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Sample records for ii receptor lacking

  1. Reduced growth, abnormal kidney structure, and type 2 (AT2) angiotensin receptor-mediated blood pressure regulation in mice lacking both AT1A and AT1B receptors for angiotensin II

    OpenAIRE

    Oliverio, Michael I.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Ito, Masaki; Le, Thu; Audoly, Laurent; Best, Christopher F.; Hiller, Sylvia; Kluckman, Kimberly; Maeda, Nobuyo; Smithies, Oliver; Coffman, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    The classically recognized functions of the renin–angiotensin system are mediated by type 1 (AT1) angiotensin receptors. Whereas man possesses a single AT1 receptor, there are two AT1 receptor isoforms in rodents (AT1A and AT1B) that are products of separate genes (Agtr1a and Agtr1b). We have generated mice lacking AT1B (Agtr1b −/−) and both AT1A and AT1B receptors (Agtr1a −/−Agtr1b −/−). Agtr1b −/− mice are healthy, without an abnormal phenotype. In contrast, Agtr1a −/−Agtr1b −/− mice have d...

  2. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  3. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjing; Barrientos, Tomasa; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Sauve, Anthony A; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-10-20

    Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1) might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure.

  4. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1 might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure.

  5. Lack of Galanin 3 Receptor Aggravates Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botz, Bálint; Kemény, Ágnes; Brunner, Susanne M; Locker, Felix; Csepregi, Janka; Mócsai, Attila; Pintér, Erika; McDougall, Jason J; Kofler, Barbara; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenic inflammation mediated by peptidergic sensory nerves has a crucial impact on the pathogenesis of various joint diseases. Galanin is a regulatory sensory neuropeptide, which has been shown to attenuate neurogenic inflammation, modulate neutrophil activation, and be involved in the development of adjuvant arthritis, but our current understanding about its targets and physiological importance is incomplete. Among the receptors of galanin (GAL1-3), GAL3 has been found to be the most abundantly expressed in the vasculature and on the surface of some immune cells. However, since there are minimal in vivo data on the role of GAL3 in joint diseases, we analyzed its involvement in different inflammatory mechanisms of the K/BxN serum transfer-model of autoimmune arthritis employing GAL 3 gene-deficient mice. After arthritis induction, GAL3 knockouts demonstrated increased clinical disease severity and earlier hindlimb edema than wild types. Vascular hyperpermeability determined by in vivo fluorescence imaging was also elevated compared to the wild-type controls. However, neutrophil accumulation detected by in vivo luminescence imaging or arthritic mechanical hyperalgesia was not altered by the lack of the GAL3 receptor. Our findings suggest that GAL3 has anti-inflammatory properties in joints by inhibiting vascular hyperpermeability and consequent edema formation.

  6. Mice lacking the PACAP type I receptor have impaired photic entrainment and negative masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, J.; Brabet, P.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    2008-01-01

    The retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) is a retinofugal neuronal pathway which, in mammals, mediates nonimage-forming vision to various areas in the brain involved in circadian timing, masking behavior, and regulation of the pupillary light reflex. The RHT costores the two neurotransmitters glutamate...... and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP), which in a rather complex interplay are mediators of photic adjustment of the circadian system. To further characterize the role of PACAP/PACAP receptor type 1 (PAC1) receptor signaling in light entrainment of the clock and in negative masking behavior......, we extended previous studies in mice lacking the PAC1 receptor (PAC1 KO) by examining their phase response to single light pulses using Aschoff type II regime, their ability to entrain to non-24-h light-dark (LD) cycles and large phase shifts of the LD cycle (jet lag), as well as their negative...

  7. Altered food consumption in mice lacking lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusaulcy, R; Daviaud, D; Pradère, J P; Grès, S; Valet, Ph; Saulnier-Blache, J S

    2009-12-01

    The release of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) by adipocytes has previously been proposed to play a role in obesity and associated pathologies such as insulin resistance and diabetes. In the present work, the sensitivity to diet-induced obesity was studied in mice lacking one of the LPA receptor subtype (LPA1R). Conversely to what was observed in wild type (WT) mice, LPA1R-KO-mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) showed no significant increase in body weight or fat mass when compared to low fat diet (LFD). In addition, in contrast to what was observed in WT mice, LPA1R-KO mice did not exhibit over-consumption of food associated with HFD. Surprisingly, when fed a LFD, LPA1R-KO mice exhibited significant higher plasma leptin concentration and higher level of adipocyte leptin mRNA than WT mice. In conclusion, LPA1R-KO mice were found to be resistant to diet-induced obesity consecutive to a resistance to fat-induced over-consumption of food that may result at least in part from alterations in leptin expression and production.

  8. Lack of renal dopamine D5 receptors promotes hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asico, Laureano; Zhang, Xiaojie; Jiang, Jifu; Cabrera, David; Escano, Crisanto S; Sibley, David R; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yu; Mannon, Roslyn; Jones, John E; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the dopamine D(5) receptor gene in mice increases BP and causes salt sensitivity. To determine the role of renal versus extrarenal D(5) receptors in BP regulation, we performed cross-renal transplantation experiments. BP was similar between wild-type mice and wild-type mice transplanted with wild-type kidneys, indicating that the transplantation procedure did not affect BP. BP was lower among D(5)(-/-) mice transplanted with wild-type kidneys than D(5)(-/-) kidneys, demonstrating that the renal D(5) receptors are important in BP control. BP was higher in wild-type mice transplanted with D(5)(-/-) kidneys than wild-type kidneys but not significantly different from syngenic transplanted D(5)(-/-) mice, indicating the importance of the kidney in the development of hypertension. On a high-salt diet, all mice with D(5)(-/-) kidneys excreted less sodium than mice with wild-type kidneys. Transplantation of a wild-type kidney into a D(5)(-/-) mouse decreased the renal expression of AT(1) receptors and Nox-2. Conversely, transplantation of a D(5)(-/-) kidney into a wild-type mouse increased the expression of both, suggesting that both renal and extrarenal factors are important in the regulation of AT(1) receptor and Nox-2 expression. These results highlight the role of renal D(5) receptors in BP homeostasis and the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  9. Lack of glucagon receptor signaling and its implications beyond glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon action is transduced by a G protein-coupled receptor located in liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart, pancreatic β-cells, and placenta. Genetically modified animal models have provided important clues about the role of glucagon and its receptor (Gcgr) beyond glucose control. The PubMed database was searched for articles published between 1995 and 2014 using the key terms glucagon, glucagon receptor, signaling, and animal models. Lack of Gcgr signaling has been associated with: i) hypoglycemic pregnancies, altered placentation, poor fetal growth, and increased fetal-neonatal death; ii) pancreatic glucagon cell hyperplasia and hyperglucagonemia; iii) altered body composition, energy state, and protection from diet-induced obesity; iv) impaired hepatocyte survival; v) altered glucose, lipid, and hormonal milieu; vi) altered metabolic response to prolonged fasting and exercise; vii) reduced gastric emptying and increased intestinal length; viii) altered retinal function; and ix) prevention of the development of diabetes in insulin-deficient mice. Similar phenotypic findings were observed in the hepatocyte-specific deletion of Gcgr. Glucagon action has been involved in the modulation of sweet taste responsiveness, inotropic and chronotropic effects in the heart, satiety, glomerular filtration rate, secretion of insulin, cortisol, ghrelin, GH, glucagon, and somatostatin, and hypothalamic signaling to suppress hepatic glucose production. Glucagon (α) cells under certain conditions can transdifferentiate into insulin (β) cells. These findings suggest that glucagon signaling plays an important role in multiple organs. Thus, treatment options designed to block Gcgr activation in diabetics may have implications beyond glucose homeostasis.

  10. Lack of the vitamin D receptor is associated with reduced epidermal differentiation and hair follicle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhongjion; Komuves, László; Yu, Qian-Chun; Elalieh, Hashem; Ng, Dean C; Leary, Colin; Chang, Sandra; Crumrine, Debra; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya; Kato, Shigeaki; Bikle, Daniel D

    2002-01-01

    The active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, acting through the vitamin D receptor, regulates the expression of genes in a variety of vitamin D-responsive tissues, including the epidermis. To investigate the role of the vitamin D receptor in mediating epidermal differentiation, we examined the histomorphology and expression of differentiation markers in the epidermis of vitamin D receptor knockout mice generated by gene targeting. The homozygous knockout mouse displayed a phenotype that closely resembles vitamin D-dependent rickets type II in humans, including the development of rickets and alopecia. Hair loss developed by 3 mo after birth and gradually led to nearly total hair loss by 8 mo. Histologic analysis of the skin of homozygous knockout mice revealed dilation of the hair follicles with the formation of dermal cysts starting at the age of 3 wk. These cysts increased in size and number with age. Epidermal differentiation markers, including involucrin, profilaggrin, and loricrin, detected by immunostaining and in situ hybridization, showed decreased expression levels in homozygous knockout mice from birth until 3 wk, preceding the morphologic changes observed in the hair follicles. Keratin 10 levels, however, were not reduced. At the ultrastructural level, homozygous knockout mice showed increased numbers of small dense granules in the granular layer with few or no surrounding keratin bundles and a loss of keratohyalin granules. Thus, both the interfollicular epidermis and the hair follicle appear to require the vitamin D receptor for normal differentiation. The temporal abnormalities between the two processes reflect the apparent lack of requirement for the vitamin D receptor during the anagen phase of the first (developmental) hair cycle, but with earlier effects on the terminal differentiation of the interfollicular epidermis.

  11. Metabolic Catastrophe in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Tomasa; Laothamatas, Indira; Koves, Timothy R; Soderblom, Erik J; Bryan, Miles; Moseley, M Arthur; Muoio, Deborah M; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-11-01

    Transferrin receptor (Tfr1) is ubiquitously expressed, but its roles in non-hematopoietic cells are incompletely understood. We used a tissue-specific conditional knockout strategy to ask whether skeletal muscle required Tfr1 for iron uptake. We found that iron assimilation via Tfr1 was critical for skeletal muscle metabolism, and that iron deficiency in muscle led to dramatic changes, not only in muscle, but also in adipose tissue and liver. Inactivation of Tfr1 incapacitated normal energy production in muscle, leading to growth arrest and a muted attempt to switch to fatty acid β oxidation, using up fat stores. Starvation signals stimulated gluconeogenesis in the liver, but amino acid substrates became limiting and hypoglycemia ensued. Surprisingly, the liver was also iron deficient, and production of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin was depressed. Our observations reveal a complex interaction between iron homeostasis and metabolism that has implications for metabolic and iron disorders.

  12. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  13. Gene expression profiling of gastric mucosa in mice lacking CCK and gastrin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Kodama, Yosuke; Flatberg, Arnar

    2014-01-01

    acid secretion was impaired and the ECL cell signaling pathway was inhibited in CCK2 receptor KO mice but not in CCK1 receptor KO mice. However, in CCK1+2 receptor double KO mice the acid secretion in response to pylorus ligation-induced vagal stimulation and the ECL cell pathway were partially...... hydroxylase probably in trefoil peptide2-immunoreactive cells. In conclusion, mice lacking CCK receptors exhibited a functional shift from the gastrin-CCK pathways to the neuronal pathway in control of the ECL cells and eventually the acid secretion. Taking the present data together with previous findings, we......The stomach produces acid, which may play an important role in the regulation of bone homeostasis. The aim of this study was to reveal signaling pathways in the gastric mucosa that involve the acid secretion and possibly the bone metabolism in CCK1 and/or CCK2 receptor knockout (KO) mice. Gastric...

  14. Postsynaptic D2 dopamine receptor supersensitivity in the striatum of mice lacking TAAR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Stefano; Ghisi, Valentina; Emanuele, Marco; Leo, Damiana; Sukhanov, Ilya; Sotnikova, Tatiana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-06-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) known to modulate dopaminergic system through several mechanisms. Mice lacking this receptor show a higher sensitivity to dopaminergic stimuli, such as amphetamine; however, it is not clear whether D1 or D2 dopamine receptors and which associated intracellular signaling events are involved in this modulation. In the striatum of TAAR1 knock out (TAAR1-KO mice) we found that D2, but not D1, dopamine receptors were over-expressed, both in terms of mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, the D2 dopamine receptor-related G protein-independent AKT/GSK3 signaling pathway was selectively activated, as indicated by the decrease of phosphorylation of AKT and GSK3β. The decrease in phospho-AKT levels, suggesting an increase in D2 dopamine receptor activity in basal conditions, was associated with an increase of AKT/PP2A complex, as revealed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Finally, we found that the locomotor activation induced by the D2 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole, but not by the full D1 dopamine receptor agonist SKF-82958, was increased in TAAR1-KO mice. These data demonstrate pronounced supersensitivity of postsynaptic D2 dopamine receptors in the striatum of TAAR1-KO mice and indicate that a close interaction of TAAR1 and D2 dopamine receptors at the level of postsynaptic structures has important functional consequences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synergistic Impairment of Glucose Homeostasis in ob/ob Mice Lacking Functional Serotonin 2C Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Jennifer M.; Juneja, Punita; Mackay, Adrienne W.; Graham, James; Havel, Peter J.; Tecott, Laurence H.; Goulding, Evan H.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate how serotonin and leptin interact in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis, we generated a genetic mouse model, the OB2C mouse, which lacks functional serotonin 2C receptors and the adipocyte hormone leptin. The OB2C mice exhibited a dramatic diabetes phenotype, evidenced by a synergistic increase in serum glucose levels and water intake. The severity of the animals’ diabetes phenotype would not have been predicted from the phenotypic characterization of mice...

  16. Impaired hair growth and wound healing in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; García-Serrano, Laura; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Paramio, Jesus M; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms) display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies.

  17. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hoa; Maga, Matthew; Pradhan, Amynah; Evans, Christopher J; Maidment, Nigel T; Hales, Tim G; Walwyn, Wendy

    2011-04-12

    Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2) augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca²+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2⁻/⁻ mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2⁻/⁻ mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2⁻/⁻ mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2⁻/⁻ and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  18. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hales Tim G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2 augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2-/- mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2-/- mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2-/- mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2-/- and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  19. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis associated with transient cerebral dyschromatopsia, prosopagnosia, and lack of stereopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Hiromasa; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Ohtomo, Ryo; Bannai, Taro; Wakakura, Masato; Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-06-01

    A 20-year-old woman suffered from anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis and was treated with removal of an ovarian teratoma and retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma in addition to immunotherapy. She was incapable of face recognition, had difficulty with object recognition, and lacked color sensation and stereo perception during recovery. These symptoms were transient and completely resolved over 4 months. Our report documents additional aspects of visual impairment associated with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and suggests that the disease can lead to diffuse cerebral dysfunction including the cortical visual system.

  20. Mice Lacking the Inhibitory Collagen Receptor LAIR-1 Exhibit a Mild Thrombocytosis and Hyperactive Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher W; Thomas, Steven G; Raslan, Zaher; Patel, Pushpa; Byrne, Maxwell; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Bem, Danai; Meyaard, Linde; Senis, Yotis A; Watson, Steve P; Mazharian, Alexandra

    2017-05-01

    Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is a collagen receptor that belongs to the inhibitory immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif-containing receptor family. It is an inhibitor of signaling via the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing collagen receptor complex, glycoprotein VI-FcRγ-chain. It is expressed on hematopoietic cells, including immature megakaryocytes, but is not detectable on platelets. Although the inhibitory function of LAIR-1 has been described in leukocytes, its physiological role in megakaryocytes and in particular in platelet formation has not been explored. In this study, we investigate the role of LAIR-1 in megakaryocyte development and platelet production by generating LAIR-1-deficient mice. Mice lacking LAIR-1 exhibit a significant increase in platelet counts, a prolonged platelet half-life in vivo, and increased proplatelet formation in vitro. Interestingly, platelets from LAIR-1-deficient mice exhibit an enhanced reactivity to collagen and the glycoprotein VI-specific agonist collagen-related peptide despite not expressing LAIR-1, and mice showed enhanced thrombus formation in the carotid artery after ferric chloride injury. Targeted deletion of LAIR-1 in mice results in an increase in signaling downstream of the glycoprotein VI-FcRγ-chain and integrin αIIbβ3 in megakaryocytes because of enhanced Src family kinase activity. Findings from this study demonstrate that ablation of LAIR-1 in megakaryocytes leads to increased Src family kinase activity and downstream signaling in response to collagen that is transmitted to platelets, rendering them hyper-reactive specifically to agonists that signal through Syk tyrosine kinases, but not to G-protein-coupled receptors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  2. Severely impaired learning and altered neuronal morphology in mice lacking NMDA receptors in medium spiny neurons.

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    Lisa R Beutler

    Full Text Available The striatum is composed predominantly of medium spiny neurons (MSNs that integrate excitatory, glutamatergic inputs from the cortex and thalamus, and modulatory dopaminergic inputs from the ventral midbrain to influence behavior. Glutamatergic activation of AMPA, NMDA, and metabotropic receptors on MSNs is important for striatal development and function, but the roles of each of these receptor classes remain incompletely understood. Signaling through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs in the striatum has been implicated in various motor and appetitive learning paradigms. In addition, signaling through NMDARs influences neuronal morphology, which could underlie their role in mediating learned behaviors. To study the role of NMDARs on MSNs in learning and in morphological development, we generated mice lacking the essential NR1 subunit, encoded by the Grin1 gene, selectively in MSNs. Although these knockout mice appear normal and display normal 24-hour locomotion, they have severe deficits in motor learning, operant conditioning and active avoidance. In addition, the MSNs from these knockout mice have smaller cell bodies and decreased dendritic length compared to littermate controls. We conclude that NMDAR signaling in MSNs is critical for normal MSN morphology and many forms of learning.

  3. Reduced Bone Turnover in Mice Lacking the P2Y13 Receptor of ADP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Robaye, Bernard; Agrawal, Ankita; Skerry, Timothy M.; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a condition of excessive and uncoupled bone turnover, in which osteoclastic resorption exceeds osteoblastic bone formation, resulting in an overall net bone loss, bone fragility, and morbidity. Although numerous treatments have been developed to inhibit bone loss by blocking osteoclastic bone resorption, understanding of the mechanisms behind bone loss is incomplete. The purinergic signaling system is emerging to be a pivotal regulator of bone homeostasis, and extracellular ADP has previously been shown to be a powerful osteolytic agent in vitro. We report here that deletion of the P2Y13 receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor for extracellular ADP, leads to a 40% reduction in trabecular bone mass, 50% reduction in osteoblast and osteoclast numbers in vivo, as well as activity in vitro, and an overall 50% reduction in the rate of bone remodeling in mice in vivo. Down-regulation of RhoA/ROCK I signaling and a reduced ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/osteoprotegerin observed in osteoblasts from P2Y13R−/− mice might explain this bone phenotype. Furthermore, because one of the main causes of osteoporosis in older women is lack of estrogen, we examined the effect of ovariectomy of the P2Y13R−/− mice and found them to be protected from ovariectomy-induced bone loss by up to 65%. These data confirm a role of purinergic ADP signaling in the skeleton, whereby deletion of the P2Y13 receptor leads to reduced bone turnover rates, which provide a protective advantage in conditions of accelerated bone turnover such as oestrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis. PMID:22108801

  4. Commercially available antibodies against human and murine histamine H₄-receptor lack specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, Silke; Seifert, Roland; Neumann, Detlef

    2012-02-01

    Antibodies are important tools to detect expression and localization of proteins within the living cell. However, for a series of commercially available antibodies which are supposed to recognize G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), lack of specificity has been described. In recent publications, antisera against the histamine H₄-receptor (H₄R), which is a member of the GPCR family, have been used to demonstrate receptor expression. However, a comprehensive characterization of these antisera has not been performed yet. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to evaluate the specificity of three commercially available H₄R antibodies. Sf9 insect cells and HEK293 cells expressing recombinant murine and human H₄R, spleen cells obtained from H₄⁻/⁻ and from wild-type mice, and human CD20⁺ and CD20⁻ peripheral blood cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot using three commercially available H₄R antibodies. Our results show that all tested H₄R antibodies bind to virtually all cells, independently of the expression of H₄R, thus in an unspecific fashion. Also in Western blot, the H₄R antibodies do not bind to the specified protein. Our data underscore the importance of stringent evaluation of antibodies using valid controls, such as cells of H₄R⁻/⁻ mice, to show true receptor expression and antigen specificity. Improved validation of commercially available antibodies prior to release to the market would avoid time-consuming and expensive validation assays by the user.

  5. Scavenger receptor AI/II truncation, lung function and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor A-I/II (SRA-I/II) on alveolar macrophages is involved in recognition and clearance of modified lipids and inhaled particulates. A rare variant of the SRA-I/II gene, Arg293X, truncates the distal collagen-like domain, which is essential for ligand recognition. We tested whet...

  6. Altered response to benzodiazepine anxiolytics in mice lacking GABA B(1) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombereau, Cedric; Kaupmann, Klemens; van der Putten, Herman; Cryan, John F

    2004-08-16

    Recently, we demonstrated that mice lacking the GABA(B(1)) subunit were more anxious than wild-type animals in several behavioural paradigms, most notably in the light-dark test. In an attempt to assess the effects of classical benzodiazepine anxiolytics on anxiety-like behaviour observed in these mice, animals were administered either chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or diazepam (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) prior to testing in the light-dark box. Surprisingly, in contrast with the wild-type mice, neither benzodiazepines decreased anxiety-like behaviour in GABA(B(1))(-/-) mice. These data suggest that targeted deletion of GABA(B(1)) subunit alters GABA(A) receptor function in vivo.

  7. Remodeling of the Cervix and Parturition in Mice Lacking the Progesterone Receptor B Isoform1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellon, Steven M.; Oshiro, Bryan T.; Chhaya, Tejas Y.; Lechuga, Thomas J.; Dias, Rejane M.; Burns, Alexandra E.; Force, Lindsey; Apostolakis, Ede M.

    2011-01-01

    Withdrawal of progestational support for pregnancy is part of the final common pathways for parturition, but the role of nuclear progesterone receptor (PGR) isoforms in this process is not known. To determine if the PGR-B isoform participates in cervical remodeling at term, cervices were obtained from mice lacking PGR-B (PGR-BKO) and from wild-type (WT) controls before or after birth. PGR-BKO mice gave birth to viable pups at the same time as WT controls during the early morning of Day 19 postbreeding. Morphological analyses indicated that by the day before birth, cervices from PGR-BKO and WT mice had increased in size, with fewer cell nuclei/area as well as diminished collagen content and structure, as evidenced by optical density of picrosirius red-stained sections, compared to cervices from nonpregnant mice. Moreover, increased numbers of resident macrophages, but not neutrophils, were found in the prepartum cervix of PGR-BKO compared to nonpregnant mice, parallel to findings in WT mice. These results suggest that PGR-B does not contribute to the growth or degradation of the extracellular matrix or proinflammatory processes associated with recruitment of macrophages in the cervix leading up to birth. Rather, other receptors may contribute to the progesterone-dependent mechanism that promotes remodeling of the cervix during pregnancy and in the proinflammatory process associated with ripening before parturition. PMID:21613631

  8. Mice lacking Axl and Mer tyrosine kinase receptors are susceptible to experimental autoimmune orchitis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Liu, Peng; Cheng, C Yan; Lee, Will M; Chen, Yongmei; Han, Daishu

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian testis is an immunoprivileged organ where male germ cell autoantigens are immunologically ignored. Both systemic immune tolerance to autoantigens and local immunosuppressive milieu contribute to the testicular immune privilege. Testicular immunosuppression has been intensively studied, but information on systemic immune tolerance to autoantigens is lacking. In the present study, we aimed to determine the role of Axl and Mer receptor tyrosine kinases in maintaining the systemic tolerance to male germ cell antigens using the experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) model. Axl and Mer double-knockout (Axl(-/-)Mer(-/-)) mice developed evident EAO after a single immunization with germ cell homogenates emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant. EAO was characterized by the accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes in the testis. Damage to the seminiferous epithelium was also observed. EAO induction was associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine upregulation in the testes, impaired permeability of the blood-testis barrier and generation of autoantibodies against germ cell antigens in Axl(-/-)Mer(-/-) mice. Immunization also induced mild EAO in Axl or Mer single-gene-knockout mice. By contrast, a single immunization failed to induce EAO in wild-type mice. The results indicate that Axl and Mer receptors cooperatively regulate the systemic immune tolerance to male germ cell antigens.

  9. Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice Lacking the Tas1r3 Taste Receptor Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir O Murovets

    Full Text Available The G-protein-coupled sweet taste receptor dimer T1R2/T1R3 is expressed in taste bud cells in the oral cavity. In recent years, its involvement in membrane glucose sensing was discovered in endocrine cells regulating glucose homeostasis. We investigated importance of extraorally expressed T1R3 taste receptor protein in age-dependent control of blood glucose homeostasis in vivo, using nonfasted mice with a targeted mutation of the Tas1r3 gene that encodes the T1R3 protein. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as behavioral tests measuring taste responses to sucrose solutions, were performed with C57BL/6ByJ (Tas1r3+/+ inbred mice bearing the wild-type allele and C57BL/6J-Tas1r3tm1Rfm mice lacking the entire Tas1r3 coding region and devoid of the T1R3 protein (Tas1r3-/-. Compared with Tas1r3+/+ mice, Tas1r3-/- mice lacked attraction to sucrose in brief-access licking tests, had diminished taste preferences for sucrose solutions in the two-bottle tests, and had reduced insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose administered intraperitoneally or intragastrically, which suggests that these effects are due to absence of T1R3. Impairment of glucose clearance in Tas1r3-/- mice was exacerbated with age after intraperitoneal but not intragastric administration of glucose, pointing to a compensatory role of extraoral T1R3-dependent mechanisms in offsetting age-dependent decline in regulation of glucose homeostasis. Incretin effects were similar in Tas1r3+/+ and Tas1r3-/- mice, which suggests that control of blood glucose clearance is associated with effects of extraoral T1R3 in tissues other than the gastrointestinal tract. Collectively, the obtained data demonstrate that the T1R3 receptor protein plays an important role in control of glucose homeostasis not only by regulating sugar intake but also via its extraoral function, probably in the pancreas and brain.

  10. How do CD4+ T cells detect and eliminate tumor cells that either lack or express MHC class II molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Audun Werner Haabeth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor specific antigen by host antigen presenting cells (APCs appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315, where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-g stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed.

  11. Postnatal development of the endocrine pancreas in mice lacking functional GABAB receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivello, Martín; Bonaventura, María Marta; Chamson-Reig, Astrid; Arany, Edith; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria

    2013-05-15

    Adult mice lacking functional GABAB receptors (GABAB1KO) have glucose metabolism alterations. Since GABAB receptors (GABABRs) are expressed in progenitor cells, we evaluated islet development in GABAB1KO mice. Postnatal day 4 (PND4) and adult, male and female, GABAB1KO, and wild-type littermates (WT) were weighed and euthanized, and serum insulin and glucagon was measured. Pancreatic glucagon and insulin content were assessed, and pancreas insulin, glucagon, PCNA, and GAD65/67 were determined by immunohistochemistry. RNA from PND4 pancreata and adult isolated islets was obtained, and Ins1, Ins2, Gcg, Sst, Ppy, Nes, Pdx1, and Gad1 transcription levels were determined by quantitative PCR. The main results were as follows: 1) insulin content was increased in PND4 GABAB1KO females and in both sexes in adult GABAB1KOs; 2) GABAB1KO females had more clusters (<500 μm(2)) and less islets than WT females; 3) cluster proliferation was decreased at PND4 and increased in adult GABAB1KO mice; 4) increased β-area at the expense of the α-cell area was present in GABAB1KO islets; 5) Ins2, Sst, and Ppy transcription were decreased in PND4 GABAB1KO pancreata, adult GABAB1KO female islets showed increased Ins1, Ins2, and Sst expression, Pdx1 was increased in male and female GABAB1KO islets; and 6) GAD65/67 was increased in adult GABAB1KO pancreata. We demonstrate that several islet parameters are altered in GABAB1KO mice, further pinpointing the importance of GABABRs in islet physiology. Some changes persist from neonatal ages to adulthood (e.g., insulin content in GABAB1KO females), whereas other features are differentially regulated according to age (e.g., Ins2 was reduced in PND4, whereas it was upregulated in adult GABAB1KO females).

  12. Increased consumption of ethanol and sugar water in mice lacking the dopamine D2 long receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulwa, Zachary B; Sharlin, Jordan A; Clark, Peter J; Bhattacharya, Tushar K; Kilby, Chessa N; Wang, Yanyan; Rhodes, Justin S

    2011-11-01

    Individual differences in dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) expression in the brain are thought to influence motivation and reinforcement for ethanol and other rewards. D2R exists in two isoforms, D2 long (D2LR) and D2 short (D2SR), produced by alternative splicing of the same gene. The relative contributions of D2LR versus D2SR to ethanol and sugar water drinking are not known. Genetic engineering was used to produce a line of knockout (KO) mice that lack D2LR and consequently have increased expression of D2SR. KO and wild-type (WT) mice of both sexes were tested for intake of 20% ethanol, 10% sugar water and plain tap water using established drinking-in-the-dark procedures. Mice were also tested for effects of the D2 antagonist eticlopride on intake of ethanol to determine whether KO responses were caused by lack of D2LR or overrepresentation of D2SR. Locomotor activity on running wheels and in cages without wheels was also measured for comparison. D2L KO mice drank significantly more ethanol than WT in both sexes. KO mice drank more sugar water than WT in females but not in males. Eticlopride dose dependently decreased ethanol intake in all groups except male KO. KO mice were less physically active than WT in cages with or without running wheels. Results suggest that overrepresentation of D2SR contributes to increased intake of ethanol in the KO mice. Decreasing wheel running and general levels of physical activity in the KO mice rules out the possibility that higher intake results from higher motor activity. Results extend the literature implicating altered expression of D2R in risk for addiction by delineating the contribution of individual D2R isoforms. These findings suggest that D2LR and D2SR play differential roles in consumption of alcohol and sugar rewards.

  13. Canid progesterone receptors lack activation function 3 domain-dependent activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracanin, Ana; van Wolferen, Monique E; Sartorius, Carol A; Brenkman, Arjan B; Schoonen, Willem G; Mol, Jan A

    2012-12-01

    Progesterone regulates multiple behavioral, physiological, and pathological aspects of female reproductive biology through its two progesterone receptors (PRs), PR-B and the truncated PR-A. PR-B is necessary for mammary gland development in mice and, compared with PR-A, is overall a stronger transactivator of target genes due to an additional activation function 3 (AF3) domain. In dogs, known for their high sensitivity to progesterone-induced mammary cancer, the PR-B function was studied. Canine PR (cPR)-B appeared to contain multiple mutations within AF3 core sequence motifs and lacks N-terminal ligand-independent posttranslational modifications. Consequently, cPR-B has a weak transactivation potential on progesterone-responsive mouse mammary tumor virus-luc and progesterone response element 2-luc reporters transiently transfected in hamster, human, or canine cells and also on known target genes FKBP5 and SGK in doxycycline-inducible, stable transfected cPR-B in canine mammary cells. The cPR-B function was restored to the level of human PR-B by the replacement of canine AF3 domain with the human one. The lack of AF3 domain-dependent transcriptional activity was unique for canids (gray wolf, red fox, and raccoon dog) and not present in closely related caniform species (brown bear, gray seal, and domestic ferret). Despite the limited transactivation potential, canids develop normal mammary glands and frequently mammary tumors. Therefore, these results question the role of PR-B in breast cancer development and may explain unique features of canid reproduction.

  14. Early signs of pathological cognitive aging in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni eKonsolaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. Α deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-, which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioural signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviours, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm and extend the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments, manifested in both spatial learning and recognition memory tasks. In addition, we reveal deficits in spontaneous behaviour and habituation processes earlier in life. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioural examination of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioural changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging.

  15. Mice lacking TR4 nuclear receptor develop mitochondrial myopathy with deficiency in complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Lee, Yi-Fen; Chou, Samuel; Uno, Hideo; Li, Gonghui; Brookes, Paul; Massett, Michael P; Wu, Qiao; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang

    2011-08-01

    The estimated incidence of mitochondrial diseases in humans is approximately 1:5000 to 1:10,000, whereas the molecular mechanisms for more than 50% of human mitochondrial disease cases still remain unclear. Here we report that mice lacking testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4(-/-)) suffered mitochondrial myopathy, and histological examination of TR4(-/-) soleus muscle revealed abnormal mitochondrial accumulation. In addition, increased serum lactate levels, decreased mitochondrial ATP production, and decreased electron transport chain complex I activity were found in TR4(-/-) mice. Restoration of TR4 into TR4(-/-) myoblasts rescued mitochondrial ATP generation capacity and complex I activity. Further real-time PCR quantification and promoter studies found TR4 could modulate complex I activity via transcriptionally regulating the complex I assembly factor NDUFAF1, and restoration of NDUFAF1 level in TR4(-/-) myoblasts increased mitochondrial ATP generation capacity and complex I activity. Together, these results suggest that TR4 plays vital roles in mitochondrial function, which may help us to better understand the pathogenesis of mitochondrial myopathy, and targeting TR4 via its ligands/activators may allow us to develop better therapeutic approaches.

  16. Lack of a Functioning P2X7 Receptor Leads to Increased Susceptibility to Toxoplasmic Ileitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Miller

    Full Text Available Oral infection of C57BL/6J mice with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii leads to a lethal inflammatory ileitis.Mice lacking the purinergic receptor P2X7R are acutely susceptible to toxoplasmic ileitis, losing significantly more weight than C57BL/6J mice and exhibiting much greater intestinal inflammatory pathology in response to infection with only 10 cysts of T. gondii. This susceptibility is not dependent on the ability of P2X7R-deficient mice to control the parasite, which they accomplish just as efficiently as C57BL/6J mice. Rather, susceptibility is associated with elevated ileal concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen intermediates and altered regulation of elements of NFκB activation in P2X7R-deficient mice.Our data support the thesis that P2X7R, a well-documented activator of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, also plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation.

  17. Mutant huntingtin regulates EGF receptor fate in non-neuronal cells lacking wild-type protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melone, Mariarosa A B; Calarco, Anna; Petillo, Orsolina; Margarucci, Sabrina; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Galderisi, Umberto; Koverech, Guido; Peluso, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin (htt) is a scaffold protein localized at the subcellular level and is involved in coordinating the activity of several protein for signaling and intracellular transport. The emerging properties of htt in intracellular trafficking prompted us to study the role of mutant htt (polyQ-htt) in the intracellular fate of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), whose activity seems to be strictly regulated by htt. In particular, to evaluate whether protein trafficking dysfunction occurs in non-neuronal cells in the absence of functional htt, we monitored the EGFR protein in fibroblasts from homozygotic HD patients and their healthy counterpart. We found that polyQ-htt controls EGFR degradation and recycling. Lack of wild-type htt caused alteration of the ubiquitination cycle, formation of EGFR-incorporating high-molecular weight protein aggregates and abnormal EGFR distribution in endosomes of the degradation and recycling pathways after EGF stimulation. PolyQ-htt-induced alteration of EGFR trafficking affected cell migration and proliferation, at least in part, through inhibition of ERK signaling. To our knowledge the data here reported represent the first signaling and phenotypic characterization of polyQ-htt involvement in the modulation of growth factor stimulation in non-neuronal cells.

  18. Angiotensin II receptor alterations during pregnancy in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.P.; Venuto, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Despite activation of the renin-angiotensin system during pregnancy, renal and peripheral vascular blood flows increase, and the systemic blood pressure and the pressor response to exogenous angiotensin II (Ang II) fall. Gestational alterations in Ang II receptors could contribute to these changes. Ang II binding parameters were determining utilizing SVI-Ang II in vascular (glomeruli and mesenteric arteries) and nonvascular (adrenal glomerulosa) tissues from 24- to 28-day pregnant rabbits. Comparisons were made utilizing tissues from nonpregnant rabbits. Binding site concentrations (N) and dissociation constants (K/sub d/) were obtained by Scatchard analyses of binding inhibition data. Meclofenamate (M) inhibits prostaglandin synthesis, reduces plasma renin activity, and enhances the pressor response to infused Ang II in pregnant rabbits. Administration of M to pregnant rabbits increased N in glomerular and in mesenteric artery membranes. These data demonstrate that Ang II receptors in glomeruli and mesenteric arteries are down regulated during gestation in rabbits. Elevated endogenous Ang II during pregnancy in rabbits may contribute to the down regulation of vascular Ang II receptors.

  19. Early Signs of Pathological Cognitive Aging in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Polissidis, Alexia V; Stamatakis, Antonios; Skaliora, Irini

    2016-01-01

    In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. A deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-), which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioral signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviors, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments in spatial learning. In addition, they document age-related deficits in other areas, such as recognition memory, burrowing and nesting building, thereby extending the validity of this animal model for the study of pathological aging. Finally, our data reveal deficits in spontaneous behavior and habituation processes that precede the onset of cognitive decline and could therefore be useful as a non-invasive behavioral screen for identifying animals at risk. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioral assessment of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioral changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging.

  20. Reduced osteoblast activity in the mice lacking TR4 nuclear receptor leads to osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shin-Jen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early studies suggested that TR4 nuclear receptor might play important roles in the skeletal development, yet its detailed mechanism remains unclear. Methods We generated TR4 knockout mice and compared skeletal development with their wild type littermates. Primary bone marrow cells were cultured and we assayed bone differentiation by alkaline phosphatase and alizarin red staining. Primary calvaria were cultured and osteoblastic marker genes were detected by quantitative PCR. Luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA were performed to demonstrate TR4 can directly regulate bone differentiation marker osteocalcin. Results We first found mice lacking TR4 might develop osteoporosis. We then found that osteoblast progenitor cells isolated from bone marrow of TR4 knockout mice displayed reduced osteoblast differentiation capacity and calcification. Osteoblast primary cultures from TR4 knockout mice calvaria also showed higher proliferation rates indicating lower osteoblast differentiation ability in mice after loss of TR4. Mechanism dissection found the expression of osteoblast markers genes, such as ALP, type I collagen alpha 1, osteocalcin, PTH, and PTHR was dramatically reduced in osteoblasts from TR4 knockout mice as compared to those from TR4 wild type mice. In vitro cell line studies with luciferase reporter assay, ChIP assay, and EMSA further demonstrated TR4 could bind directly to the promoter region of osteocalcin gene and induce its gene expression at the transcriptional level in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions Together, these results demonstrate TR4 may function as a novel transcriptional factor to play pathophysiological roles in maintaining normal osteoblast activity during the bone development and remodeling, and disruption of TR4 function may result in multiple skeletal abnormalities.

  1. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  2. MHC class II expression in human basophils: induction and lack of functional significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid L Voskamp

    Full Text Available The antigen-presenting abilities of basophils and their role in initiating a Th2 phenotype is a topic of current controversy. We aimed to determine whether human basophils can be induced to express MHC Class II and act as antigen presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Isolated human basophils were exposed to a panel of cytokines and TLR-ligands and assessed for MHC Class II expression. MHC Class II was expressed in up to 17% of isolated basophils following incubation with a combination of IL-3, IFN-γ and GM-CSF for 72 hours. Costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86 were expressed at very low levels after stimulation. Gene expression analysis of MHC Class II-positive basophils confirmed up-regulation of HLA-DR, HLA-DM, CD74 and Cathepsin S. However, MHC Class II expressing basophils were incapable of inducing antigen-specific T cell activation or proliferation. This is the first report of significant cytokine-induced MHC Class II up-regulation, at both RNA and protein level, in isolated human basophils. By testing stimulation with relevant T cell epitope peptide as well as whole antigen, the failure of MHC Class II expressing basophils to induce T cell response was shown not to be solely due to inefficient antigen uptake and/or processing.

  3. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Hansen, Jonas Tind; Sanni, Samra Joke;

    2010-01-01

    molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit β-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability......Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given...... receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of β-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying...

  4. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Hansen, Jonas Tind; Sanni, Samra Joke;

    2010-01-01

    molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit ß-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability......Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or ß-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given...... receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of ß-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying...

  5. Angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are promoted in mice lacking Fgf16

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Emi; Sasaki, Sayaka; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kito, Takuya; Ohta, Hiroya; Konishi, Morichika; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakao, Kazuwa; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) are pleiotropic proteins involved in development, repair and metabolism. Fgf16 is predominantly expressed in the heart. However, as the heart function is essentially normal in Fgf16 knockout mice, its role has remained unclear. To elucidate the pathophysiological role of Fgf16 in the heart, we examined angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in Fgf16 knockout mice. Angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were significantly promo...

  6. Enhanced Interleukin (IL)-13 Responses in Mice Lacking IL-13 Receptor α 2

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Nancy; Whitters, Matthew J.; Jacobson, Bruce A; Witek, JoAnn; Sypek, Joseph P; Kasaian, Marion; Eppihimer, Michael J.; Unger, Michelle; Tanaka, Takashi; Goldman, Samuel J; Collins, Mary; Donaldson, Debra D.; Grusby, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-13 has recently been shown to play important and unique roles in asthma, parasite immunity, and tumor recurrence. At least two distinct receptor components, IL-4 receptor (R)α and IL-13Rα1, mediate the diverse actions of IL-13. We have recently described an additional high affinity receptor for IL-13, IL-13Rα2, whose function in IL-13 signaling is unknown. To better appreciate the functional importance of IL-13Rα2, mice deficient in IL-13Rα2 were generated by gene targeting. ...

  7. Synaptic AMPA receptor subunit trafficking is independent of the C terminus in the GluR2-lacking mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicker, Sandip; Brown, Keith; Nicoll, Roger A

    2008-01-22

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) type glutamate receptors mediate most fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors are tetrameric assemblies composed from four possible subunits (GluR1-4). In hippocampal pyramidal cells, AMPA receptors are heteromeric receptors containing the GluR2 subunit and either GluR1 or GluR3. It is generally accepted that the trafficking of GluR1/GluR2 receptors to synapses requires activity, whereas GluR2/GluR3 receptors traffic constitutively. It has been suggested that the trafficking is governed by the cytoplasmic C termini of the subunits. Because the basis for this theory relied on the introduction of unnatural, homomeric, calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, we have used the GluR2(-/-) knock out mouse to determine whether the expression of mutated forms of GluR2 can rescue WT synaptic responses. We find that GluR2, lacking its entire C terminus, or a GluR2 chimera containing the C terminus of GluR1, is capable of trafficking to the synapse in the absence of activity. These findings suggest that the GluR2 C terminus is not required for GluR2 synaptic insertion.

  8. The pentapeptide RM-131 promotes food intake and adiposity in wildtype mice but not in mice lacking the ghrelin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eFischer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal peptide hormone ghrelin is the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR, a.k.a. ghrelin receptor, GHR. Currently, ghrelin is the only circulating peripheral hormone with the ability to promote a positive energy balance by stimulating food intake while decreasing energy expenditure and body fat utilization, as defined in rodents. Based on these and additional, beneficial effects on metabolism, the endogenous ghrelin system is considered an attractive target to treat diverse pathological conditions including those associated with eating/wasting disorders and cachexia. As the pharmacological potential of ghrelin is hampered by its relatively short half-life, ghrelin analogs with enhanced pharmacokinetics offer the potential to sustainably improve metabolism. One of these ghrelin analogs is the pentapeptide RM-131, which promotes food intake and adiposity with higher potency as compared to native ghrelin in rodents. Whereas the effect of RM-131 on energy metabolism is solidly confirmed in rodents, it remains elusive whether RM-131 exerts its effect solely via the ghrelin receptor. Accordingly, we assessed the receptor specificity of RM-131 to promote food intake and adiposity in mice lacking the GHR. Our data show that in wildtype mice RM-131 potently promotes weight gain and adiposity through stimulation of food intake. However, RM-131 fails to affect food intake and body weight in mice lacking the GHR, underlining that the anabolic effects of RM-131 are mediated via the ghrelin receptor in mice.

  9. Mice lacking cannabinoid CB1-, CB2-receptors or both receptors show increased susceptibility to trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M A; Kellermann, C A; Burnat, G; Hahn, E G; Rau, T; Konturek, P C

    2010-02-01

    This study was performed to assess whether mice lacking the cannabinoid receptor CB1, CB2 or both receptors show increased susceptibility to TNBS colitis in comparison to wildtype mice. Previously, activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors showed attenuation of TNBS colitis in mice. The aim of the study was to investigate the susceptibility of three mouse strains CB1-, CB2- and CB1+2 double knockout mice in the model of TNBS colitis. The different knockout mice were given each a single enema with TNBS 7 mg, volume 150 microl (in 50% ethanol solution) on day 1. Control group (C57BL/6 mice) received the same concentration of TNBS enema and each strain received vehicle application of 150 microl 50% ethanol solution. After a 3-day period, the animals were sacrificed and their colon excised. A scoring system was used to describe macroscopical and histological changes. Messenger RNA-expression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta as pro-inflammatory markers was measured by RT-PCR. All three knockout strains showed increased susceptibility to TNBS colitis quantified by macroscopical and histological scoring systems and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in comparison to the TNBS control group (wild type C57BL/6 animals). Mice lacking the CB1-, CB2-receptor or both receptors showed aggravation of inflammation in the model of TNBS colitis. Lacking of both cannabinoid receptors did not result in potentiation of colitis severity compared to lacking of each CB1 or CB2, respectively. These results suggest that the endocannabinoid system may have tonic inhibitory effects on inflammatory responses in the colon.

  10. Environmental Enrichment Ameliorates Behavioral Impairments Modeling Schizophrenia in Mice Lacking Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Emma L; McOmish, Caitlin E; Buret, Laetitia S; Van den Buuse, Maarten; Hannan, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Schizophrenia arises from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Abnormalities in glutamatergic signaling have been proposed to underlie the emergence of symptoms, in light of various lines of evidence, including the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA receptor antagonists. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has also been implicated in the disorder, and has been shown to physically interact with NMDA receptors. To clarify the role of mGlu5-dependent behavioral expression by environmental factors, we assessed mGlu5 knockout (KO) mice after exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) or reared under standard conditions. The mGlu5 KO mice showed reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI), long-term memory deficits, and spontaneous locomotor hyperactivity, which were all attenuated by EE. Examining the cellular impact of genetic and environmental manipulation, we show that EE significantly increased pyramidal cell dendritic branching and BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus of wild-type mice; however, mGlu5 KO mice were resistant to these alterations, suggesting that mGlu5 is critical to these responses. A selective effect of EE on the behavioral response to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 in mGlu5 KO mice was seen. MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion was further potentiated in enriched mGlu5 KO mice and treatment with MK-801 reinstated PPI disruption in EE mGlu5 KO mice only, a response that is absent under standard housing conditions. Together, these results demonstrate an important role for mGlu5 in environmental modulation of schizophrenia-related behavioral impairments. Furthermore, this role of the mGlu5 receptor is mediated by interaction with NMDA receptor function, which may inform development of novel therapeutics.

  11. Antiseizure Activity of Midazolam in Mice Lacking δ-Subunit Extrasynaptic GABA(A) Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandesh D; Younus, Iyan; Clossen, Bryan L; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2015-06-01

    Midazolam is a benzodiazepine anticonvulsant with rapid onset and short duration of action. Midazolam is the current drug of choice for acute seizures and status epilepticus, including those caused by organophosphate nerve agents. The antiseizure activity of midazolam is thought to result from its allosteric potentiation of synaptic GABA(A) receptors in the brain. However, there are indications that benzodiazepines promote neurosteroid synthesis via the 18-kDa cholesterol transporter protein (TSPO). Therefore, we investigated the role of neurosteroids and their extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor targets in the antiseizure activity of midazolam. Here, we used δ-subunit knockout (DKO) mice bearing a targeted deletion of the extrasynaptic receptors to investigate the contribution of the extrasynaptic receptors to the antiseizure activity of midazolam using the 6-Hz and hippocampus kindling seizure models. In both models, midazolam produced rapid and dose-dependent protection against seizures (ED50, 0.4 mg/kg). Moreover, the antiseizure potency of midazolam was undiminished in DKO mice compared with control mice. Pretreatment with PK11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide], a TSPO blocker, or finasteride, a 5α-reductase neurosteroid inhibitor, did not affect the antiseizure effect of midazolam. The antiseizure activity of midazolam was significantly reversed by pretreatment with flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist. Plasma and brain levels of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone were not significantly greater in midazolam-treated animals. These studies therefore provide strong evidence that neurosteroids and extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors are not involved in the antiseizure activity of midazolam, which mainly occurs through synaptic GABA(A) receptors via direct binding to benzodiazepine sites. This study reaffirms midazolam's use for controlling acute seizures and status epilepticus.

  12. Antiseizure Activity of Midazolam in Mice Lacking δ-Subunit Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandesh D.; Younus, Iyan; Clossen, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Midazolam is a benzodiazepine anticonvulsant with rapid onset and short duration of action. Midazolam is the current drug of choice for acute seizures and status epilepticus, including those caused by organophosphate nerve agents. The antiseizure activity of midazolam is thought to result from its allosteric potentiation of synaptic GABAA receptors in the brain. However, there are indications that benzodiazepines promote neurosteroid synthesis via the 18-kDa cholesterol transporter protein (TSPO). Therefore, we investigated the role of neurosteroids and their extrasynaptic GABAA receptor targets in the antiseizure activity of midazolam. Here, we used δ-subunit knockout (DKO) mice bearing a targeted deletion of the extrasynaptic receptors to investigate the contribution of the extrasynaptic receptors to the antiseizure activity of midazolam using the 6-Hz and hippocampus kindling seizure models. In both models, midazolam produced rapid and dose-dependent protection against seizures (ED50, 0.4 mg/kg). Moreover, the antiseizure potency of midazolam was undiminished in DKO mice compared with control mice. Pretreatment with PK11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide], a TSPO blocker, or finasteride, a 5α-reductase neurosteroid inhibitor, did not affect the antiseizure effect of midazolam. The antiseizure activity of midazolam was significantly reversed by pretreatment with flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist. Plasma and brain levels of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone were not significantly greater in midazolam-treated animals. These studies therefore provide strong evidence that neurosteroids and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors are not involved in the antiseizure activity of midazolam, which mainly occurs through synaptic GABAA receptors via direct binding to benzodiazepine sites. This study reaffirms midazolam’s use for controlling acute seizures and status epilepticus. PMID:25784648

  13. Left ventricular hypertrophy and angiotensin II receptor blocking agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Maeda, K; Nakamura, M; Watanabe, T; Yoshikawa, J; Hirohashi, K

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II plays a significant role in cell growth and proliferation in model systems and in humans. Numerous studies have shown that left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) increases the risk of coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, stroke or transient ischemic attack; all-cause deaths, and sudden death. The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) has provided beneficial effects on LVH regression and on cardiac remodeling in the presence of hypertension and heart failure. The new class of ARBs appears to provide cardioprotective effects that are similar to those of the ACE inhibitors. Most of the beneficial effects provided by these agents appear to be related to a more complete blockade of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor. However, costimulation of the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor appears to increase nitric oxide and thus causes some bradykinin-like effects. Evidence for the role of angiotensin II in promoting LVH as well as abnormal regulation of the angiotensin II signal transduction pathways in model systems and in humans has been reviewed. Secondly, the mechanisms for the beneficial effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers studied in model systems and in humans, including possible involvement in the formation of reactive oxygen species by mononuclear cells, are presented. Finally, results from large-scale interventions such as the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction (LIFE) study, as well as an overview of the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial involving the use of ARB in high-risk patients, are presented.

  14. Mice lacking the PACAP type I receptor have impaired photic entrainment and negative masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Brabet, Philippe; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2008-01-01

    phase delays, which was prominent at low light intensities. The data obtained at late night indicated that PACAP/PAC1 receptor signaling is less important during the phase-advancing part of the phase-response curve. Finally, the PAC1 KO mice showed impaired negative masking behavior at low light...

  15. Learning and memory deficits in mice lacking protease activated receptor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Antoine G; Hamill, Cecily E; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P; Wingo, Thomas S; Barber, Jeremy A; Lyuboslavsky, Polina N; David Sweatt, J; Ressler, Kerry J; White, David A; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2007-10-01

    The roles of serine proteases and protease activated receptors have been extensively studied in coagulation, wound healing, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. More recently, serine proteases have been suggested to influence synaptic plasticity. In this context, we examined the role of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1), which is activated following proteolytic cleavage by thrombin and plasmin, in emotionally motivated learning. We were particularly interested in PAR1 because its activation enhances the function of NMDA receptors, which are required for some forms of synaptic plasticity. We examined several baseline behavioral measures, including locomotor activity, expression of anxiety-like behavior, motor task acquisition, nociceptive responses, and startle responses in C57Bl/6 mice in which the PAR1 receptor has been genetically deleted. In addition, we evaluated learning and memory in these mice using two memory tasks, passive avoidance and cued fear-conditioning. Whereas locomotion, pain response, startle, and measures of baseline anxiety were largely unaffected by PAR1 removal, PAR1-/- animals showed significant deficits in a passive avoidance task and in cued fear conditioning. These data suggest that PAR1 may play an important role in emotionally motivated learning.

  16. Annexin II/annexin II receptor axis regulates adhesion, migration, homing, and growth of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Havens, Aaron M.; Jung, Younghun; Ziegler, Anne M.; Pedersen, Elisabeth A.; Wang, Jingcheng; Wang, Jianhua; Lu, Ganwei; Roodman, G. David; Loberg, Robert D.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most life-threatening complications of prostate cancer is skeletal metastasis. In order to develop treatment for metastasis, it is important to understand its molecular mechanisms. Our work in this field has drawn parallels between hematopoietic stem cell and prostate cancer homing to the marrow. Our recent work demonstrated that annexin II expressed by osteoblasts and endothelial cells plays a critical role in niche selection. In this study, we demonstrate that annexin II and its receptor play a crucial role in establishing metastasis of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cell lines migrate toward annexin II and the adhesion of prostate cancer to osteoblasts and endothelial cells was inhibited by annexin II. By blocking annexin II or its receptor in animal models, short-term and long-term localization of prostate cancers are limited. Annexin II may also facilitate the growth of prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo by the MAPK pathway. These data strongly suggest annexin II and its receptor axis plays a central role in prostate cancer metastasis, and that prostate cancer utilize the hematopoietic stem cell homing mechanisms to gain access to the niche. PMID:18636554

  17. Lack of association between folate-receptor autoantibodies and neural-tube defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molloy, Anne M

    2009-07-09

    BACKGROUND: A previous report described the presence of autoantibodies against folate receptors in 75% of serum samples from women with a history of pregnancy complicated by a neural-tube defect, as compared with 10% of controls. We sought to confirm this finding in an Irish population, which traditionally has had a high prevalence of neural-tube defects. METHODS: We performed two studies. Study 1 consisted of analysis of stored frozen blood samples collected from 1993 through 1994 from 103 mothers with a history of pregnancy complicated by a neural-tube defect (case mothers), 103 mothers with a history of pregnancy but no complication by a neural-tube defect (matched with regard to number of pregnancies and sampling dates), 58 women who had never been pregnant, and 36 men. Study 2, conducted to confirm that the storage of samples did not influence the folate-receptor autoantibodies, included fresh samples from 37 case mothers, 22 control mothers, 10 women who had never been pregnant, and 9 men. All samples were assayed for blocking and binding autoantibodies against folate receptors. RESULTS: In Study 1, blocking autoantibodies were found in 17% of case mothers, as compared with 13% of control mothers (odds ratio, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70 to 3.39), and binding autoantibodies in 29%, as compared with 32%, respectively (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.44 to 1.50). Study 2 showed similar results, indicating that sample degradation was unlikely. CONCLUSIONS: The presence and titer of maternal folate-receptor autoantibodies were not significantly associated with a neural-tube defect-affected pregnancy in this Irish population.

  18. Lack of Association Between IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Gene 86bp VNTR Polymorphism and Leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadoo Khorasani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Uterine leiomyoma (ULs is the most common gynecological tumor and a significant health concern for many women .The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra is a naturally occurring cytokine inhibiting interleukin- 1 (IL-1 activity by binding to the IL-1 receptors without signal transduction. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism and ULs in women of the South- East of Iran. Patients and Methods A total number of 99 patients with leiomyoma and 102 controls were studied. Genotyping of IL-1Ra (VNTR polymorphism was determined by gel electrophoresis after PCR amplification. Frequency of alleles and genotypes in patients and control group was statistically analyzed using χ2 test or fisher exact test. Results The frequency of alleles 1, 2 and 3 of IL-1Ra VNTR polymorphism were %71, %27 and %22 in control group and %74, %20 and %6 in the ULs patients, respectively and there were no significant differences between these two groups. No statistically significant differences were observed between the frequency of IL-1Ra genotypes in the study and control groups. Conclusions This study showed that 86bp VNTR polymorphism of IL-1Ra gene is not associated with leiomyoma in the studied population.

  19. Mice Lacking M1 and M3 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Have Impaired Odor Discrimination and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wilson; Singh, Sanmeet; Keshav, Taj; Dewan, Ramita; Eberly, Christian; Maurer, Robert; Nunez-Parra, Alexia; Araneda, Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    The cholinergic system has extensive projections to the olfactory bulb (OB) where it produces a state-dependent regulation of sensory gating. Previous work has shown a prominent role of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs) in regulating the excitability of OB neurons, in particular the M1 receptor. Here, we examined the contribution of M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes to olfactory processing using mice with a genetic deletion of these receptors, the M1−/− and the M1/M3−/− knockout (KO) mice. Genetic ablation of the M1 and M3 mAChRs resulted in a significant deficit in odor discrimination of closely related molecules, including stereoisomers. However, the discrimination of dissimilar molecules, social odors (e.g., urine) and novel object recognition was not affected. In addition the KO mice showed impaired learning in an associative odor-learning task, learning to discriminate odors at a slower rate, indicating that both short and long-term memory is disrupted by mAChR dysfunction. Interestingly, the KO mice exhibited decreased olfactory neurogenesis at younger ages, a deficit that was not maintained in older animals. In older animals, the olfactory deficit could be restored by increasing the number of new born neurons integrated into the OB after exposing them to an olfactory enriched environment, suggesting that muscarinic modulation and adult neurogenesis could be two different mechanism used by the olfactory system to improve olfactory processing. PMID:28210219

  20. Differential body weight and feeding responses to high-fat diets in rats and mice lacking cholecystokinin 1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sheng; Chen, Jie; Behles, R Ryan; Hyun, Jayson; Kopin, Alan S; Moran, Timothy H

    2007-07-01

    Prior data demonstrated differential roles for cholecystokinin (CCK)1 receptors in maintaining energy balance in rats and mice. CCK1 receptor deficiency results in hyperphagia and obesity of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats but not in mice. To ascertain the role of CCK1 receptors in high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity, we compared alterations in food intake, body weight, fat mass, plasma glucose, and leptin levels, and patterns of hypothalamic gene expression in OLETF rats and mice lacking CCK1 receptors in response to a 10-wk exposure to HFD. Compared with Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) control rats, OLETF rats on HFD had sustained overconsumption over the 10-wk period. High fat feeding resulted in greater increases in body weight and plasma leptin levels in OLETF than in LETO rats. In situ hybridization determinations revealed that, while HFD reduced neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA expression in both the arcuate nucleus (Arc) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of LETO rats, HFD resulted in decreased NPY expression in the Arc but not in the DMH of OLETF rats. In contrast to these results in OLETF rats, HFD increased food intake and induced obesity to an equal degree in both wild-type and CCK1 receptor(-/-) mice. NPY gene expression was decreased in the Arc in response to HFD, but was not detectable in the DMH in both wild-type and CCK1 receptor(-/-) mice. Together, these data provide further evidence for differential roles of CCK1 receptors in the controls of food intake and body weight in rats and mice.

  1. Functional neurokinin and NMDA receptor activity in an animal naturally lacking substance P: the naked mole-rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Brand

    Full Text Available Naked mole-rats are extremely unusual among mammals in that their cutaneous C-fibers lack the neuropeptide Substance P (SP. In other mammals, SP plays an important role in nociception: it is released from C-fibers onto spinal neurons where it facilitates NMDA receptor activity and causes sensitization that can last for minutes, hours or days. In the present study, we tested the effects of intrathecal application of: 1 SP, 2 an SP antagonist (GR-82334, and 3 an NMDA antagonist (APV on heat-evoked foot withdrawal. In the naked mole-rat, at a high enough concentration, application of SP caused a large, immediate, and long-lasting sensitization of foot withdrawal latency that was transiently reversed by application of either antagonist. However, neither SP nor NMDA antagonists had an effect when administered alone to naïve animals. In contrast, both antagonists induced an increase in basal withdrawal latency in mice. These results indicate that spinal neurons in naked mole-rats have functional SP and NMDA receptors, but that these receptors do not participate in heat-evoked foot withdrawal unless SP is experimentally introduced. We propose that the natural lack of SP in naked mole-rat C-fibers may have resulted during adaptation to living in a chronically high carbon dioxide, high ammonia environment that, in other mammals, would stimulate C-fibers and evoke nocifensive behavior.

  2. -Amphetamine and Antipsychotic Drug Effects on Latent Inhibition in Mice Lacking Dopamine D2 Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Bay-Richter, C.; O'Callaghan, M J; N Mathur; O'Tuathaigh, C.M.P.; Heery, D M; Fone, K C F; Waddington, J. L.; Moran, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Drugs that induce psychosis, such as -amphetamine (AMP), and those that alleviate it, such as antipsychotics, are suggested to exert behavioral effects via dopamine receptor D2 (D2). All antipsychotic drugs are D2 antagonists, but D2 antagonism underlies the severe and debilitating side effects of these drugs; it is therefore important to know whether D2 is necessary for their behavioral effects. Using D2-null mice (Drd 2 −/−), we first investigated whether D2 is required for AMP disruption ...

  3. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphins are micro-opioid receptor antagonists lacking inverse agonist properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Li, Tingyou; Bryant, Sharon D; Tsuda, Yuko; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2007-10-01

    [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphin-1 and -2 ([N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2) are new selective micro-opioid receptor antagonists obtained by N-alkylation with an allyl group on the amino terminus of 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) derivatives. To further characterize properties of these compounds, their intrinsic activities were assessed by functional guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) binding assays and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cell membranes obtained from vehicle, morphine, and ethanol-treated SK-N-SH cells and brain membranes isolated from naive and morphine-dependent mice; their mode of action was compared with naloxone or naltrexone, which both are standard nonspecific opioid-receptor antagonists. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2 were neutral antagonists under all of the experimental conditions examined, in contrast to naloxone and naltrexone, which behave as neutral antagonists only in membranes from vehicle-treated cells and mice but act as inverse agonists in membranes from morphine- and ethanol-treated cells as well as morphine-treated mice. Both endomorphin analogs inhibited the naloxone- and naltrexone-elicited withdrawal syndromes from acute morphine dependence in mice. This suggests their potential therapeutic application in the treatment of drug addiction and alcohol abuse without the adverse effects observed with inverse agonist alkaloid-derived compounds that produce severe withdrawal symptoms.

  4. The effect of serum angiotensin II and angiotensin II type 1 receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    2012-06-18

    Jun 18, 2012 ... frequency of AT1 receptor CC genotype among a group of Egyptian patients with ..... reported in SLE patients.2,3,15 ACE catalyses the formation of Ang II .... Bombardier C, Gladman DD, Urowitz MB, Caron. D, Chang CH.

  5. Altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice lacking both the melanocortin type 4 receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garten, Antje; Popkova, Yulia; Penke, Melanie; Franke, Christin; Ricken, Albert; Schulz, Angela; Kiess, Wieland; Huster, Daniel; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schiller, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is often associated with dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. A number of animal models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are established but they significantly differ in the molecular and biochemical changes depending on the genetic modification and diet used. Mice deficient for melanocortin type 4 receptor (Mc4rmut) develop hyperphagia, obesity, and subsequently NAFLD already under regular chow and resemble more closely the energy supply-driven obesity found in humans. This animal model was used to assess the molecular and biochemical consequences of hyperphagia-induced obesity on hepatic lipid metabolism. We analyzed transcriptome changes in Mc4rmut mice by RNA sequencing and used high resolution 1H magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to assess changes in the lipid composition. On the transcriptomic level we found significant changes in components of the triacylglycerol metabolism, unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathways, and lipid transport and storage compared to the wild-type. These findings were supported by increases in triacylglycerol, monounsaturated fatty acid, and arachidonic acid levels. The transcriptome signatures significantly differ from those of other NAFLD mouse models supporting the concept of hepatic subphenotypes depending on the genetic background and diet. Comparative analyses of our data with previous studies allowed for the identification of common changes and genotype-specific components and pathways involved in obesity-associated NAFLD. PMID:28207798

  6. Lack of thyroid hormone receptor alpha1 is associated with selective alterations in behavior and hippocampal circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadaño-Ferraz, A; Benavides-Piccione, R; Venero, C; Lancha, C; Vennström, B; Sandi, C; DeFelipe, J; Bernal, J

    2003-01-01

    Brain development and function are dependent on thyroid hormone (T3), which acts through nuclear hormone receptors. T3 receptors (TRs) are transcription factors that activate or suppress target gene expression in a hormone-dependent or -independent fashion. Two distinct genes, TRalpha and TRbeta, encode several receptor isoforms with specific functions defined in many tissues but not in the brain. Mutations in the TRbeta gene cause the syndrome of peripheral resistance to thyroid hormone; however, no alterations of the TRalpha gene have been described in humans. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking the TRalpha1 isoform display behavioral abnormalities of hippocampal origin, as shown by the open field and fear conditioning tests. In the open field test mutant mice revealed less exploratory behavior than wild-type mice. In the contextual fear conditioning test mutant mice showed a significantly higher freezing response than wild-type controls when tested 1 week after training. These findings correlated with fewer GABAergic terminals on the CA1 pyramidal neurons in the mutant mice. Our results indicate that TRalpha1 is involved in the regulation of hippocampal structure and function, and raise the possibility that deletions or mutations of this receptor isoform may lead to behavioral changes or even psychiatric syndromes in humans.

  7. Lack of Association between an Interleukin-I Receptor Antagonist Gene Polymorphism and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. Danis

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-MHC linked genes may contribute to genetic predisposition to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. The possibility that cytokine genes may be involved was raised by the observation of increased frequency in expression of an uncommon allele of an interleukin-I receptor antagonist gene polymorphism and SLE in a recent U.K. study. We have not been able to show any significant differences in expression of this allele in SLE patients as a whole or in any patient subgroups. Our results actually show a slight decrease in the expression of this allele in SLE patients compared with healthy controls and in SLE patients with malar rash compared with SLE patients without malar rash.

  8. Lack of the type III epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Nielsen, Jens Nederby;

    2007-01-01

    network are being investigated and mutations in the EGFR gene have been identified. The type III epidermal growth factor receptor, a tumour-specific, ligand independent, constitutively activated form of EGFR, might contribute to the malignant phenotype in CRC and may be a potential target for anticancer...... therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of EGFRvIII in CRC by PCR and protein analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 79 colorectal cancer patients for PCR analysis and 50 patients for protein analysis by Western blots, in two different laboratories. RESULTS......: No type III mutations were detected in our material. CONCLUSION: The EGFRvIII mutations are rare in colorectal adenocarcinomas and overall probability does not appear to contribute to the malignant phenotype of this disease....

  9. Abortive expansion of the cumulus and impaired fertility in mice lacking the prostaglandin E receptor subtype EP2

    OpenAIRE

    Hizaki, Hiroko; Segi, Eri; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Hirose, Masaya; Saji, Tomomi; Ushikubi, Fumitaka; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Noda, Yoichi; Tanaka, Takashi; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Narumiya, Shuh; Ichikawa, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    Female mice lacking the gene encoding the prostaglandin (PG) E2 receptor subtype EP2 (EP2−/−) become pregnant and deliver their pups at term, but with a much reduced litter size. A decrease in ovulation number and a much reduced fertilization rate were observed in EP2−/− females without difference of the uterus to support implantation of wild-type embryos. Treatment with gonadotropins induced EP2 mRNA expression in the cumulus cells of ovarian follicles of wild-type mice. The immature cumuli ...

  10. Purine (N)-Methanocarba Nucleoside Derivatives Lacking an Exocyclic Amine as Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, Dilip K; Ciancetta, Antonella; Warnick, Eugene; O'Connor, Robert; Chen, Zhoumou; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Crane, Steven; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Auchampach, John A; Salvemini, Daniela; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2016-04-14

    Purine (N)-methanocarba-5'-N-alkyluronamidoriboside A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) agonists lacking an exocyclic amine resulted from an unexpected reaction during a Sonogashira coupling and subsequent aminolysis. Because the initial C6-Me and C6-styryl derivatives had unexpectedly high A3AR affinity, other rigid nucleoside analogues lacking an exocyclic amine were prepared. Of these, the C6-Me-(2-phenylethynyl) and C2-(5-chlorothienylethynyl) analogues were particularly potent, with human A3AR Ki values of 6 and 42 nM, respectively. Additionally, the C2-(5-chlorothienyl)-6-H analogue was potent and selective at A3AR (MRS7220, Ki 60 nM) and also completely reversed mouse sciatic nerve mechanoallodynia (in vivo, 3 μmol/kg, po). The lack of a C6 H-bond donor while maintaining A3AR affinity and efficacy could be rationalized by homology modeling and docking of these hypermodified nucleosides. The modeling suggests that a suitable combination of stabilizing features can partially compensate for the lack of an exocyclic amine, an otherwise important contributor to recognition in the A3AR binding site.

  11. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist Losartan binds and activates bradykinin B2 receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Olsen, Kristine Boisen; Erikstrup, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker (ARB) Losartan has cardioprotective effects during ischemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits reperfusion arrhythmias -effects that go beyond the benefits of lowering blood pressure. The renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems are intricately...

  12. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  13. Macrophage dysfunction initiates colitis during weaning of infant mice lacking the interleukin-10 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redhu, Naresh S; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Conaway, Evan A; Shouval, Dror S; Tsou, Amy; Goettel, Jeremy A; Biswas, Amlan; Wang, Chuanwu; Field, Michael; Muller, Werner; Bleich, Andre; Li, Ning; Gerber, Georg K; Bry, Lynn; Fox, James G; Snapper, Scott B; Horwitz, Bruce H

    2017-07-05

    Infants with defects in the interleukin 10 receptor (IL10R) develop very early onset inflammatory bowel disease. Whether IL10R regulates lamina propria macrophage function during infant development in mice and whether macrophage-intrinsic IL10R signaling is required to prevent colitis in infancy is unknown. Here we show that although signs of colitis are absent in IL10R-deficient mice during the first two weeks of life, intestinal inflammation and macrophage dysfunction begin during the third week of life, concomitant with weaning and accompanying diversification of the intestinal microbiota. However, IL10R did not directly regulate the microbial ecology during infant development. Interestingly, macrophage depletion with clodronate inhibited the development of colitis, while the absence of IL10R specifically on macrophages sensitized infant mice to the development of colitis. These results indicate that IL10R-mediated regulation of macrophage function during the early postnatal period is indispensable for preventing the development of murine colitis.

  14. Estrogen Receptor Expression in Atypical Hyperplasia: Lack of Association with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr Fritcher, Emily G.; Degnim, Amy C.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Radisky, Derek C.; Boughey, Judy C.; Anderson, Stephanie S.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Frost, Marlene H.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Reynolds, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor (ER) is expressed in normal and malignant breast epithelium, and expression levels have been found to increase with age in normal breast epithelium but not in atypical hyperplasia (AH) and carcinoma in situ. Here we assess ER expression in AH and its association with later breast cancer. Methods ER expression was assessed immunohistochemically in archival sections from 246 women with AH who had open benign breast biopsy from 1967–1991. The ACISRIII (Dako, Carpinteria, CA) was utilized to calculate ER expression in all atypical foci. Using multivariate linear regression, we examined associations of ER expression with age at biopsy, indication for biopsy, type of atypia, number of atypical foci, involution status, and family history. Breast cancer risk across levels of ER expression was also assessed compared to the Iowa SEER control population. Results Among 246 women, 87 (35%) had atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), 141 (57%) had atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), and 18 (7%) had both. Forty-nine (20%) developed breast cancer (median follow-up of 14.4 years). Multivariate analysis indicated that type of atypia and age at diagnosis were significantly associated with ER percent staining and intensity [phyperplasia with increasing age. ER expression in atypical hyperplasia does not further discriminate breast cancer risk in women with atypia. PMID:21209395

  15. Accelerated tumor progression in mice lacking the ATP receptor P2X7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, Elena; Capece, Marina; Franceschini, Alessia; Falzoni, Simonetta; Giuliani, Anna L; Rotondo, Alessandra; Sarti, Alba C; Bonora, Massimo; Syberg, Susanne; Corigliano, Domenica; Pinton, Paolo; Jorgensen, Niklas R; Abelli, Luigi; Emionite, Laura; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Pistoia, Vito; Di Virgilio, Francesco

    2015-02-15

    The ATP receptor P2X7 (P2X7R or P2RX7) has a key role in inflammation and immunity, but its possible roles in cancer are not firmly established. In the present study, we investigated the effect of host genetic deletion of P2X7R in the mouse on the growth of B16 melanoma or CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Tumor size and metastatic dissemination were assessed by in vivo calliper and luciferase luminescence emission measurements along with postmortem examination. In P2X7R-deficient mice, tumor growth and metastatic spreading were accelerated strongly, compared with wild-type (wt) mice. Intratumoral IL-1β and VEGF release were drastically reduced, and inflammatory cell infiltration was abrogated nearly completely. Similarly, tumor growth was also greatly accelerated in wt chimeric mice implanted with P2X7R-deficient bone marrow cells, defining hematopoietic cells as a sufficient site of P2X7R action. Finally, dendritic cells from P2X7R-deficient mice were unresponsive to stimulation with tumor cells, and chemotaxis of P2X7R-less cells was impaired. Overall, our results showed that host P2X7R expression was critical to support an antitumor immune response, and to restrict tumor growth and metastatic diffusion.

  16. Augmented atherogenesis in LDL receptor deficient mice lacking both macrophage ABCA1 and ApoE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Lammers

    Full Text Available AIM: ABCA1 protects against atherosclerosis by facilitating cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall to extracellular apolipoprotein (apo A-I. In contrast to apoA-I, apoE is secreted by macrophages and can, like apoA-I, induce ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux. Yet, the combined effect of macrophage ABCA1 and apoE on lesion development is unexplored. METHODS AND RESULTS: LDL receptor knockout (KO mice were transplanted with bone marrow from ABCA1/apoE double KO (dKO mice, their respective single KO's, and wild-type (WT controls and were challenged with a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet for 9 weeks. In vitro cholesterol efflux experiments showed no differences between ABCA1 KO and dKO macrophages. The serum non-HDL/HDL ratio in dKO transplanted mice was 1.7-fold and 2.4-fold (p<0.01 increased compared to WT and ABCA1 KO transplanted mice, respectively. The atherosclerotic lesion area in dKO transplanted animals (650±94×10(3 µm(2, however, was 1.9-fold (p<0.01 and 1.6-fold (p<0.01 increased compared to single knockouts (ABCA1 KO: 341±20×10(3 µm(2; apoE KO: 402±78×10(3 µm(2, respectively and 3.1-fold increased (p<0.001 compared to WT (211±20×10(3 µm(2. When normalized for serum cholesterol exposure, macrophage ABCA1 and apoE independently protected against atherosclerotic lesion development (p<0.001. Moreover, hepatic expression levels of TNFα and IL-6 were highly induced in dKO transplanted animals (3.0-fold; p<0.05, and 4.3-fold; p<0.001, respectively. In agreement, serum IL-6 levels were also enhanced in ABCA1 KO transplanted mice (p<0.05 and even further enhanced in dKO transplanted animals (3.1-fold as compared to ABCA1 KO transplanted animals; p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Combined deletion of macrophage ABCA1 and apoE results in a defect in cholesterol efflux and, compared to ABCA1 KO transplanted mice, elevated serum total cholesterol levels. Importantly, these mice also suffer from enhanced systemic and hepatic

  17. Novel, selective EPO receptor ligands lacking erythropoietic activity reduce infarct size in acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Krisztina; Csonka, Csaba; Pálóczi, János; Pipis, Judit; Görbe, Anikó; Kocsis, Gabriella F; Murlasits, Zsolt; Sárközy, Márta; Szűcs, Gergő; Holmes, Christopher P; Pan, Yijun; Bhandari, Ashok; Csont, Tamás; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Woodburn, Kathryn W; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bencsik, Péter

    2016-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to protect the heart against acute myocardial infarction in pre-clinical studies, however, EPO failed to reduce infarct size in clinical trials and showed significant safety problems. Here, we investigated cardioprotective effects of two selective non-erythropoietic EPO receptor ligand dimeric peptides (AF41676 and AF43136) lacking erythropoietic activity, EPO, and the prolonged half-life EPO analogue, darbepoetin in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in rats. In a pilot study, EPO at 100U/mL significantly decreased cell death compared to vehicle (33.8±2.3% vs. 40.3±1.5%, pEPO reduced infarct size significantly compared to vehicle (45.3±4.8% vs. 59.8±4.5%, pEPO receptor ligand dimeric peptides AF41676 and AF43136 administered before reperfusion are able to reduce infarct size in a rat model of AMI. Therefore, non-erythropoietic EPO receptor peptide ligands may be promising cardioprotective agents.

  18. Overexpression of Annexin II Receptor-Induced Autophagy Protects Against Apoptosis in Uveal Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuelu; Song, Hongyuan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Yongzhe; Tang, Hailin; Qi, Zhongtian; Zhao, Ping; Zhao, Shihong

    2016-05-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor in adults and still lacks effective systemic therapies. Annexin A2 receptor (AXIIR), a receptor for Annexin II, was demonstrated to play an important role in multiple cells, but its role in uveal melanoma cells remains exclusive. Herein, the authors reported that overexpression of AXIIR was able to reduce cell viability and activate apoptosis apparently in the Mum2C uveal melanoma cell line. Meanwhile, overexpression of AXIIR could induce autophagy and increase autophagy flux. After autophagy was inhibited by chloroquine, enhanced apoptosis and cytotoxicity could be detected. In summary, these data highlighted the crucial role of AXIIR in reducing Mum2C cell viability through inducing apoptosis, while autophagy played a protective role in this process. Interference of this gene may be a promising method for uveal melanoma therapy and combination with specific inhibitor of autophagy may serve as a supplementary.

  19. An overview of nomegestrol acetate selective receptor binding and lack of estrogenic action on hormone-dependent cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields-Botella, J; Duc, I; Duranti, E; Puccio, F; Bonnet, P; Delansorne, R; Paris, J

    2003-11-01

    The specific pharmacological profile of the 19-norprogestin nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) is, at least in part, defined by its pattern of binding affinities to the different steroid hormone receptors. In the present study, its affinity to the progesterone receptor (PgR), the androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) was re-evaluated and compared to those obtained for progesterone (P) and several progestins. The characteristics of binding to the PgR in rat uterus were determined and Ki were found to be roughly similar with 22.8 and 34.3 nM for NOMAC and P, respectively. The binding characteristics of 3H-NOMAC were also determined and compared to that of 3H-ORG2058 with Kd of 5 and 0.6 nM, respectively for rat uterus and 4 and 3 nM, respectively for human T47-D cells. Structure-affinity and -activity relationships were studied on a variety of compounds related to NOMAC in order to assess its specificity as a progestin. The effects of NOMAC on the binding of androgen to the AR were investigated, using rat ventral prostate as target model. Contrary to what was observed for MPA, the RBA of NOMAC was found to decline with time, showing anti-androgenic rather than androgenic potential, a result that was confirmed in vivo. Regarding the ER, since none of the progestins were able to compete with estrogen for binding in rat uterus as well as in Ishikawa cells, the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity (APase) was used as an estrogen-specific response. It confirmed the intrinsic estrogenicity of progestins derived from 19-nor-testosterone (19NT), norethisterone acetate (NETA), levonorgestrel (LNG) or norgestimate (NGM) and others. In contrast, all P and 19-norP derivatives remained inactive. Finally, to complete this overview of NOMAC at the sex steroid receptor levels, the lack of estrogenic or estrogenic-like activity was checked out in different in vitro models. Data from this study have demonstrated that NOMAC is a progestin that has greater steroid

  20. Urotensin II and urotensin II-related peptide activate somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagon, Maria M; Molina, Marcelo; Gahete, Manuel D; Duran-Prado, Mario; Martinez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Alcain, Francisco J; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Leprince, Jérôme; Vaudry, Hubert; Castaño, Justo P; Vazquez-Martinez, Rafael

    2008-05-01

    The UII and urotensin II-related peptide (URP) genes belong to the same superfamily as the somatostatin gene. It has been previously shown that somatostatin activates the UII-receptor (UTR). In contrast, the possible interaction between UII and URP and somatostatin receptors has remained scarcely analyzed. Herein, we have investigated the effects of UII and URP on cell proliferation and free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in CHO-K1 cells stably expressing the porcine somatostatin receptor subtypes sst2 and sst5. Results show that both UII and URP induce stimulation of cell proliferation mediated by sst2 receptors and UII provokes inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by sst5 receptors. UII and URP also provoked an increase of [Ca2+]i in both sst2- and sst5-transfected cells. Together, our present data demonstrate that UII and URP directly activate sst2 and sst5 and thus mimic the effect of somatostatin on its cognate receptors.

  1. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n=6,each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit+ bosentan group and Nit+ losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment of nitroglycerin patch (0.05 mg/h). AngiotensinⅡ receptor antagonist losartan ( 10 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) and endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group . The effective percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit+ losartan group and Nit+ bosentan group compared with Nit group [(31.95± 4.45 ) % vs (21.00± 3.69 ) % , P Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance .

  2. Mice lacking the p43 mitochondrial T3 receptor become glucose intolerant and insulin resistant during aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Bertrand

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones (TH play an important regulatory role in energy expenditure regulation and are key regulators of mitochondrial activity. We have previously identified a mitochondrial triiodothyronine (T3 receptor (p43 which acts as a mitochondrial transcription factor of the organelle genome, which leads in vitro and in vivo, to a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, we generated mice carrying a specific p43 invalidation. At 2 months of age, we reported that p43 depletion in mice induced a major defect in insulin secretion both in vivo and in isolated pancreatic islets, and a loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The present study was designed to determine whether p43 invalidation influences life expectancy and modulates blood glucose and insulin levels as well as glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity during aging. We report that from 4 months old onwards, mice lacking p43 are leaner than wild-type mice. p43-/- mice also have a moderate reduction of life expectancy compared to wild type. We found no difference in blood glucose levels, excepted at 24 months old where p43-/- mice showed a strong hyperglycemia in fasting conditions compared to controls animals. However, the loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was maintained whatever the age of mice lacking p43. If up to 12 months old, glucose tolerance remained unchanged, beyond this age p43-/- mice became increasingly glucose intolerant. In addition, if up to 12 months old p43 deficient animals were more sensitive to insulin, after this age we observed a loss of this capacity, culminating in 24 months old mice with a decreased sensitivity to the hormone. In conclusion, we demonstrated that during aging the depletion of the mitochondrial T3 receptor p43 in mice progressively induced an increased glycemia in the fasted state, glucose intolerance and an insulin-resistance several features of type-2 diabetes.

  3. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity in response to methylphenidate, amphetamine and cocaine in mice lacking dopamine D4 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Thanos, P.K.; Bermeo, C.; Rubinstein, M.; Suchland, K.L.; Wang, G.-J.; Grandy, D.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) and amphetamine (AMPH) are the most frequently prescribed medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both drugs are believed to derive their therapeutic benefit by virtue of their dopamine (DA)-enhancing effects, yet an explanation for the observation that some patients with ADHD respond well to one medication but not to the other remains elusive. The dopaminergic effects of MP and AMPH are also thought to underlie their reinforcing properties and ultimately their abuse. Polymorphisms in the human gene that codes for the DA D4 receptor (D4R) have been repeatedly associated with ADHD and may correlate with the therapeutic as well as the reinforcing effects of responses to these psychostimulant medications. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for MP, AMPH and cocaine were evaluated in wild-type (WT) mice and their genetically engineered littermates, congenic on the C57Bl/6J background, that completely lack D4Rs (knockout or KO). In addition, the locomotor activity in these mice during the conditioning phase of CPP was tested in the CPP chambers. D4 receptor KO and WT mice showed CPP and increased locomotor activity in response to each of the three psychostimulants tested. D4R differentially modulates the CPP responses to MP, AMPH and cocaine. While the D4R genotype affected CPP responses to MP (high dose only) and AMPH (low dose only) it had no effects on cocaine. Inasmuch as CPP is considered an indicator of sensitivity to reinforcing responses to drugs these data suggest a significant but limited role of D4Rs in modulating conditioning responses to MP and AMPH. In the locomotor test, D4 receptor KO mice displayed attenuated increases in AMPH-induced locomotor activity whereas responses to cocaine and MP did not differ. These results suggest distinct mechanisms for D4 receptor modulation of the reinforcing (perhaps via attenuating dopaminergic signalling) and locomotor properties of these stimulant drugs

  4. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  5. Cutaneous nociceptors lack sensitisation, but reveal μ-opioid receptor-mediated reduction in excitability to mechanical stimulation in neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Yvonne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injuries often trigger a hypersensitivity to tactile stimulation. Behavioural studies demonstrated efficient and side effect-free analgesia mediated by opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. However, mechanistic approaches addressing such opioid properties in painful neuropathies are lacking. Here we investigated whether opioids can directly inhibit primary afferent neuron transmission of mechanical stimuli in neuropathy. We analysed the mechanical thresholds, the firing rates and response latencies of sensory fibres to mechanical stimulation of their cutaneous receptive fields. Results Two weeks following a chronic constriction injury of the saphenous nerve, mice developed a profound mechanical hypersensitivity in the paw innervated by the damaged nerve. Using an in vitro skin-nerve preparation we found no changes in the mechanical thresholds and latencies of sensory fibres from injured nerves. The firing rates to mechanical stimulation were unchanged or reduced following injury. Importantly, μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5]-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO significantly elevated the mechanical thresholds of nociceptive Aδ and C fibres. Furthermore, DAMGO substantially diminished the mechanically evoked discharges of C nociceptors in injured nerves. These effects were blocked by DAMGO washout and pre-treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys2-Tyr3-Orn5-Pen7-amide. DAMGO did not alter the responses of sensory fibres in uninjured nerves. Conclusions Our findings suggest that behaviourally manifested neuropathy-induced mechanosensitivity does not require a sensitised state of cutaneous nociceptors in damaged nerves. Yet, nerve injury renders nociceptors sensitive to opioids. Prevention of action potential generation or propagation in nociceptors might represent a cellular mechanism underlying peripheral opioid-mediated alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity in neuropathy.

  6. D-amphetamine and antipsychotic drug effects on latent inhibition in mice lacking dopamine D2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay-Richter, C; O'Callaghan, M J; Mathur, N; O'Tuathaigh, C M P; Heery, D M; Fone, K C F; Waddington, J L; Moran, P M

    2013-07-01

    Drugs that induce psychosis, such as D-amphetamine (AMP), and those that alleviate it, such as antipsychotics, are suggested to exert behavioral effects via dopamine receptor D2 (D2). All antipsychotic drugs are D2 antagonists, but D2 antagonism underlies the severe and debilitating side effects of these drugs; it is therefore important to know whether D2 is necessary for their behavioral effects. Using D2-null mice (Drd2-/-), we first investigated whether D2 is required for AMP disruption of latent inhibition (LI). LI is a process of learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli. Disruption of LI by AMP models impaired attention and abnormal salience allocation consequent to dysregulated dopamine relevant to schizophrenia. AMP disruption of LI was seen in both wild-type (WT) and Drd2-/-. This was in contrast to AMP-induced locomotor hyperactivity, which was reduced in Drd2-/-. AMP disruption of LI was attenuated in mice lacking dopamine receptor D1 (Drd1-/-), suggesting that D1 may play a role in AMP disruption of LI. Further supporting this possibility, we found that D1 antagonist SKF83566 attenuated AMP disruption of LI in WT. Remarkably, both haloperidol and clozapine attenuated AMP disruption of LI in Drd2-/-. This demonstrates that antipsychotic drugs can attenuate AMP disruption of learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli in the absence of D2 receptors. Data suggest that D2 is not essential either for AMP to disrupt or for antipsychotic drugs to reverse AMP disruption of learning to ignore irrelevant stimuli and further that D1 merits investigation in the mediation of AMP disruption of these processes.

  7. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, H H; Windahl, S H; Westberg, L; Isaksson, H; Egecioglu, E; Schele, E; Ryberg, H; Jansson, J O; Tuukkanen, J; Koskela, A; Xie, S K; Hahner, L; Zehr, J; Clegg, D J; Lagerquist, M K; Ohlsson, C

    2016-08-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα(-/-)). Female POMC-ERα(-/-) and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα(-/-) mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice.

  8. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Vieira Batista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-activating factor (PAF is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process.

  9. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process. PMID:27314042

  10. Inactivation of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Nørgaard, P; Abrahamsen, N;

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) exerts a growth inhibitory effect on many cell types through binding to two types of receptors, the type I and II receptors. Resistance to TGF-beta due to lack of type II receptor (RII) has been described in some cancer types including small cell lung...... cancer (SCLC). The purpose of this study was to examine the cause of absent RII expression in SCLC cell lines. Northern blot analysis showed that RII RNA expression was very weak in 16 of 21 cell lines. To investigate if the absence of RII transcript was due to mutations, we screened the poly-A tract...... for mutations, but no mutations were detected. Additional screening for mutations of the RII gene revealed a GG to TT base substitution in one cell line, which did not express RII. This mutation generates a stop codon resulting in predicted synthesis of a truncated RII of 219 amino acids. The nature...

  11. Macrocyclic receptor showing extremely high Sr(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Ca(II) selectivities with potential application in chelation treatment of metal intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tóth, Éva; de Blas, Andrés; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2011-04-18

    Herein we report a detailed investigation of the complexation properties of the macrocyclic decadentate receptor N,N'-Bis[(6-carboxy-2-pyridil)methyl]-4,13-diaza-18-crown-6 (H(2)bp18c6) toward different divalent metal ions [Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Sr(II), and Ca(II)] in aqueous solution. We have found that this ligand is especially suited for the complexation of large metal ions such as Sr(II) and Pb(II), which results in very high Pb(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) selectivities (in fact, higher than those found for ligands widely used for the treatment of lead poisoning such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (edta)), as well as in the highest Sr(II)/Ca(II) selectivity reported so far. These results have been rationalized on the basis of the structure of the complexes. X-ray crystal diffraction, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as theoretical calculations at the density functional theory (B3LYP) level have been performed. Our results indicate that for large metal ions such as Pb(II) and Sr(II) the most stable conformation is Δ(δλδ)(δλδ), while for Ca(II) our calculations predict the Δ(λδλ)(λδλ) form being the most stable one. The selectivity that bp18c6(2-) shows for Sr(II) over Ca(II) can be attributed to a better fit between the large Sr(II) ions and the relatively large crown fragment of the ligand. The X-ray crystal structure of the Pb(II) complex shows that the Δ(δλδ)(δλδ) conformation observed in solution is also maintained in the solid state. The Pb(II) ion is endocyclically coordinated, being directly bound to the 10 donor atoms of the ligand. The bond distances to the donor atoms of the pendant arms (2.55-2.60 Å) are substantially shorter than those between the metal ion and the donor atoms of the crown moiety (2.92-3.04 Å). This is a typical situation observed for the so-called hemidirected compounds, in which the Pb(II) lone pair is stereochemically active. The X-ray structures of the Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes show that

  12. Targeting angiotensin II type 2 receptor pathways to treat neuropathic pain and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maree T; Muralidharan, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain and chronic inflammatory pain are large unmet medical needs. Over the past two decades, numerous 'pain targets' have been identified for analgesic drug discovery. Despite promising results in rodent pain models, many compounds modulating such targets lacked efficacy in clinical trials. An exception is oral EMA401, a small-molecule angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) antagonist. Herein, angiotensin II/AT2R signaling-induced hyperexcitability and abnormal sprouting of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, together with radioligand binding, pharmacokinetics, analgesic efficacy and mode of action of small-molecule AT2R antagonists in rodent models of peripheral neuropathic and chronic inflammatory pain, are reviewed. The findings of a successful Phase IIa clinical trial of EMA401 in patients with neuropathic pain are presented in brief. The functional importance of angiotensin II/AT2R signaling has remained enigmatic for decades, and there are no clinically available medications that target the AT2R. However, on the basis of preclinical findings and recent clinical trial data showing that the peripherally restricted, small-molecule AT2R antagonist, EMA401, successfully alleviated neuropathic pain in a Phase II clinical trial, the AT2R is receiving considerable attention as a new therapeutic target with human validation for the relief of peripheral neuropathic and chronic inflammatory pain conditions.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    , Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...... complex suggesting that its biological actions can be regulated at different levels including the transcription, translation, posttranslational processing, receptor binding and intracellular signalling....

  14. Mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor Beta show enhanced apoptosis and delayed liver commitment for proliferation after partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fontal, Raquel; Zeini, Miriam; Través, Paqui G; Gómez-Ferrería, Mariana; Aranda, Ana; Sáez, Guillermo T; Cerdá, Concha; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Boscá, Lisardo

    2010-01-14

    The role of thyroid hormones and their receptors (TR) during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) was studied using genetic and pharmacologic approaches. Roles in liver regeneration have been suggested for T3, but there is no clear evidence distinguishing the contribution of increased amounts of T3 from the modulation by unoccupied TRs. Mice lacking TRalpha1/TRbeta or TRbeta alone fully regenerated liver mass after PH, but showed delayed commitment to the initial round of hepatocyte proliferation and transient but intense apoptosis at 48h post-PH, affecting approximately 30% of the remaining hepatocytes. Pharmacologically induced hypothyroidism yielded similar results. Loss of TR activity was associated with enhanced nitrosative stress in the liver remnant, due to an increase in the activity of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 2 and 3, caused by a transient decrease in the concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a potent NOS inhibitor. This decrease in the ADMA levels was due to the presence of a higher activity of dimethylarginineaminohydrolase-1 (DDAH-1) in the regenerating liver of animals lacking TRalpha1/TRbeta or TRbeta. DDAH-1 expression and activity was paralleled by the activity of FXR, a transcription factor involved in liver regeneration and up-regulated in the absence of TR. We report that TRs are not required for liver regeneration; however, hypothyroid mice and TRbeta- or TRalpha1/TRbeta-deficient mice exhibit a delay in the restoration of liver mass, suggesting a specific role for TRbeta in liver regeneration. Altered regenerative responses are related with a delay in the expression of cyclins D1 and E, and the occurrence of liver apoptosis in the absence of activated TRbeta that can be prevented by administration of NOS inhibitors. Taken together, these results indicate that TRbeta contributes significantly to the rapid initial round of hepatocyte proliferation following PH, and improves the survival of the regenerating

  15. Mice Lacking Thyroid Hormone Receptor β Show Enhanced Apoptosis and Delayed Liver Commitment for Proliferation after Partial Hepatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fontal, Raquel; Zeini, Miriam; Través, Paqui G.; Gómez-Ferrería, Mariana; Aranda, Ana; Sáez, Guillermo T.; Cerdá, Concha; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Boscá, Lisardo

    2010-01-01

    Background The role of thyroid hormones and their receptors (TR) during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) was studied using genetic and pharmacologic approaches. Roles in liver regeneration have been suggested for T3, but there is no clear evidence distinguishing the contribution of increased amounts of T3 from the modulation by unoccupied TRs. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice lacking TRα1/TRβ or TRβ alone fully regenerated liver mass after PH, but showed delayed commitment to the initial round of hepatocyte proliferation and transient but intense apoptosis at 48h post-PH, affecting ∼30% of the remaining hepatocytes. Pharmacologically induced hypothyroidism yielded similar results. Loss of TR activity was associated with enhanced nitrosative stress in the liver remnant, due to an increase in the activity of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 2 and 3, caused by a transient decrease in the concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a potent NOS inhibitor. This decrease in the ADMA levels was due to the presence of a higher activity of dimethylarginineaminohydrolase-1 (DDAH-1) in the regenerating liver of animals lacking TRα1/TRβ or TRβ. DDAH-1 expression and activity was paralleled by the activity of FXR, a transcription factor involved in liver regeneration and up-regulated in the absence of TR. Conclusions/Significance We report that TRs are not required for liver regeneration; however, hypothyroid mice and TRβ– or TRα1/TRβ–deficient mice exhibit a delay in the restoration of liver mass, suggesting a specific role for TRβ in liver regeneration. Altered regenerative responses are related with a delay in the expression of cyclins D1 and E, and the occurrence of liver apoptosis in the absence of activated TRβ that can be prevented by administration of NOS inhibitors. Taken together, these results indicate that TRβ contributes significantly to the rapid initial round of hepatocyte proliferation following PH, and improves the

  16. Mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor Beta show enhanced apoptosis and delayed liver commitment for proliferation after partial hepatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel López-Fontal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of thyroid hormones and their receptors (TR during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH was studied using genetic and pharmacologic approaches. Roles in liver regeneration have been suggested for T3, but there is no clear evidence distinguishing the contribution of increased amounts of T3 from the modulation by unoccupied TRs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice lacking TRalpha1/TRbeta or TRbeta alone fully regenerated liver mass after PH, but showed delayed commitment to the initial round of hepatocyte proliferation and transient but intense apoptosis at 48h post-PH, affecting approximately 30% of the remaining hepatocytes. Pharmacologically induced hypothyroidism yielded similar results. Loss of TR activity was associated with enhanced nitrosative stress in the liver remnant, due to an increase in the activity of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS 2 and 3, caused by a transient decrease in the concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, a potent NOS inhibitor. This decrease in the ADMA levels was due to the presence of a higher activity of dimethylarginineaminohydrolase-1 (DDAH-1 in the regenerating liver of animals lacking TRalpha1/TRbeta or TRbeta. DDAH-1 expression and activity was paralleled by the activity of FXR, a transcription factor involved in liver regeneration and up-regulated in the absence of TR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report that TRs are not required for liver regeneration; however, hypothyroid mice and TRbeta- or TRalpha1/TRbeta-deficient mice exhibit a delay in the restoration of liver mass, suggesting a specific role for TRbeta in liver regeneration. Altered regenerative responses are related with a delay in the expression of cyclins D1 and E, and the occurrence of liver apoptosis in the absence of activated TRbeta that can be prevented by administration of NOS inhibitors. Taken together, these results indicate that TRbeta contributes significantly to the rapid initial round of

  17. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Kane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin-II (UII, which binds to its receptor UT, plays an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland and CNS. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in ACAT-1 activity leading to SMC proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII, as well as inflammation, high blood pressure and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  18. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建梅; 陈永红; 王晓红; 唐朝枢

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n =6, each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit + bosentan group and Nit + losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment ofnitroglycerin patch (0. 05mg/h). Angiotensin I1 receptor antagonist losartan (10mg ·kg-1·d-1) and endothe-lin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg·kg-1· d-1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group. The effec-tive percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit + losartan group and Nit + bosentangroup compared with Nit group [(31.95±4.45) % vs (21.00±3.69) %, P <0.01and (33. 18±6. 16)% vs (21.00±3.69 ) %, P < 0. 01 , respectivelyl. The maximal vessel relaxation induced by SNP was thesame in 4 different groups but the highest EC50 (concentration which produces 50% of the maximal response toSNP) was found in tolerant group[ (34 ±10) nmol/L, P < 0. 01 ]. The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vasculartissue were markedly increased by 54% and 60% in Nit group compared with those in control group( P<0. 01). The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vascular tissue were decreased by 30% and 37% in Nit + losartangroup compared with those in Nit group ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance.

  19. Activation of D4 dopamine receptor decreases angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in rat renal proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ken; Deng, Kun; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhen; Zheng, Shuo; Ren, Hongmei; He, Duofen; Han, Yu; Asico, Laureano D; Jose, Pedro A; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    The dopaminergic and renin-angiotensin systems interact to regulate blood pressure. Disruption of the D4 dopamine receptor gene in mice produces hypertension that is associated with increased renal angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor expression. We hypothesize that the D4 receptor can inhibit AT1 receptor expression and function in renal proximal tubule cells from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, but the D4 receptor regulation of AT1 receptor is aberrant in renal proximal tubule cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The D4 receptor agonist, PD168077, decreased AT1 receptor protein expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in WKY cells. By contrast, in SHR cells, PD168077 increased AT1 receptor protein expression. The inhibitory effect of D4 receptor on AT1 receptor expression in WKY cells was blocked by a calcium channel blocker, nicardipine, or calcium-free medium, indicating that calcium is involved in the D4 receptor-mediated signaling pathway. Angiotensin II increased Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity in WKY cells. Pretreatment with PD168077 decreased the stimulatory effect of angiotensin II on Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity in WKY cells. In SHR cells, the inhibitory effect of D4 receptor on angiotensin II-mediated stimulation of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity was aberrant; pretreatment with PD168077 augmented the stimulatory effect of AT1 receptor on Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity in SHR cells. This was confirmed in vivo; pretreatment with PD128077 for 1 week augmented the antihypertensive and natriuretic effect of losartan in SHRs but not in WKY rats. We suggest that an aberrant interaction between D4 and AT1 receptors may play a role in the abnormal regulation of sodium excretion in hypertension.

  20. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Mi Bonde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R. It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of β-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit β-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability to recruit β-arrestins could lead to different cellular or in vivo outcomes than lack of ability to interact with G proteins, it is essential to distinguish between these two mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied five AT1R mutants previously published to display pathway separation: D74N, DRY/AAY, Y292F, N298A, and Y302F (Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering: 2.50, 3.49-3.51, 7.43, 7.49, and 7.53. We find that D74N, DRY/AAY, and N298A mutants are more prone to β-arrestin recruitment than WT. In contrast, receptor mutants Y292F and Y302F showed impaired ability to recruit β-arrestin in response to Sar1-Ile4-Ile8 (SII Ang II, a ligand solely activating the β-arrestin pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis reveals that the underlying conformations induced by these AT1R mutants most likely represent principally different mechanisms of uncoupling the G protein, which for some mutants may be due to their increased ability to recruit β-arrestin2. Hereby, these findings have important implications for drug discovery and 7TMR

  1. Urotensin II is a new chemotactic factor for UT receptor-expressing monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segain, Jean-Pierre; Rolli-Derkinderen, Malvyne; Gervois, Nadine; Raingeard de la Blétière, Diane; Loirand, Gervaise; Pacaud, Pierre

    2007-07-15

    Urotensin II (U-II), a vasoactive cyclic neuropeptide which activates the G protein-coupled receptor UT receptor, exerts various cardiovascular effects and may play a role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. In this study, we report that the UT receptor is expressed and functional on human PBMC and rat splenocytes. PBMC surface expression of the UT receptor was mainly found in monocytes and NK cells, also in a minority of B cells, but not in T cells. Stimulation of monocytes with LPS increased UT receptor mRNA and protein expression. Cloning and functional characterization of the human UT receptor gene promoter revealed the presence of NF-kappaB-binding sites involved in the stimulation of UT receptor gene expression by LPS. Activation of the UT receptor by U-II induced chemotaxis with maximal activity at 10 and 100 nM. This U-II effect was restricted to monocytes. Analysis of the signaling pathway involved indicated that U-II-mediated chemotaxis was related to RhoA and Rho kinase activation and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. The present results thus identify U-II as a chemoattractant for UT receptor-expressing monocytes and indicate a pivotal role of the RhoA-Rho kinase signaling cascade in the chemotaxis induced by U-II.

  2. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-02-15

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone

  3. Tissue-specific transcription start sites and alternative splicing of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor gene: a new PTH/PTHrP receptor splice variant that lacks the signal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joun, H; Lanske, B; Karperien, M; Qian, F; Defize, L; Abou-Samra, A

    1997-04-01

    The PTH/PTHrP receptor gene is expressed in bone and kidney as well as in many other tissues. Using primer extension followed by rapid cloning of amplified complementary DNA ends, we have isolated new PTH/PTHrP receptor complementary DNAs with different splicing patterns and have characterized a new upstream transcription start site. Three 5' nontranslated exons, U3, U2 and U1, located 4.8, 2.5, and 1.2 kb upstream of the exon that encodes the putative signal peptide of the classical receptor (exon S), have been characterized. Four types of splicing patterns were recognized. Type I splicing pattern is transcribed from exon U1 and is spliced to exons S and E1; this pattern was found in most tissues tested. Types II, III, and IV splicing patterns are transcribed from exon U3 and have a restricted tissue distribution. Type II splice pattern, containing exons U3, U2, and S and type III splicing pattern, containing exon U3, U2, and E1 (skipping exon S), was found only in kidney. Type IV splice pattern, containing exon U3 and S was found both in kidney and ovary. Because the type III splice variant skips exon S, translation of this splice variant initiates at a different AUG codon. The type III splice variant was weakly expressed on the cell surface of COS-7 cells, as assessed by double antibody binding assay, and no detectable ligand binding was observed on intact cells. The type III splice variant, however, increased cAMP accumulation in COS-7 cells when challenged with PTH(1-34), PTH(1-84) and hPTHrP(1-36) with EC50s that are similar to those observed in COS-7 cells expressing the type I variant but with a maximum stimulation that was lower than that observed in COS-7 cells expressing the type I variant. These data indicate low levels of cell surface expression of the type III splice variant. Treatment of COS-7 cells with tunicamycin decreased the size of the type I splice variant from a broad band of 85 kDa to a compact band of about 60 kDa. The type III splice

  4. Angiotensin II receptor mRNA expression and vasoconstriction in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Pantev, Emil; Emilson, Malin;

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II is a potent vasoconstrictor that is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and atherosclerosis. In the present study, angiotensin II receptor mRNA expression levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and the vasocontractile responses...... to angiotensin II were characterised by in vitro pharmacology in endothelium-denuded human coronary arteries. Angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)) receptor mRNA expression levels were significantly down-regulated in arteries from patients with heart failure as compared to controls. The angiotensin II...

  5. Impact of cell type and epitope tagging on heterologous expression of G protein-coupled receptor: a systematic study on angiotensin type II receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Jiang

    Full Text Available Despite heterologous expression of epitope-tagged GPCR is widely adopted for functional characterization, there is lacking of systematic analysis of the impact of expression host and epitope tag on GPCR expression. Angiotensin type II (AT2 receptor displays agonist-dependent and -independent activities, coupling to a spectrum of signaling molecules. However, consensus has not been reached on the subcellular distributions, signaling cascades and receptor-mediated actions. To examine the contributions of host cell and epitope tag on receptor expression and activity, epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were transiently or stably expressed in HEK293, CHO-K1 and PC12 cells. The epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants were detected both on the cell membrane and in the perinuclear region. In transiently transfected HEK293 cells, Myc-AT2 existed predominantly as monomer. Additionally, a ladder of ubiquitinated AT2 receptor proteins was detected. By contrast, stably expressed epitope-tagged AT2 receptor variants existed as both monomer and high molecular weight complexes, and the latter was enriched in cell surface. Glycosylation promoted cell surface expression of Myc-AT2 but had no effect on AT2-GFP in HEK293 cells. In cells that stably expressed Myc-AT2, serum starvation induced apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells but not in HEK293 or PC12 cells. Instead, HEK293 and PC12 cells stably expressing Myc-AT2 exhibited partial cell cycle arrest with cells accumulating at G1 and S phases, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that expression levels, subcellular distributions and ligand-independent constitutive activities of AT2 receptor were cell type-dependent while posttranslational processing of nascent AT2 receptor protein was modulated by epitope tag and mode of expression.

  6. Scavenger receptor AI/II truncation, lung function and COPD: a large population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor A-I/II (SRA-I/II) on alveolar macrophages is involved in recognition and clearance of modified lipids and inhaled particulates. A rare variant of the SRA-I/II gene, Arg293X, truncates the distal collagen-like domain, which is essential for ligand recognition. We tested whet...

  7. Comparison of the antagonistic effects of different angiotensin II receptor blockers in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantev, Emil; Stenman, Emelie; Wackenfors, Angelica;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a potent vasoconstrictor and a deleterious factor in cardiovascular pathophysiology. Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs) have recently been introduced into clinical practice for treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure. AIMS: This study was underta...

  8. The angiotensin II receptor 2 is expressed and mediates angiotensin II signaling in lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königshoff, Melanie; Wilhelm, Anke; Jahn, Andreas; Sedding, Daniel; Amarie, Oana Veronica; Eul, Bastian; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Günther, Andreas; Eickelberg, Oliver; Rose, Frank

    2007-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe interstitial lung disease unresponsive to currently available therapies. In IPF, initial alveolar epithelial cell damage leads to activation of fibroblast-(myo)fibroblasts, which deposit an increased amount of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix. Angiotensin II (ANGII) signaling, mediated via angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) or type 2 (AGTR2), controls tissue remodeling in fibrosis, but the relevance of AGTR2 remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated increased expression of AGTR1 und AGTR2 in human and rodent lung tissues from patients with IPF and mice subjected to bleomycin-induced fibrosis, respectively. Both AGTR1 und AGTR2 localized to interstitial fibroblasts. Quantitative analysis of cell surface expression in primary mouse fibroblasts revealed a significant increase of AGTR2 surface expression in fibrotic fibroblasts, whereas AGTR1 surface expression levels remained similar. ANGII treatment of normal fibroblasts led to enhanced migration and proliferation, which was abrogated after pretreatment with losartan (LOS), an AGTR1 inhibitor. In contrast, in fibrotic fibroblasts, migration and proliferation was modified only by AGTR2, but not AGTR1 inhibition (using PD123319). ANGII-induced effects were mediated via phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and p42/44, which was blocked via LOS and PD123319, respectively. Similar effects of AGTR1 and AGTR2 inhibition were observed using conditioned media of alveolar epithelial cells, a prominent source of ANGII in the lung in vivo. In summary, we conclude that ANGII signaling occurs primarily via AGTR1 in normal fibroblasts, while AGTR2-mediated effects are dominant on activated (myo)-fibroblasts, a receptor switch that may perturb epithelial-mesenchymal interaction, thereby further perpetuating fibrogenesis.

  9. On the lack of correlation between Mg II 2796, 2803 Å and Lyα emission in lensed star-forming galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigby, J. R. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bayliss, M. B. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gladders, M. D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sharon, K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wuyts, E. [Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dahle, H. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-07-20

    We examine the Mg II 2796, 2803 Å, Lyα, and nebular line emission in five bright star-forming galaxies at 1.66 < z < 1.91 that have been gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxy clusters. All five galaxies show prominent Mg II emission and absorption in a P Cygni profile. We find no correlation between the equivalent widths of Mg II and Lyα emission. The Mg II emission has a broader range of velocities than do the nebular emission line profiles; the Mg II emission is redshifted with respect to systemic by 100-200 km s{sup –1}. When present, Lyα is even more redshifted. The reddest components of Mg II and Lyα emission have tails to 500-600 km s{sup –1}, implying a strong outflow. The lack of correlation in the Mg II and Lyα equivalent widths, the differing velocity profiles, and the high ratios of Mg II to nebular line fluxes together suggest that the bulk of Mg II emission does not ultimately arise as nebular line emission, but may instead be reprocessed stellar continuum emission.

  10. On the Lack of Correlation Between Mg II 2796, 2803 Angstrom and Lyman alpha Emission in Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Jane Rebecca; Bayliss, M. B.; Gladders, M. D.; Sharon, K.; Wuyts, E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the Mg II 2796, 2803 Angstrom, Lyman alpha, and nebular line emission in five bright star-forming galaxies at 1.66 less than z less than 1.91 that have been gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxy clusters. All five galaxies show prominent Mg II emission and absorption in a P Cygni profile. We find no correlation between the equivalent widths of Mg II and Lyman alpha emission. The Mg II emission has a broader range of velocities than do the nebular emission line profiles; the Mg II emission is redshifted with respect to systemic by 100 to 200 km s(exp-1). When present, Lyman alpha is even more redshifted. The reddest components of Mg II and Lyman alpha emission have tails to 500-600 km s(exp-1), implying a strong outflow. The lack of correlation in the Mg II and Lyman alpha equivalent widths, the differing velocity profiles, and the high ratios of Mg II to nebular line fluxes together suggest that the bulk of Mg II emission does not ultimately arise as nebular line emission, but may instead be reprocessed stellar continuum emission.

  11. Female mice lacking cholecystokinin 1 receptors have compromised neurogenesis, and fewer dopaminergic cells in the olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi eSui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult rodent brain is largely restricted to the subependymal zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle and subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG. We examined whether cholecystokinin (CCK through actions mediated by CCK1 receptors (CCK1R is involved in regulating neurogenesis. Proliferating cells in the SVZ, measured by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU injected 2 hours prior to death or by immunoreactivity against Ki67, were reduced by 37% and 42%, respectively, in female (but not male mice lacking CCK1Rs (CCK1R-/- compared to wild-type (WT. Generation of neuroblasts in the SVZ and rostral migratory stream was also affected, since the number of doublecortin (DCX-immunoreactive (ir neuroblasts in these regions decreased by 29%. In the SGZ of female CCK1R-/- mice, BrdU-positive (+ and Ki67-ir cells were reduced by 38% and 56%, respectively, while DCX-ir neuroblasts were down 80%. Subsequently, the effect of reduced SVZ/SGZ proliferation on the generation and survival of mature adult-born cells in female CCK1R-/- mice was examined. In the OB granule cell layer (GCL, the number of neuronal nuclei (NeuN-ir and calretinin-ir cells was stable compared to WT, and 42 days after BrdU injections, the number of BrdU+ cells co-expressing GABA- or NeuN-like immunoreactivity (LI was similar. Compared to WT, the granule cell layer of the DG in female CCK1R-/- mice had a similar number of calbindin-ir cells and BrdU+ cells co-expressing calbindin-LI 42 days after BrdU injections. However, the OB glomerular layer (GL of CCK1R-/- female mice had 11% fewer NeuN-ir cells, 23% less TH-ir cells, and a 38% and 29% reduction in BrdU+ cells that co-expressed TH-LI or GABA-LI, respectively. We conclude that CCK, via CCK1Rs, is involved in regulating the generation of proliferating cells and neuroblasts in the adult female mouse brain, and mechanisms are in place to maintain steady neuronal populations in the OB and DG when the rate of proliferation is

  12. Inhibition of Stat3 signaling ameliorates atrophy of the soleus muscles in mice lacking the vitamin D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Suchitra D

    2017-01-25

    Although skeletal muscle wasting has long been observed as a clinical outcome of impaired vitamin D signaling, precise molecular mechanisms that mediate the loss of muscle mass in the absence of vitamin D signaling are less clear. To determine the molecular consequences of vitamin D signaling, we analyzed the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling, a known contributor to various muscle wasting pathologies, in skeletal muscles. We isolated soleus (slow) and tibialis anterior (fast) muscles from mice lacking the vitamin D receptor (VDR(-/-)) and used western blot analysis, quantitative RTPCR, and pharmacological intervention to analyze muscle atrophy in VDR(-/-) mice. We found that slow and fast subsets of muscles of the VDR(-/-) mice displayed elevated levels of phosphorylated Stat3 accompanied by an increase in Myostatin expression and signaling. Consequently, we observed reduced activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling components, ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) and ribosomal S6 protein (rpS6), that regulate protein synthesis and cell size, respectively. Concomitantly, we observed an increase in atrophy regulators and a block in autophagic gene expression. An examination of the upstream regulation of Stat3 levels in VDR(-/-) muscles revealed an increase in IL-6 protein expression in the soleus, but not in the tibialis anterior muscles. To investigate the involvement of satellite cells (SCs) in atrophy in VDR(-/-) mice, we found that there was no significant deficit in SC numbers in VDR(-/-) muscles compared to the wild type. Unlike its expression within VDR(-/-) fibers, Myostatin levels in VDR(-/-) SCs from bulk muscles were similar to those of wild type. However, VDR(-/-) SCs induced to differentiate in culture displayed increased p-Stat3 signaling and Myostatin expression. Finally, VDR(-/-) mice injected with a Stat3 inhibitor displayed reduced Myostatin expression and function and restored active p70S6K and

  13. Reinforcing Effects Of Compounds Lacking Intrinsic Efficacy At α1 Subunit-Containing GABAA Receptor Subtypes in Midazolam- But Not Cocaine-Experienced Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinday, Nina M; Sawyer, Eileen K; Fischer, Bradford D; Platt, Donna M; Licata, Stephanie C; Atack, John R; Dawson, Gerard R; Reynolds, David S; Rowlett, James K

    2013-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are prescribed widely but their utility is limited by unwanted side effects, including abuse potential. The mechanisms underlying the abuse-related effects of benzodiazepines are not well understood, although α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors have been proposed to have a critical role. Here, we examine the reinforcing effects of several compounds that vary with respect to intrinsic efficacy at α2, α3, and α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors but lack efficacy at α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors (‘α1-sparing compounds'): MRK-623 (functional selectivity for α2/α3 subunit-containing receptors), TPA023B (functional selectivity for α2/α3/α5 subunit-containing receptors), and TP003 (functional selectivity for α3 subunit-containing receptors). The reinforcing effects of the α1-sparing compounds were compared with those of the non-selective benzodiazepine receptor partial agonist MRK-696, and non-selective benzodiazepine receptor full agonists, midazolam and lorazepam, in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer midazolam or cocaine, under a progressive-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug injection. The α1-sparing compounds were self-administered significantly above vehicle levels in monkeys maintained under a midazolam baseline, but not under a cocaine baseline over the dose ranges tested. Importantly, TP003 had significant reinforcing effects, albeit at lower levels of self-administration than non-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonists. Together, these results suggest that α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors may have a role in the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepine-type compounds in monkeys with a history of stimulant self-administration, whereas α3 subunit-containing GABAA receptors may be important mediators of the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepine-type compounds in animals with a history of sedative-anxiolytic/benzodiazepine self-administration. PMID:23303046

  14. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β in myocyte was upregulated by angiotensin II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To observe the regulation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-βin myocyte stimulated by angiotensin II (AngII) at both integrated and cellular levels and reveal the signal transduction mechanism in cell, two kidneys, one clip (2K1C) renal hypertension were performed by placing a sliver clip around the left renal artery. Blood pressure and the ratio of left ventricular weight to body weight were measured at 4 and 8 weeks after operation. The content of AngII in heart was detected by radioimmunology assay; the protein level of PDGF receptor-βin heart was measured by Western blot analysis. The alteration of PDGF receptor-βstimulated by AngII and several inhibitors was observed on cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocyte (NRVM). The content of AngII in heart of 2K1C renal hypertensive rat at 4 and 8 weeks after operation was increased. Compared with sham group, 4 and 8 weeks after operation, PDGF receptor-βin heart of 2K1C group was upregulated by 100.3% and 127.1% (P < 0.05), respectively. This upregulation could be inhibited by captopril. For cultured myocyte, PDGF receptor-βwas increased by 47.1% after being stimulated by AngII and this upregulation could be inhibited by losartan which was an inhibitor of AT1 receptor. PLC inhibitor (U73122) and MEK inhibitor (PD98059) could partly inhibit PDGF receptor-βupregulation induced by AngII. These results suggested that AngII could upregulate PDGF receptor-βin myocyte by its AT1 receptor and this effect was at least partly dependent on PLC and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK).

  15. Interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein interacts with the type II interleukin-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, D; Lundkvist, J; Layé, S; Bartfai, T

    1998-06-16

    Stably transfected HEK-293 cells express on their surface the murine type II IL-1 receptor (mIL-1RII) as demonstrated by FACS analysis using the mAb 4E2, however binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta to these cells is nearly absent. Saturable high affinity binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta is observed when the murine IL-1 receptor accessory protein (mIL-1RAcP) is coexpressed with mIL-1RII. Binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta to mIL-1RII-mIL-1RAcP complex can be inhibited either with antibodies to mIL-1RII (mAb 4E2), or by antibodies to mIL-1RAcP (mAb 4C5). The number of high affinity binding sites in cells stably transfected with the cDNA for mIL-1RII is dependent on the dose of cDNA for mIL-1RAcP used to transfect the cells. The high affinity complex between mIL-1RII and mIL-1RAcP is not preformed by interaction between the intracellular domains of these two transmembrane proteins, rather it appears to require the extracellular portions of mIL-1RII and mIL-1RAcP and the presence of a ligand. We suggest that in addition to its earlier described decoy receptor role, IL-1RII may modulate the responsiveness of cells to IL-1 by binding the IL-1RAcP in unproductive/non-signalling complexes and thus reducing the number of signalling IL-1RI-IL-1RAcP-agonist complexes when IL-1 is bound.

  16. Angiotensin II activates endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase via AT1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S; Hirata, Y; Emori, T; Imai, T; Marumo, F

    1996-09-01

    To determine whether angiotensin (ANG) II, a vasoconstrictor hormone, activates constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) in endothelial cells (ECs), we investigated the cellular mechanism by which ANG II induces nitric oxide (NO) formation in cultured bovine ECs. ANG II rapidly (within 1 min) and dose-dependently (10(-9)-10(-6) M) increased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production. This effect of ANG II was abolished by a NOS inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. An ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist (DuP 753), but not an ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist (PD 123177), dose-dependently inhibited ANG II-induced NOx production. A Ca(2+)-channel blocker (barnidipine) failed to affect ANG II-induced NOx production, whereas an intracellular Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA) and a calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) abolished NOx production induced by ANG II. A protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (H-7) and down-regulation of endogenous PKC after pretreatment with phorbol ester decreased NOx production stimulated by ANG II. ANG II transiently stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) formation, and increased cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations; these effects were blocked by DuP 753. Our data demonstrate that ANG II stimulates NO release by activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cNOS via AT1 receptors in bovine ECs.

  17. Design of angiotensin II derivatives suitable for indirect affinity techniques: potential applications to receptor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnafous, J C; Seyer, R; Tence, M; Marie, J; Kabbaj, M; Aumelas, A

    1988-01-01

    The design of angiotensin II (A II)-derived probes suitable for indirect affinity techniques is presented. Biotin or dinitrophenyl moieties have been added at the N-terminus of A II, through aminohexanoic acid as spacer arm, to generate (6-biotinylamido)-hexanoyl-AII (Bio-Ahx-AII) and dinitrophenyl- aminohexanoyl-AII (Dnp-Ahx-AII). Monoiodinated and highly labeled radioiodinated forms of these probes have been prepared. The two bifunctional ligands displayed high affinities for rat liver A II receptors (Kd values in the nanomolar range) and their secondary acceptors: streptavidin and monoclonal anti-Dnp antibodies respectively. Bio-Ahx-AII and Dnp-Ahx-AII behaved as agonists on several AII-sensitive systems. Based on these structural assessments, the parent photoactivable azido probe: Bio-Ahx-(Ala1,Phe(4N3)8)A II. A II was synthesized and proved to possess similar biological properties than the non-azido compound. The hepatic A II receptor could be covalently labeled by the radioiodinated probe, with a particularly high yield (15-20%); SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of solubilized complexes revealed specific labeling of a 65 Kdaltons binding unit, in agreement with previous data obtained with other azido AII-derived compounds. The potential applications of these probes are: i) receptor purification by combination of its photoaffinity labeling and adsorption of biotin-tagged solubilized hormone-receptor complexes on avidin gels. ii) cell labeling and sorting. iii) histochemical receptor visualization.

  18. Efficacy and safety of the angiotensin II receptor blocker losartan for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No medical treatment has been reliably shown to halt or reverse disease progression in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but the results of several pilot studies have suggested beneficial effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers on left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, which...

  19. 29. LACK OF ASSOCIATION OF AH RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISM WITH SUSCEPTIBILITY TO BLADDER CANCER IN SHANGHAI POPULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The diversity in genetic background largely predetermine the individual susceptibility towards health risk related to xenobiotic exposure. The receptors of signal transduction mechanism are involved in the modulation of toxicological outcome of xenobiotics. The survey of distribution of different polymorphic forms of Ah receptor in Chinese population and probing into their possible association with health risk related with xenobiotic exposure will not only contribute to a better understanding of mechanism of imperilment, but also inspire a clue for a further

  20. Lack of Association between Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR Gene Polymorphisms and Alexithymia: Evidence from Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Koh

    Full Text Available Oxytocin receptor gene single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with structural and functional alterations in brain regions, which involve social-emotional processing. Therefore, oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms may contribute to individual differences in alexithymia, which is considered to be a dysfunction of emotional processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between oxytocin receptor gene single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes and alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recruited 355 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (234 men, 121 women. Alexithymia was measured by using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale. We performed single-marker and haplotype association analyses with eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs237885, rs237887, rs2268490, rs4686301, rs2254298, rs13316193, rs53576, and rs2268498 in the oxytocin receptor gene. There were no significant associations between any of the eight single nucleotide polymorphism of the oxytocin receptor gene and alexithymia. In addition, a six-locus haplotype block (rs237885-rs237887-rs2268490-rs4686301-rs2254298-rs13316193 was not significantly associated with alexithymia. These findings suggest that genetic variations in the oxytocin receptor gene may not explain a significant part of alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  1. Lack of Association between Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR) Gene Polymorphisms and Alexithymia: Evidence from Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Min Jung; Kim, Wonji; Kang, Jee In; Namkoong, Kee; Kim, Se Joo

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor gene single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with structural and functional alterations in brain regions, which involve social-emotional processing. Therefore, oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms may contribute to individual differences in alexithymia, which is considered to be a dysfunction of emotional processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between oxytocin receptor gene single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes and alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recruited 355 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (234 men, 121 women). Alexithymia was measured by using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale. We performed single-marker and haplotype association analyses with eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs237885, rs237887, rs2268490, rs4686301, rs2254298, rs13316193, rs53576, and rs2268498) in the oxytocin receptor gene. There were no significant associations between any of the eight single nucleotide polymorphism of the oxytocin receptor gene and alexithymia. In addition, a six-locus haplotype block (rs237885-rs237887-rs2268490-rs4686301-rs2254298-rs13316193) was not significantly associated with alexithymia. These findings suggest that genetic variations in the oxytocin receptor gene may not explain a significant part of alexithymia in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  2. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  3. The Relationship between Urotensin II and its Receptor and the Clinicopathological Parameters of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakan, Ozan; Kalender, Mehmet Emin; Suner, Ali; Cengiz, Beyhan; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Bayraktar, Recep; Borazan, Ersin; Babacan, Taner; Camci, Celaletdin

    2014-01-01

    Background Urotensin II is a vasoactive polypeptide. It is known that some vasoactive polypeptides are produced and secreted by tumor cells, and act as a paracrine growth stimulant. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between urotensin II and its receptor’s messenger RNA expression in breast cancer. Material/Methods Fifty-nine women with breast cancer were included in this study. The median age was 48 years. The relationships between urotensin II and urotensin II receptor mRNA expressions, which were derived from fresh breast cancer tissues and adjacent normal breast tissues, and clinical and pathological parameters, were assessed. Results We found expressions of urotensin II mRNA and its receptor in 55 of 59 breast cancer tissues and in 55 of 59 normal breast tissues. We found a positive significant correlation between urotensin II and its receptor (p=0.001, r=0.632), and found a negative, but insignificant, correlation between urotensin II and age (p=0.038, r=−0.281). Urotensin II levels were higher in the premenopausal group compared to the postmenopausal group (p<0.05). The mean urotensin II receptor expression was higher in the premenopausal group (p<0.05) compared to the postmenopausal group, and its expression was also higher in the group without extra-nodal invasion compared to that of the group with extra-nodal invasion (p=0.001). Urotensin II levels were higher in the group without lymphatic invasion compared to the group with lymphatic invasion (p=0.048). Conclusions This study is the first in the English medical literature to determine the urotensin II and its receptor mRNA expressions in breast cancer tissues. Consequently, urotensin II seems be associated with menopausal status, and extra-nodal and lymphatic invasion. PMID:25112588

  4. Molecular determinants of angiotensin II type 1 receptor functional selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Bonde, Marie Mi; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2008-01-01

    -independent recruitment of beta-arrestin-scaffolded signalling complexes that activate protein kinase pathways. Different states of receptor activation with preference for individual downstream pathways (functional selectivity) have been demonstrated in mutational studies of the AT(1) receptor and by pharmacological...... that selective blockade of G protein actions and simultaneous activation of G protein-independent signalling will prove to be a feasible strategy for improved cardiovascular therapy. The pharmacological perspectives of functional selectivity by receptors, such as the AT(1) receptor, urge the elucidation...

  5. Reduced glomerular angiotensin II receptor density in diabetes mellitus in the rat: time course and mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, B.M.

    1987-04-01

    Glomerular angiotensin II receptors are reduced in number in early diabetes mellitus, which may contribute to hyperfiltration and glomerular injury. The time course and role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the pathogenesis of the receptor abnormality were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats made diabetic with streptozotocin (65 mg, iv). Glomerular angiotensin II receptors were measured by Scatchard analysis; insulin, renin activity, angiotensin II, and aldosterone were measured by RIA. Diabetes mellitus was documented at 24 h by a rise in plasma glucose (vehicle-injected control, 133 +/- 4; diabetic, 482 +/- 22 mg/dl and a fall in plasma insulin (control, 53.1 +/- 5.7; diabetic, 35.6 +/- 4.0 microIU/ml. At 24 h glomerular angiotensin II receptor density was decreased by 26.5% in diabetic rats (control, 75.5 +/- 9.6 X 10(6); diabetic, 55.5 +/- 8.3 X 10(6) receptors/glomerulus. Receptor occupancy could not explain the defect, because there was reduced binding in diabetic glomeruli after pretreatment with 3 M MgCl/sub 2/, a maneuver that caused dissociation of previously bound hormone. There was a progressive return of the receptor density toward normal over the 60 days following induction of diabetes, with diabetic glomeruli measuring 22.7%, 14.8%, and 3.7% fewer receptors than age-matched controls at 11 days, 1 month, and 2 months, respectively.

  6. Initiation of liver growth by tumor necrosis factor: Deficient liver regeneration in mice lacking type I tumor necrosis factor receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Kirillova, Irina; Peschon, Jacques J.; Fausto, Nelson

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms that initiate liver regeneration after resection of liver tissue are not known. To determine whether cytokines are involved in the initiation of liver growth, we studied the regeneration of the liver after partial hepatectomy (PH) in mice lacking type I tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR-I). DNA synthesis after PH was severely impaired in these animals, and the expected increases in the binding of the NF-κB and STAT3 transcription factors shortly after...

  7. Lack of CB1 receptors increases noradrenaline release in vas deferens without affecting atrial noradrenaline release or cortical acetylcholine release

    OpenAIRE

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Redmer, Agnes; Werner, André; Kathmann, Markus

    2003-01-01

    We studied whether cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene disruption (to yield CB1−/− mice) affects the electrically evoked tritium overflow from vas deferens and atrial pieces preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) (‘noradrenaline release') and from cerebral cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-choline (‘acetylcholine release').NA release was higher by 37% in vas deferens from CB1−/− mice than in vas deferens from CB1+/+ mice. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibited, and the CB1 re...

  8. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  9. Angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism and diabetic microangiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Cambien, Francois; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genotypic abnormalities of the renin-angiotensin system have been suggested as risk factors for the development of hypertension, diabetic nephropathy and proliferative retinopathy. Most of the known actions of angiotensin-II are exerted through the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, whic...

  10. Hypotensive effect of angiotensin II after AT1-receptor blockade with losartan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, T; Pawlak, R; Kucharewicz, I; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W

    2000-03-01

    Recent data suggest that hypotensive effect of losartan may not be attributed solely to AT1-receptor blockade, but also to excessive AT2 or other receptors stimulation by elevated angiotensin II and its derivative peptides. Therefore in the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II on mean blood pressure after AT -receptor blockade with losartan. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetised and received injection of either losartan (30 mg/kg, 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or saline (the same volume and route) followed by bolus injection of angiotensin II (100, 300 or 1,000 ng/kg; 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or 1-hour infusion of angiotensin II (200 ng/kg/min; 2.5 ml/kg/h, i.v.). Control animals received saline instead. Angiotensin II, given either as the injection or the infusion, caused an evident increase in mean blood pressure (p ranged from 0.05 to 0.001 depending on the experimental group). Losartan caused a rapid drop in mean blood pressure and blunted the hypertensive effect of angiotensin II (p < 0.01). Moreover, in the losartan-pretreated animals the hypotensive phase was enhanced by the infusion, but not single injection of angiotensin II, which was most evident from the 30 th minute of observation (p < 0.05 vs control). In conclusion, hypotensive effect of losartan may be amplified by simultaneous increase in angiotensin II level, the situation observed during chronic AT1-receptor blockade.

  11. Lack of association between alcohol-dependence and D3 dopamine receptor gene in three independent samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorwood, P.; Feingold, J. [Universite Paris VII (France); Ades, J. [Paris Hospital Louis Mourier (France)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Numerous studies on the involvement of dopamine receptors in the genetics of alcoholism focused on associations between a polymorphism of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene and alcohol dependence. However, the results of these studies are conflicting. Another receptor, the D3 dopamine receptor (DRD3), may be of additional interest since it is specifically located in the limbic area, and in particular in the nucleus accumbens which plays a significant role in the reward process of addiction behavior. We thus tested the association in three independent samples of alcoholic patients, with different origins and various inclusion criteria. No difference in the DRD3 gene polymorphism emerged between controls and alcoholic patients, regardless of their origin, inclusion criteria, or presence or absence of the DRD2 TaqI A1-allele. Despite the fact that more information could have been considered and that association studies provide limited information, there is good evidence that this DRD3 polymorphism does not play a major role in the genetic component of alcoholism. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Hypocholesterolemia, foam cell accumulation, but no atherosclerosis in mice lacking ABC-transporter A1 and scavenger receptor BI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Ying; Pennings, Marieke; Vrins, Carlos L. J.; Calpe-Berdiel, Laura; Hoekstra, Menno; Kruijt, J. Kar; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Hildebrand, Reeni B.; van der Sluis, Ronald; Jessup, Wendy; Le Goff, Wilfried; Chapman, M. John; Huby, Thierry; Groen, Albert K.; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Van Eck, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is regarded to be crucial for prevention of foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. ABC-transporter A1 (ABCA1) and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) are involved in the biogenesis of HDL and the selective delivery of HDL choles

  13. Lack of association between neuropeptide S receptor 1 gene (NPSR1) and eczema in five European populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekelund, E.; Bradley, M.; Weidinger, S.; Jovanovic, D.L.; Johansson, C.; Lindgren, C.M.; Todorova, A.; Jakob, T.; Illig, T.; von Mutius, E.; Braun-Fahrlander, C.; Doekes, G.; Riedler, T.; Scheynius, A.; Pershagen, G.; Kockum, I.; Kere, J.

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is often associated with development of allergic asthma. The Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) gene has previously been associated with asthma and elevated serum IgE levels. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential association between the NPSR1 gene and eczema in patients and heal

  14. Population and pedigree studies reveal a lack of association between the dopamine D sub 2 receptor gene and alcoholism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolos, A.M.; Goldman, D.; Brown, G.L. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Lucas-Derse, S.; Ramsburg, M. (Program Resources Inc., Frederick, MD (USA))

    1990-12-26

    Using the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor clone {lambda}hD2G1, Blum et al recently found that the D{sub 2}/Taq 1 allele (A1) was present in 69{percent} of 35 deceased alcoholics but in only 20{percent} of an equal number of controls. To assess this association further, the authors evaluated the D{sub 2}/Taq 1 polymorphism and a single-strand conformation polymorphism detected by polymerase chain reaction and nondenaturing gel electrophoresis (PCR-SSCP) of the 3{prime} noncoding region of the D{sub 2} receptor gene. They studied 40 unrelated white alcoholics, 127 racially matched controls, and two white pedigrees. The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Lifetime Version (SADS-L) clinical diagnostic interviews were rated blindly by two clinicians. Alcoholics were subtyped according to age of onset, severity, presence of antisocial personality, and family history. No significant differences in either D{sub 2}/Taq 1 or PCR-SSCP allele frequencies were observed between alcoholics, subpopulations of alcoholics, or controls. The PCR-SSCP polymorphism provided independent information against linkage at the D{sub 2} receptor locus. This study does not support a widespread or consistent association between the D{sub 2} receptor gene and alcoholism.

  15. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene disruption causes increased adrenal angiotensin II and aldosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Di; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Somanna, Naveen K; Pandey, Kailash N

    2007-07-01

    Disruption of the guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene leads to elevated arterial blood pressure and congestive heart failure in mice lacking NPRA. This study was aimed at determining whether Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene copy number affects adrenal ANG II and aldosterone (Aldo) levels in a gene-dose-dependent manner in Npr1 gene-targeted mice. Adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels increased in 1-copy mice compared with 2-copy mice, but decreased in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. In contrast, renal ANG II levels decreased in 1-copy (25%), 3-copy (38%), and 4-copy (39%) mice compared with 2-copy mice. The low-salt diet stimulated adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (20 and 2,441%), 2-copy (15 and 2,339%), 3-copy (20 and 424%), and 4-copy (31 and 486%) mice, respectively. The high-salt diet suppressed adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (46 and 29%) and 2-copy (38 and 17%) mice. On the other hand, the low-salt diet stimulated renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (45%), 2-copy (45%), 3-copy (59%), and 4-copy (48%) mice. However, the high-salt diet suppressed renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (28%) and 2-copy (27%) mice. In conclusion, NPRA signaling antagonizes adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in a gene-dose dependent manner. Increased adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels may play an important role in elevated arterial blood pressure and progressive hypertension, leading to renal and vascular injury in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice.

  16. Ferristatin II promotes degradation of transferrin receptor-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaina L Byrne

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the small molecule iron transport inhibitor ferristatin (NSC30611 acts by down-regulating transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1 via receptor degradation. In this investigation, we show that another small molecule, ferristatin II (NSC8679, acts in a similar manner to degrade the receptor through a nystatin-sensitive lipid raft pathway. Structural domains of the receptor necessary for interactions with the clathrin pathway do not appear to be necessary for ferristatin II induced degradation of TfR1. While TfR1 constitutively traffics through clathrin-mediated endocytosis, with or without ligand, the presence of Tf blocked ferristatin II induced degradation of TfR1. This effect of Tf was lost in a ligand binding receptor mutant G647A TfR1, suggesting that Tf binding to its receptor interferes with the drug's activity. Rats treated with ferristatin II have lower TfR1 in liver. These effects are associated with reduced intestinal (59Fe uptake, lower serum iron and transferrin saturation, but no change in liver non-heme iron stores. The observed hypoferremia promoted by degradation of TfR1 by ferristatin II appears to be due to induced hepcidin gene expression.

  17. Localization of the ANG II type 2 receptor in the microcirculation of skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, E. H.; Munzenmaier, D. H.; Hansen-Smith, F. M.; Lombard, J. H.; Greene, A. S.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Only functional studies have suggested the presence of the ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor in the microcirculation. To determine the distribution of this receptor in the rat skeletal muscle microcirculation, a polyclonal rabbit anti-rat antiserum was developed and used for immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The antiserum was prepared against a highly specific and antigenic AT2-receptor synthetic peptide and was validated by competition and sensitivity assays. Western blot analysis demonstrated a prominent, single band at approximately 40 kDa in cremaster and soleus muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a wide distribution of AT2 receptors throughout the skeletal muscle microcirculation in large and small microvessels. Microanatomic studies displayed an endothelial localization of the AT2 receptor, whereas dual labeling with smooth muscle alpha-actin also showed colocalization of the AT2 receptor with vascular smooth muscle cells. Other cells associated with the microvessels also stained positive for AT2 receptors. Briefly, this study confirms previous functional data and localizes the AT2 receptor to the microcirculation. These studies demonstrate that the AT2 receptor is present on a variety of vascular cell types and that it is situated in a fashion that would allow it to directly oppose ANG II type 1 receptor actions.

  18. Mechanism of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II regulation of AMPA receptor gating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Jenkins, Meagan A; Banke, Tue G

    2011-01-01

    The function, trafficking and synaptic signaling of AMPA receptors are tightly regulated by phosphorylation. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylates the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit at Ser831 to increase single-channel conductance. We show that CaMKII increases the conductance...... of native heteromeric AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through phosphorylation of Ser831. In addition, co-expression of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) with recombinant receptors is required for phospho-Ser831 to increase conductance of heteromeric GluA1-GluA2 receptors...... the frequency of openings to larger conductances rather than altering unitary conductance. Together, these findings suggest that CaMKII phosphorylation of GluA1-Ser831 decreases the activation energy for an intrasubunit conformational change that regulates the conductance of the receptor when the channel pore...

  19. EGF receptor transactivation in angiotensin II and endothelin control of vascular protein synthesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, Pierre; Moreau, Pierre

    2004-11-01

    Endothelin represents a necessary intermediate of angiotensin II-induced resistance artery remodeling in hypertension. Recent data suggest that epidermal growth factor receptors are rapidly transactivated by angiotensin II stimulation to mediate its growth-promoting effects. Because endothelin also transactivates epidermal growth factor receptors in vitro, we studied the contribution of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation in the in vivo trophic actions of the upstream effector angiotensin II and its downstream mediator endothelin in rat mesenteric arteries. Twenty-six-hour infusion of angiotensin II (400 ng/kg per min) or endothelin (5 pmol/kg per min) via osmotic pumps significantly enhanced vascular protein synthesis. With angiotensin II, treatment with the inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation (AG1478, 0.5 mg/kg) produced a significant attenuation (P < 0.05) of protein synthesis. In contrast, AG1478 did not abrogate the elevation of protein synthesis induced by endothelin. In conclusion, angiotensin II-induced epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation seems to be involved in the recruitment of endothelin in the cascade leading to vascular protein synthesis, rather than in the effect of endothelin on small artery remodeling.

  20. Nuclear angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptors are functionally linked to nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwathmey, Tanya M; Shaltout, Hossam A; Pendergrass, Karl D; Pirro, Nancy T; Figueroa, Jorge P; Rose, James C; Diz, Debra I; Chappell, Mark C

    2009-06-01

    Expression of nuclear angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptors in rat kidney provides further support for the concept of an intracellular renin-angiotensin system. Thus we examined the cellular distribution of renal ANG II receptors in sheep to determine the existence and functional roles of intracellular ANG receptors in higher order species. Receptor binding was performed using the nonselective ANG II antagonist (125)I-[Sar(1),Thr(8)]-ANG II ((125)I-sarthran) with the AT(1) antagonist losartan (LOS) or the AT(2) antagonist PD123319 (PD) in isolated nuclei (NUC) and plasma membrane (PM) fractions obtained by differential centrifugation or density gradient separation. In both fetal and adult sheep kidney, PD competed for the majority of cortical NUC (> or =70%) and PM (> or =80%) sites while LOS competition predominated in medullary NUC (> or =75%) and PM (> or =70%). Immunodetection with an AT(2) antibody revealed a single approximately 42-kDa band in both NUC and PM extracts, suggesting a mature molecular form of the NUC receptor. Autoradiography for receptor subtypes localized AT(2) in the tubulointerstitium, AT(1) in the medulla and vasa recta, and both AT(1) and AT(2) in glomeruli. Loading of NUC with the fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) detector DAF showed increased NO production with ANG II (1 nM), which was abolished by PD and N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, but not LOS. Our studies demonstrate ANG II receptor subtypes are differentially expressed in ovine kidney, while nuclear AT(2) receptors are functionally linked to NO production. These findings provide further evidence of a functional intracellular renin-angiotensin system within the kidney, which may represent a therapeutic target for the regulation of blood pressure.

  1. An angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation switch patch revealed through evolutionary trace analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Yao, Rong; Ma, Jian-Nong;

    2010-01-01

    in the cytoplasmic parts of TM2, TM3, and TM6 to form an activation switch that is common to all family A 7TM receptors. We tested this hypothesis in the rat Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1a (AT1a) receptor. The receptor has important roles in the cardiovascular system, but has also frequently been applied as a model...... for 7TM receptor activation and signaling. Six mutations: F66A, L67R, L70R, L119R, D125A, and I245F were targeted to the putative switch and assayed for changes in activation state by their ligand binding, signaling, and trafficking properties. All but one receptor mutant (that was not expressed well...

  2. Activation Induces Structural Changes in the Liganded Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Martin; Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian J.; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) binds to and activates the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (hAT1) of the G protein-coupled receptor class A family. Several activation mechanisms have been proposed for this family, but they have not yet been experimentally validated. We previously used the methionine proximity assay to show that 11 residues in transmembrane domain (TMD) III, VI, and VII of the hAT1 receptor reside in close proximity to the C-terminal residue of AngII. With the exception of a single change in TMD VI, the same contacts are present on N111G-hAT1, a constitutively active mutant; this N111G-hAT1 is a model for the active form of the receptor. In this study, two series of 53 individual methionine mutations were constructed in TMD I, II, IV, and V on both receptor forms. The mutants were photolabeled with a neutral antagonist, 125I-[Sar1,p-benzoyl-l-Phe8]AngII, and the resulting complexes were digested with cyanogen bromide. Although no new contacts were found for the hAT1 mutants, two were found in the constitutively active mutants, Phe-77 in TMD II and Asn-200 in TMD V. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a direct ligand contact with TMD II and TMD V has been reported. These contact point differences were used to identify the structural changes between the WT-hAT1 and N111G-hAT1 complexes through homology-based modeling and restrained molecular dynamics. The model generated revealed an important structural rearrangement of several TMDs from the basal to the activated form in the WT-hAT1 receptor. PMID:19635801

  3. Contribution of renal purinergic receptors to renal vasoconstriction in angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Martha; Bautista, Rocio; Tapia, Edilia; Soto, Virgilia; Santamaría, José; Osorio, Horacio; Pacheco, Ursino; Sánchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the participation of purinergic P2 receptors in the regulation of renal function in ANG II-dependent hypertension, renal and glomerular hemodynamics were evaluated in chronic ANG II-infused (14 days) and Sham rats during acute blockade of P2 receptors with PPADS. In addition, P2X1 and P2Y1 protein and mRNA expression were compared in ANG II-infused and Sham rats. Chronic ANG II-infused rats exhibited increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reductions in glomerular blood flow, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), single-nephron GFR (SNGFR), and glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient. PPADS restored afferent and efferent resistances as well as glomerular blood flow and SNGFR, but did not ameliorate the elevated arterial blood pressure. In Sham rats, PPADS increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reduced GFR and SNGFR. Since purinergic blockade may influence nitric oxide (NO) release, we evaluated the role of NO in the response to PPADS. Acute blockade with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) reversed the vasodilatory effects of PPADS and reduced urinary nitrate excretion (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)) in ANG II-infused rats, indicating a NO-mediated vasodilation during PPADS treatment. In Sham rats, PPADS induced renal vasoconstriction which was not modified by l-NAME, suggesting blockade of a P2X receptor subtype linked to the NO pathway; the response was similar to that obtained with l-NAME alone. P2X1 receptor expression in the renal cortex was increased by chronic ANG II infusion, but there were no changes in P2Y1 receptor abundance. These findings indicate that there is an enhanced P2 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of afferent and efferent arterioles in chronic ANG II-infused rats, which contributes to the increased renal vascular resistance observed in ANG II-dependent hypertension.

  4. Pharmacologic perspectives of functional selectivity by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2008-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor plays a key role in cardiovascular pathophysiology, and it is a major pharmacologic target in the treatment of many cardiovascular disorders. However, AT(1) receptor activation is also involved in adaptive responses to altered hemodynamic demands...... and to sudden injury occurring in the circulatory system. Hence, current drugs that block all AT(1) receptor actions most likely leave room for improvement. Recent developments show that two major signaling pathways used by the AT(1) receptor may be dissected by pharmacologic means. Key pathologic responses...

  5. Enhancement of Adipocyte Browning by Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Kana; Mogi, Masaki; Iwanami, Jun; Kanno, Harumi; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Higaki, Akinori; Yamauchi, Toshifumi; Min, Li-Juan; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has been highlighted as a new possible therapeutic target for obesity, diabetes and lipid metabolic disorders, because WAT browning could increase energy expenditure and reduce adiposity. The new clusters of adipocytes that emerge with WAT browning have been named ‘beige’ or ‘brite’ adipocytes. Recent reports have indicated that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a role in various aspects of adipose tissue physiology and dysfunction. The biological effects of angiotensin II, a major component of RAS, are mediated by two receptor subtypes, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and type 2 receptor (AT2R). However, the functional roles of angiotensin II receptor subtypes in WAT browning have not been defined. Therefore, we examined whether deletion of angiotensin II receptor subtypes (AT1aR and AT2R) may affect white-to-beige fat conversion in vivo. AT1a receptor knockout (AT1aKO) mice exhibited increased appearance of multilocular lipid droplets and upregulation of thermogenic gene expression in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) compared to wild-type (WT) mice. AT2 receptor-deleted mice did not show miniaturization of lipid droplets or alteration of thermogenic gene expression levels in iWAT. An in vitro experiment using adipose tissue-derived stem cells showed that deletion of the AT1a receptor resulted in suppression of adipocyte differentiation, with reduction in expression of thermogenic genes. These results indicate that deletion of the AT1a receptor might have some effects on the process of browning of WAT and that blockade of the AT1 receptor could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:27992452

  6. Absence of angiotensin II type 1 receptor in bone marrow–derived cells is detrimental in the evolution of renal fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Masashi; FUJINAKA, Hidehiko; Matsusaka, Taiji; Price, James; Kon, Valentina; Fogo, Agnes B; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio; Homma, Toshio; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Ichikawa, Iekuni

    2002-01-01

    We examined the in vivo function of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (Agtr1) on macrophages in renal fibrosis. Fourteen days after the induction of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), wild-type mice reconstituted with marrow lacking the Agtr1 gene (Agtr1–/–) developed more severe interstitial fibrosis with fewer interstitial macrophages than those in mice reconstituted with Agtr1+/+ marrow. These differences were not observed at day 5 of UUO. The expression of profibrotic genes — includi...

  7. Advance in Research of Angiotensin II and Its Receptor and Malignant Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu SUN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin AngII, a linear small peptide,which is composed of eight amino acids, is the main effectors of renin-angiotensin systen (Renin-angiotensin system, RAS. AngII, a main biopolypeptide of the RAS, has important pathophysiologic in effects participating in cardiac hypertrophy, vascular cell proproliferation, inflammation and tissue remodeling through G-protein-coupled receptors. In recent years, Ang II can promote tumor cell proliferation, tumor vessel formation and inhibit the differentiation of the tumor cells. This suggests that inhibit the production of AngII or block its effect is expected to become a new measure for the treatment of malignant tumors. This article reviews the advances in research on the relationship between AngII and its receptor and malignant tumor in recent years.

  8. Increased angiotensin II receptors in brain nuclei of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutkind, J.S.; Kurihara, M.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1988-09-01

    We analyzed angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors by in vitro autoradiography in selective brain nuclei of control, salt-treated (1% NaCl in drinking water), deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-treated (DOCA pivalate, 25 mg/kg sc weekly), and DOCA-salt-treated (DOCA + salt treatments) uninephrectomized male Wistar-Kyoto rats. After 4 wk of treatment, only the DOCA-salt group developed hypertension. ANG II binding increased in median preoptic nucleus and subfornical organ of salt- and DOCA-treated rats. DOCA-treated rats also showed increased ANG II binding in paraventricular nucleus. DOCA-salt-treated rats showed higher ANG II binding in nucleus of the solitary tract and area postrema, as well as in the areas mentioned before. Although salt and/or DOCA treatments alone increased ANG II receptors in some brain nuclei, after combined DOCA-salt treatment there was significantly higher ANG II binding in all areas, except the median preoptic nucleus. These results suggest that increased ANG II receptors in selected brain areas may play a role in the pathophysiology of mineralocorticoid-salt experimental hypertension.

  9. 5-Hydroxytryptamine(1F) receptors do not participate in vasoconstriction: lack of vasoconstriction to LY344864, a selective serotonin(1F) receptor agonist in rabbit saphenous vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M L; Schenck, K

    1999-09-01

    Recently, several novel approaches to the treatment of migraine have been advanced, including selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (or serotonin) 1B/1D (5-HT(1B/1D)) receptor agonists such as sumatriptan and 5-HT(1F) receptor agonists such as LY344864. Many 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists have been identified based on their ability to produce cerebral vascular contraction, whereas LY344864 was identified as an inhibitor of trigeminal nerve-mediated dural extravasation. In our study, several triptan derivatives were compared with LY344864 for their ability to contract the rabbit saphenous vein, a tissue used in the preclinical identification of sumatriptan-related agonists. Sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, and naratriptan all contracted the rabbit saphenous vein from baseline tone, whereas LY344864 in concentrations up to 10(-4) M did not contract the rabbit saphenous vein. Furthermore, vascular contractions to sumatriptan were markedly augmented in the presence of prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)). However, even in the presence of PGF(2alpha) (3 x 10(-7) M), LY344864 did not contract the rabbit saphenous vein in concentrations well in excess of its 5-HT(1F) receptor affinity (pK(i) = 8.2). Only when concentrations exceeded those likely to activate 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors (>10(-5) M) did modest contractile responses occur in the presence of PGF(2alpha). Use of these serotonergic agonists revealed a significant correlation between the contractile potency in the rabbit saphenous vein and the affinities of these agonists at 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors, although contractile agonist potencies were not quantitatively similar to 5-HT(1B) or 5-HT(1D) receptor affinities. In contrast, no significant correlation existed between the contractile potencies of these serotonergic agonists in the rabbit saphenous vein and their affinity at 5-HT(1F) receptors. These data support the contention that activation of 5-HT(1F) receptors will not result in vascular

  10. beta-Arrestin 1 and 2 stabilize the angiotensin II type I receptor in distinct high-affinity conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanni, S J; Hansen, J T; Bonde, M M;

    2010-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor belongs to family A of 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptors. The receptor has important roles in the cardiovascular system and is commonly used as a drug target in cardiovascular diseases. Interaction of 7TM receptors with G proteins or beta-arrestins often...

  11. Lack of association between alopecia areata and HLA class I and II in a southeastern Brazilian population*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ângela Marques; Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz Euribel; Sobral, Aldri Roberta Sodoschi; Sakiyama, Marcelo Jun; Lemos, Bruna Cerávolo; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado; Martos, Luciana Leite Crivelin; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Alopecia areata (AA) is a common disorder of unknown etiology that affects approximately 0.7% to 3.8% of patients among the general population. Currently, genetic and autoimmune factors are emphasized as etiopathogenic. Studies linking Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) to AA have suggested that immunogenetic factors may play a role in the disease's onset/development. Objectives To investigate an association between AA and HLA class I/II in white Brazilians. Methods: Patients and control groups comprised 33 and 112 individuals, respectively. DNA extraction was performed by column method with BioPur kit. Allele's classification was undertaken using the PCR-SSO technique. HLA frequencies were obtained through direct counting and subjected to comparison by means of the chi-square test. Results Most patients were aged over 16, with no familial history, and developed partial AA, with no recurrent episodes. Patients showed a higher frequency of HLA-B*40, HLA-B*45, HLA-B*53 and HLA-C*04 compared with controls, although P was not significant after Bonferroni correction. Regarding HLA class II, only HLA-DRB1*07 revealed statistical significance; nevertheless, it featured more prominently in controls than patients (P=0.04; Pc=0.52; OR=0.29; 95%; CI=0.07 to 1.25). P was not significant after Bonferroni correction. Conclusions The development of AA does not seem to be associated with HLA in white Brazilians, nor with susceptibility or resistance. The studies were carried out in populations with little or no miscegenation, unlike the Brazilian population in general, which could explain the inconsistency found. PMID:27438193

  12. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Mezquita

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1, which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer.

  13. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, Belén; Mezquita, Pau; Pau, Montserrat; Mezquita, Jovita; Mezquita, Cristóbal

    2014-02-14

    One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT) and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1), which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer.

  14. Lack of functional P2X7 receptor aggravates brain edema development after middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Melanie; Penk, Anja; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Nörenberg, Wolfgang; Huster, Daniel; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Effective therapeutic measures against the development of brain edema, a life-threatening complication of cerebral ischemia, are necessary to improve the functional outcome for the patient. Here, we identified a beneficial role of purinergic receptor P2X7 activation in acute ischemic stroke. Involvement of P2X7 in the development of neurological deficits, infarct size, brain edema, and glial responses after ischemic cerebral infarction has been analyzed. Neurologic evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging, and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize the receptor's effect on the disease progress during 72 h after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Sham-operated animals were included in all experiments for control purposes. We found P2X7-deficient mice to develop a more prominent brain edema with a trend towards more severe neurological deficits 24 h after tMCAO. Infarct sizes, T2 times, and apparent diffusion coefficients did not differ significantly between wild-type and P2X7(-/-) animals. Our results show a characteristic spatial distribution of reactive glia cells with strongly attenuated microglia activation in P2X7(-/-) mice 72 h after tMCAO. Our data indicate that P2X7 exerts a role in limiting the early edema formation, possibly by modulating glial responses, and supports later microglia activation.

  15. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in the brain and kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehlert, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is an important component in the regulation of systemic blood pressure. Angiotensin II is the principal effector peptide of this system. Interaction of angiotensin II with specific receptors can produce in several organic systems. When administered into the brain this octa-peptide produces a variety of responses including a stimulation of drinking, increased systemic blood pressure and several neuroendocrine responses. Its effects on the kidney include alterations in arteriolar resistance, mesangial cell contraction and a feedback inhibition of the release of renin. Since this peptide produces profound effects on homeostatis by an interaction with specific receptors, the quantitative technique of in vitro autoradiography was applied to localize receptor populations for angiotensin II. Specific binding sites for a radiolabeled form of angiotensin II were localized in various brain and kidney regions. In the rat brain high densities of angiotensin II receptors were observed in the paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus, supraoptic nucleus and the posterior lobe of the pituitary, brain areas in which angiotensin II modified neuroendocrine functions.

  16. Impaired spatial memory and altered dendritic spine morphology in angiotensin II type 2 receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, Björn; von Bohlen und Halbach, Oliver; Becker, Axel; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Voigt, Jörg-Peter; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Grecksch, Gisela; Walther, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Mental retardation is the most frequent cause of serious handicap in children and young adults. Mutations in the human angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) have been implicated in X-linked forms of mental retardation. We here demonstrate that mice lacking the AT2 receptor gene are significantly impaired in their performance in a spatial memory task and in a one-way active avoidance task. As no difference was observed between the genotypes in fear conditioning, the detected deficit in spatial memory may not relate to fear. Notably, receptor knockout mice showed increased motility in an activity meter and elevated plus maze. Importantly, these mice are characterized by abnormal dendritic spine morphology and length, both features also found to be associated with some cases of mental retardation. These findings suggest a crucial role of AT2 in normal brain function and that dysfunction of the receptor has impact on brain development and ultrastructural morphology with distinct consequences on learning and memory.

  17. Lack of an association between a dopamine-4 receptor polymorphism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: genetic and brain morphometric analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, F X; Lau, E; Tayebi, N; Lee, P; Long, R E; Giedd, J N; Sharp, W; Marsh, W L; Walter, J M; Hamburger, S D; Ginns, E I; Rapoport, J L; Sidransky, E

    1998-09-01

    Although the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is likely multifactorial, family, adoption, and twin studies suggest that genetic factors contribute significantly. Polymorphisms of the dopamine 4 receptor (DRD4) affect receptor binding, and one allele with seven tandem repeats in exon 3 (DRD4*7R) has been associated with ADHD. We examined this putative association in 41 children with severe ADHD and 56 healthy controls who were group matched for ethnicity and sex. The frequency of the DRD4*7R allele did not vary by diagnosis (0.220 vs 0.205 in patients and controls, respectively). Behavioral and brain anatomic MRI measures, previously found to discriminate patients from controls, did not differ significantly between subjects having and those lacking a DRD4*7R allele. These data do not support the reported association between DRD4*7R and the behavioral or brain morphometric phenotype associated with ADHD.

  18. Lack of association between urotensin-II (UTS2 gene polymorphisms (Thr21Met and Ser89Asn and migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Ozan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common neurovascular brain disorder with heterogeneous clinical presentation, including recurrent headache attacks. The pathophysiology of migraine is complex, and a number of genomic regions have been associated with the development of migraine. In this study, we analyzed the allele and genotype frequencies of the urotensin-II gene (UTS2 polymorphisms, Thr21Met and Ser89Asn, among Turkish patients with migraine. A total of 146 patients with migraine (14 with aura [MA group] and 132 without aura [MO group] were genotyped for Thr21Met and Ser89Asn polymorphisms and compared with 154 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The UTS2 gene polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. No significant differences were observed in allele and genotype frequencies for Thr21Met and Ser89Asn polymorphisms between the patients with migraine and control group. Similarly, we did not observe significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies between MA and MO and control group. Moreover, the haplotype analysis showed no association between UTS2 gene haplotypes (MN, MS, TN, and TS and migraine. In summary, Thr21Met and Ser89Asn polymorphisms of the UTS2 gene are not risk factors for migraine in our sample of Turkish migraine patients.

  19. Lack of association between obsessive-compulsive disorder and the dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene: Some preliminary considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, M.; Sciuto, G.; Di Bella, D. [Univ. of Milan Medical School (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Controversial results possibly suggesting an association between Tourette`s syndrome (TS) and excess of homozygosity at an Msc I polymorphism in the Dopamine D{sub 3} receptor (DRD{sub 3}) gene have recently been reported. Since a relationship between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette`s syndrome (TS) has been suggested, in this study we assessed the frequency of this 2-allele polymorphism in a sample of 97 OCD patients and in 97 control subjects. No statistically significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies were found. Thus this mutation in the coding sequence of the DRD{sub 3} gene is unlikely to confer susceptibility to OCD. 28 refs., 21 tabs.

  20. Mice Lacking the β2 Adrenergic Receptor Have a Unique Genetic Profile before and after Focal Brain Ischaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin E White

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the β2AR (β2 adrenergic receptor after stroke is unclear as pharmacological manipulations of the β2AR have produced contradictory results. We previously showed that mice deficient in the β2AR (β2KO had smaller infarcts compared with WT (wild-type mice (FVB after MCAO (middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of stroke. To elucidate mechanisms of this neuroprotection, we evaluated changes in gene expression using microarrays comparing differences before and after MCAO, and differences between genotypes. Genes associated with inflammation and cell deaths were enriched after MCAO in both genotypes, and we identified several genes not previously shown to increase following ischaemia (Ccl9, Gem and Prg4. In addition to networks that were similar between genotypes, one network with a central core of GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor and including biological functions such as carbohydrate metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and inflammation was identified in FVB mice but not in β2KO mice. Analysis of differences between genotypes revealed 11 genes differentially expressed by genotype both before and after ischaemia. We demonstrate greater Glo1 protein levels and lower Pmaip/Noxa mRNA levels in β2KO mice in both sham and MCAO conditions. As both genes are implicated in NF-κB (nuclear factor κB signalling, we measured p65 activity and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α levels 24 h after MCAO. MCAO-induced p65 activation and post-ischaemic TNFα production were both greater in FVB compared with β2KO mice. These results suggest that loss of β2AR signaling results in a neuroprotective phenotype in part due to decreased NF-κB signalling, decreased inflammation and decreased apoptotic signalling in the brain.

  1. [Functional analysis of transforming growth factor-beta type II dominant negative receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, M

    1996-06-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a multifunctional homodimeric protein with an apparent molecular weight of 25 KDa. TGF-beta transduces signals by forming heteromeric complexes of their type-I (T beta R-I) and type-II (T beta R-II) serin/threonine kinase receptors. TGF-beta binds first to T beta R-II receptor, and then the ligand in this complex is recognized by T beta R-I, resulting in formation of a heteromeric receptor complex composed of T beta R-I and T beta R-II. Once received, T beta R-I becomes phosphorylated in the GS domain by the associated constitutively active T beta R-II and transmits the downstream signal. It has been reported that formation of the heteromeric complex is indispensible at least in epithelial cells for growth inhibition and extracellular matrix production induced by TGF-beta. In this study, the functional role of T beta R-II for the TGF-beta-induced signals in osteoblastic cells was investigated by using a dominant negative type of T beta R-II mutant receptors (T beta RIIDNR). ROS 17/2.8 and MG 63 cells were found to express T beta R-I, T beta R-II, and T beta R-III, and their cell growth was inhibited by TGF-beta, whereas alkaline phosphatase activity was stimulated. Cells that were stably transfected with the T beta RIIDNR plasmid showed decreased response to TGF-beta during growth and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results indicate that the intracellular serine/threonine kinase domain of T beta R-II is essential for signal transduction of the TGF-beta-induced alkaline phosphatase activity as well as growth inhibition.

  2. An Angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation switch patch revealed through Evolutionary Trace analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Yao, Rong; Ma, Jian-Nong

    2010-01-01

    in the cytoplasmic parts of TM2, TM3, and TM6 to form an activation switch that is common to all family A 7TM receptors. We tested this hypothesis in the rat Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1a (AT1a) receptor. The receptor has important roles in the cardiovascular system, but has also frequently been applied as a model......) displayed phenotypes associated with changed activation state, such as increased agonist affinity or basal activity, promiscuous activation, or constitutive internalization highlighting the importance of testing different signaling pathways. We conclude that this evolutionary important patch mediates...... to be completely resolved. Evolutionary Trace (ET) analysis is a computational method, which identifies clusters of functionally important residues by integrating information on evolutionary important residue variations with receptor structure. Combined with known mutational data, ET predicted a patch of residues...

  3. Regulation of blood pressure by the type 1A angiotensin II receptor gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, M.; Oliverio, M I; Mannon, P J; Best, C F; Maeda, N.; Smithies, O.; Coffman, T M

    1995-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system plays a critical role in sodium and fluid homeostasis. Genetic or acquired alterations in the expression of components of this system are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. To specifically examine the physiological and genetic functions of the type 1A receptor for angiotensin II, we have disrupted the mouse gene encoding this receptor in embryonic stem cells by gene targeting. Agtr1A(-/-) mice were born in expected numbers, and the histomorph...

  4. Reassessment of the unique mode of binding between angiotensin II type 1 receptor and their blockers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichiro Miura

    Full Text Available While the molecular structures of angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs are very similar, they are also slightly different. Although each ARB has been shown to exhibit a unique mode of binding to AT1 receptor, different positions of the AT1 receptor have been analyzed and computational modeling has been performed using different crystal structures for the receptor as a template and different kinds of software. Therefore, we systematically analyzed the critical positions of the AT1 receptor, Tyr(113, Tyr(184, Lys(199, His(256 and Gln(257 using a mutagenesis study, and subsequently performed computational modeling of the binding of ARBs to AT1 receptor using CXCR4 receptor as a new template and a single version of software. The interactions between Tyr(113 in the AT1 receptor and the hydroxyl group of olmesartan, between Lys(199 and carboxyl or tetrazole groups, and between His(256 or Gln(257 and the tetrazole group were studied. The common structure, a tetrazole group, of most ARBs similarly bind to Lys(199, His(256 and Gln(257 of AT1 receptor. Lys(199 in the AT1 receptor binds to the carboxyl group of EXP3174, candesartan and azilsartan, whereas oxygen in the amidecarbonyl group of valsartan may bind to Lys(199. The benzimidazole portion of telmisartan may bind to a lipophilic pocket that includes Tyr(113. On the other hand, the n-butyl group of irbesartan may bind to Tyr(113. In conclusion, we confirmed that the slightly different structures of ARBs may be critical for binding to AT1 receptor and for the formation of unique modes of binding.

  5. Lack of Association between Body Weight, Bone Mineral Density and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphism in Normal and Osteoporotic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Poggi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In an ethnically homogeneous population of women living in Tuscany, Italy, the relationships between age, body weight, bone mineral density and the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphism were studied, with the objective of recognizing patients at risk for osteoporosis. In 275 women bone mineral density was measured by Dual Energy X-rays Absorptiometry (DEXA. In 50 of them the individual genetic pattern for VDR was evaluated by DNA extraction followed by PCR amplification of the VDR gene, and digestion with the restriction enzyme BsmI. Age and bone mineral density were inversely related (R2 = 0.298. Body weight was associated with bone mineral density (R2 = 0.059, but not with age. In osteoporotic women, mean (± SD body weight was 59.9 ± 6.5 Kg, lower than that recorded in non osteoporotic women (64.2 ± 9.4 Kg, even though not significantly different (p = 0.18. No association was found between VDR gene polymorphism, bone density or body weight. The performance of anthropometric and genetic components appear to be poor, and, at least for the time being, bone mineral density measurement by means of MOC-DEXA represents the optimal method to detect women at risk for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  6. Lack of Association of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Gene Polymorphisms with Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Variables in Young Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Hirata

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the association of estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1 polymorphisms with cardiorespiratory and metabolic parameters in young women. In total, 354 healthy women were selected for cardiopulmonary exercise testing and short-term heart rate (HR variability (HRV evaluation. The HRV analysis was determined by the temporal indices rMSSD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive R–R intervals (RRi divided by the number of RRi minus one, SDNN (root mean square of differences from mean RRi, divided by the number of RRi and power spectrum components by low frequency (LF, high frequency (HF and LF/HF ratio. Blood samples were obtained for serum lipids, estradiol and DNA extraction. ESR1 rs2234693 and rs9340799 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR and fragment restriction analysis. HR and oxygen uptake (VO2 values did not differ between the ESR1 polymorphisms with respect to autonomic modulation. We not find a relationship between ESR1 T–A, T–G, C–A and C–G haplotypes and cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that VO2, total cholesterol and triglycerides influence HRV (p < 0.05. The results suggest that ESR1 variants have no effect on cardiorespiratory and metabolic variables, while HRV indices are influenced by aerobic capacity and lipids in healthy women.

  7. Lack of liver X receptors leads to cell proliferation in a model of mouse dorsal prostate epithelial cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Dufour

    Full Text Available Recent studies underline the implication of Liver X Receptors (LXRs in several prostate diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we derived epithelial cells from dorsal prostate (MPECs of wild type (WT or Lxrαβ-/- mice. In the WT MPECs, our results show that LXR activation reduces proliferation and correlates with the modification of the AKT-survival pathway. Moreover, LXRs regulate lipid homeostasis with the regulation of Abca1, Abcg1 and Idol, and, in a lesser extent, Srebp1, Fas and Acc. Conversely cells derived from Lxrαβ-/- mice show a higher basal phosphorylation and consequently activation of the survival/proliferation transduction pathways AKT and MAPK. Altogether, our data point out that the cell model we developed allows deciphering the molecular mechanisms inducing the cell cycle arrest. Besides, we show that activated LXRs regulate AKT and MAPK transduction pathways and demonstrate that LXRs could be good pharmacological targets in prostate disease such as cancer.

  8. Lack of association between estrogen receptor β dinucleotide repeat polymorphism and autoimmune thyroid diseases in Japanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Motowo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, such as Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, estrogen receptor (ER β, located at human chromosome 14q23-24.1, was identifed. We analyzed a dinucleotide (CAn repeat polymorphism located in the flanking region of ERβ gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. High heterozygosity makes this polymorphism a useful marker in the genetic study of disorders affecting female endocrine systems. We also correlated a ERβ gene microsatellite polymorphism with bone mineral density (BMD in the distal radius and biochemical markers of bone turnover in patients with GD in remission. Results Fourteen different alleles were found in 133 patients with GD, 114 patients with HT, and 179 controls subjects. The various alleles were designated as allele*1 through allele*14 according to the number of the repeats, from 18 to 30. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERβ alleles between patient groups and controls. Although recent study demonstrated a significant relation between a allele*9 in the ERβ gene and BMD in postmenopausal Japanese women, there were no statistically significant interaction between this allele and BMD in the distal radius, nor biochemical markers in patients with GD in remission. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERβ microsatellite marker and AITD in the Japanese population. We also suggest that the ERβ microsatellite polymorphism has at most a minor pathogenic importance in predicting the risk of osteoporosis as a complication of GD.

  9. Direct stimulation of angiotensin II type 2 receptor enhances spatial memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Fei; Mogi, Masaki; Sakata, Akiko

    2012-01-01

    We examined the possibility that direct stimulation of the angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2)) receptor by a newly generated direct AT(2) receptor agonist, Compound 21 (C21), enhances cognitive function. Treatment with C21 intraperitoneal injection for 2 weeks significantly enhanced cognitive function...... evaluated by the Morris water maze test in C57BL6 mice, but this effect was not observed in AT(2) receptor-deficient mice. However, C21-induced cognitive enhancement in C57BL6 mice was attenuated by coadministration of icatibant, a bradykinin B(2) receptor antagonist. Administration of C21 dose dependently...... cognitive decline in this model. These results suggest that a direct AT(2) receptor agonist, C21, enhances cognitive function at least owing to an increase in CBF, enhancement of f-EPSP, and neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons....

  10. Mice lacking the IFN-gamma receptor or fyn develop severe experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis characterized by different immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Atsuki; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Ishida, Waka; Fukata, Kazuyo; Udaka, Keiko; Ueno, Hisayuki

    2005-06-01

    Endogenous interferon (IFN)-gamma negatively regulates experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU), a Th1-mediated disease. Although it is well known that IFN-gamma exerts its effects by binding to the IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gammaR), the role that IFN-gammaR plays in the development of EAU has not been investigated. Fyn has been reported to inhibit Th2 differentiation. We aimed to investigate how endogenous IFN-gammaR and fyn, which influence Th1/Th2 differentiation, participate in the development of EAU. Sex-matched 6- to 10-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type (WT), IFN-gammaR knockout (GRKO) and fyn knockout (fyn KO) mice were compared. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with human interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein peptide 1-20 emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant together with an intraperitoneal injection of Bordetella pertussis toxin. Three weeks later, mice were sacrificed, and their eyes and spleens were harvested for histopathologic analyses and examination of cellular immune responses, respectively. Cellular immune responses were evaluated by measuring the proliferative responses and cytokine production [interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] of splenocytes. The incidence of EAU was 40.0% in WT mice, 59.3% in GRKO mice and 78.6% in fyn KO mice. The average EAU score was 0.294 in WT mice, 0.917 in GRKO mice and 1.063 in fyn KO mice. Upon EAU induction, significant infiltration of eosinophils into the eyes was observed in GRKO and fyn KO mice compared to WT mice. Splenocytes from GRKO mice proliferated against the antigen and a mitogen more vigorously than those from WT and fyn KO mice. Stimulation of splenocytes with the antigen induced a higher production of IL-4, IL-6, IL-13 and IFN-gamma in GRKO mice compared to WT and fyn KO mice. In contrast, IL-5 and TNF-alpha were most abundantly produced by splenocytes from fyn KO mice compared to WT and GRKO mice. The incidence and mean severity of EAU were

  11. Lack of LDL receptor enhances amyloid deposition and decreases glial response in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

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    Loukia Katsouri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein E (ApoE, a cholesterol carrier associated with atherosclerosis, is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR regulates ApoE levels in the periphery and in the central nervous system. LDLR has been identified on astrocytes and a number of studies show that it modulates amyloid deposition in AD transgenic mice. However these findings are controversial on whether LDLR deletion is beneficial or detrimental on the AD-like phenotype of the transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the role of LDLR in the development of the amyloid related phenotype we used an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse (5XFAD that develops an AD-like pathology with amyloid plaques, astrocytosis and microgliosis. We found that 4 months old 5XFAD transgenic mice on the LDLR deficient background (LDLR-/- have increased amyloid plaque deposition. This increase is associated with a significant decrease in astrocytosis and microgliosis in the 5XFAD/LDLR-/- mice. To further elucidate the role of LDLR in relation with ApoE we have generated 5XFAD transgenic mice on the ApoE deficient (ApoE-/- or the ApoE/LDLR double deficient background (ApoE-/-/LDLR -/-. We have found that ApoE deletion in the 4 months old 5XFAD/ApoE-/- mice decreases amyloid plaque formation as expected, but has no effect on astrocytosis or microgliosis. By comparison 5XFAD/ApoE-/-LDLR -/- double deficient mice of the same age have increased amyloid deposition with decreased astrocytosis and microgliosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis shows that LDL deficiency regulates astrocytosis and microgliosis in an AD mouse model. This effect is independent of ApoE, as both 5XFAD/LDLR -/- and 5XFAD/ApoE-/- LDLR -/- mice show reduction in inflammatory response and increase in amyloid deposition compared to control mice. These results demonstrate that LDLR regulates glial response in this mouse model independently of ApoE and modifies amyloid

  12. Lack of formyl peptide receptor 1 and 2 leads to more severe inflammation and higher mortality in mice with of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldekamp, Sandra; Pscheidl, Sebastian; Kress, Eugenia; Soehnlein, Oliver; Jansen, Sandra; Pufe, Thomas; Wang, Ji Ming; Tauber, Simone C; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial meningitis is, despite progress in research and the development of new treatment strategies, still a cause of severe neuronal sequelae. The brain is protected from penetrating pathogens by both the blood-brain barrier and the innate immune system. The invading pathogens are recognized by pattern recognition receptors including the G-protein coupled formyl peptide receptors (FPRs), which are expressed by immune cells of the central nervous system. The expression of FPRs is up-regulated during bacterial meningitis, but the consequence on the progression of inflammation and impact on mortality are far from clear. Therefore, we used mFPR1 and mFPR2-deficient mice to investigate the effects on inflammation, bacterial growth and mortality in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Our results revealed increased bacterial burden, increased neutrophil infiltration and higher mortality in mFPR1/2-deficient mice in comparison to wild-type mice. The mFPR1- or mFPR2-deficient mice also showed significantly increased glial cell density, whereas the immune responses including the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides were decreased in bacterial meningitis. Taken together, the results suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 play an important role in the innate immune responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae within the central nervous system and the lack of the receptors leads to a dysregulation of the inflammatory response compared with wild-type mice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Overexpression of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the rat heart augments load induced cardiac hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, S; van Geel, PP; Willenbrock, R; Pagel, [No Value; Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; van Gilst, WH; Lindschau, C; Paul, M; Inagami, T; Ganten, D; Urata, H

    2001-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known to stimulate cardiac hypertrophy and contractility. Most angiotensin II effects are mediated via membrane bound AT(1) receptors. However, the role of myocardial AT(1) receptors in cardiac hypertrophy and contractility is still rarely defined. To address the hypothesis that in

  14. Uterine-embryonic interaction in pit : activin, follistatin, and activin receptor II in uterus and embryo during early gestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavert, van de S.A.; Boerjan, M.L.; Stroband, H.W.J.; Taverne, M.A.M.; Hurk, van der R.

    2001-01-01

    The mRNA expression patterns of activin A and follistatin in the uterus and embryo, the mRNA expression of the activin receptor II in the embryo, and the localization in the uterus of the immunoreactive activin A and the receptor II proteins in the uterus were examined at gestation days 7-12 after o

  15. Overexpression of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the rat heart augments load induced cardiac hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, S; van Geel, PP; Willenbrock, R; Pagel, [No Value; Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; van Gilst, WH; Lindschau, C; Paul, M; Inagami, T; Ganten, D; Urata, H

    2001-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known to stimulate cardiac hypertrophy and contractility. Most angiotensin II effects are mediated via membrane bound AT(1) receptors. However, the role of myocardial AT(1) receptors in cardiac hypertrophy and contractility is still rarely defined. To address the hypothesis that

  16. The preclinical properties of a novel group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imre, Gabor

    2007-01-01

    Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors reduces excessive glutamate release that is often associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. This finding encouraged the search for potent and selective agonists as potential therapeutic agents. The search led to the

  17. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor signalling regulates microRNA differentially in cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Pia Lindgren; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schneider, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1) R) is a key regulator of blood pressure and cardiac contractility and is profoundly involved in development of cardiac disease. Since several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in cardiac disease, we asked whether miRNAs might...

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Karl Emil; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The renin-angiotensin system is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) on human AAAs remain unclear. We therefore ex...

  19. Interaction of a non-peptide agonist with angiotensin II AT1 receptor mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Miyakawa, Ayumi A; Pesquero, João B;

    2002-01-01

    To identify residues of the rat AT1A angiotensin II receptor involved with signal transduction and binding of the non-peptide agonist L-162,313 (5,7-dimethyl-2-ethyl-3-[[4-[2(n-butyloxycarbonylsulfonamido)-5-isobutyl-3-thienyl]phenyl]methyl]imidazol[4,5,6]-pyridine) we have performed ligand bindi...

  20. Uptake of angiotensin II receptor blockers in the treatment of hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greving, JP; Denig, P; van der Veen, WJ; Beltman, FW; Sturkenboom, MCJM; de Zeeuw, D; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine trends in prescribing of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) as initial and second-line treatment of hypertension. Methods: We performed a cohort study in the Integrated Primary Care Information database, a general practice research database in The Netherlands. We included

  1. INHIBITION OF KIDNEY DISORDERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: THE ROLE OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR BLOCKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Fomin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of renal disorders in cardiovascular diseases are presented. The main of these mechanisms is an endothelium dysfunction. It is related with some factors: arterial hypertension, insulin resistance syndrome, diabetes type 2, dyslipidemia, obesity. Approaches to prevention of kidney disorder and cardiovascular complications are discussed with focus on usage of angiotensin II receptor blockers.

  2. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human /sup 125/-I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4/sup 0/C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA/sub 1/-CA/sub 2/ and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of /sup 125/I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning.

  3. Clathrin-dependent internalization of the angiotensin II AT₁A receptor links receptor internalization to COX-2 protein expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Walker, Linda P; Velez, Juan Carlos Q; Ullian, Michael E

    2015-02-05

    The major effects of Angiotensin II (AngII) in vascular tissue are mediated by AngII AT1A receptor activation. Certain effects initiated by AT1A receptor activation require receptor internalization. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC), AngII stimulates cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. We have previously shown this is mediated by β-arrestin-dependent receptor internalization and NF-κB activation. In this study, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), pitstop-2, was used to test the hypothesis that clathrin-dependent internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates NF-κB activation and subsequent cyclooxygenase 2 expression. Radioligand binding assays, real time qt-PCR and immunoblotting were used to document the effects of pitstop-2 on AngII binding and signaling in RASMC. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to image pitstop-2׳s effects on AT1 receptor/GFP internalization in HEK-293 cells and p65 NF-κB nuclear localization in RASMC. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited internalization of AT1A receptor (44.7% ± 3.1% Control vs. 13.2% ± 8.3% Pitstop-2; n=3) as determined by radioligand binding studies in RASMC. Studies utilizing AT1A receptor/GFP expressed in HEK 293 cells and LSCM confirmed these findings. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear localization, COX-2 message and protein expression in RASMC without altering activation of p42/44 ERK or TNFα signaling. Pitstop-2, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, confirms that internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates AngII activation of cyclooxygenase 2 expression in RASMC. These data provide support for additional intracellular signaling pathways activated through β-arrestin mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptors, such as AT1A receptors.

  4. The lack of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor desensitisation in alphaT3-1 cells is not due to GnRH receptor reserve or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate pool size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest-Owen, W; Willars, G B; Nahorski, S R; Assefa, D; Davidson, J S; Hislop, J; McArdle, C A

    1999-01-25

    shared PtdIns(4,5)P2 pool. Partial depletion of this pool (GnRH pre-treatment in medium with LiCl) reduced the magnitude of the [3H]IP(X) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 responses to methacholine and GnRH, without altering their temporal profiles. Thus the GnRH receptor does not undergo rapid homologous desensitisation in alphaT3-1 cells in spite of the fact that they can desensitise other endogenous (and recombinant) PLC-activating GPCRs, and the lack of desensitisation cannot be attributed to the existence of GnRH receptor reserve or access to an atypically large or rapidly re-cycled PtdIns(4,5)P2 pool. This unique functional characteristic (mammalian GnRH receptors are the only PLC-activating GPCRs known not to rapidly desensitise) almost certainly therefore reflects the atypical structure of these receptors (mammalian GnRH receptors are the only PLC-activating GPCRs known to lack C-terminal tails).

  5. Lack of genomic evidence of AI-2 receptors suggests a non-quorum sensing role for luxS in most bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy Brion

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great excitement accompanied discoveries over the last decade in several Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of the LuxS protein, which catalyzes production of the AI-2 autoinducer molecule for a second quorum sensing system (QS-2. Since the luxS gene was found to be widespread among the most diverse bacterial taxa, it was hypothesized that AI-2 may constitute the basis of a universal microbial language, a kind of bacterial Esperanto. Many of the studies published in this field have drawn a direct correlation between the occurrence of the luxS gene in a given organism and the presence and functionality of a QS-2 therein. However, rarely hathe existence of potential AI-2 receptors been examined. This is important, since it is now well recognized that LuxS also holds a central role as a metabolic enzyme in the activated methyl cycle which is responsible for the generation of S-adenosyl-L-methionine, the major methyl donor in the cell. Results In order to assess whether the role of LuxS in these bacteria is indeed related to AI-2 mediated quorum sensing we analyzed genomic databases searching for established AI-2 receptors (i.e., LuxPQ-receptor of Vibrio harveyi and Lsr ABC-transporter of Salmonella typhimurium and other presumed QS-related proteins and compared the outcome with published results about the role of QS-2 in these organisms. An unequivocal AI-2 related behavior was restricted primarily to organisms bearing known AI-2 receptor genes, while phenotypes of luxS mutant bacteria lacking these genes could often be explained simply by assuming deficiencies in sulfur metabolism. Conclusion Genomic analysis shows that while LuxPQ is restricted to Vibrionales, the Lsr-receptor complex is mainly present in pathogenic bacteria associated with endotherms. This suggests that QS-2 may play an important role in interactions with animal hosts. In most other species, however, the role of LuxS appears to be limited to metabolism

  6. Molecular targeting therapy with angiotensin II receptor blocker for prostatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroji Uemura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang-II plays a key role as a vasoconstrictor in controlling blood pressure and electrolyte/fluid homeostasis. Recently it has also been shown that this peptide is a cytokine, acting as a growth factor in cardiovascular and stromal cells. In addition, the physiological function of Ang-II seems to be similar in prostate cancer and stromal cells. It is widely assumed that Ang-II facilitates the growth of both cells, and its receptor blockers (ARBs have the potential to inhibit the growth of various cancer cells and tumors through the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptor. The mechanism of cell growth inhibition by ARBs has been considered to be that of suppression of the signal transduction systems activated by growth factors or cytokines in prostate cancer cells, and suppression of angiogenesis. This review highlights the possible use of ARBs as novel agents for prostatic diseases including prostate cancer and benign hypertrophy, and covers related literature.

  7. Molecular targeting therapy with angiotensin II receptor blocker for prostatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroji Uemura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang-II plays a key role as a vasoconstrictor in controlling blood pressure and electrolyte/fluid homeostasis. Recently it has also been shown that this peptide is a cytokine, acting as a growth factor in cardiovascular and stromal cells. In addition, the physiological function of Ang-II seems to be similar in prostate cancer and stromal cells. It is widely assumed that Ang-II facilitates the growth of both cells, and its receptor blockers (ARBs have the potential to inhibit the growth of various cancer cells and tumors through the Ang-II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptor. The mechanism of cell growth inhibition by ARBs has been considered to be that of suppression of the signal transduction systems activated by growth factors or cytokines in prostate cancer cells, and suppression of angiogenesis. This review highlights the possible use of ARBs as novel agents for prostatic diseases including prostate cancer and benign hypertrophy, and covers related literature.

  8. Protection against inhaled oxidants through scavenging of oxidized lipids by macrophage receptors MARCO and SR-AI/II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Bauer, Alison K; Arredouani, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) express the class A scavenger receptors (SRAs) macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and scavenger receptor AI/II (SRA-I/II), which recognize oxidized lipids and provide innate defense against inhaled pathogens and particles. Increased MARCO expression......, consistent with SRA function in binding oxidized lipids. SR-AI/II-/- mice showed similar enhanced acute lung inflammation after beta-epoxide or another inhaled oxidant (aerosolized leachate of residual oil fly ash). In contrast, subacute ozone exposure did not enhance inflammation in SR-AI/II-/- versus SR-AI...

  9. Computational evaluation of unsaturated carbonitriles as neutral receptor model for beryllium(II) recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Alias, Yatimah; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-12-01

    Design of neutral receptor molecules (ionophores) for beryllium(II) using unsaturated carbonitrile models has been carried out via density functional theory, G3, and G4 calculations. The first part of this work focuses on gas phase binding energies between beryllium(II) and 2-cyano butadiene (2-CN BD), 3-cyano propene (3-CN P), and simpler models with two separate fragments; acrylonitrile and ethylene. Interactions between beryllium(II) and cyano nitrogen and terminal olefin in the models have been examined in terms of geometrical changes, distribution of charge over the entire π-system, and rehybridization of vinyl carbon orbitals. NMR shieldings and vibrational frequencies probed charge centers and strength of interactions. The six-membered cyclic complexes have planar structures with the rehybridized carbon slightly out of plane (16° in 2-CN BD). G3 results show that in 2-CN BD complex participation of vinyl carbon further stabilizes the cyclic adduct by 16.3 kcal mol(-1), whereas, in simpler models, interaction between beryllium(II) and acetonitrile is favorable by 46.4 kcal mol(-1) compared with that of ethylene. The terminal vinyl carbon in 2-CN BD rehybridizes to sp (3) with an increase of 7 % of s character to allow interaction with beryllium(II). G4 calculations show that the Be(II) and 2-CN BD complex is more strongly bound than those with Mg(II) and Ca(II) by 98.5 and 139.2 kcal mol(-1) (-1), respectively. QST2 method shows that the cyclic and acyclic forms of Be(II)-2-CN BD complexes are separated by 12.3 kcal mol(-1) barrier height. Overlap population analysis reveals that Ca(II) can be discriminated based on its tendency to form ionic interaction with the receptor models.

  10. Adenosine-A1 receptor agonist induced hyperalgesic priming type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala, N-Me-Phe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of transition to chronic pain that we have termed type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, type II hyperalgesic priming differs from type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that, as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study, we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms, as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor.

  11. Angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism and diabetic microangiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Cambien, Francois; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    (41%) / 14 (7%) vs. 97 (51%) / 80 (42%) / 13 (7%) had AA/AC/CC genotypes, respectively. The allele frequencies (A/C) in patients with nephropathy (0.73/0.27) and patients with normoalbuminuria (0.72/0.28) were also similar. No difference in genotype distribution between IDDM patients...... with proliferative retinopathy and without diabetic retinopathy was found either: 77 (50%) / 66 (42%) / 13 (8%) vs. 42 (63%) / 22 (33%) / 3 (4%) had AA/AC/CC genotypes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The A1166-->C polymorphism in the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene does not contribute to the genetic susceptibility......BACKGROUND: Genotypic abnormalities of the renin-angiotensin system have been suggested as risk factors for the development of hypertension, diabetic nephropathy and proliferative retinopathy. Most of the known actions of angiotensin-II are exerted through the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, which...

  12. Structure, magnetism, and theoretical study of a mixed-valence Co(II)3Co(III)4 heptanuclear wheel: lack of SMM behavior despite negative magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibotaru, Liviu F; Ungur, Liviu; Aronica, Christophe; Elmoll, Hani; Pilet, Guillaume; Luneau, Dominique

    2008-09-17

    the two marginal Co(II) sites. The lack of single-molecule magnet behavior in [Co(II)3Co(III)4(L)6(MeO)6] is explained by relatively large matrix elements of transverse magnetic moments between states of maximal magnetization of the ground Kramers doublet, evidenced by ab initio calculations, and the associated large tunneling rates between these states in the presence of dipolar transverse magnetic fields in the crystal.

  13. Implication of insulin receptor A isoform and IRA/IGF-IR hybrid receptors in the aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation: role of TNF-α and IGF-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Escribano, Óscar; Perdomo, Liliana; Otero, Yolanda F; García-Gómez, Gema; Fernández, Silvia; Beneit, Nuria; Benito, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    To assess the role of insulin receptor (IR) isoforms (IRA and IRB) in the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) involved in the atherosclerotic process, we generated new VSMC lines bearing IR (wild-type VSMCs; IRLoxP(+/+) VSMCs), lacking IR (IR(-/-) VSMCs) or expressing IRA (IRA VSMCs) or IRB (IRB VSMCs). Insulin and different proatherogenic stimuli induced a significant increase of IRA expression in IRLoxP(+/+) VSMCs. Moreover, insulin, through ERK signaling, and the proatherogenic stimuli, through ERK and p38 signaling, induced a higher proliferation in IRA than IRB VSMCs. The latter effect might be due to IRA cells showing a higher expression of angiotensin II, endothelin 1, and thromboxane 2 receptors and basal association between IRA and these receptors. Furthermore, TNF-α induced in a ligand-dependent manner a higher association between IRA and TNF-α receptor 1 (TNF-R1). On the other hand, IRA overexpression might favor the atherogenic actions of IGF-II. Thereby, IGF-II or TNF-α induced IRA and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) overexpression as well as an increase of IRA/IGF-IR hybrid receptors in VSMCs. More importantly, we observed a significant increase of IRA, TNF-R1, and IGF-IR expression as well as higher association of IRA with TNF-R1 or IGF-IR in the aorta from ApoE(-/-) and BATIRKO mice, 2 models showing vascular damage. In addition, anti-TNF-α treatment prevented those effects in BATIRKO mice. Finally, our data suggest that the IRA isoform and its association with TNF-R1 or IGF-IR confers proliferative advantage to VSMCs, mainly in response to TNF-α or IGF-II, which might be of significance in the early atherosclerotic process.

  14. α-Elapitoxin-Aa2a, a long-chain snake α-neurotoxin with potent actions on muscle (α1)(2)βγδ nicotinic receptors, lacks the classical high affinity for neuronal α7 nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklow, Benjamin; Kornhauser, Rachelle; Hains, Peter G; Loiacono, Richard; Escoubas, Pierre; Graudins, Andis; Nicholson, Graham M

    2011-01-15

    In contrast to all classical long-chain α-neurotoxins possessing the critical fifth disulfide bond, α-elapitoxin-Aa2a (α-EPTX-Aa2a), a novel long-chain α-neurotoxin from the common death adder Acanthophis antarcticus, lacks affinity for neuronal α7-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). α-EPTX-Aa2a (8850Da; 0.1-1μM) caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of indirect twitches, and blocked contractures to cholinergic agonists in the isolated chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation, consistent with a postsynaptic curaremimetic mode of action. α-EPTX-Aa2a (1-10nM) produced a potent pseudo-irreversible antagonism of chick muscle nAChRs, with an estimated pA(2) value of 8.311±0.031, which was not reversed by monovalent death adder antivenom. This is only 2.5-fold less potent than the prototypical long-chain α-neurotoxin, α-bungarotoxin. In contrast, α-EPTX-Aa2a produced complete, but weak, inhibition of (125)I-α-bungarotoxin binding to rat hippocampal α7 nAChRs (pK(I)=3.670), despite high sequence homology and similar mass to a wide range of long-chain α-neurotoxins. The mostly likely cause for the loss of α7 binding affinity is a leucine substitution, in loop II of α-EPTX-Aa2a, for the highly conserved Arg(33) in long-chain α-neurotoxins. Arg(33) has been shown to be critical for both neuronal and muscle activity. Despite this substitution, α-EPTX-Aa2a retains high affinity for muscle (α1)(2)βγδ nAChRs. This is probably as a result of an Arg(29) residue, previously shown to be critical for muscle (α1)(2)βγδ nAChR affinity, and highly conserved across all short-chain, but not long-chain, α-neurotoxins. α-EPTX-Aa2a therefore represents a novel atypical long-chain α-neurotoxin that includes a fifth disulfide but exhibits differential affinity for nAChR subtypes.

  15. An ATIPical family of angiotensin II AT2 receptor-interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Sylvie; Nahmias, Clara

    2010-11-01

    AT2, the second subtype of angiotensin II receptors, is a major component of the renin-angiotensin system involved in cardiovascular and neuronal functions. AT2 belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors, but its intracellular signaling pathways have long remained elusive. Over the past few years, efforts to characterize this atypical receptor have led to the identification of novel molecular scaffolds that directly bind to its intracellular tail. The present review focuses on a family of AT2 receptor-interacting proteins (ATIPs) involved in neuronal differentiation, vascular remodeling and tumor suppression. Recent findings that ATIPs and ATIP-related proteins associate with microtubules suggest that they might constitute a novel family of multifunctional proteins regulating a wide range of physiopathological functions.

  16. Lack of Association between Toll Like Receptor-2 and Toll Like Receptor-4 Gene Polymorphisms and Other Feature in Iranian Asthmatics Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Bahrami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma as a chronic inflammatory airway disease is considered to be the most common chronic disease that is involving genetic and environmental factors. Toll like receptors (TLRs and other inflammatory mediators are important in modulation of inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the role of TLR2 Arg753Gln and TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphisms in the asthma susceptibility, progress, control levels and lung functions in Iranian patients. On 99 asthmatic patients and 120 normal subjects, TLR2 Arg753Gln and TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphisms were evaluated by PCR-RFLP method recruiting Msp1 and Nco1 restriction enzymes, respectively. IgE serum levels by ELISA technique were determined and asthma diagnosis, treatment and control levels were considered using standard schemes and criteria. Our results indicated that the genotype and allele frequencies of the TLR2 Arg753Gln and TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphisms were not significantly different between control subjects and asthmatics and were not related to in asthma features such as IgE levels, asthma history and pulmonary factors. Wherease some previous studies indicated TLRs and their polymorphisms might have some role in asthma incidence and features, our data demonstrated that TLR2 Arg753Gln and TLR4 Asp299Gly gene variants were not risk factors for asthma or its features in Iranian patients. Genetic complexity, ethnicity, influence of other genes or polymorphisms may overcome these polymorphisms in our asthmatics.

  17. Antigen-B Cell Receptor Complexes Associate with Intracellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II Molecules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Margarida; Tucker, Heidi; Drake, Lisa; Nichol, Kathleen; Drake, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen processing and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells and B cells allows the activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and cognate interactions between B cells and effector CD4+ T cells, respectively. B cells are unique among class II-restricted antigen-presenting cells in that they have a clonally restricted antigen-specific receptor, the B cell receptor (BCR), which allows the cell to recognize and respond to trace amounts of foreign antigen present in a sea of self-antigens. Moreover, engagement of peptide-class II complexes formed via BCR-mediated processing of cognate antigen has been shown to result in a unique pattern of B cell activation. Using a combined biochemical and imaging/FRET approach, we establish that internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular class II molecules. We demonstrate that the M1-paired MHC class II conformer, shown previously to be critical for CD4 T cell activation, is incorporated selectively into these complexes and loaded selectively with peptide derived from BCR-internalized cognate antigen. These results demonstrate that, in B cells, internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules, potentially defining a site of class II peptide acquisition, and reveal a selective role for the M1-paired class II conformer in the presentation of cognate antigen. These findings provide key insights into the molecular mechanisms used by B cells to control the source of peptides charged onto class II molecules, allowing the immune system to mount an antibody response focused on BCR-reactive cognate antigen. PMID:26400081

  18. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2011-12-06

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile.

  19. Enhanced humoral immunity in mice lacking CB1 and CB2 receptors (Cnr1-/-/Cnr2-/- mice) is not due to increased splenic noradrenergic neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Tyrell; Crawford, Robert B; Goudreau, John L; Lookingland, Keith J; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2014-09-01

    Peripheral sympathetic noradrenergic neurons originating in the celiac mesenteric plexus have axons that terminate in close proximity to antibody-producing B cells in the spleen. Norepinephrine (NE) released from these neurons is reported to augment antibody production in response to an immune challenge via an action at the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). Cannabinoids are immunosuppressive, and mice lacking CB1 and CB2 receptors (Cnr1(-/-)/Cnr2(-/-) mice) have augmented cell-mediated immune responses. The purpose of this study was to determine if Cnr1(-/-)/Cnr2(-/-) mice also exhibit enhanced humoral immunity and if that is associated with corresponding changes in noradrenergic neurons terminating in the spleen. The results reveal that IgM and IgG are enhanced in Cnr1(-/-)/Cnr2(-/-) mice as compared to WT both in immunologically naïve and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice. While the elevated antibody production was correlated with increased expression of β2AR on splenic B cells and increased splenic capsule NE concentrations, the activity of noradrenergic neurons was suppressed in spleens from Cnr1(-/-)/Cnr2(-/-) mice as compared with WT controls. Together, these results suggest that Cnr1(-/-)/Cnr2(-/-) mice exhibit enhanced NE vesicular storage in axon terminals in these neurons, which might limit the NE available to bind β2AR on target cells, such as B cells. The results also demonstrate that enhanced antibody responses in the absence of CB1 and CB2 receptors are not due to increased sympathetic noradrenergic neuronal activity in the spleen.

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein receptor II regulates pulmonary artery endothelial cell barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Victoria J; Ciuclan, Loredana I; Holmes, Alan M; Rodman, David M; Walker, Christoph; Budd, David C

    2011-01-06

    Mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR-II) underlie most heritable cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, less than half the individuals who harbor mutations develop the disease. Interestingly, heterozygous null BMPR-II mice fail to develop PAH unless an additional inflammatory insult is applied, suggesting that BMPR-II plays a fundamental role in dampening inflammatory signals in the pulmonary vasculature. Using static- and flow-based in vitro systems, we demonstrate that BMPR-II maintains the barrier function of the pulmonary artery endothelial monolayer suppressing leukocyte transmigration. Similar findings were also observed in vivo using a murine model with loss of endothelial BMPR-II expression. In vitro, the enhanced transmigration of leukocytes after tumor necrosis factor α or transforming growth factor β1 stimulation was CXCR2 dependent. Our data define how loss of BMPR-II in the endothelial layer of the pulmonary vasculature could lead to a heightened susceptibility to inflammation by promoting the extravasation of leukocytes into the pulmonary artery wall. We speculate that this may be a key mechanism involved in the initiation of the disease in heritable PAH that results from defects in BMPR-II expression.

  1. Lack of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-6 or Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Results in a Failure of the Innate Immune Response after Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent pathogen that causes bacterial meningitis is the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. By entering the brain, host cells will be activated and proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α are released. The goal of the current study was to examine the interaction between IL-6 and TNFR1 as receptor for TNF-α and the innate immune response in vivo in a model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis. For the experiments IL-6−/−, TNFR1−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− KO mice were used. Our results revealed higher mortality rates and bacterial burden after infection in TNFR1−/−, IL-6−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice and a decreased immune response including lower neutrophil infiltration in the meninges of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice in contrast to IL-6−/− and wild type mice. Furthermore, the increased mortality of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice correlated with decreased glial cell activation compared to IL-6−/− or wild type mice after pneumococcal meningitis. Altogether, the results show the importance of TNFR1 and IL-6 in the regulation of the innate immune response. The lack of TNFR1 and IL-6 results in higher mortality by weakened immune defence, whereas the lack of TNFR1 results in more severe impairment of the innate immune response than the lack of IL-6 alone.

  2. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Currently, giant cell arteritis (GCA) is primarily treated with corticosteroids or immunomodulating agents, but there is interest in identifying other noncorticosteroid alternatives. Similarities exist in the injury pathways between GCA and atherosclerosis. Angiotensin II is a vasoactive...... DISCLOSURE(S): The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article....... with antibodies for the AT(2) receptor was similar in the patients with GCA and in controls. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that AT(1) receptors play a role in the development of GCA. Inhibition of the angiotensin system may thus provide a noncorticosteroid alternative for the treatment of GCA. FINANCIAL...

  3. Angiotensin receptor blockers in heart failure after the ELITE II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willenheimer Ronnie

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Specific blockers of the angiotensin type1 receptor, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, have been introduced as an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi for the treatment of heart failure. In comparison with ACEi, ARBs are better tolerated and have similar effects on haemodynamics, neurohormones and exercise capacity. Early studies have suggested that ARBs might have a superior effect on mortality. However, the first outcome trial, ELITE II (Losartan Heart Failure Survival Study, did not show any significant difference between losartan and captopril in terms of mortality or morbidity. This commentary outlines the role of ARBs in the treatment of heart failure.

  4. Mechanical stress triggers cardiomyocyte autophagy through angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated p38MAP kinase independently of angiotensin II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor is known to mediate a variety of physiological actions of Ang II including autophagy. However, the role of AT1 receptor in cardiomyocyte autophagy triggered by mechanical stress still remains elusive. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether and how AT1 receptor participates in cardiomyocyte autophagy induced by mechanical stresses. A 48-hour mechanical stretch and a 4-week transverse aorta constriction (TAC were imposed to cultured cardiomyocytes of neonatal rats and adult male C57B/L6 mice, respectively, to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy prior to the assessment of cardiomyocyte autophagy using LC3b-II. Losartan, an AT1 receptor blocker, but not PD123319, the AT2 inhibitor, was found to significantly reduce mechanical stretch-induced LC3b-II upregulation. Moreover, inhibition of p38MAP kinase attenuated not only mechanical stretch-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy but also autophagy. To the contrary, inhibition of ERK and JNK suppressed cardiac hypertrophy but not autophagy. Intriguingly, mechanical stretch-induced autophagy was significantly inhibited by Losartan in the absence of Ang II. Taken together, our results indicate that mechanical stress triggers cardiomyocyte autophagy through AT1 receptor-mediated activation of p38MAP kinase independently of Ang II.

  5. Type II Turn of Receptor-bound Salmon Calcitonin Revealed by X-ray Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Eva; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Hansen, Ann Maria Kruse; Shaw, Allan Christian; Becker, Peter; Schäffer, Lauge; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-06-24

    Calcitonin is a peptide hormone consisting of 32 amino acid residues and the calcitonin receptor is a Class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The crystal structure of the human calcitonin receptor ectodomain (CTR ECD) in complex with a truncated analogue of salmon calcitonin ([BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32)) has been determined to 2.1-Å resolution. Parallel analysis of a series of peptide ligands showed that the rank order of binding of the CTR ECD is identical to the rank order of binding of the full-length CTR, confirming the structural integrity and relevance of the isolated CTR ECD. The structure of the CTR ECD is similar to other Class B GPCRs and the ligand binding site is similar to the binding site of the homologous receptors for the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedulin (AM) recently published (Booe, J. M., Walker, C. S., Barwell, J., Kuteyi, G., Simms, J., Jamaluddin, M. A., Warner, M. L., Bill, R. M., Harris, P. W., Brimble, M. A., Poyner, D. R., Hay, D. L., and Pioszak, A. A. (2015) Mol. Cell 58, 1040-1052). Interestingly the receptor-bound structure of the ligand [BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32) differs from the receptor-bound structure of the homologous ligands CGRP and AM. They all adopt an extended conformation followed by a C-terminal β turn, however, [BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32) adopts a type II turn (Gly(28)-Thr(31)), whereas CGRP and AM adopt type I turns. Our results suggest that a type II turn is the preferred conformation of calcitonin, whereas a type I turn is the preferred conformation of peptides that require RAMPs; CGRP, AM, and amylin. In addition the structure provides a detailed molecular explanation and hypothesis regarding ligand binding properties of CTR and the amylin receptors.

  6. A novel urotensin II receptor antagonist, KR-36996, improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in experimental heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lim, Chae Jo; Park, Byung Kil; Seo, Ho Won; Lee, Byung Ho

    2017-03-15

    Urotensin II and its receptor are thought to be involved in various cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. Since the regulation of the urotensin II/urotensin II receptor offers a great potential for therapeutic strategies related to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the study of selective and potent antagonists for urotensin II receptor is more fascinating. This study was designed to determine the potential therapeutic effects of a newly developed novel urotensin II receptor antagonist, N-(1-(3-bromo-4-(piperidin-4-yloxy)benzyl)piperidin-4-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (KR-36996), in experimental models of heart failure. KR-36996 displayed a high binding affinity (Ki=4.44±0.67nM) and selectivity for urotensin II receptor. In cell-based study, KR-36996 significantly inhibited urotensin II-induced stress fiber formation and cellular hypertrophy in H9c2UT cells. In transverse aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy model in mice, the daily oral administration of KR-36996 (30mg/kg) for 14 days significantly decreased left ventricular weight by 40% (Preceptor antagonist could efficiently attenuate both cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction in experimental heart failure. KR-36996 may be useful as an effective urotensin II receptor antagonist for pharmaceutical or clinical applications.

  7. Utilizing reversible copper(II) peptide coordination in a sequence-selective luminescent receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadlbauer, Stefan; Riechers, Alexander; Späth, Andreas; König, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Although vast information about the coordination ability of amino acids and peptides to metal ions is available, little use of this has been made in the rational design of selective peptide receptors. We have combined a copper(II) nitrilotriacetato (NTA) complex with an ammonium-ion-sensitive and luminescent benzocrown ether. This compound revealed micromolar affinities and selectivities for glycine- and histidine-containing sequences, which closely resembles those of copper(II) ion peptide binding: the two free coordination sites of the copper(II) NTA complex bind to imidazole and amido nitrogen atoms, replicating the initial coordination steps of non-complexed copper(II) ions. The benzocrown ether recognizes the N-terminal amino moiety intramolecularly, and the significantly increased emission intensity signals the binding event, because only if prior coordination of the peptide has taken place is the intramolecular ammonium ion-benzocrown ether interaction of sufficient strength in water to trigger an emission signal. Intermolecular ammonium ion-benzocrown ether binding is not observed. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the binding constants derived from emission titrations. Thus, as deduced from peptide coordination studies, the combination of a truncated copper(II) coordination sphere and a luminescent benzocrown ether allows for the more rational design of sequence-selective peptide receptors.

  8. No significant effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade on intermediate cardiovascular end points in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian D; Kjaergaard, Krista D; Jensen, Jens D;

    2014-01-01

    Agents blocking the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system are frequently used in patients with end-stage renal disease, but whether they exert beneficial cardiovascular effects is unclear. Here the long-term effects of the angiotensin II receptor blocker, irbesartan, were studied in hemodialysis...... the study period significantly correlated with changes in both left ventricular mass and arterial stiffness. Thus, significant effects of irbesartan on intermediate cardiovascular end points beyond blood pressure reduction were absent in hemodialysis patients....

  9. Cripto forms a complex with activin and type II activin receptors and can block activin signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter C.; Harrison, Craig A.; Vale, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Activin, nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and signal via the activin type II (ActRII/IIB) and type I (ALK4) serine/threonine kinase receptors. Unlike activins, however, signaling by nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 requires a coreceptor from the epidermal growth factor-Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic protein family such as Cripto. Cripto has important roles during development and oncogenesis and binds nodal or related ligands and ALK4 to facilitate assembly of type I and type II receptor signaling complexes. Because Cripto mediates signaling via activin receptors and binds directly to ALK4, we tested whether transfection with Cripto would affect the ability of activin to signal and/or interact with its receptors. Here we show that Cripto can form a complex with activin and ActRII/IIB. We were unable to detect activin binding to Cripto in the absence of ActRII/IIB, indicating that unlike nodal, activin requires type II receptors to bind Cripto. If cotransfected with ActRII/IIB and ALK4, Cripto inhibited crosslinking of activin to ALK4 and the association of ALK4 with ActRII/IIB. In addition, Cripto blocked activin signaling when transfected into either HepG2 cells or 293T cells. We have also shown that under conditions in which Cripto facilitates nodal signaling, it antagonizes activin. Inhibition of activin signaling provides an additional example of a Cripto effect on the regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-β superfamily members. Because activin is a potent inhibitor of cell growth in multiple cell types, these results provide a mechanism that may partially explain the oncogenic action of Cripto. PMID:12682303

  10. Angiotensin II acts through the angiotensin 1a receptor to upregulate pendrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlander, Jill W.; Hong, Seongun; Pech, Vladimir; Bailey, James L.; Agazatian, Diana; Matthews, Sharon W.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Le, Thu; Inagami, Tadashi; Whitehill, Florence M.; Weiner, I. David; Farley, Donna B.; Kim, Young Hee

    2011-01-01

    Pendrin is an anion exchanger expressed in the apical regions of B and non-A, non-B intercalated cells. Since angiotensin II increases pendrin-mediated Cl− absorption in vitro, we asked whether angiotensin II increases pendrin expression in vivo and whether angiotensin-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. While blood pressure was similar in pendrin null and wild-type mice under basal conditions, following 2 wk of angiotensin II administration blood pressure was 31 mmHg lower in pendrin null than in wild-type mice. Thus pendrin null mice have a blunted pressor response to angiotensin II. Further experiments explored the effect of angiotensin on pendrin expression. Angiotensin II administration shifted pendrin label from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane, independent of aldosterone. To explore the role of the angiotensin receptors in this response, pendrin abundance and subcellular distribution were examined in wild-type, angiotensin type 1a (Agtr1a) and type 2 receptor (Agtr2) null mice given 7 days of a NaCl-restricted diet (Agtr1 inhibitor (candesartan) or vehicle. Both Agtr1a gene ablation and Agtr1 inhibitors shifted pendrin label from the apical plasma membrane to the subapical space, independent of the Agtr2 or nitric oxide (NO). However, Agtr1 ablation reduced pendrin protein abundance through the Agtr2 and NO. Thus angiotensin II-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. Angiotensin II acts through the Agtr1a to shift pendrin from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane. This Agtr1 action may be blunted by the Agtr2, which acts through NO to reduce pendrin protein abundance. PMID:21921024

  11. Activation of ERK, JNK, Akt, and G-protein coupled signaling by hybrid angiotensin II AT1/bradykinin B2 receptors expressed in HEK-293 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Jun; Lubinsky, David; Tsomaia, Natia;

    2007-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and angiotensin II (AngII) often have opposite roles in cardiovascular diseases. Our aim here was to construct hybrid receptors which bind AngII but signal as BK. Various sequences of the intracellular face of the AngII type I receptor, AT1R, were replaced with corresponding...

  12. Regulation of muscle growth by multiple ligands signaling through activin type II receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jin; Reed, Lori A.; Davies, Monique V.; Girgenrath, Stefan; Goad, Mary E. P.; Tomkinson, Kathy N.; Wright, Jill F.; Barker, Christopher; Ehrmantraut, Gregory; Holmstrom, James; Trowell, Betty; Gertz, Barry; Jiang, Man-Shiow; Sebald, Suzanne M.; Matzuk, Martin; Li, En; Liang, Li-fang; Quattlebaum, Edwin; Stotish, Ronald L.; Wolfman, Neil M.

    2005-01-01

    Myostatin is a secreted protein that normally functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. Agents capable of blocking the myostatin signaling pathway could have important applications for treating human muscle degenerative diseases as well as for enhancing livestock production. Here we describe a potent myostatin inhibitor, a soluble form of the activin type IIB receptor (ACVR2B), which can cause dramatic increases in muscle mass (up to 60% in 2 weeks) when injected into wild-type mice. Furthermore, we show that the effect of the soluble receptor is attenuated but not eliminated in Mstn-/- mice, suggesting that at least one other ligand in addition to myostatin normally functions to limit muscle growth. Finally, we provide genetic evidence that these ligands signal through both activin type II receptors, ACVR2 and ACVR2B, to regulate muscle growth in vivo. PMID:16330774

  13. Functional cross-talk between angiotensin II and epidermal growth factor receptors in NIH3T3 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paolis, Paola; Porcellini, Antonio; Savoia, Carmine; Lombardi, Alessia; Gigante, Bruna; Frati, Giacomo; Rubattu, Speranza; Musumeci, Beatrice; Volpe, Massimo

    2002-04-01

    The main angiotensin (Ang) II subtype receptors (AT1R and AT2R) are involved in cellular growth processes and exert functionally antagonistic effects. To characterize the mechanisms by which Ang II receptors influence growth, by investigating the interactions between Ang II subtype receptors and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation. The experiments were performed using a mouse fibroblast cell line, NIH3T3, by transient co-transfection with rat AT1R or AT2R expression vectors, or both. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation was analysed by western blot and the ERK activity was evaluated using PathDetect, an in-vivo signal transduction pathway trans-reporting system. Selective Ang II receptor antagonists (losartan for AT1R and PD123319 for AT2R) were used to investigate the contributions of each receptor to the response observed. Our data show that, in this cellular model, both Ang II receptors phosphorylate ERK1/2. However, in the cells expressing AT1R, the EGF-induced MAPK pathway was enhanced in the presence of Ang II in a synergistic fashion. In contrast, a reduction of EGF-induced MAPK activation was observed in the cells expressing AT2R. In cells expressing both Ang II subtype receptors, Ang II promoted an enhancement of EGF-induced MAPK activation. However, in the presence of the AT1R antagonist, losartan, the effect of EGF was reduced. These data indicate the existence of an opposite cross-talk of AT1R and AT2R with EGF receptors, and suggest a complex functional interaction between these pathways in the regulation of cellular growth processes.

  14. Vascular angiotensin II type 2 receptor attenuates atherosclerosis via a kinin/NO-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Hiroki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kawahito, Hiroyuki; Kishida, Sou; Irie, Daisuke; Kato, Taku; Wakana, Noriyuki; Miyagawa, Sonoko; Fukui, Kensuke; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2015-06-01

    The angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor exerts pro-atherogenic action by augmenting oxidative stress, whereas the Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2)-mediated effect on atherosclerosis remains controversial. AT2 transgenic (AT2-Tg) mice, which overexpress AT2 in their vascular smooth muscle cells, were crossed with apoE-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice to generate AT2 transgenic apoE(-/-) mice (AT2-Tg/apoE(-/-)). A subpressor dose of Ang II infusion exaggerated atherosclerosis development in apoE(-/-) mice, which was markedly suppressed in AT2-Tg/apoE(-/-) mice. Inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (L-NAME) or bradykinin type 2 receptor completely abolished AT2-mediated anti-atherogenic actions. The vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression levels and degree of monocyte/macrophage accumulation in the intima were also considerably reduced in AT2-Tg/apoE(-/-) mice; these phenomena were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment. Ang II infusion significantly enhanced the accumulation of dihydroethidium-positive mononuclear cells in the intima and mRNA expression levels of Nox2, a phagocytic cell-type NADPH oxidase subunit in apoE(-/-) mice, which was completely inhibited in AT2-Tg/apoE(-/-) mice. Vascular AT2 stimulation exerts anti-atherogenic actions in an endothelial kinin/NO-dependent manner, and its anti-oxidative effect is likely to be exerted by inhibiting the accumulation of superoxide-producing mononuclear leukocytes. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Depletion of endothelial or smooth muscle cell-specific angiotensin II type 1a receptors does not influence aortic aneurysms or atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra L Rateri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whole body genetic deletion of AT1a receptors in mice uniformly reduces hypercholesterolemia and angiotensin II-(AngII induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs. However, the role of AT1a receptor stimulation of principal cell types resident in the arterial wall remains undefined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells influences the development of atherosclerosis and AAAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: AT1a receptor floxed mice were developed in an LDL receptor -/- background. To generate endothelial or smooth muscle cell specific deficiency, AT1a receptor floxed mice were bred with mice expressing Cre under the control of either Tie2 or SM22, respectively. Groups of males and females were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 3 months to determine effects on atherosclerosis. Deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effect on the size of atherosclerotic lesions. We also determined the effect of cell-specific AT1a receptor deficiency on atherosclerosis and AAAs using male mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet and infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min. Again, deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effects on either AngII-induced atherosclerotic lesions or AAAs. CONCLUSIONS: Although previous studies have demonstrated whole body AT1a receptor deficiency diminishes atherosclerosis and AAAs, depletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells did not affect either of these vascular pathologies.

  16. Structure of the human angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor bound to angiotensin II from multiple chemoselective photoprobe contacts reveals a unique peptide binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Dany; Cabana, Jérôme; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2013-03-22

    Breakthroughs in G protein-coupled receptor structure determination based on crystallography have been mainly obtained from receptors occupied in their transmembrane domain core by low molecular weight ligands, and we have only recently begun to elucidate how the extracellular surface of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allows for the binding of larger peptide molecules. In the present study, we used a unique chemoselective photoaffinity labeling strategy, the methionine proximity assay, to directly identify at physiological conditions a total of 38 discrete ligand/receptor contact residues that form the extracellular peptide-binding site of an activated GPCR, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. This experimental data set was used in homology modeling to guide the positioning of the angiotensin II (AngII) peptide within several GPCR crystal structure templates. We found that the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 accommodated the results better than the other templates evaluated; ligand/receptor contact residues were spatially grouped into defined interaction clusters with AngII. In the resulting receptor structure, a β-hairpin fold in extracellular loop 2 in conjunction with two extracellular disulfide bridges appeared to open and shape the entrance of the ligand-binding site. The bound AngII adopted a somewhat vertical binding mode, allowing concomitant contacts across the extracellular surface and deep within the transmembrane domain core of the receptor. We propose that such a dualistic nature of GPCR interaction could be well suited for diffusible linear peptide ligands and a common feature of other peptidergic class A GPCRs.

  17. Structure of the Human Angiotensin II Type 1 (AT1) Receptor Bound to Angiotensin II from Multiple Chemoselective Photoprobe Contacts Reveals a Unique Peptide Binding Mode*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Dany; Cabana, Jérôme; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Breakthroughs in G protein-coupled receptor structure determination based on crystallography have been mainly obtained from receptors occupied in their transmembrane domain core by low molecular weight ligands, and we have only recently begun to elucidate how the extracellular surface of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allows for the binding of larger peptide molecules. In the present study, we used a unique chemoselective photoaffinity labeling strategy, the methionine proximity assay, to directly identify at physiological conditions a total of 38 discrete ligand/receptor contact residues that form the extracellular peptide-binding site of an activated GPCR, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. This experimental data set was used in homology modeling to guide the positioning of the angiotensin II (AngII) peptide within several GPCR crystal structure templates. We found that the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 accommodated the results better than the other templates evaluated; ligand/receptor contact residues were spatially grouped into defined interaction clusters with AngII. In the resulting receptor structure, a β-hairpin fold in extracellular loop 2 in conjunction with two extracellular disulfide bridges appeared to open and shape the entrance of the ligand-binding site. The bound AngII adopted a somewhat vertical binding mode, allowing concomitant contacts across the extracellular surface and deep within the transmembrane domain core of the receptor. We propose that such a dualistic nature of GPCR interaction could be well suited for diffusible linear peptide ligands and a common feature of other peptidergic class A GPCRs. PMID:23386604

  18. Lack of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel modulates the development of neurogenic bladder dysfunction induced by cross-sensitization in afferent pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Qi

    2013-01-01

    lack of TRPV1 receptors does not eliminate the development of cross-sensitization in the pelvis. However, the function of the urinary bladder significantly differs between WT and TRPV−/− mice especially upon development of colon-bladder cross-sensitization induced by transient colitis. Our results suggest that TRPV1 pathways may participate in the development of chronic pelvic pain co-morbidities in humans.

  19. Cross talk between AT1 receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 in microglia contributes to angiotensin II-derived ROS production in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Vinicia Campana; Stranahan, Alexis M; Krause, Eric G; de Kloet, Annette D; Stern, Javier E

    2016-02-01

    ANG II is thought to increase sympathetic outflow by increasing oxidative stress and promoting local inflammation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. However, the relative contributions of inflammation and oxidative stress to sympathetic drive remain poorly understood, and the underlying cellular and molecular targets have yet to be examined. ANG II has been shown to enhance Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated signaling on microglia. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine whether ANG II-mediated activation of microglial TLR4 signaling is a key molecular target initiating local oxidative stress in the PVN. We found TLR4 and ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA expression in hypothalamic microglia, providing molecular evidence for the potential interaction between these two receptors. In hypothalamic slices, ANG II induced microglial activation within the PVN (∼65% increase, P microglia) to ANG II-driven ROS production in the PVN. Taken together, these results support functional interactions between AT1 receptors and TLR4 in mediating ANG II-dependent microglial activation and oxidative stress within the PVN. More broadly, our results support a functional interaction between the central renin-angiotensin system and innate immunity in the regulation of neurohumoral outflows from the PVN.

  20. Actions of Xanthurenic acid, a putative endogenous Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, on sensory transmission in the thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, C S; Neale, S A; Salt, T E

    2013-03-01

    Xanthurenic acid (XA), a molecule arising from tryptophan metabolism by transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine, has recently been identified as an endogenous Group II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor ligand in vitro. Impairments in Group II mGlu receptor expression and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, as have multiple steps in the kynurenine metabolism pathway. Therefore, we examined XA in vivo to further investigate its potential as a Group II mGlu receptor ligand using a preparation that has been previously demonstrated to efficiently reveal the action of other Group II mGlu receptor ligands in vivo. Extracellular single-neurone recordings were made in the rat ventrobasal thalamus (VB) in conjunction with iontophoresis of agonists, an antagonist and a positive allosteric modulator and/or intravenous (i.v.) injection of XA. We found the XA effect on sensory inhibition, when applied iontophoretically and i.v., was similar to that of other Group II mGlu receptor agonists in reducing inhibition evoked in the VB from the thalamic reticular nucleus upon physiological sensory stimulation. Furthermore, we postulate that XA may be the first potential endogenous allosteric agonist (termed 'endocoid') for the mGlu receptors. As the Group II receptors and kynurenine metabolism pathway have both been heavily implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, XA could play a pivotal role in antipsychotic research as this potential endocoid represents both a convergence within these two biological parameters and a novel class of Group II mGlu receptor ligand. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors'.

  1. Affinity chromatography purification of angiotensin II receptor using photoactivable biotinylated probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, J; Seyer, R; Lombard, C; Desarnaud, F; Aumelas, A; Jard, S; Bonnafous, J C

    1990-09-25

    We have developed biotinylated photoactivable probes that are suitable for covalent labeling of angiotensin II (AII) receptors and the subsequent purification of covalent complexes through immobilized avidin or streptavidin. One of these probes, biotin-NH(CH2)2SS(CH2)2CO-[Ala1,Phe(4N3)8]AII, which contains a cleavable disulfide bridge in its spacer arm and which displays, in its radioiodinated form, very high affinity for AII receptors (Kd approximately 1 nM), proved to be suitable for indirect affinity chromatography of rat liver receptor with facilitated recovery from avidin gels by use of reducing agents. This constituted the central step of an efficient partial purification scheme involving hydroxylapatite chromatography, streptavidin chromatography, and thiopropyl-Sepharose chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis and autoradiography established the identity of the purified entity (molecular weight 65K) as the AII receptor. Possible ways of completing purification to homogeneity and extrapolation of the protocols to a preparative scale are discussed, as well as the potential contribution of our new probes to the study of the structural properties of angiotensin receptors.

  2. The D2 period of collagen II contains a specific binding site for the human discoidin domain receptor, DDR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Birgit; Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Andrzej

    2004-12-03

    The human discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 and DDR2, are expressed widely and, uniquely among receptor tyrosine kinases, activated by the extracellular matrix protein collagen. This activation is due to a direct interaction of collagen with the DDR discoidin domain. Here, we localised a specific DDR2 binding site on the triple-helical region of collagen II. Collagen II was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. As expected, DDR2 binding to collagen II was dependent on triple-helical collagen and was mediated by the DDR2 discoidin domain. Collagen II served as a potent stimulator of DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. To map the DDR2 binding site(s) on collagen II, we used recombinant collagen II variants with specific deletions of one of the four repeating D periods. We found that the D2 period of collagen II was essential for DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, whereas the D3 and D4 periods were dispensable. The DDR2 binding site on collagen II was further defined by recombinant collagen II-like proteins consisting predominantly of tandem repeats of the D2 or D4 period. The D2 construct, but not the D4 construct, mediated DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, demonstrating that the D2 period of collagen II harbours a specific DDR2 recognition site. The discovery of a site-specific interaction of DDR2 with collagen II gives novel insight into the nature of the interaction of collagen II with matrix receptors.

  3. Direct Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Stimulation Ameliorates Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mice with PPARγ Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohshima, Kousei; Mogi, Masaki; Jing, Fei

    2012-01-01

    The role of angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2)) receptor stimulation in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance is still unclear. Therefore we examined the possibility that direct AT(2) receptor stimulation by compound 21 (C21) might contribute to possible insulin-sensitizing/anti-diabetic effects in ty...... 2 diabetes (T2DM) with PPARγ activation, mainly focusing on adipose tissue....

  4. ACE-inhibition and angiotensin II receptor blockers in chronic heart failure: pathophysiological consideration of the unresolved battle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, F; Simko, J; Fabryova, M

    2003-05-01

    Reducing the effects of angiotensin II by blockade of AT1-receptors may be superior to inhibition of angiotensin II formation by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. However, the results of several trials did not fulfil this expectation. In both ELITE II with symptomatic CHF patients and in OPTIMAAL involving high risk patients after acute myocardial infarction, angiotensin II type I (AT1) receptor blocker (ARB) losartan did not prove to be superior to captopril. There are several potential reasons, why ARBs did not fare better than ACE inhibitors. Although AT1-receptor blockade may block the effects of non-ACE pathways of tissue angiotensin II formation, no clinical evidence is available that a more powerful inhibition of the tissue renin-angiotensin system brings improved survival. The choice of patients for clinical trials of HF therapy is not based on the level of neurohumoral activation. Thus, the more effective attenuation of angiotensin II action with ARBs may not bring additional benefits. The potential antiremodeling effect of ARBs through the stimulation of AT2 receptors by angiotensin II could be counterbalanced by a failure of AT1-receptor blockers to enhance bradykinin, nitric oxide and prostacyclin formation with antigrowth properties. Although ACE-inhibitors seem to have slightly better results at present than AT1 blockers in the battle on heart failure patient, future trials will decide which is the definitive winner.

  5. CORRECTION OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC COR PULMONALE BY ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTORS ANTAGONISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zadionchenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate intensity of endothelial dysfunction, processes of apoptosis, state of central and peripheral hemodynamics and to evaluate how these characteristics are influenced by angiotensin II receptors antagonists (ARA II – candesartan (Atacand and losartan (Cosaar in patients with chronic cor pulmonale (CCP at different stages of disease.Material and methods. 100 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, complicated by CCP were included into the study. Caspase activity as apoptosis induction marker, von Willebrand factor, production of nitric oxide in blood plasma and condensate of breathing out air were assessed. 70 patients received ARA II (50 patients – candesartan 4-8 mg daily, 20 patients – losartan 50-100 mg daily, 30 patients received neither ARA II nor angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI.Results. Significant increase in intensity of endothelial dysfunction and activation of apoptosis processes were registered according to growth of CCP severity. After 6 months of therapy von Willebrand factor decreased by 25,2% and 27,7% in candesartan and losartan groups respectively (p<0.01 for both groups. In the control group only 13.2% of von Willebrand factor reduction was seen.Conclusion. ARA II added to common therapy of COPD complicated by CCP improves functional state of endothelium restricting hyperproduction of nitric oxide and its toxic effects and slowing down apoptotic cell death.

  6. CORRECTION OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC COR PULMONALE BY ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTORS ANTAGONISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zadionchenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate intensity of endothelial dysfunction, processes of apoptosis, state of central and peripheral hemodynamics and to evaluate how these characteristics are influenced by angiotensin II receptors antagonists (ARA II – candesartan (Atacand and losartan (Cosaar in patients with chronic cor pulmonale (CCP at different stages of disease.Material and methods. 100 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, complicated by CCP were included into the study. Caspase activity as apoptosis induction marker, von Willebrand factor, production of nitric oxide in blood plasma and condensate of breathing out air were assessed. 70 patients received ARA II (50 patients – candesartan 4-8 mg daily, 20 patients – losartan 50-100 mg daily, 30 patients received neither ARA II nor angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI.Results. Significant increase in intensity of endothelial dysfunction and activation of apoptosis processes were registered according to growth of CCP severity. After 6 months of therapy von Willebrand factor decreased by 25,2% and 27,7% in candesartan and losartan groups respectively (p<0.01 for both groups. In the control group only 13.2% of von Willebrand factor reduction was seen.Conclusion. ARA II added to common therapy of COPD complicated by CCP improves functional state of endothelium restricting hyperproduction of nitric oxide and its toxic effects and slowing down apoptotic cell death.

  7. Impaired up-regulation of type II corticosteroid receptors in hippocampus of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J C; Fleenor, D G; Kerr, D S; Landfield, P W

    1989-01-30

    Several recent investigations have reported a decline of rat hippocampal corticosteroid-binding receptors (CSRs) with aging. This decline has been proposed to be an initial cause (through disinhibition) of the elevated adrenal steroid secretion that apparently occurs with aging; however, it could instead be an effect of corticoid elevation (through down-regulation). In order to assess the effects of age on CSR biosynthetic capacity in the absence of down-regulatory influences of endogenous corticoids, as well as to study aging changes in CSR plasticity, we examined the up-regulation of hippocampal CSR that follows adrenalectomy (ADX). The rat hippocampus contains at least two types of CSR binding and differential analysis of types I and II CSR was accomplished by selective displacement of [3H]corticosterone with RU-28362, a specific type II agonist. In young (3 months old) Fischer-344 rat hippocampus, up-regulation of type II binding above 2-day ADX baseline was present by 3-7 days and increased still further by 8-10 days post-ADX; type I CSR density did not change significantly between 1 and 10 days post-ADX. However, in aged (24-26 months old) rats, type II CSR up-regulation did not occur over the 10 day post-ADX period. Thus, the age-related impairment of type II up-regulation may reflect an intrinsic deficit in CSR biosynthesis or lability that is independent of the acute endogenous adrenal steroid environment.

  8. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (Phypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension and associated vascular and target organ damage. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-08-21

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC.

  10. (Prorenin receptor triggers distinct angiotensin II-independent extracellular matrix remodeling and deterioration of cardiac function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mari Moilanen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activation of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS plays a key pathophysiological role in heart failure in patients with hypertension and myocardial infarction. However, the function of (prorenin receptor ((PRR is not yet solved. We determined here the direct functional and structural effects of (PRR in the heart. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (PRR was overexpressed by using adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in normal adult rat hearts up to 2 weeks. (PRR gene delivery into the anterior wall of the left ventricle decreased ejection fraction (P<0.01, fractional shortening (P<0.01, and intraventricular septum diastolic and systolic thickness, associated with approximately 2-fold increase in left ventricular (PRR protein levels at 2 weeks. To test whether the worsening of cardiac function and structure by (PRR gene overexpression was mediated by angiotensin II (Ang II, we infused an AT(1 receptor blocker losartan via osmotic minipumps. Remarkably, cardiac function deteriorated in losartan-treated (PRR overexpressing animals as well. Intramyocardial (PRR gene delivery also resulted in Ang II-independent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation and myocardial fibrosis, and the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and connective tissue growth factor genes. In contrast, activation of heat shock protein 27 phosphorylation and apoptotic cell death by (PRR gene delivery was Ang II-dependent. Finally, (PRR overexpression significantly increased direct protein-protein interaction between (PRR and promyelocytic zinc-finger protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate for the first time that (PRR triggers distinct Ang II-independent myocardial fibrosis and deterioration of cardiac function in normal adult heart and identify (PRR as a novel therapeutic target to optimize RAS blockade in failing hearts.

  11. High-affinity prorenin binding to cardiac man-6-P/IGF-II receptors precedes proteolytic activation to renin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Saris (Jasper); F.H.M. Derkx (Frans); R.J.A. de Bruin (René); D.H. Dekkers (Dick); J.M.J. Lamers (Jos); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan); M.A.D.H. Schalekamp (Maarten); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMannose-6-phosphate (man-6-P)/insulin-like growth factor-II (man-6-P/IgF-II) receptors are involved in the activation of recombinant human prorenin by cardiomyocytes. To investigate the kinetics of this process, the nature of activation, the existence of other prorenin

  12. Deltorphin II enhances extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens via opioid receptor-independent mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murakawa, K.; Hirose, N.; Takada, K.; Suzuki, T.; Nagase, H.; Cools, A.R.; Koshikawa, N.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the delta2-opioid receptor agonist, deltorphin II, on extracellular levels of dopamine in the rat nucleus accumbens were investigated in awake animals by in vivo brain microdialysis. In agreement with previous studies, perfusion of deltorphin II (50.0 nmol) into the nucleus accumbens

  13. Influence of angiotensin II receptor subtypes of the paraventricular nucleus on the physiological responses induced by angiotensin II injection into the medial septal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Wilson Abrão

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We determined the effects of losartan and PD 123319 (antagonists of the AT1 and AT2 angiotensin receptors, respectively, and [Sar¹, Ala8] ANG II (a relatively peptide antagonist of angiotensin receptors injected into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN on water and 3% NaCl intake, and the diuretic, natriuretic, and pressor effects induced by administration of angiotensin II (ANG II into the medial septal area (MSA of conscious rats. METHODS: Holtzman rats were used . Animals were anesthetized with tribromoethanol (20 mg per 100 grams of body weight, ip. A stainless steel guide cannula was implanted into the MSA and PVN. All drugs were injected in 0.5-mul volumes for 10-15 seconds. Seven days after brain surgery, water and 3% NaCl intake, urine and sodium excretion, and arterial blood pressure were measured. RESULTS: Losartan (40 nmol and [Sar¹, Ala8] ANG II (40 nmol completely eliminated whereas PD 123319 (40 nmol partially blocked the increase in water and sodium intake and the increase in arterial blood pressure induced by ANG II (10 nmol injected into the MSA. The PVN administration of PD 123319 and [Sar¹, Ala8] ANG II blocked whereas losartan attenuated the diuresis and natriuresis induced by MSA administration of ANG II. CONCLUSION: MSA involvement with PVN on water and sodium homeostasis and arterial pressure modulation utilizing ANGII receptors is suggested.

  14. Expression of angiotensin II receptors in the caprine ovary and improvement of follicular viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, J B; Lima-Verde, I B; Celestino, J J H; Lima, L F; Matos, M H T; Faustino, L R; Donato, M A M; Peixoto, C A; Campello, C C; Silva, J R V; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate mRNA levels of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors (AGTR1 and AGTR2) in caprine follicles and to investigate the influence of ANG II on the viability and in vitro growth of preantral follicles. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to quantify AGTR1 and AGTR2 mRNA levels in the different follicular stages. For culture, caprine ovaries were collected, cut into 13 fragments and then either directly fixed for histological and ultrastructural analysis (fresh control) or placed in culture for 1 or 7 days in α-minumum essential medium plus (α-MEM+) with 0, 1, 5, 10, 50 or 100 ng/ml ANG II. Then, the fragments were destined to morphological, viability and ultrastructural analysis. The results showed that primordial follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 and AGTR2 mRNA than secondary follicles. Granulosa/theca cells from antral follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 mRNA than their respective cumulus-oocyte complex (COCs). After 7 days of culture, ANG II (10 or 50 ng/ml) maintained the percentages of normal follicles compared with α-MEM+. Fluorescence and ultrastructural microscopy confirmed follicular integrity in ANG II (10 ng/ml). In conclusion, a high expression of AGTR1 and AGTR2 is observed in primordial follicles. Granulosa/theca cells from antral follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 mRNA. Finally, 10 ng/ml ANG II maintained the viability of caprine preantral follicles after in vitro culture.

  15. Ligand-induced type II interleukin-4 receptor dimers are sustained by rapid re-association within plasma membrane microcompartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Moraga, Ignacio; Winkelmann, Hauke; Birkholz, Oliver; Wilmes, Stephan; Schulte, Markos; Kraich, Michael; Kenneweg, Hella; Beutel, Oliver; Selenschik, Philipp; Paterok, Dirk; Gavutis, Martynas; Schmidt, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher; Müller, Thomas D.; Piehler, Jacob

    2017-07-01

    The spatiotemporal organization of cytokine receptors in the plasma membrane is still debated with models ranging from ligand-independent receptor pre-dimerization to ligand-induced receptor dimerization occurring only after receptor uptake into endosomes. Here, we explore the molecular and cellular determinants governing the assembly of the type II interleukin-4 receptor, taking advantage of various agonists binding the receptor subunits with different affinities and rate constants. Quantitative kinetic studies using artificial membranes confirm that receptor dimerization is governed by the two-dimensional ligand-receptor interactions and identify a critical role of the transmembrane domain in receptor dimerization. Single molecule localization microscopy at physiological cell surface expression levels, however, reveals efficient ligand-induced receptor dimerization by all ligands, largely independent of receptor binding affinities, in line with the similar STAT6 activation potencies observed for all IL-4 variants. Detailed spatiotemporal analyses suggest that kinetic trapping of receptor dimers in actin-dependent microcompartments sustains robust receptor dimerization and signalling.

  16. C-type lectin-like domain and fibronectin-like type II domain of phospholipase A(2) receptor 1 modulate binding and migratory responses to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Soichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Obata, Jun-ei; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-24

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) mediates collagen-dependent migration. The mechanisms by which PLA2R interacts with collagen remain unclear. We produced HEK293 cells expressing full-length wild-type PLA2R or a truncated PLA2R that lacks fibronectin-like type II (FNII) domains or several regions of C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). We show that the CTLD1-2 as well as the FNII domain of PLA2R are responsible for binding to collagen and for collagen-dependent migration. Thus, multiple regions and domains of the extracellular portion of PLA2R participate in the responses to collagen. These data suggest a potentially new mechanism for PLA2R-mediated biological response beyond that of a receptor for secretory PLA2.

  17. Identification of a putative nuclear localization sequence within ANG II AT(1A) receptor associated with nuclear activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Raymond, John R; Baldys, Aleksander; Yang, Qing; Lee, Mi-Hye; Luttrell, Louis; Ullian, Michael E

    2007-04-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1 (AT(1)) receptors, similar to other G protein-coupled receptors, undergo desensitization and internalization, and potentially nuclear localization, subsequent to agonist interaction. Evidence suggests that the carboxy-terminal tail may be involved in receptor nuclear localization. In the present study, we examined the carboxy-terminal tail of the receptor for specific regions responsible for the nuclear translocation phenomenon and resultant nuclear activation. Human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing either a wild-type AT(1A) receptor-green fluorescent protein (AT(1A)R/GFP) construct or a site-directed mutation of a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS) [K307Q]AT(1A)R/GFP (KQ/AT(1A)R/GFP), were examined for differences in receptor nuclear trafficking and nuclear activation. Receptor expression, intracellular signaling, and ANG II-induced internalization of the wild-type/GFP construct and of the KQ/AT(1A)R/GFP mutant was similar. Laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that in cells expressing the AT(1A)R/GFP, trafficking of the receptor to the nuclear area and colocalization with lamin B occurred within 30 min of ANG II (100 nM) stimulation, whereas the KQ/AT(1A)R/GFP mutant failed to demonstrate nuclear localization. Immunoblotting of nuclear lysates with an anti-GFP antibody confirmed these observations. Nuclear localization of the wild-type receptor correlated with increase transcription for both EGR-1 and PTGS-2 genes while the nuclear-deficient KQ/AT(1A)R/GFP mutant demonstrated increases for only the EGR-1 gene. These results suggest that a NLS (KKFKKY; aa307-312) is located within the cytoplasmic tail of the AT(1A) receptor and that nuclear localization of the receptor corresponds with specific activation of transcription for the COX-2 gene PTGS-2.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA, peptides, and receptors in a thoracopulmonary malignant small round cell tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Orskov, C; Haselbacher, G;

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-(IGF) II and IGF-I and IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptors were expressed in a thoracopulmonary malignant small round cell tumor (MSRCT) from a 14-year-old boy. Northern analysis showed that the MSRCT expresses multiple IGF-II mRNA of 6.0, 4.8, 4.2, and 2.2 kilobase from...

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of novel angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists as anti-hypertension drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaolu; Zhu, Weibo; Zhang, Ruijing; Wen, Caihong; Wang, Li; Yan, Yijia; Tang, Hesheng; Chen, Zhilong

    2016-05-01

    Three new angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists, 1, 2 and 3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The AT1 receptor-binding assays in vitro showed that all the synthesized compounds had nanomolar affinity for the AT1 receptor. From which compound 3 was found to be the most potent ligands with an IC50 value of 2.67±0.23 nM. Biological evaluation in vivo revealed that all the compounds could cause significant decrease on MBP in a dose dependent manner in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compound 3 especially showed an efficient and long-lasting effect in reducing blood pressure, whose maximal response lowered 41 mmHg of MBP at 10mg/kg and 62 mmHg at 15 mg/kg after oral administration, the significant anti-hypertensive effect lasted beyond 12 h, which is better than the reference compound losartan. The pharmacokinetic experiments showed that compound 3 could be absorbed efficiently and metabolized smoothly both in blood and in tissues in Wistar rats. The acute toxicity assay suggested that it has low toxicity with the LD50 value of 2974.35 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that compound 3 is a potent angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist which could be considered as a novel anti-hypertension candidate and deserved for further investigation.

  20. Mice lacking NMDA receptors in parvalbumin neurons display normal depression-related behavior and response to antidepressant action of NMDAR antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pozzi

    Full Text Available The underlying circuit imbalance in major depression remains unknown and current therapies remain inadequate for a large group of patients. Discovery of the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine--an NMDA receptor (NMDAR antagonist--has linked the glutamatergic system to depression. Interestingly, dysfunction in the inhibitory GABAergic system has also been proposed to underlie depression and deficits linked to GABAergic neurons have been found with human imaging and in post-mortem material from depressed patients. Parvalbumin-expressing (PV GABAergic interneurons regulate local circuit function through perisomatic inhibition and their activity is NMDAR-dependent, providing a possible link between NMDAR and the inhibitory system in the antidepressant effect of ketamine. We have therefore investigated the role of the NMDAR-dependent activity of PV interneurons for the development of depression-like behavior as well as for the response to rapid antidepressant effects of NMDAR antagonists. We used mutant mice lacking NMDA neurotransmission specifically in PV neurons (PV-Cre+/NR1f/f and analyzed depression-like behavior and anhedonia. To study the acute and sustained effects of a single NMDAR antagonist administration, we established a behavioral paradigm of repeated exposure to forced swimming test (FST. We did not observe altered behavioral responses in the repeated FST or in a sucrose preference test in mutant mice. In addition, the behavioral response to administration of NMDAR antagonists was not significantly altered in mutant PV-Cre+/NR1f/f mice. Our results show that NMDA-dependent neurotransmission in PV neurons is not necessary to regulate depression-like behaviors, and in addition that NMDARs on PV neurons are not a direct target for the NMDAR-induced antidepressant effects of ketamine and MK801.

  1. Lack of the P2X7 receptor protects against AMD-like defects and microparticle accumulation in a chronic oxidative stress-induced mouse model of AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kyle A; Lin, C M; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Yang, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is an ATP-gated ion channel that is a key player in oxidative stress under pathological conditions. The P2X7R is expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina. Chronic oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice lacking Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) developed chronic oxidative stress as well as AMD-like features, but whether the P2X7R plays a causative role in oxidative stress-induced AMD is unknown. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to test if concurrent knockout (KO) of P2X7R could block AMD-like defects seen in Sod1 KO mice. Using multiple approaches, we demonstrate that Sod1 KO causes AMD-like defects, including positive staining for oxidative stress markers, 3-nitrotyrosine and carboxymethyl lysine, thinning of the RPE and retina, thickening of Bruch's membrane, presence of basal laminar and linear deposits, RPE barrier disruption and accumulation of microglia/macrophages. Moreover, we find that Sod1 KO mice accumulate more microparticles (MPs) within RPE/choroid tissues. Concurrent KO of the P2X7R protects against AMD-like defects and MP accumulation in Sod1 KO mice. Together, we show for the first time, that deficiency of P2X7R prevents in vivo oxidative stress-induced accumulation of MPs and AMD-like defects. This work could potentially lead to novel therapies for AMD and other oxidative stress-driven diseases.

  2. Lack of clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction between the thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag and hepatitis C virus protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wire, Mary Beth; Fang, Lei; Hussaini, Azra; Kleha, Joseph F; Theodore, Dickens

    2014-11-01

    Eltrombopag is an orally bioavailable thrombopoietin receptor agonist approved for the treatment of thrombocytopenia associated with chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This study evaluated the potential drug-drug interactions between eltrombopag and the HCV protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir. In this open-label, 3-period, single-sequence, and crossover study, 56 healthy adult subjects were randomized 1:1 to cohort 1 (boceprevir) or 2 (telaprevir). The dosing was as follows: period 1, single 200-mg dose of eltrombopag; period 2, 800 mg boceprevir or 750 mg telaprevir every 8 hours (q8h) for 10 days; and period 3, single 200-mg dose of eltrombopag with either 800 mg boceprevir or 750 mg telaprevir q8h (3 doses). All doses were administered with food, and eltrombopag was administered specifically with low-calcium food. There was a 3-day washout between periods 1 and 2 and no washout between periods 2 and 3. Serial pharmacokinetic samples were collected for 72 h in periods 1 and 3 and for 8 h in period 2. The coadministration of eltrombopag increased the rate of boceprevir absorption, resulting in a 20% increase in the maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax), a 1-h-earlier time to Cmax (Tmax) for boceprevir, a 32% decrease in the concentration at the end of the dosing interval (Cτ), and no change in the area under the concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUC0-τ). The coadministration of eltrombopag did not alter telaprevir pharmacokinetics, and the coadministration of boceprevir or telaprevir did not alter eltrombopag pharmacokinetics. Dysgeusia, headache, and somnolence occurred in ≥2 subjects. One subject withdrew because of nausea, headache, dizziness, sinus pressure, and vomiting. There were no severe or serious adverse events. Dose adjustment is not required when eltrombopag is coadministered with boceprevir or telaprevir given the lack of clinically significant

  3. Renal dopamine and angiotensin II receptor signaling in age-related hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Gaurav; Pokkunuri, Indira; Asghar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Kidneys play a vital role in long-term regulation of blood pressure. This is achieved by actions of many renal and nonrenal factors acting on the kidney that help maintain the body's water and electrolyte balance and thus control blood pressure. Several endogenously formed or circulating hormones/peptides, by acting within the kidney, regulate fluid and water homeostasis and blood pressure. Dopamine and angiotensin II are the two key renal factors that, via acting on their receptors and counterregulating each other's function, maintain water and sodium balance. In this review, we provide recent advances in the signaling cascades of these renal receptors, especially at the level of their cross talk, and discuss their roles in blood pressure regulation in the aging process.

  4. GnRH-II receptor-like antigenicity in human placenta and in cancers of the human reproductive organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicke, Nicola; Günthert, Andreas R; Viereck, Volker; Siebold, Doreen; Béhé, Martin; Becker, Tamara; Emons, Günter; Gründker, Carsten

    2005-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the antiproliferative activity of GnRH-II on human endometrial and ovarian cancer cell lines is not mediated through the GnRH-I receptor. A functional receptor for human GnRH-II has not yet been identified. In this study, we have generated a polyclonal antiserum to the putative human GnRH-II receptor using a peptide (YSPTMLTEVPPC) corresponding to the third extracellular domain coupled to keyhole limpet haemocyanin via the Cys residue. A database search showed no identical peptide sequences in any other human gene. To avoid cross-reactions against two similar amino acid sequences the antiserum was pre-absorbed using these peptides. Immune histological sections of human placenta and human endometrial, ovarian and prostate cancers using rabbit anti-human GnRH-II receptor antiserum showed GnRH-II receptor-like staining. Western blot analysis of cell membrane preparations of human endometrial and ovarian cancer cell lines yielded a band at approximately 43 kDa whereas Western blot analysis of cell membrane preparations of ovaries obtained from the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) yielded a band at approximately 54 kDa. To identify the GnRH-II receptor-like antigen we used the photo-affinity labelling technique. Photochemical reaction of (125)I-labelled (4-azidobenzoyl)-N-hydroxysuccinimide-[d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II (10(-9) M) with cell membrane preparations of human endometrial and ovarian cancer cells yielded a band at approximately 43 kDa. In competition experiments, the GnRH-I agonist Triptorelin (10(-7) M) showed a weak decrease of (125)I-labelled (4-azidobenzoyl)-N-hydroxysuccinimide-[d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II binding to its binding site. The GnRH-I antagonist Cetrorelix (10(-7) M) showed a clearly stronger decrease, whereas GnRH-II agonist [d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II (10(-7) M) was the most potent competitor. Western blot analysis of the same gel using rabbit anti-human GnRH-II receptor antiserum identified this band as GnRH-II receptor

  5. The angiotensin II type 2 receptor agonist Compound 21 is protective in experimental diabetes-associated atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chow, Bryna S M; Koulis, Christine; Krishnaswamy, Pooja;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Angiotensin II is well-recognised to be a key mediator in driving the pathological events of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis via signalling through its angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) subtype. However, its actions via the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) subtype...... are still poorly understood. This study is the first to investigate the role of the novel selective AT2R agonist, Compound 21 (C21) in an experimental model of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis (DAA). METHODS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic Apoe-knockout mice were treated with vehicle (0.1 mol/l citrate...

  6. Estimation of the number of angiotensin II AT1 receptors in rat kidney afferent and efferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razga, Zsolt; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2007-01-01

    of angiotensin II AT1 receptors along the length of the arterioles and per arteriole, we combined immunoelectron microscopy with stereology. RESULTS: The number of AT1 receptor molecules was significantly lower in the renin-positive smooth muscle cells (SMCs) than in the renin-negative SMCs of the afferent......OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on renal arterioles to determine the association between the distribution of angiotensin II AT1 receptors and the morphologic and physiologic heterogeneity of renal arterioles. STUDY DESIGN: To estimate the number...... and efferent arterioles. There were no significant differences along and between the afferent and efferent arterioles in relative number of AT1 receptors of endothelial cells or SMCs. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the heterogeneous activity of angiotensin II in SMCs and the different permeabilities...

  7. Randomised trial on episodic cluster headache with an angiotensin II receptor blocker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tronvik, Erling; Wienecke, Troels; Monstad, Inge

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the angiotensin II receptor antagonist candesartan as prophylactic medication in patients with episodic cluster headache. METHODS: This study comprised a prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-designed trial performed in seven...... centres in Scandinavia. Forty (40) patients with episodic cluster headache (ICHD-2) were recruited and randomised over a five-year period to placebo or 16 mg candesartan in the first week, and placebo or 32 mg candesartan in the second and third week. RESULTS: The number of cluster headache attacks...

  8. Proteinuria, a modifiable risk factor: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman-Sharpe, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Microalbuminuria and proteinuria have been determined to be modifiable risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease as well as risk factors for cardiovascular events. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers have been demonstrated to decrease proteinuria at all stages and slow the progression of renal disease. Proteinuria can be used as a marker of successful treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease in combination with other established targets. This article discusses the various diagnostic tests used for the detection of microalbuminuria and proteinuria and appropriate pharmaceutical treatment.

  9. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and lactation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, M E; Malecha, S E; Cha, A J

    2000-05-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are commonly used for the treatment of hypertension. ACEIs have been promoted as first-line therapy for selected patients with chronic hypertension and for the prevention of diabetic nephropathy, thus creating the potential for frequent ACEI exposure among women of childbearing age. ARBs are the most recent addition to the available options for antihypertensive agents. This review specifically focuses on the most up-to-date information regarding these newer antihypertensives with regard to lactation.

  10. The GnRH receptor and the response of gonadotrope cells to GnRH pulse frequency code. A story of an atypical adaptation of cell function relying on a lack of receptor homologous desensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bleux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain control of the reproductive system is mediated through hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH which activates specific receptors (GnRHR present at the surface of the pituitary gonadotropes to trigger secretion of the two gonadotropins LH and FSH. A unique feature of this system is the high dependence on the secretion mode of GnRH, which is basically pulsatile but undergoes considerable fluctuations in pulse frequency pattern in response to endogenous or external factors. How the physiological fluctuations of GnRH secretion that orchestrate normal reproduction are decoded by the gonadotrope cell machinery to ultimately control gonadotropin release and/or subunit gene transcription has been the subject of intensive studies during the past decades. Surprisingly, the mammalian GnRHR is unique among G protein-coupled receptor family as it lacks the carboxy-terminal tail usually involved in classical endocytotic process. Accordingly, it does not desensitize properly and internalizes very poorly. Both this atypical intrinsic property and post-receptor events may thus contribute to decode the GnRH signal. This includes the participation of a network of signaling pathways that differently respond to GnRH together with a growing amount of genes differentially sensitive to pulse frequency. Among these are two pairs of genes, the transcription factors EGR-1 and NAB, and the regulatory factors activin and follistatin, that function as intracellular autoregulatory feedback loops controlling respectively LHbeta and FSHbeta gene expression and hence, LH and FSH synthesis. Pituitary gonadotropes thus represent a unique model of cells functionally adapted to respond to a considerably fluctuating neuroendocrine stimulation, from short individual pulses to sustained GnRH as observed at the proestrus of ovarian cycle. Altogether, the data emphasize the adaptative reciprocal complementarity of hypothalamic GnRH neurones and pituitary gonadotropes to

  11. Attenuated renovascular constrictor responses to angiotensin II in adenosine 1 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B; Hashimoto, Seiji; Briggs, Josie

    2003-01-01

    In the present experiments we examined the renovascular constrictor effects of ANG II in the chronic and complete absence of A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) using mice with targeted deletion of the A1AR gene. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was not different between A1AR +/+ and A1AR -/- mice under...... and increased renal vascular resistance significantly more in A1AR +/+ than in A1AR -/- mice. Perfused afferent arterioles isolated from A1AR +/+ mice constricted in response to bath ANG II with an EC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(-10) mol/l, whereas a right shift in the dose-response relationship with an EC50 of 7.......3 +/- 1.2 x 10(-10) mol/l (P resistance...

  12. Effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor on the intraocular growth factors and their receptors in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ik Soo Byon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI on intraocular growth factors and their receptors in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. METHODS: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: control, diabetes mellitus (DM, candesartan-treated DM, and enalapril-treated DM (each group, n=10. After the induction of DM by streptozotocin, candesartan [ARB, 5 mg/(kg·d] and enalapril [ACEI, 10 mg/(kg·d] were administered to rats orally for 4wk. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and angiotensin II (Ang II concentrations in the vitreous were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and VEGF receptor 2 and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R levels were assessed at week 4 by Western blotting. RESULTS: Vitreous Ang II levels were significantly higher in the DM group and candesartan-treated DM group than in the control (P=0.04 and 0.005, respectively. Vitreous AT1R increased significantly in DM compared to the other three groups (P<0.007. Candesartan-treated DM rats showed higher vitreal AT1R concentration than the enalapril-treated DM group and control (P<0.001 and P=0.005, respectively. No difference in vitreous Ang II and AT1R concentration was found between the enalapril-treated DM group and control. VEGF and its receptor were below the minimum detection limit in all 4 groups. CONCLUSION: Increased Ang II and AT1R in the hyperglycemic state indicate activated the intraocular renin-angiotensin system, which is inhibited more effectively by systemic ACEI than systemic ARB.

  13. Research resource: new and diverse substrates for the insulin receptor isoform a revealed by quantitative proteomics after stimulation with igf-ii or insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Gaspari, Marco; Pandini, Giuseppe;

    2011-01-01

    The isoform A of the insulin receptor (IR) (IR-A) is a bifunctional receptor, because it binds both insulin and IGF-II. IR-A activation by IGF-II plays a role in development, but its physiological role in adults is unknown. IGF-II signaling through IR-A is deregulated in cancer and favors tumor p...

  14. Critical role of the endogenous interferon ligand-receptors in type I and type II interferons response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasfar, Ahmed; Cook, Jeffry R; Cohen Solal, Karine A; Reuhl, Kenneth; Kotenko, Sergei V; Langer, Jerome A; Laskin, Debra L

    2014-07-01

    Separate ligand-receptor paradigms are commonly used for each type of interferon (IFN). However, accumulating evidence suggests that type I and type II IFNs may not be restricted to independent pathways. Using different cell types deficient in IFNAR1, IFNAR2, IFNGR1, IFNGR2 and IFN-γ, we evaluated the contribution of each element of the IFN system to the activity of type I and type II IFNs. We show that deficiency in IFNAR1 or IFNAR2 is associated with impairment of type II IFN activity. This impairment, presumably resulting from the disruption of the ligand-receptor complex, is obtained in all cell types tested. However, deficiency of IFNGR1, IFNGR2 or IFN-γ was associated with an impairment of type I IFN activity in spleen cells only, correlating with the constitutive expression of type II IFN (IFN-γ) observed on those cells. Therefore, in vitro the constitutive expression of both the receptors and the ligands of type I or type II IFN is critical for the enhancement of the IFN activity. Any IFN deficiency can totally or partially impair IFN activity, suggesting the importance of type I and type II IFN interactions. Taken together, our results suggest that type I and type II IFNs may regulate biological activities through distinct as well as common IFN receptor complexes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Felder, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT(1)R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT(1)R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT(1)R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT(1)R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT(1)R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT(1)R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT(1)R as described in peripheral tissues.

  16. The angiotensin II-AT1 receptor stimulates reactive oxygen species within the cell nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, Karl D.; Gwathmey, TanYa M. [The Hypertension and Vascular Research Center, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Michalek, Ryan D.; Grayson, Jason M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Chappell, Mark C., E-mail: mchappel@wfubmc.edu [The Hypertension and Vascular Research Center, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2009-06-26

    We and others have reported significant expression of the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) on renal nuclei; thus, the present study assessed the functional pathways and distribution of the intracellular AT1R on isolated nuclei. Ang II (1 nM) stimulated DCF fluorescence, an intranuclear indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the AT1R antagonist losartan or the NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor DPI abolished the increase in ROS. Dual labeling of nuclei with antibodies against nucleoporin 62 (Nup62) and AT1R or the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 revealed complete overlap of the Nup62 and AT1R (99%) by flow cytometry, while NOX4 was present on 65% of nuclei. Treatment of nuclei with a PKC agonist increased ROS while the PKC inhibitor GF109203X or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished Ang II stimulation of ROS. We conclude that the Ang II-AT1R-PKC axis may directly influence nuclear function within the kidney through a redox sensitive pathway.

  17. Overview of the Mathematical and Empirical Receptor Models Workshop (Quail Roost II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert K.; Pace, Thompson G.

    On 14-17 March 1982, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored the Mathematical and Empirical Receptor Models Workshop (Quail Roost II) at the Quail Roost Conference Center, Rougemont, NC. Thirty-five scientists were invited to participate. The objective of the workshop was to document and compare results of source apportionment analyses of simulated and real aerosol data sets. The simulated data set was developed by scientists from the National Bureau of Standards. It consisted of elemental mass data generated using a dispersion model that simulated transport of aerosols from a variety of sources to a receptor site. The real data set contained the mass, elemental, and ionic species concentrations of samples obtained in 18 consecutive 12-h sampling periods in Houston, TX. Some participants performed additional analyses of the Houston filters by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, or light microscopy. Ten groups analyzed these data sets using a variety of modeling procedures. The results of the modeling exercises were evaluated and structured in a manner that permitted model intercomparisons. The major conclusions and recommendations derived from the intercomparisons were: (1) using aerosol elemental composition data, receptor models can resolve major emission sources, but additional analyses (including light microscopy and X-ray diffraction) significantly increase the number of sources that can be resolved; (2) simulated data sets that contain up to 6 dissimilar emission sources need to be generated, so that different receptor models can be adequately compared; (3) source apportionment methods need to be modified to incorporate a means of apportioning such aerosol species as sulfate and nitrate formed from SO 2 and NO, respectively, because current models tend to resolve particles into chemical species rather than to deduce their sources and (4) a source signature library may be required to be compiled for each airshed in order to

  18. Enhanced expression of the type II transforming growth factor beta receptor in human pancreatic cancer cells without alteration of type III receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, H; Yamanaka, Y; Büchler, M; Berger, H G; Kobrin, M S; Baldwin, R L; Korc, M

    1993-06-15

    We have recently found that human pancreatic adenocarcinomas exhibit strong immunostaining for the three mammalian transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) isoforms. These important growth-regulating polypeptides bind to a number of proteins, including the type I TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-I), type II TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-II), and the type III TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-III). In the present study we sought to determine whether T beta R-II and T beta R-III expression is altered in pancreatic cancer. Northern blot analysis indicated that, by comparison with the normal pancreas, pancreatic adenocarcinomas exhibited a 4.6-fold increase (P beta R-II. In contrast, mRNA levels encoding T beta R-III were not increased. In situ hybridization showed that T beta R-II mRNA was expressed in the majority of cancer cells, whereas mRNA grains encoding T beta R-III were detectable in only a few cancer cells and were present mainly in the surrounding stroma. These findings suggest that enhanced levels of T beta R-II may have a role in regulating human pancreatic cancer cell growth, while T beta R-III may function in the extracellular matrix.

  19. NR2 subunits and NMDA receptors on lamina II inhibitory and excitatory interneurons of the mouse dorsal horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacDermott Amy B

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NMDA receptors expressed by spinal cord neurons in the superficial dorsal horn are involved in the development of chronic pain associated with inflammation and nerve injury. The superficial dorsal horn has a complex and still poorly understood circuitry that is mainly populated by inhibitory and excitatory interneurons. Little is known about how NMDA receptor subunit composition, and therefore pharmacology and voltage dependence, varies with neuronal cell type. NMDA receptors are typically composed of two NR1 subunits and two of four NR2 subunits, NR2A-2D. We took advantage of the differences in Mg2+ sensitivity of the NMDA receptor subtypes together with subtype preferring antagonists to identify the NR2 subunit composition of NMDA receptors expressed on lamina II inhibitory and excitatory interneurons. To distinguish between excitatory and inhibitory interneurons, we used transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by the GAD67 promoter. Results Analysis of conductance ratio and selective antagonists showed that lamina II GABAergic interneurons express both the NR2A/B containing Mg2+ sensitive receptors and the NR2C/D containing NMDA receptors with less Mg2+ sensitivity. In contrast, excitatory lamina II interneurons express primarily NR2A/B containing receptors. Despite this clear difference in NMDA receptor subunit expression in the two neuronal populations, focally stimulated synaptic input is mediated exclusively by NR2A and 2B containing receptors in both neuronal populations. Conclusions Stronger expression of NMDA receptors with NR2C/D subunits by inhibitory interneurons compared to excitatory interneurons may provide a mechanism to selectively increase activity of inhibitory neurons during intense excitatory drive that can provide inhibitory feedback.

  20. Relationship between the bioavailability and molecular properties of angiotensin II receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević Jovana B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the relationships between several molecular properties and bioavailability data for seven of the most commonly prescribed angiotensin II receptor antagonists (also known as angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs or sartans, candesartan, eprosartan, irbesartan, losartan, olmesartan, telmisartan and valsartan. The molecular descriptors of ARBs are:, aqueous solubility (logS values, polar surface area (PSA, molecular weight (Mw, volume value (Vol, lipophilicity (logP values and the acidity descriptor (pKa1. The respective descriptors were calculated using four different software packages. The relevant bioavailability data were obtained from literature. Among calculated molecular descriptors, simple linear regression analysis showed the best correlation between bioavailability data and the lipophilicity descriptor, logP (R2 = 0.568. Multiple linear regression established good correlations between bioavailability and the lipophilicity descriptor, logP, using the molecular weight, Mw, or the acidity descriptor, pKa1, as an additional, independent variable (with R2 0.661 and 0.682, respectively. Finally, excluding candesartan from the calculations resulted in a very good correlation (R2 = 0.852 between the remaining ARB bioavailability and molecular descriptors MlogP and Mw as independent variables, determined by multiple linear regression. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR34031

  1. Endothelin ETA receptors and endothelium partially mediate the positive inotropic and lusitropic effects of angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Chaves, Paulo; Roncon-Albuquerque, Roberto; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F

    2006-08-21

    We analyzed the influence of endothelin-1 and endocardial endothelium on the myocardial effects of angiotensin-II. Angiotensin-II (10(-9)-10(-5) M) was tested in rabbit right papillary muscles in absence (Protocol-A) or presence of PD-145065 (10(-7) M; Protocol-B), BQ-123 (10(-7) M; Protocol-C) or losartan (10(-6) M; Protocol-E), as well as, after removing the endocardial endothelium with Triton X-100 0.5% (Protocol-D). In Protocol-F increasing concentrations of endothelin-1 (10(-10)-10(-8) M) were added in presence of angiotensin-II (10(-7) M) after selective removal of the endocardial endothelium. In Protocol-A, angiotensin-II had dose-dependent positive inotropic and lusitropic effects, maximal at 10(-6) M increasing 122+/-13% active tension, 117+/-16% dT/dtmax and 86+/-9% dT/dtmin. In Protocols B, C and D the inotropic and lusitropic effects of angiotensin-II were significantly attenuated. The same concentration (10(-6) M) of angiotensin-II increased respectively 48+/-11%, 59+/-27% and 72+/-16% active tension; 54+/-14%, 54+/-20% and 32+/-9% dT/dtmax; and 39+/-8%, 48+/-19% and 59+/-11% dT/dtmin; and 40+/-10%. EC(50) for active tension significantly increased from -7.8+/-0.1 logM in Protocol A to -7.1+/-0.3, -6.7+/-0.4 and -6.8+/-0.3 logM in Protocols B, C and D respectively, while Emax decreased from 106+/-14% in Protocol A to 50+/-14 and 51+/-19% in Protocols B and C respectively, but did not significantly change in Protocol D (114+/-25%). Losartan completely blocked the inotropic and lusitropic effects of angiotensin-II, while the attenuation of these effects after the selective removal of the endocardial endothelium was blunted by concomitant administration of endothelin-1 (Protocol F). In conclusion, angiotensin-II has a dose-dependent positive inotropic effect that depends, to a great extent, on endothelin ETA receptor activation and intact endocardial endothelium.

  2. Inhibitory effects of putative peptidic urotensin-II receptor antagonists on urotensin-II-induced contraction of cat isolated respiratory smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David J; Ao, Zhaohui; Camarda, Valeria; Aiyar, Nambi V; Johns, Douglas G; Douglas, Stephen A

    2005-06-15

    Urotensin-II is purported to influence pulmonary function by modulating smooth muscle tone/growth. In the present study, Northern blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated the presence of UT receptor mRNA in cat trachea, bronchi and lung parenchyma. Urotensin-II contracted cat isolated trachea and bronchi with similar potencies (pEC(50)s 8.61+/-0.07-8.81+/-0.10). Contractile efficacies ranged from 19+/-9% to 63+/-11% KCl in the primary and secondary bronchi. The peptidic UT receptor antagonists BIM-23127, SB-710411 and GSK248451 (7.18+/-0.12, 7.52+/-0.08 and 9.05+/-0.16 cat recombinant UT pK(i)s) inhibited urotensin-II-induced contraction of cat isolated trachea with pK(b)s 6.36+/-0.11, 6.74+/-0.07 and 9.27+/-0.12, respectively. As such, feline lung contains significant amounts of UT mRNA and this receptor appears to be functionally coupled to bronchoconstriction (the peptidic tool compound GSK248451 representing a sub-nanomolar inhibitor of such effects). These findings suggest that the cat represents a suitable species for future studies designed to assess the effects of the urotensin-II receptor on pulmonary (patho)physiology.

  3. Alloactivated HLA class II-positive T-cell lines induce IL-2 reactivity but lack accessory cell function in mixed leukocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Dickmeiss, E; Hofmann, B

    1989-01-01

    ). From 70 to 90% of the Ta were HLA class II-positive as judged by the reactions with HLA class II-reactive monoclonal antibodies, and the Ta carried the DR allospecificities of the original T-cell donor when typed in the microcytotoxic test using DR-specific alloantisera. Neither irradiated nor...

  4. The macrophage Ox-LDL receptor, CD36 and its association with type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Sunaina; Banerjee, Monisha

    2011-04-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a common and serious metabolic disorder worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death after cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Over time, diabetes mellitus can lead to different complications like atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease and many micro- and macrovascular diseases. CD36 is a class B scavenger receptor whose expression is prevalent in vascular lesions. It has been shown that high plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels become atherogenic when oxidized to modified LDL (Ox-LDL) by inducing foam cell formation via enhanced CD36 expression on macrophages. In addition to Ox-LDL, raised levels of glucose, insulin resistance, low HDL cholesterol, increased levels of free fatty acid (FFA) all result in increased expression of CD36, thereby contributing to T2DM and related atherosclerosis. Adipocytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin, leptin, resistin along with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) are important mediators in glucose homeostasis in association with CD36 and can be used as markers for T2DM and atherosclerosis. Several of these gene variants have shown association with lipid metabolism, T2DM and related complications. An attempt has been made to review the CD36 macrophage receptor and related molecules in association with T2DM.

  5. An antibody blocking activin type II receptors induces strong skeletal muscle hypertrophy and protects from atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach-Trifilieff, Estelle; Minetti, Giulia C; Sheppard, KellyAnn; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Feige, Jerome N; Hartmann, Steffen; Brachat, Sophie; Rivet, Helene; Koelbing, Claudia; Morvan, Frederic; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Glass, David J

    2014-02-01

    The myostatin/activin type II receptor (ActRII) pathway has been identified to be critical in regulating skeletal muscle size. Several other ligands, including GDF11 and the activins, signal through this pathway, suggesting that the ActRII receptors are major regulatory nodes in the regulation of muscle mass. We have developed a novel, human anti-ActRII antibody (bimagrumab, or BYM338) to prevent binding of ligands to the receptors and thus inhibit downstream signaling. BYM338 enhances differentiation of primary human skeletal myoblasts and counteracts the inhibition of differentiation induced by myostatin or activin A. BYM338 prevents myostatin- or activin A-induced atrophy through inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation, thus sparing the myosin heavy chain from degradation. BYM338 dramatically increases skeletal muscle mass in mice, beyond sole inhibition of myostatin, detected by comparing the antibody with a myostatin inhibitor. A mouse version of the antibody induces enhanced muscle hypertrophy in myostatin mutant mice, further confirming a beneficial effect on muscle growth beyond myostatin inhibition alone through blockade of ActRII ligands. BYM338 protects muscles from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy and weakness via prevention of muscle and tetanic force losses. These data highlight the compelling therapeutic potential of BYM338 for the treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness in multiple settings.

  6. Urea/thiourea derivatives and Zn(II)-DPA complex as receptors for anionic recognition—A brief account

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyadip Das; Prasenjit Mahato; Amrita Ghosh; Amal K Mandal; Tanmay Banerjee; Sukdeb Saha; Amitava Das

    2011-03-01

    This review covers few examples of anion complexation chemistry, with a special focus on urea/thiourea-based receptors and Zn(II)-dipicolyl amine-based receptors. This article specially focuses on structural aspects of the receptors and the anions for obtaining the desire specificity along with an efficient receptor-anion interaction. Two types of receptors have been described in this brief account; first one being the strong hydrogen bond donor urea/thiourea derivatives, which binds the anionic analytes through hydrogen bonded interactions; while, the second type of receptors are coordination complexes, where the coordination of the anion to the metal centre. In both the cases the anion binding modulate the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and thereby the spectroscopic response. Appropriate choice of the signalling unit may allow probing the anion binding phenomena through visual detection.

  7. The carboxy-terminal tail or the intracellular loop 3 is required for β-arrestin-dependent internalization of a mammalian type II GnRH receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madziva, Michael T; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Flanagan, Colleen A; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-08-15

    The type II GnRH receptor (GnRH-R2) in contrast to mammalian type I GnRH receptor (GnRH-R1) has a cytosolic carboxy-terminal tail. We investigated the role of β-arrestin 1 in GnRH-R2-mediated signalling and mapped the regions in GnRH-R2 required for recruitment of β-arrestin, employing internalization assays. We show that GnRH-R2 activation of ERK is dependent on β-arrestin and protein kinase C. Appending the tail of GnRH-R2 to GnRH-R1 enabled GRK- and β-arrestin-dependent internalization of the chimaeric receptor. Surprisingly, carboxy-terminally truncated GnRH-R2 retained β-arrestin and GRK-dependent internalization, suggesting that β-arrestin interacts with additional elements of GnRH-R2. Mutating serine and threonine or basic residues of intracellular loop 3 did not abolish β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization but a receptor lacking these basic residues and the carboxy-terminus showed no β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization. Our results suggest that basic residues at the amino-terminal end of intracellular loop 3 or the carboxy-terminal tail are required for β-arrestin dependent internalization.

  8. Conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond network between TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin; Mokrosinski, Jacek;

    2010-01-01

    Five highly conserved polar residues connected by a number of structural water molecules together with two rotamer micro-switches, TrpVI:13 and TyrVII:20, constitute an extended hydrogen bond network between the intracellular segments of TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII of 7TM receptors. Molecular dynamics...... to apparently function as a catching trap for water molecules. Mutational analysis of the beta2-adrenergic receptor demonstrated that the highly conserved polar residues of the hydrogen bond network were all important for receptor signaling but served different functions, some dampening constitutive activity...... (AsnI:18, AspII:10, and AsnVII:13), whereas others (AsnVII:12 and AsnVII:16) located one helical turn apart and sharing a water molecule were shown to be essential for agonist-induced signaling. It is concluded that the conserved water hydrogen bond network of 7TM receptors constitutes an extended...

  9. Protection of protease-activated receptor 2 mediated vasodilatation against angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chia, Elizabeth; Kagota, Satomi; Wijekoon, Enoka P; McGuire, John J

    2011-01-01

    Background Under conditions of cardiovascular dysfunction, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) agonists maintain vasodilatation activity, which has been attributed to increased cyclooxygenase-2, nitric oxide synthase and calcium-activated potassium channel (SK3.1) activities. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist mediated vasodilatation is unknown under conditions of dysfunction caused by angiotensin II. The main purpose of our study was to determine whether PAR2-induced vasodilatation of re...

  10. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker losartan prevents and rescues cerebrovascular, neuropathological and cognitive deficits in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongali, Brice; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Tong, Xin-Kang; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Lecrux, Clotilde; Imboden, Hans; Hamel, Edith

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) receptor blockers that bind selectively AngII type 1 (AT1) receptors may protect from Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the ability of the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan to cure or prevent AD hallmarks in aged (~18months at endpoint, 3months treatment) or adult (~12months at endpoint, 10months treatment) human amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We tested learning and memory with the Morris water maze, and evaluated neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-PET and laser Doppler flowmetry responses to whisker stimulation. Cerebrovascular reactivity was assessed with on-line videomicroscopy. We measured protein levels of oxidative stress enzymes (superoxide dismutases SOD1, SOD2 and NADPH oxidase subunit p67phox), and quantified soluble and deposited amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), AngII receptors AT1 and AT2, angiotensin IV receptor AT4, and cortical cholinergic innervation. In aged APP mice, losartan did not improve learning but it consolidated memory acquisition and recall, and rescued neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling and cerebrovascular dilatory capacity. Losartan normalized cerebrovascular p67phox and SOD2 protein levels and up-regulated those of SOD1. Losartan attenuated astrogliosis, normalized AT1 and AT4 receptor levels, but failed to rescue the cholinergic deficit and the Aβ pathology. Given preventively, losartan protected cognitive function, cerebrovascular reactivity, and AT4 receptor levels. Like in aged APP mice, these benefits occurred without a decrease in soluble Aβ species or plaque load. We conclude that losartan exerts potent preventive and restorative effects on AD hallmarks, possibly by mitigating AT1-initiated oxidative stress and normalizing memory-related AT4 receptors.

  11. Role of angiotensin II and vasopressin receptors within the supraoptic nucleus in water and sodium intake induced by the injection of angiotensin II into the medial septal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes V.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the effects of the injection into the supraoptic nucleus (SON of non-peptide AT1- and AT2-angiotensin II (ANG II receptor antagonists, DuP753 and PD123319, as well as of the arginine-vasopressin (AVP receptor antagonist d(CH25-Tyr(Me-AVP, on water and 3% NaCl intake induced by the injection of ANG II into the medial septal area (MSA. The effects on water or 3% NaCl intake were assessed in 30-h water-deprived or in 20-h water-deprived furosemide-treated adult male rats, respectively. The drugs were injected in 0.5 ml over 30-60 s. Controls were injected with a similar volume of 0.15 M NaCl. Antagonists were injected at doses of 20, 80 and 180 nmol. Water and sodium intake was measured over a 2-h period. Previous administration of the AT1 receptor antagonist DuP753 into the SON decreased water (65%, N = 10, P<0.01 and sodium intake (81%, N = 8, P<0.01 induced by the injection of ANG II (10 nmol into the MSA. Neither of these responses was significantly changed by injection of the AT2-receptor antagonist PD123319 into the SON. On the other hand, while there was a decrease in water intake (45%, N = 9, P<0.01, ANG II-induced sodium intake was significantly increased (70%, N = 8, P<0.01 following injection of the V1-type vasopressin antagonist d(CH25-Tyr(Me-AVP into the SON. These results suggest that both AT1 and V1 receptors within the SON may be involved in water and sodium intake induced by the activation of ANG II receptors within the MSA. Furthermore, they do not support the involvement of MSA AT2 receptors in the mediation of these responses.

  12. Modulation of the delayed rectifier K+ current in neurons by an angiotensin II type 2 receptor fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Richards, E M; Posner, P; Sumners, C

    1995-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulates the delayed rectifier K+ current (IK) in neurons cultured from rat hypothalamus and brain stem via AT2 receptors, and this effect involves activation of a Gi protein and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). However, there was no evidence that the AT2 receptor involved in this response was the same as the recently cloned AT2 receptor. In the present study, intracellular injection of a 22-amino acid peptide (PEP-22) corresponding to the putative third intracellular loop of the cloned AT2 receptor elicited an increase in IK in cultured neurons that was similar to the effect produced by ANG II. Furthermore, this effect of PEP-22 was abolished by pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml, 24 h) pretreatment and also by superfusion of the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid (10 nM), suggesting the involvement of Gi protein and PP2A, respectively. Intracellular injection of a random peptide or normal pipette solution did not affect neuronal IK. This is direct evidence to link the cloned AT2 receptor to a defined response elicited by ANG II.

  13. Interaction of angiotensin II with the C-terminal 300-320 fragment of the rat angiotensin II receptor AT1a monitored by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Nicola; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Lozzi, Luisa; Neri, Paolo; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2003-10-01

    Interaction between angiotensin II (Ang II) and the fragment peptide 300-320 (fCT300-320) of the rat angiotensin II receptor AT1a was demonstrated by relaxation measurements, NOE effects, chemical shift variations, and CD measurements. The correlation times modulating dipolar interactions for the bound and free forms of Ang II were estimated by the ratio of the nonselective and single-selective longitudinal relaxation rates. The intermolecular NOEs observed in NOESY spectra between HN protons of 9Lys(fCT) and 6His(ang), 10Phe(fCT) and 8Phe(ang), HN proton of 3Tyr(fCT) and Halpha of 4Tyr(ang), 5Phe(fCT)Hdelta and Halpha of 4Tyr(ang) indicated that Ang II aromatic residues are directly involved in the interaction, as also verified by relaxation data. Some fCT300-320 backbone features were inferred by the CSI method and CD experiments revealing that the presence of Ang II enhances the existential probability of helical conformations in the fCT fragment. Restrained molecular dynamics using the simulated annealing protocol was performed with intermolecular NOEs as constraints, imposing an alpha-helix backbone structure to fCT300-320 fragment. In the built model, one strongly preferred interaction was found that allows intermolecular stacking between aromatic rings and forces the peptide to wrap around the 6Leu side chain of the receptor fragment.

  14. Flavonoid Myricetin Modulates GABAA Receptor Activity through Activation of Ca2+ Channels and CaMK-II Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hu Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The flavonoid myricetin is found in several sedative herbs, for example, the St. John's Wort, but its influence on sedation and its possible mechanism of action are unknown. Using patch-clamp technique on a brain slice preparation, the present study found that myricetin promoted GABAergic activity in the neurons of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN by increasing the decay time and frequency of the inhibitory currents mediated by GABAA receptor. This effect of myricetin was not blocked by the GABAA receptor benzodiazepine- (BZ- binding site antagonist flumazenil, but by KN-62, a specific inhibitor of the Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMK-II. Patch clamp and live Ca2+ imaging studies found that myricetin could increase Ca2+ current and intracellular Ca2+ concentration, respectively, via T- and L-type Ca2+ channels in rat PVN neurons and hypothalamic primary culture neurons. Immunofluorescence staining showed increased phosphorylation of CaMK-II after myricetin incubation in primary culture of rat hypothalamic neurons, and the myricetin-induced CaMK-II phosphorylation was further confirmed by Western blotting in PC-12 cells. The present results suggest that myricetin enhances GABAA receptor activity via calcium channel/CaMK-II dependent mechanism, which is distinctively different from that of most existing BZ-binding site agonists of GABAA receptor.

  15. Rational drug design and synthesis of molecules targeting the angiotensin II type 1 and type 2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellici, Tahsin F; Tzakos, Andreas G; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2015-03-02

    The angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 and type 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) orchestrate an array of biological processes that regulate human health. Aberrant function of these receptors triggers pathophysiological responses that can ultimately lead to death. Therefore, it is important to design and synthesize compounds that affect beneficially these two receptors. Cardiovascular disease, which is attributed to the overactivation of the vasoactive peptide hormone Αng II, can now be treated with commercial AT1R antagonists. Herein, recent achievements in rational drug design and synthesis of molecules acting on the two AT receptors are reviewed. Quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and molecular modeling on the two receptors aim to assist the search for new active compounds. As AT1R and AT2R are GPCRs and drug action is localized in the transmembrane region the role of membrane bilayers is exploited. The future perspectives in this field are outlined. Tremendous progress in the field is expected if the two receptors are crystallized, as this will assist the structure based screening of the chemical space and lead to new potent therapeutic agents in cardiovascular and other diseases.

  16. Lack of the specific influence of histamine and histamine H1, H2 and H3 receptor ligands on the serotonin uptake and release in rat blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, D; Malinowska, B; Wollny, T; Godlewski, G; Buczko, W

    1996-01-01

    This work was designed to investigate the influence of histamine, and H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine, H2 receptor agonist dimaprit and H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the serotonin uptake and release in rat blood platelets. Histamine and R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (up to 1 mmol/l), 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine (up to 10 mumol/l) and dimaprit (up to 1 mumol/l) failed to affect the serotonin uptake. The concentration-dependent inhibitory effects of higher concentrations of 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine and dimaprit (up to 1 mmol/l) were not diminished by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene and the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (1 and 100 mumol/l each), respectively. Histamine, 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine, dimaprit and R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (up to 10 mumol/l) did not change the serotonin release from rat blood platelets. Our results demonstrate that histamine and histamine H1, H2 and H3 receptor agonists do not affect in a specific manner the serotonin uptake and release in rat blood platelets.

  17. UROTENSIN II RECEPTOR IN THE RAT AIRWAY SMOOTH MUSCLE AND ITS EFFECT ON THE RAT AIRWAY SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS PROLIFERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚红; 赵鸣武; 刘秀华; 姚婉贞; 杨军; 张肇康; 唐朝枢

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the characteristics of urotensin II (U-II) receptor in the rat airway smooth muscleand the effect and signal transduction pathway of U-II on the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells.Methods. Using 125-UII binding assay to measure the Bmax and Kd of U-II receptor. Using the 3H-TdRincorporation to deter mine the effect of U-II on the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells and its signal transduc-tion pathway. Using Fura-2/AM to measure the effect of U-II on the cytosolic free calcium concentration.Results. 1. 125I-UⅡ binding increased with the time and reached saturation at 45min. The Bmax was(ll. 36 +0.37)fmol/mg pr and Kd was (4.46 +0.61)nmol/L. 2. U-II increased 3H-TdR incorporation of theairway smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. 3. H7, PDg8059 and nicardipine, inhibitors of PKC,MAPK, calcium cha.nnel, respectively, significantly inhibited U-II-stimulated 3H-TdR incorporation of airwaysmooth muscle cells. W7, inhibitor of CaM-PK, had no effect. 4. Cyclosporin A, inhibitor of CaN, inhibited3H-TdRincorporation ofthe airway smooth muscle cells induced by U-Ⅱl in a dose-dependent manner. 5. U-Ⅱlpromot-ed cy-tosolic free calcium concentration increase by 18%.Conclusions. 1. There was U-II receptor in the rat airway smooth muscle. 2. The effect of U-II-stimulated-3H-TdR incorporation of airway smooth muscle cells was mediated by such signal transduction pathway as Ca2 +.PKC, MAPK and Ca.N, etc.``

  18. Immunosuppression preserves renal autoregulatory function and microvascular P2X1 receptor reactivity in ANG II-hypertensive rats

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Autoregulation is critical for protecting the kidney against arterial pressure elevation and is compromised in some forms of hypertension. Evidence indicates that activated lymphocytes contribute importantly to cardiovascular injury in hypertension. We hypothesized that activated lymphocytes contribute to renal vascular dysfunction by impairing autoregulation and P2X1 receptor signaling in ANG II-infused hypertensive rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving ANG II infusion were treated with a...

  19. Activation of both Group I and Group II metabotropic glutamatergic receptors suppress retinogeniculate transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Y-W; Sherman, S M

    2013-07-09

    Relay cells of dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) receive a Class 1 glutamatergic input from the retina and a Class 2 input from cortical layer 6. Among the properties of Class 2 synapses is the ability to activate metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and mGluR activation is known to affect thalamocortical transmission via regulating retinogeniculate and thalamocortical synapses. Using brain slices, we studied the effects of Group I (dihydroxyphenylglycine) and Group II ((2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine) mGluR agonists on retinogeniculate synapses. We showed that both agonists inhibit retinogeniculate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) through presynaptic mechanisms, and their effects are additive and independent. We also found high-frequency stimulation of the layer 6 corticothalamic input produced a similar suppression of retinogeniculate EPSCs, suggesting layer 6 projection to LGN as a plausible source of activating these presynaptic mGluRs.

  20. Angiotensin II receptor blocker-induced angioedema in the oral floor and epiglottis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shino, Masato; Takahashi, Katsumasa; Murata, Takaaki; Iida, Hideki; Yasuoka, Yoshihito; Furuya, Nobuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We report the rare case of angioedema (also known as Quincke edema), which was induced by valsartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). ARBs are a new class of antihypertensive agent that is developed to exclude the adverse effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. In theory, ARBs do not contribute to the occurrence of angioedema because they do not increase the serum level of bradykinin, the responsible substance for angioedema. However, some reports of ARB-induced angioedema have recently been published. In this study, we present the forth case and the first Asian case of angioedema due to valsartan, which is one of the ARBs. Otolaryngologist should be wary of the prescribing ARB and discontinue ARBs treatment soon, if angioedema is recognized.

  1. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Mediated Electrical Remodeling in Mouse Cardiac Myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Kim

    Full Text Available We recently characterized an autocrine renin angiotensin system (RAS in canine heart. Activation of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors (AT1Rs induced electrical remodeling, including inhibition of the transient outward potassium current Ito, prolongation of the action potential (AP, increased calcium entry and increased contractility. Electrical properties of the mouse heart are very different from those of dog heart, but if a similar system existed in mouse, it could be uniquely studied through genetic manipulations. To investigate the presence of a RAS in mouse, we measured APs and Ito in isolated myocytes. Application of angiotensin II (A2 for 2 or more hours reduced Ito magnitude, without affecting voltage dependence, and prolonged APs in a dose-dependent manner. Based on dose-inhibition curves, the fast and slow components of Ito (Ito,fast and IK,slow appeared to be coherently regulated by [A2], with 50% inhibition at an A2 concentration of about 400 nM. This very high K0.5 is inconsistent with systemic A2 effects, but is consistent with an autocrine RAS in mouse heart. Pre-application of the microtubule destabilizing agent colchicine eliminated A2 effects on Ito and AP duration, suggesting these effects depend on intracellular trafficking. Application of the biased agonist SII ([Sar1-Ile4-Ile8]A2, which stimulates receptor internalization without G protein activation, caused Ito reduction and AP prolongation similar to A2-induced changes. These data demonstrate AT1R mediated regulation of Ito in mouse heart. Moreover, all measured properties parallel those measured in dog heart, suggesting an autocrine RAS may be a fundamental feedback system that is present across species.

  2. Polyester monomers lack ability to bind and activate both androgenic and estrogenic receptors as determined by in vitro and in silico methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osimitz, Thomas G; Welsh, William J; Ai, Ni; Toole, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results from the screening of seven monomers used by Eastman Chemical to make various polymers. Ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, polytetramethylene glycol, isophthalic acid, monosodium-5-sulfoisophthalic acid, 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, and dimethylcyclohexanedicarboxylate were screened for potential androgenicity or estrogenicity. The following studies were conducted: QSAR for binding to the AR and ER, in vitro Androgen Receptor Binding Assay, in vitro Estrogen Receptor Binding Assays (alpha and beta isoforms), in vitro Androgen Receptor Transactivation Assay in human cells, and in vitro Estrogen Receptor Transactivation Assay in human cells. None of the QSAR models predicted that any of the monomers possessed appreciable binding affinity for either AR or ER. Binding assays showed no evidence of interaction with either the AR or the alpha or beta ER receptors. Similarly, the AR and ER transactivation assays were negative. Moreover, six of the seven monomers have been subjected to 13-week and developmental toxicity studies in rats with no androgen- or estrogen-related effects being noted. Given the negative results of the in vitro screening assays (except PMG which demonstrated cytotoxicity) as well as available repeated dose and developmental and reproductive studies, the data suggest that none of the monomers tested exhibit androgenic or estrogenic hazards.

  3. Experimental diabetes increases insulin-like growth factor I and II receptor concentration and gene expression in kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, H.; Shen-Orr, Z.; Stannard, B.; Burguera, B.; Roberts, C.T. Jr.; LeRoith, D. (National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) is a mitogenic hormone with important regulatory roles in growth and development. One of the target organs for IGF-I action is the kidney, which synthesizes abundant IGF-I receptors and IGF-I itself. To study the involvement of IGF-I and the IGF-I receptor in the development of nephropathy, one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus, we measured the expression of these genes in the kidney and in other tissues of the streptozocin-induced diabetic rat. The binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I to crude membranes was measured in the same tissues. We observed a 2.5-fold increase in the steady-state level of IGF-I-receptor mRNA in the diabetic kidney, which was accompanied by a 2.3-fold increase in IGF-I binding. In addition to this increase in IGF-I binding to the IGF-I receptor, there was also binding to a lower-molecular-weight material that may represent an IGF-binding protein. No change was detected in the level of IGF-I-peptide mRNA. Similarly, IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-II binding were significantly increased in the diabetic kidney. IGF-I- and IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-I and IGF-II binding returned to control values after insulin treatment. Because the IGF-I receptor is able to transduce mitogenic signals on activation of its tyrosine kinase domain, we hypothesize that, among other factors, high levels of receptor in the diabetic kidney may also be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Increased IGF-II-receptor expression in the diabetic kidney may be important for the intracellular transport and packaging of lysosomal enzymes, although a role for this receptor in signal transduction cannot be excluded. Finally, the possible role of IGF-binding proteins requires further study.

  4. Reduction of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors during development of benzodiazepine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ritsuko; Itoh, Yoshinori; Murata, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hosoi, Masako; Mine, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged use of benzodiazepines often leads to dependence and withdrawal syndrome. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying benzodiazepine dependence have not been fully clarified. Several investigators have shown an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the pathophysiology of dependence or withdrawal. This study was performed to elucidate the role of mGluRs in benzodiazepine dependence. Withdrawal signs were precipitated in mice by flumazenil injection (25 mg/kg) after continuous subcutaneous infusion of benzodiazepines for 7 days, and the effects of several Gi-coupled receptor ligands on forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation were examined in the cerebral cortex of mice. The mRNA expression for mGluRs was determined by RT-PCR. A single injection of flumazenil precipitated typical withdrawal signs such as tail elevation and tremor in mice treated with diazepam or alprazolam, but not quazepam. The inhibitory effect of nonselective mGluR ligands on adenylate cyclase activity was diminished in mice that showed signs of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The mRNA expression levels of mGluR2 and mGluR3 were lowered in the cerebral cortex of mice pretreated with diazepam or alprazolam. Our findings suggest that the reduction in the expression of group II mGluRs subunits may be involved in the development of benzodiazepine dependence.

  5. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-06-14

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3(-/-) but not in mGluR2(-/-) mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity.

  6. Angiotensin II directly stimulates macula densa Na-2Cl-K cotransport via apical AT(1) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gergely; Peti-Peterdi, János; Rosivall, László; Bell, P Darwin

    2002-02-01

    ANG II is a modulator of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF); however, the site of its action remains unknown. Macula densa (MD) cells sense changes in luminal NaCl concentration ([NaCl](L)) via a Na-2Cl-K cotransporter, and these cells do possess ANG II receptors. We tested whether ANG II regulates Na-2Cl-K cotransport in MD cells. MD cell Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](i)) was measured using sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate with fluorescence microscopy. Resting [Na(+)](i) in MD cells was 27.7 +/- 1.05 mM (n = 138) and increased (Delta[Na(+)](i)) by 18.5 +/- 1.14 mM (n = 17) at an initial rate (Delta[Na(+)](i)/Deltat) of 5.54 +/- 0.53 x 10(-4) U/s with an increase in [NaCl](L) from 25 to 150 mM. Both Delta[Na(+)](i) and Delta[Na(+)](i)/Deltat were inhibited by 80% with 100 microM luminal furosemide. ANG II (10(-9) or 10(-12) M) added to the lumen increased MD resting [Na(+)](i) and [NaCl](L)-dependent Delta[Na(+)](i) and caused a twofold increase in Delta[Na(+)](i)/Deltat. Bath (10(-9) M) ANG II also stimulated cotransport activity, and there was no additive effect of simultaneous addition of ANG II to bath and lumen. The effects of luminal ANG II were furosemide sensitive and abolished by the AT(1) receptor blocker candesartan. ANG II at 10(-6) M failed to stimulate the cotransporter, whereas increased cotransport activity could be restored by blocking AT(2) receptors with PD-123, 319. Thus ANG II may modulate TGF responses via alterations in MD Na-2Cl-K cotransport activity.

  7. Hyperinsulinemia: effect on cardiac mass/function, angiotensin II receptor expression, and insulin signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Anne-Maj; Bollano, Entela; Mobini, Reza; Larsson, Britt-Mari; Omerovic, Elmir; Fu, Michael; Waagstein, Finn; Holmäng, Agneta

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the association between hyperinsulinemia and cardiac hypertrophy, we treated rats with insulin for 7 wk and assessed effects on myocardial growth, vascularization, and fibrosis in relation to the expression of angiotensin II receptors (AT-R). We also characterized insulin signaling pathways believed to promote myocyte growth and interact with proliferative responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptors, and we assessed myocardial insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and p110 alpha catalytic and p85 regulatory subunits of phospatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, MEK, ERK1/2, and S6 kinase-1 (S6K1). Left ventricular (LV) geometry and performance were evaluated echocardiographically. Insulin decreased AT1a-R mRNA expression but increased protein levels and increased AT2-R mRNA and protein levels and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser374/Tyr989), MEK1/2 (Ser218/Ser222), ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), S6K1 (Thr421/Ser424/Thr389), Akt (Thr308/Thr308), and PI3K p110 alpha but not of p85 (Tyr508). Insulin increased LV mass and relative wall thickness and reduced stroke volume and cardiac output. Histochemical examination demonstrated myocyte hypertrophy and increases in interstitial fibrosis. Metoprolol plus insulin prevented the increase in relative wall thickness, decreased fibrosis, increased LV mass, and improved function seen with insulin alone. Thus our data demonstrate that chronic hyperinsulinemia decreases AT1a-to-AT2 ratio and increases MEK-ERK1/2 and S6K1 pathway activity related to hypertrophy. These changes might be crucial for increased cardiovascular growth and fibrosis and signs of impaired LV function.

  8. BMP type I receptor ALK2 is required for angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolli, Ester; Ernande, Laura; Thoonen, Robrecht; Kolodziej, Starsha A.; Leyton, Patricio A.; Cheng, Juan; Tainsh, Robert E. T.; Mayeur, Claire; Rhee, David K.; Wu, Mei. X.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Zapol, Warren M.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Bloch, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling contributes to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the identity of the BMP type I receptor involved in cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. By using quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, we demonstrated that BMP signaling increased during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs), as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5 and induction of Id1 gene expression. Inhibition of BMP signaling with LDN193189 or noggin, and silencing of Smad 1 or 4 using small interfering RNA diminished the ability of phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy in NRCs. Conversely, activation of BMP signaling with BMP2 or BMP4 induced hypertrophy in NRCs. Luciferase reporter assay further showed that BMP2 or BMP4 treatment of NRCs repressed atrogin-1 gene expression concomitant with an increase in calcineurin protein levels and enhanced activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, providing a mechanism by which BMP signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy. In a model of cardiac hypertrophy, C57BL/6 mice treated with angiotensin II (A2) had increased BMP signaling in the left ventricle. Treatment with LDN193189 attenuated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition in left ventricles. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of BMP type I receptor ALK2 (activin-like kinase 2), but not ALK1 or ALK3, inhibited BMP signaling and mitigated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular fibrosis in mice. The results suggest that BMP signaling upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell pathway via BMP type I receptor ALK2, contributing to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. PMID:26873969

  9. BMP type I receptor ALK2 is required for angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohd; Spagnolli, Ester; Ernande, Laura; Thoonen, Robrecht; Kolodziej, Starsha A; Leyton, Patricio A; Cheng, Juan; Tainsh, Robert E T; Mayeur, Claire; Rhee, David K; Wu, Mei X; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Buys, Emmanuel S; Zapol, Warren M; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B

    2016-04-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling contributes to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the identity of the BMP type I receptor involved in cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. By using quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, we demonstrated that BMP signaling increased during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs), as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5 and induction of Id1 gene expression. Inhibition of BMP signaling with LDN193189 or noggin, and silencing of Smad 1 or 4 using small interfering RNA diminished the ability of phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy in NRCs. Conversely, activation of BMP signaling with BMP2 or BMP4 induced hypertrophy in NRCs. Luciferase reporter assay further showed that BMP2 or BMP4 treatment of NRCs repressed atrogin-1 gene expression concomitant with an increase in calcineurin protein levels and enhanced activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, providing a mechanism by which BMP signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy. In a model of cardiac hypertrophy, C57BL/6 mice treated with angiotensin II (A2) had increased BMP signaling in the left ventricle. Treatment with LDN193189 attenuated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition in left ventricles. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of BMP type I receptor ALK2 (activin-like kinase 2), but not ALK1 or ALK3, inhibited BMP signaling and mitigated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular fibrosis in mice. The results suggest that BMP signaling upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell pathway via BMP type I receptor ALK2, contributing to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis.

  10. Functionalization of Ruthenium(II) terpyridine complexes with cyclic RGD pep-tides to target integrin receptors in cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahn, Eva M.; Estrada Ortiz, Natalia; Han, Jiaying; Ferreira, Vera F. C.; Kapp, Tobias G.; Correia, Joao D. G.; Casini, Angela; Kuehn, Fritz E.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of selectivity for cancer cells and the resulting negative impact on healthy tissue is a severe drawback of actual cancer chemotherapy. Tethering of cytotoxic drugs to targeting vectors such as peptides, which recognize receptors overexpressed on the surface of tumor cells, is one possible

  11. Lack of neuroprotection in the absence of P2X7 receptors in toxin-induced animal models of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittel Ágnes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies indicate a role of P2X7 receptors in processes that lead to neuronal death. The main objective of our study was to examine whether genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of P2X7 receptors influenced dopaminergic cell death in various models of Parkinson's disease (PD. Results mRNA encoding P2X7 and P2X4 receptors was up-regulated after treatment of PC12 cells with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine (MPTP. P2X7 antagonists protected against MPTP and rotenone induced toxicity in the LDH assay, but failed to protect after rotenone treatment in the MTT assay in PC12 cells and in primary midbrain culture. In vivo MPTP and in vitro rotenone pretreatments increased the mRNA expression of P2X7 receptors in the striatum and substantia nigra of wild-type mice. Basal mRNA expression of P2X4 receptors was higher in P2X7 knockout mice and was further up-regulated by MPTP treatment. Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of P2X7 receptors did not change survival rate or depletion of striatal endogenous dopamine (DA content after in vivo MPTP or in vitro rotenone treatment. However, depletion of norepinephrine was significant after MPTP treatment only in P2X7 knockout mice. The basal ATP content was higher in the substantia nigra of wild-type mice, but the ADP level was lower. Rotenone treatment elicited a similar reduction in ATP content in the substantia nigra of both genotypes, whereas reduction of ATP was more pronounced after rotenone treatment in striatal slices of P2X7 deficient mice. Although the endogenous amino acid content remained unchanged, the level of the endocannabinoid, 2-AG, was elevated by rotenone in the striatum of wild-type mice, an effect that was absent in mice deficient in P2X7 receptors. Conclusions We conclude that P2X7 receptor deficiency or inhibition does not support the survival of dopaminergic neurons in an in vivo or in vitro models of PD.

  12. Hypercholesterolemia blunts the oxidative stress elicited by hypertension in venules through angiotensin II type-2 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Alper; Senchenkova, Elena; Granger, D. Neil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia elicit inflammatory and thrombogenic responses in the microvasculature. However, little is known about whether and how risk factor combinations alter microvascular function. We examined how the actions of HTN+HCh on the microvasculature differ from the responses elicited by either risk factor alone. METHODS Intravital microscopy was used to monitor the adhesion and emigration of leukocytes and dihydrorhodamine oxidation in cremaster muscle venules of wild type mice that were infused with angiotensin II for 2 wks (HTN), placed on a high cholesterol diet (HCD), or both. RESULTS Either HTN or HCh alone enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species and promoted the recruitment of leukocytes in venules. However, the combination of HTN and HCh produced changes in ROS production and leukocyte recruitment that were greatly attenuated compared to HTN alone. The inhibitory effects of HCh on the AngII mediated responses were also observed in genetically-induced HCh (ApoE-deficient mice). Treating HCh + HTN mice with an antagonist to AT2r reversed the HCh-dependent protection against oxidative stress and inflammation during HTN. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate that HCh blunts the oxidative stress and inflammatory cell recruitment elicited by hypertension in venules through a mechanism that involves AT2 receptor activation. PMID:26775070

  13. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment.

  14. Effects of Ang II receptor blocker irbesartan on adipose tissue function in mice with metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Akinobu; Tamura, Kouichi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Ohsawa, Masato; Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Kobayashi, Ryu; Tsurumi-Ikeya, Yuko; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Dejima, Toru; Ohki, Koji; Haku, Sona; Yamashita, Akio; Umemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the functional renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the adipose tissue. The adipose tissue RAS is proposed in the pathophysiology of metabolic disorders. In the present study, we examined therapeutic effects of irbesartan, an angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R)-specific blocker, in genetically obese diabetic KKAy mice, a model of human metabolic disorders without any dietary loading, with our focus on the analysis on possible effect of irbesartan on the adipose tissue. The treatment with irbesartan significantly lowered systolic blood pressure with a concomitant decrease in body weight in KKAy mice. In addition, irbesartan significantly decreased the adipose leptin mRNA expression and tended to decrease IL-6 mRNA expression in the adipose tissue of KKAy mice. Furthermore irbesartan preserved the adipose gene expression of AT1R-associated protein (ATRAP), an endogenous inhibitory molecule of tissue AT1R signaling, with a concomitant tendency of up-regulation of adipose tissue ATRAP/AT1R ratio. Collectively, these results suggest that the irbesartan-induced beneficial suppressive effect on the leptin-IL-6 axis in the adipose tissue in KKAy mice is partly mediated by a trend of up-regulation of the adipose ATRAP/AT1R ratio as one of pleiotropic effects of irbesartan.

  15. Renal graft failure after addition of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Nielsen, Arne Høj; Baekgaard, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Combined treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and an angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor blocker (ARB) has been suggested in order to achieve a more complete blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in cardiovascular and renal disease. The present report...... describes a case of acute renal graft dysfunction following the addition of an ARB to existing ACE inhibition. This unmasked an unknown iliac artery stenosis. The case indicates a possible important role of Ang II generated by non-ACE pathways in this situation....

  16. Nuclear receptors from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi lack a zinc-finger DNA-binding domain: lineage-specific loss or ancestral condition in the emergence of the nuclear receptor superfamily?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reitzel Adam M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear receptors (NRs are an ancient superfamily of metazoan transcription factors that play critical roles in regulation of reproduction, development, and energetic homeostasis. Although the evolutionary relationships among NRs are well-described in two prominent clades of animals (deuterostomes and protostomes, comparatively little information has been reported on the diversity of NRs in early diverging metazoans. Here, we identified NRs from the phylum Ctenophora and used a phylogenomic approach to explore the emergence of the NR superfamily in the animal kingdom. In addition, to gain insight into conserved or novel functions, we examined NR expression during ctenophore development. Results We report the first described NRs from the phylum Ctenophora: two from Mnemiopsis leidyi and one from Pleurobrachia pileus. All ctenophore NRs contained a ligand-binding domain and grouped with NRs from the subfamily NR2A (HNF4. Surprisingly, all the ctenophore NRs lacked the highly conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD. NRs from Mnemiopsis were expressed in different regions of developing ctenophores. One was broadly expressed in the endoderm during gastrulation. The second was initially expressed in the ectoderm during gastrulation, in regions corresponding to the future tentacles; subsequent expression was restricted to the apical organ. Phylogenetic analyses of NRs from ctenophores, sponges, cnidarians, and a placozoan support the hypothesis that expansion of the superfamily occurred in a step-wise fashion, with initial radiations in NR family 2, followed by representatives of NR families 3, 6, and 1/4 originating prior to the appearance of the bilaterian ancestor. Conclusions Our study provides the first description of NRs from ctenophores, including the full complement from Mnemiopsis. Ctenophores have the least diverse NR complement of any animal phylum with representatives that cluster with only one subfamily (NR2A. Ctenophores and

  17. Nuclear receptors from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi lack a zinc-finger DNA-binding domain: lineage-specific loss or ancestral condition in the emergence of the nuclear receptor superfamily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzel, Adam M; Pang, Kevin; Ryan, Joseph F; Mullikin, James C; Martindale, Mark Q; Baxevanis, Andreas D; Tarrant, Ann M

    2011-02-03

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are an ancient superfamily of metazoan transcription factors that play critical roles in regulation of reproduction, development, and energetic homeostasis. Although the evolutionary relationships among NRs are well-described in two prominent clades of animals (deuterostomes and protostomes), comparatively little information has been reported on the diversity of NRs in early diverging metazoans. Here, we identified NRs from the phylum Ctenophora and used a phylogenomic approach to explore the emergence of the NR superfamily in the animal kingdom. In addition, to gain insight into conserved or novel functions, we examined NR expression during ctenophore development. We report the first described NRs from the phylum Ctenophora: two from Mnemiopsis leidyi and one from Pleurobrachia pileus. All ctenophore NRs contained a ligand-binding domain and grouped with NRs from the subfamily NR2A (HNF4). Surprisingly, all the ctenophore NRs lacked the highly conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD). NRs from Mnemiopsis were expressed in different regions of developing ctenophores. One was broadly expressed in the endoderm during gastrulation. The second was initially expressed in the ectoderm during gastrulation, in regions corresponding to the future tentacles; subsequent expression was restricted to the apical organ. Phylogenetic analyses of NRs from ctenophores, sponges, cnidarians, and a placozoan support the hypothesis that expansion of the superfamily occurred in a step-wise fashion, with initial radiations in NR family 2, followed by representatives of NR families 3, 6, and 1/4 originating prior to the appearance of the bilaterian ancestor. Our study provides the first description of NRs from ctenophores, including the full complement from Mnemiopsis. Ctenophores have the least diverse NR complement of any animal phylum with representatives that cluster with only one subfamily (NR2A). Ctenophores and sponges have a similarly restricted NR complement

  18. Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Mimicking as Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor II Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Rana O; Dhillon, Baltej Singh; Sandhu, Harleen K; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We report successful endovascular repair of a left vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with transforming growth factor beta receptor II mutation. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left subclavian artery aneurysm on computed tomography angiography. The patient consented to publication of this report.

  19. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  20. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  1. Angiotensin II-AT1–receptor signaling is necessary for cyclooxygenase-2–dependent postnatal nephron generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frölich, Stefanie; Slattery, Patrick; Thomas, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    was achievable. Plasma renin concentration in mouse pups showed a birth peak and a second peak around day P8 during the first 10 days post birth. Administration of the angiotensin II receptor AT1 antagonist telmisartan from day P1 to P3 did not result in cortical damage. However, telmisartan treatment from day P...

  2. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Erick A.; Stedenfeld, Kristen A.; Sved, Alan F.; Speth, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of 125I-sarcosine1, isoleucine8 Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10%) reduction in AT1 receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia. PMID:26138553

  3. Lack of associations between serum leptin, a polymorphism in the gene for the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor and glucose tolerance in the Dutch population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, JAMJL; Koper, JW; Stolk, RP; Englaro, P; Uitterlinden, AG; Huang, Q; van Leeuwen, JPTM; Blum, WF; Attanasio, AMF; Pols, HAP; Grobbee, DE; de Jong, FH; Lamberts, SWJ

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND The associations between leptin levels and the prevalence of a polymorphism in the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor were studied in a cross-sectional analysis of 600 participants in a population-based study, which were stratified for glucose tolerance by an oral glucose tolerance test. METHODS

  4. Protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 contribute to angiotensin II-induced activation of adventitial fibroblasts from rat aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Rui-Qing; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Bao-Li [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (China); Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai (China); Li, Xiao-Dong [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (China); Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai (China); Hong, Mo-Na [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (China); Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai (China); Chen, Qi-Zhi [Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai (China); Han, Wei-Qing, E-mail: whan020@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (China); Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai (China); Gao, Ping-Jin, E-mail: gaopingjin@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (China); Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-29

    Adventitial fibroblasts (AFs) can be activated by angiotensin II (Ang II) and exert pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory effects in vascular remodeling. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 play a significant role in fibrogenic and inflammatory diseases. The present study hypothesized that PAR1 and PAR2 are involved in Ang II-induced AF activation and contribute to adventitial remodeling. We found that direct activation of PAR1 and PAR2 with PAR1-AP and PAR2-AP led to AF activation, including proliferation and differentiation of AFs, extracellular matrix synthesis, as well as production of pro-fibrotic cytokine TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and MCP-1. Furthermore, PAR1 and PAR2 mediated Ang II-induced AF activation, since both PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists inhibited Ang II-induced proliferation, migration, differentiation, extracellular matrix synthesis and production of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in AFs. Finally, mechanistic study showed that Ang II, via Ang II type I receptor (AT1R), upregulated both PAR1 and PAR2 expression, and transactivated PAR1 and PAR2, as denoted by internalization of both proteins. In conclusion, our results suggest that PAR1 and PAR2 play a critical role in Ang II-induced AF activation, and this may contribute to adventitia-related pathological changes. - Highlights: • Direct activation of PAR1 and PAR2 led to adventitial fibroblast (AF) activation. • PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists attenuated Ang II-induced AF activation. • Ang II induced the upregulation and transactivation of PAR1/PAR2 in AFs.

  5. Cleavage of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and nuclear accumulation of the cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Julia L; Mills, Sarah J; Naquin, Ryan T; Alam, Jawed; Re, Richard N

    2007-04-01

    Our published studies show that the distribution of the ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor (AT(1)R), expressed as a enhanced yellow fluorescent fusion (YFP) protein (AT(1)R/EYFP), is altered upon cellular treatment with ANG II or coexpression with intracellular ANG II. AT(1)R accumulates in nuclei of cells only in the presence of ANG II. Several transmembrane receptors are known to accumulate in nuclei, some as holoreceptors and others as cleaved receptor products. The present study was designed to determine whether the AT(1)R is cleaved before nuclear transport. A plasmid encoding a rat AT(1)R labeled at the amino terminus with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and at the carboxy terminus with EYFP was employed. Image analyses of this protein in COS-7 cells, CCF-STTG1 glial cells, and A10 vascular smooth muscle cells show the two fluorescent moieties to be largely spatially colocalized in untreated cells. ANG II treatment, however, leads to a separation of the fluorescent moieties with yellow fluorescence accumulating in more than 30% of cellular nuclei. Immunoblot analyses of extracts and conditioned media from transfected cells indicate that the CFP domain fused to the extracellular amino-terminal AT(1)R domain is cleaved from the membrane and that the YFP domain, together with the intracellular cytoplasmic carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R, is also cleaved from the membrane-bound receptor. The carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R is essential for cleavage; cleavage does not occur in protein deleted with respect to this region. Overexpressed native AT(1)R (nonfusion) is also cleaved; the intracellular 6-kDa cytoplasmic domain product accumulates to a significantly higher level with ANG II treatment.

  6. The disintegrin and metalloproteinase ADAM12 contributes to TGF-beta signaling through interaction with the type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atfi, Azeddine; Dumont, Emmanuelle; Colland, Frédéric;

    2007-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates a wide variety of biological processes through two types of Ser/Thr transmembrane receptors: the TGF-beta type I receptor and the TGF-beta type II receptor (TbetaRII). Upon ligand binding, TGF-beta type I receptor activated by TbetaRII propagates...... signals to Smad proteins, which mediate the activation of TGF-beta target genes. In this study, we identify ADAM12 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 12) as a component of the TGF-beta signaling pathway that acts through association with TbetaRII. We found that ADAM12 functions by a mechanism...... independent of its protease activity to facilitate the activation of TGF-beta signaling, including the phosphorylation of Smad2, association of Smad2 with Smad4, and transcriptional activation. Furthermore, ADAM12 induces the accumulation of TbetaRII in early endosomal vesicles and stabilizes the Tbeta...

  7. New probes for angiotensin II receptors. Synthesis, radioiodination and biological properties of biotinylated and haptenated angiotensin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnafous, J C; Tence, M; Seyer, R; Marie, J; Aumelas, A; Jard, S

    1988-05-01

    The present work delineates the basis for chemical modifications which can be introduced on the angiotensin II (AII) molecule to design probes suitable for indirect affinity techniques, especially for receptor purification. Using the solid-phase synthesis strategy, biotin or dinitrophenyl moieties have been added at the N-terminus of AII, with aminohexanoic acid as spacer arm. The resulting probes, (6-biotinylamido)hexanoyl-AII (Bio-Ahx-AII) and dinitrophenylaminohexanoyl-AII (Dnp-Ahx-AII), were prepared in their monoiodinated and highly labelled radioiodinated forms, with possible sulphoxidation of biotin. In addition to their ability to interact with streptavidin and anti-Dnp antibodies respectively, the two ligands displayed almost unchanged affinities for hepatic AII receptors as compared with AII. Bio-Ahx-AII and Dnp-Ahx-AII behaved as agonists on several AII-sensitive systems. The potential applications of these probes, receptor purification, cell labelling and sorting and histochemical receptor visualization, are discussed.

  8. Aldosterone breakthrough caused by chronic blockage of angiotensin II type 1 receptors in human adrenocortical cells: possible involvement of bone morphogenetic protein-6 actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Fumio; Inagaki, Kenichi; Suzuki, Jiro; Miyoshi, Tomoko; Kano, Yoshihiro; Goto, Junko; Ogura, Toshio; Makino, Hirofumi

    2008-06-01

    Circulating aldosterone concentrations occasionally increase after initial suppression with angiotensin II (Ang II) converting enzyme inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), a phenomenon referred to as aldosterone breakthrough. However, the underlying mechanism causing the aldosterone breakthrough remains unknown. Here we investigated whether aldosterone breakthrough occurs in human adrenocortical H295R cells in vitro. We recently reported that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-6, which is expressed in adrenocortical cells, enhances Ang II- but not potassium-induced aldosterone production in human adrenocortical cells. Accordingly, we examined the roles of BMP-6 in aldosterone breakthrough induced by long-term treatment with ARB. Ang II stimulated aldosterone production by adrenocortical cells. This Ang II stimulation was blocked by an ARB, candesartan. Interestingly, the candesartan effects on Ang II-induced aldosterone synthesis and CYP11B2 expression were attenuated in a course of candesartan treatment for 15 d. The impairment of candesartan effects on Ang II-induced aldosterone production was also observed in Ang II- or candesartan-pretreated cells. Levels of Ang II type 1 receptor mRNA were not changed by chronic candesartan treatment. However, BMP-6 enhancement of Ang II-induced ERK1/2 signaling was resistant to candesartan. The BMP-6-induced Smad1, -5, and -8 phosphorylation, and BRE-Luc activity was augmented in the presence of Ang II and candesartan in the chronic phase. Chronic Ang II exposure decreased cellular expression levels of BMP-6 and its receptors activin receptor-like kinase-2 and activin type II receptor mRNAs. Cotreatment with candesartan reversed the inhibitory effects of Ang II on the expression levels of these mRNAs. The breakthrough phenomenon was attenuated by neutralization of endogenous BMP-6 and activin receptor-like kinase-2. Collectively, these data suggest that changes in BMP-6 availability and response may be involved

  9. Alloactivated HLA class II-positive T-cell lines induce IL-2 reactivity but lack accessory cell function in mixed leukocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Dickmeiss, E; Hofmann, B

    1989-01-01

    in the primary mixed leukocyte reaction (median counts per minute (cpm) 5.5 x 10(3] was significantly lower than that of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (cpm: 44.0 x 10(3]. The stimulation by Ta was almost only seen when the Ta were specifically directed against the class II antigens of the responder...... peripheral blood mononuclear cells (i.e., in combinations with "backstimulation") (median cpm: 21,000). In mixed leukocyte reaction combinations without backstimulation, significantly weaker reactions were seen (median cpm: 1,000). This observation may explain previous controversies concerning...

  10. Amyloid-beta neurotoxicity and clearance are both regulated by glial group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Daniela; Carniglia, Lila; Turati, Juan; Ramírez, Delia; Saba, Julieta; Caruso, Carla; Lasaga, Mercedes

    2017-09-01

    Astrocytes are now fully endorsed as key players in CNS functionality and plasticity. We recently showed that metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu3R) activation by LY379268 promotes non-amyloidogenic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in cultured astrocytes, leading to increased release of neuroprotective sAPPα. Furthermore, mGlu3R expression is reduced in hippocampal astrocytes from PDAPP-J20 mice, suggesting a role for these receptors in Alzheimer's disease. The present study enquires into the role of astroglial-derived neurotrophins induced by mGlu3R activation in neurotoxicity triggered by amyloid β (Aβ). Conditioned medium from LY379268-treated astrocytes protected hippocampal neurons from Aβ-induced cell death. Immunodepletion of sAPPα from the conditioned medium prevented its protective effect. LY379268 induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in astrocytes, and neutralizing BDNF from conditioned medium also prevented its neuroprotective effect on Aβ neurotoxicity. LY379268 was also able to decrease Aβ-induced neuron death by acting directly on neuronal mGlu3R. On the other hand, LY379268 increased Aβ uptake in astrocytes and microglia. Indeed, and more importantly, a reduction in Aβ-induced neuron death was observed when co-cultured with LY379268-pretreated astrocytes, suggesting a link between neuroprotection and increased glial phagocytic activity. Altogether, these results indicate a double function for glial mGlu3R activation against Aβ neurotoxicity: (i) it increases the release of protective neurotrophins such as sAPPα and BDNF, and (ii) it induces amyloid removal from extracellular space by glia-mediated phagocytosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of angiotensin II receptor antagonist (candesartan on rat renal vascular resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supatraviwat, J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the action of angiotensin II (AII on renal perfusion pressure and renal vascular resistance using noncompetitive AT1-receptor antagonist (candesartan or CV 11974. Experiments were performed in isolated kidney of adult male Wistar rats. Kreb's Henseleit solution was perfused into the renal artery at the rate of 3.5 ml/min. This flow rate was designed in order to maintain renal perfusion pressure between 80-120 mm Hg. Dose-response relationship between perfusion flow rate and AII concentration were studied. Renal perfusion pressure in response to 1, 10 and 100 nM AII were increased from basal perfusion pressure of 94±8 mm Hg to 127±6, 157±12 and 190±16 mm Hg, respectively. Administration of perfusate containing 11.4 μM candesartan for 30 min had no effect on the basal perfusion pressure. However, this significantly reduced renal perfusion pressure in the presence of AII (1, 10 and 100 nM by 39%, 47% and 61%, (n=7, P<0.05 respectively. At the basal perfusion pressure, calculated renal vascular resistance was 27±2 mm Hg · min · ml-1. However, the vascular resistance were found to be 41±1, 45±2 and 47±2 mm Hg · min · ml-1 when 1, 10 and 100 nM AII were added. Moreover, this dose of candesartan also showed a significant decrease in renal vascular resistance at the corresponding doses of AII by 38%, 48% and 43%, (n=7, P<0.05 respectively. The higher dose of candesartan (22.7 μM completely inhibited the action of 1, 10 and 100 nM AII on renal vasoconstriction. These results may indicate that the action of AII on renal vascular resistance is via AT1-receptor, at least in rat isolated perfusion kidney.

  12. Antiangiogenic effect of angiotensin II type 2 receptor in ischemia-induced angiogenesis in mice hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Tamarat, Radia; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Icchiki, Toshihiro; Ebrahimian, Teni; Iglarz, Marc; Besnard, Sandrine; Duriez, Micheline; Inagami, Tadashi; Lévy, Bernard I

    2002-05-31

    This study examined the potential role of angiotensin type 2 (AT(2)) receptor on angiogenesis in a model of surgically induced hindlimb ischemia. Ischemia was produced by femoral artery ligature in both wild-type and AT(2) gene-deleted mice (Agtr2(-)/Y). After 28 days, angiogenesis was quantitated by microangiography, capillary density measurement, and laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), Bax, and Bcl-2 were determined by Western blot analysis in hindlimbs. The AT(2) mRNA level (assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR) was increased in the ischemic hindlimb of wild-type mice. Angiographic vessel density and laser Doppler perfusion data showed significant improvement in ischemic/nonischemic leg ratio, 1.9- and 1.7-fold, respectively, in Agtr2(-)/Y mice compared with controls. In ischemic leg of Agtr2(-)/Y mice, revascularization was associated with an increase in the antiapoptotic protein content, Bcl-2 (211% of basal), and a decrease (60% of basal) in the number of cell death, determined by TUNEL method. Angiotensin II treatment (0.3 mg/kg per day) raised angiogenic score, blood perfusion, and both VEGF and eNOS protein content in ischemic leg of wild-type control but did not modulate the enhanced angiogenic response observed in untreated Agtr2(-)/Y mice. Finally, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that VEGF was mainly localized to myocyte, whereas eNOS-positive staining was mainly observed in the capillary of ischemic leg of both wild-type and AT(2)-deficient mice. This study demonstrates for the first time that the AT(2) receptor subtype may negatively modulate ischemia-induced angiogenesis through an activation of the apoptotic process.

  13. Dietary sodium intake regulates angiotensin II type 1, mineralocorticoid receptor, and associated signaling proteins in heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiuti, Vincent; Lapointe, Nathalie; Pojoga, Luminita; Yao, Tham; Tran, Loc; Williams, Gordon H; Adler, Gail K

    2011-10-01

    Liberal or high-sodium (HS) intake, in conjunction with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increases cardiovascular (CV) damage. We tested the hypothesis that sodium intake regulates the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)R), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and associated signaling pathways in heart tissue from healthy rodents. HS (1.6% Na(+)) and low-sodium (LS; 0.02% Na(+)) rat chow was fed to male healthy Wistar rats (n=7 animals per group). Protein levels were assessed by western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis. Fractionation studies showed that MR, AT(1)R, caveolin-3 (CAV-3), and CAV-1 were located in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. In healthy rats, consumption of an LS versus a HS diet led to decreased cardiac levels of AT(1)R and MR. Decreased sodium intake was also associated with decreased cardiac levels of CAV-1 and CAV-3, decreased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R-CAV-3 and MR-CAV-3 complexes, but increased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R/MR complexes. Furthermore, decreased sodium intake was associated with decreased cardiac extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated ERK (pERK), and pERK/ERK ratio; increased cardiac striatin; decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (peNOS), but increased peNOS/eNOS ratio; and decreased cardiac plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Dietary sodium restriction has beneficial effects on the cardiac expression of factors associated with CV injury. These changes may play a role in the cardioprotective effects of dietary sodium restriction.

  14. Variations of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are associated with extreme human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Ariela; Orisio, Silvia; Noris, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Castaldi, Davide; Kamide, Kei; Rakugi, Hiromi; Arai, Yasumichi; Todeschini, Marta; Ogliari, Giulia; Imai, Enyu; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Mari, Daniela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Longevity phenotype in humans results from the influence of environmental and genetic factors. Few gene polymorphisms have been identified so far with a modest effect on lifespan leaving room for the search of other players in the longevity game. It has been recently demonstrated that targeted disruption of the mouse homolog of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene (AGTR1) translates into marked prolongation of animal lifespan (Benigni et al., J Clin Invest 119(3):524-530, 2009). Based on the above study in mice, here we sought to search for AGTR1 variations associated to reduced AT1 receptor protein levels and to prolonged lifespan in humans. AGTR1 was sequenced in 173 Italian centenarians and 376 younger controls. A novel non-synonymous mutation was detected in a centenarian. Two polymorphisms in AGTR1 promoter, rs422858 and rs275653, in complete linkage disequilibrium, were significantly associated with the ability to attain extreme old age. We then replicated the study of rs275653 in a large independent cohort of Japanese origin (598 centenarians and semi-supercentenarians, 422 younger controls) and indeed confirmed its association with exceptional old age. In combined analyses, rs275653 was associated to extreme longevity either at recessive model (P = 0.007, odds ratio (OR) 3.57) or at genotype level (P = 0.015). Significance was maintained after correcting for confounding factors. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that subjects homozygous for the minor allele of rs275653 had less AT1R-positive peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells. Moreover, rs275653 was associated to lower blood pressure in centenarians. These findings highlight the role of AGTR1 as a possible candidate among longevity-enabling genes.

  15. Indications for and utilization of angiotensin receptor II blockers in patients at high cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsang, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    The worldwide burden of cardiovascular disease is growing. In addition to lifestyle changes, pharmacologic agents that can modify cardiovascular disease processes have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Antihypertensive agents are widely used to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events partly beyond that of blood pressure-lowering. In particular, the angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), which antagonize the vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory/pro-proliferative effects of angiotensin II, have been shown to be cardio vascularly protective and well tolerated. Although the eight currently available ARBs are all indicated for the treatment of hypertension, they have partly different pharmacology, and their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties differ. ARB trials for reduction of cardiovascular risk can be broadly categorized into those in patients with/without hypertension and additional risk factors, in patients with evidence of cardiovascular disease, and in patients with severe cardiovascular disease, such as heart failure. These differences have led to their indications in different populations. For hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, losartan was approved to have an indication for stroke prevention, while for most patients at high-risk for cardiovascular events, telmisartan is an appropriate therapy because it has a cardiovascular preventive indication. Other ARBs are indicated for narrowly defined high-risk patients, such as those with hypertension or heart failure. Although in one analysis a possible link between ARBs and increased risks of cancer has surfaced, several meta-analyses, using the most comprehensive data available, have found no link between any ARB, or the class as a whole, and cancer. Most recently, the US Food and Drug Administration completed a review of the potential risk of cancer and concluded that treatment with an ARB medication does not increase the risk of developing cancer. This review

  16. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebiyi, Adebowale; Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca(2+)]i chelator; KN-93, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca(2+)]i-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lack of run-down of smooth muscle P2X receptor currents recorded with the amphotericin permeabilized patch technique, physiological and pharmacological characterization of the properties of mesenteric artery P2X receptor ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C J; Evans, R J

    2000-12-01

    Immunoreactivity for P2X(1), P2X(4) and P2X(5) receptor subtypes was detected in the smooth muscle cell layer of second and third order rat mesenteric arteries immunoreactivity, for P2X(2), P2X(3), P2X(6) and P2X(7) receptors was below the level of detection in the smooth muscle layer. P2X receptor-mediated currents were recorded in patch clamp studies on acutely dissociated mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells. Purinergic agonists evoked transient inward currents that decayed rapidly in the continued presence of agonist (tau approximately 200 ms). Standard whole cell responses to repeated applications of agonist at 5 min intervals ran down. Run-down was unaffected by changes in extracellular calcium concentration, intracellular calcium buffering or the inclusion of ATP and GTP in the pipette solution. Run-down was overcome and reproducible responses to purinergic agonists were recorded using the amphotericin permeabilized patch recording configuration. The rank order of potency at the P2X receptor was ATP=2 methylthio ATP>alpha, beta-methylene ATP>CTP=l-beta,gamma-methylene ATP. Only ATP and 2meSATP were full agonists. The P2 receptor antagonists suramin and PPADS inhibited P2X receptor-mediated currents with IC(50)s of 4 microM and 70 nM respectively. These results provide further characterization of artery P2X receptors and demonstrate that the properties are dominated by a P2X(1)-like receptor phenotype. No evidence could be found for a phenotype corresponding to homomeric P2X(4) or P2X(5) receptors or to heteromeric P2X(1/5) receptors and the functional role of these receptors in arteries remains unclear.

  18. Lack of any prognostic relationship between adiponectin receptor (Adipo R1/R2) expression for early/advanced stage gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz, Talat; Dolar, Enver; Ugras, Nesrin; Dizdar, Oguzhan Sitki; Adim, Saduman Balaban; Yerci, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin (ApN) is a complement C1q-related protein, mainly secreted from adipose tissue, that signals through ApN receptor 1 (Adipo-R1) and ApN receptor 2 (Adipo-R2). Low serum ApN concentrations are associated with obesity-related malignancies. However, there are very few studies on any prognostic role of ApN receptors in gastric cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between AdipoR1/R2 expression and early/advanced stage gastric cancer in terms of clinicopathologic characteristics and survival. Eighteen patients with early and 39 with advanced stage gastric cancer who underwent surgical gastric resection were included in this study. Adipo-R1 expression was low in 2 of the 18 patients with early stage gastric cancer (11.1%), while 4 had low Adipo-R2 expression (22.2%). In those with advanced stage gastric cancer, 7 of 39 had low Adipo-R1 expression (17.9%) and 16 had low Adipo-R2 expression (41%). Adipo-R2 expression was significantly higher (p=0.011) in moderately differentiated tumors when compared to well-differentiated tumors. While there was nearly a statistically significant relationship between TNM stage (T, tumor size; N, regional lymph node; M, whether distant metastases exist) and Adipo-R2 expression (p=0.054), there was no relationship between Adipo-R1/-R2 expression with tumor stage and survival. Adipo-R1/-R2 expression has no prognostic significance of in early/advanced stage gastric cancer.

  19. Lack of age-dependent decrease in dopamine D3 receptor availability: a [11C]-(+)-PHNO and [11C]-raclopride positron emission tomography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Caravaggio, Fernando; Boileau, Isabelle; Chung, Jun K; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Mamo, David C; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with antagonist radiotracers has showed that striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability decreases with age. However, no study has specifically assessed whether D2/3R availability decreases with age in healthy persons as measured with agonist radiotracers. Moreover, it is unknown whether D3R availability changes with age in healthy humans. Thus, we explored the relationship between age and D2/3R availability in healthy humans using the D3 receptor (D3R)-preferential agonist radiotracer [11C]-(+)-PHNO (n=72, mean±s.d. age=40±15, range=18 to 73) and the antagonist [11C]-Raclopride (n=70, mean±s.d. age =40±14, range=18 to 73) (both, n=33). The contribution of D3R to the [11C]-(+)-PHNO signal varies across regions of interest; the substantia nigra and hypothalamus represent D3R-specific regions, the ventral pallidum, globus pallidus, and ventral striatum represent D2/3R-mixed regions, and the caudate and putamen represent D2 receptor (D2R)-specific regions. With [11C]-(+)-PHNO, a negative correlation was observed between age and nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) in the caudate (r(70)=−0.32, P=0.005). No correlations were observed in the other regions. With [11C]-Raclopride, negative correlations were observed between age and BPND in the caudate (r(68)=−0.50, P<0.001), putamen (r(68)=−0.41, P<0.001), and ventral striatum (r(68)=−0.43, P<0.001). In conclusion, in contrast with the age-dependent decrease in D2R availability, these findings suggest that D3R availability does not change with age. PMID:26058690

  20. Lack of age-dependent decrease in dopamine D3 receptor availability: a [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO and [(11)C]-raclopride positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Caravaggio, Fernando; Boileau, Isabelle; Chung, Jun K; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain; Mamo, David C; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-11-01

    Positron emission tomography with antagonist radiotracers has showed that striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability decreases with age. However, no study has specifically assessed whether D2/3R availability decreases with age in healthy persons as measured with agonist radiotracers. Moreover, it is unknown whether D3R availability changes with age in healthy humans. Thus, we explored the relationship between age and D2/3R availability in healthy humans using the D3 receptor (D3R)-preferential agonist radiotracer [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO (n=72, mean±s.d. age=40±15, range=18 to 73) and the antagonist [(11)C]-Raclopride (n=70, mean±s.d. age =40±14, range=18 to 73) (both, n=33). The contribution of D3R to the [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO signal varies across regions of interest; the substantia nigra and hypothalamus represent D3R-specific regions, the ventral pallidum, globus pallidus, and ventral striatum represent D2/3R-mixed regions, and the caudate and putamen represent D2 receptor (D2R)-specific regions. With [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO, a negative correlation was observed between age and nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) in the caudate (r(70)=-0.32, P=0.005). No correlations were observed in the other regions. With [(11)C]-Raclopride, negative correlations were observed between age and BPND in the caudate (r(68)=-0.50, P<0.001), putamen (r(68)=-0.41, P<0.001), and ventral striatum (r(68)=-0.43, P<0.001). In conclusion, in contrast with the age-dependent decrease in D2R availability, these findings suggest that D3R availability does not change with age.

  1. Activation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the median preoptic nucleus induces a diuretic and natriuretic response in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Gao; Lei Luo; Hong Liu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of activation of angiotensin II (AngII) type 1 (ATI) receptors in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) of rats on renal sodium excretion. Methods: After anesthesia, the rats were injected into the MnPO via an implanted cannula. Urine samples were collected via a bladder cannula, and the urine sodium concentration was assayed with flame spectrophotometry. The serum level of endogenous digitalis-like factor (EDLF) and Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the renal cortex tissue were assayed respectively with a radioimmunoassay and with an ammonium molybdophosphate-based kit. Results: Both the urinary volume and the sodium excretion peaked 60 min after Angll was administered into the MnPO. The responses were accompanied by an increase in serum EDLF and a decrease in Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the renal cortex. The responses of diuresis and natriuresis, as well as an increase in serum EDLF and a decrease in Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the renal cortex induced by MnPO adminstration with AngII were inhibited by pior treatment with the AngII receptor blocking agent losartan into the MnPO. Conclusion: These results suggest that activation of ATI receptors in the MnPO of rat induces diuretic and natriuretic responses. The responses are associated with an increase release of EDLF and with the inhibition of Na+,K+-ATPase activity in renal cortex tissue.

  2. Analogues of neuroactive polyamine wasp toxins that lack inner basic sites exhibit enhanced antagonism toward a muscle-type mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stromgaard, K; Brierley, M J; Andersen, K;

    1999-01-01

    properties (stepwise macroscopic pK(a) values) were determined by (13)C NMR titrations. All analogues are fully protonated at physiological pH. The effects of these compounds on acetylcholine-induced currents in TE671 cells clamped at various holding potentials were determined. All of the analogues...... noncompetitively antagonized the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in a concentration-, time-, and voltage-dependent manner. The amplitudes of acetylcholine-induced currents were compared at their peaks and at the end of a 1 s application in the presence or absence of the analogues. Most of the analogues...

  3. Troglitazone stimulates {beta}-arrestin-dependent cardiomyocyte contractility via the angiotensin II type 1{sub A} receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilley, Douglas G., E-mail: douglas.tilley@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jefferson School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University (United States); Center for Translational Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University (United States); Nguyen, Anny D. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jefferson School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University (United States); Rockman, Howard A. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center (United States); Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center (United States); Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonists are commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases, and are reported to have several effects on cardiovascular function that may be due to PPAR{gamma}-independent signaling events. Select angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) interact with and modulate PPAR{gamma} activity, thus we hypothesized that a PPAR{gamma} agonist may exert physiologic effects via the angiotensin II type 1{sub A} receptor (AT1{sub A}R). In AT1{sub A}R-overexpressing HEK 293 cells, both angiotensin II (Ang II) and the PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone (Trog) enhanced AT1{sub A}R internalization and recruitment of endogenous {beta}-arrestin1/2 ({beta}arr1/2) to the AT1{sub A}R. A fluorescence assay to measure diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation showed that although Ang II induced AT1{sub A}R-G{sub q} protein-mediated DAG accumulation, Trog had no impact on DAG generation. Trog-mediated recruitment of {beta}arr1/2 was selective to AT1{sub A}R as the response was prevented by an ARB- and Trog-mediated {beta}arr1/2 recruitment to {beta}1-adrenergic receptor ({beta}1AR) was not observed. In isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, Trog increased both % and rate of cell shortening to a similar extent as Ang II, effects which were blocked with an ARB. Additionally, these effects were found to be {beta}arr2-dependent, as cardiomyocytes isolated from {beta}arr2-KO mice showed blunted contractile responses to Trog. These findings show for the first time that the PPAR{gamma} agonist Trog acts at the AT1{sub A}R to simultaneously block G{sub q} protein activation and induce the recruitment of {beta}arr1/2, which leads to an increase in cardiomyocyte contractility.

  4. Differential Distribution of Type II CRISPR-Cas Systems in Agricultural and Nonagricultural Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni Isolates Correlates with Lack of Shared Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Bruce M; Louwen, Rogier; van Baarlen, Peter; van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2015-09-02

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems are sequence-specific adaptive defenses against phages and plasmids which are widespread in prokaryotes. Here we have studied whether phylogenetic relatedness or sharing of environmental niches affects the distribution and dissemination of Type II CRISPR-Cas systems, first in 132 bacterial genomes from 15 phylogenetic classes, ranging from Proteobacteria to Actinobacteria. There was clustering of distinct Type II CRISPR-Cas systems in phylogenetically distinct genera with varying G+C%, which share environmental niches. The distribution of CRISPR-Cas within a genus was studied using a large collection of genome sequences of the closely related Campylobacter species Campylobacter jejuni (N = 3,746) and Campylobacter coli (N = 486). The Cas gene cas9 and CRISPR-repeat are almost universally present in C. jejuni genomes (98.0% positive) but relatively rare in C. coli genomes (9.6% positive). Campylobacter jejuni and agricultural C. coli isolates share the C. jejuni CRISPR-Cas system, which is closely related to, but distinct from the C. coli CRISPR-Cas system found in C. coli isolates from nonagricultural sources. Analysis of the genomic position of CRISPR-Cas insertion suggests that the C. jejuni-type CRISPR-Cas has been transferred to agricultural C. coli. Conversely, the absence of the C. coli-type CRISPR-Cas in agricultural C. coli isolates may be due to these isolates not sharing the same environmental niche, and may be affected by farm hygiene and biosecurity practices in the agricultural sector. Finally, many CRISPR spacer alleles were linked with specific multilocus sequence types, suggesting that these can assist molecular epidemiology applications for C. jejuni and C. coli.

  5. Lack of ligand-selective binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor to putative DNA binding sites regulating expression of Bax and paraoxonase 1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA.

  6. Mice lacking the serotonin transporter exhibit 5-HT(1A) receptor-mediated abnormalities in tests for anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Andrew; Yang, Rebecca J; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Murphy, Dennis L

    2003-12-01

    The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) regulates serotonergic neurotransmission via clearance of extracellular serotonin. Abnormalities in 5-HTT expression or function are found in mood and anxiety disorders, and the 5-HTT is a major target for antidepressants and anxiolytics. The 5-HTT is further implicated in the pathophysiology of these disorders by evidence that genetic variation in the promoter region of the HTT (SLC6A4) is associated with individual differences in anxiety and neural responses to fear. To further evaluate the role of the 5-HTT in anxiety, we employed a mouse model in which the 5-HTT gene (htt) was constitutively inactivated. 5-HTT -/- mice were characterized for anxiety-related behaviors using a battery of tests (elevated plus maze, lightdark exploration test, emergence test, and open field test). Male and female 5-HTT -/- mice showed robust phenotypic abnormalities as compared to +/+ littermates, suggestive of increased anxiety-like behavior and inhibited exploratory locomotion. The selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, WAY 100635 (0.05-0.3 mg/kg), produced a significant anxiolytic-like effect in the elevated plus maze in 5-HTT -/- mice, but not +/+ controls. The present findings demonstrate abnormal behavioral phenotypes in 5-HTT null mutant mice in tests for anxiety-like and exploratory behavior, and suggest a role for the 5-HT(1A) receptor in mediating these abnormalities. 5-HTT null mutant mice provide a model to investigate the role of the 5-HTT in mood and anxiety disorders.

  7. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in severe traumatic brain injury: a phase II randomized control trial

    OpenAIRE

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R.; Carpenter, Keri LH; Pickard, John D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the commonest cause of death and disability in those aged under 40 years. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) is an endogenous competitive antagonist at the interleukin-1 type-1 receptor (IL-1R). Antagonism at the IL-1R confers neuroprotection in several rodent models of neuronal injury (i.e., trauma, stroke and excitotoxicity). We describe a single center, phase II, open label, randomized-control study of recombinant human IL1ra (rhIL1ra, anakinra) in se...

  8. Innate Response to Human Cancer Cells with or without IL-2 Receptor Common γ-Chain Function in NOD Background Mice Lacking Adaptive Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishime, Chiyoko; Kawai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Katano, Ikumi; Monnai, Makoto; Goda, Nobuhito; Mizushima, Tomoko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masato; Murata, Mitsuru; Suematsu, Makoto; Wakui, Masatoshi

    2015-08-15

    Immunodeficient hosts exhibit high acceptance of xenogeneic or neoplastic cells mainly due to lack of adaptive immunity, although it still remains to be elucidated how innate response affects the engraftment. IL-2R common γ-chain (IL-2Rγc) signaling is required for development of NK cells and a subset of dendritic cells producing IFN-γ. To better understand innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, we examined amounts of metastatic foci in the livers after intrasplenic transfer of human colon cancer HCT116 cells into NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc (null) (NOG) hosts. The intravital microscopic imaging of livers in the hosts depleted of NK cells and/or macrophages revealed that IL-2Rγc function critically contributes to elimination of cancer cells without the need for NK cells and macrophages. In the absence of IL-2Rγc, macrophages play a role in the defense against tumors despite the NOD Sirpa allele, which allows human CD47 to bind to the encoded signal regulatory protein α to inhibit macrophage phagocytosis of human cells. Analogous experiments using human pancreas cancer MIA PaCa-2 cells provided findings roughly similar to those from the experiments using HCT116 cells except for lack of suppression of metastases by macrophages in NOG hosts. Administration of mouse IFN-γ to NOG hosts appeared to partially compensate lack of IL-2Rγc-dependent elimination of transferred HCT116 cells. These results provide insights into the nature of innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, aiding in developing tumor xenograft models in experimental oncology.

  9. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Deshotels, Matthew R.; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significan...

  10. The influence of certain molecular descriptors of fecal elimination of angiotensin II receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs modulate the function of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and are commonly prescribed antihypertensive drugs, especially in patients with renal failure. In this study, the relationship between several molecular properties of seven ARBs (candesartan, eprosartan, irbesartan, losartan, olmesartan, telmisartan, valsartan and their fecal elimination data obtained from the literature were investigated. The ARB molecular descriptors were calculated using three software packages. Simple linear regression analysis showed the best 2 correlation between fecal elimination data and lipophilicity descriptor, ClogP values (R2 = 0.725. Multiple linear regression was applied to examine the correlation of ARBs’ fecal elimination data with their lipophilicity and one additional, calculated descriptor. The best correlation (R2 = 0.909 with an acceptable probability value, P <0.05 was established between the ARB fecal elimination data and their lipophilicity and aqueous solubility data. Applying computed molecular descriptors for evaluating drug elimination is of great importance in drug research.

  11. Gestational therapy with an angiotensin II receptor antagonist and transient renal failure in a premature infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, J Kirk; Faix, Roger G

    2006-07-01

    The fetotoxic effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors when used during the second half of pregnancy are well known. The more recently developed angiotensin II receptor antagonists appear to yield similar fetal abnormalities. We report a premature infant born to a 41-year-old mother with a long history of infertility who had received losartan therapy for hypertension throughout an undetected pregnancy. Ultrasound examination 2 days prior to delivery identified a single fetus at 29 weeks gestation, anhydramnios, and an empty fetal bladder. The neonatal course was complicated by oliguria, hyperkalemia, marked renal dysfunction, respiratory failure, joint contractures, and a large anterior fontanelle with widely separated sutures. Hypotension (mean arterial pressurerenal disease. Since then, weight and length have been at the 5th percentile or less, with apparent renal tubular acidosis necessitating the addition of sodium citrate supplements. This case emphasizes the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for potential pregnancy when contemplating the use of a drug of this class, and considering serial testing for pregnancy when using such drugs, even in patients with a longstanding history of infertility.

  12. The Fetal Safety of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myla E. Moretti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are known to cause fetal renal damage in pregnancy. Due to conflicting reports in the literature, their safety after first trimester exposure has been debated. Our aim was to determine whether the use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for major malformations or other adverse outcomes. All subjects were prospectively enrolled from among women contacting a teratogen information service. At initial contact, details of maternal medical history and exposures were collected and follow-up interviews were conducted to ascertain pregnancy outcomes. Two comparator groups, women with hypertension treated with other antihypertensives, and healthy controls were also recruited. Baseline maternal characteristics were not different among the three groups. There were no differences in rates of major malformations. Both the ACE-ARBs and disease-matched groups exhibited significantly lower birth weight and gestational ages than the healthy controls (P<0.001 for both variables. There was a significantly higher rate of miscarriage noted in the ACE/ARB group (P<0.001. These results suggest that ACE inhibitors/ARBs are not major human teratogens; however, they may be associated with an increased risk for miscarriage.

  13. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (A1166C gene polymorphism and essential hypertension in Egyptian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marium M. Shamaa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of essential hypertension (EH is affected by genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in hypertension-related genes can affect blood pressure (BP via alteration of salt and water reabsorption by the nephron. The genes of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS have been extensively studied because of the well documented role of this system in the control of BP. It has been previously shown that Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (ATR1 gene polymorphism could be associated with increased risk of EH. So, in the current study, we evaluated the frequency of ATR1 (A1166C polymorphism in relation to EH in a group of Egyptian population. The study population included 83 hypertensive patients and 60 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. Restriction fragment length polymorphism – Polymerase chain reaction (RFLP – PCR was used for the analysis of A1166C polymorphism of ATR1 genes in peripheral blood samples of all patients and controls. The results revealed that there was a positive risk of developing EH when having the T allele whether in homozygous or heterozygous state. From this work, it was concluded that there was an association between ATR1 (A1166C gene polymorphism and the risk of developing EH.

  14. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tianbo; Ren, Yongchao; Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-11-22

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype "AG" was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype "AA" increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals.

  15. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta receptors types II and III within various cells in the rat periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Symons, A L; Bartold, P M

    1999-02-01

    This study reports the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-beta receptor type II (T beta R-II) and type III (T beta R-III) in cells of the forming periodontal ligament (PDL) in rat first molar roots. Mandibular periodontium was obtained from 3, 6 and 12-wk-old rats. This represented tissue from the initial, pre-mature and post-mature stages of root and periodontal development, respectively. Mandibular bone chips and molar roots were used to isolate osteoblasts, fibroblasts and cementoblasts. Cells were obtained using a 2-step trypsinization and explant technique, and cultured in Dulbecco's modification of Eagle's medium (DMEM) under routine cell culture conditions. Cells were cultured on coverslips for the purpose of detecting TGF-beta receptors, and compared with whole tissue sections using the same detection method. Cells which stained positively for T beta R-II and T beta R-III on both paraffin sections and cultured cell slides were counted. Both receptors were expressed in the various periodontal tissue compartments. PDL fibroblasts, cementoblasts and osteoblasts were stained positively for T beta R-II and T beta R-III. Endothelial cells were noted to be positive for T beta R-II only. T beta R-II was more widely distributed in cells than T beta R-III, but T beta R-III was extensively localized in the extracellular matrix. Both receptors were expressed on the cell membrane and also localized in the cytoplasm. The findings for paraffin sections were consistent with the immunohistochemical staining of cultured cells. The percentage of cells which stained positively for T beta R-II was greater (approximately 85%) than that for T beta R-III (approximately 60%) in all major types of the PDL cells on both paraffin sections and cultured cell slides. Extensive location of TGF-beta receptors in both cells and extracellular matrix suggests that several binding sites are available for TGF-beta s to interact with target cells during development and following maturation

  16. Endoglin-mediated suppression of prostate cancer invasion is regulated by activin and bone morphogenetic protein type II receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Breen

    Full Text Available Mortality from prostate cancer (PCa is due to the formation of metastatic disease. Understanding how that process is regulated is therefore critical. We previously demonstrated that endoglin, a type III transforming growth factor β (TGFβ superfamily receptor, suppresses human PCa cell invasion and metastasis. Endoglin-mediated suppression of invasion was also shown by us to be dependent upon the type I TGFβ receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 2 (ALK2, and the downstream effector, Smad1. In this study we demonstrate for the first time that two type II TGFβ receptors are required for endoglin-mediated suppression of invasion: activin A receptor type IIA (ActRIIA and bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPRII. Downstream signaling through these receptors is predominantly mediated by Smad1. ActRIIA stimulates Smad1 activation in a kinase-dependent manner, and this is required for suppression of invasion. In contrast BMPRII regulates Smad1 in a biphasic manner, promoting Smad1 signaling through its kinase domain but suppressing it through its cytoplasmic tail. BMPRII's Smad1-regulatory effects are dependent upon its expression level. Further, its ability to suppress invasion is independent of either kinase function or tail domain. We demonstrate that ActRIIA and BMPRII physically interact, and that each also interacts with endoglin. The current findings demonstrate that both BMPRII and ActRIIA are necessary for endoglin-mediated suppression of human PCa cell invasion, that they have differential effects on Smad1 signaling, that they make separate contributions to regulation of invasion, and that they functionally and physically interact.

  17. Prevalence of estrogen receptor alpha PvuII and XbaI polymorphism in population of Polish postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Haczynski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous data indicate that polymorphism of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha may predict lipid levels, lipid response to hormone replacement therapy (HRT, myocardial infarction risk, bone fracture risk, bone mineral density (BMD and changes in BMD over time. In this study we aimed to evaluate distribution of ERalpha PvuII and XbaI genotypes in population of Polish postmenopausal women qualified to different protocols of HRT. Subject of the study were 64 consecutive postmenopausal women aged from 45 to 65 years (mean 56.6 assigned to HRT. ERalpha PvuII and XbaI polymorphism was determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The absence of PvuII and XbaI restriction sites were indicated by "P" and "X" and presence by "p" and "x", respectively. PvuII genotype was distributed as follows: PP 17.2% (n=11, Pp 50% (n=32, pp 32.83% (n=21. Frequency of XbaI genotype was: XX 6.25% (n=4, Xx 34.4% (n=22, xx 59.4% (n=38. Four haplotypes with following frequencies were recognized: PX 17.3%, px 47.4%, Px 24.4% and pX 10.9%. Prevalence of estrogen receptor alpha PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms in Polish women is similar to previously studied population.

  18. miR-155 functions downstream of angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 and calcineurin to regulate cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Zheng; Tong, Xin Zhu; Xie, Hua Qiang; Luo, Tao; Hua, Xian Ping; Wang, Han Qin

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by maladaptive tissue remodeling that may lead to heart failure or sudden death. MicroRNAs (miRs) are negative regulators of angiotensin II and the angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1), which are two components involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the present study, the interaction between angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1) signaling and miR-155 was investigated. Rat H9C2 (2-1) cardiomyocytes were transfected with miR-155 analogues or inhibitors, then stimulated with angiotensin II to induce cardiac hypertrophy. miR-155 expression was revealed to be altered following transfection with chemically-modified miR-155 analogues and inhibitors in rat cardiomyocytes. In cell cardiac hypertrophy models, the cell surface area, AGTR1, atrial natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain-β mRNA expression levels were revealed to be lower in cells stimulated with miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin alone (PAGTR1 and suppressing the calcium signaling pathways activated by AGTR1.

  19. Cellular localization of AT1 receptor mRNA and protein in normal placenta and its reduced expression in intrauterine growth restriction. Angiotensin II stimulates the release of vasorelaxants.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X.; M Shams; Zhu, J; Khalig, A; Wilkes, M; Whittle, M; Barnes, N; Ahmed, A.

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is a potent vasoconstrictor and growth promoter. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using the nonselective radioligand [125I]ANG II and subtype-selective competing compounds demonstrated the presence of both ANG II receptor (AT)1 and AT2 receptor recognition sites. In addition, a relatively small population of apparently non-AT1/non-AT2 sites was identified that may represent a novel high affinity ANG II recognition site in human placenta. Using placental membrane p...

  20. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator-like Proteases in Teleosts Lack Genuine Receptor-binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, René; Kristensen, Thomas Kielsgaard; Jensen, Jan Kristian

    2012-01-01

    to be central to the functions of uPA, as uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation activity appeared to be confined to cell surfaces through the binding of uPA to uPAR. However, a functional uPAR has so far only been identified in mammals. We have now cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized two zebrafish...... be found in fish white blood cells or fish cell lines. We therefore propose that the current consensus of uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation taking place on cell surfaces, derived from observations with mammals, is too narrow. Fish uPAs appear incapable of receptor binding in the manner known from...... mammals and uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation in fish may occur mainly in solution. Studies with nonmammalian vertebrate species are needed to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of plasminogen activation....

  1. Lack of association between FokI polymorphism in vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) & type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Tunisian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoubi, Imen; Kallel, Amani; Sbaï, Mohamed Hédi; Ftouhi, Bochra; ben Halima, Meriam; Jemaa, Zeineb; Feki, Moncef; Slimane, Hedia; Jemaa, Riadh; Kaabachi, Naziha

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The impact of several environmental and genetic factors on diabetes is well documented. Though the association between the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been analyzed in different ethnic groups, the results have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible association between VDR FokI polymorphism and genetic susceptibility to T2DM in Tunisian population. Methods: A total of 439 unrelated patients with T2DM and 302 healthy controls were included in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood and genotyped for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of FokI (T/C: (rs2228570) by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Results: The genotype distribution and the relative allelic frequencies for the FokI polymorphism were not significantly different between T2DM and controls: in T2DM patients the frequencies of the CC, CT, and TT genotypes were 52.6, 41.0, and 6.1 per cent, respectively, and in controls the genotype frequencies were 55.6, 38.7, and 5.6 per cent, respectively. In our study, the TT genotype of the FokI polymorphism was not associated with T2DM (OR =1.19, 95% CI 0.63 - 2.25, P=0.577). Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed no significant association of the FokI polymorphism in the vitamin D receptor gene with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Tunisian population. PMID:27834325

  2. Estrogen attenuates the MPTP-induced loss of dopamine neurons from the mouse SNc despite a lack of estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shughrue, Paul J

    2004-12-01

    Estrogen attenuates the loss of dopamine from striatum and dopamine neurons from the substantia nigra (SNc) in animal models of Parkinson's disease. Interestingly, estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) are thought to be sparse or absent in mouse striatum and SNc. Since ERalpha is markedly induced in rodent cortex after ischemic injury, the present studies evaluated changes in ERs after acute treatment with the dopamine neurotoxin MPTP. Mice were injected daily with estradiol, injected with MPTP on day 6, and brains collected on day 9 or 13. Immunocytochemistry was then used to assess tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in striatum and investigate the localization of ERalpha and ERbeta in the striatum and SNc. In addition, cryostat sections were hybridized with a riboprobe complementary to ERalpha or ERbeta mRNA. Evaluation of TH immunoreactivity revealed a dense network of fibers in the striatum of vehicle-treated animals, while a near complete loss of terminals was seen after MPTP treatment. When, however, mice were pretreated with estradiol, the MPTP-induced loss of TH was attenuated. Evaluation of ERalpha and ERbeta in the SNc and striatum demonstrated a sparse localization of both ERs in vehicle-treated mice, a pattern that did not change in animals treated with vehicle/MPTP or estradiol/MPTP. These data demonstrate that ERs are sparse in the mouse striatum and SNc and show that this pattern does not change after MPTP intoxication. This observation and the finding that estrogen affords some protection against MPTP suggest that estrogen may act via nuclear receptor independent mechanisms to protect dopamine neurons from toxins such as MPTP.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits angiotensin II receptor type 1 expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons via β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Wu, H; Yan, J-Q; Song, Z-B; Guo, Q-L

    2013-09-17

    Both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) axis play important roles in neuropathic pain and nociception. In the present study, we explored the interaction between the two systems by examining the mutual effects between TNF-α and the Ang II/AT1 receptor axis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Rat DRG neurons were treated with TNF-α in different concentrations for different lengths of time in the presence or absence of transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) inhibitor SPD304, β-catenin signaling inhibitor CCT031374, or different kinase inhibitors. TNF-α decreased the AT1 receptor mRNA level as well as the AT1a receptor promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner within 30 h, which led to dose-dependent inhibition of Ang II-binding AT1 receptor level on the cell membrane. Actinomycin D (1 mg/ml), SPD304 (50 μM), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD169316 (25 μM), and CCT031374 (50 μM) completely abolished the inhibitory effect of TNF-α on AT1 receptor expression. TNF-α dose-dependently increased soluble β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK-3β levels, which was blocked by SPD304 and PD169316. In DRG neurons treated with AT2 receptor agonist CGP421140, or Ang II with or without AT1 receptor antagonist losartan or AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319 for 30 h, we found that Ang II and Ang II+PD123319 significantly decreased TNF-α expression, whereas CPG421140 and Ang II+losartan increased TNF-α expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate that TNF-α inhibits AT1 receptor expression at the transcription level via TNFR1 in rat DRG neurons by increasing the soluble β-catenin level through the p38 MAPK/GSK-3β pathway. In addition, Ang II appears to inhibit and induce TNF-α expression via the AT1 receptor and the AT2 receptor in DRG neurons, respectively. This is the first evidence of crosstalk between TNF-α and the Ang II/AT receptor axis in DRG neurons.

  4. Effect of moxonidine on contractile activity of isolated large intestine in mice: role of alpha2-adrenoceptors and Ii-imidazoline receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaeva, L P; Korobov, N V; Medvedev, O S

    2004-03-01

    We studied the ability of moxonidine to interact with alpha2-adrenoceptors and Ii-imidazoline receptors in isolated mouse large intestine. Moxonidine caused contractions of longitudinal muscles in the large intestine, which depended on the dose of this preparation. Pretreatment with yohimbine (alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist with low affinity for Ii-imidazoline receptors) and efaroxan (Ii-imidazoline receptor antagonist with low affinity for alpha2-adrenoceptors) abolished the effect of moxonidine. Antagonistic activity and relative selectivity of yohimbine and efaroxan suggest that the effects of moxonidine on mouse large intestine are realized via alpha2-adrenoceptors.

  5. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebiyi, Adebowale, E-mail: aadebiyi@uthsc.edu; Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  6. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade restores angiotensin-(1-7)-induced coronary vasodilation in hypertrophic rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Álvaro P S; Sobrinho, Deny B S; Almeida, Jônathas F Q; Alves, Gisele M M; Macedo, Larissa M; Porto, Juliana E; Vêncio, Eneida F; Colugnati, Diego B; Santos, Robson A S; Ferreira, Anderson J; Mendes, Elizabeth P; Castro, Carlos H

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the coronary effects of Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] in hypertrophic rat hearts. Heart hypertrophy was induced by abdominal aorta CoA (coarctation). Ang-(1-7) and AVE 0991, a non-peptide Mas-receptor agonist, at picomolar concentration, induced a significant vasodilation in hearts from sham-operated rats. These effects were blocked by the Mas receptor antagonist A-779. Pre-treatment with L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) or ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinozalin-1-one) [NOS (NO synthase) and soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitors respectively] also abolished the effect of Ang-(1-7) in control hearts. The coronary vasodilation produced by Ang-(1-7) and AVE 0991 was completely blunted in hypertrophic hearts. Chronic oral administration of losartan in CoA rats restored the coronary vasodilation effect of Ang-(1-7). This effect was blocked by A-779 and AT2 receptor (angiotensin II type 2 receptor) antagonist PD123319. Acute pre-incubation with losartan also restored the Ang-(1-7)-induced, but not BK (bradykinin)-induced, coronary vasodilation in hypertrophic hearts. This effect was inhibited by A-779, PD123319 and L-NAME. Chronic treatment with losartan did not change the protein expression of Mas and AT2 receptor and ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) and ACE2 in coronary arteries from CoA rats, but induced a slight increase in AT2 receptor in aorta of these animals. Ang-(1-7)-induced relaxation in aortas from sham-operated rats was absent in aortas from CoA rats. In vitro pre-treatment with losartan restored the Ang-(1-7)-induced relaxation in aortic rings of CoA rats, which was blocked by the Mas antagonist A-779 and L-NAME. These data demonstrate that Mas is strongly involved in coronary vasodilation and that AT1 receptor (angiotensin II type 1 receptor) blockade potentiates the vasodilatory effects of Ang-(1-7) in the coronary beds of pressure-overloaded rat hearts through NO-related AT2- and Mas-receptor

  7. Regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in ovarian cancer: a potential role for BRCA1

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Fang-Fang; Li, Da; Cao, Chen; Li, Chun-Yan; Yang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background Both BRCA1 and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) play a critical role in ovarian cancer progression. However, the crosstalk between BRCA1 and AGTR1 signaling pathways remains largely unknown. Methods BRCA1 promoter methylation was analyzed by bisulfite sequence using primers focused on the core promoter region. Expression levels of BRCA1 and AGTR1 were assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Regression analysis was used to examine the possible relationship between ...

  8. Angiotensin II receptor blockers and cardiovascular protection: Focus on left ventricular hypertrophy regression and atrial fibrillation prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Cuspidi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Cesare Cuspidi1,2, Francesca Negri2, Alberto Zanchetti31Department of Clinical Medicine and Prevention, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy; 2Policlinico di Monza; 3Centro Interuniversitario di Fisiologia Clinica e Ipertensione, Università di Milano, and Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and atrial fibrillation (AF are strong predictors of cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality, independently of blood pressure levels and other modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors. The actions of circulating and tissue angiotensin II, mediated by AT1 receptors, play an important role in the development of a wide spectrum of cardiovascular alterations, including LVH, atrial enlargement and AF. Growing experimental and clinical evidence suggests that antihypertensive drugs may exert different effects on LVH regression and new onset AF in the setting of arterial hypertension. Since a number of large and adequately designed studies have found angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs to be more effective in reducing LVH than beta-blockers and data are also available showing their effectiveness in preventing new or recurrent AF, it is reasonable to consider this class of drugs among first line therapies in patients with hypertension and LVH (a very high risk phenotype predisposing to AF and as adjunctive therapy to antiarrhythmic agents in patients undergoing pharmacological or electrical cardioversion of AF.Keywords: angiotensin II receptor blockers, left ventricular hypertrophy, atrial fibrillation

  9. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate the release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and soluble IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor from MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confort, C; Rochefort, H; Vignon, F

    1995-09-01

    The growth of hormone-responsive MCF7 human breast cancer cells is controlled by steroid hormones and growth factors. By metabolic labeling of cells grown in steroid- and growth factor-stripped serum conditions, we show that insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) increase by approximately 5-fold the release of several proteins including cathepsin D, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and soluble forms of the multifunctional IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor. Two soluble forms of IGF-II/M6P receptors were detected, one major (approximately 260 kilodaltons) and one minor (approximately 85 kilodaltons) that probably represents a proteolytic fragment of the larger soluble molecule. IGFs increased receptor release in a dose-dependent fashion with 50-60% of newly synthesized receptor released at 5-10 nM IGFs. The release of IGF-II/M6P receptors correlated with the levels of secreted cathepsin D in different human breast cancer cells or in rats stable transfectants that are constitutively expressing variable levels of human cathepsin D. IGFs had a stronger effect on IGF-II/M6P receptor release, whereas estradiol treatment preferentially enhanced the release of protease and antiprotease. We thus demonstrate that in human breast cancer cells, IGFs not only act as strong mitogens but also regulate release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, IGF-II/M6P-soluble receptor, and cathepsin D; three proteins that potentially regulate cell proliferation and/or invasion.

  10. Lack of Effect of H2-Receptor Antagonists and Antacids on the Gastric and Duodenal Gastrin-, Somatostatin- and Serotonin-Producing Cells in Patients with Acid Peptic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WR Yacoub

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard therapeutic approaches to acid peptic disorders have dealt with neutralizing or inhibiting aggressive factors and/or bolstering defensive factors. Gastric and duodenal mucosal biopsies were examined from 90 patients with various acid peptic disorders, as follows: reflux esophagitis (n=24, gastric ulcer (n=13, duodenal ulcer (n=47 and nonulcer dyspepsia (n=6. Seven patients with minimal dyspeptic symptoms and an endoscopically and histologically normal stomach and duodenum served as controls. Immunoperoxidase staining for gastrin-producing G cells, somatostatin-producing D cells and serotonin-producing EC cells was carried out on fundic, antral and duodenal biopsies, and quantitated using a Zeiss MOP videoplan. No significant effects secondary to treatment with antacid, ranitidine or cimetidine were observed on endocrine cell densities and ratios. Biopsies obtained on different occasions over time indicated that in patients on enprostil (a synthetic E2 prostaglandin, there was a trend towards increasing cell counts, suggesting that the serum gastrin-lowering effect of this drug may result from inhibition of gastrin release. Thus, H2-receptor antagonists and antacids do not alter gastric or duodenal mucosal G, D or EC cells in patients with acid peptic disorders.

  11. Generation of Novel Traj18-Deficient Mice Lacking Vα14 Natural Killer T Cells with an Undisturbed T Cell Receptor α-Chain Repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyambayar Dashtsoodol

    Full Text Available Invariant Vα14 natural killer T (NKT cells, characterized by the expression of a single invariant T cell receptor (TCR α chain encoded by rearranged Trav11 (Vα14-Traj18 (Jα18 gene segments in mice, and TRAV10 (Vα24-TRAJ18 (Jα18 in humans, mediate adjuvant effects to activate various effector cell types in both innate and adaptive immune systems that facilitates the potent antitumor effects. It was recently reported that the Jα18-deficient mouse described by our group in 1997 harbors perturbed TCRα repertoire, which raised concerns regarding the validity of some of the experimental conclusions that have been made using this mouse line. To resolve this concern, we generated a novel Traj18-deficient mouse line by specifically targeting the Traj18 gene segment using Cre-Lox approach. Here we showed the newly generated Traj18-deficient mouse has, apart from the absence of Traj18, an undisturbed TCRα chain repertoire by using next generation sequencing and by detecting normal generation of Vα19Jα33 expressing mucosal associated invariant T cells, whose development was abrogated in the originally described Jα18-KO mice. We also demonstrated here the definitive requirement for NKT cells in the protection against tumors and their potent adjuvant effects on antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

  12. Lack of IL-1R8 in neurons causes hyperactivation of IL-1 receptor pathway and induces MECP2-dependent synaptic defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasoni, Romana; Morini, Raffaella; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Corradini, Irene; Canzi, Alice; Rasile, Marco; Mantovani, Cristina; Pozzi, Davide; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Menna, Elisabetta; Barco, Angel; Matteoli, Michela

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation modifies risk and/or severity of a variety of brain diseases through still elusive molecular mechanisms. Here we show that hyperactivation of the interleukin 1 pathway, through either ablation of the interleukin 1 receptor 8 (IL-1R8, also known as SIGIRR or Tir8) or activation of IL-1R, leads to up-regulation of the mTOR pathway and increased levels of the epigenetic regulator MeCP2, bringing to disruption of dendritic spine morphology, synaptic plasticity and plasticity-related gene expression. Genetic correction of MeCP2 levels in IL-1R8 KO neurons rescues the synaptic defects. Pharmacological inhibition of IL-1R activation by Anakinra corrects transcriptional changes, restores MeCP2 levels and spine plasticity and ameliorates cognitive defects in IL-1R8 KO mice. By linking for the first time neuronal MeCP2, a key player in brain development, to immune activation and demonstrating that synaptic defects can be pharmacologically reversed, these data open the possibility for novel treatments of neurological diseases through the immune system modulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21735.001

  13. Liver biomarker and in vitro assessment confirm the hepatic origin of aminotransferase elevations lacking histopathological correlate in beagle dogs treated with GABAA receptor antagonist NP260.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrill, Alison H; Eaddy, John S; Rose, Kelly; Cullen, John M; Ramanathan, Lakshmi; Wanaski, Stephen; Collins, Stephen; Ho, Yu; Watkins, Paul B; Lecluyse, Edward L

    2014-06-01

    NP260 was designed as a first-in-class selective antagonist of α4-subtype GABAA receptors that had promising efficacy in animal models of pain, epilepsy, psychosis, and anxiety. However, development of NP260 was complicated following a 28-day safety study in dogs in which pronounced elevations of serum aminotransferase levels were observed, although there was no accompanying histopathological indication of hepatocellular injury. To further investigate the liver effects of NP260, we assayed stored serum samples from the 28-day dog study for liver specific miRNA (miR-122) as well as enzymatic biomarkers glutamate dehydrogenase and sorbitol dehydrogenase, which indicate liver necrosis. Cytotoxicity assessments were conducted in hepatocytes derived from dog, rat, and human liver samples to address the species specificity of the liver response to NP260. All biomarkers, except ALT, returned toward baseline by Day 29 despite continued drug treatment, suggesting adaptation to the initial injury. In vitro analysis of the toxicity potential of NP260 to primary hepatocytes indicated a relative sensitivity of dog>human>rat, which may explain, in part, why the liver effects were not evident in the rodent safety studies. Taken together, the data indicate that a diagnostic biomarker approach, coupled with sensitive in vitro screening strategies, may facilitate interpretation of toxicity potential when an adaptive event masks the underlying toxicity.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) Pro12Ala: lack of association with weight gain in psychiatric inpatients treated with olanzapine or clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staeker, Julia; Leucht, Stefan; Steimer, Werner

    2012-04-01

    Weight gain is a common problem of treatment with atypical antipsychotics. However, the dimension of body weight change differs interindividually, and various genetic factors are considered to be associated with this effect. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) Pro12Ala polymorphism and its reported relationship to type 2 diabetes susceptibility and body mass accumulation prompted us to investigate the impact of this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on antipsychotic-induced changes of body weight and body mass index (BMI) in a naturalistic study design. Included were 138 olanzapine- and 32 clozapine-treated psychiatric inpatients whose demographic data, medical anamnesis, and drug treatment were assessed at admission to hospital and 4 weeks thereafter. The PPARG Pro12Ala SNP was determined with a validated real-time PCR assay. In contrast to previous investigations, we did not detect significant variations of weight gain among the different PPARG Pro12Ala genotypes. Our results suggest that the examined polymorphism appears to play a minor or no role in clinical practice concerning antipsychotic drug-induced weight gain.

  15. The phosphatidylserine receptor from Hydra is a nuclear protein with potential Fe(II dependent oxygenase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiening Beate

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptotic cell death plays an essential part in embryogenesis, development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis in metazoan animals. The culmination of apoptosis in vivo is the phagocytosis of cellular corpses. One morphological characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis is loss of plasma membrane phospholipid asymmetry and exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet. Surface exposure of phosphatidylserine is recognised by a specific receptor (phosphatidylserine receptor, PSR and is required for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages and fibroblasts. Results We have cloned the PSR receptor from Hydra in order to investigate its function in this early metazoan. Bioinformatic analysis of the Hydra PSR protein structure revealed the presence of three nuclear localisation signals, an AT-hook like DNA binding motif and a putative 2-oxoglutarate (2OG-and Fe(II-dependent oxygenase activity. All of these features are conserved from human PSR to Hydra PSR. Expression of GFP tagged Hydra PSR in hydra cells revealed clear nuclear localisation. Deletion of one of the three NLS sequences strongly diminished nuclear localisation of the protein. Membrane localisation was never detected. Conclusions Our results suggest that Hydra PSR is a nuclear 2-oxoglutarate (2OG-and Fe(II-dependent oxygenase. This is in contrast with the proposed function of Hydra PSR as a cell surface receptor involved in the recognition of apoptotic cells displaying phosphatidylserine on their surface. The conservation of the protein from Hydra to human infers that our results also apply to PSR from higher animals.

  16. Angiotensin II induced venoconstriction in normotensive and hypertensive rats: study of action mechanisms, localization and expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Azevedo Loiola

    2007-01-01

    Neste estudo, avaliamos e caracterizamos o efeito de Ang II em leito venular mesentérico (LVM) e anéis de veia porta (AVP) de wistar e SHR. A reatividade vascular para Ang II foi estudada na presença e ausência de diferentes antagonistas para elucidar os mecanismos envolvidos na venoconstrição induzida por Ang II. Nossos resultados sugerem que a Ang II induz venoconstrição através da ativação de receptores AT1 e AT2 em Wistar e receptor AT1 em SHR. Essa venoconstrição parece ser contrabalanc...

  17. Effect of angiotensin II receptor blocker on experimental periodontitis in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Naoto; Moriyama, Keiji; Ganburged, Ganjargal

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by aneurysm and dilatation of the aortic root, tall stature, and ectopia lentis. These manifestations reflect excessive signaling of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Moreover, cases are frequently associated with severe periodontitis, which is a chronic inflammation of the gingiva, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Recently, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) were discovered to be an effective drug class that can prevent aortic aneurysm and dilation in Marfan syndrome by inhibiting TGF-β signaling. To investigate the effect of ARB on the progression of periodontitis, the application of a potent ARB, telmisartan, was examined in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome (MgΔ). Six-week-old male heterozygous MgΔ and wild-type mice were challenged with Porphyromonas gingivalis, which causes chronic periodontitis, with and without telmisartan application. After infection, alveolar bone resorption was measured by micro-computed tomography (μCT), and inflammatory cytokine levels were examined. Infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis induced alveolar bone resorption in both MgΔ and wild-type mice. The amount of resorption was significantly larger in the former than the latter. Immunoarray and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses demonstrated that interleukin-17 (IL-17) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were significantly higher in infected MgΔ mice than infected wild-type mice. Telmisartan treatment significantly suppressed the alveolar bone resorption of infected MgΔ mice. Telmisartan also significantly decreased levels of TGF-β, IL-17, and TNF-α in infected MgΔ mice to levels seen in infected wild-type mice. This study suggests that ARB can prevent the severe periodontitis frequently seen in Marfan syndrome.

  18. Determinants for the adoption of angiotensin II receptor blockers by general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greving, Jacoba P; Denig, Petra; van der Veen, Willem Jan; Beltman, Frank W; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M

    2006-12-01

    Results of studies conducted 10-20 years ago show the prominence of commercial information sources in the adoption process of new drugs. Over the past decade, there has been a growing emphasis on practicing evidence-based medicine in drug prescribing. This raises the question whether professional information sources currently counterbalance the influence of commercial information sources in the adoption process. The aim of this study was to identify determinants influencing the adoption of a new drug class, the angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), by general practitioners (GPs) in The Netherlands. A retrospective study was conducted to assess prevalent ARB prescribing for hypertensive patients using the Integrated Primary Care Information (IPCI) database. We conducted a survey among all GPs who participated in the IPCI project in 2003 to assess their exposure to commercial and professional information sources, perceived benefits and risks of ARBs, perceived influences of the professional network, and general characteristics. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to identify determinants of ARB adoption while adjusting for patient characteristics. Data were obtained from 70 GPs and 9470 treated hypertensive patients. A total of 1093 patients received ARBs (12%). GPs who reported frequent use of commercial information sources were more likely to prescribe ARBs routinely in preference to other antihypertensives, whereas GPs who used a prescribing decision support system and those who were involved in pharmacotherapy education were less likely to prescribe ARBs. Other factors that were associated with higher levels of ARB adoption included a more positive perception of ARBs regarding their effectiveness in lowering blood pressure, and working in single-handed practices or in rural areas. Aside from determinants related to the patient population, adoption of a new drug class among Dutch GPs is still determined more by their reliance on promotional information

  19. Genomic association analysis identifies multiple loci influencing antihypertensive response to an angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T; Bailey, Kent R; Schwartz, Gary L; Chapman, Arlene B; Chai, High Seng; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2012-06-01

    To identify genes influencing blood pressure response to an angiotensin II receptor blocker, single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by genome-wide association analysis of the response to candesartan were validated by opposite direction associations with the response to a thiazide diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide. We sampled 198 white and 193 blacks with primary hypertension from opposite tertiles of the race-sex-specific distributions of age-adjusted diastolic blood pressure response to candesartan. There were 285 polymorphisms associated with the response to candesartan at P<10(-4) in whites. A total of 273 of the 285 polymorphisms, which were available for analysis in a separate sample of 196 whites, validated for opposite direction associations with the response to hydrochlorothiazide (Fisher χ(2) 1-sided P=0.02). Among the 273 polymorphisms, those in the chromosome 11q21 region were the most significantly associated with response to candesartan in whites (eg, rs11020821 near FUT4, P=8.98 × 10(-7)), had the strongest opposite direction associations with response to hydrochlorothiazide (eg, rs3758785 in GPR83, P=7.10 × 10(-3)), and had the same direction associations with response to candesartan in the 193 blacks (eg, rs16924603 near FUT4, P=1.52 × 10(-2)). Also notable among the 273 polymorphisms was rs11649420 on chromosome 16 in the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel subunit SCNN1G involved in mediating renal sodium reabsorption and maintaining blood pressure when the renin-angiotensin system is inhibited by candesartan. These results support the use of genomewide association analyses to identify novel genes predictive of opposite direction associations with blood pressure responses to inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin and renal sodium transport systems.

  20. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers as a first choice in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Bae, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Lee, Won Kee; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Chae, Shung Chull

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have not been adequately evaluated in patients without left ventricular (LV) dysfunction or heart failure after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: Between November 2005 and January 2008, 6,781 patients who were not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or ARBs were selected from the Korean AMI Registry. The primary endpoints were 12-month major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) including death and recurrent AMI. Results: Seventy percent of the patients were Killip class 1 and had a LV ejection fraction ≥ 40%. The prescription rate of ARBs was 12.2%. For each patient, a propensity score, indicating the likelihood of using ARBs during hospitalization or at discharge, was calculated using a non-parsimonious multivariable logistic regression model, and was used to match the patients 1:4, yielding 715 ARB users versus 2,860 ACEI users. The effect of ARBs on in-hospital mortality and 12-month MACE occurrence was assessed using matched logistic and Cox regression models. Compared with ACEIs, ARBs significantly reduced in-hospital mortality(1.3% vs. 3.3%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.379; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.190 to0.756; p = 0.006) and 12-month MACE occurrence (4.6% vs. 6.9%; HR, 0.661; 95% CI, 0.457 to 0.956; p = 0.028). However, the benefit of ARBs on 12-month mortality compared with ACEIs was marginal (4.3% vs. 6.2%; HR, 0.684; 95% CI, 0.467 to 1.002; p = 0.051). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ARBs are not inferior to, and may actually be better than ACEIs in Korean patients with AMI. PMID:26701233

  1. Altered transmission of maternal angiotensin II receptor haplotypes in fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Clare; Chappell, Sally; Acharya, Meera; Crane, Richard; Szolin, Stephanie; Symonds, Lyneth; Chevins, Helen; Kalsheker, Noor; Baker, Philip; Morgan, Linda

    2006-02-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) predisposes to significant short- and long-term health problems. Epidemiological studies have suggested a role for inherited factors in its pathogenesis. The angiotensin II receptor genes, AGTR1 and AGTR2, are candidate genes because they mediate processes that are important for placentation. This study investigated AGTR1 and AGTR2 haplotypes and genotypes in FGR. A total of 107 families (father, mother, and baby) with FGR, and 101 families with normal pregnancies were genotyped at five sites in AGTR1 and six sites across AGTR2. All of the participants were white western Europeans. FGR was identified antenatally by ultrasound scans and confirmed postnatally by correcting the birth weight centile for gestation, infant sex, maternal height, weight, and parity. Fetal genes were investigated using transmission disequilibrium testing (TDT), and a case-control comparison of maternal haplotypes was conducted. FGR was associated with maternal (but not paternal) transmission of the AGTR1 haplotype (GenBank AF245699.1) g.4955T, g.5052T, g.5245C, g.5612A, and haplotype g.4955T, g.5052T, g.5245T, g.5612A. Haplotype g.4955A, g.5052G, g.5245T, g.5612G was undertransmitted (P = 0.002). TDT of the AGTR1 genotype showed undertransmission of maternal AGTR1 genotypes g.4955T>A (odds ratio (OR), 0.34 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.14-0.86); P = 0.02), g.5052T>G (OR, 0.18 (0.06-0.48); PG (OR, 0.21 (0.08-0.55); P AGTR1 or AGTR2 (P > 0.10). This is the first study to show distortion of transmission of maternal AGTR1 haplotypes in FGR, which suggests that this gene plays a role in FGR. In particular, maternal-fetal gene sharing may be an important factor. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Blockade of Angiotensin II type-1 receptor reduces oxidative stress in adipose tissue and ameliorates adipocytokine dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, A; Nishizawa, H; Kihara, S; Maeda, N; Sonoda, M; Okada, T; Ohashi, K; Hibuse, T; Fujita, K; Yasui, A; Hiuge, A; Kumada, M; Kuriyama, H; Shimomura, I; Funahashi, T

    2006-11-01

    Dysregulated production of adipocytokines may be involved in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of treatment with angiotensin II (Ang II) type-1 receptor blocker (ARB) on the regulation of adipocytokines. Olmesartan, an ARB, significantly blunted the age- and body weight-associated falls in plasma adiponectin both in genetically and diet-induced obese mice, without affecting body weight, but had no effect on plasma adiponectin levels in lean mice. Olmesartan also ameliorated dysregulation of adipocytokines in obesity, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and serum amyloid A3. Olmesartan significantly reduced reactive oxygen species originating from accumulated fat and attenuated the expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phospho hydrogenase oxidase subunits in adipose tissue. In cultured adipocytes, olmesartan acted as an antioxidant and improved adipocytokine dysregulation. Our results indicate that blockade of Ang II receptor ameliorates adipocytokine dysregulation and that such action is mediated, at least in part, by targeting oxidative stress in obese adipose tissue. Ang II signaling and subsequent oxidative stress in adipose tissue may be potential targets for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in metabolic syndrome and also in metabolic syndrome-based CKD.

  3. Impaired drinking response in histamine H3 receptor knockout mice following dehydration or angiotensin-II challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Ryo; Miyamoto, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Kotani, Hidehito; Kanatani, Akio; Tokita, Shigeru

    2006-07-01

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are presynaptic receptors that negatively regulate the release of histamine. The present study examined the physiological role of H3Rs in drinking behavior. In water-replete rats, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of R-alpha-methylhistamine (RalphaMeHA), an H3R agonist, elicited drinking behavior. In contrast, i.c.v. administration of thioperamide, an H3R inverse agonist, significantly attenuated the drinking behavior elicited by either overnight dehydration or i.c.v. administration of angiotensin-II (AT-II). Inhibition of histamine release with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, an inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, did not elicit drinking behavior. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of thioperamide on drinking behavior in water-depleted rats were not mimicked by i.c.v. administration of histamine. These results suggest that the predominant effects of H3Rs on drinking behavior are not mediated by the modulation of histamine release. In H3R-deficient (H3RKO) mice, drinking behavior induced by overnight dehydration or i.c.v. administration of AT-II was significantly impaired compared to wild type mice. Collectively, these observations suggest that brain H3Rs play a pivotal role in drinking behavior in response to dehydration and AT-II, and these effects may be largely independent of the modulation of histaminergic tone.

  4. T cells induce extended class II MHC compartments in dendritic cells in a Toll-like receptor-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Marianne; Bertho, Nicolas; Cerny, Jan; Op den Brouw, Marjolein; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Ploegh, Hidde

    2003-10-15

    Interaction of Ag-loaded dendritic cells with Ag-specific CD4 T cells induces the formation of long tubular class II MHC-positive compartments that polarize toward the T cell. We show involvement of a Toll-like receptor-mediated signal in this unusual form of intracellular class II MHC trafficking. First, wild-type dendritic cells loaded with LPS-free Ag failed to show formation of class II-positive tubules upon Ag-specific T cell engagement, but did so upon supplementation of the Ag with low concentrations of LPS. Second, Ag-loaded myeloid differentiation factor 88 -deficient dendritic cells failed to form these tubules upon interaction with T cells, regardless of the presence of LPS. Finally, inclusion of a cell-permeable peptide that blocks TNFR-associated factor 6 function, downstream of myeloid differentiation factor 88, blocked T cell-dependent tubulation. A Toll-like receptor-dependent signal is thus required to allow Ag-loaded dendritic cells to respond to T cell contact by formation of extended endosomal compartments. This activation does not result in massive translocation of class II MHC molecules to the cell surface.

  5. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor expression after vascular injury: differing effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Thomas A; Massett, Michael P; Korshunov, Vyacheslav A; Mohan, Amy M; Kennedy, Amy J; Berk, Bradford C

    2006-11-01

    It has been suggested that the effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blockers are in part because of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) signaling. Interactions between the AT2R and kinins modulate cardiovascular function. Because AT2R expression increases after vascular injury, we hypothesized that the effects on vascular remodeling of the AT1R blocker valsartan and the ACE inhibitor benazepril require AT2R signaling through the bradykinin 1 and 2 receptors (B1R and B2R). To test this hypothesis, Brown Norway rats were assigned to 8 treatments (n=16): valsartan, valsartan+PD123319 (AT2R inhibitor), valsartan+des-arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin (B1R inhibitor), valsartan+HOE140 (B2R inhibitor), benazepril, benazepril+HOE140, amlodipine, and vehicle. After 1 week of treatment, carotid balloon injury was performed. Two weeks later, carotids were harvested for morphometry and analysis of receptor expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Valsartan and benazepril significantly reduced the intima:media ratio compared with vehicle. Blockade of AT2R, B1R, or B2R in the presence of valsartan prevented the reduction seen with valsartan alone. B2R blockade inhibited the effect of benazepril. Injury increased AT1R, AT2R, B1R, and B2R expression. Treatment with valsartan but not benazepril significantly increased intima AT2R expression 2-fold compared with vehicle, which was not reversed by inhibition of AT2R, B1R, and B2R. Functionally, valsartan increased intimal cGMP levels compared with vehicle, and this increase was inhibited by blocking the AT2R, B1R, and B2R. Results suggest that AT2R expression and increased cGMP represent a molecular mechanism that differentiates AT1R blockers, such as valsartan, from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors like benazepril.

  6. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor signaling significantly attenuates growth of murine pancreatic carcinoma grafts in syngeneic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troyer Deryl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with a very poor prognosis. To evaluate the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2 expression in the host's body on the growth of pancreatic carcinoma, we have investigated the growth of mouse pancreatic ductal carcinoma grafts in syngeneic wild type and AT2 receptor-deficient (AT2-KO mice. Methods The role of AT2 receptor-signaling in stromal cells on the growth of murine pancreatic carcinoma cells (PAN02 was studied using various in vitro and in vivo assays. In vivo cell proliferation, apoptosis, and vasculature in tumors were monitored by Ki-67 immunostaining, TUNEL assay, and von Willebrand factor immunostaining, respectively. In the co-culture study, cell proliferation was measured by MTT cell viability assay. All the data were analyzed using t-test and data were treated as significant when p Results Our results show that the growth of subcutaneously transplanted syngeneic xenografts of PAN02 cells, mouse pancreatic ductal carcinoma cells derived from the C57/BL6 strain, was significantly faster in AT2-KO mice compared to control wild type mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue revealed significantly more Ki-67 positive cells in xenografts grown in AT2-KO mice than in wild type mice. The index of apoptosis is slightly higher in wild type mice than in AT2-KO mice as evaluated by TUNEL assay. Tumor vasculature number was significantly higher in AT2-KO mice than in wild type mice. In vitro co-culture studies revealed that the growth of PAN02 cells was significantly decreased when grown with AT2 receptor gene transfected wild type and AT2-KO mouse-derived fibroblasts. Faster tumor growth in AT2-KO mice may be associated with higher VEGF production in stromal cells. Conclusions These results suggest that Ang II regulates the growth of pancreatic carcinoma cells through modulating functions of host stromal cells; Moreover, Ang II AT2

  7. Characterization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in estrogen receptor (ER) Null mice reveals hypergonadism and endocrine sex reversal in females lacking ERalpha but not ERbeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couse, John F; Yates, Mariana M; Walker, Vickie R; Korach, Kenneth S

    2003-06-01

    To determine the role of each estrogen receptor (ER) form (ERalpha, ERbeta) in mediating the estrogen actions necessary to maintain proper function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, we have characterized the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in female ER knockout (ERKO) mice. Evaluation of pituitary function included gene expression assays for Gnrhr, Cga, Lhb, Fshb, and Prl. Evaluation of ovarian steroidogenic capacity included gene expression assays for the components necessary for estradiol synthesis: i.e. Star, Cyp11a, Cyp17, Cyp19, Hsd3b1, and Hsd17b1. These data were corroborated by assessing plasma levels of the respective peptide and steroid hormones. alphaERKO and alphabetaERKO females exhibited increased pituitary Cga and Lhb expression and increased plasma LH levels, whereas both were normal in betaERKO. Pituitary Fshb expression and plasma FSH were normal in all three ERKOs. In the ovary, all three ERKOs exhibited normal expression of Star, Cyp11a, and Hsd3b1. In contrast, Cyp17 and Cyp19 expression were elevated in alphaERKO but normal in betaERKO and alphabetaERKO. Plasma steroid levels in each ERKO mirrored the steroidogenic enzyme expression, with only the alphaERKO exhibiting elevated androstenedione and estradiol. Elevated plasma testosterone in alphaERKO and alphabetaERKO females was attributable to aberrant expression of Hsd17b3 in the ovary, representing a form of endocrine sex reversal, as this enzyme is unique to the testes. Enhanced steroidogenic capacity in alphaERKO ovaries was erased by treatment with a GnRH antagonist, indicating these phenotypes to be the indirect result of excess LH stimulation that follows the loss of ERalpha in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Overall, these findings indicate that ERalpha, but not ERbeta, is indispensable to the negative-feedback effects of estradiol that maintain proper LH secretion from the pituitary. The subsequent hypergonadism is illustrated as increased Cyp17, Cyp19, Hsd17b1, and

  8. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 improves hypoxia-impaired energy production in cardiomyocytes through increasing activity of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Fei; Ma, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the present study, we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches to explore the effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II on energy production in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Hypoxia repressed ATP production in cultured cardiomyocytes, whereas overexpression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 significantly improved ATP production. Conversely, knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 facilitated the hypoxia-induced decrease in ATP synthesis. Further investigation revealed that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 induced the expression and activity of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, a component of cytochrome c oxidase that is important in mitochondrial respiratory chain function. Moreover, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II antagonized the decrease in ATP synthesis caused by knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1, whereas knockdown of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II attenuated the increase in ATP synthesis caused by overexpression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II by a specific inhibitor sodium azide suppressed the ATP sy nthesis induced by overexpressed tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1. Hence, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia at least partly via potentiation of energy generation, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II is one of the downstream effectors that mediates the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1-mediated energy generation program.

  9. Differential Contribution of Transmembrane Domains IV, V, VI, and VII to Human Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Homomer Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brent M; Nguyen, Elaine; Chedrawe, Matthew A J; Rainey, Jan K; Dupré, Denis J

    2017-02-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an important role in drug therapy and represent one of the largest families of drug targets. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is notable as it has a central role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Blockade of AT1R signaling has been shown to alleviate hypertension and improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. Despite this, it has become apparent that our initial understanding of AT1R signaling is oversimplified. There is considerable evidence to suggest that AT1R signaling is highly modified in the presence of receptor-receptor interactions, but there is very little structural data available to explain this phenomenon even with the recent elucidation of the AT1R crystal structure. The current study investigates the involvement of transmembrane domains in AT1R homomer assembly with the goal of identifying hydrophobic interfaces that contribute to receptor-receptor affinity. A recently published crystal structure of the AT1R was used to guide site-directed mutagenesis of outward-facing hydrophobic residues within the transmembrane region of the AT1R. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer was employed to analyze how receptor mutation affects the assembly of AT1R homomers with a specific focus on hydrophobic residues. Mutations within transmembrane domains IV, V, VI, and VII had no effect on angiotensin-mediated β-arrestin1 recruitment; however, they exhibited differential effects on the assembly of AT1R into oligomeric complexes. Our results demonstrate the importance of hydrophobic amino acids at the AT1R transmembrane interface and provide the first glimpse of the requirements for AT1R complex assembly.

  10. Replicative homeostasis II: Influence of polymerase fidelity on RNA virus quasispecies biology: Implications for immune recognition, viral autoimmunity and other "virus receptor" diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallie Richard

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Much of the worlds' population is in active or imminent danger from established infectious pathogens, while sporadic and pandemic infections by these and emerging agents threaten everyone. RNA polymerases (RNApol generate enormous genetic and consequent antigenic heterogeneity permitting both viruses and cellular pathogens to evade host defences. Thus, RNApol causes more morbidity and premature mortality than any other molecule. The extraordinary genetic heterogeneity defining viral quasispecies results from RNApol infidelity causing rapid cumulative genomic RNA mutation a process that, if uncontrolled, would cause catastrophic loss of sequence integrity and inexorable quasispecies extinction. Selective replication and replicative homeostasis, an epicyclical regulatory mechanism dynamically linking RNApol fidelity and processivity with quasispecies phenotypic diversity, modulating polymerase fidelity and, hence, controlling quasispecies behaviour, prevents this happening and also mediates immune escape. Perhaps more importantly, ineluctable generation of broad phenotypic diversity after viral RNA is translated to protein quasispecies suggests a mechanism of disease that specifically targets, and functionally disrupts, the host cell surface molecules – including hormone, lipid, cell signalling or neurotransmitter receptors – that viruses co-opt for cell entry. This mechanism – "Viral Receptor Disease (VRD" – may explain so-called "viral autoimmunity", some classical autoimmune disorders and other diseases, including type II diabetes mellitus, and some forms of obesity. Viral receptor disease is a unifying hypothesis that may also explain some diseases with well-established, but multi-factorial and apparently unrelated aetiologies – like coronary artery and other vascular diseases – in addition to diseases like schizophrenia that are poorly understood and lack plausible, coherent, pathogenic explanations.

  11. (Pro)renin receptor mediates both angiotensin II-dependent and -independent oxidative stress in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Li, Wencheng; Seth, Dale M; Nair, Anand R; Francis, Joseph; Feng, Yumei

    2013-01-01

    The binding of renin or prorenin to the (pro)renin receptor (PRR) promotes angiotensin (Ang) II formation and mediates Ang II-independent signaling pathways. In the central nervous system (CNS), Ang II regulates blood pressure via inducing oxidative stress; however, the role of PRR-mediated Ang II-independent signaling pathways in oxidative stress in the CNS remains undefined. To address this question, Neuro-2A cells were infected with control virus or an adeno-associated virus encoding the human PRR. Human PRR over-expression alone increased ROS levels, NADPH oxidase activity, as well as NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms 2 and 4 mRNA expression levels and these effects were not blocked by losartan. Moreover, the increase in NOX 2 and NOX 4 mRNA levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and ROS levels induced by PRR over-expression was prevented by mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) inhibition, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt (IP3/Akt) inhibition, indicating that PRR regulates NOX activity and ROS formation in neuro-2A cells through Ang II-independent ERK1/2 and IP3/Akt activation. Interestingly, at a concentration of 2 nM or higher, prorenin promoted Ang II formation, and thus further increased the ROS levels in cultured Neuro-2A cells via PRR. In conclusion, human PRR over-expression induced ROS production through both angiotensin II-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We showed that PRR-mediated angiotensin II-independent ROS formation is associated with activation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3/Akt signaling pathways and up-regulation of mRNA level of NOX 2 and NOX4 isoforms in neuronal cells.

  12. Mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth Factor-II receptors may represent a target for the selective delivery of mycophenolic acid to fibrogenic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greupink, Albert; Bakker, Hester; van Goor, H.; de Borst, M.H.; Beljaars, L.; Poelstra, Klaas

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. The insulin-like growth factor axis plays an important role in fibrogenesis. However, little is known about mannose-6-phosphate/Insulin-like growth factor-II receptor (M6P/IGF-IIR) expression during fibrosis. When expressed preferentially on fibrogenic cells, this receptor may be used to se

  13. Efficacy of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade on reperfusion-induced arrhythmias and mortality early after myocardial infarction is increased in transgenic rats with cardiac angiotensin II type 1 overexpression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, RA; van Geel, PP; Pinto, YM; Suurmeijer, AJH; Crijns, HJGM; van Gilst, WH; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    2002-01-01

    Angiotensin II induces ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced arrhythmias and blockade of the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) may therefore be beneficial in preventing arrhythmias and decreasing mortality after myocardial infarction (MI). Because the AT1R is upregulated after myocardial ischemia,

  14. Interleukin-1 stimulates the expression of type I and type II interleukin-1 receptors in the rat insulinoma cell line Rinm5F; sequencing a rat type II interleukin-1 receptor cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristulf, J; Gatti, S; Malinowsky, D; Bjork, L; Sundgren, A K; Bartfai, T

    1994-01-01

    The insulin secreting rat Rinm5F cells are often used to study the cytotoxic actions of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on pancreatic beta-cells. We demonstrate here that Rinm5F insulinoma cells express both type I and type II interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) mRNAs and gene products. IL-1R agonists, recombinant murine IL-1 alpha (rmIL-1 alpha, 10 ng/ml) and recombinant rat IL-1 beta (rrIL-1 beta, 100 pg/ml or 10 ng/ml) induce the upregulation of mRNA expression for both types of IL-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). This effect of rrIL-1 beta is antagonised by preincubation with recombinant human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist protein (rhIL-1ra, 5 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, this rrIL-1 beta induced upregulation of IL-1R mRNAs is blocked by actinomycin D (7.5 micrograms/ml), whereas cycloheximide (20 micrograms/ml) has no effect. The phorbol ester PMA (20 nM) upregulates the expression of mRNAs both IL-1 receptors, whereas glucose (50 mM) upregulates the expression of the type I IL-1R mRNA only. Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) partially blocks the rrIL-1 beta induced expression of mRNA for the type I and, to a lesser extent, the type II IL-1R. Incubation of the cells with rrIL-1 beta also induces a time-dependent expression of c-fos, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Binding studies with 125I-recombinant human IL-1 beta (125I-rhIL-1 beta) indicate that IL-1R gene products, with the ligand binding characteristics of the type I IL-1R, are constitutively present on Rinm5F cells. Treatment with rrIL-1 beta (6h) increases the number of 125I-rhIL-1 beta binding sites on Rinm5F cells. We have also demonstrated that the number of type II IL-1R binding sites increases after induction with rrIL-1 beta (6h), by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal antibody (ALVA 42) raised against the human type II IL-1R. Furthermore, we have sequenced the type II IL-1R cDNA in the rat insulinoma Rinm5F cells. The comparison of the amino acid

  15. Specific single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies to angiotensin II AT(2) receptor: evaluation of the angiotensin II receptor expression in normal and tumor-bearing mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Masaaki; Yan, Heping; Zegarra-Moro, Ofelia; Edl, Jennifer; Oursler, Stephanie; Chard-Bergstrom, Cindy; Andrews, Gordon; Kanehira, Tsutomu; Takekoshi, Susumu; Mernaugh, Ray

    2008-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism by which angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT(2)) regulates carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, we have newly developed anti-AT(2) single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies using a rodent phage-displayed recombinant antibody library with various peptide fragments of the receptor protein, and investigated the expression of the AT(2) receptor protein. The specificity of the antibodies was verified using AT(2) over-expressing COS-7 cells and AT(2) naturally expressing PC12W cells. In control wild type mouse lung, a stronger immunoreactivity was observed in bronchial epithelial cells. A moderate immunoreactivity was detected in pulmonary vascular walls and vascular endothelial cells. In the lungs possessing tobacco-specific nitrosamine (NNK)-induced tumors, significantly increased AT(2) and AT(1 )immunostaining was observed in adenomatous lesions. These data suggest that the increase in both receptors' expression in the alveolar epithelial cells may be accompanied with the onset of NNK-induced tumorigenesis and hence play important roles in lung tumorigenesis.

  16. Psychosocial stress inhibits amplitude of gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulses independent of cortisol action on the type II glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Breen, Kellie M; Oakley, Amy E; Tilbrook, Alan J; Karsch, Fred J

    2009-02-01

    Our laboratory has developed a paradigm of psychosocial stress (sequential layering of isolation, blindfold, and predator cues) that robustly elevates cortisol secretion and decreases LH pulse amplitude in ovariectomized ewes. This decrease in LH pulse amplitude is due, at least in part, to a reduction in pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, caused by cortisol acting via the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The first experiment of the current study aimed to determine whether this layered psychosocial stress also inhibits pulsatile GnRH release into pituitary portal blood. The stress paradigm significantly reduced GnRH pulse amplitude compared with nonstressed ovariectomized ewes. The second experiment tested if this stress-induced decrease in GnRH pulse amplitude is mediated by cortisol action on the type II GR. Ovariectomized ewes were allocated to three groups: nonstress control, stress, and stress plus the type II GR antagonist RU486. The layered psychosocial stress paradigm decreased GnRH and LH pulse amplitude compared with nonstress controls. Importantly, the stress also lowered GnRH pulse amplitude to a comparable extent in ewes in which cortisol action via the type II GR was antagonized. Therefore, we conclude that psychosocial stress reduces the amplitude of GnRH pulses independent of cortisol action on the type II GR. The present findings, combined with our recent observations, suggest that the mechanisms by which psychosocial stress inhibits reproductive neuroendocrine activity at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels are fundamentally different.

  17. Oral administration of GW788388, an inhibitor of TGF-beta type I and II receptor kinases, decreases renal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, M; Thorikay, M; Deckers, M; van Dinther, M; Grygielko, E T; Gellibert, F; de Gouville, A C; Huet, S; ten Dijke, P; Laping, N J

    2008-03-01

    Progressive kidney fibrosis precedes end-stage renal failure in up to a third of patients with diabetes mellitus. Elevated intra-renal transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is thought to underlie disease progression by promoting deposition of extracellular matrix and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. GW788388 is a new TGF-beta type I receptor inhibitor with a much improved pharmacokinetic profile compared with SB431542. We studied its effect in vitro and found that it inhibited both the TGF-beta type I and type II receptor kinase activities, but not that of the related bone morphogenic protein type II receptor. Further, it blocked TGF-beta-induced Smad activation and target gene expression, while decreasing epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and fibrogenesis. Using db/db mice, which develop diabetic nephropathy, we found that GW788388 given orally for 5 weeks significantly reduced renal fibrosis and decreased the mRNA levels of key mediators of extracellular matrix deposition in kidneys. Our study shows that GW788388 is a potent and selective inhibitor of TGF-beta signalling in vitro and renal fibrosis in vivo.

  18. Transcriptional network analysis reveals that AT1 and AT2 angiotensin II receptors are both involved in the regulation of genes essential for glioma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Fujita, André; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Iamashita, Priscila; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive primary brain tumors with high infiltrative potential. The expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors has been associated with poor prognosis in human astrocytomas, the most common type of glioma. In this study, we investigated the role of Angiotensin II in glioma malignancy through transcriptional profiling and network analysis of cultured C6 rat glioma cells exposed to Ang II and to inhibitors of its membrane receptor subtypes. C6 cells were treated with Ang II and specific antagonists of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Total RNA was isolated after three and six hours of Ang II treatment and analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology. Gene expression data was evaluated through transcriptional network modeling to identify how differentially expressed (DE) genes are connected to each other. Moreover, other genes co-expressing with the DE genes were considered in these analyses in order to support the identification of enriched functions and pathways. A hub-based network analysis showed that the most connected nodes in Ang II-related networks exert functions associated with cell proliferation, migration and invasion, key aspects for glioma progression. The subsequent functional enrichment analysis of these central genes highlighted their participation in signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated in gliomas such as ErbB, MAPK and p53. Noteworthy, either AT1 or AT2 inhibitions were able to down-regulate different sets of hub genes involved in protumoral functions, suggesting that both Ang II receptors could be therapeutic targets for intervention in glioma. Taken together, our results point out multiple actions of Ang II in glioma pathogenesis and reveal the participation of both Ang II receptors in the regulation of genes relevant for glioma progression. This study is the first one to provide systems-level molecular data for better understanding the protumoral effects of Ang II in the proliferative and infiltrative behavior of

  19. Transcriptional network analysis reveals that AT1 and AT2 angiotensin II receptors are both involved in the regulation of genes essential for glioma progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hátylas Azevedo

    Full Text Available Gliomas are aggressive primary brain tumors with high infiltrative potential. The expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II receptors has been associated with poor prognosis in human astrocytomas, the most common type of glioma. In this study, we investigated the role of Angiotensin II in glioma malignancy through transcriptional profiling and network analysis of cultured C6 rat glioma cells exposed to Ang II and to inhibitors of its membrane receptor subtypes. C6 cells were treated with Ang II and specific antagonists of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Total RNA was isolated after three and six hours of Ang II treatment and analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology. Gene expression data was evaluated through transcriptional network modeling to identify how differentially expressed (DE genes are connected to each other. Moreover, other genes co-expressing with the DE genes were considered in these analyses in order to support the identification of enriched functions and pathways. A hub-based network analysis showed that the most connected nodes in Ang II-related networks exert functions associated with cell proliferation, migration and invasion, key aspects for glioma progression. The subsequent functional enrichment analysis of these central genes highlighted their participation in signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated in gliomas such as ErbB, MAPK and p53. Noteworthy, either AT1 or AT2 inhibitions were able to down-regulate different sets of hub genes involved in protumoral functions, suggesting that both Ang II receptors could be therapeutic targets for intervention in glioma. Taken together, our results point out multiple actions of Ang II in glioma pathogenesis and reveal the participation of both Ang II receptors in the regulation of genes relevant for glioma progression. This study is the first one to provide systems-level molecular data for better understanding the protumoral effects of Ang II in the proliferative and infiltrative

  20. Silencing the mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor differentially affects tumorigenic properties of normal breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caixeiro, Nicole J; Martin, Janet L; Scott, Carolyn D

    2013-12-01

    Although loss of the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor-II receptor (M6P/IGF-IIR) in breast cancer is believed to play a role in tumorigenesis, it has not been demonstrated that M6P/IGF-IIR loss is sufficient to confer a malignant phenotype in an untransformed cell. We investigated the impact of M6P/IGF-IIR silencing using phenotypically normal (MCF-10A) and oncogenically transformed (MCF-10T, the c-Ha-ras transformed derivative of MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cell lines as model systems. In both cell lines, silencing of M6P/IGF-IIR increased cell proliferation and motility, with the effects being more pronounced in MCF-10A cells. Although anchorage-independent growth was increased by M6P/IGF-IIR silencing in MCF-10T cells, MCF-10A cells did not acquire the ability to grow in soft agar. Conversely, reduced M6P/IGF-IIR expression increased the invasive potential of MCF-10A cells, but did not enhance the already high rate of invasion of MCF-10T cells. M6P/IGF-IIR silencing had no effect on basal or IGF-II-stimulated IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) or AKT phosphorylation in either cell line, but both were abrogated by IGF-IR kinase inhibition, which also reduced the stimulatory effect of M6P/IGF-IIR silencing on proliferation under basal and IGF-II-stimulated conditions in both cell lines. However, cell motility was neither stimulated by IGF-II nor reduced by IGF-IR inhibition, suggesting that potentiation of specific tumorigenic features in response to M6P/IGF-IIR silencing involves IGF-II- dependent and -independent mechanisms. Collectively, these data suggest that M6P/IGF-IIR silencing alone is insufficient to confer a tumorigenic phenotype, but can enhance tumorigenicity in an already transformed cell.

  1. Angiotensin II receptor blockers improve peripheral endothelial function: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE(S: Several studies have assessed the effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs on peripheral endothelial dysfunction as measured by flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD, a widely-used indicator for endothelial function. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the effect in comparison to placebo or no treatment and other antihypertensives. METHODS: MEDLINE, Cochrane library and EMBASE were searched to September 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs that assessed the effect of ARBs versus placebo or no treatment and other antihypertensives (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs, calcium channel blockers (CCBs, β-blockers, diuretics by forearm FMD. Furthermore, we also use meta-regression to analyze the relationship between the endothelial function and the duration of ARBs treatments. RESULTS: In 11 trials including 590 patients, ARBs (n = 315 significantly improved FMD (1.36%, 95% confidence internal [CI]:1.28 to 1.44 versus placebo or no treatment (n = 275. In 16 trials that included 1028 patients, ARBs (n = 486 had a significant effect (0.59%, 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.94 on FMD when compared with other antihypertensives (n = 542. In 8 trials, ARBs (n = 174 had no significant effect (-0.14%, 95% CI: -0.32 to 0.03 compared with ACEI (n = 173. Compared with others, the benefits of ARBs, respectively, were 1.67% (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.93 in 7 trials with CCBs, 0.79% (95% CI: 0.42 to 1.01 with β-blockers in 3 trials and 0.9% (95% CI: 0.77 to 1.03 with diuretics in 3 trials. Importantly, we found ARBs were less effective in a long time span (95% CI: -1.990 to -0.622 than the first 6 months (95% CI: -0.484 to 0.360. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that ARBs improve peripheral endothelial function and are superior to CCBs, β-blockers and diuretics. However, the effect couldn't be maintained for a long time. In addition, there was no significant difference between ARBs and ACEI.

  2. No effect of angiotensin II AT(2)-receptor antagonist PD 123319 on cerebral blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estrup, T M; Paulson, O B; Strandgaard, S

    2001-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonists shift the limits of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) towards lower blood pressure (BP). The role of AT2-receptors in the regulation of the cerebral cir...

  3. No effect of angiotensin II AT(2)-receptor antagonist PD 123319 on cerebral blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estrup, T M; Paulson, O B; Strandgaard, S

    2001-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonists shift the limits of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) towards lower blood pressure (BP). The role of AT2-receptors in the regulation of the cerebral...

  4. Angiotensin II directly stimulates ENaC activity in the cortical collecting duct via AT(1) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Warnock, David G; Bell, P Darwin

    2002-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) helps to regulate overall renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water, yet its effects in the distal nephron have not been well studied. The purpose of these studies was to determine whether AngII stimulates luminal Na(+) transport in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](i)), as a reflection of Na(+) transport across the apical membrane, was measured with fluorescence microscopy using sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI) in isolated, perfused CCD segments dissected from rabbit kidneys. Control [Na(+)](i), during perfusion with 25 mM NaCl and a Na(+)-free solution in the bath containing the Na(+)-ionophore monensin (10 microM, to eliminate basolateral membrane Na(+) transport) averaged 19.3 +/- 5.2 mM (n = 16). Increasing luminal [NaCl] to 150 mM elevated [Na(+)](i) by 9.87 +/- 1.5 mM (n = 7; P < 0.05). AngII (10(-9) M) added to the lumen significantly elevated baseline [Na(+)](i) by 6.3 +/- 1.0 mM and increased the magnitude (Delta = 25.2 +/- 3.7 mM) and initial rate ( approximately 5 fold) of change in [Na(+)](i) to increased luminal [NaCl]. AngII when added to the bath had similar stimulatory effects; however, AngII was much more effective from the lumen. Thus, AngII significantly increased the apical entry of Na(+) in the CCD. To determine if this apical entry step occurred via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), studies were performed using the specific ENaC blocker, benzamil hydrochloride (10(-6) M). When added to the perfusate, benzamil almost completely inhibited the elevations in [Na(+)](i) to increased luminal [NaCl] in both the presence and absence of AngII. These results suggest that AngII directly stimulates Na(+) channel activity in the CCD. AT(1) receptor blockade with candesartan or losartan (10(-6) M) prevented the stimulatory effects of AngII. Regulation of ENaC activity by AngII may play an important role in distal Na(+) reabsorption in health and disease.

  5. Estrogen receptor-alpha mediates estrogen protection from angiotensin II-induced hypertension in conscious female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baojian; Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Lubahn, Dennis B; Hay, Meredith

    2007-04-01

    It has been shown that the female sex hormones have a protective role in the development of angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. The present study tested the hypotheses that 1) the estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) is involved in the protective effects of estrogen against ANG II-induced hypertension and 2) central ERs are involved. Blood pressure (BP) was measured in female mice with the use of telemetry implants. ANG II (800 ng.kg(-1).min(-1)) was administered subcutaneously via an osmotic pump. Baseline BP in the intact, ovariectomized (OVX) wild-type (WT) and ERalpha knockout (ERalphaKO) mice was similar; however, the increase in BP induced by ANG II was greater in OVX WT (23.0 +/- 1.0 mmHg) and ERalphaKO mice (23.8 +/- 2.5 mmHg) than in intact WT mice (10.1 +/- 4.5 mmHg). In OVX WT mice, central infusion of 17beta-estradiol (E(2); 30 microg.kg(-1).day(-1)) attenuated the pressor effect of ANG II (7.0 +/- 0.4 mmHg), and this protective effect of E(2) was prevented by coadministration of ICI-182,780 (ICI; 1.5 microg.kg(-1).day(-1), 18.8 +/- 1.5 mmHg), a nonselective ER antagonist. Furthermore, central, but not peripheral, infusions of ICI augmented the pressor effects of ANG II in intact WT mice (17.8 +/- 4.2 mmHg). In contrast, the pressor effect of ANG II was unchanged in either central E(2)-treated OVX ERalphaKO mice (19.0 +/- 1.1 mmHg) or central ICI-treated intact ERalphaKO mice (19.6 +/- 1.6 mmHg). Lastly, ganglionic blockade on day 7 after ANG II infusions resulted in a greater reduction in BP in OVX WT, central ER antagonist-treated intact WT, central E(2) + ICI-treated OVX WT, ERalphaKO, and central E(2)- or ICI-treated ERalphaKO mice compared with that in intact WT mice given just ANG II. Together, these data indicate that ERalpha, especially central expression of the ER, mediates the protective effects of estrogen against ANG II-induced hypertension.

  6. New highly selective turn-on fluorescence receptor for the detection of copper (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Qian; Rong, Pu; Jiang, Yunbao; Yang, Rui

    2017-03-01

    Three new receptors (1a-c) bearing a p-dimethylaminobenzamide fluorophore have been synthesized and evaluated in terms of their fluoroionophoric properties towards various metal ions. Notably, receptors 1a and 1c exhibited dramatic fluorescent enhancement towards Cu2 + in acetonitrile. Subsequent investigations revealed that the highly selective behavior of these receptors towards Cu2 + could be attributed to the Cu2 +-mediated oxidative cyclization of these compounds to the corresponding 1,3,4-oxadiazoles. Solvent effects and quantum calculations indicated that 1a and 1c both possessed an intramolecular charge transfer channel, which could be obstructed by the oxidative cyclization of these receptors. Receptor 1a was successfully applied to the determination of the Cu2 + in drug sample with a low detection limit of 2.2 × 10- 8 mol L- 1.

  7. Aldosterone breakthrough caused by chronic blockage of angiotensin II type 1 receptors in human adrenocortical cells: Possible involvement of bone morphogenetic protein-6 actions

    OpenAIRE

    Otani, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Fumio; Inagaki, Kenichi; Suzuki, Jiro; Miyoshi, Tomoko; KANO, YOSHIHIRO; GOTO, Junko; Ogura, Toshio; Makino, Hirofumi

    2008-01-01

    Circulating aldosterone concentrations occasionally increase after initial suppression with angiotensin II (Ang II) converting enzyme inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), a phenomenon referred to as aldosterone breakthrough. However, the underlying mechanism causing the aldosterone breakthrough remains unknown. Here we investigated whether aldosterone breakthrough occurs in human adrenocortical H295R cells in vitro. We recently reported that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-6...

  8. A different role of angiotensin II type 1a receptor in the development and hypertrophy of plantaris muscle in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Ogawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Ryo; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-02-01

    The role of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors in muscle development and hypertrophy remains unclear. This study was designed to reveal the effects that a loss of AT1 receptors has on skeletal muscle development and hypertrophy in mice. Eight-week-old male AT1a receptor knockout (AT1a(-/-)) mice were used for this experiment. The plantaris muscle to body weight ratio, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, and number of muscle fibers of AT1a(-/-) mice was significantly greater than wild type (WT) mice in the non-intervention condition. Next, the functional overload (OL) model was used to induce plantaris muscle hypertrophy by surgically removing the two triceps muscles consisting of the calf, soleus, and gastrocnemius muscles in mice. After 14 days of OL intervention, the plantaris muscle weight, the amount of fiber, and the fiber area increased. However, the magnitude of the increment of plantaris weight was not different between the two strains. Agtr1a mRNA expression did not change after OL in WT muscle. Actually, the Agt mRNA expression level of WT-OL was lower than WT-Control (C) muscle. An atrophy-related gene, atrogin-1 mRNA expression levels of AT1a(-/-)-C, WT-OL, and AT1a(-/-)-OL muscle were lower than that of WT-C muscle. Our findings suggest that AT1 receptor contributes to plantaris muscle development via atrogin-1 in mice.

  9. Structural mapping of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Distance between the tetrodotoxin and Centruroides suffusus suffusus II beta-scorpion toxin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbon, H; Angelides, K J

    1984-05-25

    A 7- dimethylaminocoumarin -4-acetate fluorescent derivative of toxin II from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css II) has been prepared to study the structural, conformational, and cellular properties of the beta-neurotoxin receptor site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. The derivative retains high affinity for its receptor site on the synaptosomal sodium channel with a KD of 7 nM and site capacity of 1.5 pmol/mg of synaptosomal protein. The fluorescent toxin is very environmentally sensitive and the fluorescence emission upon binding indicates that the Css II receptor is largely hydrophobic. Binding of tetrodotoxin or batrachotoxin does not alter the spectroscopic properties of bound Css II, whereas toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus effects a 10-nm blue shift to a more hydrophobic environment. This is the first direct indication of conformational coupling between these separate neurotoxin receptor sites. The distance between the tetrodotoxin and Css II scorpion toxin receptors on the sodium channel was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Efficiencies were measured by both donor quenching and acceptor-sensitized emission. The distance between these two neurotoxin sites is about 34 A. The implications of these receptor locations together with other known molecular distances are discussed in terms of a molecular structure of the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

  10. Clinical and Pharmacotherapeutic Relevance of the Double-Chain Domain of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blocker Olmesartan

    OpenAIRE

    Kiya, Yoshihiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Fujino, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Saku, Keijiro

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan has two important interactions to evoke inverse agonism (IA). We refer to these interactions as the “double-chain domain (DCD).” Since the clinical pharmacotherapeutic relevance of olmesartan is still unclear, we examined these effects in rats and humans. We analyzed the effects at an advanced stage of renal insufficiency in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats (Study 1). Rats were fed a high-salt d...

  11. Quinoxaline N-oxide containing potent angiotensin II receptor antagonists: synthesis, biological properties, and structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K S; Qian, L; Bird, J E; Dickinson, K E; Moreland, S; Schaeffer, T R; Waldron, T L; Delaney, C L; Weller, H N; Miller, A V

    1993-08-01

    A series of novel quinoxaline heterocycle containing angiotensin II receptor antagonist analogs were prepared. This heterocycle was coupled to the biphenyl moiety via an oxygen atom linker instead of a carbon atom. Many of these analogs exhibit very potent activity and long duration of effect. Interestingly, the N-oxide quinoxaline analog was more potent than the nonoxidized quinoxaline as in the comparison of compounds 5 vs 30. In order to improve oral activity, the carboxylic acid function of these compounds was converted to the double ester. This change did result in an improvement in oral activity as represented by compound 44.

  12. Synthesis and SAR of thieno[3,2-b]pyridinyl urea derivatives as urotensin-II receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chae Jo; Oh, Seung Ae; Lee, Byung Ho; Oh, Kwang-Seok; Yi, Kyu Yang

    2014-12-15

    The preparation and SAR profile of thieno[3,2-b]pyridinyl urea derivatives as novel and potent urotensin-II receptor antagonists are described. An activity optimization study, probing the effects of substituents on thieno[3,2-b]pyridinyl core and benzyl group of the piperidinyl moiety, led to the identification of p-fluorobenzyl substituted thieno[3,2-b]pyridinyl urea 6n as a highly potent UT antagonist with an IC50 value of 13nM. Although 6n displays good metabolic stability and low hERG binding activity, it has an unacceptable oral bioavailability.

  13. Rapid detection of the hypertension-associated A1166C polymorphism of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Aleksandra; Alavantic, Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Screening for polymorphisms in the human type 1 angiotensin II receptor locus (AGTR1) has led to the identification of an A1166C transversion in the 3'-untranslated region. This molecular variant, C(1166), has been linked to essential hypertension. We describe here a rapid method for the detection of this point mutation by a simple modification of PCR amplification with allele-specific oligonucleotides (ASO), so as to avoid a hybridization procedure involving either radioactive- or non-radioactive-labeled probes, labeled primers, or restriction typing. The procedure described is convenient for routine clinical laboratory use with manual sample processing and offers the potential for further automation, as well.

  14. Hippocampal angiotensin II receptors play an important role in mediating the effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Maziar M; Emami-Abarghoie, Mitra; Sadighi-Moghaddam, Bizhan; Safari, Manouchehr; Yousefi, Yasaman; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2008-09-26

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of hippocampal angiotensin II receptors in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the hippocampal angiotension II receptors, the animals received a single injection of latex microbeads for delivery of [Sar1 Thr8]-Angiotensin II into the hippocampus. The animals were exposed to five consecutive nights of exercise and then their learning and memory were tested on the Morris water maze (MWM) task using a two-trial-per-day for five consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that hippocampal angiotensin II receptor blockade reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat.

  15. Serum metabolites predict response to angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, Michelle J.; Heinzel, Andreas; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Dallmann, Guido; Rossing, Kasper; Andersen, Steen; Mayer, Bernd; Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Individual patients show a large variability in albuminuria response to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). Identifying novel biomarkers that predict ARB response may help tailor therapy. We aimed to discover and validate a serum metabolite classifier that predicts albuminuria response

  16. Tanshinone IIA Prevents Leu27IGF-II-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Mediated by Estrogen Receptor and Subsequent Akt Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yueh-Shan; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Pai, Pei-Ying; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chung, Li-Chin; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; HsuanDay, Cecilia; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    IGF-IIR plays important roles as a key regulator in myocardial pathological hypertrophy and apoptosis, which subsequently lead to heart failure. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen) is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Tanshinone IIA is an active compound in Danshen and is structurally similar to 17[Formula: see text]-estradiol (E[Formula: see text]. However, whether tanshinone IIA improves cardiomyocyte survival in pathological hypertrophy through estrogen receptor (ER) regulation remains unclear. This study investigates the role of ER signaling in mediating the protective effects of tanshinone IIA on IGF-IIR-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Leu27IGF-II (IGF-II analog) was shown in this study to specifically activate IGF-IIR expression and ICI 182,780 (ICI), an ER antagonist used to investigate tanshinone IIA estrogenic activity. We demonstrated that tanshinone IIA significantly enhanced Akt phosphorylation through ER activation to inhibit Leu27IGF-II-induced calcineurin expression and subsequent NFATc3 nuclear translocation to suppress myocardial hypertrophy. Tanshinone IIA reduced the cell size and suppressed ANP and BNP, inhibiting antihypertrophic effects induced by Leu27IGF-II. The cardioprotective properties of tanshinone IIA that inhibit Leu27IGF-II-induced cell hypertrophy and promote cell survival were reversed by ICI. Furthermore, ICI significantly reduced phospho-Akt, Ly294002 (PI3K inhibitor), and PI3K siRNA significantly reduced the tanshinone IIA-induced protective effect. The above results suggest that tanshinone IIA inhibited cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which was mediated through ER, by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibiting Leu27IGF-II-induced calcineurin and NFATC3. Tanshinone IIA exerted strong estrogenic activity and therefore represented a novel selective ER modulator that inhibits IGF-IIR signaling to block cardiac hypertrophy.

  17. Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II type I receptor gene polymorphisms with extreme obesity in Polish individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacholczyk, Marta; Ferenc, Tomasz; Kowalski, Jan; Adamczyk, Przemysław; Chojnowski, Jacek; Ponikowska, Irena

    2013-08-01

    There is strong evidence for the presence of a functional renin-angiotensin system in human adipose tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of polymorphic variants of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE I/D) and angiotensin II type I receptor gene (AGTR1 A1166C) with extreme obesity and obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to examine their combined effect on extremely obese patients. Overall, no significant associations were detected between ACE and AGTR1 gene polymorphisms and extreme obesity. However, extremely obese patients with T2DM showed an increased frequency of ACE II genotype compared with controls (pAGTR1 gene, regardless of the presence of T2DM. Moreover, the analysis of genetic polymorphisms demonstrated that ACE II and AGTR1 AC genotypes were most frequently observed in patients with extreme obesity and T2DM. On the basis of our results, we suggest that ACE II homozygosity may be a significant predictor of extreme obesity and T2DM and that the interaction between ACE and AGTR1 genes may be considered a predisposing factor for extreme obesity and extreme obesity-associated T2DM development.

  18. Tanshinone II A sulfonate, but not tanshinone II A, acts as potent negative allosteric modulator of the human purinergic receptor P2X7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, M; Sobottka, H; Fischer, W; Schaefer, M; Nörenberg, W

    2014-09-01

    Tanshinone II A sulfonate (TIIAS) was identified as a potent, selective blocker of purinergic receptor P2X7 in a compound library screen. In this study, a detailed characterization of the pharmacologic effects of TIIAS on P2X7 is provided. Because TIIAS is a derivative of tanshinone II A (TIIA) and both compounds have been used interchangeably, TIIA was included in some assays. Fluorometric and electrophysiologic assays were used to characterize effects of TIIAS and TIIA on recombinantly expressed human, rat, and mouse P2X7. Results were confirmed in human monocyte-derived macrophages expressing native P2X7. In all experiments, involvement of P2X7 was verified using established P2X7 antagonists. TIIAS, but not TIIA, reduces Ca(2+) influx via human P2X7 (hP2X7) with an IC50 of 4.3 µM. TIIAS was less potent at mouse P2X7 and poorly inhibited rat P2X7. Monitoring of YO-PRO-1 uptake confirmed these findings, indicating that formation of the hP2X7 pore is also suppressed by TIIAS. Electrophysiologic experiments revealed a noncompetitive mode of action. TIIAS time-dependently inhibits hP2X7 gating, possibly by binding to the intracellular domain of the receptor. Inhibition of native P2X7 in macrophages by TIIAS was confirmed by monitoring Ca(2+) influx, YO-PRO-1 uptake, and release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β. Fluorometric experiments involving recombinantly expressed rat P2X2 and human P2X4 were conducted and verified the compound's selectivity. Our data suggest that hP2X7 is a molecular target of TIIAS, but not of TIIA, a compound with different pharmacologic properties.

  19. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II; recognition sites for receptors and binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Terasawa, H; Kohda, D.; Hatanaka, H; Nagata, K.; Higashihashi, N; Fujiwara, H.; Sakano, K; Inagaki, F.

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor II was determined at high resolution in aqueous solution by NMR and simulated annealing based calculations. The structure is quite similar to those of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I, which consists of an alpha-helix followed by a turn and a strand in the B-region and two antiparallel alpha-helices in the A-region. However, the regions of Ala1-Glu6, Pro31-Arg40 and Thr62-Glu67 are not well-defined for lack of distanc...

  20. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of the mouse urocortin II gene: a putative connection between the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alon; Vaughan, Joan; Vale, Wylie W

    2003-08-01

    Peptides encoded by the urocortin II (Ucn II) gene were recently identified as new members of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family. Ucn II is a specific ligand for the type 2 CRF receptor. Using RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, and immunofluorescence staining, we report the expression of Ucn II mRNA in several human and mouse (m) neuronal cell lines. Using these neuronal cell lines, we provide evidence that exposure to glucocorticoid hormones increases mUcn II mRNA expression and promoter activation. The effect of glucocorticoids on mUcn II mRNA expression was tested in the Ucn II/glucocorticoid receptor-positive cell line NG108-15. The results demonstrate that mUcn II mRNA expression is up-regulated by dexamethasone in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Computer analysis revealed the presence of 14 putative half-palindrome glucocorticoid response element sequences within 1.2 kb of the mUcn II 5' flanking region. Transfections with different fragments of the 5'-flanking region of the mUcn II gene fused to a luciferase reporter gene showed a promoter-dependent expression of the reporter gene and regulation by dexamethasone. Promoter deletion studies clarify the sufficient putative glucocorticoid response element site mediating this effect. The steroid hormone antagonist RU486 blocked the effect of dexamethasone on mUcn II mRNA expression and promoter activation, suggesting a direct glucocorticoid receptor-mediated effect of dexamethasone on mUcn II mRNA expression. Ucn II is expressed in vivo in the hypothalamus, brainstem, olfactory bulb, and pituitary. Low levels were also detected in the mouse cortex, hippocampus, and spinal cord. We demonstrated that mUcn II gene transcription was stimulated by glucocorticoid administration in vivo and inhibited by removal of glucocorticoids by adrenalectomy. Administration of dexamethasone to mice resulted in an increase of mUcn II levels in the hypothalamus and brainstem but not in the olfactory bulb region 12 h following

  1. Lack of association between gene polymorphisms of Angiotensin converting enzyme, Nod-like receptor 1, Toll-like receptor 4, FAS/FASL and the presence of Helicobacter pylori-induced premalignant gastric lesions and gastric cancer in Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupcinskas Juozas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several polymorphisms of genes involved in the immunological recognition of Helicobacter pylori and regulating apoptosis and proliferation have been linked to gastric carcinogenesis, however reported data are partially conflicting. The aim of our study was to evaluate potential associations between the presence of gastric cancer (GC and high risk atrophic gastritis (HRAG and polymorphisms of genes encoding Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, Nod-like receptor 1 (NOD1, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and FAS/FASL. Methods Gene polymorphisms were analyzed in 574 subjects (GC: n = 114; HRAG: n = 222, controls: n = 238 of Caucasian origin. ACE I/D (rs4646994, NOD1 796G>A (rs5743336, TLR4 3725G>C (rs11536889, FAS 1377G>A (rs2234767, FAS 670A>G (rs1800682 and FASL 844T>C (rs763110 were genotyped by different PCR approaches and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results Frequencies of genotypes in our study are similar to the data reported on subjects of Caucasian ethnicity. There was a tendency for NOD1 796G/G genotype to be associated with increased risk of HRAG (62.4% vs. 54.5% in controls, p = 0.082. FAS 670G/G genotype was more frequent in HRAG when compared to controls, 23.9% and 17.2% respectively, however it failed to reach significance level (p = 0.077. We did not find any significant associations for all polymorphisms in relation to GC or HRAG. NOD1 796G>A and TLR4 3725G>C gene polymorphisms were also not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Conclusions ACE, NOD1, TRL4 and FAS/FASL gene polymorphisms are not linked with gastric carcinogenesis in Caucasians, and therefore they should not be considered as potential biomarkers for identifying individuals with higher risk for GC.

  2. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang XF

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Xue-Fen Pang,1 Li-Hui Zhang,2 Feng Bai,1 Ning-Ping Wang,3 Ron E Garner,3 Robert J McKallip,4 Zhi-Qing Zhao1,3 1Department of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Cardiology, Shanxi Academy of Medical Sciences and Shanxi Dayi Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, GA, USA; 4Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA Abstract: Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2 receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02% vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05. These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was

  3. Post-stroke angiotensin II type 2 receptor activation provides long-term neuroprotection in aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Isenberg, Jacob D; Harmel, Allison T

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) by administration of Compound 21 (C21), a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect effe...... disease. Further, it appears that this sustained neuroprotection is likely due to a mix of both direct and indirect effects stemming from selective activation of AT2Rs on neurons or other cells besides astrocytes and microglia.......Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) by administration of Compound 21 (C21), a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect...... effects of AT2R activation. Our objectives were to assess the long-term protective effects of post-stroke C21 treatments in a clinically-relevant model of stroke in aged rats and to characterize the cellular localization of AT2Rs in the mouse brain of transgenic reporter mice following stroke...

  4. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hypertension in elderly patients: focus on patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artavazd Tadevosyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Artavazd Tadevosyan1, Eric J MacLaughlin2, Vardan T Karamyan31Departments of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute and Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX, USAAbstract: Hypertension in the elderly is one of the main risk factors of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Knowledge regarding the mechanisms of hypertension and specific considerations in managing hypertensive elderly through pharmacological intervention(s is fundamental to improving clinical outcomes. Recent clinical studies in the elderly have provided evidence that angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 receptor antagonists can improve clinical outcomes to a similar or, in certain populations, an even greater extent than other classical arterial blood pressure-lowering agents. This newer class of antihypertensive agents presents several benefits, including potential for improved adherence, excellent tolerability profile with minimal first-dose hypotension, and a low incidence of adverse effects. Thus, AT1 receptor antagonists represent an appropriate option for many elderly patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, and/or left ventricular dysfunction.Keywords: angiotensin II, ARB, cardiovascular disease, antihypertensive therapy, elderly

  5. IN SILICO EVALUATION OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST’S PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING USING COMPUTED MOLECULAR DESCRIPTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Odović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of new pharmacologically active substances and drugs modeling led to necessity of predicting drugs properties and its ADME data. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists are a group of pharmaceuticals which modulate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and today represent the most commonly prescribed anti-hypertensive drugs. The aim of this study was to compare different molecular properties of seven angiotensin II receptor antagonists / blockers (ARBs, (eprosartan, irbesartan, losartan, olmesartan, telmisartan, valsartan and their plasma protein binding (PPB data. Several ARBs molecular descriptors were calculated using software package Molinspiration Depiction Software as well as Virtual Computational Chemistry Laboratory (electronic descriptor – PSA, constitutional parameter – Mw, geometric descriptor – Vol, lipophilicity descriptors - logP values, aqueous solubility data – logS. The correlations between all collected descriptors and plasma protein binding data obtained from relevant literature were established. In the simple linear regression poor correlations were obtained in relationships between PPB data and all calculated molecular descriptors. In the next stage of the study multiple linear regression (MLR was used for correlation of PPB data with two different descriptors as independent variables. The best correlation (R2=0.70 with P<0.05 was established between PPB data and molecular weight with addition of volume values as independent variables. The possible application of computed molecular descriptors in drugs protein binding evaluation can be of great importance in drug research.

  6. Dosage of angiotensin-II receptor blockers in heart failure patients following changes in Danish drug reimbursement policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Christian; Lamberts, Morten; Kristensen, Søren Lund;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: National reimbursement policies in Denmark were changed in November 2010 favouring a shift in angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB) treatment to generic losartan for heart failure (HF) patients. We examined how changes in reimbursement policies affected the fraction of HF patients up-tit......), compared with May-Jul 2010 (reference). CONCLUSION: Probability of being up-titrated in ARB treatment was reduced 20% following changes in drug reimbursement policies.......PURPOSE: National reimbursement policies in Denmark were changed in November 2010 favouring a shift in angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB) treatment to generic losartan for heart failure (HF) patients. We examined how changes in reimbursement policies affected the fraction of HF patients up....... Individual-level linkage of nationwide registries of hospitalization and drug dispensing in Denmark was used to describe patterns of ARB prescriptions and estimate dosage before and after November 2010. Logistic regression models were used to assess the probability for being up-titrated in the period...

  7. Angiotensin II Type 1 receptor (AGTR1) gene polymorphisms are associated with vascular manifestations in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S; Núñez-Alvarez, Carlos; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Jiménez-Alvarez, Luis; Ramírez-Martínez, Gustavo; Granados, Julio; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Zúñiga, Joaquín

    2016-07-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) shows variable clinical expression in different ethnic groups; vascular abnormalities are a prominent feature of this disease and its clinical expression may be influenced by genetic factors. Herein, we describe 15 polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway in 170 Mexican admixed SSc patients (defined as patients with Mexican ancestry for at least 3 generations) and 199 healthy controls. We determined the presence of angiotensin II Type 1 receptor (AGTR1), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and Endothelin 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using 5' exonuclease TaqMan genotyping assays on a 7900HT real-time fast polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. These polymorphisms had a similar distribution between SSc patients and controls, but we found that the AGTR1 G-680T (rs275652) (p = 0.02; OR 3.5; 95%CI 1.2-10.4) and AGTR1 A-119G (rs275653) (p = 0.008; OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.5-12.1) polymorphisms were associated with severe vascular involvement in our SSc patients. This is the first report of the association of these polymorphisms with vasculopathy in Mexican admixed SSc patients. Our findings suggested that the angiotensin II Type 1 receptor genotype may influence the clinical expression of vasculopathy in these patients. Functional analyses should follow. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Anti-Müllerian hormone inhibits growth of AMH type II receptor-positive human ovarian granulosa cell tumor cells by activating apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttonen, Mikko; Färkkilä, Anniina; Tauriala, Hanna; Kauppinen, Marjut; Maclaughlin, David T; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; Bützow, Ralf; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2011-11-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are sex cord stromal tumors that constitute 3-5% of all ovarian cancers. GCTs usually present with an indolent course but there is a high risk of recurrence, which associates with increased mortality, and targeted treatments would be desirable. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), a key factor regulating sexual differentiation of the reproductive organs, has been implicated as a growth inhibitor in ovarian cancer. GCTs and normal granulosa cells produce AMH, but its expression in large GCTs is usually downregulated. Further, as the lack of specific AMH-signaling pathway components leads to GCT development in mice, we hypothesized that AMH inhibits growth of GCTs. Utilizing a large panel of human GCT tissue samples, we found that AMH type I receptors (ALK2, ALK3 and ALK6) and type II receptor (AMHRII), as well as their downstream effectors Smad1/5, are expressed and active in GCTs. AMHRII expression was detected in the vast majority (96%) of GCTs and correlated with AMH mRNA and protein expression. AMH mRNA level was low in large GCTs, confirming previous findings on low-AMH protein expression in large human as well as mouse GCTs. To study the functional role of AMH in this peculiar ovarian cancer, we utilized a human GCT cell line (KGN) and 10 primary GCT cell cultures. We found that the AMH-Smad1/5-signaling pathway was active in these cells, and that exogenous AMH further activated Smad1/5 in KGN cells. Furthermore, AMH treatment reduced the number of KGN cells and primary GCT cells, with increasing amounts of AMH leading to augmented activation of caspase-3 and subsequent apoptosis. All in all, these data support the premise that AMH is a growth inhibitor of GCTs.

  9. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor is required for the cardiac fibrosis triggered by mechanical stress independent of Ang II in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Yong; YUAN Jie; JIANG Guo-liang; HUANG Jia-yuan; ZHANG Wei-jing; GE Jun-bo; ZOU Yun-zeng; GONG Hui; WU Jian; DING Zhi-wen; SHEN Yi; YIN Pei-pei; WANG Xing-xu; YOU Jie-yun; WANG Shi-jun

    2016-01-01

    AIM:We investigated how AT 1-R stimulated by mechanical stresses induces cardiac fibrosis .METHODS:We produced in vivo cardiac pressure overload model in angiotensinogen knockout ( ATG-/-) mice and in vitro mechanically-stretched cell model in cultured neonatal cardiac cells of ATG-/-mice both lack the participation of Ang II .RESULTS: Pressure overload for 4 weeks in ATG-/-mice induced myocardial hypertrophy accompanied by the significant interstitial fibrosis , however , the TGF-β, a key regulatory factor of fibrosis, was not significantly increased in these ATG-/-mice.Meanwhile, the inhibitor for AT1-R significantly inhibited mechani-cal stress-induced cardiac fibrosis in these ATG-/-models whereas inhibition of TGF-βdid not.CONCLUSION:The results showed that mechanical stress-induced fibrotic responses through AT 1-R required the phosphorylation of Smad 2 but not the involvement of TGF-β.

  10. Association of Transcobalamin II (TCN2) and Transcobalamin II-Receptor (TCblR) Genetic Variations With Cobalamin Deficiency Parameters in Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnat-Thoma, Emma L; Pangilinan, Faith; Matteini, Amy M; Wong, Bob; Pepper, Ginette A; Stabler, Sally P; Guralnik, Jack M; Brody, Lawrence C

    2015-07-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is a subtle progressive clinical disorder, affecting nearly 1 in 5 individuals > 60 years old. This deficiency is produced by age-related decreases in nutrient absorption, medications that interfere with vitamin B12 absorption, and other comorbidities. Clinical heterogeneity confounds symptom detection for elderly adults, as deficiency sequelae range from mild fatigue and weakness to debilitating megaloblastic anemia and permanent neuropathic injury. A better understanding of genetic factors that contribute to cobalamin deficiency in the elderly would allow for targeted nursing care and preventive interventions. We tested for associations of common variants in genes involved in cobalamin transport and homeostasis with metabolic indicators of cobalamin deficiency (homocysteine and methylmalonic acid) as well as hematologic, neurologic, and functional performance features of cobalamin deficiency in 789 participants of the Women's Health and Aging Studies. Although not significant when corrected for multiple testing, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two genes, transcobalamin II (TCN2) and the transcobalamin II-receptor (TCblR), were found to influence several clinical traits of cobalamin deficiency. The three most significant findings were the identified associations involving missense coding SNPs, namely, TCblR G220R (rs2336573) with serum cobalamin, TCN2 S348F (rs9621049) with homocysteine, and TCN2 P259R (rs1801198) with red blood cell mean corpuscular volume. These SNPs may modify the phenotype in older adults who are more likely to develop symptoms of vitamin B12 malabsorption.

  11. Absence of angiotensin II type 1 receptor in bone marrow–derived cells is detrimental in the evolution of renal fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masashi; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Matsusaka, Taiji; Price, James; Kon, Valentina; Fogo, Agnes B.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio; Homma, Toshio; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Ichikawa, Iekuni

    2002-01-01

    We examined the in vivo function of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (Agtr1) on macrophages in renal fibrosis. Fourteen days after the induction of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), wild-type mice reconstituted with marrow lacking the Agtr1 gene (Agtr1–/–) developed more severe interstitial fibrosis with fewer interstitial macrophages than those in mice reconstituted with Agtr1+/+ marrow. These differences were not observed at day 5 of UUO. The expression of profibrotic genes — including TGF-β1, α1(I) collagen, and α1(III) collagen — was substantially higher in the obstructed kidneys of mice with Agtr1–/– marrow than in those with Agtr1+/+ marrow at day 14 but not at day 5 of UUO. Mice with Agtr1–/– marrow were characterized by reduced numbers of peripheral-blood monocytes and macrophage progenitors in bone marrow. In vivo assays revealed a significantly impaired phagocytic capability in Agtr1–/– macrophages. In vivo treatment of Agtr1+/+ mice with losartan reduced phagocytic capability of Agtr1+/+ macrophages to a level comparable to that of Agtr1–/– macrophages. Thus, during urinary tract obstruction, the Agtr1 on bone marrow–derived macrophages functions to preserve the renal parenchymal architecture, and this function depends in part on its modulatory effect on phagocytosis. PMID:12488436

  12. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers suppress the cell proliferation effects of angiotensin II in breast cancer cells by inhibiting AT1R signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ning; Feng, Jiang; Hu, Li-Juan; Sun, Xin; Sun, Hai-Bing; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Yi-Ping; Ren, Hong

    2012-06-01

    Chronic stress and a high-fat diet are well-documented risk factors associated with the renin-angiotensin system in the development of breast cancer. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a novel component of the renin-angiotensin system. Several recent studies have focused on the function of AT1R in cell proliferation during cancer development. Thus, we hypothesized that angiotensin II (Ang Ⅱ) can promote proliferation of breast cancer via activated AT1R; the activation of AT1R may play an important role in promoting breast cancer growth, and AT1R blocker (ARB) may suppress the promotional effect on proliferation by antagonizing AT1R. The expression level of AT1R was found to be significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells by immunohistochemistry, but no correlation between AT1R expression and ER/PR/Her-2 expression was observed. The AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cell line exhibited high expression of AT1R protein, and we generated the AT1R(-)-MCF-7 cell line using RNA interference. ARBs, and in particular irbesartan, effectively inhibited the effects of Ang II on cell proliferation, cell cycle development and downstream AT1R signaling events, including the activation of the Ras-Raf-MAPK pathway and the transcription factors NF-κB and CREB. Irbesartan also significantly altered p53, PCNA and cyclin D1 expression, which was also influenced by activated AT1R in AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that ARBs may be useful as a novel preventive and therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer.

  13. Slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension and concomitant dendritic NMDA receptor trafficking in estrogen receptor β-containing neurons of the mouse hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus are sex and age dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Lopes, Jose; Van Kempen, Tracey; Waters, Elizabeth M; Pickel, Virginia M; Iadecola, Costantino; Milner, Teresa A

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of hypertension increases after menopause. Similar to humans, "slow-pressor" doses of angiotensin II (AngII) increase blood pressure in young males, but not in young female mice. However, AngII increases blood pressure in aged female mice, paralleling reproductive hormonal changes. These changes could influence receptor trafficking in central cardiovascular circuits and contribute to hypertension. Increased postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is crucial for the sympathoexcitation driving AngII hypertension. Estrogen receptors β (ERβs) are present in PVN neurons. We tested the hypothesis that changes in ovarian hormones with age promote susceptibility to AngII hypertension, and influence NMDA receptor NR1 subunit trafficking in ERβ-containing PVN neurons. Transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in ERβ-containing cells were implanted with osmotic minipumps delivering AngII (600 ng/kg/min) or saline for 2 weeks. AngII increased blood pressure in 2-month-old males and 18-month-old females, but not in 2-month-old females. By electron microscopy, NR1-silver-intensified immunogold (SIG) was mainly in ERβ-EGFP dendrites. At baseline, NR1-SIG density was greater in 2-month-old females than in 2-month-old males or 18-month-old females. After AngII infusion, NR1-SIG density was decreased in 2-month-old females, but increased in 2-month-old males and 18-month-old females. These findings suggest that, in young female mice, NR1 density is decreased in ERβ-PVN dendrites thus reducing NMDA receptor activity and preventing hypertension. Conversely, in young males and aged females, NR1 density is upregulated in ERβ-PVN dendrites and ultimately leads to the neurohumoral dysfunction driving hypertension.

  14. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in severe traumatic brain injury: a phase II randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri L H; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the commonest cause of death and disability in those aged under 40 years. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) is an endogenous competitive antagonist at the interleukin-1 type-1 receptor (IL-1R). Antagonism at the IL-1R confers neuroprotection in several rodent models of neuronal injury (i.e., trauma, stroke and excitotoxicity). We describe a single center, phase II, open label, randomized-control study of recombinant human IL1ra (rhIL1ra, anakinra) in severe TBI, at a dose of 100 mg subcutaneously once a day for 5 days in 20 patients randomized 1:1. We provide safety data (primary outcome) in this pathology, utilize cerebral microdialysis to directly determine brain extracellular concentrations of IL1ra and 41 cytokines and chemokines, and use principal component analysis (PCA) to explore the resultant cerebral cytokine profile. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was safe, penetrated into plasma and the brain extracellular fluid. The PCA showed a separation in cytokine profiles after IL1ra administration. A candidate cytokine from this analysis, macrophage-derived chemoattractant, was significantly lower in the rhIL1ra-treated group. Our results provide promising data for rhIL1ra as a therapeutic candidate by showing safety, brain penetration and a modification of the neuroinflammatory response to TBI by a putative neuroprotective agent in humans for the first time.

  15. Altered functioning of both renal dopamine D1 and angiotensin II type 1 receptors causes hypertension in old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Gaurav; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F; Asghar, Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    Activation of renal dopamine D1 (D1R) and angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT(1)Rs) influences the activity of proximal tubular sodium transporter Na,K-ATPase and maintains sodium homeostasis and blood pressure. We reported recently that diminished D1R and exaggerated AT(1)R functions are associated with hypertension in old Fischer 344 × Brown Norway F1 (FBN) rats, and oxidative stress plays a central role in this phenomenon. Here we studied the mechanisms of age-associated increase in oxidative stress on diminished D1R and exaggerated AT(1)R functions in the renal proximal tubules of control and antioxidant Tempol-treated adult and old FBN rats. Although D1R numbers and D1R agonist SKF38393-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]-GTPγS binding (index of D1R activation) were lower, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 (kinase that uncouples D1R) levels were higher in old FBN rats. Tempol treatment restored D1R numbers and G protein coupling and reduced G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 levels in old FBN rats. Angiotensin II-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]-GTPγS binding and Na,K-ATPase activity were higher in old FBN rats, which were also restored with Tempol treatment. We also measured renal AT(1)R function in adult and old Fischer 344 (F344) rats, which, despite exhibiting an age-related increase in oxidative stress and diminished renal D1R function, are normotensive. We found that diuretic and natriuretic responses to candesartan (indices of AT(1)R function) were similar in F344 rats, a likely explanation for the absence of age-associated hypertension in these rats. Perhaps, alterations in both D1R (diminished) and AT(1)R (exaggerated) functions are necessary for the development of age-associated hypertension, as seen in old FBN rats.

  16. The role of transmembrane segment II in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, M M

    2009-01-01

    During the two past decades tremendous effort has been put into uncovering the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors. The majority of such studies have focused on the major binding pocket, comprised of transmembrane segments (TM) -III through -VII, as most non-peptide and peptide ligands, in addi......During the two past decades tremendous effort has been put into uncovering the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors. The majority of such studies have focused on the major binding pocket, comprised of transmembrane segments (TM) -III through -VII, as most non-peptide and peptide ligands...

  17. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar1,Ile8]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor. PMID:25934394

  18. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1 mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  19. A selective fluorescent receptor for the determination of nickel (II) in semi-aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegade, Umesh [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, MS (India); School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, MS (India); Marek, Jaromir [Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic); Patil, Rahul [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, MS (India); Attarde, Sanjay [School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, MS (India); Kuwar, Anil, E-mail: kuwaras@gmail.com [School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425001, MS (India)

    2014-02-15

    The malonohydrazide based fluorescent probe (7E,8E)–N1′,N3′-bis(1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethylidene) malonohydrazide (receptor 5) was designed and synthesized. It was confirmed by spectroscopic methods and the single crystal X-ray method. The receptors 5 show strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding which is useful in host–guest complexation. The fluorescence spectra of receptor 5 have shown distinct enhancement with the addition of Ni{sup 2+} ion over other surveyed cations. The stability constant was obtained by Benesi–Hildebrand, Scatchard and Connor's fitting methodologies. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the host–guest complexation was confirmed by Job's continuous variation method. -- Highlights: • The malonohydrazide based fluorescent probe (7E,8E)-N1′,N>3′-bis(1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethylidene) malonohydrazide (receptor 5) was designed and synthesized. • The 1:1 stoichiometry of the host–guest relationship was realized from the Job's plot. • The stability constant was obtained by Benesi–Hildebrand, Scatchard and Connor methodologies.

  20. New analogues of ACPD with selective activity for group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Madsen, U; Mikiciuk-Olasik, E

    1997-01-01

    In this study we have determined the pharmacology of a series of 1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1,3-ACPD) analogues at cloned metabotropic glutamic acid (mGlu) receptors. The new analogues comprise the four possible stereoisomers of 1-amino-1-carboxycyclopentane-3-acetic acid (1,3-homo...

  1. Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Liu, Xuebo; Xu, Jianfeng; Weng, Liqing; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in the onset and development of cardiac remodelling associated with changes of autophagy. Angiotensin1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] is a newly established bioactive peptide of renin-angiotensin system, which has been shown to counteract the deleterious effects of Ang II. However, the precise impact of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy remained essentially elusive. The aim of the present study was to examine if Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced autophagy and the underlying mechanism involved. Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to Ang II for 48 hrs while mice were infused with Ang II for 4 weeks to induce models of cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. LC3b-II and p62, markers of autophagy, expression were significantly elevated in cardiomyocytes, suggesting the presence of autophagy accompanying cardiac hypertrophy in response to Ang II treatment. Besides, Ang II induced oxidative stress, manifesting as an increase in malondialdehyde production and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. Ang-(1-7) significantly retarded hypertrophy, autophagy and oxidative stress in the heart. Furthermore, a role of Mas receptor in Ang-(1-7)-mediated action was assessed using A779 peptide, a selective Mas receptor antagonist. The beneficial responses of Ang-(1-7) on cardiac remodelling, autophagy and oxidative stress were mitigated by A779. Taken together, these result indicated that Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  2. CXC chemokine receptor 1 predicts postoperative prognosis and chemotherapeutic benefits for TNM II and III resectable gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yifan; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Heng; Lin, Chao; Li, Ruochen; Wu, Songyang; Li, He; He, Hongyong; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2017-03-21

    Backround: Abnormal expression of CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1) has shown the ability to promote tumor angiogensis, invasion and metastasis in several cancers. The purpose of our curret study is to discover the clinical prognostic significance of CXCR1 in resectable gastric cancer. 330 gastric cancer patients who underwent R0 gastrectomy with standard D2 lymphadenectomy at Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University between 2007 and 2008 were enrolled. CXCR1 expression was evaluated with use of immunohistochemical staining. The relation between CXCR1 expression and clinicopathological features and postoperative prognosis was respectively inspected. In both discovery and validation data sets, CXCR1 high expression indicated poorer overall survival (OS) in TNM II and III patients. Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified CXCR1 expression and TNM stage as two independent prognostic factors for OS. Incorporating CXCR1 expression into current TNM staging system could generate a novel clinical predictive model for gastric cancer, showing better prognostic accuracy with respect to patients' OS. More importantly, TNM II patients with higher CXCR1 expression were shown to significantly benefit from postoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT). CXCR1 in gastric cancer was identified as an independent adverse prognostic factor. Combining CXCR1 expression with current TNM staging system could lead to better risk stratification and more accurate prognosis for gastric cancer patients. High expression of CXCR1 identified a subgroup of TNM stage II gastric cancer patients who appeared to benefit from 5-FU based ACT.

  3. Levamisole and ryanodine receptors (II): An electrophysiological study in Ascaris suum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttachary, Sreekanth; Robertson, Alan P.; Clark, Cheryl L.; Martin, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to antinematodal drugs like levamisole has increased and there is a need to understand what factors affect the responses to these anthelmintics. In our previous study, we examined the role of ryanodine receptors in muscle contraction pathways. Here we have examined interactions of levamisole receptors, ryanodine receptors (RyRs), the excitatory neuropeptide AF2, and coupling to electrophysiological responses. We examined the effects of a brief application of levamisole on Ascaris suum body muscle under current-clamp. The levamisole responses were characterized as an initial primary depolarization, followed by a slow secondary depolarizing response. We examined the effects of AF2 (KHEYLRFamide), 1 μM applied for 2 min. We found that AF2 potentiated the secondary response to levamisole and had no significant effect on the primary depolarization [1]. Further, the reversal potentials observed during the secondary response suggested that more than one ion was involved in producing this potential. AF2 potentiated the secondary response in the presence of 30 μM mecamylamine suggesting the effect was independent of levamisole sensitive acetylcholine receptors. The secondary response, potentiated by AF2, appeared to be dependent on cytoplasmic events triggered by the primary depolarization. Ion-substitution experiments showed that the AF2 potentiated secondary response was dependent on extracellular calcium and chloride suggesting a role for the calcium-activated anion channel. Caffeine mimicked the AF2 secondary response and 0.1 μM ryanodine inhibited it. 1.0 μM ryanodine increased spiking showing that it affected membrane excitability. A model is proposed showing ryanodine receptors mediating effects of AF2 on levamisole responses. PMID:20064567

  4. Lack of TNF-alpha receptor type 2 protects motor neurons in a cellular model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in mutant SOD1 mice but does not affect disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortarolo, Massimo; Vallarola, Antonio; Lidonnici, Dario; Battaglia, Elisa; Gensano, Francesco; Spaltro, Gabriella; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Garetto, Stefano; Martini, Elisa; Pasetto, Laura; Kallikourdis, Marinos; Bonetto, Valentina; Bendotti, Caterina

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the homeostasis of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) have been demonstrated in patients and experimental models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the contribution of TNFα to the development of ALS is still debated. TNFα is expressed by glia and neurons and acts through the membrane receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2, which may have opposite effects in neurodegeneration. We investigated the role of TNFα and its receptors in the selective motor neuron death in ALS in vitro and in vivo. TNFR2 expressed by astrocytes and neurons, but not TNFR1, was implicated in motor neuron loss in primary SOD1-G93A co-cultures. Deleting TNFR2 from SOD1-G93A mice, there was partial but significant protection of spinal motor neurons, sciatic nerves, and tibialis muscles. However, no improvement of motor impairment or survival was observed. Since the sciatic nerves of SOD1-G93A/TNFR2-/- mice showed high phospho-TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) accumulation and low levels of acetyl-tubulin, two indices of axonal dysfunction, the lack of symptom improvement in these mice might be due to impaired function of rescued motor neurons. These results indicate the interaction between TNFR2 and membrane-bound TNFα as an innovative pathway involved in motor neuron death. Nevertheless, its inhibition is not sufficient to stop disease progression in ALS mice, underlining the complexity of this pathology. We show evidence of the involvement of neuronal and astroglial TNFR2 in the motor neuron degeneration in ALS. Both concur to cause motor neuron death in primary astrocyte/spinal neuron co-cultures. TNFR2 deletion partially protects motor neurons and sciatic nerves in SOD1-G93A mice but does not improve their symptoms and survival. However, TNFR2 could be a new target for multi-intervention therapies.

  5. Coal dust alters β-naphthoflavone-induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocation in alveolar type II cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vincent

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs can cause DNA adducts and initiate carcinogenesis. Mixed exposures to coal dust (CD and PAHs are common in occupational settings. In the CD and PAH-exposed lung, CD increases apoptosis and causes alveolar type II (AT-II cell hyperplasia but reduces CYP1A1 induction. Inflammation, but not apoptosis, appears etiologically associated with reduced CYP1A1 induction in this mixed exposure model. Many AT-II cells in the CD-exposed lungs have no detectable CYP1A1 induction after PAH exposure. Although AT-II cells are a small subfraction of lung cells, they are believed to be a potential progenitor cell for some lung cancers. Because CYP1A1 is induced via ligand-mediated nuclear translocation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, we investigated the effect of CD on PAH-induced nuclear translocation of AhR in AT-II cells isolated from in vivo-exposed rats. Rats received CD or vehicle (saline by intratracheal (IT instillation. Three days before sacrifice, half of the rats in each group started daily intraperitoneal injections of the PAH, β-naphthoflavone (BNF. Results Fourteen days after IT CD exposure and 1 day after the last intraperitoneal BNF injection, AhR immunofluorescence indicated that proportional AhR nuclear expression and the percentage of cells with nuclear AhR were significantly increased in rats receiving IT saline and BNF injections compared to vehicle controls. However, in CD-exposed rats, BNF did not significantly alter the nuclear localization or cytosolic expression of AhR compared to rats receiving CD and oil. Conclusion Our findings suggest that during particle and PAH mixed exposures, CD alters the BNF-induced nuclear translocation of AhR in AT-II cells. This provides an explanation for the modification of CYP1A1 induction in these cells. Thus, this study suggests that mechanisms for reduced PAH-induced CYP1A1 activity in the CD exposed lung include not only the

  6. The Prognostic Role of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Autoantibody in Non-Gravid Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia: A Meta-analysis and Our Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jinghui; Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Suli; Wu, Ye; Wang, Pengli; Liu, Huirong

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor autoantibody (AT1-AA) is found in patients with non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia, but the relationship is uncertain.The aim of the present study was to assess the association between AT1-AA and high blood pressure using meta-analysis, and to evaluate the prognosis value of AT1-AA for hypertensive diseases.Literature search from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were conducted using keywords "hypertension" or "pre-eclampsia," "angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody," and its aliases from April 1999 to December 2015.Studies evaluating the association between AT1-AA and non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia were included in this analysis. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale with some modifications.Two researchers then independently reviewed all included studies and extracted all relevant data. Association between AT1-AA and hypertension was tested with pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Finally, we evaluated whether AT1-AA predicted the prognosis of hypertension by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and sensitivity analysis.Ten studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. AT1-AA showed more significant association with pre-eclampsia than that with non-gravid hypertension (pooled OR 32.84, 95% CI 17.19-62.74; and pooled OR 4.18, 95% CI 2.20-7.98, respectively). Heterogeneity among studies was also detected probably due to different hypertensive subtypes and AT1-AA measuring methods. Area under summary ROC curve (AUC) of pre-eclampsia was 0.92 (sensitivity 0.76; specificity 0.86). Area under the ROC curve of overall hypertensive diseases or non-gravid hypertension was lower than that of pre-eclampsia (0.86 and 0.72, respectively) with lower sensitivities (0.46 and 0.26, respectively).The major limitation of this analysis was the publication bias due to lack of unpublished data and the language limitation during

  7. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: Binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W.; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I–III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the...

  8. Glucose-induced downregulation of angiotensin II and arginine vasopressin receptors in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Role of protein kinase C.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, B.; Tsai, P.; Schrier, R W

    1992-01-01

    Early diabetes mellitus is characterized by impaired responses to pressor hormones and pressor receptor downregulation. The present study examined the effect of elevated extracellular glucose concentrations on angiotensin II (AII) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) receptor kinetics in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Scatchard analysis of [3H]AVP and 125I-AII binding to confluent VSMC showed that high glucose concentrations (20 mM) similarly depressed AVP and AII surface recepto...

  9. Effects of Autoantibodies Against At1-receptor and Angiotensin II on Refractory Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖玉华; 魏宇淼; 王敏; 董继华; 王朝晖; 苑海涛

    2001-01-01

    Objective The study will explore effects of the autoantibodies against AT1 receptor and angiotensin Ⅱ on the refractory hypertension. Methods Seventy-seven patients (46 men and 31 women) with essential hypertension were divided into groups of refractory hypertension (RH) and hypertension (HT) according to the 1999 WHO -ISH Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension. Forty normotensives (22 men) were recruited as controls.The mean age was 54. 3 ± 13 years old in RH group,53.5±9 years old in HT group and 51.2±11.9years old in normotensives (NT) group. The mean blood pressure was 154.2 ± 9.4/98.4 ± 8.2 mmHg in RH group and 130.1 ±7.6/80.5 ±6.7 mmHg in HT group after combination drug therapy of hypertension for 4 weeks. Blood pressure in NT group was 120. 8 ± 11.7/76. 4 ± 7.2 mmHg. The epitope of the 2nd extracellular loops of AT1 receptor was synthesized and used as antigens to screen the autoantibodies by ELISA. Plasma angiotensin (Ang) Ⅱ were examined by a radioimmunoassay. Results The autoantibodies against AT1 receptor were positive in 18 (46. 15% ) patients with RH, in 4 (10. 5 % ) hypertension and in 3 (7.5 % ) normotensives, P < 0.01. Ang Ⅱwas 57.01 ± 52.63 pmol/L in patients with RH. Both the autoantibodies positive and the Ang Ⅱ increasing were 4 (10. 3 %) cases, both normal were 7 (17.9% ) cases, the autoantibodies positive or Ang Ⅱ in creasing was all of 14 (35.9 % ) cases (χ2 =0. 09,P > 0. 05) There was no relationship between the autoantibodies against AT1 receptor and the angiotensin Ⅱ in refractory hypertension. Conclusion The autoantibodies against AT1 receptor and Ang Ⅱ might be two independent factors in developing of refractory hypertension. The findings suggest that AT1 receptor antagnist used in the treatment of refractory hypertension might have an important value.

  10. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Currently, giant cell arteritis (GCA) is primarily treated with corticosteroids or immunomodulating agents, but there is interest in identifying other noncorticosteroid alternatives. Similarities exist in the injury pathways between GCA and atherosclerosis. Angiotensin II is a vasoactive...... DISCLOSURE(S): The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article....

  11. Identification of a 32-34-kilodalton polypeptide as a herbicide receptor protein in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullet, J E; Arntzen, C J

    1981-04-13

    Photosystem II particles which retained high rates of herbicide-sensitive activity were used to examine the site(s) of action of various herbicides. A polypeptide of 32-34 kdaltons was identified as the triazine-herbicide binding site based upon: (a) parallel loss of atrazine activity and the polypeptide during either trypsin treatment or selective detergent depletion of protein in the Photosystem II complex, and (b) covalent labeling of the polypeptide by a 14C-labeled photoaffinity triazine. In Photosystem II particles depleted of the 32-34-kdalton polypeptide, electron transport was still active and was slightly sensitive to DCMU and largely sensitive to dinoseb (urea and nitrophenol herbicides, respectively). On the basis of this result it is proposed that the general herbicide binding site common to atrazine, DCMU and dinoseb is formed by a minimum of two polypeptides which determine affinity and/or mediate herbicide-induced inhibition of electron transport on the acceptor side of Photosystem II.

  12. Expression and localization of the AT1 and AT2 angiotensin II receptors and α1A and α1D adrenergic receptors in aorta of hypertensive and diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jessica Edith; Romero-Nava, Rodrigo; Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Rosales-Cruz, Erika; Hong, Enrique; Huang, Fengyang; Villafaña, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes are multifactorial diseases that frequently coexist and exacerbate each another. During the development of diabetes, the impairment of noradrenergic and renin-angiotensin systems has been reported in the response mediated by α1-AR and AT1 receptors. Although their participation in the development of cardiovascular complications is still controversial, some studies have found increased or diminished response to the vasoconstrictive effect of noradrenaline or angiotensin II in a time-dependent manner of diabetes. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate the possible changes in the expression or localization of α1-AR (α1A and α1D) and angiotensin II receptors (AT1 and AT2) in aorta of rats after 4 weeks of the onset of diabetes. In order to be able to examine the expression of these receptors, immunofluorescence procedure was performed in tunica intima and tunica media of histological sections of aorta. Fluorescence was detected by a confocal microscopy. Our results showed that the receptors are expressed in both tunics, where adrenergic receptors have a higher density in tunica intima and tunica media of SHR compared with WKY; meanwhile, the expression of angiotensin II receptors is not modified in both groups of rats. On the other hand, the results showed that diabetes produced an increase or a decrease in the expression of receptors that is not associated to a specific type of receptor, vascular region, or strain of rat. In conclusion, diabetes and hypertension modify the expression of the receptors in tunica intima and tunica media of aorta in a different way.

  13. Structural aspects of molecular recognition in the immune system. Part II: Pattern recognition receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate immune system uses pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to detect a large variety of molecular signatures (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs) from a broad range of different invading pathogens. The PAMPs range in size from relatively small molecules, to others of intermediate size such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide, lipopeptides, and oligosaccharides, to macromolecules such as viral DNA, RNA, and pathogen-derived proteins such as flagellin. Underlying this functio...

  14. Pentosan polysulfate treatment preserves renal autoregulation in ANG II-infused hypertensive rats via normalization of P2X1 receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhengrong; Fuller, Barry S; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Cook, Anthony K; Pollock, Jennifer S; Inscho, Edward W

    2010-05-01

    Inflammatory factors are elevated in animal and human subjects with hypertension and renal injury. We hypothesized that inflammation contributes to hypertension-induced renal injury by impairing autoregulation and microvascular reactivity to P2X(1) receptor activation. Studies were conducted in vitro using the blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephron preparation. Rats receiving ANG II (60 ng/min) infusion were treated with the anti-inflammatory agent pentosan polysulfate (PPS) for 14 days. The magnitude and progression of hypertension were similar in ANG II and ANG II+PPS-treated rats (169 ± 5 vs. 172 ± 2 mmHg). Afferent arterioles from control rats exhibited normal autoregulatory behavior with diameter decreasing from 18.4 ± 1.6 to 11.4 ± 1.7 μm when perfusion pressure was increased from 70 to 160 mmHg. In contrast, pressure-mediated vasoconstriction was markedly attenuated in ANG II-treated rats, and diameter remained essentially unchanged over the range of perfusion pressures. However, ANG II-treated rats receiving PPS exhibited normal autoregulatory behavior compared with ANG II alone rats. Arteriolar reactivity to ATP and β,γ-methylene ATP was significantly reduced in ANG II hypertensive rats compared with controls. Interestingly, PPS treatment preserved normal reactivity to P2 and P2X(1) receptor agonists despite the persistent hypertension. The maximal vasoconstriction was 79 ± 3 and 81 ± 2% of the control diameter for ATP and β,γ-methylene ATP, respectively, similar to responses in control rats. PPS treatment significantly reduced α-smooth muscle actin staining in afferent arterioles and plasma transforming growth factor-β1 concentration in ANG II-treated rats. In conclusion, PPS normalizes autoregulation without altering ANG II-induced hypertension, suggesting that inflammatory processes reduce P2X(1) receptor reactivity and thereby impair autoregulatory behavior in ANG II hypertensive rats.

  15. Angiotensin II stimulates thick ascending limb NO production via AT(2) receptors and Akt1-dependent nitric-oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Marcela; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2010-05-14

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely stimulates thick ascending limb (TAL) NO via an unknown mechanism. In endothelial cells, activation of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT(2)) stimulates NO. Akt1 activates NOS3 by direct phosphorylation. We hypothesized that Ang II stimulates TAL NO production via AT(2)-mediated Akt1 activation, which phosphorylates NOS3 at serine 1177. We measured NO production by fluorescence microscopy. In isolated TALs, Ang II (100 nm) increased NO production by 1.1 +/- 0.2 fluorescence units/min (p NOS3 at serine 1177 by 130% (p NOS3 phosphorylation. We concluded that Ang II enhances TAL NO production via activation of AT(2) and Akt1-dependent phosphorylation of NOS3 at serines 1177 and 633.

  16. Angiotensin II Stimulates Thick Ascending Limb NO Production via AT2 Receptors and Akt1-dependent Nitric-oxide Synthase 3 (NOS3) Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Marcela; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely stimulates thick ascending limb (TAL) NO via an unknown mechanism. In endothelial cells, activation of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2) stimulates NO. Akt1 activates NOS3 by direct phosphorylation. We hypothesized that Ang II stimulates TAL NO production via AT2-mediated Akt1 activation, which phosphorylates NOS3 at serine 1177. We measured NO production by fluorescence microscopy. In isolated TALs, Ang II (100 nm) increased NO production by 1.1 ± 0.2 fluorescence units/min (p NOS3 at serine 1177 by 130% (p NOS3 phosphorylation. We concluded that Ang II enhances TAL NO production via activation of AT2 and Akt1-dependent phosphorylation of NOS3 at serines 1177 and 633. PMID:20299462

  17. Androgen regulates development of the sexually dimorphic gastrin-releasing peptide neuron system in the lumbar spinal cord: evidence from a mouse line lacking androgen receptor in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Saito, Kazuhiro; Marie-Luce, Clarisse; Raskin, Kalina; Oti, Takumi; Satoh, Keita; Tamura, Kei; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina

    2014-01-13

    Androgens including testosterone, organize the nervous system as well as masculine external and internal genitalia during the perinatal period. Androgen organization involves promotion of masculine body features, usually by acting through androgen receptors (ARs). We have recently demonstrated that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbar spinal cord also mediates spinal centers promoting penile reflexes during male sexual behavior in rats. Testosterone may induce sexual differentiation of this spinal GRP system during development and maintain its activation in adulthood. In the present study, we examined the role of ARs in the nervous system regulating the development of the sexually dimorphic GRP system. For this purpose, we used a conditional mouse line selectively lacking the AR gene in the nervous system. AR floxed males carrying (mutants) or not (controls) the nestin-Cre transgene were castrated in adulthood and supplemented with physiological amounts of testosterone. Loss of AR expression in the nervous system resulted in a significant decrease in the number of GRP neurons compared to control littermates. Consequently, the intensity of GRP axonal projections onto the lower lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord was greater in control males than in mutant males. These results suggest that ARs expressed in the nervous system play a significant role in the development of the GRP system in the male lumbar spinal cord. The AR-deletion mutation may attenuate sexual behavior and activity of mutant males via spinal GRP system-mediated neural mechanisms.

  18. Efferent loop small intestinal vitamin D receptor concentration and bone mineral density after Billroth II (Polya) gastrectomy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazianas, M; Zaidi, M; Subhani, J M; Finch, P J; Ang, L; Maxwell, J D

    2003-04-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that the highest concentration of vitamin D receptors (and greatest capacity for active calcium absorption) occurs in the proximal duodenum. By passing the duodenum following Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy could result in the development of a metabolic bone disease and low bone mineral density (BMD). We thus compared the vitamin D receptor (VDR) concentration in mucosal biopsies taken at endoscopy from two functionally corresponding areas of the small intestine: the jejunum (or efferent loop) in 21 patients with a history of Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy and the second part of the duodenum in age/sex-matched control subjects. We also measured the BMD by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean VDR concentration was not significantly different between the two groups (patients vs controls, fmol/mg protein, mean +/- SE: 34.99 +/- 2.57 vs 34.67 +/- 3.71; P = 0.22), even when subgrouped as males (36.22 +/- 3.16 vs 31.2 +/- 4.24; P = 0.351) or females (31.93 +/- 4.7 vs 43 +/- 6.76; P = 0.193). In Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy patients, the VDR concentration in the efferent loop declined with age (r = -0.78, P = 0.02). In the same group, BMD, as compared with matched controls, was significantly reduced at the lumbar spine (Z-score: patients vs controls: -1.138 vs 0.099, P = 0.01), but not at the femoral neck (Z-score: -0.69 vs 0.7, P = 0.084). There was no correlation between VDR and time since operation or BMD. These results suggest that following Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy, the functional capacity of the jejunal efferent loop in reference to VDR concentration is similar to that of the second part of the duodenum in normal subjects. Therefore, the reduced BMD in our patients, also a common finding in other studies, may not be secondary to the reduced capacity of the VDR system that facilitates the active calcium transport pathway in the proximal small intestine.

  19. Effect of valsartan on the expression of angiotensin II receptors in the lung of chronic antigen exposure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Yin, Kai-sheng; Liu, Kou-yin; Lu, Guo-jun; Li, Yu-hua; Chen, Jun-di

    2008-11-20

    Many studies have suggested that angiotensin II (Ang II) and its receptors may be involved in the development of asthma. However, the expression of angiotensin II receptors (AGTR) is not clear in the lung tissue of chronic asthmatics. This study was designed to determine the relationship between airway remodeling, dysfunction and the expression of AGTRs in a rat model of asthma. Rats were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) for 2 weeks. Sixty minutes before an inhalation challenge, the rats were pretreated either with valsartan (15, 30, 50 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) or saline intragastrically. Then the rats received an OVA challenge for 30 alternative days. Acetylcholine (Ach)-induced bronchoconstriction was measured after the final antigen challenge. White cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and morphological changes in the airways were then assessed. The levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta(1)) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in BALF were detected by ELISA. The levels of AGTR1 and AGTR2 mRNA and protein in lung tissues were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting. AGTR1 mRNA and protein levels in repeatedly OVA-challenged rats were significantly increased as compared with negative controls. The AGTR1 mRNA expression versus white cell counts of BALF and airway wall thickness (mainly in small airways) in lungs of chronic antigen-exposed rats were positively correlated. Valsartan decreased the level of AGTR1 in repeatedly OVA-challenged rats. However, AGTR2 mRNA and protein levels in the OVA-challenged rats and high-dose valsartan-treated rats (50 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) were also increased. Valsartan significantly decreased inflammatory cell accumulation and attenuated Ach-evoked bronchoconstriction in repeatedly antigen-challenged rats. Valsartan also decreased allergen-induced structural changes in rat airway (including total airway wall thickness and smooth muscle area) and the levels of TGF-beta(1) and PDGF in BALF. AGTR1 expression

  20. Perioperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers for preventing mortality and morbidity in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zui; Yuan, Hong B; Yang, Bo; Xu, Fengying; Chen, Xiao Y; Liu, Guan J; Shi, Xue Y

    2016-01-27

    Perioperative hypertension requires careful management. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have shown efficacy in treating hypertension associated with surgery. However, there is lack of consensus about whether they can prevent mortality and morbidity. To systematically assess the benefits and harms of administration of ACEIs or ARBs perioperatively for the prevention of mortality and morbidity in adults (aged 18 years and above) undergoing any type of surgery under general anaesthesia. We searched the current issue of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to 8 December 2014), EMBASE (1980 to 8 December 2014), and references of the retrieved randomized trials, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing perioperative administration of ACEIs or ARBs with placebo in adults (aged 18 years and above) undergoing any type of surgery under general anaesthesia. We excluded studies in which participants underwent procedures that required local anaesthesia only, or participants who had already been on ACEIs or ARBs. Two review authors independently performed study selection, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted data. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included seven RCTs with a total of 571 participants in the review. Two of the seven trials involved 36 participants undergoing non-cardiac vascular surgery (infrarenal aortic surgery), and five involved 535 participants undergoing cardiac surgery, including valvular surgery, coronary artery bypass surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. The intervention was started from 11 days to 25 minutes before surgery in six trials and during surgery in one trial. We considered all seven RCTs to carry a high risk of bias. The effects of ACEIs or ARBs on perioperative mortality and acute myocardial infarction were uncertain

  1. The role of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists in the management of diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Toomas; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2002-01-01

    Evidence suggests that ACE inhibitors can be advantageous for prevention and halting progression of both micro- and macrovascular complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. ACE inhibitors are useful antihypertensive agents in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes; however, ACE inhibitor therapy often needs to be supplemented with calcium channel antagonists, beta-blockers or diuretics to achieve good blood pressure control. ACE inhibitors are also indicated in non-hypertensive patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who have micro- or macroalbuminuria. The effect of ACE inhibitors in halting the development and progression of retinopathy and, potentially, neuropathy needs further proof in large-scale studies. More recently, angiotensin II receptor antagonists are emerging as drugs with the potential to be successfully included in the management of diabetic complications, especially when ACE inhibitors are not suitable because of adverse effects.

  2. OS 32-03 ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 2 RECEPTOR AGONIST EXERTS SUSTAINED NEUROPROTECTIVE EFFECTS IN AGED RATS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumners, Colin; Isenberg, Jacob; Harmel, Allison;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The renin angiotensin system is a promising target for stroke neuroprotection and therapy through activation of angiotensin type II receptors (AT2R). The selective non-peptide AT2R agonist, Compound 21 (C21), has been shown to exhibit neuroprotection and improve stroke outcomes...... min), 24 h, and 48 h after stroke. Infarct size was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging at 21 days post MCAO. Animals received blinded neurological exams at 4 h, 24 h, 72 h, 7d, 14d, and 21d post-MCAO. RESULTS: Systemic treatment with C21 after stroke significantly improved neurological function...

  3. Early and exudative age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Jehs, Tina Maria Ludowika; Juel, Helene Baek;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have recently identified homeostatic alterations in the circulating T cells of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In cultures of retinal pigment epithelial cells, we have demonstrated that T-cell-derived cytokines induced the upregulation of complement, chemokines...... and other proteins implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased plasma levels of cytokines were present in patients with AMD. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study. Age-related macular degeneration status was assessed using standardized multimodal imaging...... techniques. Plasma was isolated from freshly drawn peripheral venous blood samples and analysed for interleukin (IL)15, IL18, interferon (IFN)γ, soluble tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor II (sTNFRII) and complement factor H (CFH) Y402H genotype. RESULTS: We included 136 individuals with early or late...

  4. Olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker inhibits the progression of cataract formation in cadmium chloride induced hypertensive albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2016-12-15

    Previously we found that cadmium chloride (CdCl2) exposure substantially elevates hypertension and potentiates cataract formation. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker against cataractogenesis in the CdCl2-induced hypertensive animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley albino rats (150-180g) were randomly selected and assigned to four groups (n=6). Among the four groups, one group (normal) received 0.3% carboxymethyl cellulose (10ml/kg/day, p.o.), another group (CdCl2 control) received CdCl2 (0.5mg/kg/day, i.p.), and remaining two groups received olmesartan at two doses level (2 and 4mg/kg/day, p.o.) concurrently with CdCl2 for six consecutive weeks. Blood pressure and cataract formation were examined biweekly, and pathophysiological parameters in serum and eye lenses were evaluated after six weeks of the experimental protocol. The olmesartan treatment significantly restored the blood pressure, lenticular opacity, serum and lens antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reduced), and malondialdehyde level. Additionally, it significantly restored the proteins, ions (Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)), and ATPase pumps activity (Na(+)K(+) ATPase and Ca(2+) ATPase) in the lens as compared to CdCl2 control group. The findings demonstrate that olmesartan potentially inhibits the risk of cataract formation in the hypertensive state via restoration of lenticular oxidative stress, ATPase function, and ionic contents in the eye lenses. The results suggest that angiotensin II receptor blockers play an important role to prevent cataract formation in several pathogenic conditions like hypertension, diabetes, and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High tumour cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity negatively impacts disease-specific survival in stage II microsatellite stable colorectal cancer.

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    Sofia B Gustafsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is good evidence in the literature that the cannabinoid system is disturbed in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we have investigated whether CB(1 receptor immunoreactive intensity (CB(1IR intensity is associated with disease severity and outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CB(1IR was assessed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens collected with a consecutive intent during primary tumour surgical resection from a series of cases diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Tumour centre (n = 483 and invasive front (n = 486 CB(1IR was scored from 0 (absent to 3 (intense staining and the data was analysed as a median split i.e. CB(1IR <2 and ≥2. In microsatellite stable, but not microsatellite instable tumours (as adjudged on the basis of immunohistochemical determination of four mismatch repair proteins, there was a significant positive association of the tumour grade with the CB(1IR intensity. The difference between the microsatellite stable and instable tumours for this association of CB(1IR was related to the CpG island methylation status of the cases. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses indicated a significant contribution of CB(1IR to disease-specific survival in the microsatellite stable tumours when adjusting for tumour stage. For the cases with stage II microsatellite stable tumours, there was a significant effect of both tumour centre and front CB(1IR upon disease specific survival. The 5 year probabilities of event-free survival were: 85±5 and 66±8%; tumour interior, 86±4% and 63±8% for the CB(1IR<2 and CB(1IR≥2 groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The level of CB(1 receptor expression in colorectal cancer is associated with the tumour grade in a manner dependent upon the degree of CpG hypermethylation. A high CB(1IR is indicative of a poorer prognosis in stage II microsatellite stable tumour patients.

  6. Brain Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade Improves Dairy Blood Pressure Variability via Sympathoinhibition in Hypertensive Rats

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    Takuya Kishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal blood pressure (BP elevation in early morning is known to cause cardiovascular events. Previous studies have suggested that one of the reasons in abnormal dairy BP variability is sympathoexcitation. We have demonstrated that brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R causes sympathoexcitation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether central AT1R blockade attenuates the excess BP elevation in rest-to-active phase in hypertensive rats or not. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP were treated with intracerebroventricular infusion (ICV of AT1R receptor blocker (ARB, oral administration of hydralazine (HYD, or ICV of vehicle (VEH. Telemetric averaged mean BP (MBP was measured at early morning (EM, after morning (AM, and night (NT. At EM, MBP was significantly lower in ARB to a greater extent than in HYD compared to VEH, though MBP at AM was the same in ARB and HYD. At NT, MBP was also significantly lower in ARB than in HYD. These results in MBP were compatible to those in sympathoexcitation and suggest that central AT1R blockade attenuates excess BP elevation in early active phase and continuous BP elevation during rest phase independent of depressor response in hypertensive rats.

  7. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan enhances running endurance of skeletal muscle through activation of the PPAR-δ/AMPK pathway

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    Feng, Xiaoli; Luo, Zhidan; Ma, Liqun; Ma, Shuangtao; Yang, Dachun; Zhao, Zhigang; Yan, Zhencheng; He, Hongbo; Cao, Tingbing; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Clinical trials have shown that angiotensin II receptor blockers reduce the new onset of diabetes in hypertensives; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of telmisartan on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-δ) and the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in cultured myotubes, as well as on the running endurance of wild-type and PPAR-δ-deficient mice. Administration of telmisartan up-regulated levels of PPAR-δ and phospho-AMPKα in cultured myotubes. However, PPAR-δ gene deficiency completely abolished the telmisartan effect on phospho-AMPKαin vitro. Chronic administration of telmisartan remarkably prevented weight gain, enhanced running endurance and post-exercise oxygen consumption, and increased slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres in wild-type mice, but these effects were absent in PPAR-δ-deficient mice. The mechanism is involved in PPAR-δ-mediated stimulation of the AMPK pathway. Compared to the control mice, phospho-AMPKα level in skeletal muscle was up-regulated in mice treated with telmisartan. In contrast, phospho-AMPKα expression in skeletal muscle was unchanged in PPAR-δ-deficient mice treated with telmisartan. These findings highlight the ability of telmisartan to improve skeletal muscle function, and they implicate PPAR-δ as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. PMID:20477906

  8. Prediction of Peptide Binding to Major Histocompatibility II Receptors with Molecular Mechanics and Semi-Empirical Quantum Mechanics Methods

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    James A Platts

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Methods for prediction of the binding of peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC II receptors are examined, using literature values of IC50 as a benchmark. Two sets of IC50 data for closely structurally related peptides based on hen egg lysozyme (HEL and myelin basic protein (MBP are reported first. This shows that methods based on both molecular mechanics and semi-empirical quantum mechanics can predict binding with good-to-reasonable accuracy, as long as a suitable method for estimation of solvation effects is included. A more diverse set of 22 peptides bound to HLA-DR1 provides a tougher test of such methods, especially since no crystal structure is available for these peptide-MHC complexes. We therefore use sequence based methods such as SYFPEITHI and SVMHC to generate possible binding poses, using a consensus approach to determine the most likely anchor residues, which are then mapped onto the crystal structure of an unrelated peptide bound to the same receptor. This analysis shows that the MM/GBVI method performs particularly well, as does the AMBER94 forcefield with Born solvation model. Indeed, MM/GBVI can be used as an alternative to sequence based methods in generating binding poses, leading to still better accuracy.

  9. Direct angiotensin II type 2 receptor stimulation ameliorates insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mice with PPARγ activation.

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    Kousei Ohshima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The role of angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2 receptor stimulation in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance is still unclear. Therefore we examined the possibility that direct AT(2 receptor stimulation by compound 21 (C21 might contribute to possible insulin-sensitizing/anti-diabetic effects in type 2 diabetes (T2DM with PPARγ activation, mainly focusing on adipose tissue. METHODS: T2DM mice, KK-Ay, were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of C21 and/or a PPARγ antagonist, GW9662 in drinking water for 2 weeks. Insulin resistance was evaluated by oral glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test, and uptake of 2-[(3H] deoxy-D-glucose in white adipose tissue. Morphological changes of adipose tissues as well as adipocyte differentiation and inflammatory response were examined. RESULTS: Treatment with C21 ameliorated insulin resistance in KK-Ay mice without influencing blood pressure, at least partially through effects on the PPARγ pathway. C21 treatment increased serum adiponectin concentration and decreased TNF-α concentration; however, these effects were attenuated by PPARγ blockade by co-treatment with GW9662. Moreover, we observed that administration of C21 enhanced adipocyte differentiation and PPARγ DNA-binding activity, with a decrease in inflammation in white adipose tissue, whereas these effects of C21 were attenuated by co-treatment with GW9662. We also observed that administration of C21 restored β cell damage in diabetic pancreatic tissue. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that direct AT(2 receptor stimulation by C21 accompanied with PPARγ activation ameliorated insulin resistance in T2DM mice, at least partially due to improvement of adipocyte dysfunction and protection of pancreatic β cells.

  10. Estrogen Regulates Angiotensin II Receptor Expression Patterns and Protects the Heart from Ischemic Injury in Female Rats1

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    Xue, Qin; Xiao, Daliao; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that female offspring are resistant to fetal stress-induced programming of ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the heart; however, the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that estrogen plays a role in protecting females in fetal programming of increased heart vulnerability. Pregnant rats were divided into normoxic and hypoxic (10.5% O2 from Day 15 to 21 of gestation) groups. Ovariectomy (OVX) and estrogen (E2) replacement were performed in 8-wk-old female offspring. Hearts of 4-mo-old females were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion injury in a Langendorff preparation. OVX significantly decreased postischemic recovery of left ventricular function and increased myocardial infarction, and no difference was observed between normoxic and hypoxic groups. The effect of OVX was rescued by E2 replacement. OVX decreased the binding of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to glucocorticoid response elements at angiotensin II type 1 (Agtr1) and type 2 (Agtr2) receptor promoters, resulting in a decrease in Agtr1 and an increase in Agtr2 in the heart. Additionally, OVX decreased estrogen receptor (ER) expression in the heart and inhibited ER/GR interaction in binding to glucocorticoid response elements at the promoters. Consistent with the changes in Agtrs, OVX significantly decreased Prkce abundance in the heart. These OVX-induced changes were abrogated by E2 replacement. The results indicate that estrogen is not directly responsible for the sex dimorphism in fetal programming of heart ischemic vulnerability but suggest a novel mechanism of estrogen in regulating cardiac Agtr1/Agtr2 expression patterns and protecting female hearts against ischemia and reperfusion injury. PMID:25972014

  11. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR-II Antagonist Reduces Body Weight Gain in Mice

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    Tomoko Asagami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that mifepristone can prevent and reverse weight gain in animals and human subjects taking antipsychotic medications. This proof-of-concept study tested whether a more potent and selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist could block dietary-induced weight gain and increase insulin sensitivity in mice. Ten-week-old, male, C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet containing 60% fat calories and water supplemented with 11% sucrose for 4 weeks. Groups (=8 received one of the following: CORT 108297 (80 mg/kg QD, CORT 108297 (40 mg/kg BID, mifepristone (30 mg/kg BID, rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg QD, or vehicle. Compared to mice receiving a high-fat, high-sugar diet plus vehicle, mice receiving a high-fat, high-sugar diet plus either mifepristone or CORT 108297 gained significantly less weight. At the end of the four week treatment period, mice receiving CORT 108297 40 mg/kg BID or CORT 108297 80 mg/kg QD also had significantly lower steady plasma glucose than mice receiving vehicle. However, steady state plasma glucose after treatment was not highly correlated with reduced weight gain, suggesting that the effect of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist on insulin sensitivity may be independent of its mitigating effect on weight gain.

  12. Urinary angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 increases in diabetic nephropathy by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker olmesartan.

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    Abe, Masanori; Oikawa, Osamu; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a member of the renin-angiotensin system that degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to the seven-amino acid peptide fragment Ang-(1-7). We evaluated the changes in urinary ACE2 levels in response to treatment with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker olmesartan in diabetes patients with nephropathy. This prospective, open-label, interventional study was conducted with 31 type 2 diabetes patients with nephropathy. After initial evaluation, patients received 20 mg/day olmesartan, which was increased to 40 mg/day over a 24-week period. In diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease, olmesartan significantly increased urinary ACE2 levels independently of blood pressure and plasma aldosterone levels and reduced albuminuria, urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), and plasma aldosterone levels. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that the change in urinary L-FABP levels was an independent predictor of increased urinary ACE2 levels. Olmesartan may have the unique effect of increasing urinary ACE2 levels. However, whether this contributes to olmesartan's renoprotective effect must be examined further. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

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    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC.

  14. (Pro)renin receptor and insulin resistance: possible roles of angiotensin II-dependent and -independent pathways.

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    Rafiq, Kazi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-09-25

    A growing body of evidence has suggested the potential role of (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and renal injuries during the development of hypertension and diabetes. However, there is very little information on the contribution of (P)RR to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance. In this regard, our preliminary data showed that the development of insulin resistance was associated with nonproteolytic activation of prorenin as well as local angiotensin II generation in skeletal muscle and adipose tissues of obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats. In fructose-fed rats, insulin resistance was also associated with nonproteolytic activation of prorenin and skeletal muscle angiotensin II generation. Furthermore, inhibition of (P)RR with handle region decoy peptide (HRP) improved the development of fructose-induced insulin resistance. However, in other animal model, such as transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin gene, HRP failed to ameliorate glucose intolerance. In this review, we will summarized the current knowledge regarding the possible contribution of (P)RR to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance.

  15. Evaluation of [{sup 3}H]LY341495 for labeling group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in vivo

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    Waterhouse, Rikki N. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Schmidt, Mark E.; Sultana, Abida; Schoepp, Darryle D.; Wheeler, William J.; Mozley, P. David; Laruelle, Marc

    2003-02-01

    New glutamatergic drugs are being developed as potential therapies for neurodegenerative disorders, anxiety disorders, and psychoses. The development of effective mGluR radiotracers would provide essential tools with which to probe these sites in living humans, providing critical information about certain disease processes involving the glutamaterigic system and its regulation in humans. As a first step towards this goal, the tritiated form of the high affinity group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist LY341495 [K{sub D} (mGluR{sub 2}) = 1.67{+-}0.20 nM, K{sub D} (mGluR{sub 3})=0.75{+-}0.43 nM] was evaluated to determine its potential to label mGluRs in vivo. Dissection analysis of the regional brain distribution over time of [{sup 3}H]LY341495 in male rats revealed low brain uptake and no significant demonstrable saturable binding of this tracer. A group II mGluR tracer possessing higher affinity than [{sup 3}H]LY341495 and an absence of carboxylic acid groups is likely required for in vivo PET imaging purposes.

  16. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) localization and antagonist-mediated inhibition of capsaicin responses and neurite outgrowth in human and rat sensory neurons

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    Anand, U; Facer, P; Yiangou, Y.; Sinisi, M; Fox, M.; McCarthy, T.; Bountra, C; Korchev, YE; Anand, P

    2012-01-01

    Background The angiotensin II (AngII) receptor subtype 2 (AT2R) is expressed in sensory neurons and may play a role in nociception and neuronal regeneration. Methods We used immunostaining with characterized antibodies to study the localization of AT2R in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and a range of human tissues. The effects of AngII and AT2R antagonist EMA401 on capsaicin responses in cultured human and rat (DRG) neurons were measured with calcium imaging, on neu...

  17. Angiotensin II reduces cardiac AdipoR1 expression through AT1 receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc pathway.

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    Li Li

    Full Text Available Adiponectin, an abundant adipose tissue-derived protein, exerts protective effect against cardiovascular disease. Adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mediate the beneficial effects of adiponectin on the cardiovascular system. However, the alteration of AdipoRs in cardiac remodeling is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of angiotensin II (AngII on cardiac AdipoRs expression and explored the possible molecular mechanism. AngII infusion into rats induced cardiac hypertrophy, reduced AdipoR1 but not