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Sample records for ii resin-modified glass

  1. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

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    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  2. Investigation into the Depth of Cure of Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    glass - ionomer restorative dental materials. Samples of different thicknesses using...attempt at delineating the depth of cure of resin-modified glass - ionomer restorative dental materials. Samples of different thicknesses using Vitremer... glass ionomers liners. Dent Mater 1993:9:198-203. 16. Culbertson BM. Glass - ionomer dental restoratives . Prog Polym Sci 2001 ;26:577-604. 17. Fuji II

  3. Resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer restorations in primary teeth: 8-year results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.; Manscher, E.; Teglers, P.T.

    2004-01-01

    clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer......clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer...

  4. A Retrospective Study of the 3-Year Survival Rate of Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement Class II Restorations in Primary Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webman, Mark; Mulki, Ezat; Roldan, Rosie; Arevalo, Oscar; Roberts, John F; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the three-year survival rate of Class II resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC), Vitremer, restorations in primary molars and to compare these results with measurements of survival of Class II restorations of standard restorative materials. Data on Class II restorations placed in primary molars during a six-year period were collected through a chart review and radiographic evaluation in the office of a board-certified pediatric dentist. A radiograph showing that the restoration was intact was required at least 3 years after placement to qualify as successful. If no radiograph existed, the restoration was excluded. If the restoration was not found to be intact radiographically or was charted as having been replaced before three years it was recorded as a failure. The results of this study were then compared to other standard restorative materials using normalized annual failure rates. Of the 1,231 Class II resinmodified glass-ionomer cement restorations placed over six years 427 met the inclusion criteria. There was a 97.42% survival rate for a 3-year period equivalent to an annual failure rate of 0.86%. A novel approach comparing materials showed that in this study Vitremer compared very favorably to previously published success rates of other standard restorative materials (amalgam, composite, stainless steel crown, compomer) and other RMGIC studies.

  5. Comparative efficacy of nanofilled and microfilled resin-modified glass ionomer as pits and fissure sealant in permanent molar teeth

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    Manzuma Akhter Zakaria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to compare the efficacy of nanofilled and microfilled resin- modified glass ionomer as pits and fissure sealants in permanent molar teeth. Ninety six teeth having fissure at the occlusal surface were randomly divided into two groups: Group I: Treated by nanofilled resin-modified glass ionomer sealant and Group II: Treated by microfilled resin- modified glass ionomer sealants. Clinical assessment was performed by modified Ryge´s criteria by means of retention, color match, marginal adaptation at 3, 6, and 12 months follow-up visit. Chi-square test was used for testing differences between the two groups; a value of p<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The results revealed that at 12 months observation period, nanofilled resin-modified glass ionomer sealant showed better retention, color stability and marginal adaptation than that of microfilled resin-modified glass ionomer sealants. Furthermore, the differences between two groups in respect to marginal adaptation and color match were statistically significant (p<0.05. It can be concluded that nanofilled resin-modified glass ionomer sealant could be a better alternative to microfilled resin- modified glass ionomer sealant.

  6. Effects of adding silica particles on certain properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement

    OpenAIRE

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of incorporation of silica particles with different concentrations on some properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC): Microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Materials and Methods: Silica particle was incorporated into RMGIC powder to study its effects, one type of RMGIC (Type II visible light-cured) and three concentrations of silica particles (0.06, 0.08, and 0.1% weight)...

  7. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

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    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  8. The effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajong, K. H.; Damiyanti, M.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) is a restoration material composed of powder and liquid whose stability is affected by its shelf life. This is an issue that has not been taken into consideration by customers or sellers. To observe the effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of RMGIC, 30 cylindrical (d = 4mm and t = 6mm) specimens of RMGIC (Fuji II LC, GC, Tokyo, Japan) were divided into three groups with different storage times and their compressive strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Results were statistically analyzed with the one-way ANOVA test. There were significant differences (p<0.05) between the three groups of RMGIC. There is a decrease in the compressive strength value along with the duration of storage time.

  9. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  10. Comparative study of resin sealant and resin modified glass ionomer as pit and fissure sealant

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    Shirin Malek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to compare the marginal integrity of resin modified glass ionomer cement with that of resin sealant, in vitro. Forty artificial pit and fissure cavities were prepared in occlusal surface of extracted premolar teeth by using ¼ round carbide bur. Cavities were condensed with artificial organic debris followed by cleaning with prophylaxis pumice brush and paste and then separated into two treatment groups. In Group A, 15 fissure cavities were sealed by resin sealant and in Group B, 15 fissure cavities were sealed by resin modified glass ionomer sealant. These specimens were subjected to thermo-cycling followed by dye penetration test. The remaining 5 cavities from each group were analyzed for debris score by the SEM. The results of the microleakage test showed that the efficacy of preventing microleakage of samples sealed by resin modified glass ionomer sealant was higher than the samples sealed by resin sealant. However, no significant differences were found. It can be concluded that use of resin modified glass ionomer sealant is a good alternative for sealing pits and fissures.

  11. Evaluating the effect of different conditioning agents on the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomers

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    Namith Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: This study aims to evaluate the effects three different conditioning agents on the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomers to human dentin. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty recently extracted, caries-free premolars and molars will be cleaned of debris and disinfected in a 0.5% solution of sodium hypochlorite and sterile water for 30 min. The occlusal surface of each tooth will be reduced using conventional model trimmer with water to produce the dentin surface. Then, three different resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs were triturated and mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions, 10 specimens will be made of each group. The excess restorative material will be removed from matrix band dentin interface with a sharp number 25 bard parker blade. Samples were shear tested with Instron universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. A shearing bar beveled to a 1 mm thick contact surface area will be placed at the junction of dentin and plastic band matrix. The load required for the failure will be recorded in pounds and converted to megapascals. Results: Statistical analysis was done with analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Ketac primer as conditioning agent along with Fuji II LC as restorative material had the highest shear bond value whereas intact smear layer which was unmodified dentin had the least value. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that surface conditioning of dentin resulted significantly higher bond strength than unconditioned dentin surfaces. Clinical Significance: Resin-modified glass ionomers have several advantages compared to chemically cured GICs. The advantages include command cure, ease of handling, improved physical properties, and esthetics. Resin-modified glass ionomers have been marketed as direct restorative materials for Class V lesions as well as liners, bases, and luting agents. Several conditioning

  12. Histological assessment of pulpal responses to resin modified glass ionomer cements in human teeth

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    Ali Eskandarizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biocompatibility of resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs as a lining material is still under question. The present study evaluated the response of the pulp-dentin complex following application of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, calcium hydroxide and conventional glass-ionomer in deep cavities prepared in human teeth. Materials and Methods: In this controlled clinical trial, 30 deep class V buccal cavities (3 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm were prepared in human premolars treatment planned to be extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into 3 groups. Groups were lined by a RMGI (Vivaglass, conventional glass Ionomer (Ionocid and calcium hydroxide respectively. The cavities were subsequently filled with amalgam. Each group was then divided into two sub-groups according to time intervals 5 and 30 days. The patients were referred to Kerman Dental School and in accordance with orthodontic treatment plan; premolars were extracted and then prepared for histological assessment. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff techniques. All of the samples were examined using a number of criteria including odontoblastic changes, inflammatory cells response, reactionary dentin formation and presence of microorganisms. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. P 0.05. Conclusion: Ionocid and Vivaglass resin-modified glass ionomers can be used as lining materials in human teeth.

  13. Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers as Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    Vandewalle, Kraig Civ 59 DTS/ 59 DG/ SGDTG WHASC f. 9 h. I I 1 CERTIFY ANY HUMAN OR ANIMAL RESEARCH RELATED STUDIES WERE APPROVED AND PERFORMED IN STRICT...strength of composite to dentin using resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGI) as bonding agents. Methods: Sixty extracted human third molars were...59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 2 MAR 20 16 l. Your paper, entitl ed Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin

  14. Effect of light curing unit on resin-modified glass-ionomer cements: a microhardness assessment.

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    Cefaly, Daniela Francisca Gigo; de Mello, Liliam Lucia Carrara Paes; Wang, Linda; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the microhardness of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs) photoactivated with a blue light-emitting diode (LED) curing light. Thirty specimens were distributed in 3 groups: Fuji II LC Improved/GC (RM1), Vitremer/3M ESPE (RM2) and Filtek Z250/3M ESPE (RM3). Two commercial light-curing units were used to polymerize the materials: LED/Ultrablue IS and a halogen light/XL3000 (QTH). After 24 h, Knoop microhardness test was performed. Data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. At the top surface, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the microhardness was seen when the LED and QTH lights were used for all materials. At the bottom surface, microhardness mean value of RM2 was significantly higher when the QTH light was used (plight was used. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was seen at the bottom surface for RM3, irrespective of the light used. Top-to-bottom surface comparison showed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) for both RMGICs, regardless of the light used. For RM3, microhardness mean value at the top was significantly higher (pcuring units were used. The microhardness values seen when a LED light was used varied depending on the restorative material tested.

  15. Effect of light curing unit on resin-modified glass-ionomer cements: a microhardness assessment

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    Daniela Francisca Gigo Cefaly

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the microhardness of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs photoactivated with a blue light-emitting diode (LED curing light. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty specimens were distributed in 3 groups: Fuji II LC Improved/GC (RM1, Vitremer/3M ESPE (RM2 and Filtek Z250/ 3M ESPE (RM3. Two commercial light-curing units were used to polymerize the materials: LED/Ultrablue IS and a halogen light/XL3000 (QTH. After 24 h, Knoop microhardness test was performed. Data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. RESULTS: At the top surface, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05 in the microhardness was seen when the LED and QTH lights were used for all materials. At the bottom surface, microhardness mean value of RM2 was significantly higher when the QTH light was used (p0.05 was seen at the bottom surface for RM3, irrespective of the light used. Top-to-bottom surface comparison showed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05 for both RMGICs, regardless of the light used. For RM3, microhardness mean value at the top was significantly higher (p<0.05 than bottom microhardness when both curing units were used. CONCLUSION: The microhardness values seen when a LED light was used varied depending on the restorative material tested.

  16. Reducing composite restoration polymerization shrinkage stress through resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoum, S J; Mutzelburg, P R; Shumack, T G; Thode, Djg; Martin, F E; Ellakwa, A E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether employing resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives can reduce polymerization contraction stress generated at the interface of restorative composite adhesive systems. Five resin based adhesives (G Bond, Optibond-All-in-One, Optibond-Solo, Optibond-XTR and Scotchbond-Universal) and two resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives (Riva Bond-LC, Fuji Bond-LC) were analysed. Each adhesive was applied to bond restorative composite Filtek-Z250 to opposing acrylic rods secured within a universal testing machine. Stress developed at the interface of each adhesive-restorative composite system (n = 5) was calculated at 5-minute intervals over 6 hours. The resin based adhesive-restorative composite systems (RBA-RCS) demonstrated similar interface stress profiles over 6 hours; initial rapid contraction stress development (0-300 seconds) followed by continued contraction stress development ≤0.02MPa/s (300 seconds - 6 hours). The interface stress profile of the resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesive-restorative composite systems (RMGIBA-RCS) differed substantially to the RBA-RCS in several ways. Firstly, during 0-300 seconds the rate of contraction stress development at the interface of the RMGIBA-RCS was significantly (p glass-ionomer based adhesives can significantly reduce the magnitude and rate of polymerization contraction stress developed at the interface of adhesive-restorative composite systems. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  18. Color and Gloss of Nano-Filled Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers and Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Marc; Lawson, Nathaniel C; Rupal, Manpreet; Beck, Preston; Burgess, John O

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to compare in vitro stain resistance, color stability, gloss, and gloss retention of a nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs) to a traditional RMGI and resin-based composites (RBCs). Specimens (N = 20) were fabricated from a nano-filled RBC (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), a nanohybrid RBC (Clearfil Majesty Esthetic, Kuraray; Tokyo, Japan), a nano-filled RMGI (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), and traditional RMGI (Fuji II LC, GC America, Chicago, IL, USA). L*a*b* values were recorded with a spectrophotometer, and gloss was measured with a glossmeter. For each material, 10 specimens were stored in distilled water in darkness for 1 week and 10 specimens were placed in a staining solution for 1 week. After storage, specimens were cleaned and L*a*b* and gloss measurements were remeasured. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey analyses. Regarding color change, materials ranked: Ketac = Fuji > Filtek > Clearfil in water, and Ketac > Fuji > Filtek > Clearfil in staining solution. Prior to storage, the initial gloss of the materials ranked: Filtek ≥ Clearfil ≥ Ketac > Fuji. After storage, the materials ranked: Filtek = Clearfil > Ketac > Fuji in water, and Filtek > Clearfil > Ketac > Fuji in staining solution. Gloss retention was similar for all materials in water and gloss retention ranked: Filtek = Clearfil > Ketac = Fuji in staining solution. The nano-RMGI showed less stain resistance but higher gloss than the traditional RMGI. Both RMGIs had more color change, less stain resistance, lower gloss and less gloss retention than the RBCs. The clinician should be aware that the use of a nano-RMGI may improve the gloss of an RMGI restoration; however, color change will likely occur, particularly if the patient consumes a staining diet. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Randomized clinical trial of two resin-modified glass ionomer materials: 1-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Dutra-Corrêa, M; Saraceni, S H C; Ciaramicoli, M T; Kiyan, V H

    2012-01-01

    With institutional review board approval, 33 patients who needed restoration of noncarious cervical lesions (NCCL) were enrolled in this study. A total of 92 NCCL were selected and randomly assigned to three groups: (1) Ambar (FGM), a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (control), combined with the nanofilled composite resin Filtek Supreme Plus (FSP; 3M ESPE); (2) Fuji II LC (GC America), a traditional resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC) restorative material; (3) Ketac Nano (3M ESPE), a nanofilled RMGIC restorative material. Restorations were evaluated at six months and one year using modified United States Public Health Service parameters. At six months after initial placement, 84 restorations (a 91.3% recall rate) were evaluated. At one year, 78 restorations (a 84.8% recall rate) were available for evaluation. The six month and one year overall retention rates were 93.1% and 92.6%, respectively, for Ambar/FSP; 100% and 100%, respectively, for Fuji II LC; and 100% and 100%, respectively, for Ketac Nano with no statistical difference between any pair of groups at each recall. Sensitivity to air decreased for all three adhesive materials from the preoperative to the postoperative stage, but the difference was not statistically significant. For Ambar/FSP, there were no statistical differences for any of the parameters from baseline to six months and from baseline to one year. For Fuji II LC, surface texture worsened significantly from baseline to six months and from baseline to one year. For Ketac Nano, enamel marginal staining increased significantly from baseline to one year and from six months to one year. Marginal adaptation was statistically worse at one year compared with baseline only for Ketac Nano. When parameters were compared for materials at each recall, Ketac Nano resulted in significantly worse color match than any of the other two materials at any evaluation period. At one year, Ketac Nano resulted in significantly worse marginal adaptation than the

  20. Surface pH of resin-modified glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, M J; Chadwick, R G

    1992-12-01

    The recently developed group of materials known as light-activated, or resin-modified, glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements have been produced in response to clinical demands for a command set cavity base material. This study monitored the surface pH of three commercially available resin-modified glass ionomer cements over a 60-min period following either mixing alone or mixing followed by a 30-s exposure to a curing lamp. The results indicate that each material behaves in a unique manner. For all materials and conditions the pH reached after a 60-min period was significantly (P pH of two of the materials (Baseline VLC and Vitrebond) as compared to the same materials in the uncured state. In the case of XR-Ionomer, however, no significant (P > 0.05) effect of light curing upon the surface pH was apparent. The precise clinical consequences of a low surface pH are unclear but may be an aetiological factor in postoperative pulpal sensitivity. It is therefore recommended that a sublining of a proprietary calcium hydroxide lining material should be placed routinely beneath these materials and every effort made to ensure effective light curing.

  1. Effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation on the mechanical properties of resin modified glass-ionomer cement

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    Roza Haghgoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Metallic nano-particles show exclusive biological, chemical and physical characteristic. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation (0 (as control, 20, 40, 80, 120, 200 ppm on the mechanical Properties ( compressive and flexural strength of resin modified Glass ionomer Cement.   Materials and Methods: Based on ISO 4049 and ISO 9971 for polyalkenoid cements, 90 cases in each group were prepared for the flexural and compressive strength. Specimens in 6 groups with different amounts of nanosilver (20, 40, 80, 120 and 200 ppm and control (Fuji II LC improved, stored in distilled water at 37 ° C for 1 day and 30 days. Flexural strength, using a three-point bending method, Modulus of elasticity and the compressive strength were measured by universal testing machine (Zwick with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post HOC test.   Results: The flexural strength and modulus of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation of resin modified glass-ionomer cement were not significantly different (P>0.05. The compressive strength of incorporating of20 ppm compared with control (P=0.01, 40 ppm (P=0.02 and 80 ppm compared with control (P<0.001 were increased. The flexural strength and compressive strength of Fuji II LC, containing nanosilver particles were increased after 1 day and 1 month significantly (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Incorporation of 20 to 80 ppm nanosilver into Fuji II LC had increased mechanical properties compared to the original cement.

  2. Microleakage of conventional, resin-modified, and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement as primary teeth filling material

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    Dita Madyarani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glass ionomer cements are one of many dental materials that widely used in pediatric dentistry due to their advantage of fluoride release and chemical bond to tooth structure. Adherence of the filling material to the cavity walls is one of the most important characteristic that need to be examined its effect on microleakage. Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the microleakage of nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement compared with the conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Methods: Standard class V cavities sized 3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm were made on a total of 21 extracted maxillary primary canine teeth and restored with the conventional, resin-modified, dan nano-ionomer glass ionomer cements. All the teeth were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 4 hours. The depth of dye penetration was assessed using digital microscope after sectioning the teeth labio-palatally. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: All type of glass ionomer material showed microleakage. Conventional glass ionomer cement demonstrated the least microleakage with mean score 1.29. the resin-modified glass ionomer cements (mean score 1.57 and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (mean score 2.57. Conclusion: The conventional glassionomer, resin modified glassionomer, and nano-ionomer glassionomer showed micro leakage as filling material in primary teeth cavity. The micro leakage among three types was not significant difference. All three material were comparable in performance and can be used for filling material but still needs a coating material to fill the microleakage.Latar belakang: Semen ionomer kaca adalah salah satu dari banyak bahan gigi yang banyak digunakan dalam praktek kedokteran gigi anak karena bahan tersebut merilis fluoride dan berikatan kimia dengan struktur gigi. Perlekatan bahan tumpatan pada dinding kavitas adalah salah satu karakteristik paling penting yang perlu diteliti efeknya terhadap

  3. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  4. Effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided into five groups (n = 20). Group 1 (control): enamel was etched with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, a thin layer of adhesive was applied, and the brackets were bonded with Transbond XT. Group 2: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Group 3: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with conventional GIC. Group 4: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. Group 5: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours before they were submitted to shear testing. The results demonstrated that bond strength values of group 1 (17.08 ± 6.39 MPa) were significantly higher in comparison with the other groups. Groups 2 (3.43 ± 1.94 MPa) and 3 (3.92 ± 1.57 MPa) presented values below the average recommended in the literature. With regard to adhesive remnant index, the groups in which the enamel was treated with NaOCl showed a behaviour similar to that of the resin composite. It is conclude with enamel treatment with NaOCl increased bonding strength of brackets bonded with GIC and RMGIC, but increased bond strength was not statistically significant when compared to the untreated groups.

  5. Effect of configuration factor on gap formation in hybrid composite resin, low-shrinkage composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Parvin M; Mousavinasab, Sayyed M; Hasanli, Elham

    2015-05-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the important factors in creation of gap between dental structure and composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of configuration factor (C-factor) on gap formation in a hybrid composite resin, a low shrinkage composite resin and a resin modified glass ionomer restorative material. Cylindrical dentin cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mm) were prepared on the occlusal surface of 99 human molars and the cavities assigned into three groups (each of 33). Each group contained three subgroups depend on the different depths and then cavities restored using resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC Improved) and two type composite resins (Filtek P90 and Filtek Z250). Then the restorations were cut into two sections in a mesiodistal direction in the middle of restorations. Gaps were measured on mesial, distal and pulpal floor of the cavities, using a stereomicroscope. Data analyses using Kruskal-Wallist and Mann-Whitney tests. Increasing C-factor from 1.8 to 3.4 had no effect on the gap formation in two type composite resins, but Fuji II LC Improved showed significant effect of increasing C-factor on gap formation. Taken together, when C-factor increased from 1.8 up to 3.4 had no significant effect on gap formation in two tested resin composites. Although, Filtek P90 restorations showed smaller gap formation in cavities walls compared to Filtek Z250 restorations. High C-factor values generated the largest gap formation. Silorane-based composite was more efficient for cavity sealing than methacrylate-based composites and resin modified glass ionomer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. The physics of water sorption by resin-modified glass-ionomer dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, J W

    1997-11-01

    The water-sorption characteristics of two commercial resin-modified glass-ionomer dental cements (Baseline VLC, ex. Detrey Dentsply, and Vitremer lining cement, ex. 3M Dental Products) have been studied in more detail than previously. Water sorption in both cements proved to be rapid, reaching equilibrium at approximately 48 h for Baseline VLC and at approximately 10 d for Vitremer. Over the first 8 h or so, absorption was shown to follow Fick's law, with a diffusion coefficient of 1.56x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Baseline VLC (cured for 20 s) and 5.09x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Vitremer (also cured for 20 s). As expected, sorption of water was found to be faster in specimens cured for shorter cure times and slower for those cured for longer times. In the presence of sodium chloride, both at 0.9% and at 1 M, diffusion coefficients were significantly greater than in pure water, but did not vary significantly with sodium chloride concentration, being approximately 3.3x10(-7) cm2 s(-)1 for Baseline VLC and 8.0x10(-7) cm2 s(-1) for Vitremer. This is attributed to conformational changes in hydrophilic segments of the polymer on absorption of aqueous sodium chloride in which the molecules form more compact coils than in the presence of pure water. They thus create a microstructure that is more permeable to water. Sorption in salt solutions became non-Fickian much sooner than in pure water, i.e. at 3-4 h for both cements. This is probably due to concentration changes of salt within the cement, suggesting that these materials possess a degree of permselectivity. Finally, equilibrium water uptakes varied with salt concentration, being least in 1 M NaCl, which reflects the different chemical potentials of water in the various storage media.

  7. The effect of powder/liquid ratio on microleakage of resin-modified glass-ionomer

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    Sepide Ostadi Joybari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Resin modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGI is prepared by  manual mixing of powder and liquid. Different mixing ratios influence on the RMGI properties. The aim was to compare the effect of different mixing ratios on the microleakage of RMGI. Materials &Methods: In this in vitro study, 60 Class V cavities (3×2×1.5 mm with the gingival margin of 1 mm apical to the cement-enamel junction were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 30 sound premolars. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups. Group 1: The manufacturer’s recommended ratio, without conditioning; Group2: The manufacturer’s recommended ratio with conditioning; Group 3: 20% lower than the manufacturer’s ratio without conditioning; Group4: 20% lower than the manufacturer’s ratio with conditioning; Group 5: 20% higher than the manufacturer’s ratio without conditioning; Group6: 20% higher than the manufacturer’s ratio with conditioning. After thermocycling, the microleakage was evaluated using silver nitrate staining. The teeth were cut into two mesial and distal halves, and the microleakage at occlusal and gingival margins was recorded based on a 0‒3 scoring system under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests with significance level at P<0.05. Results: The maximum microleakage at gingival margins was recorded for group 4, which was significantly higher than that of group 2 and 6 (P=0.043 and P=0.043, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the microleakage between occlusal and gingival margins. Conclusion: A 20% reduction in P/L ratio of RMGI increases the gingival microleakage when surface conditioning was appli.

  8. Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    Innovation in Direct Restorative Materials. Adv Dent Res 2013;25:8-17. 4. Wilson AD, Kent BE. The glass-ionomer cement , a new translucent dental filling...material. J Appl Chem 1971;21:313. 5. Wilson AD, Batchelor RF. Dental silicate cements I. The chemistry of erosion. J Dent Res 1967;46:1078-85. 6...modlfied glass-ionomer dental cements . Biomater 2002;23: 3289-3295. 42. Young A, Sherpa G, Pearson B, Schottlander, Waters DN. Use of Raman Spectroscopy

  9. Effect of sandblasting and enamel deproteinization on shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdane, Nadine; Kmeid, Roland; Khoury, Elie; Ghoubril, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, in vitro, the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) bonded to an enamel surface prepared by either sandblasting with 50μm of aluminium oxide particles, deproteinization with 5.25% NaOCl, or by combining both techniques. One hundred and fifty human premolars were cleaned and randomly divided into five groups. In group 1, the teeth were etched using 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Transbond XT. In group 2, the teeth were etched using 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. In group 3, the teeth were deproteinized with 5.25% NaOCl for one minute then etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. In group 4, the enamel was sandblasted with 50μm of aluminium oxide particles for 5seconds prior to etching and bonding with Fuji Ortho LC. In group 5, the teeth were both sandblasted with 50μm of aluminium oxide particles for 5seconds and deproteinized with 5.25% NaOCl for one minute prior to etching using 37% phosphoric acid and bonding with Fuji Ortho LC. The shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) index was also determined for each group. The mean shear bond strengths were as follows: group 1: 11.33±2.60MPa, group 2: 8.14±2.09, group 3: 9.57±3.25MPa, group 4: 9.49±1.99MPa and group 5: 9.76±2.29MPa (P=0.0001). The results show that pre-treating the enamel with either sandblasting, NaOCl, or both, could give a significantly higher shear bond strength than using RMGI with acid etch alone. Copyright © 2017 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Resin-modified Glass Ionomer Cement Dispensing/Mixing Methods on Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, T A; Abdulmajeed, A A; Altitinchi, A; Ahmed, S N; Donovan, T E

    2018-03-23

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGIs) are often used for luting indirect restorations. Hand-mixing traditional cements demands significant time and may be technique sensitive. Efforts have been made by manufacturers to introduce the same cement using different dispensing/mixing methods. It is not known what effects these changes may have on the mechanical properties of the dental cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties (diametral tensile strength [DTS], compressive strength [CS], and fracture toughness [FT]) of RMGIs with different dispensing/mixing systems. The RMGI specimens (n=14)-RelyX Luting (hand mix), RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-hand mix), RelyX Luting Plus (automix) (3M ESPE), GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix), and GC FujiCEM 2 (automix) (GC)-were prepared for each mechanical test and examined after thermocycling (n=7/subgroup) for 20,000 cycles to the following: DTS, CS (ISO 9917-1) and FT (ISO standard 6872; Single-edge V-notched beam method). Specimens were mounted and loaded with a universal testing machine until failure occurred. Two-/one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey honestly significantly different post hoc test was used to analyze data for statistical significance ( p<0.05). The interaction effect of both dispensing/mixing method and thermocycling was significant only for the CS test of the GC group ( p<0.05). The different dispensing/mixing methods had no effect on the DTS of the tested cements. The CS of GC Fuji PLUS was significantly higher than that of the automix version ( p<0.05). The FT decreased significantly when switching from RelyX (hand mix) to RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-hand mix) and to RelyX Luting Plus (automix) ( p<0.05). Except in the case of the DTS of the GC group and the CS of GC Fuji PLUS, thermocycling had a significant effect reducing the mechanical properties of the RMGI cements ( p<0.05). Introducing alternative dispensing/mixing methods for mixing RMGIs to reduce time and

  11. Microleakage of nano-particle-filled resin-modified glass ionomer using atraumatic restorative technique in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadenya, Rose; Smith, Jennifer; Mante, Francis

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the marginal leakage of nano-particle-filled resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC) restorations made using atraumatic restorative technique (ART) and conventional technique. Twenty primary molars with carious dentin on the buccal surfaces were restored with RMGIC using ART. The teeth were thermally cycled, sectioned and stained with methylene blue. Micro-leakage was compared to a second set of teeth restored conventionally. No significant difference (p > 0.05) in leakage was noted between the conventional and ART groups. The authors concluded that ART with RMGIC provides margins that show comparable leakage to conventionally restored primary teeth.

  12. Adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements may affect the integrity of tooth structure in the open sandwich technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Beata; Kruszelnicki, Anna; Kao, Anthony; Strykowska, Marta; Nicholson, John W

    2014-12-01

    To study the interfaces between model cavities prepared in teeth and four glass ionomer cements (two conventional and two resin-modified). Ten non-cavitated molars and premolars were used and, in each, two 3mm deep slot preparations were created on opposing sides of the tooth. The teeth were conditioned as appropriate, then restored using the open sandwich technique, using a conventional glass ionomer (Fuji IX, Ketac Molar) or resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC or N100), followed by completion with composite resin. The teeth were then embedded in a transparent acrylic resin and cut parallel to the long axis through both restorations, using a low speed diamond wheel saw. Samples were evaluated using a metallographic light microscope (100×). Three areas were assessed: the axial wall, the axial gingival line angle and the cavo-surface line angle. Bonding was categorized as inadequate or adequate based on the appearance and inadequate bonding was further studied and classified. Data were analysed statistically using the McNamara analysis. The majority of materials failed to make adequate contact with the axial wall, and there were also flaws at the axial/gingival line angle in several samples. By contrast, the cavo-surface line angle was generally soundly filled and the materials showed intimate contact with the tooth surface in this region. The most serious inadequacy, though, was not lack of intimate contact and/or adhesive bond, but the presence of perpendicular cracks in 30% of the Fuji II LC samples which extended into the underlying dentin. The problems of placement and dentin cracking experienced with these materials demonstrate that adhesive bond strength alone cannot be used as the criterion of success for restorative materials. In fact good adhesion can, in certain cases, promote cracking of the dentin due to stresses within the material, an outcome which is undesirable. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. Effects of Different Percentages of Microhydroxyapatite on Microhardness of Resin-modified Glass-ionomer and Zirconomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Shoale, Soodabe; Kowkabi, Mahsa

    2017-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the main mineral component of the tooth structure, which exhibits considerable biological behavior and its incorporation might improve microhardness of dental materials. Microhardness of restorative materials, like glass-ionomer, is critical for the clinical longevity of restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of two glass-ionomers types by incorporating different percentages of microhydroxyapatite. In this study, 80 disc-shaped experimental specimens (6 mm in diameter, 2 mm in height) were prepared in 8 groups, including resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI, GC, Gold Label, Japan), zirconia-reinforced glass-ionomer (Zirconomer, Shofu, Kyoto, Japan), and their mixture with 0, 5, 15 and 25 wt% of microhydroxyapatite (Sigma-Aldrich, Germany). All the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37ºC for 24 hours. Then Vickers microhardness test was carried out on the both sides of specimens and data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and paired t-test ( P glass-ionomer, Zirconia-reinforced glass ionomer, Microhydroxyapatite.

  14. Marginal microleakage of resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin restorations: Effect of using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

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    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Previous studies have shown that dental adhesives increase the bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI restorative materials to dentin. This in vitro study has evaluated the effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etch bonding systems v/s cavity conditioner, and in comparison to similar composite resin restorations on maintaining the marginal sealing of RMGI restorations. Materials and Methods: 98 rectangular cavities (2.5×3×1.5 mm were prepared on buccal and palatal aspects of 49 human maxillary premolars, randomly divided into 7 groups (N=14. The cavities in groups 1, 2 and 3 were restored using a composite resin (APX. The cavities in groups 4, 5, 6 and 7 were restored using a resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC. Before restoring, adhesive systems (Optibond FL = OFL, three-step etch-and-rinse; One Step Plus = OSP, two-step etch-and-rinse; Clearfil Protect Bond = CPB, two-step self-etch were used as bonding agents in groups 1-6 as follow: OFL in groups 1 and 4, OSP in groups 2 and 5, and CPB in groups 3 and 6, respectively. The specimens in group 7 were restored with GC cavity conditioner and Fuji II LC. All the specimens were thermo-cycled for 1000 cycles. Microleakage scores were determined using dye penetration method. Statistical analyzes were carried out with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=0.05. Results: There were significant differences in microleakage scores at both enamel and dentinal margins between the study groups (P<0.05. The lowest microleakage scores at enamel and dentin margins of RMGI restorations were observed in group 6. Conclusion: Use of two-step self-etch adhesive, prior to restoring cervical cavities with RMGIC, seems to be more efficacious than the conventional cavity conditioner in decreasing marginal microleakage.

  15. Effect of various dentin disinfection protocols on the bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Anand; Anil, Akansha; Thomas, Manuel S; Ginjupalli, Kishore

    2017-07-01

    Disinfection of dentin surface prior to any restorative therapy is important for the longevity of the treatment rendered. However, these dentin disinfection methods should itself not interfere with the adhesion of the restorative material. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the effect of various dentin disinfection protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). The occlusal surface of 40 extracted premolars were trimmed to obtain a flat dentinal surface and was randomly divided into four groups. CTRL was the control group; NaOCl was 1% sodium hypochlorite disinfection group; CHX was 2% chlorhexidine disinfection group; and PAD was the photo-activated disinfection group. Then a predetermined dimension of RMGIC was bonded to the pre-treated dentin surfaces. Following this, each sample was tested for SBS using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. Among the test groups, CHX showed the least reduction in SBS and NaOCl the highest reduction in SBS as compared to the control group. PAD on the other hand showed significantly lower SBS than CTRL and CHX groups, but the values were higher than the NaOCl group. Thus, it could be concluded from the present study that use of chlorhexidine based dentin disinfection does interfere with the adhesion of RMGIC. However, photo-activated disinfection should be done with caution. Moreover, sodium hypochlorite based disinfectants should be avoided prior to the use of RMGIC. Key words: Chlorhexidine, Dentin disinfection, Photo-activated disinfection, Resin modified glass ionomer cement, Shear bond strength, Sodium hypochlorite.

  16. Joggle lap shear testing of deep occlusal composite restorations lined with Dycal, Dycal LC, conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer

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    Stojanovska Vera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The longevity of a dental restoration may be predicted to some degree by its adhesive ability, and this, in turn, can be measured by bond strength testing between restorative materials and tooth structure. The aim of this study was to test an innovative joggle lap shearing jig that integrates the tooth and the entire biomechanical unit into testing, to compare the shear bond strengths of Class I occlusal composite restorations in deep cavity preparations lined with Dycal, Dycal LC, conventional glass ionomer or resin-modified glass ionomer. The mode of failure (adhesive, cohesive, mixed after debonding was determined by stereomicroscopy. Methods. A total of 150 standardized occlusal cavities were prepared and divided into five groups. The group I cavities (n = 30 were coated with adhesive (ExciTE®F and filled directly with composite (TetricEvoCeram. The group II and III cavities were lined with Dycal (n = 30 or Dycal LC (n = 30 before placing composite. The groups IV and V specimens were based with Fuji IX (n = 30 or Fuji II LC (n = 30. Shear bond strengths were determined with a universal testing machine and fractured bonding sites were analyzed under stereomicroscope. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test (p Fuji IX > Dycal LC > Dycal.

  17. The effects of Exposure Times and Light Curing Sources on Surface Micro-Hardness of a Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

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    Iman Parisay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influenceof different light curing systems and curing times on the micro-hardness of aresin modified glass ionomer. Methods: Forty two samples of ResinModified Glass Ionomer (RMGI were prepared using stainless steel cylindrical mold(8 × 2 mm and randomly divided into six groups of seven. Three groups werecured with a Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH light cure unit and the other threegroups were polymerized with LED unit for 20, 30 and 40 seconds. All sampleswere stored in distilled water for 24 hours. The micro-hardness was measured onthe top and bottom surfaces of the samples by Vickers hardness tester. Datawere analyzed by two–way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests. Results: Two-wayANOVA showed that QTH light-cure unit had higher percentage in depth of curethan LED light-curing unit in both surfaces; whereas, the application time hasno significant effect on it. There was no interaction between two variables. Inboth light-curing groups, the values of top and bottom surfaces micro-hardnesswere increased as the application time increased, but there was not anystatistically significant difference among these groups except for 40-second groupof LED light-curing unit which was significantly higher than 20-second and30-second groups (P

  18. Bond Strength of Silorane- and Methacrylate-Based Composites to Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    valid data for all variables in the model. Syntax UNIANOVA mpa BY agent comp surface /METHOD = SSTYPE(3) /INTERCEPT = INCLUDE /POSTHOC...strength and morphological study. Dent Mater 2001;17:373-380. Forsten L. Fluoride release from a glass ionomer cement. Scand J Dent Res 1977 Sep;85

  19. Setting Reaction of Dental Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Restoratives as a Function of Curing Depth and Postirradiation Time

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    Young Kyung Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specular reflectance Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the setting reaction of dental resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI restoratives as a function of curing depth and postirradiation time. Two light-cure and one tri-cure RMGI materials were selected and used according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were prepared by filling the mixed materials into custom-made molds and then light-irradiating using a dental curing light. The degree of conversion and the extent of acid-base reaction of the materials at different depths (0, 1, 2, and 4 mm and postirradiation times (10 min, 1 day, and 7 days were determined using SR-FTIR spectroscopy in conjunction with the Kramers-Kronig (K-K transformation. The setting reaction was also investigated using microhardness measurements. The results showed that the depth of cure increased over time by the continuous acid-base reaction rather than photopolymerization or chemical polymerization. Microhardness tests seemed less suitable for studying the setting reaction as a function of postirradiation time, probably due to softening from the humidity. Analysis using specular reflectance in conjunction with the K-K algorithm was an easy and effective method for monitoring the setting reaction of dental RMGI materials.

  20. Biocompatibility of a restorative resin-modified glass ionomer cement applied in very deep cavities prepared in human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Scheffel, Débora Lopes Sales; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated whether a restorative resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Vitremer (VM), would be biocompatible with pulp tissue when used as a liner in very deep cavities prepared in young human permanent teeth. Two dental cements in current use as liner materials, Vitrebond (VB) and Dycal (DY), were compared to VM. Class V cavities were prepared in 36 sound premolars that were scheduled for extraction, and the cavity floor was lined with the restorative cement (VM) or a liner/base control cement (VB or DY). For VM specimens, the cavity floor was pretreated with a primer (polyacrylic acid plus 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Teeth were extracted after 7 or 30 days and processed for microscopic evaluation. In the VM group, inward diffusion of dental material components through dentinal tubules, associated with disruption of the odontoblastic layer, moderate to intense inflammatory response, and resorption of inner dentin, was observed in 2 teeth at 7 days. These histologic features were observed in 1 tooth at 30 days. In the VB group, mild inflammatory reactions and tissue disorganization observed at 7 days were resolved at 30 days. No pulpal damage occurred in the DY specimens. Of the materials tested, only Vitremer was not considered biocompatible, because it caused persistent pulpal damage when applied in very deep cavities (remaining dentin thickness less than 0.3 mm).

  1. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

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    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  2. Consequences of enamel preparation with sodium hypochlorite, polyacrylic and phosphoric acids for the bonding of brackets with resin-modified glass ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    Trindade, Alessandra Marques; Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Smith Neto, Perrin; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Akaki, Emílio; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) prior to enamel conditioning with 10% polyacrylic acid (PAA) and 35% phosphoric acid (PA) on the bond strength (BS) of brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were divided into 5 groups (n = 20 in each group): G1 (control), enamel conditioning with PA, application of adhesive and bonding of brackets...

  3. Clinical evaluation of a new art material: Nanoparticulated resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konde, S.; Raj, S.; Jaiswal, D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The success of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) technique depends on the restorative material; hence, clinical studies with various materials are necessary. Aim: The aim of the present study was to clinically evaluate and compare the nanoionomer and high-viscosity glass ionomer using United States Public Health Services (USPHS) Modified Cvar/Ryge Criteria with ART approach. Materials and Methods: Two primary molars in 50 healthy children aged between 5 and 8 years were selected for the study. The teeth were treated with ART and divided into two groups. The group 1 teeth were restored with nanoionomer (Ketac Nano 100 3M ESPE) and group 2 with high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (HVGIC), (Fuji IX GC). Each restoration was evaluated using the USPHS Modified Cvar/Ryge Criteria at baseline and 6 months’ and 12 months’ time interval. Statistical analysis used: Chi-squared (χ2) test. Results: Nanoionomer was significantly better than HVGIC with respect to color match at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months (P0.05), but at 12 months, nanoionomer was statistically better than HVGIC (P0.05). Conclusion: The results indicate that nanoionomer can be a successful alternative restorative material for use with ART technique. PMID:24478966

  4. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

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    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  5. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

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    Monika Aleksiejunaite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n=10. Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers’ instructions (experiment I and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p<0.05. LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted.

  6. Characterization of the Mineral Trioxide Aggregate–Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement Interface in Different Setting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ashraf A.; Komabayashi, Takashi; Watanabe, Etsuko; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used successfully for perforation repair, vital pulpotomies, and direct pulp capping. However, little is known about the interactions between MTA and glass ionomer cement (GIC) in final restorations. In this study, 2 null hypotheses were tested: (1) GIC placement time does not affect the MTA-GIC structural interface and hardness and (2) moisture does not affect the MTA-GIC structural interface and hardness. Methods Fifty cylinders were half filled with MTA and divided into 5 groups. The other half was filled with resin-modified GIC either immediately after MTA placement or after 1 or 7 days of temporization in the presence or absence of a wet cotton pellet. The specimens were then sectioned, carbon coated, and examined using a scanning electron microscope and an electron probe micro-analyzer (SEM-EPMA) for interfacial adaptation, gap formation, and elemental analysis. The Vickers hardness numbers of the interfacial MTA were recorded 24 hours after GIC placement and 8 days after MTA placement and analyzed using the analysis of variance test. Results Hardness testing 24 hours after GIC placement revealed a significant increase in hardness with an increase of temporization time but not with a change of moisture conditions (P MTA placement indicated no significant differences among groups. SEM-EPMA showed interfacial adaptation to improve with temporization time and moisture. Observed changes were limited to the outermost layer of MTA. The 2 null hypotheses were not rejected. Conclusions GIC can be applied over freshly mixed MTA with minimal effects on the MTA, which seemed to decrease with time. PMID:22794220

  7. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

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    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  8. Comparison of Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Ariadent and Harvard Polycarboxylate Cement and Vitremer Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

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    Ahmadian Khoshemehr Leila

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luting agents are used to attach indirect restoration into or on the tooth. Poor mechanical properties of cement may be a cause of fracture of this layer and lead to caries and restoration removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic modulus and compressive strength of Ariadent (A Poly and Harvard polycarboxylate (H Poly cements and Vitremer resin modified glass ionomer (RGl.Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 15 specimens were prepared form each experimental cement in Laboratory of Tehran Oil Refining Company. The cylindrical specimens were compressed in Instron machine after 24 hours. Elastic modulus and compressive strength were calculated from stress/strain curve of each specimen. One way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis and P values<0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: The mean elastic modulus and mean compressive strength were 2.2 GPa and 87.8MPa in H poly, 2.4 GPa and 56.5 MPa in A Poly, and 0.8GPa and 105.6 MPa in RGI, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that compressive strength and elastic modulus of both polycarboxylate cements were significantly different from hybrid ionomer (P<0.05, but the difference between elastic modulus of two types of polycarboxilate cements was not statistically significant. Compressive strength of two polycarboxilate cements were significantly different (P<0.05. Conclusion: An ideal lutting agent must have the best mechanical properties. Between the tested luttins RGl cement had the lowest elastic modulus and the highest compressive strength, but the A poly cement had the highest elastic modulus and the lowest compressive strength. Therefore none of them was the best.

  9. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement

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    Juan Carlos Castañeda-Espinosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250, a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB, and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm² for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses.

  10. Physical Properties, Film Thickness, and Bond Strengths of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements According to Their Delivery Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Taiseer A; Abdulmajeed, Awab A; Altitinchi, Ali; Ahmed, Sumitha N; Donovan, Terence E

    2018-03-05

    To determine the effect of changing the dispensing or mixing method of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cements on their water sorption, solubility, film thickness, and shear bond strength. Disc-shaped specimens of RMGI cements (RelyX: Luting [handmix], Luting Plus [clicker-handmix], Luting Plus [automix], GC: Fuji PLUS [capsule-automix], FujiCEM 2 [automix], [n = 10]) were prepared according to ISO standard 4049 for water sorption and solubility tests. Furthermore, the percentage of mass change, percentage of solubility, and percentage of water absorbed was also determined. Film thickness was measured according to ISO standard 9917-2; the mean of 5 measurements for each cement was calculated. Shear bond strength for each cement was determined according to ISO standard 29022 before and after thermocycling at 20,000 cycles, temperatures 5 to 55°C with a 15-second dwell time (n = 10/subgroup). Two- and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze data for statistical significance (p 0.05). RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-handmix) displayed lower solubility than its handmix and automix counterparts (p < 0.05). Film thickness of RelyX cements was significantly different (p < 0.05). RelyX Luting Plus (automix) had the lowest film thickness (19 μm) compared to its handmix (48 μm) and clicker-handmix (117 μm) counterparts (p < 0.05). GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix, 22 μm) was significantly lower than the automix version (GC FujiCEM 2, 127 μm) (p < 0.05). Shear bond strength of RelyX Luting Plus (automix) was significantly lower than its handmix and clicker-handmix versions (p < 0.05). GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix) was significantly higher than GC FujiCEM 2 (automix) (p < 0.05). The binary interaction of the two independent variables (dispensing/mixing method and thermocycling) was significant for the shear bond strengths of the GC cements only (p < 0.05). Change in the dispensing/mixing method of RMGI cement from the same brand may have an effect on its physical properties

  11. TRANSMISSION OF COMPOSITE POLYMERIZATION CONTRACTION FORCE THROUGH A FLOWABLE COMPOSITE AND A RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Cavalcanti, Ana Paula; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250), a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB), and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB) adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm2 for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N ± 0.2N; G2: 9.8 ± 0.2N; G3: 1.8 ± 0.2N; G4: 6.8N ± 0.2N; G5: 6.9N ± 0.3N; G6: 4.0N ± 0.4N and G7: 2.8N ± 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses. PMID:19089187

  12. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into th...

  13. Effect of light-emitting diode and halogen light curing on the micro-hardness of dental composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, M; Patel, D; Shashikiran, N D; Mallikarjuna, R M; Nalawade, T M; Reddy, H K

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate and compare the micro-hardness of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using light-emitting diode (LED) and halogen curing and also to inter-compare the effect of LED and halogen curing. The study sample comprised of 4 stainless steel plates with a thickness of 2 mm. For these stainless steel plates, holes were made to a diameter of 3 mm. The samples were divided into 4 groups of 8 each and labeled as group I, group II, group III, group IV, thus making provision for the two different modes of light exposure. In each group, the hole was restored with its respective restorative material and cured with light-curing unit according to manufacturer instructions. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test. It was concluded that the curing efficacy of the LED lamp was comparable to that of conventional halogen lamp, even with a 50% reduction in cure time, and resin composite (Filtek Z-250) presented the highest hardness values, whereas complete hardening of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Vitremer) was observed because of its self-curing system even after the removal of light source.

  14. Effect of light-emitting diode and halogen light curing on the micro-hardness of dental composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement: An in vitro study

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    M Bhalla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate and compare the micro-hardness of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using light-emitting diode (LED and halogen curing and also to inter-compare the effect of LED and halogen curing. Materials and Methods : The study sample comprised of 4 stainless steel plates with a thickness of 2 mm. For these stainless steel plates, holes were made to a diameter of 3 mm. The samples were divided into 4 groups of 8 each and labeled as group I, group II, group III, group IV, thus making provision for the two different modes of light exposure. In each group, the hole was restored with its respective restorative material and cured with light-curing unit according to manufacturer instructions. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test. Results and conclusion: It was concluded that the curing efficacy of the LED lamp was comparable to that of conventional halogen lamp, even with a 50% reduction in cure time, and resin composite (Filtek Z-250 presented the highest hardness values, whereas complete hardening of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (Vitremer was observed because of its self-curing system even after the removal of light source.

  15. Influence of caries risk on the retention of a resin-modified glass ionomer used as occlusal sealant: a clinical trial

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    Elaine Pereira da Silva TAGLIAFERRO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Little is known whether caries risk influence occlusal sealants retention. Objective To determine the retention rates (RR of the resin-modified glass ionomer cement used as occlusal sealant in permanent first molars of 6-8-year old schoolchildren and to analyze the influence of caries risk at baseline on the RR of the sealant, over a 24-month period. Material and method The sealant application was performed in a dental office at the beginning of the study, after children being allocated into high caries risk group (HR and low caries risk group (LR. The examinations were performed by the same calibrated dentist at 0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Retention rates were estimated, the Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the survival probabilities; and the comparison between HR and LR groups was evaluated by Wilcoxon and log-rank test. Result The results showed that 14% of sealed teeth showed total loss (16% for HR and 12% for LR and 46% showed partial loss during the study (51% for HR and 41% for LR, in relation to the baseline sample. No difference could be demonstrated by the survival analysis between HR and LR groups (p>0.05. Conclusion Caries risk did not influence the retention rates of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement used as occlusal sealant in 6-8-year old schoolchildren.

  16. The effect of salivary pH on diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement coated with coating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayanti, D.; Triaminingsih, S.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial saliva with different acidities on the diametral tensile strength of Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) coated with varnish and nanofilled coating agent. The specimens coated with coating agents were immersed in artificial saliva with pH of 4.5, 5.5, and 7 for 24 hours in an incubatorat 37°C. The diametral tensile strength of the specimens was tested with Universal Testing Machine. There were no significant differences on the diametral tensile strength of all specimens that were put into groups based on the acidity of the saliva and the type of coating agent (p>0.05). Both varnish and nanofilled coating agent stayed on the RMGIC in the acidic condition that simulated the true condition of oral cavity in people with high caries risk for the 24 hours of maturation.

  17. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  18. Retention of oral microorganisms on conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements Retenção de microrganismos bucais em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais e modificados por resina

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    Denise PEDRINI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary caries are a worldwide public and socioeconomic problem. The placement of restorations can lead to the development of environmental conditions favorable to microbial colonization, especially on the tooth/restoration interface, which is a predisposing factor for secondary caries. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbial retention on conventional (Chelon-Fil and Vidrion R and resin-modified (Vitremer and Fuji II LC glass-ionomer cements, in situ, using a hybrid composite resin (Z100 as a control. Twelve volunteers wore Hawley appliances with specimens made of all tested filling materials for 7 days. The specimens were then removed from the appliances and transferred to tubes containing 2.0 ml of Ringer-PRAS. Microorganisms from the samples were inoculated onto blood agar and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar and incubated under anaerobiosis (90% N2, 10% CO2, at 37°C, for 10 and 2 days, respectively. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cements and the composite resin retained the same levels of microorganisms on their surfaces. The resin-modified glass-ionomers retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin and conventional glass-ionomer cements. The conventional glass-ionomer cements retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin, but that difference was not statistically significant.A cárie secundária representa problema de saúde pública e socioeconômico no mundo. A restauração de dentes acometidos por cárie pode criar condições favoráveis à proliferação microbiana na superfície do material restaurador ou na interface dente/restauração, criando ambiente propício para o estabelecimento de cárie secundária. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a capacidade de retenção de placa bacteriana em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais (Chelon-Fil e Vidrion R e modificados por resina (Vitremer e Fuji II LC e de resina composta híbrida (Z100, utilizada como controle. Nos testes de reten

  19. Comparison of the Shear Bond Strength of Resin Modified Glass Ionomer to Enamel in Bur-Prepared or Lased Teeth (Er:YAG

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    Ahmad Jafari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er:YAG laser on the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI to enamel.Materials and Methods: Twenty extracted caries-free human premolars were selected. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin. The buccal surfaces of each sample were ground to plane enamel with carbonated disc. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups. In the first group, the surfaces were treated by Er:YAG laser (350mJ/10Hz. The second group was prepared by carbide bur. Fuji IX RMGI was adhered to surfaces of the samples in both groups in rod shape. The shear bond strength of samples was measured by a universal testing machine. The results of the two groups were analyzed by T- test.Results: The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength of the laser-treated group and the bur-treated group were 6.75 ± 1.99 and 4.41 ± 1.62 Mpa, respectively. There is significant difference in the shear bond strength of RMGI between the two groups (P-value=0.01.Conclusion: The laser group showed better results. Er:YAG laser can be an alternative technology in restorative dentistry

  20. Residual HEMA and TEGDMA Release and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement and Compomers Cured with Different Light Sources

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    Murat Selim Botsali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the elution of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA monomers from resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and compomers cured with halogen and light-emitting diode (LED light-curing units (LCUs. The effect of cured materials on the viability of L929 fibroblast cells was also evaluated. One RMGIC (Ketac N100 and two compomers (Dyract Extra and Twinkystar were tested. Materials were prepared in teflon disks and light-cured with LED or halogen LCUs. The residual monomers of resin materials in solution were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography. The fibroblast cells’ viability was analyzed using MTT assay. The type of LCU did not have a significant effect on the elution of HEMA and TEGDMA. A greater amount of HEMA than TEGMDA was eluted. The amount of TEGDMA eluted from Twinkystar was greater than Dyract Extra (P0.05. Curing with the LED LCU decreased the cells’ viability more than curing with the halogen LCU for compomers. For Ketac N100, the halogen LCU decreased the cells’ viability more than the LED LCU.

  1. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  2. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

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    Larissa Marinho AZEVEDO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher's test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05. CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations.

  3. Influence of resin-modified glass ionomer and topical fluoride on levels of Streptococcus mutans in saliva and biofilm adjacent to metallic brackets

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    Marcela Cristina Damião ANDRUCIOLI

    Full Text Available Abstract Decalcification of enamel during fixed orthodontic appliance treatment remains a problem. White spot lesions are observed in nearly 50% of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. The use of fluoride-containing orthodontic materials has shown inconclusive results on their ability to reduce decalcification. The aims of this investigation were to compare the levels of Streptococcus mutans (SM in saliva and biofilm adjacent to orthodontic brackets retained with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (Fuji ORTHO LC and a light cured composite resin (Transbond XT, and to analyze the influence of topical application of the 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF on SM counts. In a parallel study design, two groups (n=14/15 were used with random allocation and high salivary SM counts before treatment. Biofilm was collected from areas adjacent to the brackets on teeth 13, 22, 33, and 41. Both saliva and biofilm were collected on the 7th, 21st, 35th, and 49th days after appliance placement. Topical fluoride application was carried out on the 35th day. Bonding with RMGIC did not alter SM counts in saliva or biofilm adjacent to the brackets. On the other hand, the biofilm adjacent to brackets retained with composite resin showed a significant increase in SM counts along the trial period. Topical application of 1.23% APF did not reduce salivary or biofilm SM counts regardless of the bonding material. In conclusion, fluoride topical application did not show efficacy in reducing SM. The use of RMGIC as bonding materials allowed a better control of SM cfu counts in dental biofilm hindering the significant increase of these microorganisms along the trial period, which was observed in the biofilm adjacent to the composite material.

  4. Effects of Topical Fluoride on the Marginal Microleakage of Composite Resin and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Restorations in Primary Molars: An In-vitro Study

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    Fatemeh Mir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Topical fluoride may deteriorate dental restorations. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of topical fluoride on the marginal microleakage of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI restorations in primary molars. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 60 primary molars were randomly divided into six groups of 10 based on the type of the restoration materials and before/after the application of fluoride gel, including FC (fluoride + composite, CF (composite + fluoride, C (composite, FG (fluoride + RMGI, GF (RMGI + fluoride, and G (RMGI. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface, so that the gingival margins were located in cementum. After storing, thermocycling, and immersing the specimens in basic fuchsin, they were sectioned buccolingually and evaluated in terms of dye penetration. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 18 using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test at the significance level of 0.05. Results: No significant difference was observed between the three composite groups in terms of microleakage (P>0.05. In the RMGI groups, GF showed a significantly higher microleakage compared to G (P=0.029. However, no significant difference was observed between the other groups in this regard (P>0.05. Moreover, comparison of composite and RMGI groups (matched in terms of fluoride application indicated that microleakage was significantly higher in FG than FC (P=0.024, as well as in GF than CF (P=0.002. However, no significant difference was observed between groups C and G in this regard (P=0.268. Conclusion: According to the results, the marginal seal of composite restorations in the primary molars were not affected by the acidic fluoride gel. On the other hand, applying the acidic fluoride gel was associated with a higher microleakage in the cavities restored with RMGI.

  5. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cements versus resin-based materials as fissure sealants: a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengopal, V; Mickenautsch, S

    2010-02-01

    To appraise quantitatively current evidence regarding the caries-preventing effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RM-GIC) fissure sealants in comparison to that of resin-based fissure sealants. Systematic review with meta-analysis. 8 Anglophone databases and 2 Lusophone databases were searched until 15 April 2009, using a pre-determined search strategy. Clinical trials were considered for inclusion if their titles/abstracts were relevant to the topic, published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and had a two-arm longitudinal study design. The outcome measure of the caries-preventive effect was caries absence on sealed teeth. Two reviewers independently extracted data from the accepted articles in order to complete a 2x2 table for meta-analysis. The unit of interest was the tooth, and the number of caries-free teeth (n) at the end of each time interval (6, 12 and 24 months) was compared against the total number of evaluated teeth (N). Datasets were assessed for their clinical and methodological heterogeneity, following Cochrane guidelines, and only homogeneous datasets were combined for meta-analysis, using a random effects model (RevMan 4.2). Differences in the caries-preventive effect were computed on the basis of the combined Relative Risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Of the 212 articles identified, only 6 trials were included. From these, 19 separate datasets were extracted. For the pooled data, equivalent caries-preventive effects were observed at 6 months (RR= 0.98, 95% CI 0.95- 1.00; p = 0.08); 12 months (RR=1.00, 95% CI 0.96-1.04, p = 0.99) and 24 months (RR=1.01, 95% CI 0.84-1.21, p = 0.91). The 36-month data (not pooled) favoured resin-based sealants (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.88-0.97, p = 0.002). This meta-analysis found no conclusive evidence that either material was superior to the other in preventing dental caries.

  6. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength and microleakage of conventional glass ionomer cement, resin modified glass ionomer cement and compomer: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, C Vishnu; Varma, Balagopal; Jayanthi

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the tensile bond strength and microleakage of Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC, and compoglass and to compare bond strength with degree of microleakage exhibited by the same materials. Occlusal surfaces of 96 noncarious primary teeth were ground perpendicular to long axis of the tooth. Preparations were distributed into three groups consisting of Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC and Compoglass. Specimens were tested for tensile bond strength by mounting them on Instron Universal Testing Machine. Ninety-six primary molars were treated with Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC, and compoglass on box-only prepared proximal surface. Samples were thermocycled, stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage under stereomicroscope. ANOVA and Bonferrani correction test were done for comparisons. Pearson Chi-square test and regression analysis were done to assess the association between the parameters. Compoglass showed highest tensile strength and Fuji II LC showed least microleakage. There was a significant difference between the three groups in tensile strength and microleakage levels. The correlation between tensile strength and microleakage level in each group showed that there was a significant negative correlation only in Group 3. Fuji II LC and compoglass can be advocated in primary teeth because of their superior physical properties when compared with Fuji IX GP.

  7. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive.

  8. INFILTRAÇÃO MARGINAL DE CIMENTOS IONOMÉRICOS MODIFICADOS POR RESINA MICROLEAKAGE OF RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo CARRARA

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparou-se a infiltração marginal de dois cimentos restauradores que liberam flúor, o Vitremer/3M e o Variglass/Caulk Dentsply. Cavidades classe II foram confeccionadas nas faces mesiais e distais de pré-molares extraídos. Cada dente recebeu uma restauração de cada material. Procedeu-se, então, a termociclagem em solução de fucsina básica a 0,5%. Nenhum material foi capaz de evitar a infiltração marginal, porém, esta foi menor nas restaurações de Vitremer/3M (pThe microleakage behavior of two hybrid glass ionomer cements used as restorative materials (Variglass/Caulk Dentsply and Vitremer/3M was compared. Separate class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal aspects of thirteen extracted premolars. One restoration of each material was placed on every tooth. The cervical margins of the restorations were left one millimeter below the cementoenamel junction. Thermocycling was conduced in a 0.5% basic fuchsin solution. The teeth were washed and sectioned for microleakage analysis under a dissecting microscope. None of the materials tested were able to inhibit dye penetration at the cervical margin. Vitremer/3M was more effective than Variglass/Caulk Dentsply in reducing microleakage.

  9. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  10. Water sorption of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements photoactivated with LED Sorção de água de cimentos de ionômero de vidro modificados por resina fotoativados com LED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Francisca Gigo Cefaly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Light Emitting Diodes (LED technology has been used to photoactivate composite resins and there is a great number of published studies in this area. However, there are no studies regarding resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGIC, which also need photoactivation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate water sorption of two RMGIC photoactivated with LED and to compare this property to that obtained with a halogen light curing unit. A resin composite was used as control. Five specimens of 15.0 mm in diameter x 1.0 mm in height were prepared for each combination of material (Fuji II LC Improved, Vitremer, and Filtek Z250 and curing unit (Radii and Optilight Plus and transferred to desiccators until a constant mass was obtained. Then the specimens were immersed into deionized water for 7 days, weighed and reconditioned to a constant mass in desiccators. Water sorption was calculated based on weight and volume of specimens. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p A tecnologia baseada em Diodos emissores de luz (LED tem sido utilizada para a fotoativação de resinas compostas e existe um grande número de estudos publicados a este respeito. Entretanto, não existem estudos envolvendo cimentos de ionômero de vidro modificados por resina (CIVMR, que também necessitam fotoativação. Assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi o de avaliar a sorção de água de dois CIVMR fotoativados com LED e comparar essa propriedade com aquela obtida com unidade com lâmpada halógena. Uma resina composta foi utilizada como controle. Cinco espécimes com 15,0 mm diâmetro x 1,0 mm de altura foram preparados para cada combinação de material (Fuji II LC Improved, Vitremer e Filtek Z250 e fonte de luz (Radii e Optilight Plus e transferidos a dessecadores até a obtenção de massa constante. Em seguida, os espécimes foram imersos em água deionizada por 7 dias, pesados e recondicionados a uma massa constante em dessecadores. A sor

  11. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  12. The influence of long term water immersion on shear bond strength of amalgam repaired by resin composite and mediated by adhesives or resin modified glass ionomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, R; Nissan, J; Shafir, H; Shapira, G; Alter, E; Brosh, T

    2012-07-01

    To assess the shear bond strength between amalgam and resin composite mediated by either multipurpose adhesive systems or RMGI when subjected to long term immersion in saline. Part I: Cylindrical specimens (6 mm × 6 mm) composed of equal parts of sandblasted set amalgam (Oralloy) and composite (Z-100), with a thin layer of either Scotchbond Multipurpose, All Bond 2, Amalgam Bond Plus, High Q Bond Plus or Vitrebond in between were fabricated (n = 100 × 5). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups, immersed in saline at 37 °C for either 48 h, 3 or 6 months, followed by thermocycling (5000; 5/55 °C) and shear bond strength testing (SBS). Part II: Identical specimens were fabricated with intermediary of either Ketac Cem, Fuji Lining LC, Rely X Luting, Fuji Plus or Meron Plus (n = 100 × 5). Immersion periods, followed by thermocycling and SBS testing as in Part I. Two representative specimens from each subgroup were sectioned and inspected under SEM. The two classes of intermediary agents yielded SBS which differed mainly in the 6 months incubation period. While multipurpose adhesives provided SBS values of ~9-10 MPa RMGI provided higher SBS of ~16 MPa. All Bond 2 and Amalgam Bond Plus exhibited deterioration of SBS during the 6 month period as well as Rely X Luting. Gap sizes between 0.5 and 3 μm exist between all intermediaries and the amalgam; on the other hand all intermediaries exhibit gap-free interfaces between the adhesives/RMGI and the composite. Vitrebond in particular and RMGIs in general can serve as an excellent coupler of resin composite to amalgam, providing a durable bond. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  14. Compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer restorative material: effect of P/L ratio and storage time Resistência à compressão de ionômeros de vidro modificados por resina: efeito da relação P/L e tempos de armazenagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Aratani

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement Fuji II LC and Vitremer, in powder/liquid ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, at three periods (24 hours, 7 and 28 days of storage in distilled water at 37ºC. For each material, P/L ratio and storage time, 5 cylindrical specimens were prepared, with 4mm diameter and 6mm height, in silicon moulds. Specimens were light-cured for 40 seconds at each extremity, removed from the moulds and laterally light-cured (perpendicular to long axis for 40 seconds, protected as recommended by the manufacturers and immersed for the time tested. The specimens were submitted to compressive strength testing in an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min until failure. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%, and showed that the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement was reduced when P/L ratio was reduced and that the storage in water had little influence on compressive strength.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a resistência à compressão dos cimentos de ionômero de vidro modificados por resina Vitremer e Fuji II LC, nas relações pó/líquido 1:1, 1:2 e 1:3, por três períodos de armazenagem (24 horas, 7 e 28 dias em água destilada a 37 ºC. Para cada material, relação pó/líquido e tempo de armazenagem, cinco corpos-de-prova cilíndricos foram preparados com 4 mm de diâmetro por 6 mm de altura, em moldes de silicone. Os corpos-de-prova foram fotoativados por 40 segundos, em cada extremidade, removidos dos moldes, fotoativado lateralmente (perpendicular ao longo eixo por 40 segundos, protegidos conforme as instruções dos fabricantes e imersos pelo tempo de teste. Os corpos-de-prova foram submetidos à compressão em uma Instron, à velocidade de 1,0 mm/min até a falha. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância e ao teste de Tukey (5%, e mostraram que a resistência à compressão do cimento de ionômero de

  15. Spin glasses (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of spin glass studies are reviewed and related to existing theories. Investigations of spin glasses are concentrated on atomic structure, metallurgical treatment, and high-temperature susceptibility of alloys, on magnetic properties at low temperature and near the freezing temperature, on anisotropy behaviour measured by ESR, NMR and torque, on specific heat, Moessbauer effect, neutron scattering and muon-spin depolarization experiments, ultrasound and transport properties. Some new theories of spin glasses are discussed which have been developed since Part I appeared

  16. Effect of one-bottle adhesive systems on the fluoride release of a resin-modified glass ionomer Efeito dos sistemas adesivos de frasco único na liberação de flúor de um cimento de ionômero de vidro modificado por resina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Wang

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A dhesive systems associated to resin-modified glass ionomer cements are employed for the achievement of a higher bond strength to dentin. Despite this benefit, other properties should not be damaged. This study aimed at evaluating the short-time fluoride release of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement coated with two one-bottle adhesive systems in a pH cycling system. Four combinations were investigated: G1: Vitremer (V; G2: Vitremer + Primer (VP; G3: Vitremer + Single Bond (VSB and G4: Vitremer + Prime & Bond 2.1 (VPB. SB is a fluoride-free and PB is a fluoride-containing system. After preparation of the Vitremer specimens, two coats of the selected adhesive system were carefully applied and light-cured. Specimens were immersed in demineralizing solution for 6 hours followed by immersion in remineralizing solution for 18 hours, totalizing the 15-day cycle. All groups released fluoride in a similar pattern, with a greater release in the beginning and decreasing with time. VP showed the greatest fluoride release, followed by V, with no statistical difference. VSB and VPB released less fluoride compared to V and VP, with statistical difference. Regardless the one-bottle adhesive system, application of coating decreased the fluoride release from the resin-modified glass ionomer cements. This suggests that this combination would reduce the beneficial effect of the restorative material to the walls around the restoration.Sistemas adesivos são associados aos cimentos de ionômero de vidro modificados por resina para a obtenção de maior resistência adesiva à dentina. Apesar deste benefício, outras propriedades não devem ser prejudicadas. Este estudo se propôs a avaliar a liberação de flúor a curto prazo de um cimento de ionômero de vidro modificado por resina coberto com dois diferentes sistemas adesivos em um modelo de ciclagem de pH. Quatro associações foram testadas: G1: Vitremer (V; G2: Vitremer + Primer (VP; G3: Vitremer + Single

  17. Evaluation in vivo of biocompatibility of differents resin-modified cements for bonding orthodontic bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANAINA A. MESQUITA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The focus of this study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no difference between the biocompatibility of resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Sixty male Wistar rats were selected and divided into four groups: Control Group; Crosslink Group; RMO Group and Transbond Group. The materials were inserted into rat subcutaneous tissue. After time intervals of 7, 15 and 30 days morphological analyses were performed. The histological parameters assessed were: inflammatory infiltrate intensity; reaction of multinucleated giant cells; edema; necrosis; granulation reaction; young fibroblasts and collagenization. The results obtained were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test (P<0.05. After 7 days, Groups RMO and Transbond showed intense inflammatory infiltrate (P=0.004, only Group RMO presented greater expression of multinucleated giant cell reaction (P=0.003 compared with the control group. After the time intervals of 15 and 30 days, there was evidence of light/moderate inflammatory infiltrate, lower level of multinucleated giant cell reaction and thicker areas of young fibroblasts in all the groups. The hypothesis was rejected. The Crosslink cement provided good tissue response, since it demonstrated a lower level of inflammatory infiltrate and higher degree of collagenization, while RMO demonstrated the lowest level of biocompatibility.

  18. Radiopacity Of Glass-ionomer/composite Resin Hybrid Materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Hara A.T.; Serra M.C.; Rodrigues Junior A.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study visually compared the radiopacity of seven restorative materials (3 resin-modified glass-ionomer cements, 3 polyacid-modified composite resins, and 1 conventional glass-ionomer cement) to a sound tooth structure sample, and an aluminium stepwedge. All hybrid materials were more radiopaque, except for one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, than both the tooth structure and conventional glass-ionomer cement.

  19. Marginal Adaptation Evaluation of Biodentine and MTA Plus in "Open Sandwich" Class II Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Yadav, Suman; Yadav, Harish; Ragini

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluation of two different commercially available calcium silicate materials (Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] Plus) used as dentin substitute. Sixty Class II cavities were prepared in extracted mandibular third molars, with margins extending 1 mm below the cementum-enamel junction. The samples were divided into three groups on the basis of dentin substitute used: resin modified glass ionomer cement, Biodentine, and MTA Plus. Cavities were restored with composite resins in an "open sandwich" technique. The samples were subjected to alternate aging in phosphate buffered saline and cyclic loading. Marginal adaptation was evaluated in terms of "continuous margin" at the gingival margin, using a low vacuum scanning electron microscope. Statistical analysis was done with two-way analysis of variance with Holm-Sidak's correction for multiple comparisons. The glass ionomer group and Biodentine group presented an overall 83% and 91% of continuous margins, with no difference between them. MTA Plus showed least values of continuous margins. Granular deposits were seen over the surface of Biodentine and MTA Plus. Biodentine and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, when used as a dentin substitute under composite restorations in open sandwich technique, gave satisfactory marginal adaptation values. Contemporary calcium silicate materials can be used as dentin substitute materials in "open sandwich" Class II restorations. This study evaluates the marginal adaptation of Biodentine, MTA Plus, and resin modified glass ionomer cement used as dentin substitutes and reports better adaptation obtained with Biodentine and glass ionomer cement. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Construction, testing and performance report : state study no. 137 : resin modified pavement demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Resin Modified Pavement (RMP) is a composite paving material consisting of a thin layer (2 inches) : of open graded hot mix asphalt (HMA) whose internal air voids (approximately 30% voids) are : filled with a latex rubber-modified portland cement gro...

  1. Emulsification of resin modified by simultaneous graft polymerization with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Fumio; Sasaki, Takashi; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1983-01-01

    Emulsification of the epoxy resins, onto which hydrophilic groups were introduced by simultaneous co-graft polymerization with electron beam irradiation, were studied. Resins modified with use of ionic monomers such as methacrylic acid (MAc), diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DE), tetramethylammonium methacrylate (TMAMA), or methacryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (QDM) formed latexes, when they were dissolved into small amounts of solvents followed by the addition of water. A higher composition of hydrophilic monomer in the resin-monomer mixture gave a latex with a smaller particle size and higher storage stability. TMAMA and QDM, both of which were incompatible with epoxy resin, were very effective in decreasing the particle size and increasing stability of a latex. It was also ascertained that an alkyd resin were able to emulsified similarly by grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and MAc. (author)

  2. A Second Glass Transition in Pressure Collapsed Type II Clathrate Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2018-04-19

    Type II clathrate hydrates (CHs) M·17 H 2 O, with M = tetrahydrofuran (THF) or 1,3-dioxolane, are known to collapse, or amorphize, on pressurization to ∼1.3 GPa in the temperature range 77-140 K. On heating at 1 GPa, these pressure-amorphized CH states show a weak, stretched sigmoid-shaped, heat-capacity increase because of a glass transition. Here we use thermal conductivity and heat capacity measurements to show that also type II CH with M = cyclobutanone (CB) collapses on isothermal pressurization and undergoes a similar, weak, glass transition upon heating at 1 GPa. Furthermore, we reveal for both THF CH and CB CH a second, much more pronounced, glass transition at temperatures above the thermally weak glass transition on heating in the 0.2-0.7 GPa range. This result suggests the general occurrence of two glass transitions in water-rich (94 mol %) pressure-collapsed CHs. Because of a large increase in dielectric permittivity concurrently as the weak heat capacity increase, the first glass transition must be due to kinetic unfreezing of water molecules. The thermal features of the second glass transition, measured on isobaric temperature cycling, are typical of a glass-liquid-glass transition, which suggests that pressure-amorphized CHs transform reversibly to liquids.

  3. Monolithic Rare Earth Doped PTR Glass Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a monolithic solid state laser on the basis of PTR glass co-doped with luminescent rare earth ions....

  4. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Prathibha Rani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I, 30 days (phase II, 90 days (phase III, and 180 days (Phase IV. At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC (Group II, Flowable Compomer (Group III, and Flowable Composite (Group IV, respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  5. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  6. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  7. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    composed of VO5 pyramids. The vanadates-based glasses show semiconducting ..... the composition 1 mol% of CeO2. The AC conductivity obeys a power law. The glass samples exhibit typical inor- ganic semiconducting behaviour. The activation energy and conductivity at room temperature were found to be 0.09 eV ...

  8. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Gharaei, Samineh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adh...

  9. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Gharaei, Samineh

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adhesive systems, the RMGI samples were cured. Composite layers were applied and shear bond strength was measured. Two samples of each group were evaluated by SEM. Failure mode was determined by streomicroscope. Both curing methods and adhesive systems had significant effect on bond strength (P-value adhesives had significantly higher shear bond strength than the total-etch adhesive (P-value technique improved the bond strength in self-etch adhesives, but decreased the bond strength in total-etch adhesive (P-valueadhesive systems and co-curing technique can improve the bond strength between the RMGI and composite.

  10. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    materials and electrochemical batteries.8 Rare earth metal ions when added to borate act as network modifiers and change the properties of glasses. In rare earth ... room temperature to 600◦C. For electrical measurements, samples were polished and conducting silver paste was deposited on both sides. The sample area ...

  11. Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, K

    2010-01-01

    Audio recording of the sea from the breakwater in Plymouth Sound, by Stuart Moore. Presentations and exhibitions of the film Glass include: Finding Place exhibition, Plymouth (3 > 26 February 2010); University of the West of England's Radical British Screens symposium (3 September 2010); Plymouth University Festival of Research: Materiality and Technology film programme presented by the Centre for Media Art and Design Research (MADr), Jill Craigie Cinema, Plymouth University (14 March 2011); ...

  12. Inhibition of early biofilm formation by glass-ionomer incorporated with chlorhexidine in vivo: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, X.; Huang, X.; Huang, C.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Yang, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This pilot study investigated the antibiofilm effects of glass-ionomer cements (GICs) and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs) incorporated with chlorhexidine (CHX) in vivo. METHODS: Experimental GICs and RMGICs containing 2% CHX were obtained by mixing CHX with the powder of

  13. Compressive strength of two newly developed glass-ionomer materials for use with the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach in class II cavities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenraads, H.; Kroon, G. Van der; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The null-hypotheses tested were that no difference in compressive strength of ART class II cavities exists between those restored with (1) glass-carbomer and a commonly used glass-ionomer; (2) KMEM and the commonly used glass-ionomer and; (3) glass-carbomer and KMEM. METHODS: 100 molar

  14. A Bragg glass phase in the vortex lattice of a type II superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, T; Joumard, I; Blanchard, S; Marcus, J; Cubitt, R; Giamarchi, T; Le Doussal, P

    2001-09-27

    Although crystals are usually quite stable, they are sensitive to a disordered environment: even an infinitesimal amount of impurities can lead to the destruction of crystalline order. The resulting state of matter has been a long-standing puzzle. Until recently it was believed to be an amorphous state in which the crystal would break into 'crystallites'. But a different theory predicts the existence of a novel phase of matter: the so-called Bragg glass, which is a glass and yet nearly as ordered as a perfect crystal. The 'lattice' of vortices that contain magnetic flux in type II superconductors provide a good system to investigate these ideas. Here we show that neutron-diffraction data of the vortex lattice provides unambiguous evidence for a weak, power-law decay of the crystalline order characteristic of a Bragg glass. The theory also predicts accurately the electrical transport properties of superconductors; it naturally explains the observed phase transitions and the dramatic jumps in the critical current associated with the melting of the Bragg glass. Moreover, the model explains experiments as diverse as X-ray scattering in disordered liquid crystals and the conductivity of electronic crystals.

  15. Decomposing the Bragg glass and the peak effect in a Type-II superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Balog, Sandor

    2018-01-01

    test the widespread paradigm that an order-disorder transition of the vortex ensemble drives the peak effect. Using neutron scattering to probe the vortex order in superconducting vanadium, we uncover an order-disorder transition from a quasi-long-range-ordered phase to a vortex glass. The peak effect....... In Type-II superconductors, disorder generally works to pin vortices, giving zero resistivity below a critical current j(c). However, peaks have been observed in the temperature and field dependences of j(c). This peak effect is difficult to explain in terms of an ordered Abrikosov vortex lattice. Here we...

  16. Sealing ability of a new calcium silicate based material as a dentin substitute in class II sandwich restorations: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raji Viola Solomon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Class ll sandwich restorations are routinely performed where conventional Glass ionomer cement (GIC or Resin-modified GIC (RMGIC is used as a base or dentin substitute and a light curing composite resin restorative material is used as an enamel substitute. Various authors have evaluated the microleakage of composite resin restorations where glass ionomer cement has been used as a base in class II sandwich restorations, but a literature survey reveals limited studies on the microleakage analysis of similar restorations with biodentine as a dentin substitute, as an alternative to glass ionomer cement. The aim of this study is: To evaluate the marginal sealing efficacy of a new calcium-silicate-based material (Biodentine as a dentin substitute, at the cervical margins, in posterior class II sandwich restorations.To compare and evaluate the microleakage at the biodentine/composite interface with the microleakage at the resin-modified GIC/composite interface, in posterior class II open sandwich restorations. To compare the efficacy between a water-based etch and rinse adhesive (Scotch bond multipurpose and an acetone-based etch and rinse adhesive (Prime and bond NT, when bonding biodentine to the composite. To evaluate the enamel, dentin, and interfacial microleakage at the composite and biodentine/RMGIC interfaces. Materials and Methods: Fifty class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 25 extracted human maxillary third molars, which were randomly divided into five groups of ten cavities each: (G1 Biodentine group, (G2 Fuji II LC GIC group, (G3 Biodentine as a base + prime and bond NT + Tetric N-Ceram composite, (G4 Biodentine + scotchbond multi-purpose + Tetric N-Ceram composite, (G5 Fuji II LC as a base + prime and bond NT+ Tetric-N Ceram composite. The samples were then subjected to thermocycling, 2500× (5°C to 55°C, followed by the dye penetration test. Scores are given from 0 to 3 based on the depth of

  17. Setting shrinkage strains of chemical-cured glass ionomer-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shrinkage strains are exhibited by the current formulations of chemical-cured dental restorative systems. In resin-modified glass ionomer systems, these have been linked to filler contents, types and quantity of monomer. Post-gelation rigid contraction that follows onset of cure leading to marginal defects is a clinically ...

  18. Primary study on synthesis and characterization of the new type EB curable resins. Pt.1: Acrylic resins modified by light-oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jinshan; Yi Min; Wang Ruiyu; Li Jun; Ha Hongfei

    1995-01-01

    An acrylic resin modified by vegetable oil with high degree of unsaturation level has been synthesized. The characterization of coating film EB cured by the modified acrylic resin was studied primarily. The new type of EB curable acrylic resin is possessed of many merits such as cheap raw materials, simple synthesis technique and pretty characteristics of coating film. It is especially fit for timber surface coatings cured by EB radiation

  19. Surface silver-doping of biocompatible glasses to induce antibacterial properties. Part II: Plasma sprayed glass-coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miola, M; Ferraris, S; Di Nunzio, S; Robotti, P F; Bianchi, G; Fucale, G; Maina, G; Cannas, M; Gatti, S; Massé, A; Vitale Brovarone, C; Verné, E

    2009-03-01

    A 57% SiO(2), 3% Al(2)O(3), 34% CaO and 6% Na(2)O glass (SCNA) has been produced in form of powders and deposited by plasma spray on titanium alloy and stainless steel substrates. The obtained coatings have been subjected to a patented ion-exchange treatment to introduce silver ions in the surface inducing an antibacterial behavior. Silver surface-enriched samples have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, SEM observation, EDS analysis, in vitro bioactivity tests, leaching tests by GFAAS (graphite furnace atomic adsorption spectroscopy) analyses, cells adhesion and proliferation, and antibacterial tests using Staphylococcus Aureus strain. In vitro tests results showed that the modified samples acquired an antimicrobial action against tested bacteria maintaining unaffected the biocompatibility of the glass. Furthermore the ion-exchange treatment can be successfully applied to glass-coated samples without affecting the properties of the coatings; the simplicity and reproducibility of the method make it suitable for glass or glass-ceramic coatings of different composition in order to produce coated devices for bone healing and/or prostheses, able to reduce bacterial colonization and infections risks.

  20. A Review of Glass-Ionomer Cements for Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharanbir K. Sidhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an updated review of the published literature on glass-ionomer cements and covers their structure, properties and clinical uses within dentistry, with an emphasis on findings from the last five years or so. Glass-ionomers are shown to set by an acid-base reaction within 2–3 min and to form hard, reasonably strong materials with acceptable appearance. They release fluoride and are bioactive, so that they gradually develop a strong, durable interfacial ion-exchange layer at the interface with the tooth, which is responsible for their adhesion. Modified forms of glass-ionomers, namely resin-modified glass-ionomers and glass carbomer, are also described and their properties and applications covered. Physical properties of the resin-modified glass-ionomers are shown to be good, and comparable with those of conventional glass-ionomers, but biocompatibility is somewhat compromised by the presence of the resin component, 2 hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Properties of glass carbomer appear to be slightly inferior to those of the best modern conventional glass-ionomers, and there is not yet sufficient information to determine how their bioactivity compares, although they have been formulated to enhance this particular feature.

  1. THE EFFECT OF THE APPLICATION OF 20% CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE ON THE GLASS IONOMER CEMENT TYPE II SURFACE HARDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Noerdin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In dental bleaching, carbamide peroxide is usually used at concentration of 10%, 15%, to 20%. The result of our previous study showed that the application of 10% and 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent has increased the surface hardness of glass ionomer cement. The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of 20% carbamide peroxide bleaching to glass ionomer surface hardness. Twenty specimens of glass ionomer type II after exposed to 20% carbamide peroxide were divided into two application time groups: 4 and 8 hours per day. Glass ionomer cement surface hardness was measured by Vickers Microhardness Tester series HMV-2 with a weight of 0,025 Hv for 20 seconds. The measurement was conducted at before/no application, after a week, and after 2 weeks of application in both groups. It can be concluded that the application of 20% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent could increase the surface hardness of glass ionomer cement after 1 week and 2 weeks application period.

  2. Comparative evaluation of few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type IV gypsum die materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Ealla, Kranti Kiran Reddy; Nunna, Venkata Narayana; Manne, Sanjay Dutt

    2012-01-01

    To compare and evaluate few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type-IV gypsum die material. In the present study, dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength of three die materials like epoxy resin (Diemet-E), resin-modified gypsum (Synarock) and conventional type-IV gypsum (Ultrarock) are analyzed. For dimensional accuracy, master die (Bailey's die) is used and calibrations were made with digital microscope. For surface detail reproduction and transverse strength, rectangular stainless steel master die (Duke's die) was used and calibrations were made with Toolmaker's microscope and Instron universal testing machine respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the means and standard deviation for groups of each test. The results of the study showed statistically significant difference among these materials in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength. Epoxy resin exhibited superiority in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength and is nearest to the standards of accurate die material.

  3. A comprehensive study of soft magnetic materials based on FeSi spheres and polymeric resin modified by silica nanorods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strečková, M.; Füzer, J.; Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiří; Fáberová, M.; Bureš, R.; Kollár, P.; Lauda, M.; Medvecký, L.; Girman, V.; Hadraba, Hynek; Baťková, M.; Baťko, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 3 (2014), s. 649-660 ISSN 0254-0584 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : composite materials * magnetic materials * chemical synthesis Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass (UFM-A) Impact factor: 2.259, year: 2014

  4. Clinical Performance of Heat-Cured High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer Class II Restorations in Primary Molars: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Eliyahu; Kupietzky, Ari; Fuks, Anna B; Tickotsky, Nili; Moskovitz, Moti

    The present preliminary study evaluated the clinical and radiographic performances of heat-cured high viscosity glass ionomer (HCHVGI) in class II restorations of primary molars. A retrospective study on a cohort of patients who had dental caries restored at a private practice was conducted. Restorations were evaluated radiographically and photographically by two separate examiners. Ninety-three Class II restorations in 44 patients (average age: 108 months ± 25.3, 24 males, 20 females) were examined. Average recall time was 22.2 months ± 4.2. All but three restorations (96.8%) were present and intact, with no incidents of secondary caries. Three additional restorations had occlusal defects that required retreatment, resulting in an overall success rate of 93.5%. Ninety-seven percent of the restorations were rated optimal for marginal integrity with no staining of the restoration surfaces. No patients complained of post-operative sensitivity. The most common flaw found was a concavity on the proximal wall of the cavity box (27%, mean age 16 months ± 3.9). The findings in this preliminary study suggest that heat cured high viscosity glass ionomer cement may be an effective restorative material for Class II restorations in primary molars that are a year or two from shedding.

  5. Clinical failure of class-II restorations of a highly viscous glass-ionomer material over a 6-year period : A retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    Objectives: The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the performance of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (GIC) class-II restorations over 6 years of clinical service. Methods: All class-II GIC restorations made in 1996 and 1997, in regular attending adult patients of a general

  6. Reduction-oxidation Enabled Glass-ceramics to Stainless Steel Bonding Part II interfacial bonding analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Among glass-ceramic compositions modified with a variety of oxidants (AgO, FeO, NiO, PbO, SnO, CuO, CoO, MoO3 and WO3) only CuO and CoO doped glass-ceramics showed existence of bonding oxides through reduction-oxidation (redox) at the GC-SS interface. The CuO-modified glass-ceramics demonstrate the formation of a continuous layer of strong bonding Cr2O3 at the interface in low partial oxygen (PO2) atmosphere. However, in a local reducing atmosphere, the CuO is preferentially reduced at the surface of glass-ceramic rather than the GC-SS interface for redox. The CoO-modified glass-ceramics demonstrate improved GC-SS bonding. But the low mobility of Co++ ions in the GC limited the amount of CoO that can diffuse to and participate in redox at the interface.

  7. Evaluation of antimicrobial and physical properties of orthodontic composite resin modified by addition of antimicrobial agents--an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Vikas; Shetty, V Surendra; Mogra, Subraya; Bhat, Gopalkrishna; Eipe, Montu; Jacob, Shery; Prabu, Laxman

    2007-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial and physical properties of orthodontic composite resin modified by the addition of antimicrobial agents. Unite bonding adhesive (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), a chemically cured composite resin, modified by the addition of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), chlorhexidine, and triclosan in concentrations of 0.1 wt%, 0.2 wt%, and 0.3 wt%, respectively, was formed into tablets for testing. The tablets of each group and a control group were subjected to the agar plate diffusion test to measure the zone of bacterial inhibition. In addition, they were incubated for 24 hours in tryptic soy broth inoculated with Streptococcus mutans and examined for bacterial growth. A total of 80 extracted premolars were collected and divided into 2 sets of 40 teeth each. Stainless steel Begg brackets were bonded by using control and experimental composites. A universal testing machine was used to determine shear bond strength. The first set of teeth was tested after 24 hours and the second set after 25 days of storage in distilled water. Time-dependent release of antimicrobial agents from the modified composites was monitored spectrophotometrically. The findings indicated that (1) addition of BAC to the orthodontic composite resin enhanced its antimicrobial properties, (2) there was no significant difference in the bond strengths of the control and the experimental resin tested after 24 hours and 25 days, and (3) maximum release of BAC from the modified resin was higher than that of chlorhexidine or triclosan, and was much higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration level.

  8. Compressive strength of two newly developed glass-ionomer materials for use with the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach in class II cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenraads, H; Van der Kroon, G; Frencken, J E

    2009-04-01

    The null-hypotheses tested were that no difference in compressive strength of ART class II cavities exists between those restored with (1) glass-carbomer and a commonly used glass-ionomer; (2) KMEM and the commonly used glass-ionomer and; (3) glass-carbomer and KMEM. 100 molar teeth, stratified by size, were randomly allocated to the four test groups. Large ART class II cavities were drilled and restored with Clearfil photoposterior (negative control), Fuji IX (positive control), Glass-carbomer and Ketac Molar Easymix (KMEM) (experimental groups). Half of the samples in each test group were 5000 times thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with a 30s dwell time in each bath and a transfer time of 10s. The restorations were statically tested at the marginal ridge until failure, using a rounded rectangular testing rod at crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. ANOVA and Student's t-test were applied to test for differences between the dependent variable (compressive strength at the final breaking point) and the independent variables (thermocycling and restorative material). Restorations of Clearfil photoposterior had a statistically significant higher mean compressive strength value at final breaking point than those of the three glass-ionomers tested (p=0.0001). No thermocycling effect was observed (p=0.19). ANOVA between the three glass-ionomer materials and mean compressive strength at final breaking point showed no statistically significant difference (p=0.09). Class II ART cavities restored with the newly launched Glass-carbomer and Ketac Molar Easymix were not significantly more fracture resistant than comparable restorations using the conventional glass-ionomer Fuji IX.

  9. On melting dynamics and the glass transition. II. Glassy dynamics as a melting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzakala, Florent; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2011-01-21

    There are deep analogies between the melting dynamics in systems with a first-order phase transition and the dynamics from equilibrium in super-cooled liquids. For a class of Ising spin models undergoing a first-order transition--namely p-spin models on the so-called Nishimori line--it can be shown that the melting dynamics can be exactly mapped to the equilibrium dynamics. In this mapping the dynamical--or mode-coupling--glass transition corresponds to the spinodal point, while the Kauzmann transition corresponds to the first-order phase transition itself. Both in mean field and finite dimensional models this mapping provides an exact realization of the random first-order theory scenario for the glass transition. The corresponding glassy phenomenology can then be understood in the framework of a standard first-order phase transition.

  10. A comparative survey on the increased fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth using three types of Glass Ionomer as adhesive liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiee F.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Because dental amalgam does not adhere to tooth structure, using adhesive cements in amalgam-bonded restorations have been increased. Purpose: The goal of this in-vitro study was to compare the effects of three types of glass ionomer as adhesive liners as well as varnish liner in increasing fracture resistance of teeth restored with amalgam. Materials and Methods: Seventy extracted human maxillary premolars were selected and MOD cavities were prepared on them excluding ten intact teeth as positive control group and ten cavity prepared teeth without restoration as negative control group. All the prepared teeth were then restored with spherical amalgam (gs.80 with one of the following liners silver alloy glass ionomer liner, conventional glass ionomer liner, varnish liner, resin-modified glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer with delayed light curing. The teeth were stored in 37C distilled water for 7 days and were then loaded under compressive strength using an Instron testing machine. The force required to fracture teeth were recorded and the data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in fracture resistance between restored and non-restored samples. Comparisons between groups attributed significant effects to resin-modified glass ionomer in increasing fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth (P<0.05. In most specimens, one cusp was separated from tooth structure whereas amalgam remained bonded to the intact cusp. Conclusion: According to these findings, resin-modified glass ionomer put a statistically significant effect in fracture resistance of amalgam-restored teeth.

  11. Local distortion and EPR parameters of copper(II) in borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Min-Quan; Wang, Li-Dan; Duan, Shu-Kai

    2017-12-01

    The EPR parameters (g and A tensors) of the paramagnetic Cu2+ sites in CaB4O7, LiCaBO3, Li2B4O7, KLiB4O7 glasses are well explained by utilizing the fourth-order perturbation formulas for 3 d9 ions in the tetragonally elongated octahedral [CuO6]10- clusters. The magnitude of the local distortion for the [CuO6]10- clusters suffering the Jahn-Teller effect is denoted by the relative elongation ratio ρ which is proportional to the ratio Δg///Δg⊥ (Δg//= g//-gs and Δg⊥ = g⊥-gs). The g isotropies giso (=(g//+2g⊥)/3) undergo an linear increase with the decline of the covalecny of the glass systems (i.e., the augment of the orbital reduction factor k). The signs of the hyperfine structure constants are determined by computing the quantitative contributions arising from the isotropic and anisotropic copper 3d-3s (4s) orbital admixtures indicated by the core polarization constant κ and the reduction factor H, respectively. The above correlations are proved to be available for analogous borate glasses doping with copper ions, e.g., MRbB4O7 (M = Li, Na and K), 90M2B4O7·9PbO·CuO (M = Li, Na and K), 10MO·30ZnO·60B2O3 (M = Mg, Ca and Sr) and xLi2O·(30-x)Na2O·69.5B2O3 (5 ≤ x ≤ 25 mol%), and all the results are discussed.

  12. Impact of caramelization on the glass transition temperature of several caramelized sugars. Part II: Mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Liu, Yeting; Bhandari, Bhesh; Zhou, Weibiao

    2008-07-09

    Further to part I of this study, this paper discusses mathematical modeling of the relationship between caramelization of several sugars including fructose, glucose, and sucrose and their glass transition temperatures ( T g). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used for creating caramelized sugar samples and determining their glass transition temperatures ( T g). UV-vis absorbance measurement and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were used for quantifying the extent of caramelization. Specifically, absorbances at 284 and 420 nm were obtained from UV-vis measurement, and the contents of sucrose, glucose, fructose, and 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF) in the caramelized sugars were obtained from HPLC measurements. Results from the UV and HPLC measurements were correlated with the Tg values measured by DSC. By using both linear and nonlinear regressions, two sets of mathematical models were developed for the prediction of Tg values of sugar caramels. The first set utilized information obtained from both UV-vis measurement and HPLC analysis, while the second set utilized only information from the UV-vis measurement, which is much easier to perform in practice. As a caramelization process is typically characterized by two stages, separate models were developed for each of the stages within a set. Furthermore, a third set of nonlinear equations were developed, serving as criteria to decide at which stage a caramelized sample is. The models were evaluated through a validation process.

  13. Structural Iron (II) of Basaltic Glass as an Energy Source for Zetaproteobacteria in an Abyssal Plain Environment, Off the Mid Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, Pauline A; Rommevaux-Jestin, Céline; Lesongeur, Françoise; Mumford, Adam; Emerson, David; Godfroy, Anne; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    To explore the capability of basaltic glass to support the growth of chemosynthetic microorganisms, complementary in situ and in vitro colonization experiments were performed. Microbial colonizers containing synthetic tholeitic basaltic glasses, either enriched in reduced or oxidized iron, were deployed off-axis from the Mid Atlantic Ridge on surface sediments of the abyssal plain (35°N; 29°W). In situ microbial colonization was assessed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and basaltic glass alteration was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure at the Fe-K-edge and Raman microspectroscopy. The colonized surface of the reduced basaltic glass was covered by a rind of alteration made of iron-oxides trapped in a palagonite-like structure with thicknesses up to 150 μm. The relative abundance of the associated microbial community was dominated (39% of all reads) by a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) that shared 92% identity with the iron-oxidizer Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. Conversely, the oxidized basaltic glass showed the absence of iron-oxides enriched surface deposits and correspondingly there was a lack of known iron-oxidizing bacteria in the inventoried diversity. In vitro, a similar reduced basaltic glass was incubated in artificial seawater with a pure culture of the iron-oxidizing M. ferrooxydans DIS-1 for 2 weeks, without any additional nutrients or minerals. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy revealed that the glass surface was covered by twisted stalks characteristic of this iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. This result supported findings of the in situ experiments indicating that the Fe(II) present in the basalt was the energy source for the growth of representatives of Zetaproteobacteria in both the abyssal plain and the in vitro experiment. In accordance, the surface alteration rind observed on the reduced basaltic glass incubated in situ could at least partly result from their activity.

  14. Structural iron (II of basaltic glass as an energy source for Zetaproteobacteria in an abyssal plain environment, off the Mid Atlantic Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Audrey Henri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the capability of basaltic glass to support the growth of chemosynthetic microorganisms, complementary in situ and in vitro colonization experiments were performed. Microbial colonizers containing synthetic tholeitic basaltic glasses, either enriched in reduced or oxidized iron, were deployed off-axis from the Mid Atlantic Ridge on surface sediments of the abyssal plain (35°N; 29°W. In situ microbial colonization was assessed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and basaltic glass alteration was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure at the Fe-K-edge and Raman microspectroscopy. The colonized surface of the reduced basaltic glass was covered by a rind of alteration made of iron-oxides trapped in a palagonite-like structure with thicknesses up to 150 µm. The relative abundance of the associated microbial community was dominated (39% of all reads by a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU that shared 92% identity with the iron-oxidizer Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. Conversely, the oxidized basaltic glass showed the absence of iron-oxides enriched surface deposits and correspondingly there was a lack of known iron-oxidizing bacteria in the inventoried diversity. In vitro, a similar reduced basaltic glass was incubated in artificial seawater with a pure culture of the iron-oxidizing M. ferrooxydans DIS-1 for 2 weeks, without any additional nutrients or minerals. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy revealed that the glass surface was covered by twisted stalks characteristic of this iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. This result supported findings of the in situ experiments indicating that the Fe(II present in the basalt was the energy source for the growth of representatives of Zetaproteobacteria in both the abyssal plain and the in vitro experiment. In accordance, the surface alteration rind observed on the reduced basaltic glass incubated in situ could at least partly result from

  15. A review of glass-ionomers: From conventional glass-ionomer to bioactive glass-ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials used in the body, especially the materials used in various oral cavity regions should be stable and passive without any interactions with the body tissues or fluids. Dental amalgam, composite resins and dental cements are the materials of choice with such properties. The first attempts to produce active materials, which could interact with the human body tissues and fluids were prompted by the concept that fluoride-releasing materials exert useful effects in the body. The concept of using the "smart" materials in dentistry has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Conventional glass-ionomer (GI cements have a large number of applications in dentistry. They are biocompatible with the dental pulp to some extent. GI is predominantly used as cements in dentistry; however, they have some disadvantages, the most important of which is lack of adequate strength and toughness. In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of the conventional GI, resin-modified glass-ionomers have been marketed, with hydrophilic monomers, such as hydroxyethyl methacrylated (HEMA. Some recent studies have evaluated GI with bioactive glass in its structure to validate the claims that such a combination will improve tooth bioactivity, regeneration capacity and restoration. There is ever-increasing interest in the application of bioactive materials in the dental field in an attempt to remineralize affected dentin. The aim of this review article is to evaluate these materials and their characteristics and applications.

  16. Evaluation of the bond strength of different adhesive agents to a resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadas, Muhammed; Cantekin, Kenan; Gumus, Husniye; Ateş, Sabit Melih; Duymuş, Zeynep Yesil

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of different adhesive agents to TheraCal LC and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and examined the morphologic changes of these materials with different surface treatments. A total of 120 specimens, 60 of MTA Angelus (AMTA), and 60 of TheraCal LC, were prepared and divided into six subgroups according to the adhesive agent used; these agents included Scotchbond Multipurpose, Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil S 3 Bond, OptiBond All-in-One, and G-aenial Bond. After application of adhesive agents, Filtek Z250 composite resin was placed onto the specimens. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, followed by examination of the fractured surfaces. The surface changes of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Although no significant differences were found among the bond strengths of different adhesives to AMTA (p = 0.69), a significant difference was found in terms of bond strengths of different adhesives to the TheraCal LC surface (p TheraCal LC compared to the bond with other adhesives. TheraCal LC bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA regardless of the adhesive agents tested. Resin-modified calcium silicate showed higher bond strength than AMTA in terms of the composite bond to these materials with different bonding systems. On the other hand, the highest shear bond-strength values were found for composite bonds with the combination of TheraCal LC and the total-etch adhesive system. SCANNING 38:403-411, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Study on the spin crossover transition and glass transition for Fe(II) complex film, [Fe(II)(H-triazole){sub 3}]-Nafion, by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamoto, Akio; Kamebuchi, Hajime, E-mail: cc106909@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Enomoto, Masaya [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science Division I (Japan); Kojima, Norimichi [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    [Fe(II)(H-trz){sub 3}]-Nafion (trz = triazole) is a transparent spin crossover complex film, where the spin crossover transition between the low-spin (S = 0) and the high-spin (S = 2) states takes place between 225 K and 300 K. In this film, two doublets corresponding to the low-spin and high-spin states were observed in the {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra, reflecting the spin crossover transition. From the analysis of {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra, the Debye temperatures of the low-spin and high-spin sites were estimated at 185 K and 176 K, respectively, in the temperature range between 10 K and 150 K. In this film, the total intensity of the Moessbauer spectra corresponding to the low-spin and high-spin sites drastically decreases above 200 K, reflecting the glass transition of Nafion, where the lattice vibration of [Fe(H-trz){sub 3}]{sub n}{sup 2n+} is softened just as in solution due to micro-Brown motion of the segment of Nafion polymer membrane.

  18. The effect of Coca-Cola and fruit juices on the surface hardness of glass-ionomers and 'compomers'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliping-McKenzie, M; Linden, R W A; Nicholson, J W

    2004-11-01

    The interaction of tooth-coloured dental restorative materials (a conventional glass-ionomer, two resin-modified glass-ionomers and two compomers) with acidic beverages has been studied with the aim of investigating how long-term contact affects solution pH and specimen surface hardness. For each material (ChemFil Superior, ChemFlex, Vitremer Core Build-Up/Restorative, Fuji II LC, Dyract AP and F2000) disc-shaped specimens were prepared and stored in sets of six in the following storage media: 0.9% NaCl (control), Coca-Cola, apple juice and orange juice. After time intervals of 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 4 months, 6 months and 1 year, solution pH and Vickers Hardness Number were determined for each individual specimen. Differences were analysed by anova followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc analysis. All materials were found to reduce the pH of the 0.9% NaCl, but to increase the pH of the acidic beverages. The conventional glass-ionomers dissolved completely in apple juice and orange juice, but survived in Coca-Cola, albeit with a significantly reduced hardness after 1 year. The other materials survived in apple juice and orange juice, but showed greater reductions in surface hardness in these beverages than in Coca-Cola. Fruit juices were thus shown to pose a greater erosive threat to tooth coloured materials than Coca-Cola, a finding which is similar to those concerning dentine and enamel towards these drinks.

  19. Commercial alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses for sealing solid oxide cell stacks Part II: Characterization of devitrification and glass-ceramic phase assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Karsten; Balic-Zunic, T.

    2017-01-01

    nucleation, and that the growth mechanism gradually changed from three-dimensional growth at the onset of devitrification towards one-dimensional growth in later stages, when heterogeneous nucleation was absent or less dominating. Most glasses developed entangled and fibrous microstructures with little...... diopside, substituting for Al and Si, but the so established substitution partly disappeared with time during the heat treatment....

  20. Evaluation of the Effects of Different Mouthrinses on the Color Stability of One Type of Glass Ionomer, Compomer and Giomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghayegh Razavi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of four commercially available mouthrinses on the color stability of one type of glass ionomer, giomer and compomer. Method: 60 disc-shaped specimens, 180 in total (7*2mm, fabricated from each of the following materials: A resin modified glass ionomer Fuji II LC (GC International Corp, a giomer Beautifil II (SHOFU INC and a compomer Ionosit (DMG. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37˚C for 24 hours in an incubator. The initial colour value (L*,a*,b* were recorded with spectrophotometer according to CIELAB scale. After baseline evaluation, the specimens were divided into five subgroups, according to the testing and control storage solutions (n=12. Randomly selected specimens from each material were immersed in 20 ml of the treatment solutions (Oral-B Pro Expert, Listerine, Colgate Plax, Irasha at 37˚c for 24 hours. Each specimen was then subjected to second color measurement. The collected data was statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD at a significance level of 0.05. Results: All samples displayed color changes after immersion in the mouthrinses. The observed color difference showed that mouthrinses have a significant effect on the color shift of tested materials. A significant interaction was found between the materials and the mouthrinses. Overall, discoloration with all mouthrinses was significant when compared to the control specimens stored in artificial saliva. Oral-B induced the highest level of discoloration (ΔE*= 11.62 in Compomer and the least discoloration was found with Irsha (ΔE*= 1.47 in RMGI. Conclusions: All tested restorative materials showed a color shift after immersion in mouthrinses, amongst which compomer displayed the highest change. Discolorations were clinically perceptible in most of the cases. Thus it can be concluded that daily use of mouthrinses increases the stainability of tested materials.

  1. Evaluation of the Effects of Different Mouthrinses on the Color Stability of One Type of Glass Ionomer, Compomer and Giomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghayegh Razavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of four commercially available mouthrinses on the color stability of one type of glass ionomer, giomer and compomer. Method: 60 disc-shaped specimens, 180 in total (7*2mm, fabricated from each of the following materials: A resin modified glass ionomer Fuji II LC (GC International Corp, a giomer Beautifil II (SHOFU INC and a compomer Ionosit (DMG. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37˚C for 24 hours in an incubator. The initial colour value (L*,a*,b* were recorded with spectrophotometer according to CIELAB scale. After baseline evaluation, the specimens were divided into five subgroups, according to the testing and control storage solutions (n=12. Randomly selected specimens from each material were immersed in 20 ml of the treatment solutions (Oral-B Pro Expert, Listerine, Colgate Plax, Irasha at 37˚c for 24 hours. Each specimen was then subjected to second color measurement. The collected data was statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD at a significance level of 0.05. Results: All samples displayed color changes after immersion in the mouthrinses. The observed color difference showed that mouthrinses have a significant effect on the color shift of tested materials. A significant interaction was found between the materials and the mouthrinses. Overall, discoloration with all mouthrinses was significant when compared to the control specimens stored in artificial saliva. Oral-B induced the highest level of discoloration (ΔE*= 11.62 in Compomer and the least discoloration was found with Irsha (ΔE*= 1.47 in RMGI. Conclusions: All tested restorative materials showed a color shift after immersion in mouthrinses, amongst which compomer displayed the highest change. Discolorations were clinically perceptible in most of the cases. Thus it can be concluded that daily use of mouthrinses increases the stainability of tested materials.

  2. Comparison of Cytotoxicity of New Nanohybrid Composite, Giomer, Glass Ionomer and Silver Reinforced Glass Ionomer using Human Gingival Fibroblast Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohpeima, Fatemeh; Mokhtari, Mohammad Javad; Doozandeh, Maryam; Jowkar, Zahra; Yazdanshenas, Fatemeh

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects of new nanohybrid composite, giomer, conventional and resin modified and silver reinforced glass ionomer cements and compare the biocompatibility of these dental materials in cell culture. Five cylindrical specimens were made of each material, using a mold (2mm. thick and 5 mm in diameter). For HGF, cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium. After attaining 80% confluence, cells were treated with different doses of five tested materials for 24h. Then cell cytotoxicity was assessed using MTT assay. The data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test. The materials evaluated on HGF cells, showed significantly more cytotoxicity in silver reinforced glass ionomer but nanohybrid composite shows mild cytotoxic effect. However, giomer shows no significant cytotoxicity and conventional and resin modified glass ionomer enhance cell proliferation. Silver reinforced glass ionomer induced a significant high cytotoxic effect over a wide range of concentration. Therefore, higher attention should be focused on this restorative dental material, which should be chosen for further investigations.

  3. Analysis of glass and glass melts during the vitrification of fly and bottom ashes by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy. Part II. Process analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panne, U.; Clara, M.; Haisch, C.; Niessner, R.

    1998-12-01

    Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) is employed for in situ and on-line process analysis of major glass constituents during a vitrification process for fly and bottom ashes from waste incineration. The system is based on an Nd:YAG laser for plasma ignition, while the elemental emissions from the plasma are detected time-resolved by an intensified multichannel analyzer. The perpendicular, single axis, imaging optics allow a remote sensing of the composition of the hot glass melt. Taking into account the plasma characteristics for calibration, good agreement between the LIPS analysis and the established reference analysis is achieved for the concentration ratios of SiO 2, Al 2O 3, and CaO. In addition, LIPS is applied to the analysis of aerosols generated by homogeneous nucleation during the heating-up of the investigated fly ashes. A distinctive temperature dependence of the heavy metal concentration of the aerosols is observed.

  4. Strengthening of glass-ionomer cement by compounding short fibres with CaO-P2O5-SiO2-Al2O3 glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Kon, M; Miyai, K; Asaoka, K

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if short fibres of CaO-P2O5-SiO2-Al2O3 (CPSA) glass possessing a particular aspect ratio (length/diameter) could be used as a reinforcing agent for glass-ionomer cement. The powder of a commercial glass-ionomer cement (not resin modified) was mixed with variously sized CPSA glass short fibres before mixing with the liquid of the glass-ionomer cement. The mixed powders containing 60 mass% CPSA glass short fibres (diameter, 9.7 +/- 2.1 microm, aspect ratio, 5.0 +/- 0.9) obtained maximum values of 18 and 35 MPa for the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and flexural strength (FS) of set cements, respectively, after 24 h. These DTS and FS values were 1.8 and 4.5 times larger, respectively, than those of the set glass-ionomer cement not containing short fibres. Moreover, it was found that the addition of CPSA glass short fibres was remarkably more effective in the strengthening than electric glass (a typical glass fibre) short fibres. The results suggested that the CPSA glass short fibres acted as a reinforcing agent for strengthening the glass-ionomer cement, because of the shape of short fibres and reactivity between the mixing liquid and short fibres.

  5. Initial Sliding Wear Kinetics of Two Types of Glass Ionomer Cement: A Tribological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Villat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the initial wear kinetics of two different types of glass ionomer cement used in dentistry (the conventional glass ionomer cement and the resin-modified glass ionomer cement under sliding friction after 28-day storing in distilled water or Ringer’s solution. Sliding friction was applied through a pin-on-disk tribometer, in sphere-on-plane contact conditions, under 5 N normal load and 120 rotations per minute. The test lasted 7500 cycles and replicas were performed at 2500, 5000 and 7500 cycles. A profilometer was used to evaluate the wear volume. Data were analysed using Student’s t-test at a significant level of 5%. There is no statistical significant difference between the results obtained for a given material with the maturation media (P>0.05. However, for a given maturation medium, there are significant statistical differences between the data obtained for the two materials at each measurement (P<0.0001. The wear rates of both materials decrease continuously during the running-in period between 0 and 2500 cycles. After 2500 cycles, the wear rate becomes constant and equal for both materials. The resin matrix contained in the resin-modified glass ionomer cement weakens the tribological behaviour of this material.

  6. Intrapulpal Thermal Changes during Setting Reaction of Glass Carbomer® Using Thermocure Lamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdevs Kahvecioglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To measure the temperature increase induced during thermocure lamp setting reaction of glass carbomer and to compare it with those induced by visible light curing of a resin-modified glass ionomer and a polyacid-modified composite resin in primary and permanent teeth. Materials and Methods. Nonretentive class I cavities were prepared in extracted primary and permanent molars. Glass carbomer (GC was placed in the cavity and set at 60°C for 60 sn using a special thermocure lamp. Resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC and polyacid-modified composite resin (PMCR were placed in the cavities and polymerized with an LED curing unit. Temperature increases during setting reactions were measured with a J-type thermocouple wire connected to a data logger. Data were examined using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s honestly significant difference tests. Results. The use of GC resulted in temperature changes of 5.17 ± 0.92°C and 5.32 ± 0.90°C in primary and permanent teeth, respectively (p>0.05. Temperature increases were greatest in the GC group, differing significantly from those in the PMCR group (p<0.05. Conclusion. Temperature increases during polymerization and setting reactions of the materials were below the critical value in all groups. No difference was observed between primary and permanent teeth, regardless of the material used.

  7. Quantifying the mode II critical strain energy release rate of borate bioactive glass coatings on Ti6Al4V substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinmanesh, A; Li, Y; Clarkin, O; Zalzal, P; Schemitsch, E H; Towler, M R; Papini, M

    2017-11-01

    Bioactive glasses have been used as coatings for biomedical implants because they can be formulated to promote osseointegration, antibacterial behavior, bone formation, and tissue healing through the incorporation and subsequent release of certain ions. However, shear loading on coated implants has been reported to cause the delamination and loosening of such coatings. This work uses a recently developed fracture mechanics testing methodology to quantify the critical strain energy release rate under nearly pure mode II conditions, G IIC , of a series of borate-based glass coating/Ti6Al4V alloy substrate systems. Incorporating increasing amounts of SrCO 3 in the glass composition was found to increase the G IIC almost twofold, from 25.3 to 46.9J/m 2 . The magnitude and distribution of residual stresses in the coating were quantified, and it was found that the residual stresses in all cases distributed uniformly over the cross section of the coating. The crack was driven towards, but not into, the glass/Ti6Al4V substrate interface due to the shear loading. This implied that the interface had a higher fracture toughness than the coating itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Geochemistry of the 1989-1990 eruption of redoubt volcano: Part II. Evidence from mineral and glass chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, S.E.; Nye, C.J.; Miller, T.P.; Avery, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    Early stages (December 1989) of the 1989-1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano produced two distinct lavas. Both lavas are high-silica andesites with a narrow range of bulk composition (58-64 wt.%) and similar mineralogies (phenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, augite, hypersthene and FeTi oxides in a groundmass of the same phases plus glass). The two lavas are distinguished by groundmass glass compositions, one is dacitic and the other rhyolitic. Sharp boundaries between the two glasses in compositionally banded pumices, lack of extensive coronas on hornblende phenocrysts, and seismic data suggest that a magma-mixing event immediately preceeded the eruption in December 1989. Textural disequilibrium in the phenocrysts suggests both magmas (dacitic and rhyolitic glasses) had a mixing history prior to their interaction and eruption in 1989. Sievey plagioclase and overgrowths of magnetite on ilmenite are textures that are at least consistent with magma mixing. The presence of two hornblende compositions (one a high-Al pargasitic hornblende and one a low-Al magnesiohornblende) in both the dacitic and rhyolitic groundmasses indicates a mixing event to yield these two amphibole populations prior to the magma mixing in December 1989. The pargasitic hornblende and the presence of Ca-rich overgrowths in the sievey zones of the plagioclase together indicate at least one component of this earlier mixing event was a mafic magma, either a basalt or a basaltic andesite. Eruptions in 1990 produced only andesite with a rhyolitic groundmass glass. Glass compositions in the 1990 andesite are identical to the rhyolitic glass in the 1989 andesite. Cognate xenoliths from the magma chamber (or conduit) are also found in the 1990 lavas. Magma mixing probably triggered the eruption in 1989. The eruption ended when this rather viscous (rhyolitic groundmass glass, magma capable of entraining sidewall xenoliths) magma stabalized within the conduit. ?? 1994.

  9. Clinical evaluation of glass-ionomer cement restorations Avaliação clínica de restaurações de cimento de ionômero de vidro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin John Tyas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article mentions the general structure, properties and clinical performance of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements, focusing on adhesion, caries inhibition effect and recommendations of their use.Este artigo menciona a estrutura geral, propriedades e performance clínica de cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais e modificados por resina, enfocando propriedades como adesão, efeito anti-cariogênico e recomendações de uso.

  10. Restoration of permanent teeth in young rural children in Cambodia using the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) technique and Fuji II glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallow, P K; Durward, C S; Klaipo, M

    1998-03-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the success of the ART (atraumatic restorative treatment) technique under field conditions in developing countries. The ART technique involves removal of caries using only hand instruments, and placing a glass ionomer cement (GIC) restoration. To estimate the longevity of Fuji II GIC ART restorations placed in permanent teeth by dental nurse students under field conditions in rural Cambodia. Clinical field trial. One high school in rural Cambodia. 53 subjects between the ages of 12 and 17 who had dental caries were selected to participate. Subjects were randomly assigned to a dental nurse student for cavity preparation and placement of ART restorations (without cavity conditioning). 92.1% of the carious lesions required class I or class V restorations, and 85.4% were in the lower molars. 89 teeth were filled. At 1 and 3 years 86.4% and 79.5% of restorations were still present. Restorations were assessed by one dentist according to standard criteria. 76.3% of the restorations were judged to be successful at 1 year, and 57.9% at 3 years. Factors which may have affected the success rates included: the material used, technical factors, failure to condition the cavity prior to restoration, and inexperience of the operators. The results suggest that ART restorations in permanent teeth using Fuji II GIC are only moderately successful after 3 years. Better results could be expected by using a dentine conditioner in conjunction with one of the newer stronger glass ionomer cements.

  11. Microleakage of four composite resin systems in class II restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, A; Osman, Y I; Al-Omari, T

    2009-11-01

    To compare the microleakage at the enamel and dentine/cementum margins of three nanocomposites and a microhybrid composite in Class II restorations. Four light-cured dental resin restorative materials in combination with their respective bonding agents were investigated. Eighty non-carious, extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups of 20 teeth each. The apices of the teeth were sealed with a resin modified glass ionomer cement. Standardized Class II slot cavities were prepared on the proximal surfaces of each tooth. Each group had an equal number of cavities with gingival margins on enamel and on dentine/cementum. Restorations were placed as indicated: Group 1 (G1): Ceram-X mono/Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply), G2: Premise/ OptiBond Solo Plus (Kerr), G3: Grandio/Admira Bond (VOCO), G4: Z100/Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M ESPE). After thermocycling and immersion in 0.5% methylene blue dye solution, the teeth were sectioned and dye penetration was scored on a scale of 0 to 3 on both the enamel and dentine/cementum margins. The data were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis one way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test of ranks (significance at p Grandio/Admira Bond showed significantly lower microleakage when compared to the other materials tested while Z100/Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose showed the largest microleakage (p Grandio/Admira Bond showing the least microleakage when compared to the other three materials tested. At the enamel margins, all materials tested performed reasonably well.

  12. Effect of Zirconia and Alumina Fillers on the Microstructure and Mechanical Strength of Dental Glass Ionomer Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Júlio C M; Silva, Joel B; Aladim, Andrea; Carvalho, Oscar; Nascimento, Rubens M; Silva, Filipe S; Martinelli, Antonio E; Henriques, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Glass-ionomer cements perform a protective effect on the dentin-pulp complex considering the F ions release and chemical bonding to the dental structures. On the other hand, those materials have poor physic-mechanical properties in comparison with the restorative resin composite. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of zirconia and/or alumina fillers on the microstructure and strength of a resin modified glass-ionomer cement after thermal cycling. An in vitro experimental study was carried out on 9 groups (n = 10) of cylindrical samples (6 x 4 mm) made from resin modified glass-ionomer (Vitremer, 3M, USA) with different contents of alumina and/or zirconia fillers. A nano-hybrid resin composite was tested as a control group. Samples were mechanically characterized by axial compressive tests and electron scanning microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry (EDS), before and after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling procedures were performed at 3000, 6000 and 10000 cycles in Fusayama´s artificial saliva at 5 and 60 (o)C. An improvement of compressive strength was noticed on glass-ionomer reinforced with alumina fillers in comparison with the commercial glass ionomer. SEM images revealed the morphology and distribution of alumina or zirconia in the microstructure of glass-ionomers. Also, defects such as cracks and pores were detected on the glass-ionomer cements. The materials tested were not affected by thermal cycling in artificial saliva. Addition of inorganic particles at nano-scale such as alumina can increase the mechanical properties of glass-ionomer cements. However, the presence of cracks and pores present in glass-ionomer can negatively affect the mechanical properties of the material because they are areas of stress concentration.

  13. Clinical failure of class-II restorations of a highly viscous glass-ionomer material over a 6-year period: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D N J M

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the performance of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (GIC) class-II restorations over 6 years of clinical service. All class-II GIC restorations made in 1996 and 1997, in regular attending adult patients of a general dental practice were selected. Restorations made for temporary function were excluded, as were those restorations not made using the main study material: Fuji IX GP (GC). Failures were recorded where replacement or repair had occurred. Radiographs were evaluated where available. The final study group consisted of 116 class-II restorations in 72 patients (33 males, 39 females). Distribution of restorations was: 30 MO, 40 DO, 46 MOD. Until 18 months no failures were observed. From 18 to 42 months survival dropped to 93%. After 42 months failure rate increased and at 72 months survival was only 60%. In all but one case the recorded reason for replacement or repair was gross loss of GIC in proximal areas. No restorations failed because of occlusal wear or isthmus-fractures. On radiographs, progressive loss of GIC material in proximal areas, just below contact areas, was commonly observed. In absence of adjacent teeth no loss of GIC material was observed at proximal surfaces. Rising failure rate of class-II high-viscosity GIC restorations, due to proximal breakdown was observed. We hypothesize that caries-like loss of material as seen on radiographs contributes to this phenomenon. Presence of proximal contacts seems to promote disintegration of cement.

  14. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m -2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  15. Polymerization shrinkage of different types of composite resins and microleakage with and without liner in class II cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, E; Ozgunaltay, G

    2014-01-01

    To determine the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of four different types of composite resin and to evaluate microleakage of these materials in class II (MOD) cavities with and without a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) liner, in vitro. One hundred twenty-eight extracted human upper premolar teeth were used. After the teeth were divided into eight groups (n=16), standardized MOD cavities were prepared. Then the teeth were restored with different resin composites (Filtek Supreme XT, Filtek P 60, Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z 250) with and without a RMGIC liner (Vitrebond). The restorations were finished and polished after 24 hours. Following thermocycling, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, then midsagitally sectioned in a mesiodistal plane and examined for microleakage using a stereomicroscope. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage of materials was measured using a video imaging device (Acuvol, Bisco, Inc). Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. All teeth showed microleakage, but placement of RMGIC liner reduced microleakage. No statistically significant differences were found in microleakage between the teeth restored without RMGIC liner (p>0.05). Filtek Silorane showed significantly less volumetric polymerization shrinkage than the methacrylate-based composite resins (pcomposite resin restorations resulted in reduced microleakage. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage was least with the silorane-based composite.

  16. A method for making a glass supported system, such glass supported system, and the use of a glass support therefor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unnikrishnan, S.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Fazal, I.; Louwerse, M.C.; Mogulkoc, B.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for making a glass supported micro or nano system, comprising the steps of: i) providing a glass support; ii) mounting at least one system on at least one glass support; and iii) bonding the system to the glass support, such that the system is circumferentially

  17. A 3-year clinical evaluation of glass-ionomer cements used as fissure sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Pardi, Vanessa; Mialhe, Fábio Luiz; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate the retention and caries-preventive effectiveness of two ionomeric materials (conventional and resin-modified), used as fissure sealants. 100 children (6-8 years old) with a total of 400 permanent first molars received 200 conventional glass-ionomer (Ketac Bond) and 200 resin-modified glass-ionomer (Vitremer) sealants. Additionally, 108 children constituted the control group (432 teeth). Two dentists assisted by dental hygienists performed the sealant application. Clinical evaluations were carried out 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after the sealant application by two other dentists, not carrying out clinical procedures, previously calibrated (Kappa > 0.75). Total retention rates of 26%, 12%, 3%, and 4% for Ketac Bond and 61%, 31%, 14%, and 13% for Vitremer, being 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after clinical evaluation, respectively. The differences between the two materials were statistically significant. The experimental groups showed a caries incidence of 93%, 78%, 49%, and 56% lower than the control group (Pionomeric materials were low. Nevertheless, these materials showed a cariostatic effect, supported by statistically lower caries incidence in experimental groups compared to control group. Presence of active incipient caries was statistically associated with caries incidence in the first molars after 36 months, in relation to either experimental or control group.

  18. Electronic structure and the glass transition in pnictide and chalcogenide semiconductor alloys. II. The intrinsic electronic midgap states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhugayevych, Andriy; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2010-12-21

    We propose a structural model that treats in a unified fashion both the atomic motions and electronic excitations in quenched melts of pnictide and chalcogenide semiconductors. In Part I [A. Zhugayevych and V. Lubchenko, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 234503 (2010)], we argued these quenched melts represent aperiodic ppσ-networks that are highly stable and, at the same time, structurally degenerate. These networks are characterized by a continuous range of coordination. Here we present a systematic way to classify these types of coordination in terms of discrete coordination defects in a parent structure defined on a simple cubic lattice. We identify the lowest energy coordination defects with the intrinsic midgap electronic states in semiconductor glasses, which were argued earlier to cause many of the unique optoelectronic anomalies in these materials. In addition, these coordination defects are mobile and correspond to the transition state configurations during the activated transport above the glass transition. The presence of the coordination defects may account for the puzzling discrepancy between the kinetic and thermodynamic fragility in chalcogenides. Finally, the proposed model recovers as limiting cases several popular types of bonding patterns proposed earlier including: valence-alternation pairs, hypervalent configurations, and homopolar bonds in heteropolar compounds.

  19. A Histopathologic Study on Pulp Response to Glass Ionomer Cements in Human Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghavamnasiri

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Despite the wide range of new dental materials, there is still a need for biomaterials demonstrating high biocompatibility, antimicrobial effects and ideal mechanical properties.Purpose: The aim of this study was to histologically evaluate the pulpal response to a conventional glass ionomer, a resin modified glass ionomer and a calcium hydroxide in human teeth.Materials and Methods: Fifty five deep class V cavities were prepared in premolars of 31 patients and were divided into 3 groups based on application of the following liners:resin modified glass ionomer (Vivaglass Liner, conventional glass ionomer (ChembondSuperior and calcium hydroxide (Dycal. After applying varnish, teeth were filled with amalgam. Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to time intervals of 7, 30 and 60 days. Teeth were then extracted and their crowns were fixed in formalin. Each sample was assessed microscopically for odontoblastic changes,inflammatory cell infiltration, reactionary dentin formation, remaining dentinal thickness and presence of microorganisms. Statistical analysis including Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney was carried out for comparison of mean ranks. (P=0.05.Results: In the Vivaglass Liner group, pulpal response was significantly higher on day 7 as compared to days 30 and 60 (P0.05. There was no correlation between pulpal responses with micro-organisms and remaining dentin thickness (P>0.05.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, light-cured glass ionomer as well as the other tested lining materials were determined to be biologically compatible with vital pulps in deep cavities of sound human teeth.

  20. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  1. Short chain lead (II) alkanoates as ionic liquids and glass formers: A d.s.c., X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Casado, F.J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez Arenas, A. [Seccion Departamental de Fisica Aplicada I, Facultad de Veterinaria (Spain); Garcia Perez, M.V. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Redondo Yelamos, M.I. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Lopez de Andres, S. [Departamento de Cristalografia, Facultad de Ciencias Geologicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cheda, J.A.R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: cheda@quim.ucm.es

    2007-03-15

    Three members of the lead (II) n-alkanoates (from etanoate to n-butanoate) have been synthesized, purified and studied by d.s.c., X-ray diffraction, and FTIR spectroscopy. Lead (II) acetate, propanoate, and butanoate present only a melting transition at T = (452.6, 398.2, and 346.5) K, with {delta}{sub f} H = (16.0, 13.1, and 15.6) kJ . mol{sup -1}, and {delta}{sub f} S (35.3, 32.8, and 45.1) J . mol{sup -1} . K{sup -1}, respectively. These temperature data correct to a great extent the historical values reported in the literature. These three members readily quench into a glass state. Their corresponding T {sub g} values are (314.4, 289.0, and 274.9) K, respectively, measured by d.s.c. at a heating rate of 5 K . min{sup -1}.

  2. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, part II: Grafting of polyphenols extracted from grape skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenols, as one of the most important family of phytochemicals protective substances from grape fruit, possess various biological activities and health-promoting benefits, for example: inhibition of some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, reduction of plasma oxidative stress and slowing aging. The combination of polyphenols and biomaterials may have good potential to reach good bioavailability and controlled release, as well as to give biological signaling properties to the biomaterial surfaces. In this research, conventional solvent extraction was developed for obtaining polyphenols from dry grape skins. The Folin&Ciocalteu method was used to determine the amount of total polyphenols in the extracts. Surface functionalization of two bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2) was performed by grafting the extracted polyphenols on their surfaces. The effectiveness of the functionalization was tested by UV spectroscopy, which analyzes the amount of polyphenols in the uptake solution (before and after functionalization) and on solid samples, and XPS, which analyzes the presence of phenols on the material surface.

  3. Systematic review on highly viscous glass-ionomer cement/resin coating restorations (Part II): 
Do they merge Minamata Convention and minimum intervention dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielbassa, Andrej M; Glockner, Georg; Wolgin, Michael; Glockner, Karl

    2017-01-01

    With the Minamata Convention the use of mercury will be phased down, and this undoubtedly will have an effect on dental treatment regimens and economic resources. Composite resin restorations are considered viable alternatives to amalgam fillings; however, these will not be covered completely by health insurance systems in many countries. Recently, a high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (hvGIC) processed with a resinous coating (RC) has been introduced, and has been marketed as a restorative material in load-bearing Class I cavities (and in Class II cavities with limited size), thus serving as a possible alternative to amalgam fillings. To discuss the outcome based on the evaluation presented in Part I of this paper, and to critically appraise the methodologies of the various studies. Two of the included studies were industry-funded, and status of the other clinical trials remained unclear. Quality of study reporting was considered perfectible. The use of a light-cured nanofilled resin coating material would seem advantageous, at least when regarding short- and medium term outcomes. Within the respective indications and cavity geometries, the hvGIC/RC approach would seem promising, could merge the phase-down of mercury and the objectives of minimally invasive treatment to some extent, and might be a restorative alternative for patients suffering from allergies or not willing to afford other sophisticated or expensive techniques. These recommendations are based on studies evaluating EQUIA Fil (GC), but are not transferable to clinical perspectives of the glass hybrid successor product (EQUIA Forte; GC).

  4. Long-term dentin retention of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijken, J.W.V. van; Pallesen, U.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems.......The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems....

  5. Influence of different restorative techniques on marginal seal of class II composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinval Adalberto Rodrigues Junior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the gingival marginal seal in class II composite restorations using different restorative techniques. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Class II box cavities were prepared in both proximal faces of 32 sound human third molars with gingival margins located in either enamel or dentin/cementum. Restorations were performed as follows: G1 (control: composite, conventional light curing technique; G2: composite, soft-start technique; G3: amalgam/composite association (amalcomp; and G4: resin-modified glass ionomer cement/composite, open sandwich technique. The restored specimens were thermocycled. Epoxy resin replicas were made and coated for scanning electron microscopy examination. For microleakage evaluation, teeth were coated with nail polish and immersed in dye solution. Teeth were cut in 3 slices and dye penetration was recorded (mm, digitized and analyzed with Image Tool software. Microleakage data were analyzed statistically by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. RESULTS: Leakage in enamel was lower than in dentin (p<0.001. G2 exhibited the lowest leakage values (p<0.05 in enamel margins, with no differences between the other groups. In dentin margins, groups G1 and G2 had similar behavior and both showed less leakage (p<0.05 than groups G3 and G4. SEM micrographs revealed different marginal adaptation patterns for the different techniques and for the different substrates. CONCLUSION: The soft-start technique showed no leakage in enamel margins and produced similar values to those of the conventional (control technique for dentin margins.

  6. Influence of different restorative techniques on marginal seal of class II composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    RODRIGUES JUNIOR, Sinval Adalberto; PIN, Lúcio Fernando da Silva; MACHADO, Giovanna; DELLA BONA, Álvaro; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the gingival marginal seal in class II composite restorations using different restorative techniques. Material and Methods Class II box cavities were prepared in both proximal faces of 32 sound human third molars with gingival margins located in either enamel or dentin/cementum. Restorations were performed as follows: G1 (control): composite, conventional light curing technique; G2: composite, soft-start technique; G3: amalgam/composite association (amalcomp); and G4: resin-modified glass ionomer cement/ composite, open sandwich technique. The restored specimens were thermocycled. Epoxy resin replicas were made and coated for scanning electron microscopy examination. For microleakage evaluation, teeth were coated with nail polish and immersed in dye solution. Teeth were cut in 3 slices and dye penetration was recorded (mm), digitized and analyzed with Image Tool software. Microleakage data were analyzed statistically by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results Leakage in enamel was lower than in dentin (p<0.001). G2 exhibited the lowest leakage values (p<0.05) in enamel margins, with no differences between the other groups. In dentin margins, groups G1 and G2 had similar behavior and both showed less leakage (p<0.05) than groups G3 and G4. SEM micrographs revealed different marginal adaptation patterns for the different techniques and for the different substrates. Conclusion The soft-start technique showed no leakage in enamel margins and produced similar values to those of the conventional (control) technique for dentin margins. PMID:20379680

  7. Streptococcus Mutans Biofilm Influences on the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fúcio, Suzana B P; Paula, Andréia B de; Sardi, Janaina C O; Duque, Cristiane; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial and biofilm inhibition properties of glass ionomer restorative cements. Ketac Nano, Vitremer, Ketac Molar Easymix and Fuji IX were analyzed using the following tests: a) agar plate diffusion test to evaluate the inhibitory activity of cements against S. mutans (n=8); b) S. mutans adherence test by counting colony-forming units after 2 h of material/bacteria exposure (n=10); c) biofilm wet weight after seven days of bacterial accumulation on material disks, with growth medium renewed every 48 h (n=10); d) pH and fluoride measurements from the medium aspired at 48 h intervals during the 7-day biofilm development (n=10). Data from the a, b and c tests were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests and the fluoride-release and pH data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (a=5%). Vitremer followed by Ketac Nano showed the greatest inhibitory zone against S. mutans than the conventional ionomers. Vitremer also showed higher pH values than Ketac Nano and Fuji IX in the first 48 h and released higher fluoride amount than Ketac Nano e Ketac Molar Easymix throughout the experimental period. The chemical composition of restorative glass ionomer materials influenced the antibacterial properties. The resin modified glass ionomer (Vitremer) was more effective for inhibition of S. mutans and allowed greater neutralization of the pH in the first 48 h. However, the type of glass ionomer (resin modified or conventional) did not influence the weight and adherence of the biofilm and fluoride release.

  8. Retention of a resin-based sealant and a glass ionomer used as a fissure sealant in children with special needs

    OpenAIRE

    Morales-Ch?vez, Mariana C.; Nualart-Grollmus, Zacy-Carola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research is to evaluate the retention of sealants of resin and resin-modified ionomeric glass pits and fissures, on first permanent molars of special patients. Material and Methods: The sample was comprised by 32 children. The ages were between 7 and 18 years. The sealing procedure was made with the relative isolation of the molars to be sealed, through the use of cotton rolls. Two molars were sealed with Clinpro Sealant 3M Dental and the others with Vitremer. Chec...

  9. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  10. In vitro quantitative evaluation of marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with a glass ionomer cement and two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIJELLA Maria Fernanda Borro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with the glass ionomer cement Vitremer and with the composite resins Ariston pHc and P-60. The aims of the study were to assess the effect of thermocycling on those materials and to evaluate two methods utilized in the analysis of dye penetration. Sixty premolars divided in three groups were utilized; the teeth had proximal cavities whose cervical walls were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Half of the test specimens from each group underwent thermocycling; the other half remained in deionized water, at 37ºC. The specimens were immersed, for 24 hours, in a basic 0.5% fuchsin solution at 37ºC. For the analysis of microleakage, the specimens were sectioned in a mesio-distal direction, and the observation was carried out with the software Imagetools. The results were evaluated through the 2-way ANOVA and through the Tukey?s test. All groups presented marginal microleakage. The smallest values were obtained with Vitremer, followed by those obtained with the composite resins P-60 and Ariston pHc. There was no statistically significant difference caused by thermocycling, and the method of maximum infiltration was the best for detecting the extension of microleakage.

  11. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  12. Effect of incorporation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on mechanical properties of conventional glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahandeh, Narges; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Aghaee, Mohammadamin; Hasani, Elham; Safa, Saeed

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the physical properties of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs) compared to GICs supplemented with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanofiller particles at 5% (w/w). In this in vitro study, ZnO nanoparticles of different morphologies (nanospherical, nanorod, and nanoflower) were incorporated to glass ionomer powder. The samples were subjected to the flexural strength ( n = 20) and surface hardness test ( n = 12) using a universal testing machine and a Vickers hardness machine, respectively. Surface analysis and crystal structure of samples were performed with scanning electron microscope and X-radiation diffraction, respectively. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Shapiro-Wilk, and Tukey's tests ( P glass ionomer containing nanoparticles was not significantly different from the control group ( P > 0.05). The surface hardness of the glass ionomer containing nanospherical or nanoflower ZnO was significantly lower than the control group ( P glass ionomer containing nanorod ZnO was not significantly different from the control group ( P = 0.868). Incorporation of nanospherical and nanoflower ZnO to glass ionomer decreased their surface hardness, without any changes on their flexural strength. Incorporation of nanorod ZnO particles caused no effect on the mechanical properties.

  13. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  14. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne.......The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  15. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  16. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  17. Theory of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivier, N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical properties of glass are direct consequences of its non-crystalline structure. The structure is described from a topological point of view, since topology is the only geometry surviving non-crystallinity, i.e. absence of metric and trivial space group. This fact has two main consequences: the overall homogeneity of glass is a gauge symmetry, and the only extended, structurally stable constituents are odd lines (or 2π-disclinations in the elastic continuum limit). A gauge theory of glass, based on odd lines as sources of frozen-in strain, can explain those properties of glasses which are both specific to, and universal in amorphous solids: low-temperature excitations, and relaxation at high temperatures. The methods of statistical mechanics can be applied to give a minimal description of amorphous structures in statistical equilibrium. Criteria for statistical equilibrium of the structure and detailed balance are given, together with structural equations of state, which turn out to be well-known empirically among botanists and metallurgists. This review is based on lectures given in 1984 in Niteroi. It contains five parts: I - Structure, from a topological viewpoint; II - gauge invariance; III - Tunneling modes; IV - Supercooled liquid and the glass transitions; V - Statistical crystallography. (Author) [pt

  18. Effect of Caries Removal Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Resin and Glass IonomerAdhesives to Primary Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There is no enough published data about the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer adhesives on caries-affected primary tooth dentin excavated using minimally invasive systems. Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of 2 different adhesives (one resin modified glass ionomer and one resin using two caries removal tech- niques on healthy and caries-affected primary dentin. Materials and Methods: Two caries removal methods including mechanical (handpiece and chemomechanical (Carisolv techniques and two types of ad- hesives including one resin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond; CSEB, Kuraray and one resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive (Riva Bond LC; RBLC, SDI were used in this study. Ten extracted healthy primary teeth were used for the control group. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and mesio-distally in order to obtain four specimens from each tooth. Thirty suitable specimens were selected as the “control” and randomly divided into two groups of “sound dentin” based on the type of the adhesive used. Sixty extracted caries affected teeth were used for the carious group; sectioned as mentioned above and sixty suitable specimens were selected as the “treatment”. Then the specimens were arbitrarily divided into four groups based on caries removal techniques and the type of ad- hesive used (n = 15. After bonding with either CSEB or RBLC, the specimens were restored with a resin composite by means of PVC tubes and subjected to the shear bond strength test. The data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The specimens in Carisolv group bonded with CSEB (11.68 ± 3.1 showed a statistically significant higher mean bond strength followed by those in handpiece group bonded with CSEB (9.4 ± 2.7, which exhibited higher mean values than those groups with RBLC (p < 0.05. Shear bond strength values for Clearfil SE Bond was not significantly higher than Riva Bond LC when used in sound

  19. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. II. Gigahertz-frequency longitudinal and shear acoustic dynamics in glycerol and DC704 studied by time-domain Brillouin scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klieber, Christoph; Hecksher, Tina; Pezeril, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the temperature and frequency dependence of the longitudinal and shear viscoelastic response at MHz and GHz frequencies of the intermediate glass former glycerol and the fragile glass former tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704). Measurements were performed...... of the shear acoustic relaxation time agrees well with literature data for dielectric measurements. In DC704, combining the new data with data from measurements obtained previously by piezo-ceramic transducers yields figures showing the longitudinal and shear sound velocities at frequencies from mHz to GHz...

  20. Initial sliding wear kinetics of two types of glass ionomer cement: a tribological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villat, Cyril; Ponthiaux, Pierre; Pradelle-Plasse, Nelly; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Colon, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the initial wear kinetics of two different types of glass ionomer cement used in dentistry (the conventional glass ionomer cement and the resin-modified glass ionomer cement) under sliding friction after 28-day storing in distilled water or Ringer's solution. Sliding friction was applied through a pin-on-disk tribometer, in sphere-on-plane contact conditions, under 5 N normal load and 120 rotations per minute. The test lasted 7500 cycles and replicas were performed at 2500, 5000 and 7500 cycles. A profilometer was used to evaluate the wear volume. Data were analysed using Student's t-test at a significant level of 5%. There is no statistical significant difference between the results obtained for a given material with the maturation media (P > 0.05). However, for a given maturation medium, there are significant statistical differences between the data obtained for the two materials at each measurement (P glass ionomer cement weakens the tribological behaviour of this material.

  1. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity induced by eluates from orthodontic glass ionomer cements in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Angelieri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of some orthodontic glass ionomer cements commercially available by means of the single cell gel (comet assay. For this purpose, five commercial orthodontic glass ionomer cements (Vidrion C®, Meron®, Optiband®, Multicure® and Ultra Band Lok® were tested in murine fibroblasts in vitro. For this purpose, eluates from each cement were prepared according manufactures instructions at 0, 2, 4, 8, 18, 32 and 64 days of immersion in artificial saliva at 37 °C. All orthodontic glass ionomer cements failed to induce cytotoxicity to murine fibroblasts for all periods evaluated in this study. However, Vidrion C® was able to induce genotoxicity after 64 days of exposure to eluates. Meron® also demonstrated genotoxicity as depicted by increasing DNA damage on 2nd day. Multicure® demonstrated genotoxicity on 32nd day and Ultra band Lok on 18th, 32nd days of exposure. Taken together, our results demonstrated that orthodontic cements derived from resin-modified glass ionomer composite (Multicure® and compomer (Ultra Band Lok® cause genetic damage in mammalian cells in vitro.

  2. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. II. In vitro and in vivo biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Bal, B Sonny; Bonewald, Lynda F; Kuroki, Keiichi; Brown, Roger F

    2010-10-01

    In Part I, the in vitro degradation of bioactivAR52115e glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of human trabecular bone, but with three different compositions, was investigated as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. This work is an extension of Part I, to investigate the effect of the glass composition on the in vitro response of osteogenic MLO-A5 cells to these scaffolds, and on the ability of the scaffolds to support tissue infiltration in a rat subcutaneous implantation model. The results of assays for cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity showed that the slower degrading silicate 13-93 and borosilicate 13-93B1 scaffolds were far better than the borate 13-93B3 scaffolds in supporting cell proliferation and function. However, all three groups of scaffolds showed the ability to support tissue infiltration in vivo after implantation for 6 weeks. The results indicate that the required bioactivity and degradation rate may be achieved by substituting an appropriate amount of SiO2 in 13-93 glass with B2O3, and that these trabecular glass scaffolds could serve as substrates for the repair and regeneration of contained bone defects. Copyright 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2010.

  3. In vitro microleakage of Biodentine as a dentin substitute compared to Fuji II LC in cervical lining restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Anne; Eschrich, Geoffroy; Dejou, Jacques; About, Imad

    2012-12-01

    1) To evaluate the marginal sealing efficacy of Biodentine at the cervical margins of approximal cavities placed in molars; 2) to evaluate and compare the use of Biodentine in combination with resin-based adhesives and a resin composite, compared with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Fuji II LC). Sixty approximal cavities were prepared on mesial and distal surfaces of 30 extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly assigned into 6 groups of 10 cavities each: (G1) Biodentine, (G2) Fuji II LC as a filling material, (G3) Biodentine as a base + Optibond Solo Plus + silane + Filtek Z250, (G4) as in G3 without silane, (G5) Biodentine as a base + Septobond SE + Filtek Z250, (G6) Fuji II LC as a base + Optibond Solo Plus + Filtek Z250. The materials were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. Biodentine required no dentin or enamel surface conditioning treatment. The teeth were thermocycled 2500x (5°C to 55°C). The specimens were then sealed with a 1-mm window around the marginal interface. Samples were immersed in a 50% w/v silver nitrate solution and exposed to a photo developing solution. The teeth were embedded in resin (Sody 33) and sectioned through the restorations. The silver penetration was directly measured using a light microscope. The results were expressed as ordinal scores from 0 to 3 at cervical, interfacial, and enamel margins. The data were analyzed with the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Games Howell, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests (p Biodentine or Fuji II LC)/resin composite interfaces. Statistically significant differences were observed between G5 (median score = 2.0) and the other groups (median score = 1.0) for the enamel margins. Statistically significant differences were found between enamel and dentin cervical margins in G2 (enamel median score = 1.0; dentin median score = 1.5) and G5 (enamel median score = 2.0; dentin median score = 1.0). Within the limits of this in vitro study, Biodentine as dentin substitute in

  4. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.H.; Hertz, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Spin glasses, simply defined by the authors as a collection of spins (i.e., magnetic moments) whose low-temperature state is a frozen disordered one, represent one of the fascinating new fields of study in condensed matter physics, and this book is the first to offer a comprehensive account of the subject. Included are discussions of the most important developments in theory, experimental work, and computer modeling of spin glasses, all of which have taken place essentially within the last two decades. The first part of the book gives a general introduction to the basic concepts and a discussion of mean field theory, while the second half concentrates on experimental results, scaling theory, and computer simulation of the structure of spin glasses

  5. Evaluation of the effect of home bleaching agents on surface microhardness of different glass-ionomer cements containing hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Kowkabi, Mahsa; Shoale, Soodabe

    2017-09-01

    Home bleaching agents may exert some negative effects on surface hardness of restorative materials such as glass-ionomer cements (GICs). Since some studies have shown that some components such as hydroxyapatite (HA), as a bioactive glass, can improve the mechanical properties of dental materials, the effect of bleaching agents on surface hardness of GICs containing hydroxyapatite is questionable. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of home bleaching agents on the surface hardness of two different commercially available GICs containing hydroxyapatite. 80 disk-shaped specimens were made from two different GICs, including resin modified glass-ionomer and Zirconomer. Each material was divided into four groups (n=10): 1. control, 2. 20 %wt. hydroxyapatite-containing, 3. bleached and 4. bleached 20 %wt. hydroxyapatite-containing. Group 1 and 2 specimens were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks while group 3 and 4 specimens were treated with 15% carbamide peroxide in that period. Surface hardness was tested with Vickers surface hardness tester. Data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and mean comparison done by post hoc Tukey tests ( p Glass-ionomer cement, surface hardness, Zirconia-reinforced glass ionomer, hydroxyapatite.

  6. Survival of Dicor glass-ceramic dental restorations over 14 years. Part II: effect of thickness of Dicor material and design of tooth preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malament, K A; Socransky, S S

    1999-06-01

    The influence of different restorative design features on the long-term survival of Dicor glass-ceramic restorations is not well understood. This study examined the relationship of different types of restorations and methods of preparation with the survival of Dicor glass-ceramic restorations functioning in vivo. A total of 1444 Dicor glass-ceramic restorations were placed on the teeth of 417 adults. Failure was defined as a restoration that required remake because of material fracture. Survival of restorations of different types and with different methods of preparation was described by using Kaplan Meier survivor functions. Statistical significance between restoration type and preparation method was determined with the log rank test. Probability of survival of a typical partial coverage restoration was 92% at 11.3 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the survival of inlay or onlay restorations. For the 91 cores used for pulpless teeth, none failed over a total cumulative monitoring period of 419 years. There was no significant difference in survival of acid-etched Dicor restorations that were placed on shoulder or chamfer preparations. Thickness measured at the midpoint of the labial, lingual, mesial, distal, and midocclusal surfaces did not relate to risk of failure. The majority of Dicor glass-ceramic partial coverage inlay and onlay restorations and cores survived over time. Survival of restorations with either chamfer or shoulder preparations did not differ whether the restoration was acid-etched. Thickness of the restoration measured at the midaxial point of each surface did not relate to survival.

  7. Metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Arjen Sybren

    1981-01-01

    It is shown in section 7.1. that the influence of topological disorder on the range of magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) glasses, is much less than often assumed. This is demonstrated via a study of the temperature dependence of the average iron hyperfine field

  8. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A.S.; Weir, Michael D.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2016-01-01

    A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2) investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC); the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1), and much greater than RMGI (p control composites (p control composites (p 0.1). In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries. PMID:28774007

  9. Modifications in Glass Ionomer Cements: Nano-Sized Fillers and Bioactive Nanoceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Khan, Abdul Samad; Zohaib, Sana; Martí, Juan Manuel Nuñez; Sauro, Salvatore; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are being used for a wide range of applications in dentistry. In order to overcome the poor mechanical properties of glass ionomers, several modifications have been introduced to the conventional GICs. Nanotechnology involves the use of systems, modifications or materials the size of which is in the range of 1–100 nm. Nano-modification of conventional GICs and resin modified GICs (RMGICs) can be achieved by incorporation of nano-sized fillers to RMGICs, reducing the size of the glass particles, and introducing nano-sized bioceramics to the glass powder. Studies suggest that the commercially available nano-filled RMGIC does not hold any significant advantage over conventional RMGICs as far as the mechanical and bonding properties are concerned. Conversely, incorporation of nano-sized apatite crystals not only increases the mechanical properties of conventional GICs, but also can enhance fluoride release and bioactivity. By increasing the crystallinity of the set matrix, apatites can make the set cement chemically more stable, insoluble, and improve the bond strength with tooth structure. Increased fluoride release can also reduce and arrest secondary caries. However, due to a lack of long-term clinical studies, the use of nano-modified glass ionomers is still limited in daily clinical dentistry. In addition to the in vitro and in vivo studies, more randomized clinical trials are required to justify the use of these promising materials. The aim of this paper is to review the modification performed in GIC-based materials to improve their physicochemical properties. PMID:27428956

  10. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A S; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-11-01

    A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2) investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC); the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control ( p > 0.1), and much greater than RMGI ( p biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites ( p Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI ( p > 0.1). In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  11. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  12. Retention of a resin-based sealant and a glass ionomer used as a fissure sealant in children with special needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Chávez, Mariana C; Nualart-Grollmus, Zacy-Carola

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the retention of sealants of resin and resin-modified ionomeric glass pits and fissures, on first permanent molars of special patients. The sample was comprised by 32 children. The ages were between 7 and 18 years. The sealing procedure was made with the relative isolation of the molars to be sealed, through the use of cotton rolls. Two molars were sealed with Clinpro Sealant 3M Dental and the others with Vitremer. Checking of the sealants was made after 3 and 6 months of their placement, evaluating with 3 values: TR: Totally Restrained; PR: Partially Restrained; and CL: Completely Lost. 67.18% of the resinous sealants, and 70.31% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful after three months. After six months, 57.81% of the resin-based sealants and 51.56% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful. When performing the Chi-square statistical analysis (Psealant was similar to that of the glass ionomer cement at the end of six months and the retention of sealants on maxillary teeth was higher than on mandibular teeth. Key words:Sealant, glass ionomer, retention, caries, special needs.

  13. Non-polymeric asymmetric binary glass-formers. II. Secondary relaxation studied by dielectric, 2H NMR, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzschner, B.; Mohamed, F.; Bächer, C.; Wagner, E.; Lichtinger, A.; Bock, D.; Kreger, K.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Rössler, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the secondary (β-) relaxations of an asymmetric binary glass former consisting of a spirobichroman derivative (SBC; Tg = 356 K) as the high-Tg component and the low-Tg component tripropyl phosphate (TPP; Tg = 134 K). The main relaxations are studied in Paper I [B. Pötzschner et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 164503 (2017)]. A high Tg contrast of ΔTg = 222 K is put into effect in a non-polymeric system. Component-selective studies are carried out by combining results from dielectric spectroscopy (DS) for mass concentrations cTPP ≥ 60% and those from different methods of 2H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. In the case of NMR, the full concentration range (10% ≤ cTPP ≤ 100%) is covered. The neat components exhibit a β-relaxation (β1 (SBC) and β2 (TPP)). The latter is rediscovered by DS in the mixtures for all concentrations with unchanged time constants. NMR spectroscopy identifies the β-relaxations as being alike to those in neat glasses. A spatially highly restricted motion with angular displacement below ±10° encompassing all molecules is involved. In the low temperature range, where TPP shows the typical 31P NMR echo spectra of the β2-process, very similar spectral features are observed for the (deuterated) SBC component by 2H NMR, in addition to its "own" β1-process observed at high temperatures. Apparently, the small TPP molecules enslave the large SBC molecules to perform a common hindered reorientation. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time of both components is the same and reveals an angular displacement of the SBC molecules somewhat smaller than that of TPP, though the time constants τβ2 are the same. Furthermore, T1(T) of TPP in the temperature region of the β2-process is absolutely the same as in the mixture TPP/polystyrene investigated previously. It appears that the manifestations of the β-process introduced by one component are essentially independent of the second component. Finally, at cTPP ≤ 20% one

  14. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  15. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  16. Impact Strength of Glass and Glass Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-01

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  17. Remineralizing efficacy of silver diamine fluoride and glass ionomer type VII for their proposed use as indirect pulp capping materials - Part II (A clinical study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, N; Gupta, A; Logani, A; Shah, N

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate in vivo the remineralizing efficacy of silver diamine fluoride (SDF), glass ionomer Type VII (GC VII) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal). 60 subjects in the age group of 18-35 years, matching the inclusion criteria and having deep carious lesions in the permanent first and second molars were selected. The teeth were aseptically opened under rubber dam and after gross caries removal, approximately 0.4mg of soft discolored dentin was removed with a sharp spoon excavator from the mesial or distal aspect of the cavity. The test material was randomly selected and applied in a thickness of 1.5-2mm and the cavity sealed with cavit. The patients were followed up at regular intervals with radiographic evaluation at 12 weeks. At 3 months the temporary restoration was removed and dentin samples were collected from the other half of the cavity which was left in the first appointment. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry, Colorimetric test using UV-vis spectrometer and potentiometric titration were used for determining calcium, phosphorous and fluoride respectively. Almost equivalent rise in the percentage of calcium level was seen in GC VII and Ca(OH)(2) groups, followed by SDF group. Highest percentage rise in phosphate ions was seen in GC VII group followed by SDF group and Ca(OH)(2) group. Highest percentage of fluoride rise was seen in GC VII group followed by SDF group and Ca(OH)(2) group. The results indicated that both GC VII and SDF can be potential indirect pulp capping materials.

  18. Remineralizing efficacy of silver diamine fluoride and glass ionomer type VII for their proposed use as indirect pulp capping materials – Part II (A clinical study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, N; Gupta, A; Logani, A; Shah, N

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate in vivo the remineralizing efficacy of silver diamine fluoride (SDF), glass ionomer Type VII (GC VII) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal). Materials and Methods: 60 subjects in the age group of 18-35 years, matching the inclusion criteria and having deep carious lesions in the permanent first and second molars were selected. The teeth were aseptically opened under rubber dam and after gross caries removal, approximately 0.4mg of soft discolored dentin was removed with a sharp spoon excavator from the mesial or distal aspect of the cavity. The test material was randomly selected and applied in a thickness of 1.5-2mm and the cavity sealed with cavit. The patients were followed up at regular intervals with radiographic evaluation at 12 weeks. At 3 months the temporary restoration was removed and dentin samples were collected from the other half of the cavity which was left in the first appointment. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry, Colorimetric test using UV-vis spectrometer and potentiometric titration were used for determining calcium, phosphorous and fluoride respectively. Results: Almost equivalent rise in the percentage of calcium level was seen in GC VII and Ca(OH)2 groups, followed by SDF group. Highest percentage rise in phosphate ions was seen in GC VII group followed by SDF group and Ca(OH)2 group. Highest percentage of fluoride rise was seen in GC VII group followed by SDF group and Ca(OH)2 group. Conclusions: The results indicated that both GC VII and SDF can be potential indirect pulp capping materials. PMID:22025824

  19. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  20. Glass reactive sintering as an alternative route for the synthesis of NZP glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenu, Sebastien; Lebullenger, Ronan; Benard-Rocherulle, Patricia; Calvez, Guillaume; Guillou, Olivier; Rocherulle, Jean; Kidari, Abdessamad; Pomeroy, Mickael J.; Hampshire, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The NZP-type crystal structure allows a large number of ionic substitutions which leads to ceramics with adjustable thermal expansion properties or interesting ionic conductivity. However, NZP is difficult to fabricate into monoliths because it requires both high temperatures and long sintering times. An alternative low temperature route to obtain a tungsten (IV) and tin (IV) containing NZP crystalline phase uses a process of glass reactive sintering of a phosphate glass. Using a microwave oven, a glass with the appropriate composition in the NaPO 3 -Sn(II)O-W(VI)O 3 ternary diagram is prepared by a conventional melting and casting technique. After crushing, the glass powder is pressed at room temperature. The green pellet is cured during various times at temperatures where glass reactive sintering takes place. From XRD and DTA experiments, we have shown that different parameters influence the achievement of NZP phase. Consequently, specific conditions, such as (i) initial glass composition, (ii) equimolar quantities of SnO and WO 3 , (iii) glass particle size lower than 100 μ m, and (iv) curing conducted under air, are required to obtain a glass-ceramic with a single crystalline phase with the NZP-type crystal structure. (authors)

  1. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  2. Basaltic glass alteration in confined media: analogy with nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parruzot, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation concerns basaltic glass alteration mechanisms and rates. Through a better understanding of the processes controlling the basaltic glass durability, this thesis attempts to establish a link between laboratory studies and volcanic glass alteration in natural environment. The methodology used here is similar to the one used for nuclear glasses. Thus, we measured for the first time the residual alteration rate of basaltic glasses. Protective effect of the alteration film is clearly established. Moreover, synthetic glass representativeness is evaluated through a study focused on the effect of iron oxidation degree on the glass structure and leaching properties. A minor effect of Fe II on the forward rate and a negligible effect on the residual rate are shown. The residual rate is extrapolated at 5 C and compared to the mean alteration rate of natural samples of ages ranging from 1900 to 10 7 years. Non-zeolitized natural glasses follow this linear tendency, suggesting a control of the long-term rate by clayey secondary phase precipitation. Natural environments are open environments: a parametric study was performed in order to quantify the water flow rate effect on chemical composition of the alteration layer. When applied to two natural samples, the obtained laws provide coherent results. It seems possible to unify the descriptive approach from the study of natural environments to the mechanistic approach developed at the laboratory. The next step will consist in developing a model to transpose these results to nuclear glasses. (author) [fr

  3. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  4. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  5. Fluoride release by glass ionomer cements, compomer and giomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion:Fuji IX, Fuji VII, Fuji IX Extra, and Fuji II LC released higher amounts of fluoride compared to Beautifil and Dyract Extra in this study. It seems that the extent of the glass ionomer matrix plays an important role in determining the fluoride releasing ability of glass ionomer cement materials.

  6. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  7. Effect of new innovative restorative carbomised glass cement on intrapulpal temperature rise: an ex-vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Selim BOTSALI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the temperature changes that occurred in the pulp chamber when using GCP Glass Carbomer Fill (GCP and two different resin-modified glass-ionomer (RGI restorative materials at different dentin thicknesses. A standardized Class I occlusal cavity with 1 mm or 2 mm dentin thickness was prepared in the extracted human molar teeth. RGI and GCP fills were placed in the cavities and cured with two different light-curing units. This study included a total of 120 samples, with 20 samples in each group. The pulp microcirculation method was used for measuring the intrapulpal temperature changes. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD multiple comparison tests. Statistically significant differences were observed between 1 mm and 2 mm dentin thicknesses (p 0.05. The highest temperature changes were observed with 1 mm dentin thickness. While RGI materials in both dentin thicknesses did not cause temperature changes that were harmful to the pulp, GCP CarboLED LCU caused the highest intrapulpal temperature rise, and these values were borderline harmful to the dental pulp.

  8. Modified glass ionomer and orthodontic band: An interim alternative for the treatment of molar incisor hypomineralization. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Orellana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH is a developmental condition resulting in defects in the enamel characterized by demarcated opacities mainly affecting first permanent molars and occasionally permanent incisors in 1 of every 6 children worldwide. Affected molars have greater susceptibility to post eruptive breakdown, extensive caries and, in severe cases, are difficult to restore. When the MIH-affected molar presents severe crown destruction, it is necessary to perform an intermediate restoration to preserve the remaining dental structure in order to maintain occlusion, proper hygiene and periodontal health. The case of an 11-year-old patient with severe MIH is reported. The patient had extensive crown destruction by caries in tooth 1.6 without clinical or radiographic signs of pulp pathology. After an initial preventive intervention, enamel without dentin support and carious dentin were removed from tooth 1.6. Subsequently, crown restoration was performed with resin-modified glass ionomer, followed by the cementation of an orthodontic band. After 18 months of follow-up, the patient reported no pain or discomfort. The restoration was preserved intact, maintaining occlusal functionality, pulp and gingival health. Conclusion: The interim treatment, cementing an orthodontic band over a tooth restored with glass ionomer seems to favor retention and compressive strength, keeping the MIH-affected molar asymptomatic for at least 18 months. Further studies evaluating this treatment option in similar clinical situations are recommended.

  9. Dynamics and thermodynamics of polymer glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangialosi, D

    2014-04-16

    The fate of matter when decreasing the temperature at constant pressure is that of passing from gas to liquid and, subsequently, from liquid to crystal. However, a class of materials can exist in an amorphous phase below the melting temperature. On cooling such materials, a glass is formed; that is, a material with the rigidity of a solid but exhibiting no long-range order. The study of the thermodynamics and dynamics of glass-forming systems is the subject of continuous research. Within the wide variety of glass formers, an important sub-class is represented by glass forming polymers. The presence of chain connectivity and, in some cases, conformational disorder are unfavourable factors from the point of view of crystallization. Furthermore, many of them, such as amorphous thermoplastics, thermosets and rubbers, are widely employed in many applications. In this review, the peculiarities of the thermodynamics and dynamics of glass-forming polymers are discussed, with particular emphasis on those topics currently the subject of debate. In particular, the following aspects will be reviewed in the present work: (i) the connection between the pronounced slowing down of glassy dynamics on cooling towards the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the thermodynamics; and, (ii) the fate of the dynamics and thermodynamics below Tg. Both aspects are reviewed in light of the possible presence of a singularity at a finite temperature with diverging relaxation time and zero configurational entropy. In this context, the specificity of glass-forming polymers is emphasized.

  10. Technique for Machining Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Process for machining glass with conventional carbide tools requires a small quantity of a lubricant for aluminum applied to area of glass to be machined. A carbide tool is then placed against workpiece with light pressure. Tool is raised periodically to clear work of glass dust and particles. Additional lubricant is applied as it is displaced.

  11. Hexatic vortex glass in disordered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that interaction of the flux-line lattice with randomly arranged pinning centers should destroy the long-range positional order in the lattice, but not the long-range orientational order. A new phase: hexatic vortex glass, is suggested for the mixed state of disordered, type-II superconductors. Relevance to amorphous and high-T c superconductors is discussed

  12. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  13. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  14. Acoustics of glass harmonicas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    2004-05-01

    Glass musical instruments are probably as old as glassmaking. At least as early as the 17th century it was discovered that wine glasses, when rubbed with a wet finger, produced a musical tone. A collection of glasses played in this manner is called a glass harp. Another type of glass harmonica, called the armonica by its inventor Benjamin Franklin, employs glass bowls or cups turned by a horizontal axle, so the performer need only touch the rim of the bowls as they rotate to set them into vibration. We discuss the modes of vibration of both types of glass harmonica, and describe the different sounds that are emitted by rubbing, tapping, or bowing them. Rubbing with a wet finger tends to excite only the (2,0) mode and its harmonics through a ``stick-slip'' process, while tapping excites the other modes as well.

  15. Leaching of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  16. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  17. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  18. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming ad...... calorimetric data show that panel glass possesses good stability against crystallisation. X-ray diffraction data show that the foaming agents enhance the surface crystallisation of the panel glass. We find that the crystallisation impedes the formation of low density foam glass.......Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...

  19. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...... the dimension and the intensity is used to quantify and rank the homogeneity of glass products. Compared with the refractive index method, the image processing method has a wider detection range and a lower statistical uncertainty....

  20. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  1. Fractography of glass

    CERN Document Server

    Tressler, Richard

    1994-01-01

    As the first major reference on glass fractography, contributors to this volume offer a comprehensive account of the fracture of glass as well as various fracture surface topography Contributors discuss optical fibers, glass containers, and flatglass fractography In addition, papers explore fracture origins; the growth of the original flaws of defects; and macroscopic fracture patterns from which fracture patterns evolve This volume is complete with photographs and schematics

  2. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Miguel O.; Prastalo, Simon; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan M.; Repetto Llamazares, A.H.V.

    2007-01-01

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author) [es

  3. Glass to contain wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, M.; Jacquet-Francillon, M.

    1994-01-01

    Here are the tables and figures presented during the conference on the glass to confine high level radioactive wastes: definition, fabrication, storage and disposal. The composition of glasses are detailed, their properties and the vitrification proceeding. The behaviour of these glasses in front of water, irradiation and heat are shown. The characteristics of parcels are given according to the radiation protection rule, ALARA principle, the concept of multi-barriers and the geological stability

  4. Vortex-glass transition in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reger, J.D.; Tokuyasu, T.A.; Young, A.P.; Fisher, M.P.A.

    1991-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of a vortex-glass transition in a disordered type-II superconductor in a magnetic field in three dimensions by numerical studies of a simplified model. Monte Carlo simulations at finite temperature and domain-wall renormalization-group calculations at T=0 indicate that d=3 is just above the lower critical dimension d l , though the possibility that d l =3 cannot be definitely ruled out. A comparison is made with XY and Ising spin glasses. The (effective) correlation-length exponent ν and dynamical exponent z are in fairly good agreement with experiment

  5. Nano-engineered polyurethane resin-modified concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The goal of the proposed work is to investigate the application of nano-engineered polyurethane (NEPU) emulsions for latex modified : concrete (LMC). NEPU emulsions are non-toxic, environment friendly, durable over a wide temperature range, provide b...

  6. Memo, "Incorporation of HLW Glass Shell V2.0 into the Flowsheets," to ED Lee, CCN: 184905, October 20, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-12-18

    Efforts are being made to increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of vitrifying radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The compositions of acceptable and processable high-level waste (HL W) glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to reduce cost. A database of glass properties of waste glass and associated simulated waste glasses was collected and documented in PNNL 18501, Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume and glass property models were curve-fitted to the glass compositions. A routine was developed that estimates HL W glass volumes using the following glass property models: II Nepheline, II One-Percent Crystal Temperature (T1%), II Viscosity (11) II Product Consistency Tests (PCT) for boron, sodium, and lithium, and II Liquidus Temperature (TL). The routine, commonly called the HL W Glass Shell, is presented in this document. In addition to the use of the glass property models, glass composition constraints and rules, as recommend in PNNL 18501 and in other documents (as referenced in this report) were incorporated. This new version of the HL W Glass Shell should generally estimate higher waste loading in the HL W glass than previous versions.

  7. Relaxations in spin glasses: Similarities and differences from ordinary glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Rajagopal, A.K.; Huang, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena have become a major concern in the physics of spin glasses. There are certain resemblances of these relaxation properties to those of ordinary glasses. In this work, we compare the relaxation properties of spin glasses near the freezing temperature with those of glasses near the glass transition temperature. There are similarities between the two types of glasses. Moreover, the relaxation properties of many glasses and spin glasses are in conformity with two coupled ''universality'' relations predicted by a recent model of relaxations in condensed matter

  8. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  9. Getting Started with Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The metamorphosis of glass when heated is a magical process to students, yet teachers are often reluctant to try it in class. The biggest challenge in working with glass in the classroom is to simplify procedures just enough to ensure student success while maintaining strict safety practices so no students are injured. Project concepts and safety…

  10. Radioresistance of inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, A.A.; Zavadovskaya, E.K.; Fedorov, B.V.; Starodubtsev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Regularities are considered in the variation of properties of glass due to irradiations. On the basis of previous theoretical statements and experimental investigations, it is inferred that the irradiation resistance of glasses of the same type, synthesis conditions, content of impurities and amount of imperfections, is a function of the ''element-oxygen'' bond energy. The irradiation resistance depends on the number and the nature of glass structure imperfections. The averaged level of bonding forces is indicative of the glass formation temperature; the imperfections in glasses are formed in structure elements whose amount predominates as compared to the others. Electric charges which accumulate on the crack surface tend to increase its size, thus lessening even further the electric strength of the dielectric. The greater the irradiation time, the greater the number of irradiation imperfections causing a drop in the electric strength of glass. When choosing a glass for service in a radiation field, it is necessary to select those of a highest temperature of glass formation and with a least amount of imperfections

  11. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  12. Dramatic Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that is appropriate for students in fifth through twelfth grade in which they create Gothic-style stained-glass windows. Discusses how college students majoring in elementary education created stained-glass windows. Addresses how to adapt this lesson for younger students. (CMK)

  13. Polymorphism in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landa, L.M.; Nikolaeva, I.N.

    1979-01-01

    To defect phase interfaces and spasmodic properties change, the inhomogeneity and the second radiation effects in quartz glass, metamict phase and intermediate states have been investigated. When irradiating with fast neutrons the transformation of quartz glass - metamict phase occurs completely. The transformation is completed at 2x10 20 part./cm 2 dose. Thermal treatment not only increases the number of inhomogeneities but also results in increasing quartz glass density. Annealing transforms the metamict phase into common quartz glass at 1400 K. The fact, that thermal treatment results in the complete transformation of metamict phase into quartz glass, and the inverse transformation occurs only partially, is quite regular, as the metamict phase has a lesser entropy and is a more ordered state. It is shown that different amorphous phases of a chemical composition have different structures and properties, that there are interfaces between them, and the transformation from one state to another in microvolumes is realized spasmodically and requires expenditure of energy

  14. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  15. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  16. Iron phosphate glasses: Bulk properties and atomic scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Asuvathraman, R.; Dube, Charu L.; Gandy, Amy S.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Jolley, Kenny; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.; Smith, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Bulk properties such as glass transition temperature, density and thermal expansion of iron phosphate glass compositions, with replacement of Cs by Ba, are investigated as a surrogate for the transmutation of 137Cs to 137Ba, relevant to the immobilisation of Cs in glass. These studies are required to establish the appropriate incorporation rate of 137Cs in iron phosphate glass. Density and glass transition temperature increases with the addition of BaO indicating the shrinkage and reticulation of the iron phosphate glass network. The average thermal expansion coefficient reduces from 19.8 × 10-6 K-1 to 13.4 × 10-6 K-1, when 25 wt. % of Cs2O was replaced by 25 wt. % of BaO in caesium loaded iron phosphate glass. In addition to the above bulk properties, the role of Ba as a network modifier in the structure of iron phosphate glass is examined using various spectroscopic techniques. The FeII content and average coordination number of iron in the glass network was estimated using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The FeII content in the un-doped iron phosphate glass and barium doped iron phosphate glasses was 20, 21 and 22 ± 1% respectively and the average Fe coordination varied from 5.3 ± 0.2 to 5.7 ± 0.2 with increasing Ba content. The atomic scale structure was further probed by Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The average coordination number provided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure was in good agreement with that given by the Mössbauer data.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...... with different gas compositions. The foam glasses were characterised concerning densities, open/closed porosity and crystallinity. We find out, through analytical calculations and experiments, how the thermal conductivity of foam glass depends on density, glass composition and gas composition. Certain glass...

  18. In vitro evaluation of marginal microleakage of class II bonded amalgam restorations using a dentin adhesive and a glass ionomer cement Avaliação in vitro da microinfiltração marginal em restaurações de amálgama tipo classe II usando adesivo dentinário e cimento de ionômero de vidro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmêr Silvestre PEREIRA JÚNIOR

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effectiveness of the dentin bonding system All Bond 2 associated with Resinomer (Bisco, and of Vitrebond (3M glass ionomer cement fresh-mixed, both used in the bonded amalgam technique, to prevent short-term microleakage in class II cavities restored with Dispersalloy (Dentsply, an admixed alloy. The control group utilized the Copalite (Cooley & Cooley varnish. Forty five sound human extracted premolars were used. Class II cavity preparations were made on the mesial and distal surfaces of non-carious teeth, with the gingival margins wall established 1mm under the cementum enamel junction. The specimens were divided randomly into three groups with thirty cavities in each group. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours and were thermocyled through 500 cycles in distilled water between 5°C and 55°C with a dwell time of 15 seconds. The apices and roots of the teeth were sealed. They were placed in a 37°C bath of 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours. The teeth were washed in tap water for 24 hours and cut. The microleakage scores per restoration were averaged and three values of various test groups were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test at a significance level of p O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar in vitro a efetividade na prevenção da microinfiltração do sistema adesivo All Bond 2 associado ao Resinomer (Bisco, e do cimento de ionômero de vidro Vitrebond (3M, sem polimerização, em amálgama adesivo classe II, restauradas com Dispersalloy (Dentsply. No grupo controle utilizou-se o verniz cavitário Copalite (Cooley & Cooley. Para tanto, 45 pré-molares humanos íntegros e extraídos, com finalidade ortodôntica, receberam cavidades classe II, sendo uma na face mesial e outra na face distal de cada dente, com a parede cervical localizada a 1mm além da junção cemento-esmalte, sendo 30 cavidades em cada grupo. Após as restaurações os dentes foram estocados

  19. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  20. A Picture behind Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poprzęcka, Maria

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the singular situation of reception occasioned by a painting shielded with a reflective pane of glass. The reflections in the glass dramatically break the cohesion of the painting and bring about distracting – although sometimes intriguing – surprises. The glass is an iconoclastic intrusion, an infection of the artistic order by an invading disorder and transient immediacy, which however can be very attractive visually. The accidental obliterates the significant. "The truth of art" is confronted here with a delusive phantom. Not only two entirely different visual effects are mixed here, but also different ontological and axiological spheres.

  1. Orbital glass in HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-10-01

    The physical reasons why the orbital glass may exist in granular high-temperature superconductors and the existing experimental data appeared recently are discussed. The orbital glass is characterized by the coexistence of the orbital paramagnetic state with the superconducting state and occurs at small magnetic fields H c0 c1 . The transition in orbital glass arises at the critical field H c0 which is inversely proportional to the surface cross-area S of an average grain. In connection with theoretical predictions the possible experiments are proposed. (author). 10 refs

  2. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  3. Glass Stronger than Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  4. Super ionic conductive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  5. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    The use of glass as a load carrying material in structural elements is rarely seen even though glass is a popular material for many architects. This is owed to the unreliable and low tensile strength, which is due to surface flaws and high brittleness of the material. These properties lead...... to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... presented. The experiments show that it is possible to obtain a very ductile structural behavior using the right amount of reinforcement. A Finite Element Model including - in a simple manner - the effects of cracking of glass is presented. Based on a comparison between experimental and model results...

  6. Waste glass weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass

  7. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  8. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II

  9. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  10. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  11. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  12. Glass microsphere lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  13. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  14. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.; Pickenheim, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  15. Optical properties of 3d transition metal ion-doped sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Hongli; Tanner, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Photographs of undoped (SiO 2 ) 50 (Na 2 O) 25 (B 2 O 3 ) 25 (SiNaB) glass and transition metal ion-doped (TM) 0.5 (SiO 2 ) 49.5 (Na 2 O) 25 (B 2 O 3 ) 25 glass samples. - Highlights: • 3d transition metal ion (from Ti to Zn) doped SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses. • Optical properties of doped glasses investigated. • V(IV,V); Cr(III, VI); Mn(II,III); Fe(II,III); Co(II); Ni(II); Cu(II) by XANES, DRS. • Strong visible absorption but only vanadium ion gives strong emission in glass. - Abstract: SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses doped with 3d-transition metal species from Ti to Zn were prepared by the melting-quenching technique and their optical properties were investigated. The X-ray absorption near edge spectra of V, Cr, and Mn-doped glasses indicate that the oxidation states of V(IV, V), Cr(III, VI) and Mn(II, III) exist in the studied glasses. The oxidation states revealed from the diffuse reflectance spectra of the glasses are V(IV, V), Cr(III, VI), Mn(III), Fe(II, III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II). Most of the 3d transition element ions exhibit strong absorption in the visible spectral region in the glass. Under ultraviolet excitation, the undoped sodium borosilicate glass produces weak and broad emission, while doping of vanadium introduces strong and broad emission due to the V(V) charge transfer transition. Only weak emission is observed from Ti(IV), Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II), partly resulting from the strong electron–phonon coupling of the 3d-electrons and the relatively high phonon energy of the studied glass host, with the former leading to dominant nonradiative relaxation based on multiphonon processes for most of the 3d excited states

  16. Electrical properties of phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogus-Milankovic, A; Santic, A; Reis, S T; Day, D E

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the electrical properties of phosphate glasses where transition metal oxide such as iron oxide is the network former and network modifier is presented. Phosphate glasses containing iron are electronically conducting glasses where the polaronic conduction is due to the electron hopping from low to high iron valence state. The identification of structural defects caused by ion/polaron migration, the analysis of dipolar states and electrical conductivity in iron phosphate glasses containing various alkali and mixed alkali ions was performed on the basis of the impedance spectroscopy (IS). The changes in electrical conductivity from as-quenched phosphate glass to fully crystallized glass (glass-ceramics) by IS are analyzed. A change in the characteristic features of IS follows the changes in glass and crystallized glass network. Using IS, the contribution of glass matrix, crystallized grains and grain boundary to the total electrical conductivity for iron phosphate glasses was analyzed. It was shown that decrease in conductivity is caused by discontinuities in the conduction pathways as a result of the disruption of crystalline network where two or more crystalline phases are formed. Also, phosphate-based glasses offer a unique range of biomaterials, as they form direct chemical bonding with hard/soft tissue. The surface charges of bioactive glasses are recognized to be the most important factors in determining biological responses. The improved bioactivity of the bioactive glasses as a result of the effects of the surface charges generated by electrical polarization is discussed.

  17. Glass matrix armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  18. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  19. High Resolution Autostereoscopic Cockpit Display, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase II program Dimension Technologies Inc. (DTI) proposes to design and build an autostereoscopic (glasses-free 3D) LCD based aircraft cockpit display...

  20. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – bis(benzoin)ethylenediiminato have been prepared and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, conductivity measurements and solubility. The potentiometric, and elemental analyses studies of the complexes revealed 1:1 ...

  1. Comparison of shear bond strength of aesthetic restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B P Suryakumari Nujella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The present study was conducted to determine and compare the shear bond strengths of Conventional glass ionomer; Resin-modified glass ionomer; Polyacid-modified composite and Composite Resin, and to assess and determine the mode of failure (adhesive, cohesive, mixed. Materials and Methods : Occlusal dentin of 40 extracted human teeth were randomly divided into four groups of ten teeth, each based on the restorative materials tested as follows: Group I: Conventional Glass Ionomer Cement (Control; Group II: Resin-modified Glass Ionomer Cement; Group III: Polyacid-modified Composite Resin; Group IV: Hybrid Composite Resin. The bonded materials were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS testing in a Instron Universal Testing Machine (UTM at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The bond failure location was examined by the use of a stereomicroscope at 10× magnification. The mean SBS of Groups I-IV obtained was 3.81, 9.71, 11.96 and 18.16 MPa, respectively. Comparison of mean shear bond strengths of all groups was done by one way ANOVA test and comparison of means in between groups by the Student′s t test. Conclusion : It is concluded that the compomer restorative materials show higher shear bond strength than conventional glass-ionomer and resin-modified glass-ionomer, but less than composite resin.

  2. Using physical properties of molten glass to estimate glass composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwan Sik; Yang, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Jong Kil

    1997-01-01

    A vitrification process is under development in KEPRI for the treatment of low-and medium-level radioactive waste. Although the project is for developing and building Vitrification Pilot Plant in Korea, one of KEPRI's concerns is the quality control of the vitrified glass. This paper discusses a methodology for the estimation of glass composition by on-line measurement of molten glass properties, which could be applied to the plant for real-time quality control of the glass product. By remotely measuring viscosity and density of the molten glass, the glass characteristics such as composition can be estimated and eventually controlled. For this purpose, using the database of glass composition vs. physical properties in isothermal three-component system of SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 , a software TERNARY has been developed which determines the glass composition by using two known physical properties (e.g. density and viscosity)

  3. Porous vycor glass tube joined to borosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shinichi; Kikuchi, Takemitsu; Onodera, Shinji

    1992-09-01

    Porous glass can absorb various size of molecules with large surface area even in high temperature. However, it is difficult to use porous glass tubes at high-temperature, for example as a separation membrane for hydrogen condensation, because adhesives at joining sites could be damaged. In this study, welding of a porous glass tube and a glass tube was attempted to develop a gas separation membrane used at 500 C. Since forms present in porous glass may cause crack at high temperature, it is necessary to remove such forms by heat processing. Such porous glass is called to be porous vycor glass, which contains quartz 6 percents, and can be joined with a quartz tube. As a result, a gas separator with porous glass membrane which is joined by this process could endure high temperature up to 600 C and could maintain high vacuum.

  4. Configurational entropy of polar glass formers and the effect of electric field on glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-21

    A model of low-temperature polar liquids is constructed that accounts for the configurational heat capacity, entropy, and the effect of a strong electric field on the glass transition. The model is based on the Padé-truncated perturbation expansions of the liquid state theory. Depending on parameters, it accommodates an ideal glass transition of vanishing configurational entropy and its avoidance, with a square-root divergent enumeration function at the point of its termination. A composite density-temperature parameter ρ(γ)/T, often used to represent combined pressure and temperature data, follows from the model. The theory is in good agreement with the experimental data for excess (over the crystal state) thermodynamics of molecular glass formers. We suggest that the Kauzmann entropy crisis might be a signature of vanishing configurational entropy of a subset of degrees of freedom, multipolar rotations in our model. This scenario has observable consequences: (i) a dynamical crossover of the relaxation time and (ii) the fragility index defined by the ratio of the excess heat capacity and excess entropy at the glass transition. The Kauzmann temperature of vanishing configurational entropy and the corresponding glass transition temperature shift upward when the electric field is applied. The temperature shift scales quadratically with the field strength.

  5. Aging in a Structural Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Kob, Walter; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the relaxation dynamics of a simple structural glass which has been quenched below its glass transition temperature. We demonstrate that time correlation functions show strong aging effects and investigate in what way the fluctuation dissipation theorem is violated.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with and without Chlorhexidine Gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadiki, Josna Vinutha; Jampanapalli, Sharada Reddy; Konda, Suhasini; Inguva, Hema Chandrika; Chimata, Vamsi Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Chlorhexidine gluconate is a widely used antimicrobial agent. Adding chlorhexidine and quaternary ammonium compounds to filling materials, such as composite resins, acrylic resins, and glass ionomer cements increases the antibacterial property of restorative materials. This study includes antibacterial property of glass ionomer restorative cements with chlorhexidine gluconate. The primary objective of our study was to compare the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available glass ionomer cements with and without chlorhexidine gluconate on strains of mutans streptococci. Two glass ionomers (Fuji II Conventional and Fuji IX) were used. Chlorhexidine gluconate was mixed with glass ionomer cements, and antimicrobial properties against mutans streptococci were assessed by agar diffusion. The tested bacterial strain was inhibited and the antimicrobial properties decreased with time. The highest amount of antimicrobial activity with mean inhibitory zone was found in Fuji II with chlorhexidine gluconate followed by Fuji IX with chlorhexidine gluconate, Fuji II without chlorhexidine gluconate, and Fuji IX without chlorhexidine gluconate. The results of the study confirmed that the addition of 5% chlorhexidine gluconate to Fuji II and Fuji IX glass ionomer cements resulted in a restorative material that had increased antimicrobial properties over the conventional glass ionomer cements alone for Streptococcus mutans. How to cite this article: Yadiki JV, Jampanapalli SR , Konda S, Inguva HC, Chimata VK. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with and without Chlorhexidine Gluconate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):99-103.

  7. What Glass Ceiling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

  8. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  9. in glass transition region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    compositions of arsenic. An effort has also been made to develop an empirical model for the composition dependence of ∆H. A good agreement has been observed between the experimental values and the results of model calculation. Keywords. Glass transition temperature; activation energy; heat absorbed; composition ...

  10. Glass as matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Refraiming the Moderns - Substitute Windows and Glass. In general terms, the seminar has contributed to the growing interest in the problems concerning the restoration of Modern Movement architecture. More particularly, it has of course drawn our attention to modern windows, which are increasingl...... recognized as precious and important feature, both for technical resons and for their expression af aesthetic values....

  11. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  12. in glass transition region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    wave-guides e.g. in welding and surgery (Nishi et al. 1992). Especially amorphous chalcogenide alloys exhibit the property of reversible transformation. This property makes these systems very useful in optical memory. Glasses are amorphous (Elliot 1990) in nature, i.e. they form a disordered and metastable structure.

  13. Glass as matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Refraiming the Moderns - Substitute Windows and Glass. In general terms, the seminar has contributed to the growing interest in the problems concerning the restoration of Modern Movement architecture. More particularly, it has of course drawn our attention to modern windows, which are increasingl...

  14. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  15. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  16. Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "Glass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Dale

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a glass art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-glass quality. The "glass" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…

  17. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    . Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  18. Assessment of the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements for orthodontic cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel M. Farret

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the mechanical properties of three glass ionomers cements (GICs used for band cementation in Orthodontics. METHODS: Two conventional glass ionomers (Ketac Cem Easy mix/3M-ESPE and Meron/Voco and one resin modified glass ionomer (Multi-cure Glass ionomer/3M-Unitek were selected. For the compressive strength and diametral tensile strength tests, 12 specimens were made of each material. For the microhardness test 15 specimens were made of each material and for the shear bond strength tests 45 bovine permanent incisors were used mounted in a self-cure acrylic resin. Then, band segments with a welded bracket were cemented on the buccal surface of the crowns. For the mechanical tests of compressive and diametral tensile strength and shear bond strength a universal testing machine was used with a crosshead speed of 1,0 mm/min and for the Vickers microhardness analysis tests a Microdurometer was used with 200 g of load during 15 seconds. The results were submitted to statistical analysis through ANOVA complemented by Tukey's test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: The results shown that the Multi-Cure Glass Ionomer presented higher diametral tensile strength (p OBJETIVO: avaliar as propriedades mecânicas de três cimentos de ionômero de vidro (CIVs utilizados para cimentação de anéis ortodônticos. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados dois CIVs convencionais (Ketac Cem Easy mix/3M-ESPE e Meron/Voco e um CIV modificado por resina (Multi-Cure Glass ionomer/3M-Unitek. Para os testes de resistência à compressão e tração diametral, foram confeccionados 12 corpos de prova de cada material. Para os testes de microdureza, foram confeccionados 15 corpos de prova de cada material; para os testes de resistência de união ao cisalhamento, foram utilizados 45 dentes bovinos incluídos em resina acrílica, sobre os quais foi cimentada uma lâmina de anel ortodôntico com braquete soldado a ela para a realização dos ensaios. Para os

  19. U-based metallic glasses with superior glass forming ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongyang; Ke, Haibo; Huang, Huogen; Zhang, Pengguo; Pu, Zhen; Zhang, Pei; Liu, Tianwei

    2018-02-01

    By using Al as the third and B as the fourth but minor alloying elements for the U66.7Co33.3 basic metallic glass, a series of U-Co-Al(-B) alloys were designed. The quaternary U-Co-Al-B alloys exhibit significantly improved glass-forming ability (GFA) than previously reported U-based metallic glasses. Low fragility (∼24) is found for these new U-based metallic glasses. The improvement in GFA would result from denser atomic packing in the undercooled liquids due to the presence of small B atoms. Some U-Co-Al(-B) glasses showed corrosion resistance comparable to that of U64Co34Al2 glass, known for premium anti-corrosive performance among the unveiled U-based glasses.

  20. Two-year clinical study on postoperative pulpal complications arising from the absence of a glass-ionomer lining in deep occlusal resin-composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banomyong, Danuchit; Messer, Harold

    2013-11-01

    To observe the effects of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) lining on the risk of pulpal complications in deep occlusal cavities with resin-based restorations. Fifty-three patients, aged 18-30 years, who had one or two deep occlusal carious lesions (≥3 mm in depth) in molars, were recruited. Dental caries were removed, and the prepared cavity was restored with resin composite using one of two restorative procedures: (a) without GIC lining; and (b) with (resin-modified) GIC lining. Restored teeth were evaluated for any pulpal complications (subjective symptoms, objective signs or loss of tooth vitality) at 1 month (baseline), 1 year, and 2 years after restoration. After excluding shallow cavities, 31 restorations without GIC lining, and 31 restorations with GIC lining, were placed and recalled at baseline without any pulpal complications. At the 1- and 2-year recalls, six patients who had restorations in group 1, and 13 in group 2, had dropped out. None of the remaining teeth in the two groups exhibited pulpal complications at either recall period, regardless of GIC lining placement. The absence of GIC lining does not increase the risk of pulpal complications in deep occlusal cavities restored with resin-based restorations in either the short or long term. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Christendom's Narratives and the Stained Glass Designs of Yusuf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper attempts a recast of Christendom's narratives in the stained glass designs of Yusuf Cameron Adebayo Grillo as the distinctive overarching mechanism of the evangelisation paradigm of the post Vatican II Church. It, therefore, draws attention to the delimitation of time frames in the history of the art form. Using the ...

  2. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... the foaming process for foam glass with closed pores. In addition, it is shown that melt foaming should preferably be performed in a viscosity limited regime. Finally, it is suggested that the foaming agent contributes significantly to the solid conductivity of foam glass....

  3. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  4. The borosilicate glass for 'PAMELA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, E.

    1986-01-01

    The low enriched waste concentrate (LEWC) stored at Mol, Belgium, will be solidified in the vitrification plant 'PAMELA'. An alkali-borosilicate glass was developed by the Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin, which dissolves (11 +- 3)wt% waste oxides while providing sufficient flexibility for changes in the process parameters. The development of the glass labelled SM513LW11 is described. Important properties of the glass melt (viscosity, resistivity, formation of yellow phase) and of the glass (corrosion in aqueous solutions, crystallization) are reported. The corrosion data of this glass are similar to those of other HLW-glasses. Less than five wt% of crystalline material are produced upon cooling of large glass blocks. Crystallization does not affect the chemical durability. (Auth.)

  5. Iron Phosphate Glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Moguš-Milanković

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization of 40Fe2O3-60P2O5, 10ZnO-30Fe2O3-60P2O5 and (43.3−xPbO–(13.7+xFe2O3–43P2O5, (0 x < 30, glasses and glass-ceramic have been investigated. The structural evolution of glasses during heat treatment at various temperatures and the tendency for crystallization for series of glasses with modified composition are characterized by a dendrite-like phase separation in the early stage of crystallization. Such a behavior leads to the formation of randomly dispersed agglomerates which contain the anhedrally shaped crystallites embedded in glass matrix. Therefore, regardless of the type of crystallization, controlled or spontaneous, the formation of crystalline phases in these phosphate glasses and glass-ceramics is attributed to the disordered interfaces between crystalline grains and glassy matrix.

  6. Preparative process for hollow glass microsphere with wall thickness under 1 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Shoude; Wei Sheng; Shi Tao

    1998-12-01

    The process for mass producing the high quality glass microspheres has been developed for ICF in China. The wall thickness of these microspheres is less than one micron. The effect of each zone temperature of drop furnace, flow rate of furnace air, solid concentration in the glass forming solution and concentration of the blowing agent on parameters of glass microspheres such as diameter and wall thickness are systematically studied. Glass microspheres with walls under 1 μm thick and which satisfy the exacting surface and symmetry specifications of targets for Shen-Guang-II directly driven experiments are now produced routinely

  7. Glasses for Mali

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, Bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  8. Breaking the glass ceiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A

    1997-03-01

    The glass ceiling is a form of organizational bias and discrimination that prevents qualified professionals from achieving positions of top governance and leadership. This article examines glass ceiling barriers that keep physicians from the upper reaches of management. While these factors apply mainly to women and minority physicians in academia, and are attributable to sexual harassment and discrimination, physicians as a class are frequently denied executive management positions. Such denial results from inadequate preparation for a career in health care administration. Important issues in the professional development of physician executives include mentoring, training and education, administrative experience, and cultural and personality factors. All of those must be considered when making the transition from medicine to management.

  9. Amorphous gauge glass theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Bennett, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    Assuming that a lattice gauge theory describes a fundamental attribute of Nature, it should be pointed out that such a theory in the form of a gauge glass is a weaker assumption than a regular lattice model in as much as it is not constrained by the imposition of translational invariance; translational invariance is, however, recovered approximately in the long wavelength or continuum limit. (orig./WL)

  10. Nuclear traces in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia A, M. de N.

    1978-01-01

    The charged particles produce, in dielectric materials, physical and chemical effects which make evident the damaged zone along the trajectory of the particle. This damaged zone is known as the latent trace. The latent traces can be enlarged by an etching of the detector material. This treatment attacks preferently the zones of the material where the charged particles have penetrated, producing concavities which can be observed through a low magnification optical microscope. These concavities are known as developed traces. In this work we describe the glass characteristics as a detector of the fission fragments traces. In the first chapter we present a summary of the existing basic theories to explain the formation of traces in solids. In the second chapter we describe the etching method used for the traces development. In the following chapters we determine some chatacteristics of the traces formed on the glass, such as: the development optimum time; the diameter variation of the traces and their density according to the temperature variation of the detector; the glass response to a radiation more penetrating than that of the fission fragments; the distribution of the developed traces and the existing relation between this ditribution and the fission fragments of 252 Cf energies. The method which has been used is simple and cheap and can be utilized in laboratories whose resources are limited. The commercial glass which has been employed allows the registration of the fission fragments and subsequently the realization of experiments which involve the counting of the traces as well as the identification of particles. (author)

  11. Polyamorphism in metalic glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, H. W.; Liu, H. Z.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Wen, J.; Lee, P.L.; Luo, W.K.; Shastri, S.D.; Ma, E.; X-Ray Science Division; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2007-03-01

    A metal, or an alloy, can often exist in more than one crystal structure. The face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic forms of iron (or steel) are a familiar example of such polymorphism. When metallic materials are made in the amorphous form, is a parallel 'polyamorphism' possible? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in the glassy state have been observed only in glasses involving directional and open (such as tetrahedral) coordination environments. Here, we report an in situ X-ray diffraction observation of a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous polymorphs in a Ce{sub 55}Al{sub 45} metallic glass. The large density difference observed between the two polyamorphs is attributed to their different electronic and atomic structures, in particular the bond shortening revealed by ab initio modeling of the effects of f-electron delocalization. This discovery offers a new perspective of the amorphous state of metals, and has implications for understanding the structure, evolution and properties of metallic glasses and related liquids. Our work also opens a new avenue towards technologically useful amorphous alloys that are compositionally identical but with different thermodynamic, functional and rheological properties due to different bonding and structural characteristics.

  12. Athermal photofluidization of glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G. J.; Maclennan, J. E.; Yi, Y.; Glaser, M. A.; Farrow, M.; Korblova, E.; Walba, D. M.; Furtak, T. E.; Clark, N. A.

    2013-02-01

    Azobenzene and its derivatives are among the most important organic photonic materials, with their photo-induced trans-cis isomerization leading to applications ranging from holographic data storage and photoalignment to photoactuation and nanorobotics. A key element and enduring mystery in the photophysics of azobenzenes, central to all such applications, is athermal photofluidization: illumination that produces only a sub-Kelvin increase in average temperature can reduce, by many orders of magnitude, the viscosity of an organic glassy host at temperatures more than 100 K below its thermal glass transition. Here we analyse the relaxation dynamics of a dense monolayer glass of azobenzene-based molecules to obtain a measurement of the transient local effective temperature at which a photo-isomerizing molecule attacks its orientationally confining barriers. This high temperature (Tloc~800 K) leads directly to photofluidization, as each absorbed photon generates an event in which a local glass transition temperature is exceeded, enabling collective confining barriers to be attacked with near 100% quantum efficiency.

  13. Antibacterial properties of copper iodide-doped glass ionomer-based materials and effect of copper iodide nanoparticles on collagen degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renné, Walter G; Lindner, Amanda; Mennito, Anthony S; Agee, Kelli A; Pashley, David H; Willett, Daniel; Sentelle, David; Defee, Michael; Schmidt, Michael; Sabatini, Camila

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial properties and micro-hardness of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated copper iodide (CuI) nanoparticles incorporated into glass ionomer-based materials, and the effect of PAA-CuI on collagen degradation. PAA-CuI nanoparticles were incorporated into glass ionomer (GI), Ionofil Molar AC, and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), Vitrebond, at 0.263 wt%. The antibacterial properties against Streptococcus mutans (n = 6/group) and surface micro-hardness (n = 5/group) were evaluated. Twenty dentin beams were completely demineralized in 10 wt% phosphoric acid and equally divided in two groups (n = 10/group) for incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF) or SBF containing 1 mg/ml PAA-CuI. The amount of dry mass loss and hydroxyproline (HYP) released were quantified. Kruskal-Wallis, Student's t test, two-way ANOVA, and Mann-Whitney were used to analyze the antibacterial, micro-hardness, dry mass, and HYP release data, respectively (p glass ionomer matrix yielded significant reduction (99.999 %) in the concentration of bacteria relative to the control groups. While micro-hardness values of PAA-CuI-doped GI were no different from its control, PAA-CuI-doped RMGI demonstrated significantly higher values than its control. A significant decrease in dry mass weight was shown only for the control beams (10.53 %, p = 0.04). Significantly less HYP was released from beams incubated in PAA-CuI relative to the control beams (p glass ionomer-based materials as they greatly enhance their antibacterial properties and reduce collagen degradation without an adverse effect on their mechanical properties. The use of copper-doped glass ionomer-based materials under composite restorations may contribute to an increased longevity of adhesive restorations, because of their enhanced antibacterial properties and reduced collagen degradation.

  14. An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

    2005-08-01

    This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data

  15. Fe++/Fe+++ concentration relationship and mechanical properties of phosphate glasses useful for wastes immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D.A.; Prado, Miguel O.

    2007-01-01

    Under different melting conditions, glasses with different Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration relationship were prepared within each type of glass 43Fe 2 O 3 -57P 2 O 5 and 33,33Fe 2 O 3 - 66,67P 2 O 5 . Using Moessbauer spectroscopy Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration values were determined. Vickers and Knoop indentations were used for determining their hardness, toughness, Young modulus and brittleness. The same measurements were carried on some silicate and aluminosilicate glasses. Also Weibull statistics was done to determine the characteristics (Weibull modulus and and fracture probability) of glass fracture. We found that silicate glasses (SG) are harder than phosphate glasses (PG). Toughness values for PG, are in the same range than for SG, although for the same density exhibit larger values or smaller brittleness than silicate glasses. For one of the glasses it was found that the mechanical load P 0 needed for a fracture probability of 63% increases with the Fe(II) content. (author)

  16. Helium behaviour in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, T.

    2011-01-01

    The present thesis focuses on the study of helium behavior in R7T7 nuclear waste glass. Helium is generated by the minor actinides alpha decays incorporated in the glass matrix. Therefore, four types of materials were used in this work. These are non radioactive R7T7 glasses saturated with helium under pressure, glasses implanted with 3 He + ions, glasses doped with curium and glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor. The study of helium solubility in saturated R7T7 glass has shown that helium atoms are inserted in the glass free volume. The results yielded a solubility of about 10 16 at. cm -3 atm. -1 . The incorporation limit of helium in this type of glass has been determined; its value amounted to about 2*10 21 at. cm -3 , corresponding to 2.5 at.%. Diffusion studies have shown that the helium migration is controlled by the single population dissolved in the glass free volume. An ideal diffusion model was used to simulate the helium release data which allowed to determine diffusion coefficients obeying to the following Arrhenius law: D = D 0 exp(-E a /kBT), where D 0 = 2.2*10 -2 and 5.4*10 -3 cm 2 s -1 and E a = 0.61 eV for the helium saturated and the curium doped glass respectively. These results reflect a thermally activated diffusion mechanism which seems to be not influenced by the glass radiation damage and helium concentrations studied in the present work (up to 8*10 19 at. g -1 , corresponding to 0.1 at.%). Characterizations of the macroscopic, structural and microstructural properties of glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor did not reveal any impact associated with the presence of helium at high concentrations. The observed modifications i.e. a swelling of 0.7 %, a decrease in hardness by 38 %, an increase between 8 and 34 % of the fracture toughness and a stabilization of the glass structure under irradiation, were attributed to the glass nuclear damage induced by the irradiation in reactor. Characterizations by SEM and TEM of R7T7 glasses implanted

  17. Transferability of glass lens molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuki, Masahide

    2006-02-01

    Sphere lenses have been used for long time. But it is well known that sphere lenses theoretically have spherical aberration, coma and so on. And, aspheric lenses attract attention recently. Plastic lenses are molded easily with injection machines, and are relatively low cost. They are suitable for mass production. On the other hand, glass lenses have several excellent features such as high refractive index, heat resistance and so on. Many aspheric glass lenses came to be used for the latest digital camera and mobile phone camera module. It is very difficult to produce aspheric glass lenses by conventional process of curve generating and polishing. For the solution of this problem, Glass Molding Machine was developed and is spreading through the market. High precision mold is necessary to mold glass lenses with Glass Molding Machine. The mold core is ground or turned by high precision NC aspheric generator. To obtain higher transferability of the mold core, the function of the molding machine and the conditions of molding are very important. But because of high molding temperature, there are factors of thermal expansion and contraction of the mold and glass material. And it is hard to avoid the factors. In this session, I introduce following items. [1] Technology of glass molding and the machine is introduced. [2] The transferability of glass molding is analyzed with some data of glass lenses molded. [3] Compensation of molding shape error is discussed with examples.

  18. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  19. Thermal conductivity of Glycerol's liquid, glass, and crystal states, glass-liquid-glass transition, and crystallization at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G P

    2016-02-14

    To investigate the effects of local density fluctuations on phonon propagation in a hydrogen bonded structure, we studied the thermal conductivity κ of the crystal, liquid, and glassy states of pure glycerol as a function of the temperature, T, and the pressure, p. We find that the following: (i) κcrystal is 3.6-times the κliquid value at 140 K at 0.1 MPa and 2.2-times at 290 K, and it varies with T according to 138 × T(-0.95); (ii) the ratio κliquid (p)/κliquid (0.1 MPa) is 1.45 GPa(-1) at 280 K, which, unexpectedly, is about the same as κcrystal (p)/κcrystal (0.1 MPa) of 1.42 GPa(-1) at 298 K; (iii) κglass is relatively insensitive to T but sensitive to the applied p (1.38 GPa(-1) at 150 K); (iv) κglass-T plots show an enhanced, pressure-dependent peak-like feature, which is due to the glass to liquid transition on heating; (v) continuous heating cold-crystallizes ultraviscous glycerol under pressure, at a higher T when p is high; and (vi) glycerol formed by cooling at a high p and then measured at a low p has a significantly higher κ than the glass formed by cooling at a low p. On heating at a fixed low p, its κ decreases before its glass-liquid transition range at that p is reached. We attribute this effect to thermally assisted loss of the configurational and vibrational instabilities of a glass formed at high p and recovered at low p, which is different from the usual glass-aging effect. While the heat capacity, entropy, and volume of glycerol crystal are less than those for its glass and liquid, κcrystal of glycerol, like its elastic modulus and refractive index, is higher. We discuss these findings in terms of the role of fluctuations in local density and structure, and the relations between κ and the thermodynamic quantities.

  20. Effects of surface treatments of conventional glass-ionomer on shear bond strength to giomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Oskoee, Parnian Alizadeh; Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel Ebrahimi; Bahari, Mahmood; Sadr, Alireza; Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh

    2012-01-01

    Background: An appropriate bond between glass-ionomer and the superficial resin materials is very important for the success of sandwich technique. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments of conventional glass-ionomer on its shear bond strength to giomer. Materials and Methods: Sixty cylindrical specimens of a conventional glass-ionomer (GC Fuji II) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). The specimens in groups 1 and 2 were treated with total-etch adhesive resin (Single Bond) along with acid etching, and self-etch adhesive resin (FL-Bond II) on the set glass-ionomer, respectively. Specimens in group 3 were treated with self-etch adhesive resin (FL-Bond II) before initial setting of the glass-ionomer was complete. Then a giomer restorative (Beautifil II) was added to the specimens. Subsequent to thermocycling, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test. Failure modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test at a significance level of P glass-ionomer yielded the highest bond strength in the glass-ionomer/giomer sandwich technique. PMID:23559944

  1. Foam Glass Production from Waste Glass by Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamidulina, D. D.; Nekrasova, S. A.; Voronin, K. M.

    2017-11-01

    The authors have identified the impact of the glass mixture briquetting process parameters (milling method, dispersibility, particle size distribution, particle form and compression parameters) on the performance characteristics and the physical and chemical properties of foam glass. It was demonstrated that briquette density increasing contributes to achieving a lower average density of foam glass. It was proven that briquettes produced from multifractional powders are characterized by a higher density than those produced from powders with a limited range of particle size distribution.

  2. Influence of Glass Property Restrictions on Hanford HLW Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) loading in alkali-alumino-borosilicate glasses was performed. The waste feed compositions used were obtained from current tank waste composition estimates, Hanford's baseline retrieval sequence, and pretreatment processes. The waste feeds were sorted into groups of like composition by cluster analysis. Glass composition optimization was performed on each cluster to meet property and composition constraints while maximizing waste loading. Glass properties were estimated using property models developed for Hanford HLW glasses. The impacts of many constraints on the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford were evaluated. The liquidus temperature, melting temperature, chromium concentration, formation of multiple phases on cooling, and product consistency test response requirements for the glass were varied one- or many-at-a-time and the resultant glass volume was calculated. This study shows clearly that the allowance of crystalline phases in the glass melter can significantly decrease the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford.

  3. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We review the recent results of molecular dynamics simulations on metallic glasses. → They show the equivalence of mechanical failure and glass transition. → We discuss the microscopic mechanism behind this equivalence. → We show that the density of defects in metallic glasses is as high as a quarter. → Our concepts about the defect state in glasses need to be changed. - Abstract: The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  4. EPR dosimetry of glass substrate of mobile phone LCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trompier, F., E-mail: francois.trompier@irsn.fr [Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay aux roses (France); Della Monaca, S. [Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay aux roses (France); Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Fattibene, P. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy); Clairand, I. [Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay aux roses (France)

    2011-09-15

    Previous studies have shown that mineral glass from watches, windows and displays of personal electronic devices could be a suitable restrospective dosimeter in case of radiation accident. In this paper glass substrates of the window display of 100 mobile phones of different trademarks were analized by X-band cw-EPR before and after irradiation at 100 Gy. The objective of this study was to highlight some issues of EPR measurements of glass related to inter-sample variability of: i) signal line shape in irradiated and unirradiated glass; ii) signal intensity loss and line shape change with post-irradiation time; iii) signal changes induced by sample preparation and iv) signal changes induced by thermal annealing. Scope of the paper is to provide a phenomenological picture of the observed effects in order to give a warning about possible problems and to provide suggestions for future work. Explanation of the mechanisms and the causes leading to the observed effects was beyond the scope of this work. These preliminary results confirm that glass substrate of mobile phone displays should be considered as a fortuitous dosimeter in radiation accidents. However, albeit very promising, mineral glass presents a number of issues that should be thoroughly investigated and addressed in future work.

  5. Archeological Applications of XAFS: Prehistorical Paintings And Medieval Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farges, F.; Chalmin, E.; Vignaud, C.; Pallot-Frossard, I.; Susini, J.; Bargar, J.; Brown, G.E., Jr.; Menu, M.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    High-resolution manganese and iron K-edges XANES spectra were collected on several samples of archeological interest: prehistorical paintings and medieval glasses. XANES spectra were collected at the ID21 facility (ESRF, Grenoble, France) using a micro-beam device and at the 11-2 beamline (SSRL, Stanford, USA) using a submillimetric beam. The medieval glasses studied are from gothic glass windows from Normandy (XIVth century). The aim of this study is to help understand the chemical durability of these materials, exposed to weathering since the XIVth century. They are used as analogues of weathered glasses used to dump metallic wastes. These glasses show surficial enrichment in manganese, due to its oxidation from II (glass) to III/IV (surface), which precipitates as amorphous oxy-hydroxides. Similarly, iron is oxidized on the surface and forms ferrihydrite-type aggregates. The prehistorical paintings are from Lascaux and Ekain (Basque country). We choose in that study the black ones, rich in manganese to search for potential evidences of some 'savoir-faire' that the Paleolithic men could have used to realize their paint in rock art, as shown earlier for Fe-bearing pigments. A large number of highly valuable samples, micrometric scaled, were extracted from these frescoes and show large variation in the mineralogical nature of the black pigments used, from an amorphous psilomelane-type to a well-crystallized pyrolusite. Correlation with the crystals morphology helps understanding the know-how of these early artists.

  6. Characterization and Conduction Mechanism of Highly Conductive Vanadate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuaki Nishida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent studies of highly conductive barium iron vanadate glass with a composition of 20 BaO ∙ 10 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 (in mol %. Isothermal annealing of the vanadate glass for several ten minutes at a given temperature, higher than glass transition temperature or crystallization temperature, caused an increase in σ. Substitution of CuI (3d10, ZnII (3d10 and CuII (3d9 for FeIII (3d5 was investigated to elucidate the effect of electron configuration on the conductivity (σ. A marked decrease in the activation energy of conduction (Ea was also observed after the annealing. Values of Ea were correlated to the energy gap between the donor level and the conduction band (CB in the n-type semiconductor model. Isothermal annealing of ZnII-substituted vanadate glass (20 BaO ∙ 5 ZnO ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 at 450 °C for 30 min showed an increase in σ from 2.5 × 10–6 to 2.1 × 10–1 S cm–1, which was one order of magnitude larger than that of non-substituted vanadate glass (3.4 × 10–2 S cm–1. Under the same annealing condition, σ’s of 2.0 × 10–1 and 3.2 × 10–1 S cm–1 were observed for 20 BaO ∙ 5 Cu2O ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 and 20 BaO ∙ 5 CuO ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 glasses, respectively. These results demonstrate an increase in the carrier (electron density in the CB, primarily composed of anti-bonding 4s-orbitals.

  7. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    surfaces are called sizing. The sizing influences the properties of the interface between fibres and a matrix, and subsequently affects mechanical properties of composites. In this work the sizing of commercially available glass fibres was analysed so as to study the composition and chemical structures......Glass fibre reinforced polymer composites are widely used for industrial and engineering applications which include construction, aerospace, automotive and wind energy industry. During the manufacturing glass fibres, they are surface-treated with an aqueous solution. This process and the treated....... Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  8. Relaxation Pathways in Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    At temperatures below the glass transition temperature, physical properties of metallic glasses, such as density, viscosity, electrical resistivity or enthalpy, slowly evolve with time. This is the process of physical aging that occurs among all types of glasses and leads to structural changes at the microscopic level. Even though the relaxation pathways are ruled by thermodynamics as the glass attempts to re-attain thermodynamic equilibrium, they are steered by sluggish kinetics at the microscopic level. Understanding the structural and dynamic pathways of the relaxing glassy state is still one of the grand challenges in materials physics. We review some of the recent experimental advances made in understanding the nature of the relaxation phenomenon in metallic glasses and its implications to the macroscopic and microscopic properties changes of the relaxing glass.

  9. Crystallization of bismuth borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, Anu; Khanna, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Bismuth borate glasses with Bi 2 O 3 concentration of 20-66 mol% were prepared by melt quenching and devitrified by heat treatment above their glass transition temperatures. All glasses show a strong tendency towards crystallization on annealing that increases with Bi 2 O 3 concentration. The crystalline phases formed on devitrification were characterized by FTIR absorption spectroscopy and DSC measurements. Our studies reveal that phases produced in glasses are strongly determined by initial glass composition and the two most stable crystalline phases are: Bi 3 B 5 O 12 and Bi 4 B 2 O 9 . The metastable BiBO 3 phase can also be formed by devitrification of glass with 50 mol% of Bi 2 O 3 . This phase is, however, unstable and decomposes into Bi 3 B 5 O 12 and Bi 4 B 2 O 9 on prolonged heat treatment.

  10. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  11. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  12. Who will buy smart glasses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauschnabel, Philipp; Brem, Alexander; Ivens, Bjørn S.

    2015-01-01

    of research that investigates the role of personality in predicting media usage by analyzing smart glasses, particularly Google Glass. First, we integrate AR devices into the current evolution of media and technologies. Then, we draw on the Big Five Model of human personality and present the results from two...... studies that investigate the direct and moderating effects of human personality on the awareness and innovation adoption of smart glasses. Our results show that open and emotionally stable consumers tend to be more aware of Google Glass. Consumers who perceive the potential for high functional benefits...

  13. Halide laser glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-14

    Energy storage and energy extraction are of prime importance for efficient laser action and are affected by the line strengths and linewidths of optical transitions, excited-state lifetimes, nonradiative decay processes, spectroscopic inhomogeneities, nonlinear refractive index, and damage threshold. These properties are all host dependent. To illustrate this, the spectroscopic properties of Nd/sup 3 +/ have been measured in numerous oxide, oxyhalide, and halide glasses. A table summarizes the reported ranges of stimulated emission cross sections, peak wavelengths, linewidths, and radiative lifetimes associated with the /sup 4/F/sub 3/2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/I/sub 11/2/ lasing transition.

  14. New Erbium Doped Antimony Glasses for Laser and Glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses.

  15. Structural Glass Beams with Embedded Glass Fibre Reinforcement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, P.C.; Leung, Calvin; Kolstein, M.H.; Vambersky, J.N.J.A.; Bos, Freek; Louter, Pieter Christiaan; Veer, Fred

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibilities of pultruded glass fibre rods as embedded reinforcement in SentryGlas (SG) laminated glass beams. To do so, a series of pullout tests, to investigate the bond strength of the rods to the laminate, and a series of beam tests, to investigate the post-breakage

  16. Restorative Glass : Reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikonomopoulou, F.; Bristogianni, T.; Barou, L.; van Hees, R.P.J.; Nijsse, R.; Veer, F.A.; Henk, Schellen; van Schijndel, Jos

    2016-01-01

    The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and

  17. Spherical resonators coated by glass and glass-ceramic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Davor; Chiappini, Andrea; Chiasera, Alessandro; Armellini, Cristina; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Mazzola, Maurizio; Moser, Enrico; Varas, Stefano; Berneschi, Simone; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Pelli, Stefano; Soria, Silvia; Speranza, Giorgio; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Prudenzano, Francesco; Feron, Patrice; Ivanda, Mile; Cibiel, Gilles; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    Coating of spherical microresonators is a very promising technique for optimizing their optical properties. Optical coatings are constituted by glasses, polymer, and glass ceramics, passive or activated by luminescent species, Glass ceramic activated by rare earth ions are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing to develop interesting new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. At the state of art the fabrication techniques based on bottom-up and top-down approaches appear to be viable although a specific effort is required to achieve the necessary reliability and reproducibility of the preparation protocols. In particular, the dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the employed synthesis still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including coating of spherical microresonators. Here we present a review regarding spherical microresonators coated by glass and glass-ceramic film activated by Er3+ ions. Er3+ ions appear to be embedded in a crystalline or amorphous environment and the lifetime dynamic is influenced by the geometry and by the morphology of the system. Photoluminescence results and morphologic properties are discussed for both amorphous and glass ceramic films.

  18. Glass ceramic fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaschek, O.; Paulitsch, P.

    1983-01-01

    As the correlation between mineralogical phase and chemical composition influences the type of application at different high temperatures, we studied the mineralogical phases of nine crystal glass fibres of the temperature ranges 1 150 degrees Celsius (Type 1), 1 400 degrees Celsius (Type 2) and 1 500 degrees Celsius (Type 3) at various high temperatures. The methods used in the study were microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential thermal analysis. The investigations showed that mullite forms in glassy fibres of the system Al 2 O 3 . SiO 2 from 850 degrees Celsius to 990 degrees Celsius as 2/1 mullite; 3/2 mullite appeared above 990 degrees Celsius besides the crystallization of cristobalite. Fibres with 95 per cent Al 2 O 3 include the phases delta-Al 2 O 3 and alpha- Al 2 O 3 and mullite. Delta- Al 2 O 3 is stable up to 1 100 degrees Celsius. Alpha-Al 2 O 3 and mullite are only stable phases at 1 400 degrees Celsius. These different crystal phases influence the quality of the technical fibre according to the stability field of glass and crystals. This study has determined that it is possible to identify different fibres from different productions by their mineralogical compositions and to relate them to the high temperature application

  19. INORGANIC PHOSPHORS IN GLASS BASED ON LEAD SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aseev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We created and synthesized luminescent composite of the "phosphor in glass" type, based on the lead-silicate matrix and fine-dispersed powder of cerium-activated yttrium-aluminum garnet crystal. Lead-silicate system (40SiO2- 20PbO-(40-x PbF2-xAlF3, x = 0-25 was chosen as the glassy matrix. Initial glass was reduced to powder (frit for "phosphor in glass" composite with a particle size about 50 µm. Glass frit and powder of commercial YAG:Ce3+ phosphor were mixed in a ratio of 30 to 70 (wt %. Then this composite was pressed in a tablet and sintered on a quartz substrate at 823 К for 30 minutes. Thus, the plane parallel sheet for composite of the "phosphor in glass" was obtained with a diameter equal to 10 mm. For the purpose to reduce the loss of light in the presence of dispersion at a glass-phosphor boundary, optimization of glass mixture was done by adjusting the refractive index. X-ray phase and spectral-luminescent analysis of the derived composite were done. The results of these studies showed that there was no degradation of YAG: Ce powder during sintering. Dependence of luminescence intensity from temperature in the range from room temperature to 473 К was studied. It was shown, that with the phosphor in glass usage thermal quenching of luminescence was reduced in comparison with the silicone. The model of white LED was created with the "phosphor in glass" composite based on lead-silicate glasses with low temperature of vitrifying. The derived LED emits white light with a color temperature of 4370 K, and the luminous efficiency is equal to 58 lm/W. The developed luminescent composite based on the lead-silicate matrix can be used for the production of high-power white light LED.

  20. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste

  1. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  2. Properties of gallium lanthanum sulphide glass

    OpenAIRE

    Bastock, P.; Craig, C.; Khan, K.; Weatherby, E.; Yao, J.; Hewak, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses has been studied in order to ascertain properties across the entire glass forming region. This is the first comprehensive study of GLS glass over a wide compositional range.

  3. Superconductive analogue of spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigel'man, M.; Ioffe, L.; Vinokur, V.; Larkin, A.

    1987-07-01

    The properties of granular superconductors in magnetic fields, namely the existence of a new superconductive state analogue of the low-temperature superconductive state in spin glasses are discussed in the frame of the infinite-range model and the finite-range models. Experiments for elucidation of spin-glass superconductive state in real systems are suggested. 30 refs

  4. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  5. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  6. Radiation effects in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Howitt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of radiation effects in complex silicate glasses has received renewed attention because of their use in special applications such as high level nuclear waste immobilization and fiber optics. Radiation changes the properties of these glasses by altering their electronic and atomic configurations. These alterations or defects may cause dilatations or microscopic phase changes along with absorption centers that limit the optical application of the glasses. Atomic displacements induced in the already disordered structure of the glasses may affect their use where heavy irradiating particles such as alpha particles, alpha recoils, fission fragments, or accelerated ions are present. Large changes (up to 1%) in density may result. In some cases the radiation damage may be severe enough to affect the durability of the glass in aqueous solutions. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning radiation effects on density, durability, stored energy, microstructure and optical properties of silicate glasses. Both simple glasses and complex glasses used for immobilization of nuclear waste are considered

  7. Molecular mobility in sugar glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, van den I.J.

    2000-01-01

    Glasses are liquids that exhibit solid state behavior as a result of their extremely high viscosity. Regarding their application to foods, glasses play a role in the preservation of foods, due to their high viscosity and the concomitant low molecular mobility. This thesis focuses on sugar

  8. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time.

  9. Holder for rotating glass body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolleck, F.W.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint

  10. International Congress on Glass XII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doremus, R H; LaCourse, W C; Mackenzie, J D; Varner, J R; Wolf, W W [eds.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 158 papers are included under nine headings: structure and glass formation; optical properties; electrical and magnetic properties; mechanical properties and relaxation; mass transport; chemical durability and surfaces; nucleation; crystallization; and glass ceramics; processing; and automatic controls. Separate abstracts were prepared for eight papers; four of the remaining papers had been processed previously for the data base. (DLC)

  11. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  12. Phonon scattering in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review some recent theoretical and experimental developments in the study of metallic glasses at temperatures near or below 1K. In this temperature regime, it appears that practically all glasses, whether metallic or insulating, behave in a similar fashion. The fact that such similarities occur, despite substantial structural differences between metallic and insulating glasses, constitutes a major theoretical challenge. This challenge, however, is not directly addressed in what follows. Instead, the evidence for universal behavior and the theory which is necessary to understand this evidence are emphasized. It turns out that most of this evidence involves a comparison of phonon scattering in metallic glasses with its counterpart in insulating glasses

  13. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  14. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  15. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

    2001-07-24

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  16. Joints in Tempered Glass Using Glass Dowel Discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    One of the major reasons for using glass in structures is its transparency; however, traditional mechanical joints such as friction joints and steel dowel pinned connections are compromising the transparency. The present paper describes a novel joint which is practically maintaining the complete...... transparency of the glass. This is achieved by using a dowel disc made entirely of tempered glass. The concept of the joint is proved by pilot tests and numerical models. From the work it is seen that the load-carrying capacity of such a connection is similar to what is found for traditionally in-plane loaded...

  17. Impact of Redox on Glass Durability: The Glass Selection Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEELER, DAVID

    2004-01-01

    Recent glass formulation activities have focused on developing alternative frit compositions for use with specific sludge batches to maximize melt rate and/or waste throughput. The general trend has been to increase the total alkali content in the glass through the use of a high alkali based frit, a less washed sludge, or a combination of the two. As a result, predictions of durability have become a limiting factor in defining the projected operating windows for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for certain systems. An additional issue for these high alkali glasses has been the effect of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on the durability of the glass. Recent analyses have indicated that the application of the durability model's value without consideration of the overall glass composition may lead to a more significant shift (larger magnitude) than needed. Therefore, activation of the REDOX term in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) may have a significant impact on the predicted operational windows based on model predictions, but may not represent the realistic impact on the measured durability. In this report, two specific issues are addressed. First, a review of the data used to develop PCCS (in particular the durability model) showed the potential for a REDOX interaction that is not accounted for. More specifically, three terms were added to the current model and were found to be statistically significant at a confidence level of 95 per cent. These results suggest a possible interaction between REDOX and glass composition that is not accurately captured leading to potentially conservative decisions regarding the durability of reduced glasses. The second issue addressed in this report is the development of a 45 glass test matrix to assess the effect of REDOX on durability as well as to provide insight into specific interactive compositional effects on durability. The glasses were selected to support the assessment of the following specific

  18. Properties and structural features of iron doped BABAL glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Signo Tadeu dos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical durability, density and structure of the BABAL glasses with batch compositions (100-x(0.30BaO·0.50B2O3·0.20Al2O3·xFe 2O3 (1 < x < 10 mol%, were investigated using Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR, X-ray diffraction, Raman and differential thermal analysis (DTA. The chemical durability for the glass of composition 27BaO·45B2O3·18Al 2O3·10Fe2O3 (mol% at 90 °C in distilled water was 700 times lower than that of iron phosphate glass 40Fe2O3·60P2O 5 (mol%. The Mössbauer spectra indicate the presence of iron (II and iron (III in tetrahedral or octahedral coordination. The results obtained from the g ef = 4.3 EPR line are typical of the occurrence of iron (III occupying substitutional sites and the line g ef = 2.0 is related to the association of two or more Fe ions found in the interstices (or holes occupied by the glass modifier cations of the glass network. The paths of X-ray diffraction are typical for glasses based in borate glasses. The Raman spectra showed that the boroxol ring disappears with the increase of iron content, concomitant with the appearance of BO4 and tetraborate structural units. At these conditions, an increase of dissolution rate and clustering of iron ions is observed.

  19. Glass packages in interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO 2 . The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ''source term'' models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs

  20. SCHOTT optical glass in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Petzold, Uwe

    2017-09-01

    Optical systems in space environment have to withstand harsh radiation. Radiation in space usually comes from three main sources: the Van Allen radiation belts (mainly electrons and protons); solar proton events and solar energetic particles (heavier ions); and galactic cosmic rays (gamma- or x-rays). Other heavy environmental effects include short wavelength radiation (UV) and extreme temperatures (cold and hot). Radiation can damage optical glasses and effect their optical properties. The most common effect is solarization, the decrease in transmittance by radiation. This effect can be observed for UV radiation and for gamma or electron radiation. Optical glasses can be stabilized against many radiation effects. SCHOTT offers radiation resistant glasses that do not show solarization effects for gamma or electron radiation. A review of SCHOTT optical glasses in space missions shows, that not only radiation resistant glasses are used in the optical designs, but also standard optical glasses. This publication finishes with a selection of space missions using SCHOTT optical glass over the last decades.

  1. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  2. Restorative glass: reversible, discreet restoration using structural glass components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidra Oikonomopoulou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of structural glass as the principal material in restoration and conservation practices is a distinguishable, yet discreet approach. The transparency of glass allows the simultaneous perception of the monument at both its original and present condition, preserving its historical and aesthetical integrity. Concurrently, the material’s unique mechanical properties enable the structural consolidation of the monument. As a proof of concept, the restoration of Lichtenberg Castle is proposed. Solid cast glass units are suggested to complete the missing parts, in respect to the existing construction technique and aesthetics of the original masonry. Aiming for a reversible system, the glass units are interlocking, ensuring the overall stability without necessitating permanent, adhesive connections. This results in an elegant and reversible intervention.

  3. Glass enamel and glass-ceramic coatings for chemical apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Es'kov, A.S.; Oleinik, M.I.; Shabrova, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the known anticorrosion coatings used in chemical engineering, glass enamel base coatings are distinguished by such advantages as a high degree of continuity and chemical resistance. The paper describes basic principles for the creation of acid and alkali resistant glass enamel and ceramic coatings for chemical apparatus. As the result of investgations, glass enamel coatings with increased electrical conductivity and also experimental production compositions of chemical, temperature and radiation resistant coatings for protection of chemical equipment of 12Kh18N10T stainless steel have been developed. The coatings have successfully passed testing under service conditions. A new type of coating is short-term glass enamel, which may be recommended for use in chemical machinery manufacturing and other branches of industry in oxidation-free heating and forming of stainless steels

  4. The ions displacement through glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevegnani, F.X.

    1980-01-01

    A method to introduce sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, iron and other ions in vacuum or gas light bulb by mean of a strong stationay electric field. The experiments showed that the mass deposited inside the bulbs obey Faraday's law of electrolysis, although the process of mass transfer is not that of a conventional electrolysis. A method which allows to show that hydrogen ions do not penetrate the glass structure is also described. Using radioactive tracers, it is shown that heavy ions, such PO 4 --- do not penetrate the glass structure. The vitreous state and the glass properties were studied for interpreting experimental results. (Author) [pt

  5. The molten glass sewing machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, P.-T.; Inamura, Chikara; Lizardo, Daniel; Franchin, Giorgia; Stern, Michael; Houk, Peter; Oxman, Neri

    2017-04-01

    We present a fluid-instability-based approach for digitally fabricating geometrically complex uniformly sized structures in molten glass. Formed by mathematically defined and physically characterized instability patterns, such structures are produced via the additive manufacturing of optically transparent glass, and result from the coiling of an extruded glass thread. We propose a minimal geometrical model-and a methodology-to reliably control the morphology of patterns, so that these building blocks can be assembled into larger structures with tailored functionally and optically tunable properties. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications'.

  6. Nondestructive Redox Quantification Reveals Glassmaking of Rare French Gothic Stained Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunault, Myrtille O J Y; Loisel, Claudine; Bauchau, Fanny; Lemasson, Quentin; Pacheco, Claire; Pichon, Laurent; Moignard, Brice; Boulanger, Karine; Hérold, Michel; Calas, Georges; Pallot-Frossard, Isabelle

    2017-06-06

    The sophisticated colors of medieval glasses arise from their transition metal (TM) impurities and capture information about ancient glassmaking techniques. Beyond the glass chemical composition, the TM redox is also a key factor in the glass color, but its quantification without any sampling is a challenge. We report a combination of nondestructive and noninvasive quantitative analyses of the chemical composition by particle-induced X-ray emission-particle-induced γ-ray emission mappings and of the color and TM element speciation by optical absorption spectroscopy performed on a red-blue-purple striped glass from the stained glass windows of the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris, France, during its restoration. These particular glass pieces must have been produced as a single shot, which guarantees that the chemical variations reflect the recipe in use in a specific medieval workshop. The quantitative elemental mappings demonstrate that the colored glass parts are derived from the same base glass, to which TMs were deliberately added. Optical absorption spectra reveal the origin of the colors: blue from Co II , red from copper nanoparticles, and purple from Mn III . Furthermore, the derivation of the quantitative redox state of each TM in each color shows that the contents of Fe, Cu, and Mn were adjusted to ensure a reducing glass matrix in the red stripe or a metastable overoxidized glass in the purple stripe. We infer that the agility of the medieval glassmaker allowed him to master the redox kinetics in the glass by rapid shaping and cooling to obtain a snapshot of the thermodynamically unstable glass colors.

  7. Quantitative Evaluation by Glucose Diffusion of Microleakage in Aged Calcium Silicate-Based Open-Sandwich Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Koubi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the in vitro marginal integrity of open-sandwich restorations based on aged calcium silicate cement versus resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Class II cavities were prepared on 30 extracted human third molars. These teeth were randomly assigned to two groups (=10 to compare a new hydraulic calcium silicate cement designed for restorative dentistry (Biodentine, Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Ionolux, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany in open-sandwich restorations covered with a light-cured composite. Positive (=5 and negative (=5 controls were included. The teeth simultaneously underwent thermocycling and mechanocycling using a fatigue cycling machine (1,440 cycles, 5–55°C; 86,400 cycles, 50 N/cm2. The specimens were then stored in phosphate-buffered saline to simulate aging. After 1 year, the teeth were submitted to glucose diffusion, and the resulting data were analyzed with a nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. The Biodentine group and the Ionolux group presented glucose concentrations of 0.074 ± 0.035 g/L and 0.080 ± 0.032 g/L, respectively. No statistically significant differences were detected between the two groups. Therefore, the calcium silicate-based material performs as well as the resin-modified glass ionomer cement in open-sandwich restorations.

  8. Organic modification of glass structure : new glasses or new polymers?

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Helmut K.

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of organic components into glass structures is possible by sol-gel techniques and leads to hybrid materials. The question whether these materials are more likely glasses or organic polymers is discussed. Different data show that the inorganic network structure governs important properties such as brittleness, hardness, or homogeneity. Other properties, such as density, free volume, or thermal stability depend on the organic groupings. Summarizing one can say that organically ...

  9. Shattered glass seeking the densest matter: the color glass condensate

    CERN Multimedia

    Appell, D

    2004-01-01

    "Physicists investigating heavy-particle collisions believe they are on the track of a universal form of matter, one common to very high energy particles ranging from protons to heavy nuclei such as uranium. Some think that this matter, called a color glass condensate, may explain new nuclear properties and the process of particle formation during collisions. Experimentalists have recently reported intriguing data that suggest a color glass condensate has actually formed in past work" (1 page)

  10. Observation on Surface Change of Fragile Glass: Temperature - Time Dependence Studied by X-Ray Reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Hiroyuki; Kitahara, Amane; Takahashi, Isao

    2004-01-01

    The structural change of a fragile glass surface close to the glass transition temperature Tg is studied by using X-ray reflectivity. Measurements were performed on surfaces of maltitol, which is a typical polyalcohol fragile glass with Tg = 320K. Upon both heating and cooling, we find the following features which are also noticed in silicate glass surfaces: (i) On heating, the surface morphology indicates a variation at temperatures below Tg; (ii) A drastic increase in surface roughness occurs at a temperature about 333K on heating, which is 13K higher than Tg; (iii) During the cooling of the sample, formation of a low-density surface layer (3nm at 293K) is observed. Prior to the crystallization, nm - μm sized domains were grown at the surface, which might not be reported for other glasses

  11. Potential for microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in basaltic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mai Yia; Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Roden, Eric E

    2015-05-01

    Basaltic glass (BG) is an amorphous ferrous iron [Fe(II)]-containing material present in basaltic rocks, which are abundant on rocky planets such as Earth and Mars. Previous research has suggested that Fe(II) in BG can serve as an energy source for chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism, which has important ramifications for potential past and present microbial life on Mars. However, to date there has been no direct demonstration of microbially catalyzed oxidation of Fe(II) in BG. In this study, three different culture systems were used to investigate the potential for microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in BG, including (1) the chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing "Straub culture"; (2) the mixotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organism Desulfitobacterium frappieri strain G2; and (3) indigenous microorganisms from a streambed Fe seep in Wisconsin. The BG employed consisted of clay and silt-sized particles of freshly quenched lava from the TEB flow in Kilauea, Hawaii. Soluble Fe(II) or chemically reduced NAu-2 smectite (RS) were employed as positive controls to verify Fe(II) oxidation activity in the culture systems. All three systems demonstrated oxidation of soluble Fe(II) and/or structural Fe(II) in RS, whereas no oxidation of Fe(II) in BG material was observed. The inability of the Straub culture to oxidize Fe(II) in BG was particularly surprising, as this culture can oxidize other insoluble Fe(II)-bearing minerals such as biotite, magnetite, and siderite. Although the reason for the resistance of the BG toward enzymatic oxidation remains unknown, it seems possible that the absence of distinct crystal faces or edge sites in the amorphous glass renders the material resistant to such attack. These findings have implications with regard to the idea that Fe(II)-Si-rich phases in basalt rocks could provide a basis for chemolithotrophic microbial life on Mars, specifically in neutral-pH environments where acid-promoted mineral dissolution and

  12. Potential and challenges of interdisciplinary research on historical window glass, stained glass and reverse glass paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trümpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Kessler, Cordula; Goll, Jürg

    The interdisciplinary study of ancient materials has become an increasingly common strategy, mainly because it has proved to be a highly rewarding approach to studying the age, provenance and production of archaeological objects. The results of such an approach sometimes also provide answers to questions relating not only to socio-cultural, economic or technological developments in a particular region or period (trade, innovation, production etc.), but also the conservation of the materials or artefacts in question. A number of analytical methods, ranging from microscopic to elementary analyses, have been successfully applied to determine the nature of materials and technologies used in the production, as well as to identify the provenance of ancient glass. As far as window glass and stained glass is concerned, the study of architectural context and art history - as well as the technological characteristics of materials - has proved to be most helpful in determining history, production and artistic importance of the objects under study. This paper discusses some of the multidisciplinary studies that the Vitrocentre Romont has conducted on early medieval window glass, stained glass and reverse glass paintings and illustrates the potential of a holistic approach in solving questions about materials, techniques, window design and conservation. It also addresses the limitations of the approach, which are often related to finding appropriate (i.e. non-destructive and possibly portable) methods for the analysis of sometimes extremely fragile stained glass windows.

  13. Thermodynamic explanation of eliminating platinum inclusions in laser glass by POCl3 gas bubbling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zhonghong; Hu Lili; Yu Yaochu

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of eliminating platinum inclusions in laser glass by POCl 3 gas bubbling has been discussed from thermodynamic aspects in the present paper. It is deduced from calculated reaction free energy that the platinum inclusion is ionized after POCl 3 gas bubbling in the existence of water and oxygen. The platinum inclusion is dissolved as platinum(II) metaphosphate in the laser glass matrix

  14. Properties Of Soda/Yttria/Silica Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental study of glass-formation compositional region of soda/ yttria/silicate system and of selected physical properties of glasses within compositional region part of continuing effort to identify glasses with high coefficients of thermal expansion and high softening temperatures, for use as coatings on superalloys and as glass-to-metal seals.

  15. The Future of all glass structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is new developments in structural engineering related especially to the use of the material glass. After a philosophical discussion about why glass is the material for the Future, all glass elements and related techniques are presented from which an all glass building can be assembled. To

  16. The bearable lightness of all glass structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is new developments in structural engineering related especially to the use of the material glass. After a philosophical discussion about why glass is the material for the Future, all glass elements and related techniques are presented from which an all glass building can be assembled. To

  17. Image-based stained glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We present a method of restyling an image so that it approximates the visual appearance of a work of stained glass. To this end, we develop a novel approach which involves image warping, segmentation, querying, and colorization along with texture synthesis. In our method, a given input image is first segmented. Each segment is subsequently transformed to match real segments of stained glass queried from a database of image exemplars. By using real sources of stained glass, our method produces high quality results in this nascent area of nonphotorealistic rendering. The generation of the stained glass requires only modest amounts of user interaction. This interaction is facilitated with a unique region-merging tool.

  18. Structural principles in network glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boolchand, P.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial progress in decoding the structure of network glasses has taken place in the past few years. Crucial insights into the molecular structure of glasses have emerged by application of Raman bond and Moessbauer site spectroscopy. In this context, the complimentary role of each spectroscopy as a check on the interpretation of the other, is perhaps one of the more significant developments in the field. New advances in the theory of the subject have also taken place. It is thus appropriate to inquire what general principles if any, have emerged on the structure of real glasses. The author reviews some of the principal ideas on the structure of inorganic network glasses with the aid of specific examples. (Auth.)

  19. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  20. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  1. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  2. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  3. Penetration Physics of Armor Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-30

    shaft (b). The surface of the fragment agglomerate in contact with the projectile shaft in Figure 6 was blackened and coherent, suggesting frictional...rearrangement and breaking up of glass particles, and sliding at the glass/ metal interface. RESULTS Figure 2 shows shear stress as a function of shear...several decades to relate material failure in metals and composites to the underlying microscopic processes, thereby helping to select appropriate

  4. A combination of a connector for glass elements and such glass elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.

    2014-01-01

    A combination of a connector for glass elements and such glass elements to provide a loadbearing glass construc- tion that comprises at least one glass post and at least one glass beam that are arranged adjacent to each other, wherein the connector is arranged to provide a rotationally fixed

  5. Glass science tutorial: Lecture number-sign 2, Operating electric glass melters. James N. Edmonson, Lecturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains basic information on electric furnaces used for glass melting and on the properties of glass useful for the stabilization of radioactive wastes. Furnace nomenclature, furnace types, typical silicate glass composition and properties, thermal conductivity information, kinetics of the melting process, glass furnace refractory materials composition and thermal conductivity, and equations required for the operation of glass melters are included

  6. Contrasting the magnetic response between magnetic-glass and reentrant spin-glass

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, S. B.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic-glass is a recently identified phenomenon in various classes of magnetic systems undergoing a first order magnetic phase transition. We shall highlight here a few experimentally determined characteristics of magnetic-glass and the relevant set of experiments, which will enable to distinguish a magnetic-glass unequivocally from the well known phenomena of spin-glass and reentrant spin-glass.

  7. Production of lightweight foam glass (invited talk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    result in viscous sintering and subsequent foaming of the glass melt. The porous glass melt is cooled down to room temperature to freeze-in the foam structure. The resulting foam glass is applied in constructions as a light weight material to reduce load bearing capacity and as heat insulating material......The foam glass production allows low cost recycling of postconsumer glass and industrial waste materials as foaming agent or as melt resource. Foam glass is commonly produced by utilising milled glass mixed with a foaming agent. The powder mixture is heat-treated to around 10^3.7 – 10^6 Pa s, which...... in buildings and industry. We foam panel glass from old televisions with different foaming agents. We discuss the foaming ability and the foaming mechanism of different foaming systems. We compare several studies to define a viscous window for preparing low density foam glass. However, preparing foam glass...

  8. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input

  9. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

  10. BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling

  11. Bioactive glasses: Frontiers and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry L. Hench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. In the 1980’s it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass®. The four eras are: a discovery; b clinical application; c tissue regeneration; and d innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs.

  12. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  13. Experimental Design for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses with High Waste Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Cooley, Scott K.; Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2015-01-01

    This report discusses the development of an experimental design for the initial phase of the Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) enhanced glass study. This report is based on a manuscript written for an applied statistics journal. Appendices A, B, and E include additional information relevant to the LAW enhanced glass experimental design that is not included in the journal manuscript. The glass composition experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC involving 15 LAW glass components. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this report. One of the glass components, SO 3 , has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO 3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO 3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The partial quadratic mixture model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This report describes how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study. A layered design consists of points on an outer layer, and inner layer, and a center point. There were 18 outer-layer glasses chosen using optimal experimental design software to augment 147 existing glass compositions that were within the LAW glass composition experimental region. Then 13 inner-layer glasses were chosen with the software to augment the existing and outer-layer glasses. The experimental

  14. Experimental Design for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses with High Waste Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooley, Scott K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    This report discusses the development of an experimental design for the initial phase of the Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) enhanced glass study. This report is based on a manuscript written for an applied statistics journal. Appendices A, B, and E include additional information relevant to the LAW enhanced glass experimental design that is not included in the journal manuscript. The glass composition experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC involving 15 LAW glass components. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this report. One of the glass components, SO3, has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The partial quadratic mixture model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This report describes how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study. A layered design consists of points on an outer layer, and inner layer, and a center point. There were 18 outer-layer glasses chosen using optimal experimental design software to augment 147 existing glass compositions that were within the LAW glass composition experimental region. Then 13 inner-layer glasses were chosen with the software to augment the existing and outer

  15. Characterization of α-cordierite glass-ceramics from fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yong; Cheng Weimin; Cai Hesheng

    2005-01-01

    Batches of α-cordierite glass-ceramics, designated as GC-I and GC-II, containing 68 and 64 wt.% fly ash, respectively, were crystallized in the temperature range of 1125-1320 deg. C. The XRD (X-ray powder diffractometer) of the glass-ceramics show that α-cordierite became the dominant phase in GC-I and GC-II at 1200 deg. C. GC-I and GC-II, whose solid parts contain 74 and 78 vol.% α-cordierite and whose compressive strengths are 35 and 50 MPa, respectively, have the respective linear thermal expansion coefficients of 1.51 x 10 -6 and 1.43 x 10 -6 / deg. C. The fly ash α-cordierite glass-ceramics can be employed as kiln furniture, honeycomb substrates for catalysts, and heat exchangers

  16. High-Level Waste Glass Formulation Model Sensitivity Study 2009 Glass Formulation Model Versus 1996 Glass Formulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsher, J.D.; Meinert, F.L.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the differences between two HLW glass formulation models (GFM): The 1996 GFM and 2009 GFM. A glass formulation model is a collection of glass property correlations and associated limits, as well as model validity and solubility constraints; it uses the pretreated HLW feed composition to predict the amount and composition of glass forming additives necessary to produce acceptable HLW glass. The 2009 GFM presented in this report was constructed as a nonlinear optimization calculation based on updated glass property data and solubility limits described in PNNL-18501 (2009). Key mission drivers such as the total mass of HLW glass and waste oxide loading are compared between the two glass formulation models. In addition, a sensitivity study was performed within the 2009 GFM to determine the effect of relaxing various constraints on the predicted mass of the HLW glass.

  17. Complexing agents and pH influence on chemical durability of type I moulded glass containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biavati, Alberto; Poncini, Michele; Ferrarini, Arianna; Favaro, Nicola; Scarpa, Martina; Vallotto, Marta

    2017-06-16

    Among the factors that affect the glass surface chemical durability, pH and complexing agents presence in aqueous solution have the main role (1). Glass surface attack can be also related to the delamination issue with glass particles appearance in the pharmaceutical preparation. A few methods to check for glass containers delamination propensity and some control guidelines have been proposed (2,3). The present study emphasizes the possible synergy between a few complexing agents with pH on the borosilicate glass chemical durability. Hydrolytic attack was performed in small volume 23 ml type I glass containers autoclaved according to EP or USP for 1 hour at 121°C, in order to enhance the chemical attack due to time, temperature and the unfavourable surface/volume ratio. 0,048 M or 0.024 M (moles/liter) solutions of the acids citric, glutaric, acetic, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) and sodium phosphate with water for comparison, were used for the trials. The pH was adjusted ± 0,05 units at fixed values 5,5-6,6-7-7,4-8-9 by LiOH diluted solution. Since silicon is the main glass network former, silicon release into the attack solutions was chosen as the main index of the glass surface attack and analysed by ICPAES. The work was completed by the analysis of the silicon release in the worst attack conditions, of moulded glass, soda lime type II and tubing borosilicate glass vials to compare different glass compositions and forming technologies. Surface analysis by SEM was finally performed to check for the surface status after the worst chemical attack condition by citric acid. Copyright © 2017, Parenteral Drug Association.

  18. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses

  19. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  20. Bacterial microleakage of temporary filling materials used for endodontic access cavity sealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Križnar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: None of the tested materials were able to completely prevent bacterial microleakage. Adhesively bonded composites and Cavit offer better sealing compared with glass ionomer cements, resin modified glass ionomer cements, and composites without the use of an adhesive system.

  1. Chiral-glass transition and replica symmetry breaking of a three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass

    OpenAIRE

    Hukushima, K.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive equilibrium Monte Carlo simulations are performed for a three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass with the nearest-neighbor Gaussian coupling to investigate its spin-glass and chiral-glass orderings. The occurrence of a finite-temperature chiral-glass transition without the conventional spin-glass order is established. Critical exponents characterizing the transition are different from those of the standard Ising spin glass. The calculated overlap distribution suggests the appearance ...

  2. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G P; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-21

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ∼20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  3. Ultrasonic relaxations in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Tripodo, G.; Carini, G.; Cosio, E.; Bartolotta, A.; Di Marco, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range from 10 to 70 MHz have been measured in M 2 O-B 2 O 3 borate glasses (M: Li or Ag) as a function of temperature between 15 and 350 K. The velocity of sound waves decreases with increasing temperature in all the glasses, the decrease as the temperature is increased is larger in glasses containing silver than in those with lithium. A broad relaxation peak characterises the attenuation behaviour of the lithium and silver borate glasses at temperatures below 100 K and is paralleled by a corresponding dispersive behaviour of the sound velocity. Above 100 K, the ultrasonic velocity shows a nearly linear behaviour regulated by the vibrational anharmonicity, which decreases with increasing content of modifier oxide and is smaller in lithium than in silver borates. These results suggest that the relaxation of structural defects and the anharmonicity of borate glasses are strongly affected by two parameters: the number of bridging bonds per network forming ion and the polarising power of network modifier ions which occupy sites in the existing interstices

  4. Yield point of metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Ogata, Shigenobu; Li, Ju

    2006-01-01

    Shear bands form in most bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) within a narrow range of uniaxial strain ε y ≅ 2%. We propose this critical condition corresponds to embryonic shear band (ESB) propagation, not its nucleation. To propagate an ESB, the far-field shear stress τ ∞ ∼ Eε y /2 must exceed the quasi-steady-state glue traction τ glue of shear-alienated glass until the glass transition temperature is approached internally due to frictional heating, at which point ESB matures as a runaway shear crack. The incubation length scale l inc necessary for this maturation is estimated to be ∼10 2 nm for Zr-based BMGs, below which sample size-scale shear localization does not happen. In shear-alienated glass, the last resistance against localized shearing comes from extremely fast downhill dissipative dynamics of timescale comparable to atomic vibrations, allowing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to capture this recovery process which governs τ glue . We model four metallic glasses: a binary Lennard-Jones system, two binary embedded atom potential systems and a quinternary embedded atom system. Despite vast differences in the structure and interatomic interactions, the four MD calculations give ε y predictions of 2.4%, 2.1%, 2.6% and 2.9%, respectively

  5. Bulk metallic glass for low noise fluxgate, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The team of Prime Photonics, Virginia Tech, and Utron Kinetics propose to develop a fabrication technology that will result in drop-in replacements for a diminishing...

  6. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  7. Fragility, anharmonicity and anelasticity of silver borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carini, Giovanni; Carini, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Giovanna; Tripodo, Gaspare; Bartolotta, Antonio; Marco, Gaetano Di

    2006-01-01

    The fragility and the anharmonicity of (Ag 2 O) x (B 2 O 3 ) 1-x borate glasses have been quantified by measuring the change in the specific heat capacity at the glass transition temperature T g and the room-temperature thermodynamic Grueneisen parameter. Increasing the silver oxide content above X = 0.10 leads to an increase of both the parameters, showing that a growing fragility of a glass-forming liquid is predictive of an increasing overall anharmonicity of its glassy state. The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range of 10-70 MHz have also been measured in silver borate glasses as a function of temperature between 1.5 and 300 K. The experimental data reveal anelastic behaviours which are governed by (i) quantum-mechanical tunnelling below 20 K (ii) thermally activated relaxations between 20 and 200 K and (iii) vibrational anharmonicity at even higher temperatures. Evaluation of tunnelling (C) and relaxation (C * ) strengths shows that C is independent of the structural changes affecting the borate network with increasing metal oxide content and is at least one order of magnitude smaller than C * . The latter observation implies that only a small fraction of the locally mobile defects are subjected to tunnelling motions

  8. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (nano-crystals in a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase is zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  9. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  10. Gauge theory of glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    A new analytical approach for the description of the glass transition in a frustrated system is suggested. The theory is based on the non-equilibrium dynamics technique, and takes into account the interaction of the local order field with the massive gauge field, which describes frustration-induced plastic deformation. The glass transition is regarded as a phase transition interrupted because of the premature critical slowing-down of one of the degrees of freedom caused by the frustrations. It is shown that freezing of the system appears when the correlation length and relaxation time of the gauge field diverge. The Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann relation for the transition kinetics and the critical exponent for the nonlinear susceptibility, 2.5∼ t correlation function dependence on time, and explains the boson peak appearance on this curve. In addition, the function of the glass transition temperature value with cooling rate is derived; this dependence fully conforms with known experimental data

  11. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Oliveira Fillho, J.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO 3 (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  12. Properties of Chemically Synthesized Nanostructured Copper (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wet chemical method has been successfully used in preparation of Copper (II) Oxide Thin Film by spin coating on glass substrates, at an annealing temperature of 600°C for 1 hour in air. It has high absorbency within visible region wavelength 400 – 700 nm of the electromagnetic wave, making it a suitable absorber in the ...

  13. Applications for curved glass in buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Neugebauer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last years an increase of the number of building projects with built-in curved glass can be observed. The applications can principally be curved monolithic glass, laminated safety glass or insulated glass. This fact makes it absolute of interest to make more investigations in this field. The investigations can be focused on e.g. the process of the bending of the glass to bring it into a certain shape, or the very difficult topic of pre-stressing it. The state of the art of the production process of such glass shows some different ways to produce curved glass. The most used way is to bend the glass at a high temperature of more than 550° Celsius. Another kind of curved glass can be achieved in combination with the laminating process. With the cooling down at the end of the laminating process the interlayer becomes stiff enough to hold the shape by activated shear forces between the glass layers. Another possibility is to produce flat glass and bend it while mounting the glass. The question how to pre-stress curved glass is on the very first beginning of investigations. All these different processes are on the first view very easy but very difficult in the detail.

  14. Theories of glass formation and the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, J S

    2014-04-01

    This key-issues review is a plea for a new focus on simpler and more realistic models of glass-forming fluids. It seems to me that we have too often been led astray by sophisticated mathematical models that beautifully capture some of the most intriguing features of glassy behavior, but are too unrealistic to provide bases for predictive theories. As illustrations of what I mean, the first part of this article is devoted to brief summaries of imaginative, sensible, but disparate and often contradictory ideas for solving glass problems. Almost all of these ideas remain alive today, with their own enthusiastic advocates. I then describe numerical simulations, mostly by H Tanaka and coworkers, in which it appears that very simple, polydisperse systems of hard disks and spheres develop long range, Ising-like, bond-orientational order as they approach glass transitions. Finally, I summarize my recent proposal that topologically ordered clusters of particles, in disordered environments, tend to become aligned with each other as if they were two-state systems, and thus produce the observed Ising-like behavior. Neither Tanaka's results nor my proposed interpretation of them fit comfortably within any of the currently popular glass theories.

  15. Complexing Agents and pH Influence on Chemical Durability of Type I Molded Glass Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biavati, Alberto; Poncini, Michele; Ferrarini, Arianna; Favaro, Nicola; Scarpa, Martina; Vallotto, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Among the factors that affect the glass surface chemical durability, pH and complexing agents present in aqueous solution have the main role. Glass surface attack can be also related to the delamination issue causing glass particles' appearance in the pharmaceutical preparation. A few methods to check for glass containers delamination propensity and some control guidelines have been proposed. The present study emphasizes the possible synergy between a few complexing agents with pH on borosilicate glass chemical durability.Hydrolytic attack was performed in small-volume 23 mL type I glass containers autoclaved according to the European Pharmacopoeia or United States Pharmacopeia for 1 h at 121 °C, in order to enhance the chemical attack due to time, temperature, and the unfavorable surface/volume ratio. Solutions of 0.048 M or 0.024 M (M/L) of the acids citric, glutaric, acetic, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), together with sodium phosphate with water for comparison, were used for the trials. The pH was adjusted ±0.05 units at fixed values 5.5, 6.6, 7, 7.4, 8, and 9 by LiOH diluted solution.Because silicon is the main glass network former, silicon release into the attack solutions was chosen as the main index of the glass surface attack and analysed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry. The work was completed by the analysis of the silicon release in the worst attack conditions of molded glass, soda lime type II glass, and tubing borosilicate glass vials to compare different glass compositions and forming technologies. Surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy was finally performed to check for the surface status after the worst chemical attack condition by citric acid. LAY ABSTRACT: Glass, like every packaging material, can have some usage limits, mainly in basic pH solutions. The issue of glass surface degradation particles that appear in vials (delamination) has forced a number of drug product recalls in recent years

  16. Preparation and characterization of special glasses for sealing and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrikhande, V. K.

    2009-07-01

    Glasses find wide applications, among others, in process technologies, vacuum science and technology etc. because of their desired thermo-mechanical properties and chemical durability. In particular, hermetic glass-to-metal (GM) seals are required mainly as electrical feed through for various types of gas based and electron devices, chemical process industries, including for packaging of power devices. The physico-chemical properties of glasses play important role in forming hermetic sealing with metals/alloys. The properties like thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature, micro hardness, chemical durability etc. can be tailored by varying the glass composition by adding multi alkali and alkaline earth metal oxides to the base glass and varying the process parameters. We have prepared different types of glasses for the fabrication of different types of hermetic seals. Some of these are i) Lead silicate (LS) glass having SiO2, Na2O, K2O, BaO and PbO for compression type GM seals with SS304/Inconel and AISI 446 alloy ii) Borosilicate (BS) glass containing SiO2.Na2O.K20. Al2O3.B2O3 for matched type GM seals with Mo/ Kovar alloy and for uptake of synthetic dyes like Rhodamine 6G, Methylene Blue, Uranyl ions in process industries and nuclear industry iii) Sodium alumino phosphate (NAP) glass with P2O5-Na2O-B2O3-BaO- PbO for matched type GM seals with low melting metals (Al,Cu)/alloys like Cu-Be.

  17. Glass Transition, Crystallization of Glass-Forming Melts, and Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürn W. P. Schmelzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A critical analysis of possible (including some newly proposed definitions of the vitreous state and the glass transition is performed and an overview of kinetic criteria of vitrification is presented. On the basis of these results, recent controversial discussions on the possible values of the residual entropy of glasses are reviewed. Our conclusion is that the treatment of vitrification as a process of continuously breaking ergodicity with entropy loss and a residual entropy tending to zero in the limit of zero absolute temperature is in disagreement with the absolute majority of experimental and theoretical investigations of this process and the nature of the vitreous state. This conclusion is illustrated by model computations. In addition to the main conclusion derived from these computations, they are employed as a test for several suggestions concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients in the glass transition range. Further, a brief review is given on possible ways of resolving the Kauzmann paradox and its implications with respect to the validity of the third law of thermodynamics. It is shown that neither in its primary formulations nor in its consequences does the Kauzmann paradox result in contradictions with any basic laws of nature. Such contradictions are excluded by either crystallization (not associated with a pseudospinodal as suggested by Kauzmann or a conventional (and not an ideal glass transition. Some further so far widely unexplored directions of research on the interplay between crystallization and glass transition are anticipated, in which entropy may play—beyond the topics widely discussed and reviewed here—a major role.

  18. Extraction chromatography of trace concentrations of mercury(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smejkal, Z.; Zepla, Z.; Tauferova, J.

    1984-01-01

    The separation of trace amounts of mercury(II) from aqueous solutions has been studied in mixtures of other metal ions (concentration Hg(II) 10 μg/100 ml). The Hg(II) separation was carried out in glass columns filled with Synachrom E-5 carrier impregnanted with a solution of bis(diethyldithiocarbamate)-copper(II) in a mixture of 1.2-dichlorbenzene and cyclohexane (1:1). Trapped Hg(II) was eluted by HCl. The course of the chromatographic process was followed by gamma spectroscopy. Separation yields of Hg(II) were about 90%. (author)

  19. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  20. Physical stability of drugs after storage above and below the glass transition temperature: Relationship to glass-forming ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhalaweh, Amjad; Alzghoul, Ahmad; Mahlin, Denny; Bergström, Christel A S

    2015-11-10

    Amorphous materials are inherently unstable and tend to crystallize upon storage. In this study, we investigated the extent to which the physical stability and inherent crystallization tendency of drugs are related to their glass-forming ability (GFA), the glass transition temperature (Tg) and thermodynamic factors. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to produce the amorphous state of 52 drugs [18 compounds crystallized upon heating (Class II) and 34 remained in the amorphous state (Class III)] and to perform in situ storage for the amorphous material for 12h at temperatures 20°C above or below the Tg. A computational model based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was developed to predict the structure-property relationships. All drugs maintained their Class when stored at 20°C below the Tg. Fourteen of the Class II compounds crystallized when stored above the Tg whereas all except one of the Class III compounds remained amorphous. These results were only related to the glass-forming ability and no relationship to e.g. thermodynamic factors was found. The experimental data were used for computational modeling and a classification model was developed that correctly predicted the physical stability above the Tg. The use of a large dataset revealed that molecular features related to aromaticity and π-π interactions reduce the inherent physical stability of amorphous drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    ., 2009) biomaterials. However, the ..... reported for various microorganisms by various researchers (Gong et al., 2005). At biomass ... the increase in initial Pb (II) was also observed for removal of Pb (II) by loofa sponge immobilized Aspergillus.

  2. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... variations. One way is by saturation of glass melts with gas. The other involves sintering of powdered glass under a high gas pressure resulting in glass pellets with high pressure bubbles entrapped. Reheating the glass pellets above the glass transition temperature under ambient pressure allows the bubbles...... to expand. After heat-treatment foam glass can be obtained with porosities of 80–90 %. In this study we conduct physical foaming of cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass by sintering under high pressure (5-25 MPa) using helium, nitrogen, or argon at 640 °C (~108 Pa s). Reheating a sample in a heating...

  3. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  4. [Plastics or glass for children's eyeglasses?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützner, P

    1977-09-08

    Up to +5 dpt glass should be used in spectacles for children. There is more protection for the eye than danger of injury. Glasses out of plastic material are scratched very quickly, also they are more expensive.

  5. Flight Deck I-Glasses, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight Deck i-Glasses is a color, stereoscopic 3-D display mounted on consumer style eye glass frames that will enhance operator performance and multi-modal...

  6. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  7. Manganese activated phosphate glass for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.

    1975-01-01

    A measuring element comprises a metaphosphate glass doped with manganese as an activator. The manganese activated metaphosphate glass can detect and determine radiation doses in the range between milliroentgens and more than 10 megaroentgens. (auth)

  8. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  9. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  10. Granular packing as model glass formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yujie

    2017-01-01

    Static granular packings are model hard-sphere glass formers. The nature of glass transition has remained a hotly debated issue. We review recent experimental progresses in using granular materials to study glass transitions. We focus on the growth of glass order with five-fold symmetry in granular packings and relate the findings to both geometric frustration and random first-order phase transition theories. (paper)

  11. An Ultraviolet Faraday Rotator Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    to provide a Verdet constant above at least 2870 deg/ Telsa -meter and optical transmission above at least 50 percent in a 25mm thick polished glass sample at least at one wave-length in the 200 to 400 nm wave-length region

  12. Moessbauerspectroscopy on Gold Ruby Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslbeck, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the chemical states of gold and the physical mechanisms of the growing process of the particles under the influence of additional ingredients like tin, lead, antimony and selenium before, during and after the colouring process are investigated by using the Moessbauer spectroscopy on 197 Au, 119 Sn and 121 Sb, optical spectroscopy and X-ray-diffraction. Gold in an unnealed, colourless state of the glasses consists of monovalent forming linear bonds to two neighbouring oxygen atoms. The Lamb-Moessbauer factor of these gold oxide bondings is observed as 0.095 at 4.2 K. The gold in it's oxide state transforms to gold particles with a diameter of 3 nm to 60 nm. The size of the gold particles is quite definable within the optical spectra and certain sizes are also discernable within the Moessbauer spectra. One component of the Moessbauer spectra is assigned to the surface layer of the gold particles. By comparing this surface component with the amount of the bulk metallic core, one can calculate the size of the gold particles. In the Moessbauer spectra of the colourless glass one also can find parts of bulk metallic gold. Investigations with X-ray diffraction show that these are gold particles with a diameter of 100 nm to 300 nm and therefore have no additional colouring effect within the visible spectrum. The Moessbauer spectra on gold of the remelt glasses are similar to those which have been measured on the initial colourless glasses

  13. Effect of small glass composition changes on flue gas emissions of glass furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kersbergen, M.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Relatively small changes in glass composition might have drastic consequences on the evaporation rates of volatile glass components in glass melting furnaces. Transpiration evaporation tests have been applied to measure the impact of minor glass composition changes on the evaporation rates of

  14. Pulsed laser excited photothermal lens spectrometry of cadmium sulfoselenide doped silica glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Prakash R; Dada, Oluwatosin O; Bialkowski, Stephen E, E-mail: stephen.bialkowski@usu.ed [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-0300 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Experimental results for photothermal lens measurements are compared to finite elemental analysis models for commercial colored glass filters. Finite elemental analysis software is used to model the photothermal effect by simulating the coupling of heat both within the sample and out to the surroundings. Modeling shows that heat transfer between the glass surface and the air coupling fluid has a significant effect on the predicted time dependent photothermal lens signals. For comparison with experimental signals, a simple equation based on the finite element analysis result is proposed for accounting for the variance of experimental data where this type of heat coupling situation occurs. The colored glass filters are found to have positive thermo-optical coefficient. Finite element analysis modeling results are also used to correlate experimental measurements of different sample geometries. In particular, the glass samples are compared to ethanol solutions of iron (II) dicyclopentadiene in a sample cuvette even though heat transfer is different for these two samples.

  15. Importance of space-time fluctuations and non-linearities for the transport inside insulating glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladieu, F.

    2003-07-01

    This work deals with transport in insulating glasses. In such solids, the discrete translational symmetry is lost, which means that the plane wave analysis is not a priori the right 'starting point'. As a result, the transport is more difficult to handle, and a huge amount of works have been devoted to many aspects of transport in disordered systems, especially since the seventies. Here we focus on three specific questions: (i) the heat transport in glasses submitted to micro-beams and the associated irreversible vaporization; (ii) the electronic d.c. transport, below 1 Kelvin, in Mott-Anderson insulators, i.e. in 'electron glasses' where both disorder and electron-electron interactions are relevant; (iii) the low frequency dielectric constant in 'structural glasses' (i.e. 'ordinary glasses') which, below 1 Kelvin, is both universal (i.e. independent on the chemical composition) and very different of that of crystals. For each topic, we present both original experiments and the new theoretical concepts that we have elaborated so as to understand the main experimental features. Eventually, it appears that, in any case, transport in insulating glasses is strongly dominated by quite a small part of the 'glass-applied field' ensemble and that the nonlinear response is a relevant tool to get informations on this 'sub-part' which dominates the transport in the whole system. (author)

  16. Jagged Edges of the Glass Ceiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Victoria L.

    2004-01-01

    Although many aspiring young women might believe the glass ceiling was shattered a decade ago, they still need to understand how that glass ceiling impacted an older generation of women in educational leadership. They also must be aware that some segments of the glass ceiling might still exist. This article provides a historical overview of the…

  17. Effects of composition on waste glass properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Chick, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical conductivity, viscosity, chemical durability, devitrification, and crystallinity of a defense waste glass were measured. Each oxide component in the glass was varied to determine its effect on these properties. A generic study is being developed which will determine the effects of 26 oxides on the above and additional properties of a wide field of possible waste glasses. 5 figures, 2 tables

  18. Durable Glass For Thousands Of Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al 3+ rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  19. Glass markets information system: Application records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The Glass Markets Information System synthesizes technical and economic information on existing and potential uses for recovered glass for the purpose of making this information readily available in a structured form. Access to reliable information regarding the technical characteristics and market conditions for recovered glass facilitates decisions on its use and marketing.

  20. Superconducting state parameters of ternary metallic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    to binary metallic glasses. They are of interest since third element can modify the physical properties of binary metallic glasses and can also be used as a probe to study the host. ..... conducting nature in the present case. When we. Figure 6. Variation of transition temperature (TC) with valance (Z) of ternary metallic glasses.

  1. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the nature of the phase transition in spin glasses with vector spins. Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. A finite-size scaling analysis of the correlation length of the ...

  2. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the nature of the phase transition in spin glasses with vector spins. Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. A finite-size scaling analysis of the correlation length ...

  3. Spin-glass transition in disordered terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    While crystalline Tb is a helix antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 229 K which becomes ferromagnetic at 222 K, disordered Tb exhibits a spin-glass transition. The spin-glass freezing temperature ranges from 183 to 53 K, the lowest temperatures corresponding to the greatest degree of atomic disorder. These experiments constitute the first evidence for an elemental spin-glass. (author)

  4. Characterization of Fe -doped silver phosphate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tures of the glass and at lower concentration of dopant, a nanostructure is obtained. Electrical ... striking features of ion-conducting glasses is compositional .... ions. Thus the dopant metal ions form a P–O. − ....Fe3+ bond in the glass structure and Fe3+ ions serve as ionic cross-links between the non-bridging oxygen.

  5. Are people adapted to their own glasses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, W.D.; Brenner, E.; Sousa, R.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Negative lenses, either in the form of glasses or contact lenses, can correct nearsightedness. Unlike contact lenses, glasses do not only correct, but also induce optic distortions. In the scientific literature, it has often been assumed that people who wear corrective glasses instantaneously

  6. DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2009-12-04

    The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

  7. Friction behavior of glass and metals in contact with glass in various environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments have been conducted for heat-resistant glass and metals in contact with glass. These experiments were conducted in various environments including vacuum, moist air, dry air, octane, and stearic acid in hexadecane. Glass exhibited a higher friction force in moist air than it did in vacuum when in sliding contact with itself. The metals, aluminum, iron, and gold, all exhibited the same friction coefficient when sliding on glass in vacuum as glass sliding on glass. Gold-to-glass contacts were extremely sensitive to the environment despite the relative chemical inertness of gold.

  8. Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An exactly solvable model for glass to spin-glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisanti, A.; Leuzzi, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present the full phase diagram of the spherical 2+p spin-glass model with p≥4. The main outcome is the presence of a phase with both properties of full replica symmetry breaking phases of discrete models, e.g., the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, and those of one replica symmetry breaking. This phase has a finite complexity which leads to different dynamic and static properties. The phase diagram is rich enough to allow the study of different kinds of glass to spin glass and spin glass to spin glass phase transitions

  9. Analysis of early medieval glass beads - Glass in the transition period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, Ziga, E-mail: ziga.smit@ijs.si [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Knific, Timotej [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jezersek, David [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Istenic, Janka [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-05-01

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th-10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE-PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  10. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Fulchiron, Ren?; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legar?, V?ronique

    2015-01-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg ) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of ap...

  11. Reductive spectrophotometry of divalent tin sensitization on soda lime glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejugam, Vinith; Wei, Xingfei; Roper, D. Keith

    2016-07-01

    Rapid and facile evaluation of tin (II) sensitization could lead to improved understanding of metal deposition in electroless (EL) plating. This report used a balanced redox reaction between 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB-HCL) and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) to evaluate effects of sensitization conditions (i.e., sensitization time, analyte concentration, aqueous immersion, and acid content) on the accumulated mass of surface-associated divalent tin ion. The accumulated mass of tin (II) increased as the sensitization time increased up to 30 s in proportion to aqueous tin (II) chloride concentrations between 2.6 and 26 mM at a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) content of 68 mM. The average mass peaked at 7.3 nanomoles (nmol) per cm2 after a 5 s aqueous immersion post-sensitization, and then decreased with increasing aqueous immersion post-sensitization. The total average tin (II) + tin (IV) accumulated on soda lime glass measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was 17% higher at 30 s sensitization, suggesting a fraction of the tin (II) present may have oxidized to tin (IV). These results indicated that in situ spectrophotometric evaluation of tin (II) could support development of EL plating for electronics, catalysis, and solar cells.

  12. Precision glass molding technology for low Tg glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Yunlong; Zhang, Feng; Tian, Minqiang; Shao, Xinzheng

    2017-02-01

    Precision glass molding (PGM) technology is a cost-effective manufacturing process for high precision optical elements with complex surfaces. With this processing technology, one or more pieces of lenses may be produced through one-step molding. Due to the high efficiency of the replicative process, PGM has found wide applications in high volume production of optical elements. At present, it has been well developed and widely used in mass industry production in Japan and South Korea, but in China PGM technology research is still in the elementary stage. To develop the PGM technology, we need to conquer several technical difficulties, such as the melting technology of low Tg glasses, highprecision mold design and the corresponding machining technology and the coating technology for the molds. In this paper, we discussed the PGM technology as a complete manufacturing process, focused on the technical difficulties mentioned above, and introduced the development directions for this technology in China.

  13. Strong-Superstrong Transition in Glass Transition of Metallic Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Wang; Hong-Yan, Peng; Xiao-Yu, Xu; Bao-Ling, Chen; Chun-Lei, Wu; Min-Hua, Sun

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic fragility of bulk metallic glass (BMG) of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 alloy is studied by three-point beam bending methods. The fragility parameter mfor Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG is calculated to be 24.5 at high temperature, which means that the liquid is a 'strong' liquid, while to be 13.4 at low temperature which means that the liquid is a 'super-strong' liquid. The dynamical behavior of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG in the supercooled region undergoes a strong to super-strong transition. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a strong-to-superstrong transition is found in the metallic glass. Using small angle x-ray scattering experiments, we find that this transition is assumed to be related to a phase separation process in supercooled liquid. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  14. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  15. The compaction of waste disposal glasses and its dependence on composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinivella, G.; Stoneham, A.M.

    1980-12-01

    This note gives a preliminary discussion of the change in density under irradiation of glasses for waste disposal. The discussion includes (i) a simple model to predict whether the density will rise or fall; (ii) a simple model to assess how rapidly these density changes occur, and (iii) possible implications for related properties like stored energy. (author)

  16. In vivo near real time imaging of oxygen partial pressures in the glass catfish (Kryptopterus bichirris)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    of the transparent glass catfish (Kryptopterus bichirris), it is possible to measure near realtime oxygen partial pressure in vivo. We used a commercially-available digital single-lens reflex camera mounted with an optical long pass filter (II = 490 nm) and excited the phosphorescent dye in the microspheres inside...

  17. Investigation of near-source basaltic glasses using {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fern, G. R., E-mail: george.fern@brunel.ac.uk [Brunel University, Wolfson Centre for Materials Processing (United Kingdom); Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M. [University of Cambridge, Department of Earth Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    Two basaltic glass samples have been studied, one from the Masaya volcano in Nicaragua and one from the Villarrica volcano in Chile using {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The iron(II) to iron(III) ratio has been determined for each sample. The 80 K data shows some separation of the sites and is fitted allowing for discrete doublets.

  18. Functional Glasses and Glass-ceramics Derived from Industrial Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Rama Krishna Satish, Chinnam

    2014-01-01

    Wastes from industrial processes and energy generation facilities pose environment and health issues. Diversion of wastes from landfill to favour reuse or recycling options and towards the fabrication of marketable products is of high economic and ecologic interest. Moreover safe recycling of industrial wastes is necessary and even vital to our society because of the increasing volume being generated. Glasses and glass–ceramics (GCs) attract particular interest in waste recycli...

  19. SenseGlass: using google glass to sense daily emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Picard, Rosalind W.; Hernandez Rivera, Javier

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have studied human emotions in laboratory settings. However, these emotions have been largely contrived -- elicited by movies or fake "lab" stimuli, which tend not to matter to the participants in the studies, at least not compared with events in their real life. This work explores the utility of Google Glass, a head-mounted wearable device, to enable fundamental advances in the creation of affect-based user interfaces in natural settings.

  20. Inelastic neutron scattering from glass formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchenau, U.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron spectra below and above the glass transition temperature show a pronounced difference between strong and fragile glass formers in Angell's fragility scheme. The strong anharmonic increase of the inelastic scattering with increasing temperature in fragile substances is absent in the strongest glass former SiO 2 . That difference is reflected in the temperature dependence of Brillouin sound velocities above the glass transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of sound waves and local modes at the low frequency boson peak. A relation between the fragility and the temperature dependence of the transverse hypersound velocity at the glass temperature is derived. (author)

  1. A new glass option for parenteral packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaut, Robert A; Peanasky, John S; DeMartino, Steven E; Schiefelbein, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Glass is the ideal material for parenteral packaging because of its chemical durability, hermeticity, strength, cleanliness, and transparency. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time, but they do have some issues relating to breakage, delamination, and variation in hydrolytic performance. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the compendial requirements, and to have similar thermal, optical, and mechanical attributes as the current alkali borosilicate glasses. In addition, the alkali aluminosilicate performed as well or better than the current alkali borosilicates in extractables tests and stability studies, which suggests that it would be suitable for use with the studied liquid product formulation. The physical, mechanical, and optical properties of glass make it an ideal material for packaging injectable drugs and biologics. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time for these applications, but there are some issues. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the requirements for packaging injectable drugs and biologics, and to be suitable for use with a particular liquid drug. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  2. Control of radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Smith, P.K.; Hrma, P.; Bowan, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive waste-glass melters require physical control limits and redox control of glass to assure continuous operation, and maximize production rates. Typical waste-glass melter operating conditions, and waste-glass chemical reaction paths are discussed. Glass composition, batching and melter temperature control are used to avoid the information of phases which are disruptive to melting or reduce melter life. The necessity and probable limitations of control for electric melters with complex waste feed compositions are discussed. Preliminary control limits, their bases, and alternative control methods are described for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP), and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). Slurries of simulated high level radioactive waste and ground glass frit or glass formers have been isothermally reacted and analyzed to identify the sequence of the major chemical reactions in waste vitrification, and their effect on waste-glass production rates. Relatively high melting rates of waste batches containing mixtures of reducing agents (formic acid, sucrose) and nitrates are attributable to exothermic reactions which occur at critical stages in the vitrification process. The effect of foaming on waste glass production rates is analyzed, and limits defined for existing waste-glass melters, based upon measurable thermophysical properties. Through balancing the high nitrate wastes of the WVDP with reducing agents, the high glass melting rates and sustained melting without foaming required for successful WVDP operations have been demonstrated. 65 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs

  3. Bioactive Glasses in Dentistry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses are silicate-based and can form a strong chemical bond with the tissues. These biomaterials are highly biocompatible and can form a hydroxyapatite layer when implanted in the body or soaked in the simulated body fluid. Due to several disadvantages, conventional glass processing method including melting of glass components, is replaced by sol-gel method with a large number of benefits such as low processing temperature, higher purity and homogeneity and therefore better control of bioactivity. Bioactive glasses have a wide range of applications, particularly in dentistry. These glasses can be used as particulates or monolithic shapes and porous or dense constructs in different applications such as remineralization or hypersensitivity treatment. Some properties of bioactive glasses such as antibacterial properties can be promoted by adding different elements into the glass. Bioactive glasses can also be used to modify different biocompatible materials that need to be bioactive. This study reviews the significant developments of bioactive glasses in clinical application, especially dentistry. Furthermore, we will discuss the field of bioactive glasses from beginning to the current developments, which includes processing methods, applications, and properties of these glasses.

  4. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  5. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farges, Francois; /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur. /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci.; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; /Marne la Vallee U.; Haddi, Amine; /Marne la Valle U.; Trocellier,; /Saclay; Curti, Enzo; /PSI, Villigen; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  6. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-02-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  7. Phase separation in an ionomer glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Tian, K.V.; Dobó-Nagy, C.

    2015-01-01

    conclusively determined. In this work, we identify these phases by performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses on both the as-received glass and heat-treated samples. We detected three glass transitions in the as-received G338 glass during DSC upscaning, implying......The G338 ionomer glass is a fluoro-alumino-silicate system, which is used as the powder component of glass ionomer cements (GICs) in dental applications. However, despite progress in understanding the nature of this glass, chemical identity of its separated amorphous phases has not yet been...... amorphous phases in G388 are Ca/Na-Al-Si-O, Ca-Al-F and Ca-P-O-F phases, respectively. However, the exact chemical compositions of the three phases still require further exploration. The results of this work are important for understanding the impact of phase separation within ionomer glasses on the setting...

  8. Neutron diffraction studies of natural glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.; Erwin Desa, J.A.; Weeks, R.A.; Sinclair, R.N.; Bailey, D.K.

    1983-08-01

    A neutron diffraction investigation has been carried out of the structures of several naturally occurring glasses, viz. Libyan Desert glass, a Fulgurite, Wabar glass, Lechatelierite from Canon Diablo, a Tektite, Obsidian (3 samples), and Macusani glass. Libyan Desert sand has also been examined, together with crystalline α-quartz and α-cristobalite. A comparison of data for the natural glasses and synthetic vitreous silica (Spectrosil B) in both reciprocal and real space allows a categorisation into Silicas, which closely resemble synthetic vitreous silica, and Silicates, for which the resemblance to silica is consistently less striking. The data support the view that Libyan Desert glass and sand have a common origin, while the Tektite has a structure similar to that of volcanic glasses

  9. Comprehension and modelling of chromia-forming alloys corrosion mechanisms in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmucker, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear wastes management consists in the confinement of the radioactive wastes in a glass matrix. This is made by inductive melting in a hot crucible at an operating temperature around 1150 C. These crucibles are constituted of nickel based superalloys with high chromium content. They are submitted to a harsh corrosion by the molten glass, eventually leading to their replacement. The protection of the crucible against corrosion is best provided by the establishment of a protective chromium oxide layer at the surface of the alloy. A binary chromia-forming alloy (Ni-30Cr) is studied in this work. Three different binary and ternary glass compositions are chosen in order to understand the influence of the glass basicity and glass viscosity on the corrosion kinetics. Besides, the de-correlation of the formation and dissolution kinetics of the oxide layer allows the modelling of the overall oxide growth in the molten glass. For that purpose, the oxide formation kinetics in molten glass media is assimilated to the oxidation kinetics of the alloy in gaseous media with oxygen partial pressure that are representative of the redox properties of the glasses. Studies of the oxidation kinetics and of the diffusion mechanisms have shown that the oxidation kinetics is independent on the oxygen pressure in the range of 10 -13 up to 10 -3 atm O 2 at 1150 C. The present work has shown that the dissolution kinetics of the oxide layer is governed by the diffusion of Cr(III) in the glass melt. This dissolution kinetics has been evaluated from the diffusion coefficient and the solubility limit of Cr(III) in the glass. Finally, the overall growth kinetics of the Cr 2 O 3 layer in the glass has been successfully modelled for each glass, thanks to the knowledge of (i) the solubility limit of Cr(III), (ii) its diffusion coefficient in the glasses and (iii) the oxidation kinetics of the alloy. The presented model also allows quantifying the influence of each of these parameters on the

  10. Formulation of heat absorbing glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez-Casariego, Pedro

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available In the thermal exchanges between buildings and environment, glazing is an element of major importance, for it largely influences the so-called Solar Heat Gain and Thermal Losses. These parameters can be modified by applying different type of coatings onto glass surface or by adding colorant compounds during glass melting. The latter is a cheaper way to control the Solar Heat Gain. The knowledge of the laws governing the interaction between colorant compounds and solar radiation, allows us to define glass formulations achieving specific aesthetic requirements and solar energy absorption. In this paper two examples of application of the modelling of glass colorants spectral absorptance are presented. First is addressed to obtaining a glass with high luminous transmittance and low solar energy transmittance, and the other one to obtaining a glass with neutral colour appearance and minimized solar energy transmittance. Calculation formulas are defined together with photometric properties so-obtained. These type of glasses are particularly suitable to be used as building and automotive glazing, for they retain the mechanical characteristics and possibilities of transformation of standard glass.

    En los intercambios de energía entre un edificio y el medio exterior, el vidrio es el elemento de mayor importancia, por su influencia en la Ganancia de Calor Solar y en las Pérdidas Térmicas. Estos parámetros pueden ser modificados mediante el depósito de capas sobre el vidrio o mediante la adición de compuestos absorbentes de la radiación solar. Esta última vía es la más económica para controlar la Ganancia de Calor Solar. El conocimiento de las leyes que gobiernan la interacción de los diversos colorantes con la radiación solar, permite definir formulaciones de vidrios con características especificas de tipo estético y de absorción energética. En este trabajo se presentan dos ejemplos de aplicación de esta modelización de las

  11. Plate shell structures of glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne

    to their curved shape. A plate shell structure maintains a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, while facilitating the use of plane structural elements. The study focuses on using laminated glass panes for the load bearing facets. Various methods of generating a plate shell geometry are suggested. Together with Ghent......, such as facet size, imperfections, and connection characteristics. The critical load is compared to that of a similar, but smoothly curved, shell structure. Based on the investigations throughout the study, a set of guidelines for the structural design of plate shells of glass is proposed.......This thesis is a study of plate shell structures -- a type of shell structure with a piecewise plane geometry, organized so that the load bearing system is constituted by distributed in-plane forces in the facets. The high stiffness-to-weight ratio of smoothly curved shell structures is mainly due...

  12. Joining ceramics, glass and metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, W.

    1989-01-01

    In many areas of electronics, engine manufacturing, machine and apparatus construction and aearospace, different combinations of materials such as ceramics/metal and glass/metal are gaining increasingly in importance. The proceedings cover the 53 papers presented to the 3rd International Conference on Joining Ceramics, Glass and Metal, held in Bad Nauheim (FRG) from April 26 to 28, 1989. The papers discuss problems and results under the following main topics of the conference: (1) Active brazing applied to non-oxide ceramics and oxide ceramics. (2) Diffusion bonding of metals and ceramics. (3) Friction welding, reaction bonding, and other joining methods. (4) Properties of metal-ceramic joints (as e.g. residual stress, fracture toughness, thermal stress) and various investigation methods for their determination. (MM) [de

  13. Lid heater for glass melter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    1993-01-01

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

  14. Sodium diffusion in boroaluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.

    2011-01-01

    of isothermal sodium diffusion in BAS glasses by ion exchange, inward diffusion, and tracer diffusion experiments. By varying the [SiO2]/[Al2O3] ratio of the glasses, different structural regimes of sodium behavior are accessed. We show that the mobility of the sodium ions decreases with increasing [SiO2]/[Al2O......3] ratio, revealing that sodium is more mobile when it acts as a charge compensator to stabilize network formers than when it acts as a creator of non-bridging oxygens on tetrahedrally-coordinated silicon and trigonal boron. The impacts of both the addition of iron and its redox state on the sodium...... be attributed to the fact that for sodium inward diffusion, the charge compensation for electron holes is a rather slow process that limits the rate of diffusion. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  16. Development of a glass GEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Yuki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Fushie, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Gas electron multipliers (GEMs) apply the concept of gas amplification inside many tiny holes, realizing robust and high-gain proportional counters. However, the polyimide substrate of GEMs prevents them from being used in sealed detector applications. We have fabricated and tested glass GEMs (G-GEMs) with substrates made of photosensitive glass material from the Hoya Corporation. We fabricated G-GEMs with several different hole diameters and thicknesses and successfully operated test G-GEMs with a 100×100 mm 2 effective area. The uniformity of our G-GEMs was good, and the energy resolution for 5.9 keV X-rays was 18.8% under uniform irradiation of the entire effective area. A gas gain by the G-GEMs of up to 6700 was confirmed with a gas mixture of Ar (70%)+CH 4 (30%). X-ray imaging using the charge division readout method was demonstrated

  17. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644K, a glass transition temperature of 401K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ˜350Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  18. Elemental analysis of glass by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Emily R; Almirall, José R

    2012-04-10

    The elemental analysis of glass evidence has been established as a powerful discrimination tool for forensic analysts. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES) has been compared to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and energy dispersive micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μXRF/EDS) as competing instrumentation for the elemental analysis of glass. The development of a method for the forensic analysis of glass coupling laser ablation to ICP-OES is presented for the first time. LA-ICP-OES has demonstrated comparable analytical performance to LA-ICP-MS based on the use of the element menu, Al (Al I 396.15 nm), Ba (Ba II 455.40 nm), Ca (Ca II 315.88 nm), Fe (Fe II 238.20 nm), Li (Li I 670.78 nm), Mg (Mg I 285.21 nm), Sr (Sr II 407.77 nm), Ti (Ti II 368.51 nm), and Zr (Zr II 343.82 nm). The relevant figures of merit, such as precision, accuracy and sensitivity, are presented and compared to LA-ICP-MS. A set of 41 glass samples was used to assess the discrimination power of the LA-ICP-OES method in comparison to other elemental analysis techniques. This sample set consisted of several vehicle glass samples that originated from the same source (inside and outside windshield panes) and several glass samples that originated from different vehicles. Different match criteria were used and compared to determine the potential for Type I and Type II errors. It was determined that broader match criteria is more applicable to the forensic comparison of glass analysis because it can reduce the affect that micro-heterogeneity inherent in the glass fragments and a less than ideal sampling strategy can have on the interpretation of the results. Based on the test set reported here, a plus or minus four standard deviation (± 4s) match criterion yielded the lowest possibility of Type I and Type II errors. The developed LA-ICP-OES method has been shown to perform similarly to LA-ICP-MS in the

  19. Crystallization of lithium borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, A. A.; Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of lithium borate compositions, in the diborate-to-metaborate-range, were studied. In particular, the nature and sequence of formation of crystalline phases and the tendency toward devitrification were investigated as functions of temperature, thermal history and batch composition. It was found that the sequence of crystalline phase formation was sensitive to all of the three latter factors, and it was observed that under certain conditions metastable defect structures of the metaborate can appear.

  20. Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, BS

    2000-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

  1. Metallizing of machinable glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigal, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    A satisfactory technique has been developed for metallizing Corning (Code 9658) machinable glass ceramic for brazing. Analyses of several bonding materials suitable for metallizing were made using microprobe analysis, optical metallography, and tensile strength tests. The effect of different cleaning techniques on the microstructure and the effect of various firing temperatures on the bonding interface were also investigated. A nickel paste, used for thick-film application, has been applied to obtain braze joints with strength in excess of 2000 psi

  2. Taylor impact of glass rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willmott, G.R.; Radford, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10 GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below ∼2 GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above ∼3 GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at ∼4 GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7±0.5 and 4.6±0.5 mm μs -1 for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density

  3. Mozart, dice, and glass selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, John C.

    2000-10-01

    In a perfect world a good starting point should not be required. A Genetic Algorithm in powerful lens design software should find an optimum solution for us. As a practical matter a good starting point does matter. Time and resources may not be sufficient to generate a good design in a global optimizer quickly. In lens design a small glass catalog combined with the Hammer algorithm in ZEMAX moves the glass selection process in a search around the glass map forcing the design to consider many radically different forms in a short amount of time. From this starting point an expanded search can be undertaken by conventional design methods or in a global search algorithm. There are precedents in other fields for a narrow search method that still yields near infinite numbers of solutions. Mozart invented a game that narrows a search from a blank sheet paper and a set of notes to a single voice minuet by rolling dice. The results can be played and the dynamics manipulated to form the starting points for future compositions. Music composition software has, like lens design software, incorporated many powerful algorithms and search techniques. A simple comparison will be made. It is a long way from a protoplasm to Christie Brinkley. A good starting point means a lot whether you are an optical designer, a composer, or running the universe.

  4. Phase separation of borosilicate glass with molybdenum oxide addition and pore structure of porous glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yazawa, Tetsuo; Eguchi, Kiyohisa

    1985-01-01

    Porous glass prepared by acid leaching of phase-separated soda borosilicate glass usually contains colloidal silica which originates from the silica component in the borate phase. Molybdenum trioxide was added to the starting borosilicate glass to prevent the formation of colloidal silica. It promoted the opacification of the starting glass. Opaque glasses in as-cast state showed a spherical phase-separated structure and were amorphous by X-ray doffraction. The phase separation was related to the solubility of molybdenum oxide in the glass. The phase separation occurs at a high temperature and proceeds rapidly in the cooling process of the cast glass. Another type of phase separation, which was assigned to the phase separation in the ternary soda borosilicate glass, took place during the heat treatment of the opaque glasses. When the phase-separated structure of the heat-treated glasses is interconnected, the porous glasses composed of silica skeleton are obtained by the acid leaching of the phase-separated glasses. The colloidal silica in the porous glass increased with increasing silica content of the starting glass and at the same time the volume of the pores of skeleton decreased markedly. (author)

  5. Atmospheric Processing of Volcanic Glass: Effects on Iron Solubility and Redox Speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maters, Elena C; Delmelle, Pierre; Bonneville, Steeve

    2016-05-17

    Volcanic ash from explosive eruptions can provide iron (Fe) to oceanic regions where this micronutrient limits primary production. Controls on the soluble Fe fraction in ash remain poorly understood but Fe solubility is likely influenced during atmospheric transport by condensation-evaporation cycles which induce large pH fluctuations. Using glass powder as surrogate for ash, we experimentally simulate its atmospheric processing via cycles of pH 2 and 5 exposure. Glass fractional Fe solubility (maximum 0.4%) is governed by the pH 2 exposure duration rather than by the pH fluctuations, however; pH 5 exposure induces precipitation of Fe-bearing nanoparticles which (re)dissolve at pH 2. Glass leaching/dissolution release Fe(II) and Fe(III) which are differentially affected by changes in pH; the average dissolved Fe(II)/Fetot ratio is ∼0.09 at pH 2 versus ∼0.18 at pH 5. Iron release at pH 2 from glass with a relatively high bulk Fe(II)/Fetot ratio (0.5), limited aqueous Fe(II) oxidation at pH 5, and possibly glass-mediated aqueous Fe(III) reduction may render atmospherically processed ash a significant source of Fe(II) for phytoplankton. By providing new insight into the form(s) of Fe associated with ash as wet aerosol versus cloud droplet, we improve knowledge of atmospheric controls on volcanogenic Fe delivery to the ocean.

  6. Quantitative determination of copper in a glass matrix using double pulse laser induced breakdown and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ahmed A I; Morsy, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    A series of lithium-lead-borate glasses of a variable copper oxide loading were quantitatively analyzed in this work using two distinct spectroscopic techniques, namely double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). DP-LIBS results measured upon a combined nanosecond lasers irradiation running at 266nm and 1064nm pulses of a collinear configuration directed to the surface of borate glass samples with a known composition. This arrangement was employed to predict the electron's temperature (Te) and density (Ne) of the excited plasma from the recorded spectra. The intensity of elements' responses using this scheme is higher than that of single-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS) setup under the same experimental conditions. On the other hand, the EPR data shows typical Cu (II) EPR-signals in the borate glass system that is networked at a distorted tetragonal Borate-arrangement. The signal intensity of the Cu (II) peak at g⊥=2.0596 has been used to quantify the Cu-content accurately in the glass matrix. Both techniques produced linear calibration curves of Cu-metals in glasses with excellent linear regression coefficient (R(2)) values. This study establishes a good correlation between DP-LIBS analysis of glass and the results obtained using EPR spectroscopy. The proposed protocols prove the great advantage of DP-LIBS system for the detection of a trace copper on the surface of glasses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hollow glass waveguides: New variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Daniel Joseph

    This study is an effort to develop new variations on the infrared silver-silver iodide hollow glass waveguide (HGW) with application specific properties. Four variations are presented: a HGW with a long, gradual taper, a HGW with a rectangular cross-section, curved HGW tips and a new all-dielectric hollow waveguide based on photonic bandgap guidance principles. A hollow glass waveguide tapered over its entire length offers ease of coupling at the proximal end and excellent flexibility at the distal end. Waveguides tapered from 1000 to 500 mum and 700 to 500 mum over 1.5 m were fabricated in this study. Compared to similarly sized non-tapered waveguides, laser losses for the tapered guides were high but decreased when bent. This behavior is contrary to that of non-tapered guides and an iterative ray tracing model was also developed to explain the observed loss characteristics of tapered hollow waveguides. Hollow glass waveguides with round profiles do not maintain the polarization state of the delivered radiation to any appreciable degree. HGWs with large- and small-aspect ratio rectangular cross sections were developed and shown to preserve polarization up to 96%, even when bent. The large aspect ratio guide was able to effectively rotate the transmitted polarization when twisted along its axis. Curved distal tips for medical and dental laser applications were developed by removing the low-OH silica fiber from commercially available stainless steel dental tips, and inserting HGWs of various sizes. The optical performances and heating profiles of the various configurations indicate the tips are suitable for certain medical applications, but the minimum bending radius is limited by the mechanical properties of the glass substrate. A small radii bending loss study confirms that propagating modes periodically couple as the radius of curvature is reduced. Through the application of the photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance, hollow waveguides can be made entirely from

  8. Edge-Strengthening of Structural Glass with Protective Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist Maria; Louter Christian; Lebet Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    In modern buildings, glass is increasingly used as a load-carrying material in structural components, such as glass beams. For glass beams especially the edge strength of glass is important. However, the strength of glass is not a material constant but depends on various parameters, which makes glass, amongst other things, a challenging building material. One of the parameters influencing glass strength is the combination of humidity and stress, which may cause stress corrosion. The aim of th...

  9. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: A Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of 2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid and 2, 4 - pentanedione. The reaction of the prepared Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride formed diaquo bis( N – 2 – amino – 3 - methylbutyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) complex. The Schiff base is ...

  10. THE CURIOUS CASE OF GLASS I: HIGH IONIZATION AND VARIABILITY OF DIFFERENT TYPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Andrew J. [Department of Physical Science, Wilbur Wright College, 4300 N. Narragansett Ave., Chicago, IL 60634 (United States); Richter, Matthew J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Carr, John S. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7210, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moerchen, Margaret M. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Santiago (Chile); Doppmann, Greg W. [W. M. Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Hwy, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Seifahrt, Andreas [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Our Spitzer IRS observation of the infrared companion Glass Ib revealed fine-structure emission with high ionization ([Ne III]/[Ne II] = 2.1 and [S IV]/[S III] = 0.6) that indicates that the gas is likely illuminated by hard radiation. While models suggest that extreme-ultraviolet radiation could be present in T Tauri stars, this is the first detection of [S IV] and such a high [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratio in a young star. We also find that Glass Ib displays the molecules HCN, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O in emission. Here we investigate the Glass I binary system and consider possible mechanisms that may have caused the high ionization, whether from an outflow or disk irradiation. We also model the spectral energy distributions of Glass Ia and Ib to test if the system is a young member of the Chameleon I star-forming region, and we consider other possible classifications for the system. We find that Glass Ib is highly variable, showing changes in continuum strength and emission features at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. The optical light curve indicates that a central stellar component in Glass Ib became entirely visible for 2.5 years beginning in mid-2002 and possibly displayed periodic variability with repeated, short-period dimming during that time. As the fine-structure emission was not detected in observations before or after our Spitzer IRS observation, we explore whether the variable nature of Glass Ib is related to the gas being highly ionized, possibly due to variable accretion or an X-ray flare.

  11. Influence of zeolite precipitation on borosilicate glass alteration under hyperalkaline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Depierre, S.; Fournier, M.; Gin, S.; Angeli, F.

    2017-08-01

    This study enables a better understanding of how nucleation-growth of zeolites affects glass dissolution kinetics in hyperalkaline solutions characteristic of cement waters. A 20-oxide borosilicate glass, an inactive surrogate of a typical intermediate level waste glass, was altered in static mode at 50 °C in a hyperalkaline solution rich in Na+, K+ and Ca2+ and at an initial pH50°C of 12.6. Experiments were performed at four glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume (S/V) ratios to investigate various reaction progresses. Two types of glass alteration kinetics were obtained: (i) at low S/V, a sharp alteration resumption occurred after a rate drop regime, (ii) at high S/V, a high dissolution rate was maintained throughout the test duration with a slight progressive slow-down. In all the experiments, zeolites precipitated but the time taken to form stable zeolite nuclei varied dramatically depending on the S/V. Resulting changes in pH affected zeolite composition, morphology, solubility and growth rate. A change in a critical parameter such as S/V affected all the processes controlling glass dissolution.

  12. Mechanical performance of a biocompatible biocide soda-lime glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Esteban, S; Bartolomé, J F; Dí Az, L A; Esteban-Tejeda, L; Prado, C; López-Piriz, R; Torrecillas, R; Moya, J S

    2014-06-01

    A biocompatible soda-lime glass-ceramic in the SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-B2O3 system containing combeite and nepheline as crystalline phases, has been obtained at 750°C by two different routes: (i) pressureless sintering and (ii) Spark Plasma Sintering. The SPS glass-ceramic showed a bending strength, Weibull modulus, and toughness similar values to the cortical human bone. This material had a fatigue limit slightly superior to cortical bone and at least two times higher than commercial dental glass-ceramics and dentine. The in vitro studies indicate that soda-lime glass-ceramic is fully biocompatible. The in vivo studies in beagle jaws showed that implanted SPS rods presented no inflammatory changes in soft tissues surrounding implants in any of the 10 different cases after four months implantation. The radiological analysis indicates no signs of osseointegration lack around implants. Moreover, the biocide activity of SPS glass-ceramic versus Escherichia coli, was found to be >4log indicating that it prevents implant infections. Because of this, the SPS new glass-ceramic is particularly promising for dental applications (inlay, crowns, etc). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of machinability and flexural strength of a novel dental machinable glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Feng; Zheng, Shucan; Luo, Zufeng; Li, Yong; Guo, Ling; Zhao, Yunfeng; Fu, Qiang

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the machinability and flexural strength of a novel dental machinable glass-ceramic (named PMC), and to compare the machinability property with that of Vita Mark II and human enamel. The raw batch materials were selected and mixed. Four groups of novel glass-ceramics were formed at different nucleation temperatures, and were assigned to Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and Group 4. The machinability of the four groups of novel glass-ceramics, Vita Mark II ceramic and freshly extracted human premolars were compared by means of drilling depth measurement. A three-point bending test was used to measure the flexural strength of the novel glass-ceramics. The crystalline phases of the group with the best machinability were identified by X-ray diffraction. In terms of the drilling depth, Group 2 of the novel glass-ceramics proves to have the largest drilling depth. There was no statistical difference among Group 1, Group 4 and the natural teeth. The drilling depth of Vita MK II was statistically less than that of Group 1, Group 4 and the natural teeth. Group 3 had the least drilling depth. In respect of the flexural strength, Group 2 exhibited the maximum flexural strength; Group 1 was statistically weaker than Group 2; there was no statistical difference between Group 3 and Group 4, and they were the weakest materials. XRD of Group 2 ceramic showed that a new type of dental machinable glass-ceramic containing calcium-mica had been developed by the present study and was named PMC. PMC is promising for application as a dental machinable ceramic due to its good machinability and relatively high strength.

  14. Gold nanoparticles grafting on glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvítek, Ondřej; Bot, Marek; Švorčík, Václav

    2012-09-01

    New method of grafting of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to glass surface was developed and investigated. The method based on glass activation by plasma discharge use dithiols for AuNP binding as an alternative to silane chemistry currently used for binding AuNPs onto glass surface. XPS measurements confirmed the presence of sulfur and gold on the modified glass surface. The presence of AuNPs on modified glass surface was then directly proven with AFM method. UV-vis spectra of samples with grafted AuNPs show a peak of SPR absorbance. With increasing modification time, more AuNPs are bound to the glass surface, which can aggregate.

  15. Glass stability in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.H.; Fyfe, W.S.; Tazaki, K.

    1987-01-01

    Similarities in corrosion behavior have been found in static leaching experiments on natural (basaltic and rhyolitic) and waste form (PNL76-68, ABS-118) glasses in seawater and marine sediments. Grainy but cohesive magnesium-rich surface layers form on both natural and waste form glasses. Basaltic and ABS-118 glasses exhibit especially similar corrosion behavior and have comparable corrosion rates. As fresh basaltic and rhyolitic glasses are common in sediments as old as Miocene (∼ 15 my) in two deep-sea drilling sites, it appears that fine natural glass can survive for a few million years. Metal encapsulated, massive glass pieces could therefore survive for millions of years if buried in appropriate marine sediments in the submarine environment. (author)

  16. Borosilicate glass for gamma irradiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydogan, N.; Tugrul, A. B.

    2012-11-01

    Four different types of silicate glass specimens were irradiated with gamma radiation using a Co-60 radioisotope. Glass specimens, with four different chemical compositions, were exposed to neutron and mixed neutron/gamma doses in the central thimble and tangential beam tube of the nuclear research reactor. Optical variations were determined in accordance with standardisation concept. Changes in the direct solar absorbance (αe) of borosilicate glass were examined using the increase in gamma absorbed dose, and results were compared with the changes in the direct solar absorbance of the three different type silicate glass specimens. Solar absorption decreased due to decrease of penetration with absorbed dose. αe of borosilicate increased considerably when compared with other glass types. Changes in optical density were evaluated as an approach to create dose estimation. Mixed/thermal neutron irradiation on glass caused to increse αe.

  17. Shear Adhesive Connections for Glass Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalická, K.; Horčičková, I.; Eliášová, M.

    2015-11-01

    Unique aesthetical properties of glass - not only transparency but also smooth, glossy and primarily reflective surface - give this material special importance in the contemporary architecture. In every structural application of glass it is necessary to solve the problem associated with connections between glass pane and other part from a different material or between two glass elements. Moreover, there are many types of hybrid structures that combine glass and different materials to achieve safe failure behaviour and high degree of transparency at the same time. Connection of brittle glass and reinforcing material is an essential part of these structures, where composite action between two parts is beneficially ensured by a glued joint. The current paper deals with the experimental analysis focused on the determination of mechanical characteristics of adhesives applied in planar connections under shear loading.

  18. Mixed mobile ion effect in fluorozincate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S; Ghosh, A

    2005-01-01

    The mixed mobile ion effect has been investigated for the first time in zinc fluoride glasses where in addition to alkali cations fluorine anions also participate in the diffusion process, unlike mixed alkali oxide glasses. The minimum in the conductivity, conductivity relaxation frequency, crossover frequency and decoupling index indicates the existence of the mixed mobile ion effect in these fluoride glasses. It has been observed that the non-exponential parameter and the frequency exponent are independent of temperature. It has been established that alkali ions and fluorine anions exhibit lower dimensionality of the conduction pathways in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses than that in the single alkali lithium based zinc fluoride glasses while they are migrating. From the scaling of the conductivity spectra, it has been established that the relaxation dynamics in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses is independent of temperature and composition

  19. Immobilization of radioactive waste in glass matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A promising process for long-term management of high-level radioactive waste is to immobilize the waste in a borosilicate glass matrix. Among the most important criteria characterizing the integrity of the large-scale glass-waste forms are that they possess good chemical stability (including low leachability), thermal stability, mechanical integrity, and high radiation stability. Fulfillment of these criteria ensures the maximum margin of safety of glass-waste products, following solidification, handling, transportation, and long-term storage

  20. Sustainable Innovation of Glass Design and Craft

    OpenAIRE

    Sparre-Petersen, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Barely any research has been made into the implementation of sustainable principles in glass design and craft. A common tendency among students and practitioners is to consider it problematic if not impossible to develop a “truly sustainable practice”. Generally glass crafts people and glass designers aim to explore new aesthetic possibilities for the material and see sustainability as a hindrance for aesthetic freedom.On the contrary the field of design has strong and growing emphasis on sus...

  1. Iron phosphate glass containing simulated fast reactor waste: Characterization and comparison with pristine iron phosphate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Asuvathraman, R.; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Ravindran, T.R.; Govindaraj, R.; Govindan Kutty, K.V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed characterization was carried out on an iron phosphate glass waste form containing 20 wt.% of a simulated nuclear waste. High temperature viscosity measurement was carried out by the rotating spindle method. The Fe 3+ /Fe ratio and structure of this waste loaded iron phosphate glass was investigated using Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopy respectively. Specific heat measurement was carried out in the temperature range of 300–700 K using differential scanning calorimeter. Isoconversional kinetic analysis was employed to understand the crystallization behavior of the waste loaded iron phosphate glass. The glass forming ability and glass stability of the waste loaded glass were also evaluated. All the measured properties of the waste loaded glass were compared with the characteristics of pristine iron phosphate glass

  2. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  3. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  5. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  6. Float glass innovation in the flat glass industry

    CERN Document Server

    Uusitalo, Olavi

    2014-01-01

    A thorough industry analysis is of utmost importance for a study on the impact of technological changes on industry structure. This book evaluates the consequences of a vaguely chosen level of an industry analysis. Too broad a definition of the industry may disaggregate sub-industries, processing industries and international aspects. This is illustrated by revisiting an industry study upon which the dominant design model was based. Readers will see and understand the consequences of too broadly defined industries together with quantitative research approach can have. The book argues that the nature of the industry should define the level of the analysis. This is done by revisiting the flat glass industry study, on which Anderson and Tushman’s (1990) dominant design model is partly based. In their study Anderson and Tushman defined the flat glass industry based on four-digit SIC codes. It is argued that this definition was too broad and it disaggregated important sub-industries, processing industries and int...

  7. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joo Hoon; Choi, Eui Hwan

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  8. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  9. The feasibility of sampling the glass pour in a high level waste vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, G.V.; Shilton, P.; Morris, J.B.

    1986-06-01

    Vitrified high level waste can be sampled for quality assurance purposes in three general ways: (I) from the glass pour, (II) from the canister, and (III) from the melter. A discussion of the potential advantages and disadvantages of each route is presented. The second philosophy seems to show the best promise; it is recommended that the Contained Pot method and the Token method are best suited for further development. An international survey of policy at vitrification plants shows that with one possible exception no glass sampling is intended and that quality is normally to be assured by control of the vitrification process. (author)

  10. Impact Resistance Enhancement by Adding Core-Shell Particle to Epoxy Resin Modified with Hyperbranched Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiping Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A core-shell particle was fabricated by grafting amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer to the surface of silica nanoparticles. The influences of core-shell particle contents on the tensile and impact strength of the epoxy thermosets modified with amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer were discussed in detail. For comparison, core-shell particle was added into the epoxy/polyamide system for toughness improvement. Results from tensile and impact tests are provided. The introduction of core-shell particle into the epoxy/polyamide systems just slightly enhanced the tensile and impact strength. The incorporation of 3 wt % core-shell particle could substantially improve the tensile and impact strength of epoxy/amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer thermosets. Field emission-scanning electron microscope images of the impact fracture surfaces showed that the excellent impact resistance of epoxy/amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer/core-shell particle thermosets may be attributed to the synergistic effect of shearing deformation and crack pinning/propagation, which is induced by the good compatibility between epoxy matrix and core-shell particle in the presence of amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer.

  11. Epoxy Resin Modified Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agent Sulfur Mustard Vapor Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra BUNKAR

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An epoxy resin polymer coated quartz crystal microbalance (PC-QCM is used for detection of sulfur mustard vapor (SM. When SM vapor is exposed to PC-QCM sensor frequency shift is observed. The response of the sensor in ambient condition is 554 Hz with ±10 % variation upon exposure of 155 ppm of the SM concentration. The observed response loss is nearly 40 % over the period of 15 months. The response of the sensor is higher for SM than compare to structurally similar chloroethyl ether (CEE and other interferences.

  12. Cyanate Ester Resin Modified with Nano-particles for Inclusion in Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    transition. The impact strength of the fully cured specimens were determined using a Tinius Olsen Charpy impact strength tester. The samples were machined...by swinging the pendulum for 11 half cycles. 2.3 Results and Discussion The effect of CNT loading on the viscosity of BECy resin at 23 oC is

  13. A Method to Produce Foam Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    or a compound which yields pure carbon as the foaming agent is oxidized by a sufficient amount of an efficient oxidizing agent essentially added to the glass-carbon powder mixture, where the oxidizing agent supplies oxygen in the relevant temperature range, to release CO/CO2 gas mixture in the softened glass......The present invention relates to a production process of foam glass from a mixture of glass cullet or slag or fly ash with a foaming agent and an oxidizing agent and heating to below 1100 C under low oxygen atmosphere. The invention relates more particularly to a process wherein pure carbon...

  14. Modifying glass surfaces via internal diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjaer, M.M.; Yue, Y.Z.; Deubener, J.

    2010-01-01

    The surface chemistry and structure of iron-bearing silicate glasses have been modified by means of heat-treatment around the glass transition temperature under different gaseous media at ambient pressure. When the glasses are heat-treated in atmospheric air, oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ occurs, which......- ions in the network and their strong attraction to the modifying ions, whereas the latter is due to the requirement of the charge neutrality. The role of N3- in driving OD is verified by the composition profile of the surface layer of the glass treated in pure N-2 gas. The OD exerts pronounced impacts...

  15. Mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connelly, A.J.; Hand, R.J.; Bingham, P.A.; Hyatt, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses are important as they will determine the degree of cracking that may occur either on cooling or following a handling accident. Recent interest in the vitrification of intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) as well as high level radioactive waste (HLW) has led to the development of new waste glass compositions that have not previously been characterised. Therefore the mechanical properties, including Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, hardness, indentation fracture toughness and brittleness of a series of glasses designed to safely incorporate wet ILW have been investigated. The results are presented and compared with the equivalent properties of an inactive simulant of the current UK HLW glass and other nuclear waste glasses from the literature. The higher density glasses tend to have slightly lower hardness and indentation fracture toughness values and slightly higher brittleness values, however, it is shown that the variations in mechanical properties between these different glasses are limited, are well within the range of published values for nuclear waste glasses, and that the surveyed data for all radioactive waste glasses fall within relatively narrow range.

  16. Thin glass substrates for mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, Reiner H.; Wegener, Holger; Kruse, Anke; Hildebrand, Norbert

    2000-10-01

    Flat panel displays play an important role as the visual interface for today's electronic devices (Notebook computers, PDA's, pagers, mobile phones, etc.). Liquid Crystal Display's are dominating the market. While for higher resolution displays active matrix displays like Thin Film Transistor LCD's are used, portable devices are mainly using Super Twisted Nematic (STN) displays. Based on the application, STN displays for mobile applications require thinner glass substrates with improved surface quality at a lower cost. The requirements and trends for STN glass substrates are identified and discussed. Different glass manufacturing processes are used today for the manufacture of these substrates. Advantages and disadvantages of the different glass substrate types are presented and discussed.

  17. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  18. Embedded adhesive connection for laminated glass plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Poulsen, S.H.; Bagger, A.

    2012-01-01

    The structural behavior of a new connection design, the embedded adhesive connection, used for laminated glass plates is investigated. The connection consists of an aluminum plate encapsulated in-between two adjacent triple layered laminated glass plates. Fastening between glass and aluminum...... is ensured using a structural adhesive. At first, the elastic and viscoelastic material properties of the adhesive are identified where the influence of load-rate and failure properties are also examined. Through an inverse analysis using the finite element method, the experimental observations...... usage in a design situation. The embedded connection shows promising potential as a future fastening system for load-carrying laminated glass plates....

  19. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  20. Radionuclide diffusion in alkali aluminosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, I.A.; Shatkov, V.M.; Gulin, A.N.; Florovskii, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients for /sup 90/Sr and /sup 134/Cs are less by about four orders of magnitude than those for /sup 22/Na at temperatures close to the transformation points in these glasses. At comparable temperatures, the strontium and cesium radionuclides migrate 30-700 times more rapidly in aluminophosphate glasses than in aluminoborosilicate ones. Crystallization in an aluminophosphate glass increases the diffusion mobilities of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 134/Cs and reduces that of /sup 22/Na. Gamma irradiation of aluminophosphate and aluminoborosilicate glasses has no appreciable effect on the diffusion of /sup 22/Na.

  1. Hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Estrup, Maja

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their degree of crystallisation has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses were achieved...... by varying the temperature of heat treatment. The predominant crystalline phase in the glass was identified as augite. It was found that the hardness of the glass phase decreased slightly with an increase in the degree of crystallisation, while that of the augite phase drastically decreased....

  2. Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brophy, Brenor [Enki Technology Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This project aims to enable US module manufacturers to coat glass with Enki’s state of the art tunable functionalized AR coatings at the lowest possible cost and highest possible performance by encapsulating Enki’s coating process in an integrated tool that facilitates effective process improvement through metrology and data analysis for greater quality and performance while reducing footprint, operating and capital costs. The Phase 1 objective was a fully designed manufacturing line, including fully specified equipment ready for issue of purchase requisitions; a detailed economic justification based on market prices at the end of Phase 1 and projected manufacturing costs and a detailed deployment plan for the equipment.

  3. DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M andO 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to

  4. Recycling of glass: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Anna W; Merrild, Hanna; Christensen, Thomas H

    2009-11-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to recycling of glass waste were assessed from a waste management perspective. Focus was on the material recovery facility (MRF) where the initial sorting of glass waste takes place. The MRF delivers products like cullet and whole bottles to other industries. Two possible uses of reprocessed glass waste were considered: (i) remelting of cullet added to glass production; and (ii) re-use of whole bottles. The GHG emission accounting included indirect upstream emissions (provision of energy, fuels and auxiliaries), direct activities at the MRF and bottle-wash facility (combustion of fuels) as well as indirect downstream activities in terms of using the recovered glass waste in other industries and, thereby, avoiding emissions from conventional production. The GHG accounting was presented as aggregated global warming factors (GWFs) for the direct and indirect upstream and downstream processes, respectively. The range of GWFs was estimated to 0-70 kg CO(2)eq. tonne( -1) of glass waste for the upstream activities and the direct emissions from the waste management system. The GWF for the downstream effect showed some significant variation between the two cases. It was estimated to approximately -500 kg CO(2)-eq. tonne(- 1) of glass waste for the remelting technology and -1500 to -600 kg CO(2)-eq. tonne(-1) of glass waste for bottle re-use. Including the downstream process, large savings of GHG emissions can be attributed to the waste management system. The results showed that, in GHG emission accounting, attention should be drawn to thorough analysis of energy sources, especially electricity, and the downstream savings caused by material substitution.

  5. Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1978-12-01

    A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal

  6. Misfit and microleakage of implant-supported crown copings obtained by laser sintering and casting techniques, luted with glass-ionomer, resin cements and acrylic/urethane-based agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Turrión, Andrés S; López-Lozano, José F; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the marginal misfit and microleakage of cement-retained implant-supported crown copings. Single crown structures were constructed with: (1) laser-sintered Co-Cr (LS); (2) vacuum-cast Co-Cr (CC) and (3) vacuum-cast Ni-Cr-Ti (CN). Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion onto machined titanium abutments using: (1) GC Fuji PLUS (FP); (2) Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); (3) RelyX Unicem 2 Automix (RXU) and (4) DentoTemp (DT) (n=15 each). After 60 days of water ageing, vertical discrepancy was SEM-measured and cement microleakage was scored using a digital microscope. Misfit data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests were run for microleakage analysis (α=0.05). Regardless of the cement type, LS samples exhibited the best fit, whilst CC and CN performed equally well. Despite the framework alloy and manufacturing technique, FP and DT provide comparably better fit and greater microleakage scores than did CEC and RXU, which showed no differences. DMLS of Co-Cr may be a reliable alternative to the casting of base metal alloys to obtain well-fitted implant-supported crowns, although all the groups tested were within the clinically acceptable range of vertical discrepancy. No strong correlations were found between misfit and microleakage. Notwithstanding the framework alloy, definitive resin-modified glass-ionomer (FP) and temporary acrylic/urethane-based (DT) cements demonstrated comparably better marginal fit and greater microleakage scores than did 10-methacryloxydecyl-dihydrogen phosphate-based (CEC) and self-adhesive (RXU) dual-cure resin agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of the glass composition on the chemical durability of zinc-phosphate-based glasses in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, J.; Bourhis, K.; Petit, L.; Couzi, M.; Hupa, L.; Hupa, M.; Videau, J. J.; Cardinal, T.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical durability of glasses with the composition 40P2O5-55ZnO-1Ga2O3-4Ag2O and 41P2O5-51ZnO-8Ga2O3 (mol%) was studied by measuring the rates of aqueous dissolution in neutral, acidic and alkaline aqueous solutions and discussed as a function of the glass composition. The change in the pH of the solutions as a function of the immersion time of the samples was used to study the dissolution mechanism. Using XRD and SEM/EDXA, we showed that the dissolution in deionized (DI) water and HCl consists of the leaching of the phosphate chains into the medium along with (i) the formation of a hydrated layer with the composition Zn2P2O7·3H2O and also of AgCl agglomerates when immersed in HCl and (ii) a leaching out of P, Ga and Ag when immersed for more than 180 min in DI water and for more than 60 min in HCl. The dissolution in NaOH-Na2CO3 consists of a net consumption of the OH- along with the formation of layers of Zn3(PO4)2·(H2O)4 and Zn(H2PO2)2·H2O with no apparent diffusion of P, Ga and Ag when immersed for as long as 240 min. Increasing the Ga2O3 concentration in zinc-phosphate glass at the expense of Ag2O lowers the dissolution rate when immersed in DI water, HCl and NaOH-Na2CO3 probably due to a reinforcement of the glass network.

  8. Weeping Glass: The Identification of Ionic Species on the Surface of Vessel Glass Using Ion Chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, G.; van Bommel, M.R.; Tennent, N.H.; Roemich, H.; Fair, L.

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous films on the surface of unstable vessel glass were analysed. Five cation and eight anion species from eleven glass items in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Hamburg Museum and the Corning Museum of Glass have been quantified by ion chromatography. Sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium

  9. X-ray tomography of feed-to-glass transition of simulated borosilicate waste glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, W.H.; Guillen, D.P.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Pokorný, P.; Yano, T.; Lee, S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Hrma, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2017), s. 3883-3894 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : borosilicate glass * computed tomography * glass melting * morphology * nuclear waste * X-ray Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  10. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  11. Algebraic topology of spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koma, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    We study the topology of frustration in d-dimensional Ising spin glasses with d ≥ 2 with nearest-neighbor interactions. We prove the following. For any given spin configuration, the domain walls on the unfrustration network are all transverse to a frustrated loop on the unfrustration network, where a domain wall is defined to be a connected element of the collection of all the (d - 1)-cells which are dual to the bonds having an unfavorable energy, and the unfrustration network is the collection of all the unfrustrated plaquettes. These domain walls are topologically nontrivial because they are all related to the global frustration of a loop on the unfrustration network. Taking account of the thermal stability for the domain walls, we can explain the numerical results that three- or higher-dimensional systems exhibit a spin glass phase, whereas two-dimensional ones do not. Namely, in two dimensions, the thermal fluctuations of the topologically nontrivial domain walls destroy the order of the frozen spins on the unfrustration network, whereas they do not in three or higher dimensions. This may be interpreted as a global topological effect of the frustrations.

  12. ION EXCHANGE IN GLASS-CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Halsey Beall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years ion-exchange in glasses has found a renewed interest with a lot of new development and research in industrial and academic labs and the commercialization of materials with outstanding mechanical properties. These glasses are now widely used in many electronic devices including hand-held displays and tablets. The exchange is generally conducted in a bath of molten salt below the transition temperature of the glass. The exchange at the surface of an alkali ion by a bigger one brings compressive stress at the surface. The mechanical properties are dependent on the stress level at the surface and the depth of penetration of the bigger ion. As compared to glasses, glass-ceramics have the interest to display a wide range of aspects (transparent to opaque and different mechanical properties (especially higher modulus and toughness. There has been little research on ion-exchange in glass-ceramics. In these materials the mechanisms are much more complex than in glasses because of their polyphasic nature: ion-exchange generally takes place mostly in one phase (crystalline phase or residual glass. The mechanism can be similar to what is observed in glasses with the replacement of an ion by another in the structure. But in some cases this ion-exchange leads to microstructural modifications (for example amorphisation or phase change.This article reviews these ion-exchange mechanisms using several transparent and opaque alumino-silicate glass-ceramics as examples. The effect of the ion exchange in the various glass-ceramics will be described, with particular emphasis on flexural strength.

  13. Analysis of elementary process steps in industrial glass melting tanks: some ideas on innovations in industrial glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional industrial glass furnaces show broad glass melt residence time distributions in the melting tanks and average residence times may be up to more than two days for high quality glass products, such as float glass or TV glass, despite the minimum residence times of 8-10 hours (or even less

  14. Comment on 'Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An analytically solvable model with a glass-to-glass transition'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakoviack, V.

    2007-01-01

    Guided by old results on simple mode-coupling models displaying glass-glass transitions, we demonstrate, through a crude analysis of the solution with one step of replica symmetry breaking (1RSB) derived by Crisanti and Leuzzi for the spherical s+p mean-field spin glass [Phys. Rev. B 73, 014412 (2006)], that the phase behavior of these systems is not yet fully understood when s and p are well separated. First, there seems to be a possibility of glass-glass transition scenarios in these systems. Second, we find clear indications that the 1RSB solution cannot be correct in the full glassy phase. Therefore, while the proposed analysis is clearly naive and probably inexact, it definitely calls for a reassessment of the physics of these systems, with the promise of potentially interesting developments in the theory of disordered and complex systems

  15. Synthesis and properties of ZnTe and Eu3+ ion co-doped glass nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman Molla, Atiar; Tarafder, Anal; Dey, Chirantan; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2014-01-01

    In this study, ZnTe (II-VI) semiconductor and Eu +3 -ion co-doped borosilicate glass has been prepared in the SiO 2 -K 2 O-CaO-BaO-B 2 O 3 glass system followed by controlled heat-treatment to produce glass nanocomposites. Glass transition temperature and crystallization peak temperature have been evaluated using DSC analysis. Dilatometric studies were carried out to evaluate thermal expansion co-efficient, glass transition temperature, and dilatometric softening temperature and found to be 10.7 × 10 −6 /K, 580° C and 628° C, respectively. TEM micrographs demonstrate formation of nano sized crystallites of less than 50 nm. The ZnTe crystal formation also established through selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis and high resolution images obtained through TEM studies. With increasing heat treatment time, optical transmission cut-off wavelength (λ cut-off ) shifted towards higher wavelength. Excitation spectra were recorded by monitoring emission at 613 nm corresponding to the 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 transition. An intense 394 nm excitation band corresponding to the 7 F 0 → 5 L 6 transition was observed. Emission spectra were then recorded by exciting the glass samples at 394 nm. When the glass is heat-treated for 30 min at 610° C, a 6-fold increase in the intensity of the red emission at 612 nm has been observed, which is attributed to the segregation of Eu 3+ ions into the low phonon energy ZnTe crystallites and as the size of the nanocrystals is smaller than the size of the exciton, quantum confinement effect is visible. Further increase in heat-treatment duration led to decrease in luminescence intensity due to the growth of larger size crystals. 5 D 1 → 7 F 0 transition is visible only in the samples heat-treated for 30 min and 1 h, which is a characteristic of presence of Eu 3+ ions in the low phonon energy ZnTe crystal sites. The micro hardness of the precursor glass and glass nanocomposites was evaluated; base glass shows

  16. Static corrosion of radioactive glass at 400C and corrosion of radioactive glass under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The goals of the project were to establish to what extent results obtained on non-radioactive glass are applicable to real waste glasses and also to develop a basis for understanding the effects of the components in the waste package on the glass dissolution behaviour as well as to obtain basic data on the temperature dependence of dissolution and the glass behaviour under flow conditions. Based on the results from these initial three phases, a model for predicting the dissolution behaviour of highly radioactive glass under realistic conditions in a granitic repository is being developed and refined. (orig./PW)

  17. Influence of glass structure on the ac conductivity of alkali phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidebottom, D L

    2003-01-01

    The conductivity dispersion in several alkali phosphate glasses is examined as the glass structure changes from an interconnected 'mesh' network to one of phosphate chains cross-linked by alkali ions. For metaphosphate glasses the dispersion varies in response to the size of the mobile ion relative to the mean spacing between phosphate chains. Preliminary work on ultraphosphate glasses suggests this 'constriction' effect largely disappears as the chain structure is replaced by a mesh structure. However, some puzzling changes in the conductivity dispersion with respect to alkali ion size remain. It is suggested that these changes may be related to a 're-polymerization' mechanism thought to occur in phosphate glasses

  18. Setting of the Optimal Parameters of Melted Glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luptáková, Natália; Matejíčka, L.; Krečmer, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2015), s. 73-79 ISSN 1802-2308 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Striae * Glass * Glass melting * Regression * Optimal parameters Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  19. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  20. Hydrothermal metallurgy for recycling of slag and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Katsuyama, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    The authors have applied hydrothermal reactions to develop recycling processing of slag or glass. As an example, under hydrothermal conditions such as 200 300 deg. C and 30 40MPa with H 2 O, powders made of glass can be sintered to become solidified glass materials containing about 10mass% H 2 O. When the glass containing H 2 O is heated again under normal pressure, the glass expands releasing H 2 O to make porous microstructure. H 2 O starts to emit just above the glass transition temperature. Therefore, when we have a glass with low glass transition temperature, we can make low temperature foaming glass. The SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 glass is a candidate to be such a foaming glass. In this paper, we describe our recent trial on the fabrication of the low temperature foaming glass by using hydrothermal reaction.