts to characterize micro additive manufacturing (AM) processes is challenging due to the influence of the manufacturing and metrology processes. This work builds on the lessons learned from a case study in the literature to derive generalized requirements and high...... of other micro additive manufacturing related studies and their decompositions can help structure future work....

  8. Testing for constant nonparametric effects in general semiparametric regression models with interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Jiawei

    2011-07-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work was originally motivated by a unique testing problem in genetic epidemiology (Chatterjee, et al., 2006) that involved a typical generalized linear model but with an additional term reminiscent of the Tukey one-degree-of-freedom formulation, and their interest was in testing for main effects of the genetic variables, while gaining statistical power by allowing for a possible interaction between genes and the environment. Later work (Maity, et al., 2009) involved the possibility of modeling the environmental variable nonparametrically, but they focused on whether there was a parametric main effect for the genetic variables. In this paper, we consider the complementary problem, where the interest is in testing for the main effect of the nonparametrically modeled environmental variable. We derive a generalized likelihood ratio test for this hypothesis, show how to implement it, and provide evidence that our method can improve statistical power when compared to standard partially linear models with main effects only. We use the method for the primary purpose of analyzing data from a case-control study of colorectal adenoma.

  9. Testing for Constant Nonparametric Effects in General Semiparametric Regression Models with Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiawei; Carroll, Raymond J; Maity, Arnab

    2011-07-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work was originally motivated by a unique testing problem in genetic epidemiology (Chatterjee, et al., 2006) that involved a typical generalized linear model but with an additional term reminiscent of the Tukey one-degree-of-freedom formulation, and their interest was in testing for main effects of the genetic variables, while gaining statistical power by allowing for a possible interaction between genes and the environment. Later work (Maity, et al., 2009) involved the possibility of modeling the environmental variable nonparametrically, but they focused on whether there was a parametric main effect for the genetic variables. In this paper, we consider the complementary problem, where the interest is in testing for the main effect of the nonparametrically modeled environmental variable. We derive a generalized likelihood ratio test for this hypothesis, show how to implement it, and provide evidence that our method can improve statistical power when compared to standard partially linear models with main effects only. We use the method for the primary purpose of analyzing data from a case-control study of colorectal adenoma.

  10. Validation of the WMS-III Facial Memory subtest with the Graduate Hospital Facial Memory Test in a sample of right and left anterior temporal lobectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; Tulsky, David S; Glosser, Guila

    2004-06-01

    A number of studies have shown visuospatial memory deficits following anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) in the right, nondominant temporal lobe (RATL). The current study examines 26 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy who underwent ATL in either the right (RATL, n = 16) or left temporal lobe (LATL, n = 10) on two tests of facial memory abilities, the Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) Faces subtest and the Graduate Hospital Facial Memory Test (FMT). Repeated measures ANOVA on the FMT indicated a significant main effect of side of surgery. The RATL group performed significantly below the LATL group overall. Both groups showed a slight, but non-significant, improvement in performance from pre- to postsurgery on the FMT immediate memory, likely due to practice effects. Repeated measures ANOVA on the WMS-III Faces subtest revealed a significant interaction of group (RATL vs. LATL) by delay (immediate vs. delayed). Overall, the LATL group showed an improvement in recognition scores from immediate to delayed memory, whereas the RATL group performed similarly at both immediate and delayed testing. No effects of surgery were noted on the WMS-III. Following initial data analysis the WMS-III Faces I and II data were re-scored using the scoring suggested by Holdnack and Delis (2003), earlier in this issue. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed a trend toward significance in the three-way interaction of group (RATL vs. LATL) x time of testing (pre- versus postop) x delay (immediate vs. delayed memory). On the Faces I subtest, both the RATL and LATL groups showed a decline from preoperative to postoperative testing. However, on Faces II the LATL group showed an increase in performance from preoperative to postoperative testing, while the RALT group showed a decline in performance from preoperative to postoperative testing. While the FMT appears to be superior to the WMS-III Faces subtest in identifying deficits in facial memory prior to and following RATL, the

  11. A-priori "imprinting" of General Relativity itself on some tests of it?

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of possible a-priori "imprinting" effects of general relativity itself on satellite/spaceraft-based tests of it. We deal with some performed or proposed time-delay ranging experiments in the Sun's gravitational field. It turns out that the "imprint" of general relativity on the Astronomical Unit and the solar gravitational constant GM_{\\odot}, not solved for in the so far performed spacecraft-based time-delay tests, induces an a-priori bias of the order of 10^-6 in typical solar system ranging experiments aimed to measuring the space curvature PPN parameter gamma. It is too small by one order of magnitude to be of concern for the performed Cassini experiment, but it would affect future planned or proposed tests aiming to reach a 10^-7-10^-9 accuracy in determining gamma.

  12. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations as Tools for Testing General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2004-01-01

    We continued a project, to analyse the ways in which detection and study of gravitational waves could provide quantitative tests of general relativity, with particular emphasis on waves that would be detectable by space-based observatories, such as LISA. This work had three foci: 1) Tests of scalar-tensor theories of gravity that, could be done by analyzing gravitational waves from neutron stars inspiralling into massive black holes, as detectable by LISA; 2) Study of alternative theories of gravity in which the graviton could be massive, and of how gravitational-wave observations by space-based detectors, solar-system tests, and cosmological observations could constrain such theories; and 3) Study of gravitational-radiation back reaction of particles orbiting black holes in general relativity, with emphasis on the effects of spin.

  13. The achievement impact of the inclusion model on the standardized test scores of general education students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett-Rainey, Syrena

    The purpose of this study was to compare the achievement of general education students within regular education classes to the achievement of general education students in inclusion/co-teach classes to determine whether there was a significant difference in the achievement between the two groups. The school district's inclusion/co-teach model included ongoing professional development support for teachers and administrators. General education teachers, special education teachers, and teacher assistants collaborated to develop instructional strategies to provide additional remediation to help students to acquire the skills needed to master course content. This quantitative study reviewed the end-of course test (EoCT) scores of Grade 10 physical science and math students within an urban school district. It is not known whether general education students in an inclusive/co-teach science or math course will demonstrate a higher achievement on the EoCT in math or science than students not in an inclusive/co-teach classroom setting. In addition, this study sought to determine if students classified as low socioeconomic status benefited from participating in co-teaching classrooms as evidenced by standardized tests. Inferential statistics were used to determine whether there was a significant difference between the achievements of the treatment group (inclusion/co-teach) and the control group (non-inclusion/co-teach). The findings can be used to provide school districts with optional instructional strategies to implement in the diverse classroom setting in the modern classroom to increase academic performance on state standardized tests.

  14. Exploring the Incorporation of Executive Functions in Intelligence Testing: Factor Analysis of the WAIS-III and Traditional Tasks of Executive Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Aken, L. van; R.P.C. Kessels; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Wiltink, M.; Heijden, P.T. van der; Egger, J.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – third edition (WAIS-III) and executive functions. The Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Stroop Color-Word Test were administered to a heterogeneous group of 234 psychiatric patients and 24 healthy volunteers. Maximum likelihood procedures with promax rotation were applied to two, three and four factor solutions. The four factor m...

  15. Design-for-Testability Features and Test Implementation of a Giga Hertz General Purpose Microprocessor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da Wang; Yu Hu; Hua-Wei Li; Xiao-Wei Li

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design-for-testability (DFT) features and low-cost testing solutions of a general purpose microprocessor. The optimized DFT features are presented in detail. A hybrid scan compression structure was executed and achieved compression ratio more than ten times. Memory built-in self-test (BIST) circuitries were designed with scan collars instead of bitmaps to reduce area overheads and to improve test and debug efficiency. The implemented DFT framework also utilized internal phase-locked loops (PLL) to provide complex at-speed test clock sequences. Since there are still limitations in this DFT design, the test strategies for this case are quite complex, with complicated automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) and debugging flow. The sample testing results are given in the paper. All the DFT methods discussed in the paper are prototypes for a high-volume manufacturing (HVM) DFT plan to meet high quality test goals as well as slow test power consumption and cost.

  16. [Comparison of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III and the Spain-Complutense Verbal Learning Test in acquired brain injury: construct validity and ecological validity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Lario, P; Pena, J; Ojeda, N

    2017-04-16

    Objetivo. Profundizar en la validez de constructo y en la validez ecologica de la escala de memoria de Wechsler-III (WMS-III) y el test de aprendizaje verbal España-Complutense (TAVEC). Pacientes y metodos. La muestra consta de 106 adultos con daño cerebral adquirido atendidos en el Area de Neuropsicologia y Neuropsiquiatria del Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, con deficit de memoria como secuela principal, medido a traves de test especificos de memoria. Para determinar la validez de constructo se examinan las tareas requeridas en cada prueba sobre los modelos teoricos de base, comparando el rendimiento segun los parametros ofrecidos por los tests, contrastando los indices de gravedad de cada prueba y analizando su convergencia. La validez externa se explora a traves de la correlacion entre las pruebas y mediante modelos de regresion. Resultados. De acuerdo con los resultados obtenidos, la WMS-III y el TAVEC tienen validez de constructo. El TAVEC es mas sensible y capta no solo los deficits en la consolidacion mnesica, sino en las estrategias ejecutivas implicadas en la memoria. El indice de memoria de trabajo de la WMS-III es util para predecir la reincorporacion laboral a los dos años del daño cerebral adquirido, pero ningun instrumento anticipa la discapacidad y la dependencia al menos seis meses despues de la lesion. Conclusion. Se reflexiona sobre la validez de constructo de las pruebas y su capacidad insuficiente para predecir la funcionalidad cuando las secuelas se cronifican.

  17. Interpreting change on the WAIS-III/WMS-III in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, G L

    2001-02-01

    Clinicians should note that there is considerable variability in the reliabilities of the index and subtest scores derived from the third editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III). The purpose of this article is to review these reliabilities and to illustrate how they can be used to interpret change in patients' performances from test to retest. The WAIS-III IQ and Index scores are consistently the most reliable scores, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The most internally consistent WAIS-III subtests are Vocabulary, Information, Digit Span, Matrix Reasoning, and Arithmetic. Information and Vocabulary have the highest test-retest reliability. On the WMS-III, the Auditory Immediate Index, Immediate Memory Index, Auditory Delayed Index, and General Memory Index are the most reliable, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The Logical Memory I and Verbal Paired Associates I subtests are the most reliable. Data from three clinical groups (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, chronic alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia) were extracted from the Technical Manual [Psychological Corporation (1997). WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual. San Antonio: Harcourt Brace] for the purpose of calculating reliable change estimates. A table of confidence intervals for test-retest measurement error is provided to help the clinician determine if patients have reliably improved or deteriorated on follow-up testing.

  18. Increased incidence of kidney diseases in general practice after a nationwide albuminuria self-test program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheij Robert A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the influence of a nationwide albuminuria self-test program on the number of GP contacts for urinary complaints and/or kidney diseases and the number of newly diagnosed patients with kidney diseases by the GP. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice (LINH, including a representative sample of general practices with a dynamic population of approximately 300.000 listed patients. Morbidity data were retrieved from electronic medical records, kept in a representative sample of general practices. The incidence of kidney diseases and urinary complaints before and after the albuminuria self-test program was compared with logistic regression analyses. Results Data were used from 139 general practices, including 444,220 registered patients. The number of GP consultations for kidney diseases and urinary complaints was increased in the year after the albuminuria self-test program and particularly shortly after the start of the program. Compared with the period before the self-test program, more patients have been diagnosed by the GP with symptoms/complaints of kidney disease and urinary diseases (OR = 1.7 (CI 1.4 - 2.0 and OR = 2.1 (CI 1.9 - 2.3, respectively. The odds on an abnormal urine-test in the period after the self-test program was three times higher than the year before (OR = 3.0 (CI 2.4 - 3.6. The effect of the self-test program on newly diagnosed patients with an abnormal urine test was modified by both the presence of the risk factors hypertension and diabetes mellitus. For this diagnosis the highest OR was found in patients without both conditions (OR = 4.2 (CI 3.3 - 5.4. Conclusions A nationwide albuminuria self-test program resulted in an increasing number of newly diagnosed kidney complaints and diseases the year after the program. The highest risks were found in patients without risk factors for kidney diseases.

  19. Parallel rapid HIV testing in pregnant women at Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Rolando M; Araneta, Maria Rosario G; Spector, Stephen A

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of parallel rapid HIV testing and the presence of HIV-associated risk factors in pregnant women with unknown HIV status in Baja California, Mexico. Pregnant women attending the delivery unit or the prenatal clinic at Tijuana General Hospital had blood drawn for parallel rapid HIV testing with Determine™ HIV-1/2 and Uni-Gold™ Recombigen(®) HIV. The parallel rapid HIV test performance was compared to the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and western blot. From September 2007 to July 2008, 1,383 (94%) of 1,464 women in labor and 1,992 (96%) of 2,075 women in prenatal care were enrolled. The HIV seroprevalence among women screened during labor (19/1,383, 1.37%, 95% CI: 0.85-2.18%) was significantly higher compared to those seeking prenatal care (5/1,992, 0.25%, 95% CI: 0.09-0.62%; pwomen testing positive by parallel rapid HIV testing 24 had a positive confirmatory western blot and one (0.03%) was confirmed as false positive. Additionally, two (0.06%) women had parallel rapid HIV discordant testing results; both tested negative by western blot. All women who tested negative by rapid testing had negative results on pooled EIA antibody testing. The overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of parallel rapid HIV testing were 100%, 99.9%, 96%, and 100%, respectively. These findings document a very high acceptance rate and an excellent performance of the parallel rapid HIV testing strategy during pregnancy.

  20. The ITER neutral beam test facility: Designs of the general infrastructure, cryosystem and cooling plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, J.J. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jean-jacques.cordier@cea.fr; Hemsworth, R. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Chantant, M. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Gravil, B. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Henry, D. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Sabathier, F. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Doceul, L. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Thomas, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Houtte, D. van [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM, Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, bat 506, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Zaccaria, P. [CONSORZIO RFX Association EURATOM-ENEA, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Antoni, V. [CONSORZIO RFX Association EURATOM-ENEA, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Bello, S. Dal; Marcuzzi, D. [CONSORZIO RFX Association EURATOM-ENEA, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Antipenkov, A.; Day, C.; Dremel, M. [FZK, Institut fuer Technische Physik, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Mondino, P.L. [EFDA CSU, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    The CEA Association is involved, in close collaboration with ENEA, FZK, IPP and UKAEA European Associations, in the first ITER neutral beam (NB) injector and the ITER neutral beam test facility design (EFDA task ref. TW3-THHN-IITF1). A total power of about 50 MW will have to be removed in steady state on the neutral beam test facility (NBTF). The main purpose of this task is to make progress with the detailed design of the first ITER NB injector and to start the conceptual design of the ITER NBTF. The general infrastructure layout of a generic site for the NBTF includes the test facility itself equipped with a dedicated beamline vessel [P.L. Zaccaria, et al., Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility, this conference] and integration studies of associated auxiliaries such as cooling plant, cryoplant and forepumping system.

  1. Examining the Accuracy of Astrophysical Disk Simulations with a Generalized Hydrodynamical Test Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael

    2016-11-01

    We discuss a generalization of the classic Keplerian disk test problem allowing for both pressure and rotational support, as a method of testing astrophysical codes incorporating both gravitation and hydrodynamics. We argue for the inclusion of pressure in rotating disk simulations on the grounds that realistic, astrophysical disks exhibit non-negligible pressure support. We then apply this test problem to examine the performance of various smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods incorporating a number of improvements proposed over the years to address problems noted in modeling the classical gravitation-only Keplerian disk. We also apply this test to a newly developed extension of SPH based on reproducing kernels called CRKSPH. Counterintuitively, we find that pressure support worsens the performance of traditional SPH on this problem, causing unphysical collapse away from the steady-state disk solution even more rapidly than the purely gravitational problem, whereas CRKSPH greatly reduces this error.

  2. Examining the Accuracy of Astrophysical Disk Simulations With a Generalized Hydrodynamical Test Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Raskin, Cody

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a generalization of the classic Keplerian disk test problem allowing for both pressure and rotational support, as a method of testing astrophysical codes incorporating both gravitation and hydrodynamics. We argue for the inclusion of pressure in rotating disk simulations on the grounds that realistic, astrophysical disks exhibit non-negligible pressure support. We then apply this test problem to examine the performance of various smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods incorporating a number of improvements proposed over the years to help SPH better address problems noted in modeling the classical gravitation only Keplerian disk. We also apply this test to a newly developed extension of SPH based on reproducing kernels called CRKSPH. Counterintuitively, we find that pressure support worsens the performance of traditional SPH on this problem, causing unphysical collapse away from the steady-state disk solution even more rapidly than the purely gravitational problem, whereas CRKSPH greatly redu...

  3. Extension of the Generalized Disequilibrium Test to polytomous phenotypes and two-locus models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eBureau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We extend the usual logistic model between a dichotomous phenotype and an allele count in two ways: a polytomous phenotype with K > 2 levels, and modelling of allele counts at two unlinked marker loci. Inference is based on within-family information to guard against potential bias due to population genetic structure. Score tests of the model coefficients taking into account the correlation between relatives in entire pedigrees are derived as an extension of the Generalized Disequilibrium Test (GDT. Simulations confirm that the tests have the expected statistical properties, and that their power exceeds that of the GDT under a favorable scenario. The score tests are illustrated with candidate genetic markers, a major psychosis phenotype and a cognitive endophenotype in large kindreds from Eastern Quebec.

  4. Extended testing of a general contextual classifier using the massively parallel processor - Preliminary results and test plans. [for thematic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Earlier encouraging test results of a contextual classifier that combines spatial and spectral information employing a general statistical approach are expanded. The earlier results were of limited meaning because they were produced from small (50-by-50 pixel) data sets. An implementation of the contextual classifier on NASA Goddard's Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) is presented; for the first time the MPP makes feasible the testing of the classifier on large data sets (a 12-hour test on a VAX-11/780 minicomputer now takes 5 minutes on the MPP). The MPP is a Single-Instruction, Multiple Data Stream computer, consisting of 16,384 bit serial microprocessors connected in a 128-by-128 mesh array with each element having data transfer connections with its four nearest neighbors so that the MPP is capable of billions of operations per second. Preliminary results are given (with more expected for the conference) and plans are mentioned for extended testing of the contextual classifier on Thematic Mapper data sets.

  5. Generalized linear mixed models for multi-reader multi-case studies of diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Pantoja-Galicia, Norberto; Zhang, Bo; Kotz, Richard M; Pennello, Gene; Zhang, Hui; Jacob, Jessie; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2017-06-01

    Diagnostic tests are often compared in multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) studies in which a number of cases (subjects with or without the disease in question) are examined by several readers using all tests to be compared. One of the commonly used methods for analyzing MRMC data is the Obuchowski-Rockette (OR) method, which assumes that the true area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for each combination of reader and test follows a linear mixed model with fixed effects for test and random effects for reader and the reader-test interaction. This article proposes generalized linear mixed models which generalize the OR model by incorporating a range-appropriate link function that constrains the true AUCs to the unit interval. The proposed models can be estimated by maximizing a pseudo-likelihood based on the approximate normality of AUC estimates. A Monte Carlo expectation-maximization algorithm can be used to maximize the pseudo-likelihood, and a non-parametric bootstrap procedure can be used for inference. The proposed method is evaluated in a simulation study and applied to an MRMC study of breast cancer detection.

  6. The Generalized Higher Criticism for Testing SNP-Set Effects in Genetic Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Ian; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Lin, Xihong

    2017-01-01

    It is of substantial interest to study the effects of genes, genetic pathways, and networks on the risk of complex diseases. These genetic constructs each contain multiple SNPs, which are often correlated and function jointly, and might be large in number. However, only a sparse subset of SNPs in a genetic construct is generally associated with the disease of interest. In this article, we propose the generalized higher criticism (GHC) to test for the association between an SNP set and a disease outcome. The higher criticism is a test traditionally used in high-dimensional signal detection settings when marginal test statistics are independent and the number of parameters is very large. However, these assumptions do not always hold in genetic association studies, due to linkage disequilibrium among SNPs and the finite number of SNPs in an SNP set in each genetic construct. The proposed GHC overcomes the limitations of the higher criticism by allowing for arbitrary correlation structures among the SNPs in an SNP-set, while performing accurate analytic p-value calculations for any finite number of SNPs in the SNP-set. We obtain the detection boundary of the GHC test. We compared empirically using simulations the power of the GHC method with existing SNP-set tests over a range of genetic regions with varied correlation structures and signal sparsity. We apply the proposed methods to analyze the CGEM breast cancer genome-wide association study. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.

  7. Classic tests of General Relativity described by brane-based spherically symmetric solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuzinatto, R.R. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Pompeia, P.J. [Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Instituto de Fomento e Coordenacao Industrial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); De Montigny, M. [University of Alberta, Theoretical Physics Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Campus Saint-Jean, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Khanna, F.C. [University of Alberta, Theoretical Physics Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of Victoria, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO box 1700, Victoria, BC (Canada); Silva, J.M.H. da [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We discuss a way to obtain information about higher dimensions from observations by studying a brane-based spherically symmetric solution. The three classic tests of General Relativity are analyzed in detail: the perihelion shift of the planet Mercury, the deflection of light by the Sun, and the gravitational redshift of atomic spectral lines. The braneworld version of these tests exhibits an additional parameter b related to the fifth-coordinate. This constant b can be constrained by comparison with observational data for massive and massless particles. (orig.)

  8. Classic tests of General Relativity described by brane-based spherically symmetric solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cuzinatto, R R; de Montigny, M; Khanna, F C; da Silva, J M Hoff

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a way to obtain information about higher dimensions from observations by studying a brane-based spherically symmetric solution. The three classic tests of General Relativity are analyzed in details: the perihelion shift of the planet Mercury, the deflection of light by the Sun, and the gravitational redshift of atomic spectral lines. The braneworld version of these tests exhibits an additional parameter $b$ related to the fifth-coordinate. This constant $b$ can be constrained by comparison with observational data for massive and massless particles.

  9. General-Relativistic Resistive Magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions: formulation and tests

    CERN Document Server

    Dionysopoulou, Kyriaki; Palenzuela, Carlos; Rezzolla, Luciano; Giacomazzo, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    We present a new numerical implementation of the general-relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations within the Whisky code. The numerical method adopted exploits the properties of Implicit-Explicit Runge-Kutta numerical schemes to treat the stiff terms that appear in the equations for small electrical conductivities. Using tests in one, two, and three dimensions, we show that our implementation is robust and recovers the ideal-MHD limit in regimes of very high conductivity. Moreover, the results illustrate that the code is capable of describing physical setups in all ranges of conductivities. In addition to tests in flat spacetime, we report simulations of magnetized nonrotating relativistic stars, both in the Cowling approximation and in dynamical spacetimes. Finally, because of its astrophysical relevance and because it provides a severe testbed for general-relativistic codes with dynamical electromagnetic fields, we study the collapse of a nonrotating star to a black hole. We show that als...

  10. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Mechanical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2B/2C Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    , ENRESA and NRC teams. All teams discretized the DST test area into two-dimensional vertical cross sections through the center of the heated drift and derived material properties suitable for their respective modeling approaches using the site testing data from Yucca Mountain project reports. The generally good agreement between simulated and measured temperature, displacements, and changes in air permeability shows that the numerical models and underlying conceptual models are adequate for simulating coupled THM processes at the DST. From the analyses and discussions presented, the following specific conclusions were drawn: i) A continuum model approach is adequate for simulating relevant coupled THM processes at the DST; ii) TM-induced rock deformations are generally well simulated using an elastic model, although some individual displacements appear to be captured using an elasto-plastic model; iii) The highest potential for inelastic deformation in the form of fracture shear slip occurs near the drift wall and in a zone of thermal stress decrease located more than 15 m above the heated drift and iv) Despite potential shear slip along fractures, fracture closure/opening caused by change in normal stress across fractures is the dominant mechanism for TM-induced changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, whereas fracture shear dilation appears to be less significant at the DST. This conclusion indicates that TM-induced changes in permeability at the DST, which are within one order of magnitude, tend to be reversible.

  11. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vic [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally

  12. Generalizing Terwilliger's likelihood approach: a new score statistic to test for genetic association

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu Li; Helmer Quinta; de Visser Marieke CH; Uitte de Willige Shirley; el Galta Rachid; Houwing-Duistermaat Jeanine J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background: In this paper, we propose a one degree of freedom test for association between a candidate gene and a binary trait. This method is a generalization of Terwilliger's likelihood ratio statistic and is especially powerful for the situation of one associated haplotype. As an alternative to the likelihood ratio statistic, we derive a score statistic, which has a tractable expression. For haplotype analysis, we assume that phase is known. Results: By means of a simulation study...

  13. A validity generalization procedure to test relations between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and influence tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuto, John E; Moss, Jennifer A

    2006-08-01

    The relations of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation with use of consultative, legitimating, and pressure influence tactics were examined using validity generalization procedures. 5 to 7 field studies with cumulative samples exceeding 800 were used to test each relationship. Significance was found for relation between agents' intrinsic motivation and their use of consultative influence tactics and agents' extrinsic motivation and their use of legitimating influence tactics.

  14. Peeling-and-Coring-Machine Operator 529.886 -- Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  15. Routeman, Retail Dairy Products (dairy prod.) 1-80.06--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  16. Routeman, Wholesale Dairy Products (dairy prod.) 1-80.06--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  17. Processor, Solid Propellant (chem.) 6-52.773--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  18. Glass Blower, Laboratory Apparatus (inst. & app.) 4-65.440--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  19. Tomato Peeler (can. & preserv.) 529.887 -- Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  20. Resistor Winder (elec. equip.) 724.884--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  1. Shrimp Picker (can. & Preserv.) 8-04.10--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  2. Autoclave Operator (chem.) 4-52.711--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  3. Testing general relativity with black-hole binary observations: results and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2017-01-01

    The first two LIGO-Virgo detections of gravitational waves from binary black-hole inspirals offered the first opportunity to test gravitation in its strong-field, relativistic-motion, and radiative sector. The initial tests reported in PRL 116 (2016) probed consistency with the predictions of general relativity, to moderate precision. The space-based observatory LISA will observe black-hole binary signals with much larger SNRs, allowing for even more precise tests. Last, the detection of a binary black-hole stochastic background with pulsar-timing arrays will offer more constraints on the speed and polarizations of gravitational waves. I review these results and examine synergies across the gravitational-wave spectrum. I discuss the main challenges and opportunities from the viewpoint of data analysis, and outline prospects for making contact with current alternative theories of gravitation, in particular those motivated by models of dark energy.

  4. The type III manufactory

    CERN Document Server

    Palcoux, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Using unusual objects in the theory of von Neumann algebra, as the chinese game Go or the Conway game of life (generalized on finitely presented groups), we are able to build, by hands, many type III factors.

  5. A generalized Forchheimer radial flow model for constant-rate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Chen, Yi-Feng; Zhan, Hongbin; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2017-09-01

    Models used for data interpretation of constant-rate tests (CRTs) are commonly derived with the assumption of Darcian flow in an idealized integer flow dimension, where the non-Darcian nature of fluid flow and the complexity of flow geometry are disregarded. In this study, a Forchheimer's law-based analytical model is proposed with the assumption of buildup (or drawdown) decomposition for characterizing the non-Darcian flow in a generalized radial formation where the flow dimension n may become non-integer. The proposed model immediately reduces to Barker's (1988) model for Darcian flow in the generalized radial formation and to Mathias et al.'s (2008) model for non-Darcian flow in a two-dimensional confined aquifer. A comparison with numerical simulations shows that the proposed model behaves well at late times for flow dimension n > 1.5. The proposed model is finally applied for data interpretation of the constant-rate pumping tests performed at Ploemeur (Le Borgne et al., 2004), showing that the intrinsic hydraulic conductivity of formations will be underestimated and the specific storage will be overestimated if the non-Darcian effect is ignored. The proposed model is an extension of the generalized radial flow (GRF) model based on Forchheimer's law, which would be of significance for data interpretation of CRTs in aquifers of complex flow geometry in which non-Darcian flow occurs.

  6. Third law of thermodynamics as a key test of generalized entropies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, E P; Viswanathan, G M; da Luz, M G E; Silva, R

    2015-02-01

    The laws of thermodynamics constrain the formulation of statistical mechanics at the microscopic level. The third law of thermodynamics states that the entropy must vanish at absolute zero temperature for systems with nondegenerate ground states in equilibrium. Conversely, the entropy can vanish only at absolute zero temperature. Here we ask whether or not generalized entropies satisfy this fundamental property. We propose a direct analytical procedure to test if a generalized entropy satisfies the third law, assuming only very general assumptions for the entropy S and energy U of an arbitrary N-level classical system. Mathematically, the method relies on exact calculation of β=dS/dU in terms of the microstate probabilities p(i). To illustrate this approach, we present exact results for the two best known generalizations of statistical mechanics. Specifically, we study the Kaniadakis entropy S(κ), which is additive, and the Tsallis entropy S(q), which is nonadditive. We show that the Kaniadakis entropy correctly satisfies the third law only for -1law for q<1. Finally, we give a concrete example of the power of our proposed method by applying it to a paradigmatic system: the one-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model with nearest-neighbor interactions.

  7. A revalidation of the Thurstone Test of Mental Alertness as a brief measure of intelligence through comparison with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaal, S A; Wygonik, E; Spanos, A; Landsberger, S

    2001-04-01

    In earlier research, Rossini, Wygonik, Barrett, and Friedman (1994) demonstrated that the Thurstone Test of Mental Alertness (TMA) is a valid, brief measure of intelligence by comparing it to the Wechsler Scale of Adult Intelligence-Revised, which was at that time the "gold standard" of IQ assessment. Since that study, the WAIS has again been revised and reissued in a third edition, the WAIS-III. We assessed the relationship between scores on the Thurstone Test of Mental Alertness and this latest WAIS test to see if there is still a predictive relationship between the two tests. Correlations between the two tests and the accuracy of TMA point estimates of IQ indicate that the Thurstone Test of Mental Alertness remains a viable brief measure of adult intelligence.

  8. General-relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions: Formulation and tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulou, Kyriaki; Alic, Daniela; Palenzuela, Carlos; Rezzolla, Luciano; Giacomazzo, Bruno

    2013-08-01

    We present a new numerical implementation of the general-relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations within the Whisky code. The numerical method adopted exploits the properties of implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta numerical schemes to treat the stiff terms that appear in the equations for large electrical conductivities. Using tests in one, two, and three dimensions, we show that our implementation is robust and recovers the ideal-MHD limit in regimes of very high conductivity. Moreover, the results illustrate that the code is capable of describing scenarios in a very wide range of conductivities. In addition to tests in flat spacetime, we report simulations of magnetized nonrotating relativistic stars, both in the Cowling approximation and in dynamical spacetimes. Finally, because of its astrophysical relevance and because it provides a severe tested for general-relativistic codes with dynamical electromagnetic fields, we study the collapse of a nonrotating star to a black hole. We show that also in this case our results on the quasinormal mode frequencies of the excited electromagnetic fields in the Schwarzschild background agree with the perturbative studies within 0.7% and 5.6% for the real and the imaginary part of the ℓ=1 mode eigenfrequency, respectively. Finally we provide an estimate of the electromagnetic efficiency of this process.

  9. A massive binary black-hole system in OJ287 and a test of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Valtonen, M J; Nilsson, K; Heidt, J; Takalo, L O; Sillanpää, A; Villforth, C; Kidger, M; Poyner, G; Pursimo, T; Zola, S; Wu, J H; Zhou, X; Sadakane, K; Drozdz, M; Koziel, D; Marchev, D; Ogloza, W; Porowski, C; Siwak, M; Stachowski, G; Winiarski, M; Hentunen, V P; Nissinen, M; Liakos, A; Dogru, S

    2008-01-01

    Tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity have mostly been carried out in weak gravitational fields where the space-time curvature effects are first-order deviations from Newton's theory. Binary pulsars provide a means of probing the strong gravitational field around a neutron star, but strong-field effects may be best tested in systems containing black holes. Here we report such a test in a close binary system of two candidate black holes in the quasar OJ287. This quasar shows quasi-periodic optical outbursts at 12 yr intervals, with two outburst peaks per interval. The latest outburst occurred in September 2007, within a day of the time predicted by the binary black-hole model and general relativity. The observations confirm the binary nature of the system and also provide evidence for the loss of orbital energy in agreement (within 10 per cent) with the emission of gravitational waves from the system. In the absence of gravitational wave emission the outburst would have happened twenty days later.

  10. A Bayesian goodness of fit test and semiparametric generalization of logistic regression with measurement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schörgendorfer, Angela; Branscum, Adam J; Hanson, Timothy E

    2013-06-01

    Logistic regression is a popular tool for risk analysis in medical and population health science. With continuous response data, it is common to create a dichotomous outcome for logistic regression analysis by specifying a threshold for positivity. Fitting a linear regression to the nondichotomized response variable assuming a logistic sampling model for the data has been empirically shown to yield more efficient estimates of odds ratios than ordinary logistic regression of the dichotomized endpoint. We illustrate that risk inference is not robust to departures from the parametric logistic distribution. Moreover, the model assumption of proportional odds is generally not satisfied when the condition of a logistic distribution for the data is violated, leading to biased inference from a parametric logistic analysis. We develop novel Bayesian semiparametric methodology for testing goodness of fit of parametric logistic regression with continuous measurement data. The testing procedures hold for any cutoff threshold and our approach simultaneously provides the ability to perform semiparametric risk estimation. Bayes factors are calculated using the Savage-Dickey ratio for testing the null hypothesis of logistic regression versus a semiparametric generalization. We propose a fully Bayesian and a computationally efficient empirical Bayesian approach to testing, and we present methods for semiparametric estimation of risks, relative risks, and odds ratios when parametric logistic regression fails. Theoretical results establish the consistency of the empirical Bayes test. Results from simulated data show that the proposed approach provides accurate inference irrespective of whether parametric assumptions hold or not. Evaluation of risk factors for obesity shows that different inferences are derived from an analysis of a real data set when deviations from a logistic distribution are permissible in a flexible semiparametric framework.

  11. [Validation of the Eating Attitudes Test as a screening instrument for eating disorders in general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Fernández, María Angeles; Ruiz-Lázaro, Pedro Manuel; Labrador, Francisco Javier; Raich, Rosa María

    2014-02-20

    To validate the best cut-off point of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), Spanish version, for the screening of eating disorders (ED) in the general population. This was a transversal cross-sectional study. The EAT-40 Spanish version was administered to a representative sample of 1.543 students, age range 12 to 21 years, in the Region of Madrid. Six hundred and two participants (probable cases and a random sample of controls) were interviewed. The best diagnostic prediction was obtained with a cut-off point of 21, with sensitivity: 88.2%; specificity: 62.1%; positive predictive value: 17.7%; negative predictive value: 62.1%. Use of a cut-off point of 21 is recommended in epidemiological studies of eating disorders in the Spanish general population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  13. A reliability generalization study of coefficient alpha for the life orientation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassar, Matt; Bradley, Greg

    2010-07-01

    Dispositional optimism is a widely studied construct in social science and medicine associated with a variety of important psychological and physiological outcomes. Our purpose in this study was to examine coefficient alpha for a popular optimism measure: The Life Orientation Test (LOT; Scheier & Carver, 1985). We utilized a meta-analytic procedure known as reliability generalization to provide an aggregate estimate of coefficient alpha across empirical studies that have employed the scale over time and across populations. Furthermore, we identified sample and demographic characteristics associated with variance in coefficient alpha. We discuss conditions associated with variability in coefficient alpha and provide suggestions for continued research for the LOT.

  14. Frequency standards based on ultracold atoms in tests of general relativity, navigation and gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, K. Yu.; Kudeyarov, K. S.; Kolachevsky, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    Research and development in the field of optical clocks based on ultracold atoms and ions have enabled the relative uncertainty in frequency to be reduced down to a few parts in 1018. The use of novel, precise frequency comparison methods opens up new possibilities for basic research (sensitive tests of general relativity, a search for a drift of fundamental constants and a search for ‘dark matter’) as well as for state-of-the-art navigation and gravimetry. We discuss the key methods that are used in creating precision clocks (including transportable clocks) based on ultracold atoms and ions and the feasibility of using them in resolving current relativistic gravimetry issues.

  15. A Nonparametric Test of Interaction in the General Two-Way Layout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ÖHRVIK

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-way layout is frequently occurring, e.g. blocking is used to reduce the between subject variability when comparing treatments or many medical centers are included in a clinical trial to recruit a sufficient number of patients. In epidemiological studies, it is common to study the interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This paper is concerned with the statistical analysis of data arising in these situations when assumptions like normality do not necessarily apply. The main objective of this paper is to propose a test for interactions for continuous data based on joint ranking of all observations after iteratively eliminating the two main effects. The validity of the significance levels of the test when using a finite sample version of the asymptotic distribution of the test statistic is manifested and the power against different alternatives illustrated by extensive simulation experiments. The proposed test is compared with competitors on published data sets. Data from the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland (SALVe project are analyzed both with our test and Brunner and Puri's proposal. The test shows good asymptotic and small sample properties. It can be used in the general two-way layout and multiple comparisons can be performed in a straightforward way. The analyses of the SALVe project show that our proposal can be useful in such studies. It has the potential to pick-up interactions hidden in the noise of gross errors when using standard ANOVA. The test may become a valuable tool and alternative to other proposals in exploring interactions.

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  17. Implicit theories of intelligence and IQ test performance in adolescents with Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fonseca, D; Cury, F; Fakra, E; Rufo, M; Poinso, F; Bounoua, L; Huguet, P

    2008-04-01

    During the past decade, several studies have reported positive effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of children and adolescents with mental disorders. One of the most important CBT interventions is to teach children and adolescents to challenge negative thoughts that lead to maladjusted behaviors. Based on the implicit theories of intelligence framework, the main purpose of this study was to test whether an incremental theory manipulation could be used to affect IQ test performance in adolescents with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Results showed that patients demonstrated enhanced IQ performance and experienced less state anxiety when they were exposed to an incremental theory of intelligence manipulation. Our findings suggest that incremental theory manipulation provides a useful cognitive strategy for addressing school-related anxiety in adolescents with mental disorders such as GAD.

  18. Improved anomaly detection using multi-scale PLS and generalized likelihood ratio test

    KAUST Repository

    Madakyaru, Muddu

    2017-02-16

    Process monitoring has a central role in the process industry to enhance productivity, efficiency, and safety, and to avoid expensive maintenance. In this paper, a statistical approach that exploit the advantages of multiscale PLS models (MSPLS) and those of a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test to better detect anomalies is proposed. Specifically, to consider the multivariate and multi-scale nature of process dynamics, a MSPLS algorithm combining PLS and wavelet analysis is used as modeling framework. Then, GLR hypothesis testing is applied using the uncorrelated residuals obtained from MSPLS model to improve the anomaly detection abilities of these latent variable based fault detection methods even further. Applications to a simulated distillation column data are used to evaluate the proposed MSPLS-GLR algorithm.

  19. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10^{-5} – 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  20. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2012-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ~0.01mHz - 1Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  1. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative theories of gravity using Gravitational Wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational Wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test General Relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories like Scalar-Tensor theories, Dynamical Chern-Simons theory and Massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrised gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA config...

  2. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10(-5) - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  3. Perspectives for Developing New Tuberculosis Vaccines Derived from the Pathogenesis of Tuberculosis: I. Basic Principles, II. Preclinical Testing, and III. Clinical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Arthur M; Dey, Bappaditya

    2013-01-25

    stop the growth of developing tubercles before while they are still microscopic in size). Unfortunately, rabbits are rarely used in preclinical vaccine trials, despite their relative ease of handling and human-like response to this infection. Mice do not generate an effective DTH response, and guinea pigs do not generate an effective CMI response. Only the rabbits and most humans can establish the proper amount of DTH and CMI that is necessary to contain this infection. Therefore, rabbits should be included in all pre-clinical testing of new TB vaccines. New drugs (and/or immunological procedures) to reduce liquefaction and cavity formation are urgently needed. A simple intradermal way to select such drugs or procedures is described herein. Part III. Clinical Testing. Vaccine trials would be much more precise if the variations in human populations (listed herein) were taken into consideration. BCG and successful new TB vaccines should always increase host resistance to TB in naive subjects. This is a basic immunological principle. The efficacies of new and old TB vaccines are often not recognized, because these variations were not identified in the populations evaluated.

  4. Optimal Constant-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Plans Using Nonlinear Generalized Wiener Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated degradation test (ADT has been widely used to assess highly reliable products’ lifetime. To conduct an ADT, an appropriate degradation model and test plan should be determined in advance. Although many historical studies have proposed quite a few models, there is still room for improvement. Hence we propose a Nonlinear Generalized Wiener Process (NGWP model with consideration of the effects of stress level, product-to-product variability, and measurement errors for a higher estimation accuracy and a wider range of use. Then under the constraints of sample size, test duration, and test cost, the plans of constant-stress ADT (CSADT with multiple stress levels based on the NGWP are designed by minimizing the asymptotic variance of the reliability estimation of the products under normal operation conditions. An optimization algorithm is developed to determine the optimal stress levels, the number of units allocated to each level, inspection frequency, and measurement times simultaneously. In addition, a comparison based on degradation data of LEDs is made to show better goodness-of-fit of the NGWP than that of other models. Finally, optimal two-level and three-level CSADT plans under various constraints and a detailed sensitivity analysis are demonstrated through examples in this paper.

  5. Aircraft control surface failure detection and isolation using the OSGLR test. [orthogonal series generalized likelihood ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnice, W. F.; Motyka, P.; Wagner, E.; Hall, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of the orthogonal series generalized likelihood ratio (OSGLR) test in detecting and isolating commercial aircraft control surface and actuator failures is evaluated. A modification to incorporate age-weighting which significantly reduces the sensitivity of the algorithm to modeling errors is presented. The steady-state implementation of the algorithm based on a single linear model valid for a cruise flight condition is tested using a nonlinear aircraft simulation. A number of off-nominal no-failure flight conditions including maneuvers, nonzero flap deflections, different turbulence levels and steady winds were tested. Based on the no-failure decision functions produced by off-nominal flight conditions, the failure detection and isolation performance at the nominal flight condition was determined. The extension of the algorithm to a wider flight envelope by scheduling on dynamic pressure and flap deflection is examined. Based on this testing, the OSGLR algorithm should be capable of detecting control surface failures that would affect the safe operation of a commercial aircraft. Isolation may be difficult if there are several surfaces which produce similar effects on the aircraft. Extending the algorithm over the entire operating envelope of a commercial aircraft appears feasible.

  6. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity Using Gravitational Wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, K. G.; Pai, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test general relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories such as scalar-tensor theories, dynamical Chern-Simons theory and massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrized gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA configuration. We also compare the expected bounds on alternative theories of gravity from ground-based and space-based detectors and find that space-based GW detectors can test GR and other theories of gravity with unprecedented accuracies. We then focus on a recent proposal to use singular value decomposition of the Fisher information matrix to improve the accuracies with which post-Newtonian theory can be tested. We extend those results to the case of space-based detector eLISA and discuss its implications.

  7. 49 CFR 40.321 - What is the general confidentiality rule for drug and alcohol test information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Release of Information § 40.321 What is the general confidentiality rule for drug and alcohol test... explicitly authorize or require the transmission of information in the course of the drug or alcohol testing... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the general confidentiality rule for...

  8. Demand patterns for HIV-tests in general practice: information collected by sentinel networks in 5 European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteren, V. van; Leurquin, P.; Bartelds, A.; Gurtner, F.; Massari, V.; Maurice-Tison, S.; Vega, A.T.; Mak, R.

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a 1 year international data collection on the demand pattern for HIV-antibody tests in general practice recorded by 6 sentinel networks in 5 European countries. The purpose of the recording was to evaluate the use of HIV-antibody testing by general practitioners and the demand

  9. Testing General Relativity on Horizon Scales and the Primordial non-Gaussianity

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uros; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2011-01-01

    The proper general relativistic description of the observed galaxy power spectrum is substantially different from the standard Newtonian description on large scales, providing a unique opportunity to test general relativity on horizon scales. Using the Einstein equations, the general relativistic effects can be classified as two new terms that represent the velocity and the gravitational potential, coupling to the time evolution of galaxy number density and Hubble parameter. Compared to the dominant density and velocity redshift-space distortion terms, the former scales as H/k and correlates the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier modes, while the latter scales as (H/k)^2, where k is the comoving wave number and H is the conformal Hubble parameter. We use the recently developed methods to reduce the sampling variance and shot noise to show that in an all sky galaxy redshift survey at low redshift the velocity term can be measured at 10-sigma confidence level, if one can utilize halos of mass M>10^{10} Msu...

  10. ROSA-III double-ended break test series for a loss-of-coolant accident in a boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasaka, K.; Anoda, Y.; Koizumi, Y.; Kumamaru, H.; Nakamura, H.; Shiba, M.; Suzuki, M.; Yonomoto, T.

    1985-01-01

    The Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA) III facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) boiling water reactor (BWR) system with an electrically heated core designed for integral loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and emergency-core-cooling-system (ECCS) tests. Experimental results obtained so far confirm that the severest single failure assumption in ECCS is the high-pressure core spray system failure even in a large-break LOCA in a BWR. The measured peak cladding temperature was well below the present safety criterion of 1473 K, even with the single failure assumption in ECCS, and the effectiveness of ECCS for core cooling during a double-ended-break LOCA has been confirmed. The overall agreement between the results calculated by the RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3 computer code and the experimental results is good. The similarity between the ROSA-III test and a BWR LOCA has been confirmed through the comparison of calculated results for the ROSA-III facility and a BWR system.

  11. Rorschach and the WAIS-III after one and two years of psychotherapy O teste de Rorschach e a Escala WAIS-III após um e dois Anos de psicoterapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latife Yazigi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying what aspects of personality are modified after one and two years of psychoanalytic psychotherapy in adults attending a free university healthcare service in São Paulo, Brazil. The instruments were the Rorschach and the WAIS-III tests which were administered before and after one and two years of treatment. The participants were 34 adult individuals, both genders. After one year of psychotherapy in the Rorschach method there was an increase in effective and adaptive interpersonal relationship, an enhancement in sensitiveness related to the capacity of modulating affect, the need for close contact as well as the arousal of feelings of discomfort associated with intensification of self-regard, and a decrease in narcissistic tendencies. As well as in WAIS-III, there was an increase in motivation, attention and speed processing.O estudo teve por objetivo identificar quais aspectos da personalidade são modificados após um e dois anos de psicoterapia psicanalítica em adultos atendidos em um serviço público de saúde mental de uma universidade em São Paulo, no Brasil. Os instrumentos utilizados foram o Rorschach e a Escala de Inteligência Wechsler para adultos (WAIS-III, os quais foram administrados antes e após um e dois anos de tratamento. Os participantes foram 34 indivíduos adultos, de ambos os sexos. No Rorschach, após um ano de psicoterapia, ocorreu melhora da relação interpessoal adaptada e efetiva, melhora na sensibilidade relacionada à capacidade de modular afeto e da necessidade de contato mais próximo, e surgimento de sentimentos de desconforto associados à intensificação de auto-observação e diminuição de tendências narcisistas. No WAIS-III houve aumento de motivação, melhora atencional e de velocidade de processamento.

  12. International Conference on Harmonisation; Stability Data Package for Registration Applications in Climatic Zones III and IV; Stability Testing of New Drug Substances and Products; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-21

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of two guidances prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The first is a guidance entitled "Q1F Stability Data Package for Registration Applications in Climatic Zones III and IV'' (the Q1F guidance). The second is a revised guidance entitled "Q1A(R2) Stability Testing of New Drug Substances and Products'' (the Q1A guidance). The Q1F guidance, which is an annex to the Q1A guidance, defines an approach for broader use of the Q1A guidance for territories in climatic zones III and IV. The revised Q1A guidance incorporates relevant Q1F recommendations.

  13. The Moon as a Test Body for General Relativity and New Gravitational Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Manuele; March, Riccardo; Bellettini, Giovanni; Dell'Agnello, S.; Delle Monache, G. O.; Currie, D. G.; Martini, M.; Lops, C.; Garattini, M.; March, R.; Bellettini, G.; Tauraso, R.; Battat, J. B.; Bianco, G.; Murphy, T. W., Jr.; Coradini, A.; Boni, A.; Cantone, C.; Maiello, M.; Porcelli, L.; Berardi, S.; Intaglietta, N.

    Since 1969 Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo Cube Corner Reflector (CCR) arrays has supplied several significant tests of General Relativity (GR): it has evaluated the Geodetic Precession, probed the weak and strong equivalence principle, determined the PPN parameter , addressed the time change of G and 1/r2 deviations. We show that the Moon equipped with retroreflectors can be used effectively to test new gravitational theories beyond GR, like spacetime torsion (developed by some of the authors) and the unified braneworld theory by G. Dvali et al. LLR has also provided important information on the composition and origin of the Moon through measurement of its rotations and tides. Future robotic lunar missions, like the proposed International Lunar Network (ILN) will greatly expand this broad scientific program.Initially, the Apollo arrays contributed a negligible portion of the LLR error budget. Nowadays, the ranging accuracy of ground stations has improved by more than two orders of magnitude: the new APOLLO station at Apache Point, USA, is capable of mm-level range measurements; MRLO, at the ASI Space Geodesy Center in Matera, Italy, has re-started LR operations. Now, because of lunar librations, the Apollo arrays dominate the LLR error budget, which is a few cm. The University of Maryland, Principal Investigator for the Apollo arrays, and INFN-LNF are proposing an innovative CCR array design that will reduce the error contribution of LLR payloads by more than two orders of magnitude, down to tens of microns. This is the goal of the MoonLIGHT technological experiment of INFN (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-Accuracy Tests) and of the SCF, the CCR space test facility at LNF. We have also proposed the precursor test of the MoonLIGHT payload on the ASI lunar orbiter mission MAGIA (A. Coradini PI), which concluded its Phase A Study in 2009. In our new array design the main challenges are: 1) address the thermal and optical effects of the

  14. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project/General Electric Open Rotor Test Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zante, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The Open Rotor is a modern version of the UnDucted Fan (UDF) that was flight tested in the late 1980's through a partnership between NASA and General Electric (GE). Tests were conducted in the 9'x15' Low Speed Wind Tunnel and the 8'x6' Supersonic Wind Tunnel starting in late 2009 and completed in early 2012. Aerodynamic and acoustic data were obtained for takeoff, approach and cruise simulations. GE was the primary partner, but other organizations were involved such as Boeing and Airbus who provided additional hardware for fuselage simulations. This test campaign provided the acoustic and performance characteristics for modern open rotor blades designs." NASA and GE conducted joint systems analysis to evaluate how well new blade designs would perform on a B737 class aircraft, and compared the results to an advanced higher bypass ratio turbofan." Acoustic shielding experiments were performed at NASA GRC and Boeing LSAF facilities to provide data for noise estimates of unconventional aircraft configurations with Open Rotor propulsion systems." The work was sponsored by NASA's aeronautics programs, including the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) projects."

  15. Predictive validity of a written knowledge test of skills for an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, A W M; Jansen, J J M; Zuithoff, P; Düsman, H; Tan, L H C; Grol, R P T M; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2002-09-01

    To examine the validity of a written knowledge test of skills for performance on an OSCE in postgraduate training for general practice. A randomly-selected sample of 47 trainees in general practice took a knowledge test of skills, a general knowledge test and an OSCE. The OSCE included technical stations and stations including complete patient encounters. Each station was checklist rated and global rated. The knowledge test of skills was better correlated to the OSCE than the general knowledge test. Technical stations were better correlated to the knowledge test of skills than stations including complete patient encounters. For the technical stations the rating system had no influence on the correlation. For the stations including complete patient encounters the checklist rating correlated better to the knowledge test of skills than the global rating. The results of this study support the predictive validity of the knowledge test of skills. In postgraduate training for general practice a written knowledge test of skills can be used as an instrument to estimate the level of clinical skills, especially for group evaluation, such as in studies examining the efficacy of a training programme or as a screening instrument for deciding about courses to be offered. This estimation is more accurate when the content of the test matches the skills under study. However, written testing of skills cannot replace direct observation of performance of skills.

  16. A general method for preparing lanthanide oxide nanoparticles via thermal decomposition of lanthanide(III) complexes with 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and hydrazine ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parimalagandhi, Karuppannan; Premkumar, Thathan; Vairam, Sundararajan

    2016-09-01

    Six new lanthanide(III) complexes (i.e., [Ln(L)2(NA)1.5]·3H2O, where Ln=La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), and Ce(III) and L and NA indicate N2H4 and C10H6(1-O)(2-COO), respectively) with 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid [C10H6(1-O)(2-COOH)] and hydrazine (N2H4) as co-ligands were characterized by elemental, FTIR, UV-visible, and XRD techniques. In the FT-IR spectra, the N-N stretching frequency in the range of 981-949 cm-1 demonstrates evidence of the presence of coordinated N2H4, indicating the bidentate bridging nature of hydrazine in the complexes. These complexes show symmetric and asymmetric COO- stretching from 1444 to 1441 cm-1 and 1582 to 1557 cm-1, respectively, indicating bidentate coordination. TG-DTA studies revealed that the compounds underwent endothermic dehydration from 98 to 110 °C. This was followed by the exothermic decomposition of oxalate intermediates to yield the respective metal oxides as the end products. From SEM images, the average size of the metal oxide particles prepared by thermal decomposition of the complexes was determined to be 39-42 nm. The powder X-ray and SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) studies revealed the presence of the respective nano-sized metal oxides. The kinetic parameters of the decomposition of the complexes were calculated using the Coats-Redfern equation.

  17. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Chemical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2D Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2D concerns numerical simulation of the coupled THC modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, hydrologic, mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and compared with geochemical measurements performed on gas, water, and mineral samples collected from the DST. Two teams of DOE/LBNL (USA) and JNC (Japan) participated the task with different approaches. The LBNL model represented the fractures and rock matrix by a dual-continuum concept, with the mineral-water-gas reactions treated by primarily kinetic and a few equilibrium reactions. The JNC model represented the fractures and matrix as a single effective continuum, with equilibrium mineral-water reactions controlling the chemical evolution (as well as considering aqueous species transport). The JNC team performed the coupled THC simulation of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test by the coupled THM code 'THAMES', mass transport code 'Dtransu' and geochemical code 'PHREEQE' under coupling system code 'COUPLYS'. The LBNL team simulated the THC processes include coupling between heat, water, and vapor flow; aqueous and gaseous species transport; kinetic and equilibrium mineral-water reactions; and feedback of mineral precipitation/dissolution on porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, with the FDM code TOUGHREACT V3.0. In general, both models capture the temperature evolution in the rock fairly well, although the JNC model yielded a closer match to the initial temperature rise in the rock, probably due to the better site-specific thermal data. Both models showed the contrasting solubility effects of increasing temperature on calcite and silica solubility; yet the dual continuum approach better represented the effects of

  18. A general approach for combining diverse rare variant association tests provides improved robustness across a wider range of genetic architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Brian; Hainline, Allison; Arbet, Jaron; Grinde, Kelsey; Benitez, Alejandra; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    The widespread availability of genome sequencing data made possible by way of next-generation technologies has yielded a flood of different gene-based rare variant association tests. Most of these tests have been published because they have superior power for particular genetic architectures. However, for applied researchers it is challenging to know which test to choose in practice when little is known a priori about genetic architecture. Recently, tests have been proposed which combine two particular individual tests (one burden and one variance components) to minimize power loss while improving robustness to a wider range of genetic architectures. In our analysis we propose an expansion of these approaches, yielding a general method that works for combining any number of individual tests. We demonstrate that running multiple different tests on the same data set and using a Bonferroni correction for multiple testing is never better than combining tests using our general method. We also find that using a test statistic that is highly robust to the inclusion of non-causal variants (joint-infinity) together with a previously published combined test (sequence kernel adaptive test-optimal) provides improved robustness to a wide range of genetic architectures and should be considered for use in practice. Software for this approach is supplied. We support the increased use of combined tests in practice - as well as further exploration of novel combined testing approaches using the general framework provided here - to maximize robustness of rare variant testing strategies against a wide range of genetic architectures.

  19. Planetary ephemeris construction and general relativity tests of PPN-formalism with MESSENGER radioscience data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2013-10-01

    Current knowledge of Mercury orbit is mainly brought by the direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft orbiting Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the Mercury orbit. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity test of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (β and γ) are most stringent than previous results.

  20. Use of MESSENGER radioscience data to improve planetary ephemeris and to test general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Ashok; Laskar, Jacques; Manche, Herve; Gastineau, Mickael

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of Mercury orbit is mainly brought by the direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft orbiting Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the orbit of Mercury. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity test of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters are most stringent than previous results.

  1. Motivation towards extracurricular activities and motivation at school: A test of the generalization effect hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denault, Anne-Sophie; Guay, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is a promising avenue for enhancing students' school motivation. Using self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), the goal of this study was to test a serial multiple mediator model. In this model, students' perceptions of autonomy support from their extracurricular activity leader predicted their activity-based intrinsic and identified regulations. In turn, these regulations predicted their school-based intrinsic and identified regulations during the same school year. Finally, these regulations predicted their school-based intrinsic and identified regulations one year later. A total of 276 youths (54% girls) from disadvantaged neighborhoods were surveyed over two waves of data collection. The proposed mediation model was supported for both types of regulation. These results highlight the generalization effects of motivation from the extracurricular activity context to the school context. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Supermassive Black Hole Tests of General Relativity with eLISA

    CERN Document Server

    Huwyler, Cédric; Jetzer, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the parameterized post-Einsteinian (ppE) scheme devised by Yunes and Pretorius, which introduces corrections to the post-Newtonian coefficients of the frequency domain gravitational waveform in order to emulate alternative theories of gravity, we compute analytical time domain waveforms that, after a numerical Fourier transform, aim to represent (phase corrected only) ppE waveforms. In this formalism, alternative theories manifest themselves via corrections to the phase and frequency, as predicted by General Relativity (GR), at different post-Newtonian (PN) orders. In order to present a generic test of alternative theories of gravity, we assume that the coupling constant of each alternative theory is manifestly positive, allowing corrections to the GR waveforms to be either positive or negative. By exploring the capabilities of massive black hole binary GR waveforms in the detection and parameter estimation of corrected time domain ppE signals, using the current eLISA configuration (as presented ...

  3. General-purpose heat source safety verification test series: SVT-7 through SVT-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, T. G.; Pavone, D.

    1985-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses (formerly ISPM) space missions. The GPHS provides power by transmitting the heat of (238)PuO2 (ALPHA)-decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because the possibility of an orbital abort always exists, the heat source was designed and constructed to minimize plutonia release in any accident environment. The Safety Verification Test (SVT) series was formulated to evaluate the effectiveness of GPHS plutonia containment after atmospheric reentry and Earth impact. The first report (covering SVT-1 through SVT-6) described the results of flat and side-on module impacts. This report describes module impacts at angles of 15(0) and 30(0).

  4. General-purpose heat source safety verification test series: SVT-11 through SVT-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, T. G.; Pavone, D.

    1986-05-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator that will provide power for the Galileo and Ulysses (formerly ISPM) space missions. The GPHS provides power by transmitting the heat of Pu -decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because the possibility of an orbital abort always exists, the heat source was designed and constructed to minimize plutonia release in any accident environment. The Safety Verification Test (SVT) series was formulated to evaluate the effectiveness of GPHS plutonia containment after atmospheric reentry and Earth impact. The first two reports (covering SVT-1 through SVT-10) described the results of flat, side-on, and angular module impacts against steel targets at 54 m/s. This report describes flat-on module impacts against concrete and granite targets, at velocities equivalent to or higher than previous SVTs.

  5. A generalized Nadai failure criterion for both crystalline and clastic rocks based on true triaxial tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimson, Bezalel; Chang, Chandong; Ma, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    The UW true triaxial testing system enables the application of independent compressive loads to cuboidal specimens (19×19×38 mm) along three principal directions. We used the apparatus to conduct extensive series of experiments in three crystalline rocks (Westerly granite, KTB amphibolite, and SAFOD granodiorite) and three clastic rocks of different porosities [TCDP siltstone (7%), Coconino sandstone (17%), and Bentheim sandstone (24%)]. For each rock, several magnitudes of σ3 were employed, between 0 MPa and 100-160 MPa, and for every σ3, σ2 was varied from test to test between σ2 = σ3 and σ2=(0.4 to 1.0) σ1.Testing consisted of keeping σ2and σ3constant, and raising σ1to failure (σ1,peak). The results, plotted as σ1,peakvs. σ2for each σ3 used, highlight the undeniable effect of σ2on the compressive failure of rocks. For each level of σ3, the lowest σ2 tested (σ2 = σ3) yielded the data point used for conventional-triaxial failure criterion. However, for the same σ3 and depending on σ2 magnitude, the maximum stress bringing about failure (σ1,peak) may be considerably higher, by as much as 50% in crystalline rocks, or 15% in clastic rocks, over that in a conventional triaxial test. An important consequence is that use of a Mohr-type criterion leads to overly conservative predictions of failure. The true triaxial test results demonstrate that a criterion in terms of all (three principal stresses is necessary to characterize failure. Thus, we propose a 'Generalized Nadai Criterion' (GNC) based on Nadai (1950), i.e. expressed in terms of the two stress invariants at failure (f), τoct,f = βσoct,f, where τoct,f = 1/3[(σ1,peak -σ2)2+(σ2 -σ3)2+(σ3 -σ1,peak)2]0.5 and σoct,f = (σ1,peak + σ2 + σ3)/3, and β is a function that varies from rock to rock. Moreover, the criterion depends also on the relative magnitude of σ2, represented by a parameter b [= (σ2 - σ3)/(σ1,peak - σ3)]. For each octahedral shear stress at failure (

  6. School truancy among Turkish high school students: A test of General Strain Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Solakoglu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available School absenteeism is a complicated problem with a variety of causes. It has been shown to be one of the main predictors of school drop-outs as well as leading to delinquency and criminal behavior in adulthood. This study examines the applicability of General Strain Theory on educational factors by considering truancy as a risk behavior. In this empirical study, we test the explanatory powers of certain kinds of strain, including school strain, economic deprivation, negative life events, anger, college plans, past victimization, and depression on students’ truancy. Data were drawn from the part of 2008 Youth in Europe Survey conducted in Istanbul in 2008. The sample consists of 2445 high school students. Results indicate that school strain, anger, and negative life events are significantly associated with likelihood of truancy while past victimization and economic strain have no effect. College goal and depression, on the other hand, have relatively weaker effects on students’ school absenteeism. Findings revealed that there is a relationship between cutting classes and certain kinds of strain among Turkish adolescents. The study also demonstrates that General Strain Theory is applicable for problematic behaviors in an educational context and generalizable to countries other than the U.S.

  7. The Moon as a Laser-ranged Test Body for General Relativity and New Gravitational Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agnello, Simone; Currie, Douglas

    Since the 1970s Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) to the Apollo/Lunokhod Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR) Arrays supplied some of the best tests of General Relativity (GR): possible changes in the gravitational constant, gravitational self-energy (PPN parameter beta), weak equivalence principle, geodetic precession, inverse-square force-law. Secondly, LLR has provided significant information on the composition of the deep interior of the Moon. LLR physics analysis also allows to set constraints on extensions of GR (like spacetime torsion) and, possibly, on new gravitational physics which may explain the gravitational universe without Dark Matter and Dark Energy (like, for example, Non-Minimally Coupled gravity, NMC). LLR is the only Apollo/Lunokhod experiment still in operation, since 45 years. In the 1970s Apollo/Lunokohd LLR Arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Since the ranging capabilities of ground stations improved by more than two orders of magnitude, now, because of the lunar librations, Apollo/Lunokhod CCR arrays dominate the error budget. With the US/Italy project "LLRRA21/MoonLIGHT (Lunar Laser Ranging Retroreflector Array for the 21st century / Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High accuracy Tests)", University of Maryland and INFN-LNF developed and tested a next-generation LLR payload made by a single, large CCR (100 mm diameter), unaffected by the effect of librations. In fact, we will show that MoonLIGHT reflectors will improve the LLR accuracy by a factor of ten to one hundred in a few years. INFN-LNF also developed a laser retroreflector micropayload to be deployed on the lunar surface to be laser-ranged by lunar orbiters. The latter micropayload will further extend the physics reach of Apollo, Lunokhod and MoonLIGHT CCRs to improve all precision tests of GR and new gravitational physics using LLR data. As an added value for the LRR and SLR (Satellite Laser ranging) disciplines INFN-LNF built and is

  8. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydrological Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2A concerns coupled TH modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and requiring predictions for distributions and evolutions of the temperature and saturation fields. Three teams of ENRESA (Spain), DOE (USA), and NRC (USA) teams participated the task with different approaches, using FEM code Bright with a double porosity structure (ENRESA), a FDM code MULTIFLO with a dual continuum approach and an active fracture model (NRC) and a FDM code TOUGH 2 with a dual permeability approach (DOE), respectively. Based on the results of the temperature and moisture distributions and temperature histories, it can be concluded that in general, the three models capture the TH response of the DST fairly well, although there are some differences between the teams' results. Conduction is the dominant heat-transfer mechanism in the fractured unsaturated rock in the DST, especially in the sub-boiling regime. However, the pore water plays an important role near the boiling point as it goes through cycles of vaporization and condensation causing the so called heat-pipe effect. A characteristic signature of heatpipes - a short lull in the rise of temperature - was captured by all three teams. The 2D modeling of the DST carried out by the ENRESA team initially was characterized by very little diffusion of vapor because the tortuosity factor was set at a low value of 0.05 and is referred to as the ND (No Diffusion) case. The recent 3D model with a tortuosity factor set at 1 and a vapor diffusion enhancement coefficient allows maximum vapor diffusion and is referred to as the MD (maximum diffusion) case. Comparative analyses of the modeling results for ND and MD

  9. Rapid and sensitive lateral flow immunoassay method for determining alpha fetoprotein in serum using europium (III) chelate microparticles-based lateral flow test strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rong-Liang; Xu, Xu-Ping; Liu, Tian-Cai; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Wang, Xian-Guo; Ren, Zhi-Qi; Hao, Fen; Wu, Ying-Song

    2015-09-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a primary marker for many diseases including various cancers, is important in clinical tumor diagnosis and antenatal screening. Most immunoassays provide high sensitivity and accuracy for determining AFP, but they are expensive, often complex, time-consuming procedures. A simple and rapid point-of-care system that integrates Eu (III) chelate microparticles with lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) has been developed to determine AFP in serum with an assay time of 15 min. The approach is based on a sandwich immunoassay performed on lateral flow test strips. A fluorescence strip reader was used to measure the fluorescence peak heights of the test line (HT) and the control line (HC); the HT/HC ratio was used for quantitation. The Eu (III) chelate microparticles-based LFIA assay exhibited a wide linear range (1.0-1000 IU mL(-1)) for AFP with a low limit of detection (0.1 IU mL(-1)) based on 5ul of serum. Satisfactory specificity and accuracy were demonstrated and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) for AFP were both chelate microparticles-based LFIA system provided a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for determining AFP in serum, indicating that it would be suitable for development in point-of-care testing.

  10. General Aviation Flight Test of Advanced Operations Enabled by Synthetic Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Hughhes, Monica F.; Parrish, Russell V.; Takallu, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test was performed to compare the use of three advanced primary flight and navigation display concepts to a baseline, round-dial concept to assess the potential for advanced operations. The displays were evaluated during visual and instrument approach procedures including an advanced instrument approach resembling a visual airport traffic pattern. Nineteen pilots from three pilot groups, reflecting the diverse piloting skills of the General Aviation pilot population, served as evaluation subjects. The experiment had two thrusts: 1) an examination of the capabilities of low-time (i.e., <400 hours), non-instrument-rated pilots to perform nominal instrument approaches, and 2) an exploration of potential advanced Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC)-like approaches in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Within this context, advanced display concepts are considered to include integrated navigation and primary flight displays with either aircraft attitude flight directors or Highway In The Sky (HITS) guidance with and without a synthetic depiction of the external visuals (i.e., synthetic vision). Relative to the first thrust, the results indicate that using an advanced display concept, as tested herein, low-time, non-instrument-rated pilots can exhibit flight-technical performance, subjective workload and situation awareness ratings as good as or better than high-time Instrument Flight Rules (IFR)-rated pilots using Baseline Round Dials for a nominal IMC approach. For the second thrust, the results indicate advanced VMC-like approaches are feasible in IMC, for all pilot groups tested for only the Synthetic Vision System (SVS) advanced display concept.

  11. Attitudes toward genetic testing among the general population and relatives of patients with a severe genetic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hietala, M; Hakonen, A; Aro, A R

    1995-01-01

    In the present study we explore the attitudes of the Finnish population toward genetic testing by conducting a questionnaire study of a stratified sample of the population as well as of family members of patients with a severe hereditary disease, aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU). The questionnaire...... members of AGU patients have a favorable attitude toward genetic testing. However, a commonly expressed reason against testing was that test results might lead to discrimination in employment or insurance policies. Based on the responses, we predict that future genetic testing programs will most probably...... evaluated attitudes toward gene tests in general and also respondents' preparedness to undergo gene tests for predictive testing, carrier detection, prenatal diagnosis, and selective abortion, in theoretical situations. The results of the study indicate that both the Finnish population in general and family...

  12. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part III--Practitioners and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, David; Martinez, David; Aenchbacher, Amy; Aiello, Rocco; Doyle, Mike; Hilgenbrinck, Linda; Busse, Sean; Cappuccio, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In Part III of the feature, physical educators and adapted physical educators offer current best practices as models of implementation for readers. Contributions included are: (1) Answer to the Dear Colleague Letter from the Anchorage School District's Adapted Sport Program (David Poulin); (2) Georgia's Adapted Physical Educators Response to the…

  13. Rapid and sensitive lateral flow immunoassay method for determining alpha fetoprotein in serum using europium (III) chelate microparticles-based lateral flow test strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Rong-Liang; Xu, Xu-Ping; Liu, Tian-Cai; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Wang, Xian-Guo; Ren, Zhi-Qi [Institute of Antibody Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong (China); Hao, Fen [DaAn Gene Co. Ltd. of Sun Yat-sen University, 19 Xiangshan Road, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Wu, Ying-Song, E-mail: wg@smu.edu.cn [Institute of Antibody Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong (China)

    2015-09-03

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a primary marker for many diseases including various cancers, is important in clinical tumor diagnosis and antenatal screening. Most immunoassays provide high sensitivity and accuracy for determining AFP, but they are expensive, often complex, time-consuming procedures. A simple and rapid point-of-care system that integrates Eu (III) chelate microparticles with lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) has been developed to determine AFP in serum with an assay time of 15 min. The approach is based on a sandwich immunoassay performed on lateral flow test strips. A fluorescence strip reader was used to measure the fluorescence peak heights of the test line (H{sub T}) and the control line (H{sub C}); the H{sub T}/H{sub C} ratio was used for quantitation. The Eu (III) chelate microparticles-based LFIA assay exhibited a wide linear range (1.0–1000 IU mL{sup −1}) for AFP with a low limit of detection (0.1 IU mL{sup −1}) based on 5ul of serum. Satisfactory specificity and accuracy were demonstrated and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) for AFP were both <10%. Furthermore, in the analysis of human serum samples, excellent correlation (n = 284, r = 0.9860, p < 0.0001) was obtained between the proposed method and a commercially available CLIA kit. Results indicated that the Eu (III) chelate microparticles-based LFIA system provided a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for determining AFP in serum, indicating that it would be suitable for development in point-of-care testing. - Highlights: • Europium (III) chelate microparticles was used as a label for LIFA. • Quantitative detection by using H{sub T}/H{sub C} ratio was achieved. • LIFA for simple and rapid AFP detection in human serum. • The sensitivity and linearity was more excellent compared with QD-based ICTS. • This method could be developed for rapid point-of-care screening.

  14. On-Demand Testing and Maintaining Standards for General Qualifications in the UK Using Item Response Theory: Possibilities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingping

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although on-demand testing is being increasingly used in many areas of assessment, it has not been adopted in high stakes examinations like the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) and General Certificate of Education Advanced level (GCE A level) offered by awarding organisations (AOs) in the UK. One of the major issues…

  15. The Impact of Prerequisite General Education Courses on the ETS Major Field Test for Business (MFT-B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Charles Michael; Rodriguez, Linda Carol; Harrison, David S.; Wates, Kathleen W.

    2014-01-01

    The authors explore the relationship between general education prerequisite courses, used for schools of business admission, and predicted grade point averages (PGPAs) with the Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B). The MFT-B is designed to assess the general business knowledge of students at the end of their programs. There is no known literature…

  16. Testing and preventive maintenance scheduling optimization for aging systems modeled by generalized renewal process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Correa Damaso

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of stochastic point processes to model the reliability of repairable systems has been a regular approach to establish survival measures in failure versus repair scenarios. However, the traditional processes do not consider the actual state in which an item returns to operational condition. The traditional renewal process considers an "as-good-as-new" philosophy, while a non-homogeneous Poisson process is based on the minimal repair concept. In this work, an approach based on the concept of Generalized Renewal Process (GRP is presented, which is a generalization of the renewal process and the non-homogeneous Poisson process. A stochastic modeling is presented for systems availability analysis, including testing and/or preventive maintenances scheduling. To validate the proposed approach, it was performed a case study of a hypothetical auxiliary feed-water system of a nuclear power plant, using genetic algorithm as optimization tool.O uso de processos estocásticos pontuais para modelar a confiabilidade de sistemas reparáveis tem sido constante para estabelecer medidas de sobrevivência em cenários de falha versus reparo. Entretanto, os processos tradicionais não consideram o real estado no qual um item retorna à condição operacional. O processo de renovação tradicional considera uma filosofia de "tão-bom-quanto-novo", enquanto um processo não-homogêneo de Poisson é baseado no conceito de reparo mínimo. Neste trabalho, é apresentada uma abordagem baseada no conceito de Processo de Renovação Generalizado (PRG, que é uma generalização de processo de renovação e de processo não-homogêneo de Poisson. Uma modelagem estocástica será apresentada para análise de disponibilidade de sistemas, incluindo planejamento de testes e/ou manutenção preventiva. Para validar a abordagem proposta, um estudo de caso foi desenvolvido para um hipotético sistema auxiliar de água de alimentação de uma usina nuclear, usando algoritmo

  17. First level analysis report: comparative testing of HVS Mk IV+ and HVS Mk III on road D2388 near Cullinan

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Morton, B

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available , result in variations in pavement response and test results. Based on this concern and in an effort to ensure uniformity throughout APT with the HVS, a comparative testing project was initiated to compare the effect of the two machines on pavement...

  18. New tests of the distal speech rate effect: examining cross-linguistic generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Laura C; Morrill, Tuuli H; Banzina, Elina

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings [Dilley and Pitt, 2010. Psych. Science. 21, 1664-1670] have shown that manipulating context speech rate in English can cause entire syllables to disappear or appear perceptually. The current studies tested two rate-based explanations of this phenomenon while attempting to replicate and extend these findings to another language, Russian. In Experiment 1, native Russian speakers listened to Russian sentences which had been subjected to rate manipulations and performed a lexical report task. Experiment 2 investigated speech rate effects in cross-language speech perception; non-native speakers of Russian of both high and low proficiency were tested on the same Russian sentences as in Experiment 1. They decided between two lexical interpretations of a critical portion of the sentence, where one choice contained more phonological material than the other (e.g., /str'na/ "side" vs. /str'na/ "country"). In both experiments, with native and non-native speakers of Russian, context speech rate and the relative duration of the critical sentence portion were found to influence the amount of phonological material perceived. The results support the generalized rate normalization hypothesis, according to which the content perceived in a spectrally ambiguous stretch of speech depends on the duration of that content relative to the surrounding speech, while showing that the findings of Dilley and Pitt (2010) extend to a variety of morphosyntactic contexts and a new language, Russian. Findings indicate that relative timing cues across an utterance can be critical to accurate lexical perception by both native and non-native speakers.

  19. New tests of the distal speech rate effect: Examining cross-linguistic generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eDilley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings [Dilley and Pitt, 2010. Psych. Science. 21, 1664-1670] have shown that manipulating context speech rate in English can cause entire syllables to disappear or appear perceptually. The current studies tested two rate-based explanations of this phenomenon while attempting to replicate and extend these findings to another language, Russian. In Experiment 1, native Russian speakers listened to Russian sentences which had been subjected to rate manipulations and performed a lexical report task. Experiment 2 investigated speech rate effects in cross-language speech perception; non-native speakers of Russian of both high and low proficiency were tested on the same Russian sentences as in Experiment 1. They decided between two lexical interpretations of a critical portion of the sentence, where one choice contained more phonological material than the other (e.g., /stərʌ'na/ side vs. /strʌ'na/ country. In both experiments, with native and non-native speakers of Russian, context speech rate and the relative duration of the critical sentence portion were found to influence the amount of phonological material perceived. The results support the generalized rate normalization hypothesis, according to which the content perceived in a spectrally ambiguous stretch of speech depends on the duration of that content relative to the surrounding speech, while showing that the findings of Dilley and Pitt (2010 extend to a variety of morphosyntactic contexts and a new language, Russian. Findings indicate that relative timing cues across an utterance can be critical to accurate lexical perception by both native and non-native speakers.

  20. General synthetic approach to heterostructured nanocrystals based on noble metals and I-VI, II-VI, and I-III-VI metal chalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minghui; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2014-08-19

    Solid metal precursors (alloys or monometals) can serve both as a starting template and as a source material for chemical transformation to metal chalcogenides. Herein, we develop a simple solution-based strategy to obtain highly monodisperse noble-metal-based heterostructured nanocrystals from such precursor seeds. By utilizing chemical and structural inhomogeneity of these metal seeds, in this work, we have synthesized a total of five I-VI (Ag2S, Ag2Se, Ag3AuS2, Ag3AuSe2, and Cu9S5), three II-VI (CdS, CdSe, and CuSe), and four I-III-VI (AgInS2, AgInSe2, CuInS2, and CuInSe2) chalcogenides, together with their fifteen associated heterodimers (Au-Ag2S, Au-Ag2Se, Au-Ag3AuS2, Au-Ag3AuSe2, Au-AgInS2, Au-AgInSe2, Au-CdS, Au-CdSe, Ag-Ag2S, Ag-AgInS2, Au-Cu9S5, Au-CuInS2, Au-CuSe, Au-CuInSe2, and Pt-AgInS2) to affirm the process generality. Briefly, by adding elemental sulfur or selenium to AuAg alloy seeds and tuning the reaction conditions, we can readily obtain phase-pure Au-Ag2S, Au-Ag2Se, Au-Ag3AuS2, and Au-Ag3AuSe2 heterostructures. Similarly, we can also fabricate Au-AgInS2 and Au-AgInSe2 heterostructures from the AuAg seeds by adding sulfur/selenium and indium precursors. Furthermore, by partial or full conversion of Ag seeds, we can prepare both single-phase Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals and Ag-based heterostructures. To demonstrate wide applicability of this strategy, we have also synthesized Au-based binary and ternary Cu chalcogenide (Au-Cu9S5, Au-CuSe, Au-CuInS2, and Au-CuInSe2) heterostructures from alloy seeds of AuCu and Pt chalcogenides (e.g., Pt-AgInS2) from alloy seeds of PtAg. The structure and composition of the above products have been confirmed with X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods. A kinetic investigation of the formation mechanism of these heterostructures is brought forward using Au-AgInS2 and Ag-CuInS2 as model examples.

  1. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  2. Perceptions of point-of-care infectious disease testing among European medical personnel, point-of-care test kit manufacturers, and the general public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaman, Wendy E; Andrinopoulou, Eleni-Rosalina; Hays, John P

    2013-01-01

    Background The proper development and implementation of point-of-care (POC) diagnostics requires knowledge of the perceived requirements and barriers to their implementation. To determine the current requirements and perceived barriers to the introduction of POC diagnostics in the field of medical microbiology (MM)-POC a prospective online survey (TEMPOtest-QC) was established. Methods and results The TEMPOtest-QC survey was online between February 2011 and July 2012 and targeted the medical community, POC test diagnostic manufacturers, general practitioners, and the general public. In total, 293 individuals responded to the survey, including 91 (31%) medical microbiologists, 39 (13%) nonmedical microbiologists, 25 (9%) employees of POC test manufacturers, and 138 (47%) members of the general public. Responses were received from 18 different European countries, with the largest percentage of these living in The Netherlands (52%). The majority (>50%) of medical specialists regarded the development of MM-POC for blood culture and hospital acquired infections as “absolutely necessary”, but were much less favorable towards their use in the home environment. Significant differences in perceptions between medical specialists and the general public included the: (1) Effect on quality of patient care; (2) Ability to better monitor patients; (3) Home testing and the doctor-patient relationship; and (4) MM-POC interpretation. Only 34.7% of the general public is willing to pay more than a€10 ($13) for a single MM-POC test, with 85.5% preferring to purchase their MM-POC test from a pharmacy. Conclusion The requirements for the proper implementation of MM-POC were found to be generally similar between medical specialists and POC test kit manufacturers. The general public was much more favorable with respect to a perceived improvement in the quality of healthcare that these tests would bring to the hospital and home environment. PMID:23814465

  3. Testing General Relativity's No-Hair Theorem with X-Ray Observations of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hoormann, Janie K; Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-01-01

    Despite its success in the weak gravity regime, General Relativity (GR) has yet to be verified in the regime of strong gravity. In this paper, we present the results of detailed ray tracing simulations aiming at clarifying if the combined information from X-ray spectroscopy, timing, and polarization observations of stellar mass and supermassive black holes can be used to test GR's no-hair theorem. The latter states that stationary astrophysical black holes are described by the Kerr-family of metrics with the black hole mass and spin being the only free parameters. We use four "non-Kerr metrics", some phenomenological in nature and others motivated by alternative theories of gravity, and study the observational signatures of deviations from the Kerr metric. Particular attention is given to the case when all the metrics are set to give the same Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) in quasi-Boyer Lindquist coordinates. We give a detailed discussion of similarities and differences of the observational signature...

  4. Gender, general theory of crime and computer crime: an empirical test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byongook; McCluskey, John D; McCluskey, Cynthia P; Lee, Sangwon

    2013-04-01

    Regarding the gender gap in computer crime, studies consistently indicate that boys are more likely than girls to engage in various types of computer crime; however, few studies have examined the extent to which traditional criminology theories account for gender differences in computer crime and the applicability of these theories in explaining computer crime across gender. Using a panel of 2,751 Korean youths, the current study tests the applicability of the general theory of crime in explaining the gender gap in computer crime and assesses the theory's utility in explaining computer crime across gender. Analyses show that self-control theory performs well in predicting illegal use of others' resident registration number (RRN) online for both boys and girls, as predicted by the theory. However, low self-control, a dominant criminogenic factor in the theory, fails to mediate the relationship between gender and computer crime and is inadequate in explaining illegal downloading of software in both boy and girl models. Theoretical implication of the findings and the directions for future research are discussed.

  5. Supermassive black hole tests of general relativity with eLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwyler, Cédric; Porter, Edward K.; Jetzer, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the parametrized post-Einsteinian (ppE) scheme devised by Yunes and Pretorius, which introduces corrections to the post-Newtonian coefficients of the frequency domain gravitational waveform in order to emulate alternative theories of gravity, we compute analytical time domain waveforms that, after a numerical Fourier transform, aim to represent (phase corrected only) ppE waveforms. In this formalism, alternative theories manifest themselves via corrections to the phase and frequency, as predicted by general relativity (GR), at different post-Newtonian (PN) orders. To present a generic test of alternative theories of gravity, we assume that the coupling constant of each alternative theory is manifestly positive, allowing corrections to the GR waveforms to be either positive or negative. By exploring the capabilities of massive black hole binary GR waveforms in the detection and parameter estimation of corrected time domain ppE signals, using the current eLISA configuration (as presented for the European Space Agency Cosmic Vision L3 mission), we demonstrate that for corrections arising at higher than 1PN order in phase and frequency GR waveforms are sufficient for both detecting and estimating the parameters of alternative theory signals. However, for theories introducing corrections at the 0 and 0.5PN orders, GR waveforms are not capable of covering the entire parameter space, requiring the use of non-GR waveforms for detection and parameter estimation.

  6. Use of MESSENGER radioscience data to improve planetary ephemeris and to test general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, A. K.; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2014-01-01

    The current knowledge of Mercury's orbit has mainly been gained by direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and by five Mercury flybys made with Mariner 10 in the 70s, and with MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the orbit of Mercury. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity tests of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (γ and β) are more stringent than previous results.

  7. High-Order Fully General-Relativistic Hydrodynamics: new Approaches and Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Radice, David; Galeazzi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    We present a new approach for achieving high-order convergence in fully general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. The approach is implemented in WhiskyTHC, a new code that makes use of state-of-the-art numerical schemes and was key in achieving, for the first time, higher than second-order convergence in the calculation of the gravitational radiation from inspiraling binary neutron stars Radice et al. (2013). Here, we give a detailed description of the algorithms employed and present results obtained for a series of classical tests involving isolated neutron stars. In addition, using the gravitational-wave emission from the late inspiral and merger of binary neutron stars, we make a detailed comparison between the results obtained with the new code and those obtained when using standard second-order schemes commonly employed for matter simulations in numerical relativity. We find that even at moderate resolutions and for binaries with large compactness, the phase accuracy is improved by a factor 50 or mo...

  8. A Genetically Optimized Predictive System for Success in General Chemistry Using a Diagnostic Algebra Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cameron I.; Pearson, Paul T.

    2012-02-01

    In higher education, many high-enrollment introductory courses have evolved into "gatekeeper" courses due to their high failure rates. These courses prevent many students from attaining their educational goals and often become graduation roadblocks. At the authors' home institution, general chemistry has become a gatekeeper course in which approximately 25% of students do not pass. This failure rate in chemistry is common, and often higher, at many other institutions of higher education, and mathematical deficiencies are perceived to be a large contributing factor. This paper details the development of a highly accurate predictive system that identifies students at the beginning of the semester who are "at-risk" for earning a grade of C- or below in chemistry. The predictive accuracy of this system is maximized by using a genetically optimized neural network to analyze the results of a diagnostic algebra test designed for a specific population. Once at-risk students have been identified, they can be helped to improve their chances of success using techniques such as concurrent support courses, online tutorials, "just-in-time" instructional aides, study skills, motivational interviewing, and/or peer mentoring.

  9. Testing General Relativity with the Radio Science Experiment of the BepiColombo mission to Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Giulia; Tommei, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    The relativity experiment is part of the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) on-board the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. Thanks to very precise radio tracking from the Earth and accelerometer, it will be possible to perform an accurate test of General Relativity, by constraining a number of post-Newtonian and related parameters with an unprecedented level of accuracy. The Celestial Mechanics Group of the University of Pisa developed a new dedicated software, ORBIT14, to perform the simulations and to determine simultaneously all the parameters of interest within a global least squares fit. After highlighting some critical issues, we report on the results of a full set of simulations, carried out in the most up-to-date mission scenario. For each parameter we discuss the achievable accuracy, in terms of a formal analysis through the covariance matrix and, furthermore, by the introduction of an alternative, more representative, estimation of the errors. We show that, for example, an accuracy of some parts in 10^-6 for the Eddington parameter β and of 10^-5 for the Nordtvedt parameter η can be attained, while accuracies at the level of 5×10^-7 and 1×10^-7 can be achieved for the preferred frames parameters α1 and α2, respectively.

  10. Application of a generalized likelihood ratio test statistic to MAGIC data

    CERN Document Server

    Klepser, S; 10.1063/1.4772359

    2012-01-01

    The commonly used detection test statistic for Cherenkov telescope data is Li & Ma (1983), Eq. 17. It evaluates the compatibility of event counts in an on-source region with those in a representative off-region. It does not exploit the typically known gamma-ray point spread function (PSF) of a system, and in practice its application requires either assumptions on the symmetry of the acceptance across the field of view, orMonte Carlo simulations.MAGIC has an azimuth-dependent, asymmetric acceptance which required a careful review of detection statistics. Besides an adapted Li & Ma based technique, the recently presented generalized LRT statistic of [1] is now in use. It is more flexible, more sensitive and less systematics-affected, because it is highly customized for multi-pointing Cherenkov telescope data with a known PSF. We present the application of this new method to archival MAGIC data and compare it to the other, Li&Ma-based method.

  11. Plane Wave Imaging for ultrasonic non-destructive testing: Generalization to multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jeune, Léonard; Robert, Sébastien; Lopez Villaverde, Eduardo; Prada, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new ultrasonic array imaging method for Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) which is derived from the medical Plane Wave Imaging (PWI) technique. The objective is to perform fast ultrasound imaging with high image quality. The approach is to transmit plane waves at several angles and to record the back-scattered signals with all the array elements. Focusing in receive is then achieved by coherent summations of the signals in every point of a region of interest. The medical PWI is generalized to immersion setups where water acts as a coupling medium and to multimodal (direct, half-skip modes) imaging in order to detect different types of defects (inclusions, porosities, cracks). This method is compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM) which is the reference imaging technique in NDT. First, the two post-processing algorithms are described. Then experimental results with the array probe either in contact or in immersion are presented. A good agreement between the TFM and the PWI is observed, with three to ten times less transmissions required for the PWI.

  12. Testing General Relativity with the Radio Science Experiment of the BepiColombo mission to Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Schettino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The relativity experiment is part of the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE on-board the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. Thanks to very precise radio tracking from the Earth and accelerometer, it will be possible to perform an accurate test of General Relativity, by constraining a number of post-Newtonian and related parameters with an unprecedented level of accuracy. The Celestial Mechanics Group of the University of Pisa developed a new dedicated software, ORBIT14, to perform the simulations and to determine simultaneously all the parameters of interest within a global least squares fit. After highlighting some critical issues, we report on the results of a full set of simulations, carried out in the most up-to-date mission scenario. For each parameter we discuss the achievable accuracy, in terms of a formal analysis through the covariance matrix and, furthermore, by the introduction of an alternative, more representative, estimation of the errors. We show that, for example, an accuracy of some parts in 10 − 6 for the Eddington parameter β and of 10 − 5 for the Nordtvedt parameter η can be attained, while accuracies at the level of 5 × 10 − 7 and 1 × 10 − 7 can be achieved for the preferred frames parameters α 1 and α 2 , respectively.

  13. Extending cosmological tests of General Relativity with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Tests of general relativity (GR) are still in their infancy on cosmological scales, but forthcoming experiments promise to greatly improve their precision over a wide range of distance scales and redshifts. One such experiment, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will carry out several wide and deep surveys of resolved and unresolved neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line-emitting galaxies, mapping a significant fraction of the sky from $0 \\le z \\lesssim 6$. I present forecasts for the ability of a suite of possible SKA HI surveys to detect deviations from GR by reconstructing the cosmic expansion and growth history. SKA Phase 1 intensity mapping surveys can achieve sub-1% measurements of $f\\sigma_8$ out to $z\\approx 1$, with an SKA1-MID Band 2 survey out to $z \\lesssim 0.6$ able to surpass contemporary spectroscopic galaxy surveys such as DESI and Euclid in terms of constraints on modified gravity parameters if challenges such as foreground contamination can be tackled effectively. A more futuristic Phase 2 HI survey...

  14. A Comparison of the Hybrid III and BioRID II Dummies in Low-Severity, Rear-Impact Sled Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A; Anderson, K F; Berliner, J; Bryzik, C; Hassan, J; Jensen, J; Kendall, M; Mertz, H J; Morrow, T; Rao, A; Wozniak, J A

    2001-11-01

    A BioRID II dummy and a Hybrid III dummy, each representative of a midsize adult male, were tested side-by-side in simulated rear-impact sled tests. In all tests the dummies were restrained by 3-point belt systems. The results of 4 test sets conducted at a nominal change in velocity (deltaV) of 16 km/hr are presented and discussed. In three of the test sets, bucket seats were used. The head restraints were placed in the up-position in two of the three test sets and in the down-position in the third set of tests. In the fourth test set, rigid seats without any head restraints were used. While analyzing the BioRID II data, the presence of an axial neck load acting on the head, which bypassed the upper neck load transducer, was discovered in all the reported tests. The implication of this observation is that the axial force and all the moments measured by the BioRID II upper neck load transducer could be erroneous. A second concern with the BioRID II data was the high frequency noise observed, especially on the T1 acceleration response which is used in the NIC calculation. The 18 Hz filter used to process the T1 acceleration data for the NIC calculation attenuated the peak NIC values by 15% as compared to the SAE 180 filtered values. The unmeasured neck loads and high-frequency noise issues need to be resolved before additional BioRID II testing is done. A third concern with the BioRID II is the initial position of its head in the automotive seating posture. It is higher and more forward than that of the 50(th) percentile adult male.

  15. How Are Spoken Skills Assessed in Proficiency Tests of General English as a Foreign Language? A Preliminary Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Varela, Mª Luisa; Palacios, Ignacio M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines some of the best known proficiency tests in English, with particular focus on the oral component. Attention is paid to the following issues, among others: the weighting of oral elements in testing, the criteria used for the assessment of oral skills and the relation of these to the general guidelines in the "Common…

  16. Randomised controlled trial of CRP rapid test as a guide to treatment of respiratory infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, H Z; Skamling, M; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2000-01-01

    To assess whether the frequency of antibiotic prescriptions to patients with respiratory infections is reduced when general practitioners (GPs) use a C-reactive protein (CRP) rapid test in support of their clinical assessment, and to study whether using the test will have any effect on the course...

  17. Interaction of a cumulus cloud ensemble with the large-scale environment. III - Semi-prognostic test of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    The verification of the Arakawa and Schubert (1974) cumulus parameterization is continued using a semiprognostic approach. Observed data from Phase III of GATE are used to provide estimates of the large-scale forcing of a cumulus ensemble at each observation time. Instantaneous values of the precipitation and the warming and drying due to cumulus convection are calculated using the parameterization. The results show that the calculated precipitation agrees very well with estimates from the observed large-scale moisture budget and from radar observations. The calculated vertical profiles of cumulus warming and drying also are quite similar to the observed. It is shown that the closure assumption adopted in the parameterization (the cloud-work function quasi-equilibrium) results in errors of generally less than 10% in the calculated precipitation. The sensitivity of the parameterization to some assumptions of the cloud ensemble model and the solution method for the cloud-base mass flux is investigated.

  18. General Tests of Personal Protective Equipment (Non-ballistic) - Soft Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    AATCC TM 70, Water Repellency : Tumble Jar Dynamic Absorption Test, 2010. q. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D 5170, Standard...AATCC TM 22, Water Repellency ; Spray Test, 2010. TOP 10-2-204 23 July 2012

  19. Classifying and scoring of molecules with the NGN: new datasets, significance tests, and generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Christopher JF

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates how a Neural Grammar Network learns to classify and score molecules for a variety of tasks in chemistry and toxicology. In addition to a more detailed analysis on datasets previously studied, we introduce three new datasets (BBB, FXa, and toxicology to show the generality of the approach. A new experimental methodology is developed and applied to both the new datasets as well as previously studied datasets. This methodology is rigorous and statistically grounded, and ultimately culminates in a Wilcoxon significance test that proves the effectiveness of the system. We further include a complete generalization of the specific technique to arbitrary grammars and datasets using a mathematical abstraction that allows researchers in different domains to apply the method to their own work. Background Our work can be viewed as an alternative to existing methods to solve the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR problem. To this end, we review a number approaches both from a methodological and also a performance perspective. In addition to these approaches, we also examined a number of chemical properties that can be used by generic classifier systems, such as feed-forward artificial neural networks. In studying these approaches, we identified a set of interesting benchmark problem sets to which many of the above approaches had been applied. These included: ACE, AChE, AR, BBB, BZR, Cox2, DHFR, ER, FXa, GPB, Therm, and Thr. Finally, we developed our own benchmark set by collecting data on toxicology. Results Our results show that our system performs better than, or comparatively to, the existing methods over a broad range of problem types. Our method does not require the expert knowledge that is necessary to apply the other methods to novel problems. Conclusions We conclude that our success is due to the ability of our system to: 1 encode molecules losslessly before presentation to the learning system, and 2

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 414: Clean Slate III Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 414 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 130 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and approximately 40 miles southeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CAU 414 site consists of the release of radionuclides to the surface and shallow subsurface from the conduct of the Clean Slate III (CSIII) storage–transportation test conducted on June 9, 1963. CAU 414 includes one corrective action site (CAS), TA-23-03CS (Pu Contaminated Soil). The known releases at CAU 414 are the result of the atmospheric dispersal of contamination from the 1963 CSIII test. The CSIII test was a nonnuclear detonation of a nuclear device located inside a reinforced concrete bunker covered with 8 feet of soil. This test dispersed radionuclides, primarily uranium and plutonium, on the ground surface. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 414 will be evaluated based on information collected from a corrective action investigation (CAI). The investigation is based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 7, 2016, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; the U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 414.

  1. Common Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Test Facilities - A General Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Phillip W., Sr.; Hughes, Mark S.; Davis, Dawn M.; Turowski, Mark P.; Holladay, Wendy T.; Marshall, PeggL.; Duncan, Michael E.; Morris, Jon A.; Franzl, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the commercial space launch industry and NASA's more recent resumption of operation of Stennis Space Center's large test facilities after thirty years of contractor control resulted in a need for a non-proprietary data acquisition system (DAS) software to support government and commercial testing. The software is designed for modularity and adaptability to minimize the software development effort for current and future data systems. An additional benefit of the software's architecture is its ability to easily migrate to other testing facilities thus providing future commonality across Stennis. Adapting the software to other Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Centers such as MSFC, White Sands, and Plumbrook Station would provide additional commonality and help reduce testing costs for NASA. Ultimately, the software provides the government with unlimited rights and guarantees privacy of data to commercial entities. The project engaged all RPT Centers and NASA's Independent Verification & Validation facility to enhance product quality. The design consists of a translation layer which provides the transparency of the software application layers to underlying hardware regardless of test facility location and a flexible and easily accessible database. This presentation addresses system technical design, issues encountered, and the status of Stennis' development and deployment.

  2. The EORTC emotional functioning computerized adaptive test: phases I-III of a cross-cultural item bank development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamper, E.M.; Groenvold, M.; Petersen, M.; Young, T.; Constantini, A.; Aaronson, N.; Giesinger, J.; Meraner, V.; Kemmler, G.; Holzner, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is currently developing computerized adaptive testing measures for the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) scales. The work presented here describes the development of an EORTC item b

  3. Interpreting Personality Tests: A Clinical Manual for the MMPI-2, MCMI-III, CPI-R, and 16PF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Robert J.

    This book provides step-by-step procedures for clinical personality interpretation to help mental health professionals determine the psychological health of their clients, determine maladjustment and problem behaviors, and reach a diagnosis. Each of the four chapters is devoted to one of the four key personality tests. These are: (1)…

  4. The EORTC emotional functioning computerized adaptive test: phases I-III of a cross-cultural item bank development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Gamper; M. Groenvold; M. Petersen; T. Young; A. Constantini; N. Aaronson; J. Giesinger; V. Meraner; G. Kemmler; B. Holzner

    2013-01-01

    Background: The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is currently developing computerized adaptive testing measures for the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) scales. The work presented here describes the development of an EORTC item b

  5. Underground gasification for steeply dipping coal beds: Phase III. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1981. [Rawlins Test 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    Preparations are being made for the August start-up of Rawlins Test 2. Site construction activities began May 4 with the mobilization of the construction subcontractor. The drilling program was completed this quarter with the installation of instrumentation wells. The Experimental Basis Document, PGA Operating Manual, and DAS Operating Manual have also been completed.

  6. Acceptance of Genetic Testing in a General Population: Age, Education and Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, A. R.; Hakonen, A.; Hietala, M.; Lonnqvist, J.; Niemela, P.; Peltonen, L; Aula, P.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of age, education, and gender on acceptance of genetic testing were studied. Finnish participants responded to a questionnaire presenting reasons for and against genetic testing (N=1,967). Intentions to take genetic tests, worries, and experience of genetic test or hereditary disease were also assessed. Results are presented and discussed.…

  7. Kinetic and kinematic responses of post mortem human surrogates and the Hybrid III ATD in high-speed frontal sled tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, Stephanie M; Kemper, Andrew R; Madigan, Michael L; Duma, Stefan M

    2013-06-01

    Despite improvements in vehicle design and safety technologies, frontal automotive collisions continue to result in a substantial number of injuries and fatalities each year. Although a considerable amount of research has been performed on PMHSs and ATDs, matched dynamic whole-body frontal testing with PMHSs and the current ATD aimed at quantifying both kinetic and kinematic data in a single controlled study is lacking in the literature. Therefore, a total of 4 dynamic matched frontal sled tests were performed with three male PMHSs and a Hybrid III 50th percentile male ATD (28.6g, Δv=40 kph). Each subject was restrained using a 4 kN load limiting, driver-side, 3-point seatbelt. Belt force was measured for the lap belt and shoulder belt. Reaction forces were measured at the seat pan, seat back, independent foot plates, and steering column. Linear head acceleration, angular head acceleration, and pelvic acceleration were measured for all subjects. Acceleration of C7, T7, T12, both femurs, and both tibias were also measured for the PMHSs. A Vicon motion analysis system, consisting of 12 MX-T20 2 megapixel cameras, was used to quantify subject 3D motion (±1 mm) at a rate of 1 kHz. Excursions of select anatomical regions were normalized to their respective initial positions and compared by test condition and between subject types. Notable discrepancies were observed in the responses of the PMHSs and the ATD. The reaction forces and belt loading for the ATD, particularly foot plate, seat back, steering column, and lap belt forces, were not in agreement with those of the PMHSs. The forward excursions of the ATD were consistently within those of the PMHSs with the exception of the left upper extremity. This could potentially be due to the known limitations of the Hybrid III ATD shoulder and chest. The results presented herein demonstrate that there are some limitations to the current Hybrid III ATD under the loading conditions evaluated in the current study. Overall

  8. Results from the Operational Testing of the General Electric Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Barney Carlson; Don Scoffield; Brion Bennett

    2013-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the General Electric (GE) smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from GE for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the GE smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  9. Verification Test of the SURF and SURFplus Models in xRage: Part III Affect of Mesh Alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The previous studies used an underdriven detonation wave in 1-dimension (steady ZND reaction zone profile followed by a scale-invariant rarefaction wave) for PBX 9502 as a verification test of the implementation of the SURF and SURFplus models in the xRage code. Since the SURF rate is a function of the lead shock pressure, the question arises as to the effect on accuracy of variations in the detected shock pressure due to the alignment of the shock front with the mesh. To study the effect of mesh alignment we simulate a cylindrically diverging detonation wave using a planar 2-D mesh. The leading issue is the magnitude of azimuthal asymmetries in the numerical solution. The 2-D test case does not have an exact analytic solution. To quantify the accuracy, the 2-D solution along rays through the origin are compared to a highly resolved 1-D simulation in cylindrical geometry.

  10. Fatigue Lives of Specimens Representing Critical Locations in Mirage III Spars under Australian and Swiss Test Spectra,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    Library Qantas Airways Limited Ansett Airlines of Australia. Library BHP, Melbourne Research Laboratories Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation, Library Hawker...where the crack initiated. The results of a fractographic analysis of the spar fracture surface are contained in Reference 4, and the significance on the...in the failure regions under the two test spectra. An important implication of this analysis was that, unless this difference in lives could be

  11. Generalization Gradients in Human Predictive Learning: Effects of Discrimination Training and within-Subjects Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervliet, Bram; Iberico, Carlos; Vervoort, Ellen; Baeyens, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Generalization gradients have been investigated widely in animal conditioning experiments, but much less so in human predictive learning tasks. Here, we apply the experimental design of a recent study on conditioned fear generalization in humans (Lissek et al., 2008) to a predictive learning task, and examine the effects of a number of relevant…

  12. Atmospheric Test Models and Numerical Experiments for the Simulation of the Global Distributions of Weather Data Transponders III. Horizontal Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Grossman, A.

    1999-12-20

    A network of small balloon-borne transponders which gather very high resolution wind and temperature data for use by modern numerical weather predication models has been proposed to improve the reliability of long-range weather forecasts. The global distribution of an array of such transponders is simulated using LLNL's atmospheric parcel transport model (GRANTOUR) with winds supplied by two different general circulation models. An initial study used winds from CCM3 with a horizontal resolution of about 3 degrees in latitude and longitude, and a second study used winds from NOGAPS with a 0.75 degree horizontal resolution. Results from both simulations show that reasonable global coverage can be attained by releasing balloons from an appropriate set of launch sites.

  13. Testing general relativity with compact coalescing binaries: comparing exact and predictive methods to compute the Bayes factor

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter; Mandel, Ilya; Vecchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The second generation of gravitational-wave detectors is scheduled to start operations in 2015. Gravitational-wave signatures of compact binary coalescences could be used to accurately test the strong-field dynamical predictions of general relativity. Computationally expensive data analysis pipelines, including TIGER, have been developed to carry out such tests. As a means to cheaply assess whether a particular deviation from general relativity can be detected, Cornish et al. and Vallisneri recently proposed an approximate scheme to compute the Bayes factor between a general-relativity gravitational-wave model and a model representing a class of alternative theories of gravity parametrised by one additional parameter. This approximate scheme is based on only two easy-to-compute quantities: the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal and the fitting factor between the signal and the manifold of possible waveforms within general relativity. In this work, we compare the prediction from the approximate formula agains...

  14. A General Test of Association for Quantitative Traits in Nuclear Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abecasis, G.R; Cardon, L.R; Cookson, W.O.C

    2000-01-01

    .... Appropriately designed tests of association that use family-based controls to account for population substructure can provide direct tests of linkage disequilibrium and efficient fine-mapping tools. T...

  15. A general review of major global coagulation assays : thrombelastography, thrombin generation test and clot waveform analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancé, Marcus D

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis and hemorrhage are major contributors to morbidity and mortality. The traditional laboratory tests do not supply enough information to diagnose and treat patients timely and according to their phenotype. Global hemostasis tests might improve this circumstance. The viscoelastic tests (ROTE

  16. Point-of-care C-reactive protein testing in Febrile Children in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Montenij (Miriam); M.H. ten Brinke (Majolein); J. van Brakel (Jocelyn); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); M.Y. Beger (Marjolein)

    2006-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Point-of-care testing for C-reactive protein (CRP) may be helpful in differentiating viral from bacterial infection. Such a device should give results comparable to laboratory testing. The aim was to evaluate two point-of-care CRP tests (Nycocard and QuikRead) in febr

  17. Qualification of TRACE V5.0 Code against Fast Cooldown Transient in the PKL-III Integral Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Coscarelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the analytical study of the PKL experiment G3.1 performed using the TRACE code (version 5.0 patch1. The test G3.1 simulates a fast cooldown transient, namely, a main steam line break. This leads to a strong asymmetry caused by an increase of the heat transfer from the primary to the secondary side that induces a fast cooldown transient on the primary side-affected loop. The asymmetric overcooling effect requires an assessment of the reactor pressure vessel integrity considering PTS (pressurized thermal shock and an assessment of potential recriticality following entrainment of colder water into the core area. The aim of this work is the qualification of the heat transfer capabilities of the TRACE code from primary to secondary side in the intact and affected steam generators (SGs during the rapid depressurization and the boiloff in the affected SG against experimental data.

  18. Ten Year Operating Test Results and Post-Test Analysis of a 1/10 Segment Stirling Sodium Heat Pipe, Phase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, John, H; Minnerly, Kenneth, G; Dyson, Christopher, M.

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 yr) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described.

  19. Perceptions of point-of-care infectious disease testing among European medical personnel, point-of-care test kit manufacturers, and the general public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaman WE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wendy E Kaman,1 Eleni-Rosalina Andrinopoulou,2 John P Hays11Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 2Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The NetherlandsBackground: The proper development and implementation of point-of-care (POC diagnostics requires knowledge of the perceived requirements and barriers to their implementation. To determine the current requirements and perceived barriers to the introduction of POC diagnostics in the field of medical microbiology (MM-POC a prospective online survey (TEMPOtest-QC was established.Methods and results: The TEMPOtest-QC survey was online between February 2011 and July 2012 and targeted the medical community, POC test diagnostic manufacturers, general practitioners, and the general public. In total, 293 individuals responded to the survey, including 91 (31% medical microbiologists, 39 (13% nonmedical microbiologists, 25 (9% employees of POC test manufacturers, and 138 (47% members of the general public. Responses were received from 18 different European countries, with the largest percentage of these living in The Netherlands (52%. The majority (>50% of medical specialists regarded the development of MM-POC for blood culture and hospital acquired infections as “absolutely necessary”, but were much less favorable towards their use in the home environment. Significant differences in perceptions between medical specialists and the general public included the: (1 Effect on quality of patient care; (2 Ability to better monitor patients; (3 Home testing and the doctor-patient relationship; and (4 MM-POC interpretation. Only 34.7% of the general public is willing to pay more than €10 ($13 for a single MM-POC test, with 85.5% preferring to purchase their MM-POC test from a pharmacy.Conclusion: The requirements for the proper implementation of MM-POC were found to be generally similar between medical

  20. The usefulness of a free self-test for screening albuminuria in the general population: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we evaluated the usefulness of a free self-test for screening albuminuria in the general population. Methods Dutch adults were invited by the Dutch Kidney Foundation to order a free albuminuria self-test, consisting of three semi quantitative dipstick tests, via the Internet. Results were classified in negative, low-positive and high-positive. In case of a positive test result, the tester was recommended to visit a GP for supplementary examination and/or treatment. Participants of the programme were sent a questionnaire for evaluation by e-mail eight weeks after receiving the self-test. Results During the first 30 days of the self-test programme, 996,927 self-tests were ordered. In total, 71,714 participants completed the questionnaire: 79% had a negative test result and 21% had a positive test result (20% low-positive and 1% high-positive. Of the positive testers, 25% visited a GP after testing for albuminuria. Among the 3,983 participants who visited a GP, 193 new diseases were detected: 25 chronic renal failure, 152 hypertension and 31 diabetes mellitus. Conclusion Using a free self-test for screening albuminuria in the general population resulted in a large response and a number of newly detected diseases. However, we found a very high percentage of positive testers of which probably a large part is false positive. Furthermore, only a small part of the positive testers visited a GP for additional examination and/or treatment. The efficiency of such a campaign could be increased by embedding the testing in health care to reduce the number of false-positive results and to ensure follow-up and treatment in case of a positive test result.

  1. The usefulness of a free self-test for screening albuminuria in the general population: a cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielen, Markus MJ; Schellevis, François G; Verheij, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study we evaluated the usefulness of a free self-test for screening albuminuria in the general population. Methods Dutch adults were invited by the Dutch Kidney Foundation to order a free albuminuria self-test, consisting of three semi quantitative dipstick tests, via the Internet. Results were classified in negative, low-positive and high-positive. In case of a positive test result, the tester was recommended to visit a GP for supplementary examination and/or treatment. Participants of the programme were sent a questionnaire for evaluation by e-mail eight weeks after receiving the self-test. Results During the first 30 days of the self-test programme, 996,927 self-tests were ordered. In total, 71,714 participants completed the questionnaire: 79% had a negative test result and 21% had a positive test result (20% low-positive and 1% high-positive). Of the positive testers, 25% visited a GP after testing for albuminuria. Among the 3,983 participants who visited a GP, 193 new diseases were detected: 25 chronic renal failure, 152 hypertension and 31 diabetes mellitus. Conclusion Using a free self-test for screening albuminuria in the general population resulted in a large response and a number of newly detected diseases. However, we found a very high percentage of positive testers of which probably a large part is false positive. Furthermore, only a small part of the positive testers visited a GP for additional examination and/or treatment. The efficiency of such a campaign could be increased by embedding the testing in health care to reduce the number of false-positive results and to ensure follow-up and treatment in case of a positive test result. PMID:19818129

  2. Evaluation of hydrophobic treatments applied to stones used in andalusian cathedrals. III.-Accelerated weathering test with polluted atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villegas Sánchez, R.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY In this work we study the weathering resistance of samples of five types of stone used in Andalusian Cathedrals, treated with six water repellent products, by subjecting the samples to a SO2 polluted atmosphere. To evaluate the alteration of the samples, besides visual observation of macroscopic aspect, changes in weight and the quantity of sulfate that remains on the surface have been measured. Also properties related with water have been measured after the test to determine if there have been any changes in the hydrophobic characteristics.

    En el presente artículo se estudia el comportamiento de muestras de cinco tipos de piedra utilizados en catedrales andaluzas, tratadas con seis productos hidrófugos, sometiéndolas a un ensayo acelerado de alteración en atmósfera contaminada con SO2 . Para evaluar la alteración, además de la observación visual de las manifestaciones macroscópicas, se ha medido la variación de peso de las muestras expuestas y la cantidad de sulfato que permanece en la superficie tras el ensayo. Así mismo, se han detectado los cambios experimentados en las propiedades hidrófugas conferidas por los tratamientos, mediante la medida de propiedades relacionadas con el movimiento del agua.

  3. How Do Executive Functions Fit with the Cattell-Horn-Carroll Model? Some Evidence from a Joint Factor Analysis of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System and the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Randy G.; Bergeron, Renee; Hamilton, Gloria; Parra, Gilbert R.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relations among executive functions and cognitive abilities through a joint exploratory factor analysis and joint confirmatory factor analysis of 25 test scores from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System and the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities. Participants were 100 children and adolescents…

  4. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  5. General recommendations for soil ecotoxicological tests suitable for the environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römbke, Jörg; Jänsch, Stephan; Meier, Matthias; Hilbeck, Angelika; Teichmann, Hanka; Tappeser, Beatrix

    2010-04-01

    Before a genetically modified plant (GMP) can be placed on the market in the European Union (EU), an environmental risk assessment has to be conducted according to EU-Directive 2001/18/EC or Regulation (EC) No. 1829/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council. However, no harmonized concept for ecotoxicological testing is available today that considers the characteristics of GMPs as a whole. In fact, to date, mainly ecotoxicological tests originally developed and standardized for pesticides are used for this purpose. Frequently in these tests, not the whole GMP is tested but only specific transgene products (mainly toxins). In this contribution, ecotoxicological methods developed for the testing of pesticides are evaluated for whether they are suitable for risk assessment of GMPs as well. In total, 105 test methods covering a wide range of terrestrial invertebrates, microbes, and plants (laboratory, semifield, and field levels) were assessed. Only 7 of them had already been used with GMPs, and in about 20 studies the existing tests methods were modified, mostly in a way such that nonstandard species were used. In the laboratory, few earthworm and nontarget arthropod (NTA) species as well as collembolans and isopods were tested, and, in the field, only the litter-bag test was used. Clearly, more species than these few standard organisms currently in use have to be selected for testing purposes. A more detailed analysis of GMP tests with soil invertebrates published in the literature revealed that some of the relevant GMP exposure routes, such as via bulk soil, soil porewater, and litter from GMPs, are well covered. However, studies addressing either consumption of GMPs themselves or secondary exposure after GMPs have been taken up by invertebrates that feed on living or dead GMPs are underrepresented. (c) 2009 SETAC.

  6. Overgeneralization of validity generalization in personality inventories: applied issues in testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, D W; Tiffany, P G

    1999-04-01

    Generalization of validity asserts that a predictor or criterion generalizes across studies and will continue to show similar parameters when the situation changes. Kurt Lewin explored situation-behavior relationships, and Mischel examined the situation-behavior association showing predictive accuracy between behaviors and contexts. Investigators have critically reproached the assumed generalization of assessment instruments that ignore contextual variance. The validity hypothesis confirmed that using nonsituation-specific scales does not focus on the contextual effects relevant to the criterion measured and consequently has no practical application for focused evaluation in clinical and employment settings. This study describes a model and technique for the measurement of contextual variance in personality dimensions thereby introducing situation-specificity in evaluation for more focused research, treatment, and a more specific job fit in employment settings.

  7. Tests of General relativity with planetary orbits and Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fienga, A; Exertier, P; Manche, H; Gastineau, M

    2014-01-01

    Based on the new developped planetary ephemerides INPOP13c, determinations of acceptable intervals of General Relativity violation in considering simultaneously the PPN parameters $\\beta$, PPN $\\gamma$, the flattening of the sun $J_{2}^\\odot$ and time variation of the gravitational mass of the sun $\\mu$ are obtained in using Monte Carlo simulation coupled with basic genetic algorithm. Possible time variations of the gravitational constant G are also deduced. Discussions are lead about the better choice of indicators for the goodness-of-fit for each run and limits consistent with general relativity are obtained simultaneously.

  8. The Performance of Native Speakers of English and ESL Speakers on the Computer-based TOEFL and GRE General Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research on the construct validity of the paper-based version of the TOEFL and extend it to the computer-based TOEFL. Two samples of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test-takers were used: native speakers of English specially recruited to take the computer-based TOEFL, and ESL…

  9. The Usefulness of the Denver Developmental Screening Test to Predict Kindergarten Problems in a General Community Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadman, David; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST) was administered to 2569 children prior to starting kindergarten. At the end of the school year, teachers rated each child. Results suggest that because of its low sensitivity and modest predictive value, the DDST is relatively inefficient for a school entry screening program in a general population.…

  10. A Comprehensive Test of General Strain Theory: Key Strains, Situational- and Trait-Based Negative Emotions, Conditioning Factors, and Delinquency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byongook; Morash, Merry; McCluskey, Cynthia Perez; Hwang, Hye-Won

    2009-01-01

    Using longitudinal data on South Korean youth, the authors addressed limitations of previous tests of general strain theory (GST), focusing on the relationships among key strains, situational- and trait-based negative emotions, conditioning factors, and delinquency. Eight types of strain previously shown most likely to result in delinquency,…

  11. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  12. The Performance of Native Speakers of English and ESL Speakers on the Computer-based TOEFL and GRE General Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research on the construct validity of the paper-based version of the TOEFL and extend it to the computer-based TOEFL. Two samples of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test-takers were used: native speakers of English specially recruited to take the computer-based TOEFL, and ESL…

  13. The Use and Results of Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing in General Practice in the Former Aarhus County

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukai, Thomas; Bro, Flemming; Pedersen, Knud Venborg;

    Background: Prostate Cancer (PC) is the most common type of cancer among Danish men, and the incidence is increasing. PC is often asymptomatic, making it difficult to establish a clinical diagnosis. The general practitioner can use prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing as a tool for diagnosing ...

  14. Self-Control, Social Factors, and Delinquency: A Test of the General Theory of Crime among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nicole W. T.; Cheung, Yuet W.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the predictive power of self-control theory for delinquency in a Chinese context, and to explore if social factors as predicted in social bonding theory, differential association theory, general strain theory, and labeling theory have effects on delinquency in the presence of self-control. Self-report data…

  15. Why do patients want to have their blood tested? : A qualitative study of patient expectations in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhoven, M.A. van; Pleunis-van Empel, M.C.; Koch, H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Dinant, G.J.; Weijden, T. van der

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners often take their impression of patients' expectations into account in their decision to have blood tests done. It is commonly recommended to involve patients in decision-making during consultations. The study aimed to obtain detailed information on patients' expecta

  16. Knowledge of asthma guidelines: results of a UK General Practice Airways Group (GPIAG) web-based 'Test your Knowledge' quiz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Hilary; Holmes, Steve; Levy, Mark L; McArthur, Ruth; Small, Iain

    2010-06-01

    A web-based questionnaire, comprising 11 multiple choice questions, tested the knowledge of visitors to the General Practice Airways Group (GPIAG) online summary of the British Asthma guideline. On average, the 413 respondents answered less than half the questions correctly. GP scores were significantly lower than practice nurses. Improving clinicians' knowledge of asthma is a prerequisite for improving management.

  17. Application of the Test of Scientific Literacy Skills in the Assessment of a General Education Natural Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Jennifer Turner

    2014-01-01

    The peer-reviewed and psychometrically validated Test of Scientific Literacy Skills developed by Gormally et al. was used to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a general education natural science program. By comparing the scores of students who had already taken at least one course in this area with the scores of those who had not, and by…

  18. General Consideration of Measuring System for Operational Test of Thyristor Valves of Ultra High Voltage DC Power Transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hui-gao; XU Fan; ZHANG Chang-chun; HU Zhi-long; LIU Pu; HUANG Xi-dong; WAN Gan; DING Qian

    2011-01-01

    Thyristor valve is one of the key equipments for ultra high voltage direct current (UHVDC)power transmission projects.Before being installed on site,they need to be tested in a laboratory in order to verify their operational performance to satisfy the technical specification of project related.Test facilities for operational tests of thyristor valves are supposed to enable to undertake more severe electrical stresses than those being applied in the thyristor valves under test (test objects).On the other hand,the stresses applied into the test objects are neither higher nor lower than specified by the specification,because inappropriate stresses applied would result in incorrect evaluation of performance on the test objects,more seriously,would cuase the damage of test objects with expensive cost losing.Generally,the process of operational tests is complicated and performed in a complex synthetic test circuit(hereafter as STC),where there are a lot of sensors used for measuring,monitoring and protection on line to ensure that the test circuit functions in good condition.Therefore,the measuring systems embedded play a core role in STC,acting like "eyes".Based on the first project of building up a STC in China,experience of planning measuring systems is summarized so as to be referenced by related engineers.

  19. The efficacy of computer reminders on external quality assessment for point-of-care testing in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans B; Siersma, Volkert; Ertmann, Ruth;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care testing (POCT) is increasingly being used in general practice to assist general practitioners (GPs) in their management of patients with diseases. However, low adherence to quality guidelines in terms of split test procedures has been observed among GPs in parts...... of the Capital Region in Denmark. Computer reminders embedded in GPs electronic medical records (ComRem) may facilitate improved quality control behaviour, but more research is needed to identify what types of reminders work and when. The overall aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of ComRem to improve...... GPs adherence to quality guidelines. This article describes the rationale and methods of the study that constitute this research project. METHODS/DESIGN: The study is conducted as two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) among general practices in two districts of the Capital Region in Denmark...

  20. Cytology versus HPV testing for cervical cancer screening in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliopoulos, George; Nyaga, Victoria N; Santesso, Nancy; Bryant, Andrew; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre Pl; Mustafa, Reem A; Schünemann, Holger; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Arbyn, Marc

    2017-08-10

    Cervical cancer screening has traditionally been based on cervical cytology. Given the aetiological relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical carcinogenesis, HPV testing has been proposed as an alternative screening test. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of HPV testing for detecting histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) of grade 2 or worse (CIN 2+), including adenocarcinoma in situ, in women participating in primary cervical cancer screening; and how it compares to the accuracy of cytological testing (liquid-based and conventional) at various thresholds. We performed a systematic literature search of articles in MEDLINE and Embase (1992 to November 2015) containing quantitative data and handsearched the reference lists of retrieved articles. We included comparative test accuracy studies if all women received both HPV testing and cervical cytology followed by verification of the disease status with the reference standard, if positive for at least one screening test. The studies had to include women participating in a cervical cancer screening programme who were not being followed up for previous cytological abnormalities. We completed a 2 x 2 table with the number of true positives (TP), false positives (FP), true negatives (TN), and false negatives for each screening test (HPV test and cytology) used in each study. We calculated the absolute and relative sensitivities and the specificities of the tests for the detection of CIN 2+ and CIN 3+ at various thresholds and computed sensitivity (TP/(TP + TN) and specificity (TN/ (TN + FP) for each test separately. Relative sensitivity and specificity of one test compared to another test were defined as sensitivity of test-1 over sensitivity of test-2 and specificity of test-1 over specificity of test-2, respectively. To assess bias in the studies, we used the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic test Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) tool. We used a bivariate random

  1. Multivariate generalizations of the Wald--Wolfowitz and Smirnov two-sample tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, J.H.; Rafsky, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    Multivariate generalizations of the Wald--Wolfowitz runs statistic and the Smirnov maximum deviation statistic for the two-sample problem are presented. They are based on the minimal spanning tree of the pooled sample points. Some null distribution results are derived and a simulation study of power is reported. 5 figures, 2 tables.

  2. A Comparison of General Diagnostic Models (GDM) and Bayesian Networks Using a Middle School Mathematics Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    General diagnostic models (GDMs) and Bayesian networks are mathematical frameworks that cover a wide variety of psychometric models. Both extend latent class models, and while GDMs also extend item response theory (IRT) models, Bayesian networks can be parameterized using discretized IRT. The purpose of this study is to examine similarities and…

  3. A Genetically Optimized Predictive System for Success in General Chemistry Using a Diagnostic Algebra Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cameron I.; Pearson, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    In higher education, many high-enrollment introductory courses have evolved into "gatekeeper" courses due to their high failure rates. These courses prevent many students from attaining their educational goals and often become graduation roadblocks. At the authors' home institution, general chemistry has become a gatekeeper course in which…

  4. Using an Online, Self-Diagnostic Test for Introductory General Chemistry at an Open University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennepohl, Dietmar; Guay, Matthew; Thomas, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    A simple, online, self-diagnostic tool has been developed to allow students to independently and quickly measure their potential of success in a first-year general chemistry course. The online tool employs well-established performance predictors in areas such as student educational background, conceptual basics, critical thinking, mathematical…

  5. The Testing Effect: An Intervention on Behalf of Low-Skilled Comprehenders in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyburn, Daniel T.; Pazicni, Samuel; Benassi, Victor A.; Tappin, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Past work has demonstrated that language comprehension ability correlates with general chemistry course performance with medium effect sizes. We demonstrate here that language comprehension's strong cognitive grounding can be used to inform effective and equitable pedagogies, namely, instructional interventions that differentially aid low-skilled…

  6. A Test of Gottfredson and Hirschi's General Theory of Crime in African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazsonyi, Alexander T.; Crosswhite, Jennifer M.

    2004-01-01

    Considerable empirical support exists for "The General Theory of Crime". However, little work has been completed on members of minority populations in the United States. The current investigation examined whether low self-control predicted deviance in a sample of African American adolescents (n = 661; 55.1 percent female; mean age = 15.7 years).…

  7. Possibility for a fourth test of general relativity in earth's gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuan-zhong

    1982-10-01

    In this work, the effect of Earth's gravitational field on a interferometer is calculated in general relativity. The result is that an expected fringe shift, about 10/sup -10/, will occur when the interferometer is rotated through 90/sup 0/ if the length of arms are 1 meter and wavelength of light is 1 ..mu..m.

  8. The Testing Effect: An Intervention on Behalf of Low-Skilled Comprehenders in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyburn, Daniel T.; Pazicni, Samuel; Benassi, Victor A.; Tappin, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Past work has demonstrated that language comprehension ability correlates with general chemistry course performance with medium effect sizes. We demonstrate here that language comprehension's strong cognitive grounding can be used to inform effective and equitable pedagogies, namely, instructional interventions that differentially aid…

  9. Contact allergy to allergens of the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) has decreased modestly in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T; Nielsen, N H; Johansen, J D

    2009-11-01

    The prevalence of contact allergy in the general population is nearly 20%. This study aimed to monitor the development of contact allergy to allergens from the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) between 1990 and 2006. Two random samples of adults from the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark, were invited to participate in a general health examination including patch testing. In 1990 and 2006, we patch tested and questioned 543 and 3460 adult Danes. Patch test readings were performed on day 2 only. The overall prevalence decreased significantly from 15.5% in 1990 to 10.0% in 2006, mainly as a result of a decrease in thimerosal allergy from 3.4% to 0.8%. Furthermore, the prevalence of cobalt allergy and rubber-related allergens decreased from 1.1% to 0.2% and from 1.5% to 0.2%, respectively. Stratification by sex and age group revealed decreasing prevalences of contact allergy in all male age groups and in young and middle-aged female age groups (18-55 years) whereas increasing prevalences were observed among older women (56-69 years). The diverging trend observed in women was probably explained by a cohort effect due to a change in the prevalence of nickel allergy following the Danish regulation on nickel exposure. Although the overall prevalence of contact allergy decreased in the general population, frequent contact allergens such as fragrance mix II and methyldibromo glutaronitrile were not tested. Thus, contact allergy remains prevalent in the general population.

  10. Performance Comparison of Student-Athletes and General College Students on the Functional Movement Screen and the Y Balance Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engquist, Katherine D; Smith, Craig A; Chimera, Nicole J; Warren, Meghan

    2015-08-01

    Although various studies have assessed performance of athletes on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Y Balance Test (YBT), no study to date has directly evaluated a comparison of performance between athletes and members of the general population. Thus, to better understand the application of the FMS and the YBT to general college students, this study examined whether or not general college students performed similarly to student-athletes on the FMS (composite and movement pattern scores) and the YBT (composite and reach directions). This study evaluated 167 Division I student-athletes and 103 general college students from the same university on the FMS and the YBT. No difference was found in FMS composite scores between student-athletes and general college students. For FMS movement patterns, female student-athletes scored higher than general college students in the deep squat. No difference was found for men in any FMS movement pattern. Female student-athletes scored higher than female general college students in YBT composite scores; no difference was found for men in YBT composite scores. In analysis of YBT reach directions, female student-athletes scored higher than female general college students in all reach directions, whereas no difference was found in men. Existing research on the FMS composite score in athletic populations may apply to a general college population for the purposes of preparticipation screening, injury prediction, etc. Existing research on the YBT in male athletic populations is expected to apply equally to general college males for the purposes of preparticipation screening, injury prediction, etc.

  11. Testing general gelativity using gravitational waves from binary neutron stars: Effect of spins

    CERN Document Server

    Agathos, Michalis; Li, Tjonnie G F; Broeck, Chris Van Den; Veitch, John; Vitale, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    We present a Bayesian data analysis pipeline for testing GR using gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries, and in particular binary neutron stars. In this study, we investigate its performance when sources with spins are taken into account.

  12. The ITER neutral beam test facility: designs of the general infrastructure, cryo-system and cooling plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R.; Chantant, M.; Gravil, B.; Henry, D.; Sabathier, F.; Doceul, L.; Thomas, E.; Van Houtte, D. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (DSM/DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Zaccaria, P.; Antoni, V.; Dal Bello, S.; Masiello, A.; Marcuzzi, D. [Consorzio RFX Association Euratom-ENEA, Padova (Italy); Antipenkov, A.; Dremel, M.; Day, C. [Institut fur Technische Physik, FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Mondino, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EFDA CSU, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The CEA Association is involved, in close collaboration with ENEA, FZK, IPP and UKEA European Associations, in the first ITER neutral beam injector and the ITER neutral beam test facility design (NBTF). A total power of about 50 MW will have to be removed in steady state on the neutral beam test facility (NBTF). The main purpose of this task is to make progress with the detailed design of the first ITER NB injector and to start the conceptual design of the ITER NBTF. The general infrastructure layout of a generic site for the NBTF, includes the test facility itself equipped of a dedicated beamline vessel and integration studies of associated auxiliaries as cooling plant, cryo-plant and fore-pumping system. The general infrastructure and auxiliaries layout of the NBTF are described. (authors)

  13. The association of general practitioners’ risk attitudes, level of empathy and burnout status with PSA testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Carlsen, Anders Helles; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Når alment praktiserende læger sammenlignes, finder man ofte stor variation i raten af PSA-tests foretaget på mandlige patienter. Dette studie viser, at lægens risikovillighed influerer på raten af PSA-tests. Således har patienter, som er registreret hos en læge, som har mange bekymringer for fej...

  14. Evaluation of Immunoassays and General Biological Indicator Tests for Field Screening of Bacillus anthracis and Ricin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Arce, Jennifer S.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Hofstad, Beth A.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Jarman, Kristin; Melville, Angela M.; Victry, Kristin D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this testing was to evaluate the ability of currently available commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) biological indicator tests and immunoassays to detect Bacillus anthracis (Ba) spores and ricin. In general, immunoassays provide more specific identification of biological threats as compared to indicator tests [3]. Many of these detection products are widely used by first responders and other end users. In most cases, performance data for these instruments are supplied directly from the manufacturer, but have not been verified by an external, independent assessment [1]. Our test plan modules included assessments of inclusivity (ability to generate true positive results), commonly encountered hoax powders (which can cause potential interferences or false positives), and estimation of limit of detection (LOD) (sensitivity) testing.

  15. A comparison of three tests to detect general clustering of a rare disease in Santa Clara County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E G; Ding, L; Waller, L A

    2000-05-30

    Statistical tests to detect clustering of a rare disease investigate whether an observed spatial pattern of cases appears to be due to chance alone. Heterogeneous population density and the geographic structure of the data under consideration complicate the ability to make comparisons of different tests. Further, interpretation of test results depends on the nature of the test used and what feature of the data it is designed to detect. With these issues in mind, we compare three recent tests for assessing general clustering among cases where the population is distributed heterogeneously across the study area, namely those of Besag and Newell, Turnbull et al. and Tango. We compare these methods using 1981 incidence data for severe cardiac birth defects from Santa Clara County, California.

  16. Gravitational Wave Tests of General Relativity with the Parameterized Post-Einsteinian Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish, Neil; Yunes, Nico; Pretorius, Frans

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy has tremendous potential for studying extreme astrophysical phenomena and exploring fundamental physics. The waves produced by binary black hole mergers will provide a pristine environment in which to study strong field, dynamical gravity. Extracting detailed information about these systems requires accurate theoretical models of the gravitational wave signals. If gravity is not described by General Relativity, analyses that are based on waveforms derived from Einstein's field equations could result in parameter biases and a loss of detection efficiency. A new class of "parameterized post-Einsteinian" (ppE) waveforms has been proposed to cover this eventuality. Here we apply the ppE approach to simulated data from a network of advanced ground based interferometers (aLIGO/aVirgo) and from a future spaced based interferometer (LISA). Bayesian inference and model selection are used to investigate parameter biases, and to determine the level at which departures from general relativity...

  17. Modeling the Dispersion and Polarization Content of Gravitational Waves for Tests of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tso, Rhondale; Chen, Yanbei; Stein, Leo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic, phenomenological approach to modifying the dispersion of gravitational waves, independent of corrections to the generation mechanism. This model-independent approach encapsulates all previously proposed parametrizations, including Lorentz violation in the Standard-Model Extension, and provides a roadmap for additional theories. Furthermore, we present a general approach to include modulations to the gravitational-wave polarization content. The framework developed here can be implemented in existing data analysis pipelines for future gravitational-wave observation runs.

  18. Effects of Dark Energy Perturbations on Cosmological Tests of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Dossett, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Cosmological tests to distinguish between dark energy (DE) and modifications to gravity are a promising route to obtain clues on the origin of cosmic acceleration. We study here the robustness of these tests to the presence of DE density, velocity, and anisotropic stress perturbations. We find that the dispersion in the growth index parameter remains small enough to distinguish between extreme cases of DE models and some commonly used modified gravity models. The sign of the slope parameter for a redshift dependent growth index was found to be inconsistent as an additional test in extreme cases of DE models with perturbations. Next, we studied the effect of DE perturbations on the modified growth (MG) parameters that enter the perturbed Einstein equations. We find that while the dark energy perturbations affect the MG parameters, the deviations remain smaller than those due to modified gravity models. Additionally, the deviations due to DE perturbations with a non-zero effective sound speed occur at scale ran...

  19. A general test of self-control theory: has its importance been exaggerated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretacci, Michael A

    2008-10-01

    Self-control theory has been tested for 2 decades. However, mixed results and measurement problems have made it difficult to ascertain its true utility. This study addresses recent concerns and includes variables such as risk, consequences, criminal opportunity, an interaction term, and bond controls in one complete test. It also addresses self-control's ability to explain different forms of crime and whether the support that it has garnered has been exaggerated. Results of both cross-sectional and semilongitudinal tests indicate that self-control significantly predicts a higher probability of involvement in property and drug crime but is virtually silent in its ability to explain violence. Furthermore, it can be tentatively stated that support for the theory wanes over time. Finally, neglected concepts such as opportunity, risk, consequences, and bond controls may be important to the theory's ability to explain crime, and further negligence of these concepts may hamper a true understanding of its impact.

  20. A general review of major global coagulation assays: thrombelastography, thrombin generation test and clot waveform analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancé, Marcus D

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis and hemorrhage are major contributors to morbidity and mortality. The traditional laboratory tests do not supply enough information to diagnose and treat patients timely and according to their phenotype. Global hemostasis tests might improve this circumstance. The viscoelastic tests (ROTEM/TEG) demonstrated to ameliorate treatment of acute hemorrhage in terms of decreased amount of transfusion and lowered costs. Thrombin generation measurement is indicative for thrombosis and might also become an important tool in managing hemorrhage. While the clot waveform analysis is less well known it could be of worth in staging sepsis patients, early detection of DIC and also in diagnosis and treatment monitoring of hemophiliac patients. Although in different degree all three methods still need more background, standardization and acceptance before a wide clinical application.

  1. Generally representative is representative of none: commentary on the pitfalls of IQ test standardization in multicultural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth-Edwards, A B

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to address the issue of IQ testing within the multicultural context, with a focus on the adequacy of nationwide population-based norms vs. demographically stratified within-group norms for valid assessment purposes. Burgeoning cultural diversity worldwide creates a pressing need to cultivate culturally fair psychological assessment practices. Commentary is provided to highlight sources of test-taking bias on tests of intellectual ability that may incur invalid placement and diagnostic decisions in multicultural settings. Methodological aspects of population vs. within-group norming solutions are delineated and the challenges of culturally relevant norm development are discussed. Illustrative South African within-group comparative data are supplied to support the review. A critical evaluation of the South African WAIS-III and the WAIS-IV standardizations further serves to exemplify the issues. A flaw in both South African standardizations is failure to differentiate between African first language individuals with a background of advantaged education vs. those from educationally disadvantaged settings. In addition, the standardizations merge the performance outcomes of distinct racial/ethnic groups that are characterized by differentially advantaged or disadvantaged backgrounds. Consequently, the conversion tables are without relevance for any one of the disparate South African cultural groups. It is proposed that the traditional notion of a countrywide unitary norming (also known as 'population-based norms') of an IQ test is an unsatisfactory model for valid assessment practices in diverse cultural contexts. The challenge is to develop new solutions incorporating data from finely stratified within-group norms that serve to reveal rather than obscure cross-cultural disparity in cognitive test performance.

  2. Design and Testing of a Generalized Reduced Gradient Code for Nonlinear Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    Penalty Methods.. 34 6.2 Solution of Himmelblau Test Problems ...... 36 K6.3 Comparison with Two Other-NLP Codes ...... 4.1 S6.4i Comparison of Linear vs...effects of m’altiprogramming. ’-g 6.2 Solution of Himmelblau Test Problems I-’ The first twenty-four problems specified in Appendix A of reference [4... Himmelblau (221 implementing an "exact" exterior penalty method, or "Method of Multipliers"--as well as by an earlier version of the code described here

  3. Contemporaneous and Lagged Effects of Life Domains and Substance Use: A Test of Agnew's General Theory of Crime and Delinquency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawn T. Ngo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a partial test of Agnew’s general theory of crime and delinquency. Relying on a sample of adolescents and employing measures of the self, family, school, and peers domains, this study examines the contemporaneous and lagged effects of these four life domains on the likelihood of consuming alcohol and using marijuana. This study also assesses the contemporaneous and lagged effects of the life domain variables on themselves and on one another. Overall, the results lend support for Agnew’s general theory. The results also reveal several notable puzzles and underscore the complexity of this potentially important contemporary theoretical perspective.

  4. Good quality of oral anticoagulation treatment in general practice using international normalised ratio point of care testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Tina Heidi; Lind, Bent

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OACT)with warfarin is common in general practice. Increasingly,international normalised ratio (INR) point of care testing(POCT) is being used to manage patients. The aim of thisstudy was to describe and analyse the quality of OACT withwarfarin...... in the management of patients in warfarintreatment provided good quality of care. Sampling intervaland diagnostic coding were significantly correlated withtreatment quality. FUNDING: The study received financial support from theSarah Krabbe Foundation, the General Practitioners’ Educationand Development Foundation...

  5. Contact allergy to allergens of the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) has decreased modestly in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of contact allergy in the general population is nearly 20%. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to monitor the development of contact allergy to allergens from the TRUE-test (panels 1 and 2) between 1990 and 2006. METHODS: Two random samples of adults from the general population...... of contact allergy in all male age groups and in young and middle-aged female age groups (18-55 years) whereas increasing prevalences were observed among older women (56-69 years). The diverging trend observed in women was probably explained by a cohort effect due to a change in the prevalence of nickel...

  6. Effect of compression stockings on physiological responses and running performance in division III collegiate cross-country runners during a maximal treadmill test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Brian C; Coughlin, Adam M; Hew-Butler, Tamara D; Goslin, Brian R

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing trend for runners to use compression stockings (CS) to improve performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CS on physiological variables associated with running performance. Participants were 10 NCAA division III cross-country runners. The study used a randomized, crossover design with 2 conditions (with CS and without CS). Both conditions consisted of a maximal treadmill test that involved 3-minute stages of increasing speed and incline, separated by a minute and one-half walking recovery stage. Seven days later, the participants repeated the maximal test but switched CS condition. Heart rate, blood lactate (BLa), blood lactate threshold, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), respiratory exchange ratio, rating of perceived exertion, and time to fatigue were measured. Before and during the maximal treadmill tests, the variables showed no significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) between the CS conditions. Blood lactate was lower while wearing CS when measured during recovery at the 1-minute (CS = 13.3 ± 2.9 mmol · L(-1), non-CS = 14.8 ± 2.8 mmol · L(-1), p = 0.03) and the 5-minute (CS = 11.0 ± 2.7 mmol · L(-1), non-CS = 12.8 ± 2.8 mmol · L(-1), p = 0.02) periods. Time to fatigue was longer without CS (CS = 23.570 ± 2.39 minutes, non-CS = 23.93 ± 2.49 minutes, p = 0.04). These findings suggest that CS may not improve running performance, but could lend credence to certain manufacturers' claims of improved recovery through lower BLa values after exercise.

  7. A mixed methods protocol for developing and testing implementation strategies for evidence-based obesity prevention in childcare: a cluster randomized hybrid type III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, Taren; Johnson, Susan L; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Curran, Geoffrey M

    2017-07-18

    Despite the potential to reach at-risk children in childcare, there is a significant gap between current practices and evidence-based obesity prevention in this setting. There are few investigations of the impact of implementation strategies on the uptake of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for obesity prevention and nutrition promotion. This study protocol describes a three-phase approach to developing and testing implementation strategies to support uptake of EBPs for obesity prevention practices in childcare (i.e., key components of the WISE intervention). Informed by the i-PARIHS framework, we will use a stakeholder-driven evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI) process to apply information gathered in qualitative interviews on barriers and facilitators to practice to inform the design of implementation strategies. Then, a Hybrid Type III cluster randomized trial will compare a basic implementation strategy (i.e., intervention as usual) with an enhanced implementation strategy informed by stakeholders. All Head Start centers (N = 12) within one agency in an urban area in a southern state in the USA will be randomized to receive the basic or enhanced implementation with approximately 20 classrooms per group (40 educators, 400 children per group). The educators involved in the study, the data collectors, and the biostastician will be blinded to the study condition. The basic and enhanced implementation strategies will be compared on outcomes specified by the RE-AIM model (e.g., Reach to families, Effectiveness of impact on child diet and health indicators, Adoption commitment of agency, Implementation fidelity and acceptability, and Maintenance after 6 months). Principles of formative evaluation will be used throughout the hybrid trial. This study will test a stakeholder-driven approach to improve implementation, fidelity, and maintenance of EBPs for obesity prevention in childcare. Further, this study provides an example of a systematic process to develop

  8. On the history of Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s “General Systemology”, and on its relationship to cybernetics – part III: convergences and divergences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drack, Manfred; Pouvreau, David

    2015-01-01

    Bertalanffy’s so-called “general system theory” (GST) and cybernetics were and are often confused: this calls for clarification. In this article, Bertalanffy’s conceptions and ideas are compared with those developed in cybernetics in order to investigate the differences and convergences. Bertalanffy was concerned with first order cybernetics. Nonetheless, his perspectivist epistemology is also relevant with regard to developments in second order cybernetics, and the latter is therefore also considered to some extent. W. Ross Ashby’s important role as mediator between GST and cybernetics is analysed. The respective basic epistemological approaches, scientific approaches and inherent world views are discussed. We underline the complementarity of cybernetic and “organismic” trends in systems research within the unitary hermeneutical framework of “general systemology”. PMID:26612966

  9. On the history of Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s “General Systemology”, and on its relationship to cybernetics – part III: convergences and divergences

    OpenAIRE

    Drack, Manfred; Pouvreau, David

    2015-01-01

    Bertalanffy’s so-called “general system theory” (GST) and cybernetics were and are often confused: this calls for clarification. In this article, Bertalanffy’s conceptions and ideas are compared with those developed in cybernetics in order to investigate the differences and convergences. Bertalanffy was concerned with first order cybernetics. Nonetheless, his perspectivist epistemology is also relevant with regard to developments in second order cybernetics, and the latter is therefore also c...

  10. 21 CFR 1271.80 - What are the general requirements for donor testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.80 What are... mother instead of a specimen from the donor. (b) Timing of specimen collection. You must collect the donor specimen for testing at the time of recovery of cells or tissue from the donor; or up to 7 days...

  11. Bullying Victimization and Adolescent Self-Harm: Testing Hypotheses from General Strain Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Carter; Meldrum, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Self-harm is widely recognized as a significant adolescent social problem, and recent research has begun to explore its etiology. Drawing from Agnew's (1992) social psychological strain theory of deviance, this study considers this issue by testing three hypotheses about the effects of traditional and cyber bullying victimization on deliberate…

  12. Bullying Victimization and Adolescent Self-Harm: Testing Hypotheses from General Strain Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Carter; Meldrum, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Self-harm is widely recognized as a significant adolescent social problem, and recent research has begun to explore its etiology. Drawing from Agnew's (1992) social psychological strain theory of deviance, this study considers this issue by testing three hypotheses about the effects of traditional and cyber bullying victimization on deliberate…

  13. Variation in general practice prostate-specific antigen testing and prostate cancer outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Brugen af prostata-specifikt antigen (PSA) er mangedoblet i dansk almen praksis siden introduktionen i 1990’erne. Dansk Urologisk Selskab anbefaler brug af testen ved relevante symptomer og arvelig disposition, men ikke til screening. Alligevel varierer brugen af PSA-tests i almen praksis. Dette ...

  14. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. [test methods and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, J.; Muirhead, V. U.; Smith, H. W.; Peschier, T. D.; Durenberger, D.; Vandam, K.; Shu, T. C.

    1977-01-01

    Analytical and semi-empirical methods for determining the transmission of sound through isolated panels and predicting panel transmission loss are described. Test results presented include the influence of plate stiffness and mass and the effects of pressurization and vibration damping materials on sound transmission characteristics. Measured and predicted results are presented in tables and graphs.

  15. Test Pricing and Reimbursement in Genomic Medicine: Towards a General Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozikis, Athanassios; Cooper, David N; Mitropoulou, Christina; Kambouris, Manousos E; Brand, Angela; Dolzan, Vita; Fortina, Paolo; Innocenti, Federico; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Leyens, Lada; Macek, Milan; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Prainsack, Barbara; Squassina, Alessio; Taruscio, Domenica; van Schaik, Ron H; Vayena, Effy; Williams, Marc S; Patrinos, George P

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to provide an overview of the rationale and basic principles guiding the governance of genomic testing services, to clarify their objectives, and allocate and define responsibilities among stakeholders in a health-care system, with a special focus on the EU countries. Particular attention is paid to issues pertaining to pricing and reimbursement policies, the availability of essential genomic tests which differs between various countries owing to differences in disease prevalence and public health relevance, the prescribing and use of genomic testing services according to existing or new guidelines, budgetary and fiscal control, the balance between price and access to innovative testing, monitoring and evaluation for cost-effectiveness and safety, and the development of research capacity. We conclude that addressing the specific items put forward in this article will help to create a robust policy in relation to pricing and reimbursement in genomic medicine. This will contribute to an effective and sustainable health-care system and will prove beneficial to the economy at large. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. General Purpose Electronic Test Equipment (GPETE) Acquisition Considerations for Automated Calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    block (BB) test instruments requiring off-line calibration. For example, of the 23 AI/USH-470 building blocks, only one (the calibration module itself...management facility and phone conversations with IAVSUP, NAVCOMPT and the Fleet Material Suppor-t Office ( FPSO ) failed to locate a viable figure. With

  17. Testing general relativity by means of ring lasers. Ring lasers and relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Angelo; Di Virgilio, Angela; Belfi, Jacopo; Beverini, Nicolò; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses the optimal configuration of one or more ring lasers to be used for measuring the general relativistic effects of the rotation of the Earth, as manifested on the surface of the planet. The analysis is focused on devices having their normal vector lying in the meridian plane. The crucial role of the evaluation of the angles is evidenced. Special attention is paid to the orientation at the maximum signal, minimizing the sensitivity to the orientation uncertainty. The use of rings at different latitudes is mentioned and the problem of the non-sphericity of the Earth is commented.

  18. Emergency Locator Transmitter System Performance During Three Full-Scale General Aviation Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D.; Stimson, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    Full-scale crash tests were conducted on three Cessna 172 aircraft at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research facility during the summer of 2015. The purpose of the three tests was to evaluate the performance of commercially available Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) systems and support development of enhanced installation guidance. ELTs are used to provide location information to Search and Rescue (SAR) organizations in the event of an aviation distress situation, such as a crash. The crash tests simulated three differing severe but survivable crash conditions, in which it is expected that the onboard occupants have a reasonable chance of surviving the accident and would require assistance from SAR personnel. The first simulated an emergency landing onto a rigid surface, while the second and third simulated controlled flight into terrain. Multiple ELT systems were installed on each airplane according to federal regulations. The majority of the ELT systems performed nominally. In the systems which did not activate, post-test disassembly and inspection offered guidance for non-activation cause in some cases, while in others, no specific cause could be found. In a subset of installations purposely disregarding best practice guidelines, failure of the ELT-to-antenna cabling connections were found. Recommendations for enhanced installation guidance of ELT systems will be made to the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) Special Committee 229 for consideration for adoption in a future release of ELT minimum operational performance specifications. These recommendations will be based on the data gathered during this test series as well as a larger series of crash simulations using computer models that will be calibrated based on these data

  19. Low verbal assessment with the Bayley-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Linda; Ruiter, Selma A J; Van der Meulen, Bieuwe F; Ruijssenaars, Wied A J J M; Timmerman, Marieke E

    2014-10-24

    Recently, the authors have developed the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal for developmental assessment of children with language impairment. The Low Verbal version consists of an accommodated cognition scale, and non-accommodated communication and motor scales. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the validity and added value of the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal for children with a language impairment, in relation to the standard Bayley-III-NL for children without impairment. We administered the Bayley-III Low Verbal to 69 children with language impairment, and the standard Bayley-III-NL to 1132 children without impairments. We used an evaluation form for test administrators and interviews with developmental psychologists to evaluate the suitability of the Low Verbal version for the target group. We analyzed the test results using nonparametric item response theory (IRT) to investigate whether test results can be reasonably compared across the two groups. The results of the IRT analyses support the validity of the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal: the test items do not suffer from differential item functioning (DIF) across the two groups, and thus measure the ability levels of interest in the same way. The results of the evaluation form and interviews confirm that the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal has added value for testing children with a language impairment, especially for children up to 36 months old. It is also suitable for children with general developmental delay. We conclude that the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal can validly assess the cognitive, language, and motor development of young children with a language impairment and is the preferred instrument for this target group.

  20. Routine mortality monitoring for detecting mass murder in UK general practice: test of effectiveness using modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Bruce; Love, Tom; Kaye, Rebecca; MacLeod, Margaret; Chalmers, Jim

    2008-05-01

    The Shipman Inquiry recommended mortality rate monitoring if it could be 'shown to be workable' in detecting a future mass murderer in general practice. To examine the effectiveness of cumulative sum (CUSUM) charts, cross-sectional Shewhart charts, and exponentially-weighted, moving-average control charts in mortality monitoring at practice level. Analysis of Scottish routine general practice data combined with estimation of control chart effectiveness in detecting a 'murderer' in a simulated dataset. Practice stability was calculated from routine data to determine feasible lengths of monitoring. A simulated dataset of 405,000 'patients' was created, registered with 75 'practices' whose underlying mortality rates varied with the same distribution as case-mix-adjusted mortality in all Scottish practices. The sensitivity of each chart to detect five and 10 excess deaths was examined in repeated simulations. The sensitivity of control charts to excess deaths in simulated data, and the number of alarm signals when control charts were applied to routine data were estimated. Practice instability limited the length of monitoring and modelling was consequently restricted to a 3-year period. Monitoring mortality over 3 years, CUSUM charts were most sensitive but only reliably achieved >50% successful detection for 10 excess deaths per year and generated multiple false alarms (>15%). At best, mortality monitoring can act as a backstop to detect a particularly prolific serial killer when other means of detection have failed. Policy should focus on changes likely to improve detection of individual murders, such as reform of death certification and the coroner system.

  1. Adolescents' eating behaviour in general and in the peer context: testing the prototype-willingness model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnke, Birte; Steinhilber, Amina; Fuchs, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the prototype-willingness model (PWM) for eating behaviour in general and in the peer context in order to gain further evidence on the PWM and social-reactive processes in adolescents' eating behaviour. A longitudinal study was conducted. PWM variables for unhealthy and healthy eating were assessed at baseline in 356 adolescents (mean age 12.61 years). Eating behaviour was measured four weeks after baseline by two indicators: general eating pattern index (self-report) and consumption of unhealthy and healthy snacks in the peer context (behavioural observation). For both, structural equation models were conducted introducing PWM variables for either unhealthy or healthy eating. The PWM was mainly confirmed for the eating pattern index; intention, willingness and prototype perception had direct effects. Differences between unhealthy and healthy eating were found. Moreover, the PWM contributed to the prediction of healthy, but not unhealthy, snack consumption over and above current hunger; willingness had a direct effect. The PWM can be applied to predict and understand adolescents' eating behaviour. Social-reactive processes, namely willingness and prototype perception, are behavioural determinants that should be considered in theory and as novel targets in health promotion interventions.

  2. Confiabilidade do teste da caminhada de seis minutos em pacientes com miastenia gravis generalizada Reliability of the six-minute walk test in patients with generalized myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Regiane Resqueti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou determinar a confiabilidade do teste da caminhada de seis minutos (TC6M como um teste de capacidade funcional em pacientes com miastenia gravis generalizada (MG. Foram selecionados 11 pacientes com MG - 5 homens, 6 mulheres - com idade de 55±9 anos, avaliados inicialmente quanto à função fulmonar, que se submeteram a três TC6M em dias diferentes. Durante e/ou após cada teste foram medidas freqüência cardíaca e saturação de oxigênio (por oxímetro portátil, sensação de dispnéia (pela escala de Borg e distância percorrida. Nos três testes as distâncias percorridas foram 498 m, 517 m e 520 m (respectivamente 99%, 103% e 104% do valor predito. Em média, a freqüência cardíaca, dispnéia e saturação de oxigênio mostraram comportamento constante nos três testes. Foram encontradas alta confiabilidade relativa, com coeficiente de correlação interclasse maior que 0,90 entre os testes (TC6M1-TC6M2, 0,960; TC6M1-TC6M3, 0,945; e TC6M2-TC6M3, 0,970 e confiabilidade absoluta de 4%, 3,5% e 4,8%, com reprodutibilidade de 11%, 9,8% e 13,4%, respectivamente para o primeiro, segundo e terceiro testes. Os limites superiores e inferiores de concordância e o valor médio das médias das diferenças (bias calculados pelo teste de Bland-Altman mostraram-se clinicamente aceitáveis. Conclui-se que o TC6M se mostrou seguro, confiável e reprodutível, podendo ser aplicado para avaliação e seguimento da tolerância ao exercício em pacientes com MG generalizada.The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of the six minutes walking test (6MWT as a functional capacity test for patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG. Eleven patients with generalized MG (5 men, six women, aged 55±9 years, were first assessed as to pulmonary function and then submitted to three 6MWT in different days. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were measured (by means of portable oxymeter during, and dyspnea (by the Borg scale and

  3. Report to the Attorney General on Body Armor Safety Initiative Testing and Activities. Supplement 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-27

    directed the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to initiate an examination of Zylon ®-based bullet-resistant armor1 (both new and used), to analyze...upgrade kits2 provided by manufacturers to retrofit Zylon ®- based bullet-resistant armors, and to review the existing process by which bullet-resistant...development, standards and testing, and also reviewed information about NIJ’s preliminary evaluation of Zylon ®- based armor. NIJ continues to conduct

  4. A Modified Generalized Fisher Method for Combining Probabilities from Dependent Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying (Daisy eDai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid developments in molecular technology have yielded a large amount of high throughput genetic data to understand the mechanism for complex traits. The increase of genetic variants requires hundreds and thousands of statistical tests to be performed simultaneously in analysis, which poses a challenge to control the overall Type I error rate. Combining p-values from multiple hypothesis testing has shown promise for aggregating effects in high-dimensional genetic data analysis. Several p-value combining methods have been developed and applied to genetic data; see [Dai, et al. 2012b] for a comprehensive review. However, there is a lack of investigations conducted for dependent genetic data, especially for weighted p-value combining methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are often correlated due to linkage disequilibrium. Other genetic data, including variants from next generation sequencing, gene expression levels measured by microarray, protein and DNA methylation data, etc. also contain complex correlation structures. Ignoring correlation structures among genetic variants may lead to severe inflation of Type I error rates for omnibus testing of p-values. In this work, we propose modifications to the Lancaster procedure by taking the correlation structure among p-values into account. The weight function in the Lancaster procedure allows meaningful biological information to be incorporated into the statistical analysis, which can increase the power of the statistical testing and/or remove the bias in the process. Extensive empirical assessments demonstrate that the modified Lancaster procedure largely reduces the Type I error rates due to correlation among p-values, and retains considerable power to detect signals among p-values. We applied our method to reassess published renal transplant data, and identified a novel association between B cell pathways and allograft tolerance.

  5. Validation of MIL-F-9490D. General Specification for Flight Control System for Piloted Military Aircraft. Volume III. C-5A Heavy Logistics Transport Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-04-01

    of IELT -F-9490D are not compatible with the C-5A. The elevation of the pilot affects his visibility. Although there is similarity in the provisions...requiremnts. Other considerations were to insure that the air vehicle and its subsysbems, trainers , engines, test vehicles, ground support equipment, •tc

  6. Tests and numerical simulation of aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils for general aviation applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lizhen; Wang Xiaoming; Miguel A.González Hernández; Wang Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper was to validate the effects of airfoil thickness ratio on the characteristics of a family of airfoils.Re-search was carried out in different ways.First,tests were conducted in the wind tunnel.And numerical simulation was performed on the basis of tests.Results from calculation were consistent with tests,indicating that numerical method could help evaluate characteristics of airfoils.Then the results were confirmed by compared with empirical data.The study also showed that the determining factor of lift is not only the thickness ratio,but the angle of attack,the relative camber and the camber line.The thickness ratio appears to have little effect on lift coefficient at zero angle of attack,since the angle of zero llft is largely determined by the airfoil camber.According to the research,numerical simulation can be used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in different environment such as in the dusty or hu-mid air.

  7. Comparison of geochemical data obtained using four brine sampling methods at the SECARB Phase III Anthropogenic Test CO2 injection site, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher; Thordsen, James J.; Manning, Michael A.; Cook, Paul J.; Trautz, Robert C.; Thomas, Burt; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of formation water and associated gases from the lower Cretaceous Paluxy Formation was determined using four different sampling methods at a characterization well in the Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama, as part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Anthropogenic Test, which is an integrated carbon capture and storage project. In this study, formation water and gas samples were obtained from well D-9-8 #2 at Citronelle using gas lift, electric submersible pump, U-tube, and a downhole vacuum sampler (VS) and subjected to both field and laboratory analyses. Field chemical analyses included electrical conductivity, dissolved sulfide concentration, alkalinity, and pH; laboratory analyses included major, minor and trace elements, dissolved carbon, volatile fatty acids, free and dissolved gas species. The formation water obtained from this well is a Na–Ca–Cl-type brine with a salinity of about 200,000 mg/L total dissolved solids. Differences were evident between sampling methodologies, particularly in pH, Fe and alkalinity. There was little gas in samples, and gas composition results were strongly influenced by sampling methods. The results of the comparison demonstrate the difficulty and importance of preserving volatile analytes in samples, with the VS and U-tube system performing most favorably in this aspect.

  8. STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF COMPLEX TREATMENT USING IMMUNOMODULATORS ON THE STATE OF LOCAL IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC GENERALIZED PERIODONTITIS I-II SEVERITY ON ENTEROBIASIS

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Due to the high prevalence of chronic generalized periodontitis there is a need for a broader analysis of the causes and development of diseases, as well as the search for effective treatments for etiopathogenetical. The aim of this work was to study the effect of newly developed therapy on local immunity in patients CGP I and II severity with enterobiasis. Material & methods. The main group consisted of 32 people with СGP I degree and 60 people with СGP II severity who were...

  9. A Test of General Relativity Using the LARES and LAGEOS Satellites and a GRACE Earth's Gravity Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of General Relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth's gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure $\\mu = (0.994 \\pm 0.002) \\pm 0.05$, where $\\mu$ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its General Relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is the estimated systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth's gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of General Relativity.

  10. On possible a-priori "imprinting" of General Relativity itself on the performed Lense-Thirring tests with LAGEOS satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    The impact of possible a-priori "imprinting" effects of general relativity itself on recent attempts to measure the Lense-Thirring precessions with the LAGEOS satellites orbiting the Earth and the terrestrial geopotential models by the dedicated mission GRACE is investigated. It is analytically shown that general relativity, not explicitly solved for in the GRACE-based models, may "imprint" their even zonal harmonic coefficients J_L at a non-negligible level, given the present-day accuracy in recovering them. This translates into a bias of the LAGEOS-based relativistic tests as large as the Lense-Thirring effect itself. Further analyses should include general relativity itself in the GRACE data processing by explicitly solving for it.

  11. Good quality of oral anticoagulation treatment in general practice using international normalised ratio point of care testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Tina Heidi; Lind, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OACT) with warfarin is common in general practice. Increasingly, international normalised ratio (INR) point of care testing (POCT) is being used to manage patients. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the quality of OACT with warfarin...... in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark using INR POCT. METHODS: A total of 20 general practices, ten single-handed and ten group practices using INR POCT, were randomly selected to participate in the study. Practice organisation and patient characteristics were recorded. INR measurements were...... collected retrospectively for a period of six months. For each patient, time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated and correlated with practice and patient characteristics using multilevel linear regression models. RESULTS: We identified 447 patients in warfarin treatment in the 20 practices using POCT...

  12. Good quality of oral anticoagulation treatment in general practice using international normalised ratio point of care testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Tina Heidi; Lind, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OACT)with warfarin is common in general practice. Increasingly,international normalised ratio (INR) point of care testing(POCT) is being used to manage patients. The aim of thisstudy was to describe and analyse the quality of OACT withwarfarin...... was notsignificant (4.2 percentage points (pp); 95% confidenceinterval (CI): –0.8-9.2). Short sampling intervals, e.g. 10-20days (–11 pp, 95% CI: –16-–6)) and lack of diagnostic coding(–11.8 pp; 95% CI: –19.9-–3.7) were correlated with a lowTTR. CONCLUSION: In our study most of the general practices usingINR POCT...... in the management of patients in warfarintreatment provided good quality of care. Sampling intervaland diagnostic coding were significantly correlated withtreatment quality. FUNDING: The study received financial support from theSarah Krabbe Foundation, the General Practitioners’ Educationand Development Foundation...

  13. A New Content-Based Image Retrieval Using the Multidimensional Generalization of Wald-Wolfowitz Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leauhatong, Thurdsak; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Atsuta, Kiyoaki; Kondo, Shozo

    This paper proposes two new similarity measures for the content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems. The similarity measures are based on the k-means clustering algorithm and the multidimensional generalization of the Wald-Wolfowitz (MWW) runs test. The performance comparisons between the proposed similarity measures and a current CBIR similarity measure based on the MWW runs test were performed, and it can be seen that the proposed similarity measures outperform the current similarity measure with respect to the precision and the computational time.

  14. A General Tank Test of a Model of the Hull of the British Singapore IIC Flying Boat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, John R; Truscott, Starr

    1936-01-01

    A general test was made in the N.A.C.A. tank of a 1/12-size model of the hull of the British Singapore IIC flying boat loaned by the Director of Research, British Air Ministry. The results are given in charts and are compared with the results of tests of a model of an American flying-boat hull, the Sikorsky S-40. The Singapore hull has a greater hump resistance but a much lower high-speed resistance than the S-40.

  15. Do general relativistic effects limit experiments to test the universality of free fall and the weak equivalence principle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Anna M.

    2016-12-01

    The universality of free fall and the weak equivalence principle, which are at the basis of general relativity, have been confirmed to 1 part in 1 013. Space experiments with macroscopic test masses of different composition orbiting Earth inside a low altitude satellite aim to improve this precision by 2 orders of magnitude (with the Microscope satellite launched on April 25, 2016) and up to 4 orders of magnitude (with the Galileo Galilei satellite). At such a high precision, many tiny effects must be taken into account in order to be ruled out as the source of a spurious violation signal. In this work, we investigate the general relativistic effects, including those which involve the rotation of both Earth and the test masses, and show that they are by far too small to be considered even in the most challenging experiment.

  16. Do general relativistic effects limit experiments to test the universality of free fall and the weak equivalence principle?

    CERN Document Server

    Nobili, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    The Universality of Free Fall and the Weak Equivalence Principle, which are at the basis of General Relativity, have been confirmed to 1 part in 10^13. Space experiments with macroscopic test masses of different composition orbiting the Earth inside a low altitude satellite aim at improving this precision by two orders of magnitude (with the Microscope satellite, launched on 25 April 2016) and up to four orders of magnitude (with the 'Galileo Galilei' - GG satellite). At such a high precision many tiny effects must be taken into account in order to be ruled out as the source of a spurious violation signal. In this work we investigate the general relativistic effects, including those which involve the rotation of both the source body and the test masses, and show that they are by far too small to be considered even in the most challenging experiment.

  17. An Asset Pricing Approach to Testing General Term Structure Models including Heath-Jarrow-Morton Specifications and Affine Subclasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; van der Wel, Michel

    of the risk premium is associated with the slope factor, and individual risk prices depend on own past values, factor realizations, and past values of other risk prices, and are significantly related to the output gap, consumption, and the equity risk price. The absence of arbitrage opportunities is strongly...... is tested, but in addition to the standard bilinear term in factor loadings and market prices of risk, the relevant mean restriction in the term structure case involves an additional nonlinear (quadratic) term in factor loadings. We estimate our general model using likelihood-based dynamic factor model...... techniques for a variety of volatility factors, and implement the relevant likelihood ratio tests. Our factor model estimates are similar across a general state space implementation and an alternative robust two-step principal components approach. The evidence favors time-varying market prices of risk. Most...

  18. Experimental Test of the State Estimation-Reversal Tradeoff Relation in General Quantum Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When a measurement has limited strength, only partial information, regarding the initial state, is extracted, and, correspondingly, there is a probability to reverse its effect on the system and retrieve the original state. Recently, a clear and direct quantitative description of this complementary relationship, in terms of a tradeoff relation, was developed by Y. K. Cheong and S. W. Lee. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 150402 (2012]. Here, this tradeoff relation is experimentally verified using polarization-encoded single photons from a quantum dot. Measurement operators representing a complete range, from not affecting the system to a projection to a single polarization state, are realized. In addition, for each measurement operator, an optimal reversal operator is also implemented. The upper bound of the tradeoff relation is mapped to experimental parameters representing the measurement strength. Our results complement the theoretical work and provide a hands-on characterization of general quantum measurements.

  19. Testing General Relativity with Stellar Orbits around the Supermassive Black Hole in Our Galactic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A; Do, T; Ghez, A M; Martinez, G D; Naoz, S; Becklin, E E; Boehle, A; Chappell, S; Chu, D; Dehghanfar, A; Kosmo, K; Lu, J R; Matthews, K; Morris, M R; Sakai, S; Schödel, R; Witzel, G

    2017-05-26

    We demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from general relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of |α|black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.

  20. Testing a generalized cooling procedure in the complex Langevin simulation of chiral Random Matrix Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nagata, Keitaro; Shimasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The complex Langevin method has been attracting much attention as a solution to the sign problem since the method was shown to work in finite density QCD in the deconfined phase by using the so-called gauge cooling procedure. Whether it works also in the confined phase with light quarks is still an open question, though. In order to shed light on this question, we apply the method to the chiral Random Matrix Theory, which describes the epsilon regime of finite density QCD. Earlier works reported that a naive implementation of the method fails to reproduce the known exact results and that the problem can be solved by choosing a suitable coordinate. In this work we stick to the naive implementation, and show that a generalized gauge cooling procedure can be used to avoid the problem.

  1. GAME - A small mission concept for high-precision astrometric test of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, A.; Gai, Mario; Donati, Paolo; Morbidelli, Roberto; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Crosta, Mariateresa

    2010-11-01

    GAME (Gamma Astrometric Measurement Experiment) is a concept for a small mission whose main goal is to measure from space the γ parameter of the Parameterized Post-Newtonian formalism, Will (2001)) A satellite, looking as close as possible to the Solar limb, measures the gravitational bending of light in a way similar to that followed by past experiments from the ground during solar eclipses. In the cited formalism, deviations of the γ parameter from unity are interpreted as deviations from the predictions of General Relativity which are foreseen by several competing theories of gravity. In the present theoretical scenario, such deviations are expected to appear in the range between 10-5 and 10-7. The most stringent experimental constraints available up to now are those of the Cassini mission, that gives 1-γ≲10-5 Bertotti et al. (2003), while future space missions are expected to reach the 10-7 level of accuracy. (Vecchiato et al. (2003), Turyshev et al. (2004), Ni (2008)) Preliminary simulations have shown that the expected final accuracy of GAME can reach the 10-7 level, or better if the mission profile can be extended to fit a larger budget Vecchiato et al. (2009), Gai et al. (2009). This work, which has recently been extended to better assess the mission performances, has confirmed the previous results and has given indications on how further improve various aspects of the mission profile. Moreover, thanks to its flexible observation strategy, GAME is also able to target other interesting scientific goals in the realm of General Relativity, as well as in those involving observations of selected extrasolar systems in the brown dwarf and planetary regime.

  2. Introducing Distance and Measurement in General Relativity: Changes for the Standard Tests and the Cosmological Large-Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crothers S. J.

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic motion in the gravitational field of a massive body is governed by the external metric of a spherically symmetric extended object. Consequently, any solution for the point-mass is inadequate for the treatment of such motions since it pertains to a fictitious object. I therefore develop herein the physics of the standard tests of General Relativity by means of the generalised solution for the field external to a sphere of incompressible homogeneous fluid.

  3. Association of 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels with indexes of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Jari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to determine the association of serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25(OHD levels with measures of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted among 1090 students, aged 10-18 years, living in 27 provinces in Iran. Serum concentration of 25(OHD was analyzed quantitatively by direct competitive immunoassay chemiluminescence method. Body mass index (BMI and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR were considered as measures of generalized and abdominal obesity, respectively. Results: Study participants consisted of 1090 adolescents (51.9% boy and 67.1% urban residents with mean age, BMI, and waist circumference of 14.7 (2.6 years, 19.3 (4.2 kg/m 2 , and 67.82 (12.23 cm, respectively. The median serum 25(OHD was 13.0 ng/mL (interquartile range: 20.6. Overall, 40% of participants were Vitamin D deficient, and 39% were Vitamin D insufficient. Serum 25(OHD level was not associated with BMI and WHtR. Conclusion: We did not document any significant association between serum 25(OHD level and anthropometric measures in adolescents. This finding may be because of considerably high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the study population.

  4. Association of 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels with indexes of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jari, Mohsen; Qorbani, Mostafa; Moafi, Mohammad; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Keikha, Mojtaba; Ardalan, Gelayol; Kelishadi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the association of serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels with measures of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted among 1090 students, aged 10-18 years, living in 27 provinces in Iran. Serum concentration of 25(OH)D was analyzed quantitatively by direct competitive immunoassay chemiluminescence method. Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) were considered as measures of generalized and abdominal obesity, respectively. Results: Study participants consisted of 1090 adolescents (51.9% boy and 67.1% urban residents) with mean age, BMI, and waist circumference of 14.7 (2.6) years, 19.3 (4.2) kg/m2, and 67.82 (12.23) cm, respectively. The median serum 25(OH)D was 13.0 ng/mL (interquartile range: 20.6). Overall, 40% of participants were Vitamin D deficient, and 39% were Vitamin D insufficient. Serum 25(OH)D level was not associated with BMI and WHtR. Conclusion: We did not document any significant association between serum 25(OH)D level and anthropometric measures in adolescents. This finding may be because of considerably high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the study population. PMID:25983762

  5. Gravitational Wave Tests of Strong Field General Relativity with Binary Inspirals: Realistic Injections and Optimal Model Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Sampson, Laura; Yunes, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    We study generic tests of strong-field General Relativity using gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral of compact binaries. Previous studies have considered simple extensions to the standard post-Newtonian waveforms that differ by a single term in the phase. Here we improve on these studies by (i) increasing the realism of injections and (ii) determining the optimal waveform families for detecting and characterizing such signals. We construct waveforms that deviate from those in General Relativity through a series of post-Newtonian terms, and find that these higher-order terms can affect our ability to test General Relativity, in some cases by making it easier to detect a deviation, and in some cases by making it more difficult. We find that simple single-phase post-Einsteinian waveforms are sufficient for detecting deviations from General Relativity, and there is little to be gained from using more complicated models with multiple phase terms. The results found here will help guide future attempts t...

  6. The Vanderbilt Expertise Test reveals domain-general and domain-specific sex effects in object recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGugin, Rankin W; Richler, Jennifer J; Herzmann, Grit; Speegle, Magen; Gauthier, Isabel

    2012-09-15

    Individual differences in face recognition are often contrasted with differences in object recognition using a single object category. Likewise, individual differences in perceptual expertise for a given object domain have typically been measured relative to only a single category baseline. In Experiment 1, we present a new test of object recognition, the Vanderbilt Expertise Test (VET), which is comparable in methods to the Cambridge Face Memory Task (CFMT) but uses eight different object categories. Principal component analysis reveals that the underlying structure of the VET can be largely explained by two independent factors, which demonstrate good reliability and capture interesting sex differences inherent in the VET structure. In Experiment 2, we show how the VET can be used to separate domain-specific from domain-general contributions to a standard measure of perceptual expertise. While domain-specific contributions are found for car matching for both men and women and for plane matching in men, women in this sample appear to use more domain-general strategies to match planes. In Experiment 3, we use the VET to demonstrate that holistic processing of faces predicts face recognition independently of general object recognition ability, which has a sex-specific contribution to face recognition. Overall, the results suggest that the VET is a reliable and valid measure of object recognition abilities and can measure both domain-general skills and domain-specific expertise, which were both found to depend on the sex of observers.

  7. Effects of Interleaved and Blocked Study on Delayed Test of Category Learning Generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo F. Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studying different concepts by frequently alternating between them (i.e., interleaving, improves discriminative contrast between different categories, while studying each concept in separate blocks emphasizes the similarities within each category. Interleaved study has been shown to improve learning of high similarity categories by increasing between-category comparison, while blocked study improves learning of low similarity categories by increasing within-category comparison. In addition, interleaved study presents greater temporal spacing between repetitions of each category compared to blocked study, which might present long-term memory benefits. In this study we asked if the benefits of temporal spacing would interact with the benefits of sequencing for making comparisons when testing was delayed, particularly for low similarity categories. Blocked study might be predicted to promote noticing similarities across members of the same category and result in short-term benefits. However, the increase in temporal delay between repetitions inherent to interleaved study might benefit both types of categories when tested after a longer retention interval. Participants studied categories either interleaved or blocked and were tested immediately and 24 hours after study. We found an interaction between schedule of study and the type of category studied, which is consistent with the differential emphasis promoted by each sequential schedule. However, increasing the retention interval did not modulate this interaction or resulted in improved performance for interleaved study. Overall, this indicates that the benefit of interleaving is not primarily due to temporal spacing during study, but rather due to the cross-category comparisons that interleaving facilitates. We discuss the benefits of temporal spacing of repetitions in the context of sequential study and how it can be integrated with the attentional bias hypothesis proposed by Carvalho and

  8. Statistical power analysis a simple and general model for traditional and modern hypothesis tests

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Kevin R; Wolach, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Noted for its accessible approach, this text applies the latest approaches of power analysis to both null hypothesis and minimum-effect testing using the same basic unified model. Through the use of a few simple procedures and examples, the authors show readers with little expertise in statistical analysis how to obtain the values needed to carry out the power analysis for their research. Illustrations of how these analyses work and how they can be used to choose the appropriate criterion for defining statistically significant outcomes are sprinkled throughout. The book presents a simple and g

  9. A new upper bound on the query complexity for testing generalized Reed-Muller codes

    CERN Document Server

    Ron-Zewi, Noga

    2012-01-01

    Over a finite field $\\F_q$ the $(n,d,q)$-Reed-Muller code is the code given by evaluations of $n$-variate polynomials of total degree at most $d$ on all points (of $\\F_q^n$). The task of testing if a function $f:\\F_q^n \\to \\F_q$ is close to a codeword of an $(n,d,q)$-Reed-Muller code has been of central interest in complexity theory and property testing. The query complexity of this task is the minimal number of queries that a tester can make (minimum over all testers of the maximum number of queries over all random choices) while accepting all Reed-Muller codewords and rejecting words that are $\\delta$-far from the code with probability $\\Omega(\\delta)$. (In this work we allow the constant in the $\\Omega$ to depend on $d$.) In this work we give a new upper bound of $(c q)^{(d+1)/q}$ on the query complexity, where $c$ is a universal constant. In the process we also give new upper bounds on the "spanning weight" of the dual of the Reed-Muller code (which is also a Reed-Muller code). The spanning weight of a co...

  10. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson-Kac processes—part III extensions and applications to kinetic theory and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-08-01

    This third part extends the theory of Generalized Poisson-Kac (GPK) processes to nonlinear stochastic models and to a continuum of states. Nonlinearity is treated in two ways: (i) as a dependence of the parameters (intensity of the stochastic velocity, transition rates) of the stochastic perturbation on the state variable, similarly to the case of nonlinear Langevin equations, and (ii) as the dependence of the stochastic microdynamic equations of motion on the statistical description of the process itself (nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Kac models). Several numerical and physical examples illustrate the theory. Gathering nonlinearity and a continuum of states, GPK theory provides a stochastic derivation of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, furnishing a positive answer to the Kac’s program in kinetic theory. The transition from stochastic microdynamics to transport theory within the framework of the GPK paradigm is also addressed.

  11. Ornamental-Iron Worker (const.) 4-84.020; Structural-Steel Worker (const.) 4-84-010--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  12. Countergirl 2-27.13; Counterman, Lunchroom or Coffee Shop (hotel and rest.) 2-27.13--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  13. Clicking-Machine Operator (boot & show; leather prod.) 6-62.055--Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  14. Influence of demographic factors, basic blood test parameters and opioid type on propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in ASA I-III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Agnieszka; Wiczling, Paweł; Zaba, Czesław; Zaba, Zbigniew; Wolc, Anna; Marciniak, Ryszard; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Kusza, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine population pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of propofol (CAS 2078-54-8) during total intravenous anesthesia monitored by spectral frequency index (SFx). Twenty-eight patients of ASA physical status I-III (ASA: American Society of Anesthesiologists) scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included. In group I an anesthesia was induced with a bolus of propofol (2 mg/kg) and remifentanil (CAS 132875-61-7) (1.0 microg/kg), followed by a continuous infusion of remifentanil. In group II, an alfentanil (CAS 71195-58-9) (10 microg/kg) bolus dose was followed by a continuous infusion of alfentanil. The general anesthetic technique included propofol, opioid and muscle relaxant. During anesthesia, the propofol infusion rate (3-8 mg/kg/h) was adjusted to the SFx value. Venous blood samples were collected from the patients during 240 min after termination of the infusion. A two compartment model was used to describe propofol PK. A standard effect compartment model was used to describe the delay between the effect and the concentration of propofol. The SFx index was linked to the effect site concentrations through a sigmoidal Emax model. The influence of continuous (body weight, age, blood pressure, heart rate and blood oxygenation, serum protein, the erythrocyte count, hemoglobin and hematocrit, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance) and categorical (gender and the type of opioid) covariates on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters was investigated. PK/PD analysis was performed using NONMEM. All the screened covariates did not influence propofol PK and PD, except of the opioid type. The central compartment volume of propofol was larger in the presence of remifentanil than in the presence of alfentanil.

  15. Population-based preconception carrier screening: how potential users from the general population view a test for 50 serious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Mirjam; Birnie, Erwin; Abbott, Kristin M; Sinke, Richard J; Lucassen, Anneke M; Schuurmans, Juliette; Kaplan, Seyma; Verkerk, Marian A; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Langen, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    With the increased international focus on personalized health care and preventive medicine, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has substantially expanded the options for carrier screening of serious, recessively inherited diseases. NGS screening tests not only offer reproductive options not previously available to couples, but they may also ultimately reduce the number of children born with devastating disorders. To date, preconception carrier screening (PCS) has largely targeted single diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but NGS allows the testing of many genes or diseases simultaneously. We have developed an expanded NGS PCS test for couples; simultaneously it covers 50 very serious, early-onset, autosomal recessive diseases that are untreatable. This is the first, noncommercial, population-based, expanded PCS test to be offered prospectively to couples in a health-care setting in Europe. So far, little is known about how potential users view such a PCS test. We therefore performed an online survey in 2014 among 500 people from the target population in the Netherlands. We enquired about their intention to take an expanded PCS test if one was offered, and through which provider they would like to see it offered. One-third of the respondents said they would take such a test were it to be offered. The majority (44%) preferred the test to be offered via their general practitioner (GP) and 58% would be willing to pay for the test, with a median cost of €75. Our next step is to perform an implementation study in which this PCS test will be provided via selected GPs in the Northern Netherlands. PMID:27165008

  16. Geometric and growth rate tests of General Relativity with recovered linear cosmological perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    I investigate the consistency of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey v7 galaxy sample with the expansion history and linear growth rate predicted by General Relativity (GR) and a Planck (2015) cosmology. To do so, I measure the redshift-space power spectrum, which is anisotropic due to both redshift-space distortions (RSD) and the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect. In Chapter 6, I place constraints of $f \\sigma_8(0.76) = 0.44 \\pm 0.04$ and $f \\sigma_8(1.05) = 0.28 \\pm 0.08$, which remain consistent with GR at 95% confidence. Marginalising over the anisotropic AP effect degrades the constraints by a factor of three but allows $F_{AP} \\equiv (1+z) D_A H/c$ to be simultaneously constrained. The VIPERS v7 joint-posterior on $(f \\sigma_8, F_{AP})$ shows no compelling deviation from GR. Chapter 7 investigates the inclusion of a simple density transform: `clipping' prior to the RSD analysis. This tackles the root-cause of non-linearity and may extend the validity of perturbation theory. Moreover, this marked s...

  17. Reply to "Comment on 'Third law of thermodynamics as a key test of generalized entropies' ".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, E P; Viswanathan, G M; da Luz, M G E; Silva, R

    2015-07-01

    In Bento et al. [Phys. Rev. E 91, 039901 (2015)] we develop a method to verify if an arbitrary generalized statistics does or does not obey the third law of thermodynamics. As examples, we address two important formulations, Kaniadakis and Tsallis. In their Comment on the paper, Bagci and Oikonomou suggest that our examination of the Tsallis statistics is valid only for q≥1, using arguments like there is no distribution maximizing the Tsallis entropy for the interval qlaw is not verified) compatible with the problem energy expression. In this Reply, we first (and most importantly) show that the Comment misses the point. In our original work we have considered the now already standard construction of the Tsallis statistics. So, if indeed such statistics lacks a maximization principle (a fact irrelevant in our protocol), this is an inherent feature of the statistics itself and not a problem with our analysis. Second, some arguments used by Bagci and Oikonomou (for 0

  18. Testing a procedural variant of written imaginal exposure for generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracalanza, Katie; Koerner, Naomi; Antony, Martin M

    2014-08-01

    This experiment examined the degree to which it is more beneficial for individuals with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) to engage in repeated exposure to mental imagery of the same feared scenario versus varying the exposure content. On three consecutive days, individuals with GAD (N=57) spent 20min writing about: (1) the same worst case scenario (consistent exposure; CE), (2) variations of their worst case scenario (varied exposure; VE), or (3) a neutral topic (neutral control; NC). Participants in the CE condition displayed significant decreases in worry, acute cognitive avoidance, and intolerance of uncertainty from baseline to 1-week follow-up; participants in the VE and NC conditions did not. Initial activation of self-reported anxiety (observed in the CE and VE conditions) and between-session reduction in anxiety (observed in the CE condition only) were associated with improvement in worry. Including more references to negative emotion and writing in the present tense were also associated with greater improvement in worry in the CE condition. These findings suggest that writing repeatedly about the same worst case scenario may benefit people with GAD. The study also provides information on potential mechanisms of change.

  19. Reply to "Comment on `Third law of thermodynamics as a key test of generalized entropies' "

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, E. P.; Viswanathan, G. M.; da Luz, M. G. E.; Silva, R.

    2015-07-01

    In Bento et al. [Phys. Rev. E 91, 039901 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.039901] we develop a method to verify if an arbitrary generalized statistics does or does not obey the third law of thermodynamics. As examples, we address two important formulations, Kaniadakis and Tsallis. In their Comment on the paper, Bagci and Oikonomou suggest that our examination of the Tsallis statistics is valid only for q ≥1 , using arguments like there is no distribution maximizing the Tsallis entropy for the interval q <0 (in which the third law is not verified) compatible with the problem energy expression. In this Reply, we first (and most importantly) show that the Comment misses the point. In our original work we have considered the now already standard construction of the Tsallis statistics. So, if indeed such statistics lacks a maximization principle (a fact irrelevant in our protocol), this is an inherent feature of the statistics itself and not a problem with our analysis. Second, some arguments used by Bagci and Oikonomou (for 0

  20. What Are Standardized Literacy and Numeracy Tests Testing? Evidence of the Domain-General Contributions to Students' Standardized Educational Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Steven J.; Woodcock, Stuart; Ehrich, John; Bokosmaty, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    Background: A fundamental aim of standardized educational assessment is to achieve reliable discrimination between students differing in the knowledge, skills and abilities assessed. However, questions of the purity with which these tests index students' genuine abilities have arisen. Specifically, literacy and numeracy assessments may also engage…

  1. Development of an Intervention for implementing Immunochemical Faecal Occult Blood Test in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Søgaard; Vedsted, Peter; Bro, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Denne korte artikel handler om udviklingen af en intervention til implementering af immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) i almen praksis. Artiklen gennemgår processen fra de tidlige udviklingsstadier, over pilot-testning og frem til de endelige justeringer før selve implementeringen blev...... iværksat i almen praksis. Erfaringerne fra pilot-testningen betød, at vejledningen til brugen af iFOBT blev ændret – fra en fast og ”rigid” vejledning, som byggede på helt specifikke indikationer, til en mere ”fleksibel” vejledning, som i højere grad byggede på den praktiserende læges egen kliniske...

  2. Testing the Master Constraint Programme for Loop Quantum Gravity I. General Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, B; Dittrich, Bianca; Thiemann, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Recently the Master Constraint Programme for Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) was proposed as a classically equivalent way to impose the infinite number of Wheeler -- DeWitt constraint equations in terms of a single Master Equation. While the proposal has some promising abstract features, it was until now barely tested in known models. In this series of five papers we fill this gap, thereby adding confidence to the proposal. We consider a wide range of models with increasingly more complicated constraint algebras, beginning with a finite dimensional, Abelean algebra of constraint operators which are linear in the momenta and ending with an infinite dimensional, non-Abelean algebra of constraint operators which closes with structure functions only and which are not even polynomial in the momenta. In all these models we apply the Master Constraint Programme successfully, however, the full flexibility of the method must be exploited in order to complete our task. This shows that the Master Constraint Programme has a w...

  3. Radon-222 as a test of convective transport in a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Prather, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional tracer model based on the Goddard Institude of Space Studies GCM is used to simulate the distribution of Rn-222 over North America to test the ability of the model to describe the transport of pollutants in the boundary layer and the exchange of mass between the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The model results are compared with surface observations from five sites in the U.S., showing that Rn-222 concentrations are primarily regulated by dry convection. The simulations show satisfactory agreement with observations although the model underpredicts observations at night and the simulated Rn-222 concentrations over the northeastern U.S. are too high in the spring and too low in the fall.

  4. A generalized Grubbs-Beck test statistic for detecting multiple potentially influential low outliers in flood series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, T.A.; England, J.F.; Berenbrock, C.E.; Mason, R.R.; Stedinger, J.R.; Lamontagne, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    he Grubbs-Beck test is recommended by the federal guidelines for detection of low outliers in flood flow frequency computation in the United States. This paper presents a generalization of the Grubbs-Beck test for normal data (similar to the Rosner (1983) test; see also Spencer and McCuen (1996)) that can provide a consistent standard for identifying multiple potentially influential low flows. In cases where low outliers have been identified, they can be represented as “less-than” values, and a frequency distribution can be developed using censored-data statistical techniques, such as the Expected Moments Algorithm. This approach can improve the fit of the right-hand tail of a frequency distribution and provide protection from lack-of-fit due to unimportant but potentially influential low flows (PILFs) in a flood series, thus making the flood frequency analysis procedure more robust.

  5. Gravitational quadrupolar coupling to equivalence principle test masses: the general case

    CERN Document Server

    Lockerbie, N A

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the significance of the quadrupolar gravitational force in the context of test masses destined for use in equivalence principle (EP) experiments, such as STEP and MICROSCOPE. The relationship between quadrupolar gravity and rotational inertia for an arbitrary body is analysed, and the special, gravitational, role of a body's principal axes of inertia is revealed. From these considerations the gravitational quadrupolar force acting on a cylindrically symmetrical body, due to a point-like attracting source mass, is derived in terms of the body's mass quadrupole tensor. The result is shown to be in agreement with that obtained from MacCullagh's formula (as the starting point). The theory is then extended to cover the case of a completely arbitrary solid body, and a compact formulation for the quadrupolar force on such a body is derived. A numerical example of a dumb-bell's attraction to a local point-like gravitational source is analysed using this theory. Close agreement is found between th...

  6. The cost-effectiveness of point of care testing in a general practice setting: results from a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briggs Nancy E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While point of care testing (PoCT for general practitioners is becoming increasingly popular, few studies have investigated whether it represents value for money. This study aims to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of PoCT in general practice (GP compared to usual testing practice through a pathology laboratory. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis based on a randomized controlled trial with 4,968 patients followed up for 18 months and fifty-three general practices in urban, rural and remote locations across three states in Australia. The incremental costs and health outcomes associated with a clinical strategy of PoCT for INR, HbA1c, lipids, and ACR were compared to those from pathology laboratory testing. Costs were expressed in year 2006 Australian dollars. Non-parametric bootstrapping was used to generate 95% confidence intervals. Results The point estimate of the total direct costs per patient to the health care sector for PoCT was less for ACR than for pathology laboratory testing, but greater for INR, HbA1c and Lipids, although none of these differences was statistically significant. PoCT led to significant cost savings to patients and their families. When uncertainty around the point estimates was taken into account, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for PoCT was found to be unfavourable for INR, but somewhat favourable for ACR, while substantial uncertainty still surrounds PoCT for HbA1c and Lipids. Conclusions The decision whether to fund PoCT will depend on the price society is willing to pay for achievement of the non-standard intermediate outcome indicator. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12605000272695

  7. Plant-soil feedback: testing the generality with the same grasses in serpentine and prairie soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casper, B.B. (U. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA); Bentivenga, S.P. (U. of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI); Ji, Baoming (U. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA); Doherty, J.H. (U. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA); Edenborn, H.M.; Gustafson, D.J. (The Citadel, Charleston, SC)

    2008-08-01

    Plants can alter soil properties in ways that feed back to affect plant performance. The extent that plant–soil feedback affects co-occurring plant species differentially will determine its impact on plant community structure. Whether feedback operates consistently across similar plant communities is little studied. Here, the same grasses from two eastern U.S. serpentine grasslands and two midwestern tallgrass prairie remnants were examined for plant–soil feedback in parallel greenhouse experiments. Native soils were homogenized and cultured (trained) for a year with each of the four grasses. Feedback was evaluated by examining biomass variation in a second generation of (tester) plants grown in the trained soils. Biomass was lower in soils trained by conspecifics compared to soils trained by heterospecifics in seven of 15 possible cases; biomass was greater in conspecific soils in one other. Sorghastrum nutans exhibited lower biomass in conspecific soils for all four grasslands, so feedback may be characteristic of this species. Three cases from the Hayden prairie site were explained by trainer species having similar effects across all tester species so the relative performance of the different species was little affected; plants were generally larger in soils trained by Andropogon gerardii and smaller in soils trained by S. nutans. Differences among sites in the incidence of feedback were independent of serpentine or prairie soils. To explore the causes of the feedback, several soil factors were measured as a function of trainer species: nutrients and pH, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) spore communities, root colonization by AM fungi and putative pathogens, and functional diversity in bacterial communities as indicated by carbon substrate utilization. Only variation in nutrients was consistent with any patterns of feedback, and this could explain the greater biomass in soils trained by A. gerardii at Hayden. Feedback at Nottingham (one of the serpentine sites

  8. Plant-soil feedback: Testing the generality with the same grasses in serpentine and prairie soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casper, Brenda B. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Biology; Bentivenga, Stephen P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI (United States). Dept. of Biology and Microbiology; Ji, Baoming [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Biology; Doherty, Jennifer H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Biology; Edenborn, Harry M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Gustafson, Danny J. [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology

    2008-08-01

    Plants can alter soil properties in ways that feed back to affect plant performance. The extent that plant-soil feedback affects co-occurring plant species differentially will determine its impact on plant community structure. Whether feedback operates consistently across similar plant communities is little studied. Here, the same grasses from two eastern U. S. serpentine grasslands and two midwestern tallgrass prairie remnants were examined for plant-soil feedback in parallel greenhouse experiments. Native soils were homogenized and cultured (trained) for a year with each of the four grasses. Feedback was evaluated by examining biomass variation in a second generation of (tester) plants grown in the trained soils. Biomass was lower in soils trained by conspecifics compared to soils trained by heterospecifics in seven of 15 possible cases; biomass was greater in conspecific soils in one other. Sorghastrum nutans exhibited lower biomass in conspecific soils for all four grasslands, so feedback may be characteristic of this species. Three cases from the Hayden prairie site were explained by trainer species having similar effects across all tester species so the relative performance of the different species was little affected; plants were generally larger in soils trained by Andropogon gerardii and smaller in soils trained by S. nutans. Differences among sites in the incidence of feedback were independent of serpentine or prairie soils. To explore the causes of the feedback, several soil factors were measured as a function of trainer species: nutrients and pH, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) spore communities, root colonization by AM fungi and putative pathogens, and functional diversity in bacterial communities as indicated by carbon substrate utilization. Only variation in nutrients was consistent with any patterns of feedback, and this could explain the greater biomass in soils trained by A. gerardii at Hayden. Feedback at Nottingham (one of the serpentine sites

  9. WAIS-III and WMS-III performance in chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilp, John G; Corbera, Kathy; Slavov, Iordan; Taylor, Michael J; Sackeim, Harold A; Fallon, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the nature and degree of intellectual and memory deficits in chronic Lyme disease. In this study, 81 participants with rigorously diagnosed chronic Lyme disease were administered the newest revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III), and compared to 39 nonpatients. On the WAIS-III, Lyme disease participants had poorer Full Scale and Performance IQ's. At the subtest level, differences were restricted to Information and the Processing Speed subtests. On the WMS-III, Lyme disease participants performed more poorly on Auditory Immediate, Immediate, Auditory Delayed, Auditory Recognition Delayed, and General Memory indices. Among WMS-III subtests, however, differences were restricted to Logical Memory (immediate and delayed) and Family Pictures (delayed only), a Visual Memory subtest. Discriminant analyses suggest deficits in chronic Lyme are best characterized as a combination of memory difficulty and diminished processing speed. Deficits were modest, between one-third and two-thirds of a standard deviation, consistent with earlier studies. Depression severity had a weak relationship to processing speed, but little other association to test performance. Deficits in chronic Lyme disease are consistent with a subtle neuropathological process affecting multiple performance tasks, although further work is needed to definitively rule out nonspecific illness effects.

  10. Exploring general practitioners' experience of informing women about prenatal screening tests for foetal abnormalities: A qualitative focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiser Bettina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments have made screening tests for foetal abnormalities available earlier in pregnancy and women have a range of testing options accessible to them. It is now recommended that all women, regardless of their age, are provided with information on prenatal screening tests. General Practitioners (GPs are often the first health professionals a woman consults in pregnancy. As such, GPs are well positioned to inform women of the increasing range of prenatal screening tests available. The aim of this study was to explore GPs experience of informing women of prenatal genetic screening tests for foetal abnormality. Methods A qualitative study consisting of four focus groups was conducted in metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. A discussion guide was used and the audio-taped transcripts were independently coded by two researchers using thematic analysis. Multiple coders and analysts and informant feedback were employed to reduce the potential for researcher bias and increase the validity of the findings. Results Six themes were identified and classified as 'intrinsic' if they occurred within the context of the consultation or 'extrinsic' if they consisted of elements that impacted on the GP beyond the scope of the consultation. The three intrinsic themes were the way GPs explained the limitations of screening, the extent to which GPs provided information selectively and the time pressures at play. The three extrinsic factors were GPs' attitudes and values towards screening, the conflict they experienced in offering screening information and the sense of powerlessness within the screening test process and the health care system generally. Extrinsic themes reveal GPs' attitudes and values to screening and to disability, as well as raising questions about the fundamental premise of testing. Conclusion The increasing availability and utilisation of screening tests, in particular first trimester tests, has expanded GPs

  11. A prediction method for the general corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 steam generator tube using eddy current testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hee-Sang; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng, E-mail: dhhur@kaeri.re.kr

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • A corrosion test for the tubes with different levels of eddy current noise was conducted. • A relationship between the corrosion rate and the eddy current noise of tubes was explored. • Corrosion rate was closely correlated to the tube noise of a rotating pancake probe. • Corrosion rate was not related to the tube noise measured using a bobbin probe. - Abstract: The purpose of this work is to develop an eddy current testing method to predict the general corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 steam generator tubes. A corrosion test was conducted for tubes with different levels of eddy current noise in simulated primary water at 330 °C, and their corrosion behavior was correlated with the tube noise measured using bobbin and rotating probes. The corrosion behavior was closely correlated with the tube noise measured using a rotating probe. However, there was no correlation between the corrosion behavior and the tube noise measured using a bobbin probe. The tube noise value measured using a rotating pancake coil probe is suggested to be a significant parameter in estimating the general corrosion behavior of tubes.

  12. Optimization of the general acceptability though affective tests and response surface methodology of a dry cacao powder mixture based beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Chau Loo Kung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This research work had as main objective optimizing the general acceptability though affective tests and response surface methodology of a dry cacao powder mixture based beverage. We obtained formulations of mixtures of cacao powder with different concentrations of 15%, 17.5% and 20%, as well as lecithin concentrations of 0.1%; 0.3%; and 0.5% maintaining a constant content of sugar (25 %, Vanillin (1% that included cacao powder with different pH values: natural (pH 5 and alkalinized (pH 6.5 and pH 8 and water by difference to 100%, generating a total of fifteen treatments to be evaluated, according to the Box-Behnen design for three factors. The treatments underwent satisfaction level tests to establish the general acceptability. The treatment that included cacao powder with a concentration of 17.5 %, pH 6.5 and lecithin concentration of 0.3 % obtained the best levels of acceptability. The software Statgraphics Plus 5.1 was used to obtain the treatment with maximum acceptability that corresponded to cacao powder with pH 6.81, with a concentration of 18.24 % and soy lecithin in 0.28% with a tendency to what was obtained in the satisfaction levels tests. Finally we characterized in a physical-chemistry and microbiological way the optimum formulation as well as evaluated sensitively obtaining an acceptability of 6.17.

  13. Prevalence of liver fibrosis and risk factors in a general population using non-invasive biomarkers (FibroTest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bismut Françoise

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FibroTest and elastography have been validated as biomarkers of liver fibrosis in the most frequent chronic liver diseases and in the fibrosis screening of patients with diabetes. One challenge was to use them for estimating the prevalence of fibrosis, identifying independent risk factors and to propose screening strategies in the general population. Methods We prospectively studied 7,463 consecutive subjects aged 40 years or older. Subjects with presumed advanced fibrosis (FibroTest greater than 0.48 were re-investigated in a tertiary center. Results The sample characteristics were similar to those of the French population. FibroTest was interpretable in 99.6%. The prevalence of presumed fibrosis was 2.8%, (209/7,463, including cirrhosis in 0.3% (25/7,463; 105/209 (50% subjects with presumed fibrosis accepted re-investigation. Fibrosis was confirmed in 50, still suspected in 27, indeterminate in 25 and not confirmed with false positive FibroTest or false negative elastography in 3 subjects. False negative rate of FibroTest estimated using elastography was 0.4% (3/766. The attributable causes for confirmed fibrosis were both alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in 66%, NAFLD in 13%, alcohol in 9%, HCV in 6%, and other in 6%. Factors independently associated (all P Conclusions Biomarkers have permitted to estimate prevalence of advanced fibrosis around 2.8% in a general population aged 40 years or older, and several risk factors which may be used for the validation of selective or non-selective screening strategies.

  14. STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF COMPLEX TREATMENT USING IMMUNOMODULATORS ON THE STATE OF LOCAL IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC GENERALIZED PERIODONTITIS I-II SEVERITY ON ENTEROBIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savel’eva NN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Due to the high prevalence of chronic generalized periodontitis there is a need for a broader analysis of the causes and development of diseases, as well as the search for effective treatments for etiopathogenetical. The aim of this work was to study the effect of newly developed therapy on local immunity in patients CGP I and II severity with enterobiasis. Material & methods. The main group consisted of 32 people with СGP I degree and 60 people with СGP II severity who were treated according to our scheme. The control group consisted of 30 people with СGP I degree and 58 people with СGP II severity, treated with conventional treatment. The control group consisted of 30 people without periodontal disease and chronic diseases of other systems. All patients were studied the main group and the comparison group conducted a basic local therapeutic treatment of periodontal disease, including professional oral hygiene, temporary splinting of teeth, selective prishlifovyvanie teeth. For medical treatment of periodontal tissues using 0.05% - 0.2% solution of chlorhexidine bigluconate. Further treatment of patients of the main group carried out in 2 stages. At the first stage the main group received: irrigation and instillation of periodontal tissue in periodontal pockets antiseptic preparation "Dekasan" application keratoplastic drug "Katomas". Systemically administered drug tonic "Sage oil" probiotic "Kvertulin" immunomodulator "Erbisol". In the second phase, patients received: applications on the gums periodontal gel "Lizomukoid" systemically complex preparation "Оil extract from pumpkin seeds." All patients of the main group used toothpaste "Lacalut flora" and rinse "grapefruit". In the comparison group, patients received applications in periodontal pockets (drug Dalatsin C application to the gums (keratoplastic drug Aekol system - a probiotic Linex, immunomodulator "Echinacea compositum С". All patients with the comparison group

  15. A Comparison of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) in General Population Surveys in nine European Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomfield, Kim; Knibbe, Ronald; Derickx, Mieke

    2006-01-01

    Aims: This study explored the suitability of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) for cross-national comparable estimates of problem drinking in general populations. On the item level the focus is on responsiveness to cross-national and gender differences. For the set of items...... the focus is on intercorrelations between items, indicating to what extent the AUDIT constitutes a scale. Methods: General population surveys from nine European countries were included. Cross-tabulations were used to analyse cross-national and gender differences in scores on the items. Reliability analysis......'. The reliability analysis shows that in eight of the nine countries frequency of drinking lowers the alpha. Injury and concern of others lead to a lower internal consistency in three countries. Conclusions: There was sufficient variation between countries in the pattern of responses and variation in gender...

  16. A collection of the collapsed results of general tank tests of miscellaneous flying-boat-hull models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, F W S , Jr

    1947-01-01

    Presented here are the summary charts of the collapsed results of general tank tests of about 100 flying boat hull models. These summary charts are intended to be used as an engineering tool to enable a flying boat designer to grasp more quickly the significance of various hull form parameters as they influence his particular airplane. The form in which the charts are prepared is discussed in some detail in order to make them clearer to the designer. This is a data report, and no attempt has been made to produce conclusions or correlations of the usual sort. However, some generalizations are put forward on the various methods in which summary charts may be used.

  17. A Comparison of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) in General Population Surveys in nine European Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomfield, Kim; Knibbe, Ronald; Derickx, Mieke

    2006-01-01

    Aims: This study explored the suitability of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) for cross-national comparable estimates of problem drinking in general populations. On the item level the focus is on responsiveness to cross-national and gender differences. For the set of items...... the focus is on intercorrelations between items, indicating to what extent the AUDIT constitutes a scale. Methods: General population surveys from nine European countries were included. Cross-tabulations were used to analyse cross-national and gender differences in scores on the items. Reliability analysis......'. The reliability analysis shows that in eight of the nine countries frequency of drinking lowers the alpha. Injury and concern of others lead to a lower internal consistency in three countries. Conclusions: There was sufficient variation between countries in the pattern of responses and variation in gender...

  18. Operational performance of the ETH-hybrid III drive system - at the test stand and in the vehicle; Betriebsverhalten des ETH-Hybrid III Antriebes - Auf dem dynamischen Pruefstand und im Fahrzeug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, P.; Eberle, M.K.

    1999-07-01

    The position and the way of operation of the ETH hybrid III drive system in an Otto engine, an electric motor, a flywheel and an infinitely variable wide-range transmission are presented. The consumption values for gasoline and electric power are shown for constant drive and in city cycles. The achievable conservation of 40% at gasoline operation is not limited to one cycle and shows the robustness of this measure to improve partial load operation. The sensitiveness towards the evaluated current generation is shown by means of the autarkic charge operation. (orig.) [German] Es wird die Anordnung und die Betriebsweise des ETH-Hybrid III Antriebes mit einem Ottomotor, einem Elektromotor, einem Schwungrad und einem stufenlosen Weitbereichsgetriebe dargestellt. Es werden die Verbrauchswerte bei Konstantfahrt und in Stadtzyklen sowohl fuer Benzin und Strom aufgezeigt. Die erzielbaren 40% Verbrauchseinsparung im Benzinbetrieb ist nicht nur auf einen Zyklus beschraenkt und zeigt die Robustheit dieser Teillastverbesserungsmassnahme auf. Anhand des autarken Ladebetriebes wird die Sensitivitaet gegenueber der betrachteten Stromherstellung aufgezeigt. (orig.)

  19. Environmental Technology Verification: Supplement to Test/QA Plan for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners; Bioaerosol Inactivation Efficiency by HVAC In-Duct Ultraviolet Light Air Cleaners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center has selected general ventilation air cleaners as a technology area. The Generic Verification Protocol for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners is on the Environmental Technology Verification we...

  20. Toward generally accepted forensic assessment practices among clinical neuropsychologists: a survey of professional practice and common test use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Casey; Barr, William; Brodale, Donald L; Rabin, Laura A

    2017-07-04

    This study investigated professional practice and common test use among clinical neuropsychologists engaging in forensic assessment.  Doctorate-level psychologists active in the practice of neuropsychology and on the INS and NAN membership listings (n = 502) were surveyed about their demographics, professional practice, and common test use. Participants who reported engaging in forensic practice (n = 255) were further surveyed about their forensic practice. Forensic participants were more likely to be male and Caucasian, and reported higher ages, more years of professional experience, and a higher prevalence of board certification. While characteristics of their professional and forensic practice varied, forensic participants reported spending most of their professional time conducting neuropsychological assessments with adult clients in a private or group practice setting, focusing on civil referrals and civil legal questions involving older adult issues, developmental issues, head injury, and psychiatric issues. Common test use across neuropsychological assessment domains is presented for board-certified forensic participants (n = 77). An examination of these results reveals that the current pattern of test use is similar to the results of a more general survey of neuropsychological test use.  The findings provide insight into the practice of forensic neuropsychological assessment, and further establish the admissibility of neuropsychological evidence in the United States legal system. Results will be useful for clinical neuropsychologists, field leaders, and legal professionals hoping to gain insight into the role of clinical neuropsychology in civil and criminal legal decision-making.