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Sample records for ii nkt cells

  1. Choline Deficiency Causes Colonic Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cell Loss and Alleviates Murine Colitis under Type I NKT Cell Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagami, Shintaro; Ueno, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Shinji; Fujita, Akira; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryohei; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Hinoi, Takao; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Serum levels of choline and its derivatives are lower in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than in healthy individuals. However, the effect of choline deficiency on the severity of colitis has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the role of choline deficiency in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. Methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet lowered the levels of type II natural killer T (NKT) cells in the colonic lamina propria, peritoneal cavity, and mesenteric lymph nodes, and increased the levels of type II NKT cells in the livers of wild-type B6 mice compared with that in mice fed a control (CTR) diet. The gene expression pattern of the chemokine receptor CXCR6, which promotes NKT cell accumulation, varied between colon and liver in a manner dependent on the changes in the type II NKT cell levels. To examine the role of type II NKT cells in colitis under choline-deficient conditions, we assessed the severity of DSS-induced colitis in type I NKT cell-deficient (Jα18-/-) or type I and type II NKT cell-deficient (CD1d-/-) mice fed the MCD or CTR diets. The MCD diet led to amelioration of inflammation, decreases in interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 secretion, and a decrease in the number of IFN-γ and IL-4-producing NKT cells in Jα18-/- mice but not in CD1d-/- mice. Finally, adaptive transfer of lymphocytes with type II NKT cells exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in Jα18-/- mice with MCD diet. These results suggest that choline deficiency causes proinflammatory type II NKT cell loss and alleviates DSS-induced colitis. Thus, inflammation in DSS-induced colitis under choline deficiency is caused by type II NKT cell-dependent mechanisms, including decreased type II NKT cell and proinflammatory cytokine levels.

  2. Recognition of lysophosphatidylcholine by type II NKT cells and protection from an inflammatory liver disease

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    Maricic, Igor; Girardi, Enrico; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Lipids presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecule, CD1d, are recognized by natural killer T (NKT) cells, which can be broadly categorized into two subsets. The well-characterized type I NKT cells, express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) and can recognize both α- and β-linked glycolipids, whereas type II NKT cells are less well studied, express a relatively diverse TCR repertoire, and recognize β-linked lipids. Recent structural studies have shown a distinct mode of recognition of a self-glycolipid sulfatide bound to CD1d by a type II NKT TCR. To further characterize antigen recognition by these cells we have used the structural data and screened other small molecules able to bind to CD1d and activate type II NKT cells. Using plate-bound CD1d and APC-based antigen presentation assay we found that phospholipids such as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) can stimulate the sulfatide-reactive type II NKT hybridoma Hy19.3 in a CD1d-dependent manner. Using plasmon resonance studies we found that this type II NKT TCR binds with CD1d-bound LPC with micromolar affinities similar to that for sulfatide. Furthermore LPC-mediated activation of type II NKT cells leads to anergy induction in type I NKT cells and affords protection from ConA-induced hepatitis. These data indicate that, in addition to self-glycolipids, self-lysophospholipids are also recognized by type II NKT cells. Since lysophospholipids are involved during inflammation our findings have implications for not only understanding activation of type II NKT cells in physiological settings but also for the development of immune intervention in inflammatory diseases. PMID:25261475

  3. Type II NKT cells in inflammation, autoimmunity, microbial immunity and cancer

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    Idania eMarrero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T cells (NKT recognize self and microbial lipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. Two major NKT cell subsets, type I and II, express different types of antigen receptors (TCR with distinct mode of CD1d/lipid recognition. Though, type II NKT cells are less frequent in mice and difficult to study, they are predominant in human. One of the major subsets of type II NKT cells reactive to the self-glycolipid sulfatide is the best characterized and has been shown to induce a dominant immune regulatory mechanism that controls inflammation in autoimmunity and in anti-cancer immunity. Recently, type II NKT cells reactive to other self-glycolipids and phospholipids have been identified suggesting both promiscuous and specific TCR recognition in microbial immunity as well. Since the CD1d pathway is highly conserved, a detailed understanding of the biology and function of type II NKT cells as well as their interplay with type I NKT cells or other innate and adaptive T cells will have major implications for potential novel interventions in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, microbial immunity and cancer.

  4. Type II NKT Cells in Inflammation, Autoimmunity, Microbial Immunity, and Cancer.

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    Marrero, Idania; Ware, Randle; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) recognize self and microbial lipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. Two major NKT cell subsets, type I and II, express different types of antigen receptors (TCR) with distinct mode of CD1d/lipid recognition. Though type II NKT cells are less frequent in mice and difficult to study, they are predominant in human. One of the major subsets of type II NKT cells reactive to the self-glycolipid sulfatide is the best characterized and has been shown to induce a dominant immune regulatory mechanism that controls inflammation in autoimmunity and in anti-cancer immunity. Recently, type II NKT cells reactive to other self-glycolipids and phospholipids have been identified suggesting both promiscuous and specific TCR recognition in microbial immunity as well. Since the CD1d pathway is highly conserved, a detailed understanding of the biology and function of type II NKT cells as well as their interplay with type I NKT cells or other innate and adaptive T cells will have major implications for potential novel interventions in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, microbial immunity, and cancer.

  5. The Adaptor Protein SAP Regulates Type II NKT Cell Development, Cytokine Production and Cytotoxicity Against Lymphoma1

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    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L.; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT cell TCR transgenic mouse model (24αβTg), we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells but not thymic epithelial cells meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Further, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT cell development by controlling Egr2 and PLZF expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IRF4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. PMID:25236978

  6. The adaptor protein SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity against lymphoma.

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    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L; Stein, Paul L; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT-cell TCR transgenic mouse model, we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells, but not thymic epithelial cells, meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Furthermore, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development by controlling early growth response 2 protein and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IFN regulatory factor 4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Multiple tissue-specific isoforms of sulfatide activate CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomqvist, Maria; Rhost, Sara; Teneberg, Susann

    2009-01-01

    of the long fatty acid (C24:0), resulted in reduced stimulatory capacity, and fatty acid hydroxylation abolished the response. Moreover, sulfatide was not responsible for the natural autoreactivity toward splenocytes by XV19 T hybridoma cells. Our results reveal a promiscuity in the recognition of sulfatide...... isoforms by a CD1d-restricted NKT-cell clone, and suggest that sulfatide, a major component of the myelin sheet and pancreatic beta-cells, is one of several natural ligands for type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells.......The glycosphingolipid sulfatide (SO(3)-3Galbeta1Cer) is a demonstrated ligand for a subset of CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which could regulate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a murine model for multiple sclerosis, as well as tumor immunity and experimental hepatitis. Native sulfatide...

  8. CD4+ type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes

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    Kadri, Nadir; Korpos, Eva; Gupta, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic ß cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry ...

  9. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma

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    Junxin Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma.

  10. NKT cell networks in the regulation of tumor immunity

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    Faith C Robertson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT cells lie at the interface between the innate and adaptive immune systems and are important mediators of immune responses and tumor immunosurveillance. These NKT cells uniquely recognize lipid antigens, and their rapid yet specific reactions influence both innate and adaptive immunity. In tumor immunity, two NKT subsets (type I and type II have contrasting roles in which they not only cross-regulate one another, but also impact innate immune cell populations, including natural killer, dendritic and myeloid lineage cells, as well as adaptive populations, especially CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The extent to which NKT cells promote or suppress surrounding cells affects the host’s ability to prevent neoplasia and is consequently of great interest for therapeutic development. Data have shown the potential for therapeutic use of NKT cell agonists and synergy with immune response modifiers in both pre-clinical studies and preliminary clinical studies. However, there is room to improve treatment efficacy by further elucidating the biological mechanisms underlying NKT cell networks. Here, we discuss the progress made in understanding NKT cell networks, their consequent role in the regulation of tumor immunity, and the potential to exploit that knowledge in a clinical setting.

  11. NKT cells in HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell population that have important immunoregulatory functions and have been shown to be involved in host immunity against a range of microorganisms. It also emerges that they might play a role in HIV-1 infection, and therefore be selectively depleted during the early stages of infection. Recent studies are reviewed regarding the dynamics of NKT depletion during HIV-I infection and their recovery under highly active antiretrovirai treatment (HAART). Possible mechanisms for these changes are proposed based on the recent developments in HIV pathogenesis. Further discussions are focused on HIV's disruption of NKT activation by downregulating CDId expression on antigen presentation cells (APC). HIV-1 protein Nefis found to play the major role by interrupting the intraceilular trafficking of nascent and recycling CDId molecules.

  12. Invariant NKT cells: regulation and function during viral infection.

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    Jennifer A Juno

    Full Text Available Natural killer T cells (NKT cells represent a subset of T lymphocytes that express natural killer (NK cell surface markers. A subset of NKT cells, termed invariant NKT cells (iNKT, express a highly restricted T cell receptor (TCR and respond to CD1d-restricted lipid ligands. iNKT cells are now appreciated to play an important role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses and have been implicated in infectious disease, allergy, asthma, autoimmunity, and tumor surveillance. Advances in iNKT identification and purification have allowed for the detailed study of iNKT activity in both humans and mice during a variety of chronic and acute infections. Comparison of iNKT function between non-pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection models and chronic HIV-infected patients implies a role for iNKT activity in controlling immune activation. In vitro studies of influenza infection have revealed novel effector functions of iNKT cells including IL-22 production and modulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, but ex vivo characterization of human iNKT cells during influenza infection are lacking. Similarly, as recent evidence suggests iNKT involvement in dengue virus pathogenesis, iNKT cells may modulate responses to a number of emerging pathogens. This Review will summarize current knowledge of iNKT involvement in responses to viral infections in both human and mouse models and will identify critical gaps in knowledge and opportunities for future study. We will also highlight recent efforts to harness iNKT ligands as vaccine adjuvants capable of improving vaccination-induced cellular immune responses.

  13. Directing traffic on the NKT-cell highway: a key role for ThPOK.

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    Chakravarti, Sumone; Godfrey, Dale I

    2010-09-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells include CD4(+) and DN subsets, with an additional CD8(+) subset that is present in humans but not in mice. The molecular regulation of CD4/CD8 expression by NKT cells, and differentiation of these NKT-cell subsets, is poorly understood. The transcription factors GATA3 and ThPOK regulate lineage commitment of conventional MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells; however, their role in CD4/CD8 expression by CD1d-restricted NKT cells is less clear. A new study in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology demonstrates a key role for ThPOK in differentiation of NKT-cell subsets. This study reveals that GATA3 and ThPOK are necessary for the development of CD4(+) NKT cells. Furthermore, ThPOK-deficient mice generate an unusual population of CD8(+) NKT cells, which are absent in control mice. This study sheds new light on the underlying molecular events leading to the emergence of distinct NKT-cell subsets.

  14. NKT cell-TCR expression activates conventional T cells in vivo, but is largely dispensable for mature NKT cell biology.

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    Vahl, J Christoph; Heger, Klaus; Knies, Nathalie; Hein, Marco Y; Boon, Louis; Yagita, Hideo; Polic, Bojan; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cell development depends on recognition of self-glycolipids via their semi-invariant Vα14i-TCR. However, to what extent TCR-mediated signals determine identity and function of mature NKT cells remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain allowing conditional Vα14i-TCR expression from within the endogenous Tcrα locus. We demonstrate that naïve T cells are activated upon replacement of their endogenous TCR repertoire with Vα14i-restricted TCRs, but they do not differentiate into NKT cells. On the other hand, induced TCR ablation on mature NKT cells did not affect their lineage identity, homeostasis, or innate rapid cytokine secretion abilities. We therefore propose that peripheral NKT cells become unresponsive to and thus are independent of their autoreactive TCR.

  15. NKT cell-TCR expression activates conventional T cells in vivo, but is largely dispensable for mature NKT cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Christoph Vahl

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cell development depends on recognition of self-glycolipids via their semi-invariant Vα14i-TCR. However, to what extent TCR-mediated signals determine identity and function of mature NKT cells remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain allowing conditional Vα14i-TCR expression from within the endogenous Tcrα locus. We demonstrate that naïve T cells are activated upon replacement of their endogenous TCR repertoire with Vα14i-restricted TCRs, but they do not differentiate into NKT cells. On the other hand, induced TCR ablation on mature NKT cells did not affect their lineage identity, homeostasis, or innate rapid cytokine secretion abilities. We therefore propose that peripheral NKT cells become unresponsive to and thus are independent of their autoreactive TCR.

  16. Immunologic glycosphingolipidomics and NKT cell development in mouse thymus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yunsen; Thapa, Prakash; Hawke, David

    2009-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are a hybrid cell type of Natural Killer cells and T cells, whose development is dependent on thymic positive selection mediated by double positive thymocytes through their recognition of natural ligands presented by CD1d, a nonpolymorphic, non-MHC, MHC-like antigen presenting...... for identifying additional ligands for NKT cells. Our results also provide early insights into cellular lipidomics studies, with a specific focus on the important immunological functions of glycosphingolipids....

  17. Impaired SLAM-SLAM homotypic interaction between invariant NKT cells and dendritic cells affects differentiation of IL-4/IL-10-secreting NKT2 cells in nonobese diabetic mice.

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    Baev, Denis V; Caielli, Simone; Ronchi, Francesca; Coccia, Margherita; Facciotti, Federica; Nichols, Kim E; Falcone, Marika

    2008-07-15

    The regulatory function of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells for tolerance induction and prevention of autoimmunity is linked to a specific cytokine profile that comprises the secretion of type 2 cytokines like IL-4 and IL-10 (NKT2 cytokine profile). The mechanism responsible for iNKT cell differentiation toward a type 2 phenotype is unknown. Herein we show that costimulatory signals provided by the surface receptor signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) on myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) to iNKT cells is crucial for NKT2 orientation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the impaired acquisition of an NKT2 cytokine phenotype in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes is due to defective SLAM-induced signals generated by NOD mDC. Mature mDC of C57BL/6 mice express SLAM and induce C57BL/6 or NOD iNKT cells to acquire a predominant NKT2 cytokine phenotype in response to antigenic stimulation with the iNKT cell-specific Ag, the alpha-galactosylceramide. In contrast, mature NOD mDC express significantly lower levels of SLAM and are unable to promote GATA-3 (the SLAM-induced intracellular signal) up-regulation and IL-4/IL-10 production in iNKT cells from NOD or C57BL/6 mice. NOD mice carry a genetic defect of the Slamf1 gene that is associated with reduced SLAM expression on double-positive thymocytes and altered iNKT cell development in the thymus. Our data suggest that the genetic Slamf1 defect in NOD mice also affects SLAM expression on other immune cells such as the mDC, thus critically impairing the peripheral differentiation of iNKT cells toward a regulatory NKT2 type.

  18. Endogenous collagen peptide activation of CD1d-restricted NKT cells ameliorates tissue-specific inflammation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Anna; Mondoc, Emma

    2011-01-01

    suppressed a range of in vivo inflammatory conditions, including delayed-type hypersensitivity, antigen-induced airway inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis, and EAE, which were all ameliorated by mCII707-721 vaccination. The findings presented here offer new insight into the intrinsic roles of NKT cells......NKT cells in the mouse recognize antigen in the context of the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d and play an important role in peripheral tolerance and protection against autoimmune and other diseases. NKT cells are usually activated by CD1d-presented lipid antigens. However, peptide recognition...... in the context of CD1 has also been documented, although no self-peptide ligands have been reported to date. Here, we have identified an endogenous peptide that is presented by CD1d to activate mouse NKT cells. This peptide, the immunodominant epitope from mouse collagen type II (mCII707-721), was not associated...

  19. Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation.

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    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Faya; Zhu, Zhaohui; Luong, Dung; Meadows, Gary G

    2015-01-15

    Alcohol consumption exhibits diverse effects on different types of immune cells. NKT cells are a unique T cell population and play important immunoregulatory roles in different types of immune responses. The effects of chronic alcohol consumption on NKT cells remain to be elucidated. Using a mouse model of chronic alcohol consumption, we found that alcohol increases the percentage of NKT cells, especially iNKT cells in the thymus and liver, but not in the spleen or blood. Alcohol consumption decreases the percentage of NK1.1(-) iNKT cells in the total iNKT cell population in all of the tissues and organs examined. In the thymus, alcohol consumption increases the number of NK1.1(+)CD44(hi) mature iNKT cells but does not alter the number of NK1.1(-) immature iNKT cells. A BrdU incorporation assay shows that alcohol consumption increases the proliferation of thymic NK1.1(-) iNKT cells, especially the NK1.1(-)CD44(lo) Stage I iNKT cells. The percentage of NKG2A(+) iNKT cells increases in all of the tissues and organs examined; whereas CXCR3(+) iNKT cells only increases in the thymus of alcohol-consuming mice. Chronic alcohol consumption increases the percentage of IFN-γ-producing iNKT cells and increases the blood concentration of IFN-γ and IL-12 after in vivo α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation. Consistent with the increased cytokine production, the in vivo activation of iNKT cells also enhances the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and NK, B, and T cells in the alcohol-consuming mice. Taken together the data indicate that chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation, which favors the Th1 immune response.

  20. Cutting edge: NKT cell development is selectively impaired in Fyn- deficient mice.

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    Eberl, G; Lowin-Kropf, B; MacDonald, H R

    1999-10-15

    Most NK1.1+ T (NKT) cells express a biased TCRalphabeta repertoire that is positively selected by the monomorphic MHC class I-like molecule CD1d. The development of CD1d-dependent NKT cells is thymus dependent but, in contrast to conventional T cells, requires positive selection by cells of hemopoietic origin. Here, we show that the Src protein tyrosine kinase Fyn is required for development of CD1d-dependent NKT cells but not for the development of conventional T cells. In contrast, another Src kinase, Lck, is required for the development of both NKT and T cells. Impaired NKT cell development in Fyn-deficient mice cannot be rescued by transgenic expression of CD8, which is believed to increase the avidity of CD1d recognition by NKT cells. Taken together, our data reveal a selective and nonredundant role for Fyn in NKT cell development.

  1. Invariant NKT Cells as Novel Targets for Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors

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    Karsten A. Pilones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a small population of lymphocytes that possess characteristics of both innate and adaptive immune cells. They are uniquely poised to respond rapidly to infection and inflammation and produce cytokines that critically shape the ensuing adaptive cellular response. Therefore, they represent promising therapeutic targets. In cancer, NKT cells are attributed a role in immunosurveillance. NKT cells also act as potent activators of antitumor immunity when stimulated with a synthetic agonist in experimental models. However, in some settings, NKT cells seem to act as suppressors and regulators of antitumor immunity. Here we briefly review current data supporting these paradoxical roles of NKT cells and their regulation. Increased understanding of the signals that determine the function of NKT cells in cancer will be essential to improve current strategies for NKT-cell-based immunotherapeutic approaches.

  2. EBV-Induced Human CD8+ NKT Cells Synergize CD4+ NKT Cells Suppressing EBV-Associated Tumors upon Induction of Th1-Bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xiao; Li Li; Rui Zhou; Ruijing Xiao; Yujuan Wang; Xiang Ji; Mengjun Wu; Lan Wang; Wei Huang; Xiaoling Zheng; Xinti Tan; Lang Chen; Tao Xiong; Jie Xiong; Youxin Jin; Jinquan Tan; Yuling He

    2009-01-01

    CD8+ natural killer T (NKT) cells from EBV-associated turnout patients are quantitatively and functionally impaired. EBV-induced CD8+ NKT cells drive syngeneic T cells into a Thl-bias response to suppress EBV-associated malignancies. IL-4-biased CD4+ NKT cells do not affect either syngeneic T cell cytotoxicity or Th cytokine secretion. Circulating mDC1 cells from patients with EBV-associated malignancies impair the production of IFN-γ by CD8+ NKT cells. In this study, we have established a human-thymus-SCID chimaera model to further investigate the underlying mechanism of EBV-induced CD8+ NKT cells in suppressing EBV-associated malignancies. In the human-thymus-SCID chimera, EBV-induced CD8+ NKT cells suppress EBV-associated malignancies in a manner dependent on the Th1-bias response and syngeneic CD3+ T cells. However, adoptive transfer with CD4+ NKT cells alone inhibits T cell immunity. Interestingly, CD4+ NKT cells themselves secrete high levels of IL-2, enhancing the persistence of adoptively transferred CD8+ NKT cells and T cells, thereby leading to a more pronounced T cell anti-tumour response in chimaeras co-transferred with CD4+ and CD8+ NKT cells. Thus, immune reconstitution with EBV-induced CD4+ and CD8+ NKT cells synergistically enhances T cell tumour immunity, providing a potential prophylactic and therapeutic treatment for EBV-associated malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2009;6(5):367-379.

  3. Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation

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    Zhang, Hui, E-mail: hzhang@wsu.edu; Zhang, Faya; Zhu, Zhaohui; Luong, Dung; Meadows, Gary G.

    2015-01-15

    Alcohol consumption exhibits diverse effects on different types of immune cells. NKT cells are a unique T cell population and play important immunoregulatory roles in different types of immune responses. The effects of chronic alcohol consumption on NKT cells remain to be elucidated. Using a mouse model of chronic alcohol consumption, we found that alcohol increases the percentage of NKT cells, especially iNKT cells in the thymus and liver, but not in the spleen or blood. Alcohol consumption decreases the percentage of NK1.1{sup −} iNKT cells in the total iNKT cell population in all of the tissues and organs examined. In the thymus, alcohol consumption increases the number of NK1.1{sup +}CD44{sup hi} mature iNKT cells but does not alter the number of NK1.1{sup −} immature iNKT cells. A BrdU incorporation assay shows that alcohol consumption increases the proliferation of thymic NK1.1{sup −} iNKT cells, especially the NK1.1{sup −}CD44{sup lo} Stage I iNKT cells. The percentage of NKG2A{sup +} iNKT cells increases in all of the tissues and organs examined; whereas CXCR3{sup +} iNKT cells only increases in the thymus of alcohol-consuming mice. Chronic alcohol consumption increases the percentage of IFN-γ-producing iNKT cells and increases the blood concentration of IFN-γ and IL-12 after in vivo α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation. Consistent with the increased cytokine production, the in vivo activation of iNKT cells also enhances the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and NK, B, and T cells in the alcohol-consuming mice. Taken together the data indicate that chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation, which favors the Th1 immune response. - Highlights: • Chronic alcohol consumption increases iNKT cells in the thymus and liver • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances thymic Stage I iNKT cell proliferation • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation in thymus and periphery • Chronic alcohol

  4. The adaptor molecule SAP plays essential roles during invariant NKT cell cytotoxicity and lytic synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid; Guan, Peng; Wiener, Susan; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André; Orange, Jordan S; Nichols, Kim E

    2013-04-25

    The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) plays critical roles during invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell ontogeny. As a result, SAP-deficient humans and mice lack iNKT cells. The strict developmental requirement for SAP has made it difficult to discern its possible involvement in mature iNKT cell functions. By using temporal Cre recombinase-mediated gene deletion to ablate SAP expression after completion of iNKT cell development, we demonstrate that SAP is essential for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced iNKT cell cytotoxicity against T-cell and B-cell leukemia targets in vitro and iNKT-cell-mediated control of T-cell leukemia growth in vivo. These findings are not restricted to the murine system: silencing RNA-mediated suppression of SAP expression in human iNKT cells also significantly impairs TCR-induced cytolysis. Mechanistic studies reveal that iNKT cell killing requires the tyrosine kinase Fyn, a known SAP-binding protein. Furthermore, SAP expression is required within iNKT cells to facilitate their interaction with T-cell targets and induce reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center to the immunologic synapse (IS). Collectively, these studies highlight a novel and essential role for SAP during iNKT cell cytotoxicity and formation of a functional IS.

  5. Activation and Function of iNKT and MAIT Cells.

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    Chandra, Shilpi; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, it has been established that peptides are not the only antigens recognized by T lymphocytes. Here, we review information on two T lymphocyte populations that recognize nonpeptide antigens: invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells), which respond to glycolipids, and mucosal associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells), which recognize microbial metabolites. These two populations have a number of striking properties that distinguish them from the majority of T cells. First, their cognate antigens are presented by nonclassical class I antigen-presenting molecules; CD1d for iNKT cells and MR1 for MAIT cells. Second, these T lymphocyte populations have a highly restricted diversity of their T cell antigen receptor α chains. Third, these cells respond rapidly to antigen or cytokine stimulation by producing copious amounts of cytokines, such as IFNγ, which normally are only made by highly differentiated effector T lymphocytes. Because of their response characteristics, iNKT and MAIT cells act at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity, participating in both types of responses. In this review, we will compare these two subsets of innate-like T cells, with an emphasis on the various ways that lead to their activation and their participation in antimicrobial responses.

  6. Discrete TCR Binding Kinetics Control Invariant NKT Cell Selection and Central Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Tleugabulova, Mayra; Escalante, Nichole K; Deng, Shenglou; Fieve, Stephanie; Ereño-Orbea, June; Savage, Paul B; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Mallevaey, Thierry

    2016-11-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells develop and differentiate in the thymus, segregating into iNKT1/2/17 subsets akin to Th1/2/17 classical CD4(+) T cells; however, iNKT TCRs recognize Ags in a fundamentally different way. How the biophysical parameters of iNKT TCRs influence signal strength in vivo and how such signals affect the development and differentiation of these cells are unknown. In this study, we manipulated TCRs in vivo to generate clonotypic iNKT cells using TCR retrogenic chimeras. We report that the biophysical properties of CD1d-lipid-TCR interactions differentially impacted the development and effector differentiation of iNKT cells. Whereas selection efficiency strongly correlated with TCR avidity, TCR signaling, cell-cell conjugate formation, and iNKT effector differentiation correlated with the half-life of CD1d-lipid-TCR interactions. TCR binding properties, however, did not modulate Ag-induced iNKT cytokine production. Our work establishes that discrete TCR interaction kinetics influence iNKT cell development and central priming. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cátia S.; Ribeiro, Helena; Macedo, M. Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d) molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed. PMID:28245613

  8. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia S. Pereira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed.

  9. The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein is required for iNKT cell maturation and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locci, Michela; Draghici, Elena; Marangoni, Francesco; Bosticardo, Marita; Catucci, Marco; Aiuti, Alessandro; Cancrini, Caterina; Marodi, Laszlo; Espanol, Teresa; Bredius, Robbert G.M.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Schulz, Ansgar; Litzman, Jiri; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein (WASp) is a regulator of actin cytoskeleton in hematopoietic cells. Mutations of the WASp gene cause WAS. Although WASp is involved in various immune cell functions, its role in invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells has never been investigated. Defects of iNKT cells could indeed contribute to several WAS features, such as recurrent infections and high tumor incidence. We found a profound reduction of circulating iNKT cells in WAS patients, directly correlating with the severity of clinical phenotype. To better characterize iNKT cell defect in the absence of WASp, we analyzed was−/− mice. iNKT cell numbers were significantly reduced in the thymus and periphery of was−/− mice as compared with wild-type controls. Moreover analysis of was−/− iNKT cell maturation revealed a complete arrest at the CD44+ NK1.1− intermediate stage. Notably, generation of BM chimeras demonstrated a was−/− iNKT cell-autonomous developmental defect. was−/− iNKT cells were also functionally impaired, as suggested by the reduced secretion of interleukin 4 and interferon γ upon in vivo activation. Altogether, these results demonstrate the relevance of WASp in integrating signals critical for development and functional differentiation of iNKT cells and suggest that defects in these cells may play a role in WAS pathology. PMID:19307326

  10. The split personality of NKT cells in malignancy, autoimmune and allergic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subleski, Jeff J; Jiang, Qun; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H

    2011-10-01

    NKT cells are a heterogeneous subset of specialized, self-reactive T cells, with innate and adaptive immune properties, which allow them to bridge innate and adaptive immunity and profoundly influence autoimmune and malignant disease outcomes. NKT cells mediate these activities through their ability to rapidly express pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that influence the type and magnitude of the immune response. Not only do NKT cells regulate the functions of other cell types, but experimental evidence has found NKT cell subsets can modulate the functions of other NKT subsets. Depending on underlying mechanisms, NKT cells can inhibit or exacerbate autoimmunity and malignancy, making them potential targets for disease intervention. NKT cells can respond to foreign and endogenous antigenic glycolipid signals that are expressed during pathogenic invasion or ongoing inflammation, respectively, allowing them to rapidly react to and influence a broad array of diseases. In this article we review the unique development and activation pathways of NKT cells and focus on how these attributes augment or exacerbate autoimmune disorders and malignancy. We also examine the growing evidence that NKT cells are involved in liver inflammatory conditions that can contribute to the development of malignancy.

  11. Invariant NKT cells require autophagy to coordinate proliferation and survival signals during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Bo; Zhao, Meng; Miller, Brian C; Véla, Jose Luis; Bruinsma, Monique W; Virgin, Herbert W; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-06-15

    Autophagy regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival in multiple cell types, including cells of the immune system. In this study, we examined the effects of a disruption of autophagy on the differentiation of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Using mice with a T lymphocyte-specific deletion of Atg5 or Atg7, two members of the macroautophagic pathway, we observed a profound decrease in the iNKT cell population. The deficit is cell-autonomous, and it acts predominantly to reduce the number of mature cells, as well as the function of peripheral iNKT cells. In the absence of autophagy, there is reduced progression of iNKT cells in the thymus through the cell cycle, as well as increased apoptosis of these cells. Importantly, the reduction in Th1-biased iNKT cells is most pronounced, leading to a selective reduction in iNKT cell-derived IFN-γ. Our findings highlight the unique metabolic and genetic requirements for the differentiation of iNKT cells.

  12. Selective Conditions Are Required for the Induction of Invariant NKT Cell Hyporesponsiveness by Antigenic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Gerhard; Birkholz, Alysia M; Sag, Duygu; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Howell, Amy R; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-10-15

    Activation of invariant (i)NKT cells with the model Ag α-galactosylceramide induces rapid production of multiple cytokines, impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. In contrast, following secondary activation with α-galactosylceramide, the behavior of iNKT cells is altered for months, with the production of most cytokines being strongly reduced. The requirements for the induction of this hyporesponsive state, however, remain poorly defined. In this study, we show that Th1-biasing iNKT cell Ags could induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness, as long as a minimum antigenic affinity was reached. In contrast, the Th2-biasing Ag OCH did not induce a hyporesponsive state, nor did cytokine-driven iNKT cell activation by LPS or infections. Furthermore, although dendritic cells and B cells have been reported to be essential for iNKT cell stimulation, neither dendritic cells nor B cells were required to induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness. Therefore, our data indicate that whereas some bone marrow-derived cells could induce iNKT cell hyporesponsiveness, selective conditions, dependent on the structure and potency of the Ag, were required to induce hyporesponsiveness.

  13. Retinoic acid alleviates Con A-induced hepatitis and differentially regulates effector production in NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Song, You Chan; Kim, Ga-Young; Choi, Gyeyoung; Lee, Yoon-Sook; Lee, Jung-Mi; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2012-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a diverse regulator of immune responses. Although RA promotes natural killer T (NKT) cell activation in vitro by increasing CD1d expression on antigen-presenting cells (APCs), the direct effects of RA on NKT-cell responses in vivo are not known. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of RA on the severity of Con A-induced hepatitis and molecular changes of NKT cells. First, we demonstrated that Con A-induced liver damage was ameliorated by RA. In correlation with cytokine levels in serum, RA regulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α by NKT cells without influencing the NKT-cell activation status. However, RA did not alleviate α-GalCer-induced liver injury, even though it reduced IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α levels in serum. This regulation was also detected when liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) or NKT hybridoma cells were treated with RA in vitro. The regulatory effect of RA on NKT cells was mediated by RAR-α, and RA reduced the phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that RA differentially modulates the production of effector cytokines by NKT cells in hepatitis, and the suppressive effect of RA on hepatitis varies with the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury.

  14. An in silico approach for modelling T-helper polarizing iNKT cell agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Spiegeleer, Anton; Wynendaele, Evelien; Vandekerckhove, Matthias; Stalmans, Sofie; Boucart, Maxime; Van Den Noortgate, Nele; Venken, Koen; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Elewaut, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Many analogues of the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) are known to activate iNKT cells through their interaction with CD1d-expressing antigen-presenting cells, inducing the release of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Because of iNKT cell involvement and associated Th1/Th2 cytokine changes in a broad spectrum of human diseases, the design of iNKT cell ligands with selective Th1 and Th2 properties has been the subject of extensive research. This search for novel iNKT cell ligands requires refined structural insights. Here we will visualize the chemical space of 333 currently known iNKT cell activators, including several newly tested analogues, by more than 3000 chemical descriptors which were calculated for each individual analogue. To evaluate the immunological responses we analyzed five different cytokines in five different test-systems. We linked the chemical space to the immunological space using a system biology computational approach resulting in highly sensitive and specific predictive models. Moreover, these models correspond with the current insights of iNKT cell activation by α-GalCer analogues, explaining the Th1 and Th2 biased responses, downstream of iNKT cell activation. We anticipate that such models will be of great value for the future design of iNKT cell agonists.

  15. An in silico approach for modelling T-helper polarizing iNKT cell agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton De Spiegeleer

    Full Text Available Many analogues of the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer are known to activate iNKT cells through their interaction with CD1d-expressing antigen-presenting cells, inducing the release of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Because of iNKT cell involvement and associated Th1/Th2 cytokine changes in a broad spectrum of human diseases, the design of iNKT cell ligands with selective Th1 and Th2 properties has been the subject of extensive research. This search for novel iNKT cell ligands requires refined structural insights. Here we will visualize the chemical space of 333 currently known iNKT cell activators, including several newly tested analogues, by more than 3000 chemical descriptors which were calculated for each individual analogue. To evaluate the immunological responses we analyzed five different cytokines in five different test-systems. We linked the chemical space to the immunological space using a system biology computational approach resulting in highly sensitive and specific predictive models. Moreover, these models correspond with the current insights of iNKT cell activation by α-GalCer analogues, explaining the Th1 and Th2 biased responses, downstream of iNKT cell activation. We anticipate that such models will be of great value for the future design of iNKT cell agonists.

  16. Border Patrol Gone Awry: Lung NKT Cell Activation by Francisella tularensis Exacerbates Tularemia-Like Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Timothy M; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Cicek, Basak B; Osina, Maria A; Boyd, Kelli L; Durrant, Douglas M; Metzger, Dennis W; Khanna, Kamal M; Joyce, Sebastian

    2015-06-01

    The respiratory mucosa is a major site for pathogen invasion and, hence, a site requiring constant immune surveillance. The type I, semi-invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells are enriched within the lung vasculature. Despite optimal positioning, the role of NKT cells in respiratory infectious diseases remains poorly understood. Hence, we assessed their function in a murine model of pulmonary tularemia--because tularemia is a sepsis-like proinflammatory disease and NKT cells are known to control the cellular and humoral responses underlying sepsis. Here we show for the first time that respiratory infection with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain resulted in rapid accumulation of NKT cells within the lung interstitium. Activated NKT cells produced interferon-γ and promoted both local and systemic proinflammatory responses. Consistent with these results, NKT cell-deficient mice showed reduced inflammatory cytokine and chemokine response yet they survived the infection better than their wild type counterparts. Strikingly, NKT cell-deficient mice had increased lymphocytic infiltration in the lungs that organized into tertiary lymphoid structures resembling induced bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) at the peak of infection. Thus, NKT cell activation by F. tularensis infection hampers iBALT formation and promotes a systemic proinflammatory response, which exacerbates severe pulmonary tularemia-like disease in mice.

  17. EBV-induced human CD8+ NKT cells synergize CD4+NKT cells suppressing EBV-associated tumors upon induction of Th1 bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xiao; Xiaoling Zheng; Xinti Tan; Lang Chen; Tao Xiong; Jie Xiong; Youxin Jin; Jinquan Tan; Yuling He; Li Li; Rui Zhou; Ruijing Xiao; Yujuan Wang; Xiang Ji; Mengjun Wu; Lan Wang; Wei Huang

    2011-01-01

    @@ The authors inadvertently published histograms in the fourth panel to the right in both rows of Figure 4c that were actually the data of CD8+NKT cells from EBV-exposed CD8+ NKT cell-transferred, or EBV-exposed CD4 + and CD8 + NKT-transferred hu-thym-SCID chimeras.The corrected figure included here contains the histograms that correctly represent the data of T ceils from EBV-exposed CD4+ and CD8+NKT-transferred hu-thym-SCID chimeras.Since the fourth panels to the right in both rows of Figure 4c show the cellular proliferation using the CFSE labeling technique, the histogram substitutions do not alter the conclusions that were drawn from the original data.The authors would like to apologize for their mistake.

  18. SAP expression in invariant NKT cells is required for cognate help to support B-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Castro, Wilson; Agyemang, Amma F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Carroll, Michael C; Tsokos, George C; Wang, Ninghai; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-07-05

    One of the manifestations of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is progressive agammaglobulinemia, caused by the absence of a functional signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) in T, invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells and NK cells. Here we report that α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) activated NKT cells positively regulate antibody responses to haptenated protein antigens at multiple checkpoints, including germinal center formation and affinity maturation. Whereas NKT cell-dependent B cell responses were absent in SAP(-/-).B6 mice that completely lack NKT cells, the small number of SAP-deficient NKT cells in SAP(-/-).BALB/c mice adjuvated antibody production, but not the germinal center reaction. To test the hypothesis that SAP-deficient NKT cells can facilitate humoral immunity, SAP was deleted after development in SAP(fl/fl).tgCreERT2.B6 mice. We find that NKT cell intrinsic expression of SAP is dispensable for noncognate helper functions, but is critical for providing cognate help to antigen-specific B cells. These results demonstrate that SLAM-family receptor-regulated cell-cell interactions are not limited to T-B cell conjugates. We conclude that in the absence of SAP, several routes of NKT cell-mediated antibody production are still accessible. The latter suggests that residual NKT cells in XLP patients might contribute to variations in dysgammaglobulinemia.

  19. Natural killer T (NKT cells accelerate Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2 pathology in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko eObata

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC is a leading cause of childhood renal disease He-molytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS. The involvement of renal cytokines and chemokines is sus-pected to play a critical role in disease progression. In current article, we tested the hypothesis that NKT cells are involved in Stx2-induced pathology in vivo. To address this hypothesis we compared Stx2 toxicity in WT and CD1 knockout (KO mice. In CD1KO mice, which lack nat-ural killer T (NKT cells, Stx2-induced pathologies such as weight loss, renal failure, and death were delayed. In WT mice, Stx2-specific selective increase in urinary albumin occurs in later time points, and this was also delayed in NKT cell deficient mice. NKT cell-associated cytokines such as IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-17 were detected in kidney lysates of Stx2-injected WT mice with the peak around 36 h after Stx2 injection. In CD1KO, there was a delay in the kinetics, and increases in these cytokines were observed 60 h post Stx2 injection. These data suggest that NKT cells accelerate Stx2-induced pathology in mouse kidneys. To determine the mechanism by which NKT cells promote Stx2-associated disease, in vitro studies were performed using murine renal cells. We found that murine glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes express functional CD1d molecules and can present exogenous antigen to NKT cells. Moreover, we observed the direct interaction between Stx2 and the receptor Gb3 on the surface of mouse renal cells by 3D STORM-TIRF which provides single molecule imaging. Collectively, these data suggest that Stx2 binds to Gb3 on renal cells and leads to aberrant CD1d-mediated NKT cell activation. Therefore, strategies targeting NKT cells could have a significant impact on Stx2-associated renal pathology in STEC disease.

  20. The transcription factor Th-POK negatively regulates Th17 differentiation in Vα14i NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Isaac; Zhao, Meng; Kappes, Dietmar; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2012-11-29

    The majority of mouse Vα14 invariant natural killer T (Vα14i NKT) cells produce several cytokines, including IFNγ and IL-4, very rapidly after activation. A subset of these cells, known as NKT17 cells, however, differentiates in the thymus to preferentially produce IL-17. Here, we show that the transcription factor-known as T helper, Poxviruses, and Zinc-finger and Krüppel family, (Th-POK)-represses the formation of NKT17 cells. Vα14i NKT cells from Th-POK-mutant helper deficient (hd/hd) mice have increased transcripts of genes normally expressed by Th17 and NKT17 cells, and even heterozygosity for this mutation leads to dramatically increased numbers of Vα14i NKT cells that are poised to express IL-17, especially in the thymus and lymph nodes. In addition, using gene reporter mice, we demonstrate that NKT17 cells from wild-type mice express lower amounts of Th-POK than the majority population of Vα14i NKT cells. We also show that retroviral transduction of Th-POK represses the expression of the Th17 master regulator RORγT in Vα14i NKT-cell lines. Our data suggest that NKT17-cell differentiation is intrinsically regulated by Th-POK activity, with only low levels of Th-POK permissive for the differentiation of NKT17 cells.

  1. Potential role of NKT regulatory cell ligands for the treatment of immune mediated colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer T lymphocytes (NKT) have been implicated in the regulation of autoimmune processes in both mice and humans. In response to stimuli, this subset of cells rapidly produces large amounts of cytokines thereby provoking immune responses, including protection against autoimmune diseases. NKT cells are present in all lymphoid compartments, but are most abundant in the liver and bone marrow. They are activated by interaction of their T-cell receptor with glycolipids presented by CD1d, a nonpolymorphic, major histocompatibility complex class Mike molecule expressed by antigen presenting cells. Several possible ligands for NKT cells have recently been suggested, p-glucosylceramide, a naturally occurring glycolipid, is a metabolic intermediate in the anabolic and catabolic pathways of complex glycosphingolipids. Like other p-glycolipids, p-glucosylceramide has an immunomodulatory effect in several immune mediated disorders, including immune mediated colitis. Due to the broad impact that NKT cells have on the immune system, there is intense interest in understanding how NKT cells are stimulated and the extent to which NKT cell responses can be controlled. These novel ligands are currently being evaluated in animal models of colitis. Here, we discuss strategies to alter NKT lymphocyte function in various settings and the potential clinical applications of natural glycolipids.

  2. iNKT Cells and Their potential Lipid Ligands during Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anunya eOpasawatchai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a unique population of lipid reactive CD1d restricted innate-like T lymphocytes. Despite being a minor population, they serve as an early source of cytokines and promote immunological crosstalk thus bridging innate and adaptive immunity. Diseases ranging from allergy, autoimmunity, and cancer as well as infectious diseases, including viral infection, have been reported to be influenced by iNKT cells. However, it remains unclear how iNKT cells are activated during viral infection, as virus derived lipid antigens have not been reported. Cytokines may activate iNKT cells during infections from influenza and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV, although CD1d dependent activation is evident in other viral infections. Several viruses, such as dengue virus (DENV, induce CD1d upregulation which correlates with iNKT cell activation. In contrast, Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and Human papiloma virus (HPV promote CD1d downregulation as a strategy to evade iNKT cell recognition. These observations suggest the participation of a CD1d-dependent process in the activation of iNKT cells in response to viral infection. Endogenous lipid ligands, including phospholipids as well as glycosphingolipids, such as glucosylceramide have been proposed to mediate iNKT cell activation. Pro-inflammatory signals produced during viral infection may stimulate iNKT cells through enhanced CD1d dependent endogenous lipid presentation. Furthermore, viral infection may alter lipid composition and inhibit endogenous lipid degradation. Recent advances in this field are reviewed.

  3. NKT cells prevent chronic joint inflammation after infection with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupin, Emmanuel; Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Kinjo, Yuki; Patsey, Rebeca; Lena, Christopher J; Haller, Matthew C; Caimano, Melissa J; Imamura, Masakazu; Wong, Chi-Huey; Crotty, Shane; Radolf, Justin D; Sellati, Timothy J; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-12-16

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, a multisystem inflammatory disorder that principally targets the skin, joints, heart, and nervous system. The role of T lymphocytes in the development of chronic inflammation resulting from B. burgdorferi infection has been controversial. We previously showed that natural killer T (NKT) cells with an invariant (i) TCR alpha chain (iNKT cells) recognize glycolipids from B. burgdorferi, but did not establish an in vivo role for iNKT cells in Lyme disease pathogenesis. Here, we evaluate the importance of iNKT cells for host defense against these pathogenic spirochetes by using Valpha14i NKT cell-deficient (Jalpha18(-/-)) BALB/c mice. On tick inoculation with B. burgdorferi, Jalpha18(-/-) mice exhibited more severe and prolonged arthritis as well as a reduced ability to clear spirochetes from infected tissues. Valpha14i NKT cell deficiency also resulted in increased production of antibodies directed against both B. burgdorferi protein antigens and borrelial diacylglycerols; the latter finding demonstrates that anti-glycolipid antibody production does not require cognate help from Valpha14i NKT cells. Valpha14i NKT cells in infected wild-type mice expressed surface activation markers and produced IFNgamma in vivo after infection, suggesting a participatory role for this unique population in cellular immunity. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the antigen-specific activation of Valpha14i NKT cells is important for the prevention of persistent joint inflammation and spirochete clearance, and they counter the long-standing notion that humoral rather than cellular immunity is sufficient to facilitate Lyme disease resolution.

  4. Role of SLAM in NKT cell development revealed by transgenic complementation in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Margaret A; Fletcher, Julie M; Jose, Roby; Chowdhury, Shahead; Gerlach, Nicole; Allison, Janette; Baxter, Alan G

    2011-04-01

    Allelic variation of SLAM expression on CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes has been proposed to play a major role in NKT cell development. In this article, this hypothesis is tested by the production of subcongenic mouse strains and Slamf1 transgenic lines. The long isoform of the C57BL/6 allele of Slamf1 was transgenically expressed on CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes under control of an hCD2 minigene. NOD.Nkrp1b.Tg(Slamf1)1 mice, which had a 2-fold increase in SLAM protein expression on CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes, had a 2-fold increase in numbers of thymic NKT cells. The additional thymic NKT cells in NOD.Nkrp1b.Tg(Slamf1)1 mice were relatively immature, with a similar subset distribution to those of congenic NOD.Nkrp1b.Nkt1 and NOD.Nkrp1b.Slamf1 mice, which also express increased levels of SLAM on CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes and produce larger numbers of NKT cells. Transgenic enhancement of SLAM expression also increased IL-4 and IL-17 production in response to TCR-mediated stimulation. Paradoxically, NOD.Nkrp1b.Tg(Slamf1)2 mice, which had a 7-fold increase in SLAM expression, showed no significant increase in NKT cells numbers; on the contrary, at high transgene copy number, SLAM expression levels correlated inversely with NKT cell numbers, consistent with a contribution to negative selection. These data confirm a role for SLAM in controlling NKT cell development and are consistent with a role in both positive and negative thymic selection of NKT cells.

  5. Thymic and peripheral microenvironments differentially mediate development and maturation of iNKT cells by IL-15 transpresentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eliseo F; Acero, Luis F; Stonier, Spencer W; Zhou, Dapeng; Schluns, Kimberly S

    2010-10-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are an innate type of T cells, which respond rapidly on activation. iNKT cells acquire these innate-like abilities during development; however, the signals driving development and functional maturation remain only partially understood. Because interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for iNKT development and is delivered by transpresentation, we set out to identify the cell types providing IL-15 to developing iNKT cells and determine their role at the various states of development and maturation. We report here that transpresentation of IL-15 by parenchymal cells was crucial for generating normal number of iNKTs in the thymus, whereas both hematopoietic and parenchymal cells regulated iNKT cell numbers in the periphery, particularly in the liver. Specifically, dendritic cells contributed to peripheral iNKT cell numbers by up-regulating Bcl-2 expression and promoting extrathymic iNKT cell ex-pansion and their homeostatic proliferation. Whether IL-15 affects functional maturation of iNKT cells was also examined. In IL-15Rα(-/-) mice, CD44(High)NK1.1(+) iNKT cells displayed decreased T-bet expression and in response to α-galactosylceramide, had deficient interferon-γ expression. Such defects could be reversed by exogenous IL-15 signals. Overall, these studies identify stage-specific functions of IL-15, which are determined by the tissue microenvironment and elucidate the importance of IL-15 in functional maturation.

  6. On/off TLR segnaling decides immunogenic or tolerogenic dendritic cell maturation upon NKT cell contact

    OpenAIRE

    Caielli,

    2009-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer (iNK)T cells play opposite immune functions. They participate in the innate immune response to promote anti-microbial and anti-tumor immunity and they are crucial to maintain T cell tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases. While it is well known that the adjuvant function of iNKT cells is mediated through maturation of dendritic cells (DC), the mechanism underlying the tolerogenic function of iNKT cells remains unclear. We performed co-culture experiments with immat...

  7. Reduced iNKT cells numbers in type 1 diabetes patients and their first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain-Covarrubias, Nonantzin; Canche-Pool, Elsy; Gomez-Diaz, Rita; Sanchez-Torres, Luvia E; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by the specific destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been associated with development of T1D. Class I MHC-restricted T cell-associated molecule (CRTAM) is expressed on activated iNKT, CD8(+), and CD4(+) T cells, and it is associated with the pro-inflammatory profiles of these cells. Crtam gene expression in CD3(+) lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice is associated with T1D onset. However, expression of CRTAM on T cells from patients with T1D has not yet been evaluated. We compared iNKT cell (CD3(+)Vα24(+)Vβ11(+)) numbers and CRTAM expression in a Mexican population with recent-onset T1D and their first-degree relatives with control families. Remarkably, we found lower iNKT cell numbers in T1D families, and we identified two iNKT cell populations in some of the families. One iNKT cell population expressed high iTCR levels (iNKT(hi)), whereas another expressed low levels (iNKT(lo)) and also expressed CRTAM. These findings support a probable genetic determinant of iNKT cell numbers and a possible role for these cells in T1D development. This study also suggests that CRTAM identifies recently activated iNKT lymphocytes.

  8. CD1d expression and invariant NKT cell responses in herpesvirus infections

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    Rusung eTan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a highly conserved subset of unconventional T lymphocytes that express a canonical, semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR and surface markers shared with the natural killer cell lineage. iNKT cells recognize exogenous and endogenous glycolipid antigens restricted by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules, and are highly responsive to the prototypical agonist, α-galactosylceramide. Upon activation, iNKT cells rapidly coordinate signaling between innate and adaptive immune cells through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, leading to the maturation of antigen-presenting cells and expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Because of their potent immunoregulatory properties, iNKT cells have been extensively studied and are known to play a pivotal role in mediating immune responses against microbial pathogens including viruses. Here, we review evidence that herpesviruses manipulate CD1d expression to escape iNKT cell surveillance and establish lifelong latency in humans. Collectively, published findings suggest that iNKT cells play critical roles in anti-herpesvirus immune responses and could be harnessed therapeutically to limit viral infection and viral-associated disease.

  9. Diverse endogenous antigens for mouse NKT cells: self-antigens that are not glycosphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Bo; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Butters, Terry; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-02-01

    NKT cells with an invariant Ag receptor (iNKT cells) represent a highly conserved and unique subset of T lymphocytes having properties of innate and adaptive immune cells. They have been reported to regulate a variety of immune responses, including the response to cancers and the development of autoimmunity. The development and activation of iNKT cells is dependent on self-Ags presented by the CD1d Ag-presenting molecule. It is widely believed that these self-Ags are glycosphingolipids (GSLs), molecules that contain ceramide as the lipid backbone. In this study, we used a variety of methods to show that mammalian Ags for mouse iNKT cells need not be GSLs, including the use of cell lines deficient in GSL biosynthesis and an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis. Presentation of these Ags required the expression of CD1d molecules that could traffic to late endosomes, the site where self-Ag is acquired. Extracts of APCs contain a self-Ag that could stimulate iNKT cells when added to plates coated with soluble, rCD1d molecules. The Ag(s) in these extracts are resistant to sphingolipid-specific hydrolase digestion, consistent with the results using live APCs. Lyosphosphatidylcholine, a potential self-Ag that activated human iNKT cell lines, did not activate mouse iNKT cell hybridomas. Our data indicate that there may be more than one type of self-Ag for iNKT cells, that the self-Ags comparing mouse and human may not be conserved, and that the search to identify these molecules should not be confined to GSLs.

  10. TLR4 and NKT cell synergy in immunotherapy against visceral leishmaniasis.

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    Subir Karmakar

    Full Text Available NKT cells play an important role in autoimmune diseases, tumor surveillance, and infectious diseases, providing in most cases protection against infection. NKT cells are reactive to CD1d presented glycolipid antigens. They can modulate immune responses by promoting the secretion of type 1, type 2, or immune regulatory cytokines. Pathogen-derived signals to dendritic cells mediated via Toll like Receptors (TLR can be modulated by activated invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT cells. The terminal β-(1-4-galactose residues of glycans can modulate host responsiveness in a T helper type-1 direction via IFN-γ and TLRs. We have attempted to develop a defined immunotherapeutic, based on the cooperative action of a TLR ligand and iNKT cell using a mouse model of visceral leishmaniasis. We evaluated the anti-Leishmania immune responses and the protective efficacy of the β-(1-4-galactose terminal NKT cell ligand glycosphingophospholipid (GSPL antigen of L. donovani parasites. Our results suggest that TLR4 can function as an upstream sensor for GSPL and provoke intracellular inflammatory signaling necessary for parasite killing. Treatment with GSPL was able to induce a strong effective T cell response that contributed to effective control of acute parasite burden and led to undetectable parasite persistence in the infected animals. These studies for the first time demonstrate the interactions between a TLR ligand and iNKT cell activation in visceral leishmaniasis immunotherapeutic.

  11. iNKT Cell Emigration out of the Lung Vasculature Requires Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanabalasuriar, A; Neupane, A.S; Wang, J; Krummel, M.F; Kubes, P

    2017-01-01

    iNKT cells are a subset of innate T cells that recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d molecules and protect against a variety of bacterial infections including S. pneumoniae. Using lung intravital imaging, we examined the behavior and mechanism of pulmonary iNKT cell activation in response to the potent iNKT cell ligand α-galactosylceramide or during S. pneumoniae infection. In untreated mice the major fraction of iNKT cells resided in the vasculature, but a small critical population resided in the extravascular space in proximity to monocyte-derived DCs. Administration of either α-GalCer or S. pneumoniae, induced CD1d dependent rapid recruitment of neutrophils out of the vasculature. This neutrophil exodus paved the way for extravasation of iNKT cells from the lung vasculature via CCL17. Depletion of monocyte-derived DCs abrogated both the neutrophil and subsequent iNKT cell extravasation. Moreover, impairing iNKT cell migration out of the lung vasculature by blocking CCL17 greatly increased susceptibility to S. pneumoniae infection, suggesting a critical role for the secondary wave of iNKT cells in host defense. PMID:27653688

  12. The differentiation of ROR-γt expressing iNKT17 cells is orchestrated by Runx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Puspa; Manso, Bryce; Chung, Ji Young; Romera Arocha, Sinibaldo; Xue, Hai-Hui; Angelo, Derek B Sant'; Shapiro, Virginia Smith

    2017-08-01

    iNKT cells are a unique lineage of T cells that recognize glycolipid presented by CD1d. In the thymus, they differentiate into iNKT1, iNKT2 and iNKT17 effector subsets, characterized by preferential expression of Tbet, Gata3 and ROR-γt and production of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-17, respectively. We demonstrate that the transcriptional regulator Runx1 is essential for the generation of ROR-γt expressing iNKT17 cells. PLZF-cre Runx1 cKO mice lack iNKT17 cells in the thymus, spleen and liver. Runx1-deficient iNKT cells have altered expression of several genes important for iNKT17 differentiation, including decreased expression of IL-7Rα, BATF and c-Maf and increased expression of Bcl11b and Lef1. However, reduction of Lef1 expression or introduction of an IL-7Rα transgene is not sufficient to correct the defect in iNKT17 differentiation, demonstrating that Runx1 is a key regulator of several genes required for iNKT17 differentiation. Loss of Runx1 leads to a severe decrease in iNKT cell numbers in the thymus, spleen and liver. The decrease in cell number is due to a combined decrease in proliferation at Stage 1 during thymic development and increased apoptosis. Thus, we describe a novel role of Runx1 in iNKT cell development and differentiation, particularly in orchestrating iNKT17 differentiation.

  13. Adipose tissue invariant NKT cells protect against diet-induced obesity and metabolic disorder through regulatory cytokine production.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Lydia

    2012-09-21

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are evolutionarily conserved innate T cells that influence inflammatory responses. We have shown that iNKT cells, previously thought to be rare in humans, were highly enriched in human and murine adipose tissue, and that as adipose tissue expanded in obesity, iNKT cells were depleted, correlating with proinflammatory macrophage infiltration. iNKT cell numbers were restored in mice and humans after weight loss. Mice lacking iNKT cells had enhanced weight gain, larger adipocytes, fatty livers, and insulin resistance on a high-fat diet. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells into obese mice or in vivo activation of iNKT cells via their lipid ligand, alpha-galactocylceramide, decreased body fat, triglyceride levels, leptin, and fatty liver and improved insulin sensitivity through anti-inflammatory cytokine production by adipose-derived iNKT cells. This finding highlights the potential of iNKT cell-targeted therapies, previously proven to be safe in humans, in the management of obesity and its consequences.

  14. Intravascular Immune Surveillance by CXCR6+ NKT Cells Patrolling Liver Sinusoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geissmann Frederic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the in vivo behavior of liver natural killer T cells (NKT cells by intravital fluorescence microscopic imaging of mice in which a green fluorescent protein cDNA was used to replace the gene encoding the chemokine receptor CXCR6. NKT cells, which account for most CXCR6+ cells in liver, were found to crawl within hepatic sinusoids at 10-20 µm/min and to stop upon T cell antigen receptor activation. CXCR6-deficient mice exhibited a selective and severe reduction of CD1d-reactive NKT cells in the liver and decreased susceptibility to T-cell-dependent hepatitis. CXCL16, the cell surface ligand for CXCR6, is expressed on sinusoidal endothelial cells, and CXCR6 deficiency resulted in reduced survival, but not in altered speed or pattern of patrolling of NKT cells. Thus, NKT cells patrol liver sinusoids to provide intravascular immune surveillance, and CXCR6 contributes to liver-based immune responses by regulating their abundance.

  15. Intravascular immune surveillance by CXCR6+ NKT cells patrolling liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Geissmann

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined the in vivo behavior of liver natural killer T cells (NKT cells by intravital fluorescence microscopic imaging of mice in which a green fluorescent protein cDNA was used to replace the gene encoding the chemokine receptor CXCR6. NKT cells, which account for most CXCR6(+ cells in liver, were found to crawl within hepatic sinusoids at 10-20 microm/min and to stop upon T cell antigen receptor activation. CXCR6-deficient mice exhibited a selective and severe reduction of CD1d-reactive NKT cells in the liver and decreased susceptibility to T-cell-dependent hepatitis. CXCL16, the cell surface ligand for CXCR6, is expressed on sinusoidal endothelial cells, and CXCR6 deficiency resulted in reduced survival, but not in altered speed or pattern of patrolling of NKT cells. Thus, NKT cells patrol liver sinusoids to provide intravascular immune surveillance, and CXCR6 contributes to liver-based immune responses by regulating their abundance.

  16. Innate invariant NKT cells recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages, produce interferon-gamma, and kill intracellular bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Sada-Ovalle

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb requires a coordinated response between the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, resulting in a type 1 cytokine response, which is associated with control of infection. The contribution of innate lymphocytes to immunity against Mtb remains controversial. We established an in vitro system to study this question. Interferon-gamma is produced when splenocytes from uninfected mice are cultured with Mtb-infected macrophages, and, under these conditions, bacterial replication is suppressed. This innate control of bacterial replication is dependent on CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT cells, and their activation requires CD1d expression by infected macrophages as well as IL-12 and IL-18. We show that iNKT cells, even in limiting quantities, are sufficient to restrict Mtb replication. To determine whether iNKT cells contribute to host defense against tuberculosis in vivo, we adoptively transferred iNKT cells into mice. Primary splenic iNKT cells obtained from uninfected mice significantly reduce the bacterial burden in the lungs of mice infected with virulent Mtb by the aerosol route. Thus, iNKT cells have a direct bactericidal effect, even in the absence of synthetic ligands such as alpha-galactosylceramide. Our finding that iNKT cells protect mice against aerosol Mtb infection is the first evidence that CD1d-restricted NKT cells mediate protection against Mtb in vivo.

  17. Tolerogenic interactions between CD8+ dendritic cells and NKT cells prevent rejection of bone marrow and organ grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, David; Tang, Xiaobin; Zhang, Xiangyue; Engleman, Edgar G; Strober, Samuel

    2017-01-17

    The combination of total lymphoid irradiation and anti-T cell antibodies safely induces immune tolerance to combined hematopoietic cell and organ allografts in humans. Our mouse model required host natural killer T (NKT) cells to induce tolerance. Since NKT cells normally depend on signals from CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs) for their activation, we used the mouse model to test the hypothesis that after lymphoid irradiation host CD8+DCs play a requisite role in tolerance induction through interactions with NKT cells. Selective deficiency of either CD8+DCs or NKT cells abrogated chimerism and organ graft acceptance. After radiation, the CD8+DCs increased expression of surface molecules required for NKT and apoptotic cell interactions and developed suppressive immune functions including production of indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase (IDO). Injection of naïve mice with apoptotic spleen cells generated by irradiation led to DC changes similar to those induced by lymphoid radiation, suggesting that apoptotic body ingestion by CD8+DCs initiates tolerance induction. Tolerogenic CD8+DCs induced the development of tolerogenic NKT cells with a marked Th2 bias that, in turn, regulated the differentiation of the DCs and suppressed rejection of the transplants. Thus, reciprocal interactions between CD8+DCs and iNKT cells are required for tolerance induction in this system that was translated into a successful clinical protocol.

  18. Clinical regressions and broad immune activation following combination therapy targeting human NKT cells in myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Joshua; Neparidze, Natalia; Zhang, Lin; Nair, Shiny; Monesmith, Tamara; Sundaram, Ranjini; Miesowicz, Fred; Dhodapkar, Kavita M; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2013-01-17

    Natural killer T (iNKT) cells can help mediate immune surveillance against tumors in mice. Prior studies targeting human iNKT cells were limited to therapy of advanced cancer and led to only modest activation of innate immunity. Clinical myeloma is preceded by an asymptomatic precursor phase. Lenalidomide was shown to mediate antigen-specific costimulation of human iNKT cells. We treated 6 patients with asymptomatic myeloma with 3 cycles of combination of α-galactosylceramide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells and low-dose lenalidomide. Therapy was well tolerated and led to reduction in tumor-associated monoclonal immunoglobulin in 3 of 4 patients with measurable disease. Combination therapy led to activation-induced decline in measurable iNKT cells and activation of NK cells with an increase in NKG2D and CD56 expression. Treatment also led to activation of monocytes with an increase in CD16 expression. Each cycle of therapy was associated with induction of eosinophilia as well as an increase in serum soluble IL2 receptor. Clinical responses correlated with pre-existing or treatment-induced antitumor T-cell immunity. These data demonstrate synergistic activation of several innate immune cells by this combination and the capacity to mediate tumor regression. Combination therapies targeting iNKT cells may be of benefit toward prevention of cancer in humans.

  19. NKT cells mediate the recruitment of neutrophils by stimulating epithelial chemokine secretion during colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Enyu; Liu, Ronghua; Lu, Zhou; Liu, Jiajing; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-05-27

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a kind of inflammatory bowel diseases characterized by chronic inflammation and ulcer in colon, and UC patients have increased risk of getting colorectal cancer. NKT cells are cells that express both NK cell markers and semi-invariant CD1d-restricted TCRs, can regulate immune responses via secreting a variety of cytokines upon activation. In our research, we found that the NKT cell-deficient CD1d(-/-) mice had relieved colitis in the DSS-induced colitis model. Further investigations revealed that the colon of CD1d(-/-) mice expressed less neutrophil-attracting chemokine CXCL 1, 2 and 3, and had decreased neutrophil infiltration. Infiltrated neutrophils also produced less reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TNF-α, indicating they may cause less epithelial damage. In addition, colitis-associated colorectal cancer was also relieved in CD1d(-/-) mice. During colitis, NKT cells strongly expressed TNF-α, which could stimulate CXCL 1, 2, 3 expressions by the epithelium. In conclusion, NKT cells can regulate colitis via the NKT cell-epithelium-neutrophil axis. Targeting this mechanism may help to improve the therapy of UC and prevent colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interview: glycolipid antigen presentation by CD1d and the therapeutic potential of NKT cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2007-01-01

    Natural Killer T cells (NKT) are critical determinants of the immune response to cancer, regulation of autioimmune disease, clearance of infectious agents, and the development of artheriosclerotic plaques. In this interview, Mitch Kronenberg discusses his laboratory's efforts to understand the mechanism through which NKT cells are activated by glycolipid antigens. Central to these studies is CD1d--the antigen presenting molecule that presents glycolipids to NKT cells. The advent of CD1d tetramer technology, a technique developed by the Kronenberg lab, is critical for the sorting and identification of subsets of specific glycolipid-reactive T cells. Mitch explains how glycolipid agonists are being used as therapeutic agents to activate NKT cells in cancer patients and how CD1d tetramers can be used to assess the state of the NKT cell population in vivo following glycolipid agonist therapy. Current status of ongoing clinical trials using these agonists are discussed as well as Mitch's prediction for areas in the field of immunology that will have emerging importance in the near future.

  1. Increase of NK-T cells in aged depressed patients not treated with antidepressive drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flentge, F; van den Berg, MD; Bouhuys, AL; The, HT

    2000-01-01

    Background: A change in number and/or activity of natural killer cells has repeatedly been reported in depressive illness. Much less attention has yet been given to the subgroup of natural killer cells that are positive Sor the T-cell marker CD3 (NK-T cells). These cells possibly have important immu

  2. iNKT cells from patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis display pro-inflammatory profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara De Biasi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple Sclerosis (MS, an autoimmune disease with neurodegeneration and inflammation, is characterized by several alterations of different T cell subsets. However, few data exist on the role of iNKT lymphocytes. Objective. To identify possible changes in the phenotype of iNKT cells in patients with different clinical forms of MS, and find alterations in their polyfunctionality (i.e., ability to produce simultaneously up to 4 cytokines such as IL-17, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-4.Methods. We studied a total of 165 patients, 91 with a Relapsing Remitting form RR; 31 were treated with interferon (IFN1-β, 25 with natalizumab (Nat, 29 with glatiramer acetate (Gla; 17 were newly-diagnosed RR without treatment, 19 not active RR without treatment. Forty-four patients had a Progressive MS: 20 Primary Progressive (PP, 24 Secondary Progressive (SP. A total of 55 age- and sex-matched subjects represented healthy controls (CTR. Among fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC iNKT cells were identified by flow cytometry. Moreover, the capability of iNKT cells to produce different cytokines (IL-17, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-4 after in vitro stimulation were evaluated in 18 RR (11 treated with Nat and 7 with IFN, 4 PP, 6 SP and 16 CTR.Results. No main differences were found in iNKT cell phenotype among MS patients with different MS forms, or during different treatments. However, the polyfunctional response of iNKT cells showed Th1 and Th17 profiles. This was well evident in patients with secondary progressive form, who are characterized by high levels of inflammation and neurodegeneration, and exhibited a sustained increase in the production of Th17 cytokines. Patients treated with natalizumab displayed lower levels of iNKT cells producing IL-17, TNF-α and IFN-γ.Conclusion. Our data suggest that the progressive phase of the disease is characterized by permanent iNKT activation and a skewing towards an inflammatory phenotype. Compared to other

  3. Bacterial CD1d-restricted glycolipids induce IL-10 production by human regulatory T cells upon cross-talk with invariant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venken, Koen; Decruy, Tine; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Lambrecht, Bart N; Elewaut, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important immune regulatory T cells with Ag reactivity to glycolipids and peptides, respectively. However, the functional interplay between these cells in humans is poorly understood. We show that Tregs suppress iNKT cell proliferation induced by CD1d-restricted glycolipids, including bacterial-derived diacylglycerols, as well as by innate-like activation. Inhibition was related to the potency of iNKT agonists, making diacylglycerol iNKT responses very prone to suppression. Cytokine production by iNKT cells was differentially modulated by Tregs because IL-4 production was reduced more profoundly compared with IFN-γ. A compelling observation was the significant production of IL-10 by Tregs after cell contact with iNKT cells, in particular in the presence of bacterial diacylglycerols. These iNKT-primed Tregs showed increased FOXP3 expression and superior suppressive function. Suppression of iNKT cell responses, but not conventional T cell responses, was IL-10 dependent, suggesting that there is a clear difference in mechanism between the Treg-mediated inhibition of these cell types. Our data highlight a physiologically relevant interaction between human iNKT and Tregs upon pathogen-derived glycolipid recognition that has a significant impact on the design of iNKT cell-based therapeutics.

  4. Selective conditions are required for the induction of iNKT cell hypo-responsiveness by antigenic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Gerhard; Birkholz, Alysia M.; Sag, Duygu; Farber, Elisa; Chitale, Sampada; Howell, Amy R.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells with the model antigen α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) induces rapid production of multiple cytokines, impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. In contrast, following secondary activation with αGalCer, the behavior of iNKT cells is altered for months, with the production of most cytokines being strongly reduced. The requirements for the induction of this hypo-responsive state, however, remain poorly defined. Here, we show that Th1-biasing iNKT cell antigens could induce iNKT cell hypo-responsiveness, as long as a minimum antigenic affinity was reached. In contrast, the Th2-biasing antigen OCH did not induce a hypo-responsive state, nor did cytokine-driven iNKT cell activation by LPS or infections. Furthermore, while DCs and B cells have been reported to be essential for iNKT cell stimulation, neither DCs nor B cells were required to induce iNKT cell hypo-responsiveness. Therefore, our data indicate that while some bone marrow-derived cells could induce iNKT cell hypo-responsiveness, selective conditions, dependent on the structure and potency of the antigen, were required to induce hypo-responsiveness. PMID:26355152

  5. [Identification of cell division of CD8+ NKT cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ye-Lei; Chen, Yu; Zhong, Jiang; Zhang, Shi-Lun

    2011-02-01

    To measure the in vitro cell division ability of CD8(+);NKT cells by CFSE staining and flow cytometry(FCM). Fresh spleen lymphocytes of C57BL/J mice were separated and stained with CFSE, and then stimulated by ConA and LPS for 3 d, and by SEB for 5 d and 10 d respectively. The stimulated cells were harvested and analyzed for CD69 expression on the cell surface and the ability of cell division using FCM. The SEB-activated effector cells for 10 d further stimulated with IL-2 for the consecutive 10 days, and were analyzed for their cell division ability, CD69 expression and NKT cell subsets by FCM. ConA, LPS and SEB stimulated the proliferation of spleen cells. ConA and LPS made the cells divide 3 times within 3 d, and increased CD69 expression up to 74.19% and 41.56% respectively. SEB made the cells divide 5 times within 5 d and 7 times within 10 d respectively, with increased CD69 expression of 32.09% and 48.66% respectively. Ten-day IL-2 stimulation of SEB-activated cells caused population expansion for 7 times with the CD8(+);NKT cell subsets significantly increased from 0.36% to 38.58% and CD69 expression significantly increased from 0.11% to 83.74%. The SEB-activated CD8(+);NKT cells proliferated in vitro and their cell division capability could be determined by CFSE staining and FCM.

  6. Activation of invariant NKT cells enhances the innate immune response and improves the disease course in influenza A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ling-Pei; Denney, Laura; Luhn, Kerstin; Teoh, Denise; Clelland, Colin; McMichael, Andrew J

    2008-07-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells have an indubitable role in antiviral immunity, although the mechanisms by which these cells exert their functions are not fully elucidated. With the emerging importance of high-pathogenicity influenza A virus infections in humans, we questioned whether iNKT cells contribute to immune defence against influenza A virus and whether activation of these cells influences outcome. We show that activation of iNKT cells with alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GC) during influenza virus infection transiently enhanced early innate immune response without affecting T cell immunity, and reduced early viral titres in lungs of C57BL/6 mice. This is accompanied by a better disease course with improved weight loss profile. Temporal changes in iNKT cells in the liver, blood and lungs suggest activation and migration of iNKT cells from the liver to the lungs in mice that were administered alpha-GC. Improvement in viral titres appears dependent on activation of iNKT cells via the intraperitoneal route since intranasal administration of alpha-GC did not have the same effect. We conclude that activation of iNKT cells enhances early innate immune response in the lungs and contribute to antiviral immunity and improved disease course in influenza A virus infection.

  7. Cutting edge: the mechanism of invariant NKT cell responses to viral danger signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyznik, Aaron J; Tupin, Emmanuel; Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Her, Min J; Benedict, Chris A; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-10-01

    Invariant NK T (iNKT) cells influence the response to viral infections, although the mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study we show that these innate-like lymphocytes secrete IFN-gamma upon culture with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) from mouse bone marrow. This requires TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion by the activated DCs, but it does not require CD1d expression. iNKT cells also produce IFN-gamma in response to mouse CMV infection. Their mechanism of mouse CMV detection is quite similar to that of CpG, requiring both TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion, while the need for CD1d expression is relatively minor. Consequently, iNKT cells have the ability to respond to a variety of microbes, including viruses, in an Ag-independent manner, suggesting they may play a broad role in antipathogen defenses despite their limited TCR repertoire.

  8. The mechanism of invariant NKT cell responses to viral danger signals1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyznik, Aaron J.; Tupin, Emmanuel; Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Her, Min J.; Benedict, Chris A.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    Invariant (i)NKT cells influence the response to viral infections, although the mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we show that these innate-like lymphocytes secrete IFN-γ upon culture with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) from mouse bone marrow. This requires TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion by the activated DCs, but does not require CD1d expression. iNKT cells also produce IFN-γ in response to mouse CMV (MCMV) infection. Their mechanism of MCMV detection is quite similar to that of CpG, requiring bothTLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion, while the need for CD1d expression is relatively minor. Consequently, iNKT cells have the ability to respond to a variety of microbes, including viruses, in an antigen-independent manner, suggesting they may play a broad role in anti-pathogen defenses despite their limited TCR repertoire. PMID:18802047

  9. Technical Advance: a new cell preparation strategy that greatly improves the yield of vital and functional Tregs and NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissiek, Björn; Danquah, Welbeck; Haag, Friedrich; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2014-03-01

    Release of NAD(+) during preparation of murine lymphocytes causes enzymatic ADP-ribosylation of cell-surface proteins on T cells, catalyzed by toxin-related ecto-ADP-ribosyltransferase, ARTC2. ADP-riboslyation activates the cytolytic P2X7 ion channel and affects, in particular, the vitality and function of Tregs and NKT cells. Here, we describe a simple method-injection of an ARTC2-blocking nanobody-to greatly improve Treg and NKT cell vitality and to preserve their function during in vitro assays and in adoptive-transfer experiments. Moreover, we present a method for the sorting of functional, primary NKT cells, based on coexpression of ARTC2 and NK1.1. Our results pave the way for the efficient ex vivo proliferation of Tregs and NKT cells and for new experimental and therapeutic uses of these important regulatory cells.

  10. RASAL3, a novel hematopoietic RasGAP protein, regulates the number and functions of NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Suguru; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yoshita-Takahashi, Manami; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Kanda, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Hiroki; Jiang, Shuying; Naito, Makoto; Yoshizaki, Takumi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    Ras GTPase-activating proteins negatively regulate the Ras/Erk signaling pathway, thereby playing crucial roles in the proliferation, function, and development of various types of cells. In this study, we identified a novel Ras GTPase-activating proteins protein, RASAL3, which is predominantly expressed in cells of hematopoietic lineages, including NKT, B, and T cells. We established systemic RASAL3-deficient mice, and the mice exhibited a severe decrease in NKT cells in the liver at 8 weeks of age. The treatment of RASAL3-deficient mice with α-GalCer, a specific agonist for NKT cells, induced liver damage, but the level was less severe than that in RASAL3-competent mice, and the attenuated liver damage was accompanied by a reduced production of interleukin-4 and interferon-γ from NKT cells. RASAL3-deficient NKT cells treated with α-GalCer in vitro presented augmented Erk phosphorylation, suggesting that there is dysregulated Ras signaling in the NKT cells of RASAL3-deficient mice. Taken together, these results suggest that RASAL3 plays an important role in the expansion and functions of NKT cells in the liver by negatively regulating Ras/Erk signaling, and might be a therapeutic target for NKT-associated diseases.

  11. NKT Cell-Deficient Mice Harbor an Altered Microbiota That Fuels Intestinal Inflammation during Chemically Induced Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvanantham, Thirumahal; Lin, Qiaochu; Guo, Cynthia Xinyi; Surendra, Anuradha; Fieve, Stephanie; Escalante, Nichole K; Guttman, David S; Streutker, Catherine J; Robertson, Susan J; Philpott, Dana J; Mallevaey, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    NKT cells are unconventional T cells that respond to self and microbe-derived lipid and glycolipid Ags presented by the CD1d molecule. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells influence immune responses in numerous diseases. Although only a few studies have examined their role during intestinal inflammation, it appears that iNKT cells protect from Th1-mediated inflammation but exacerbate Th2-mediated inflammation. Studies using iNKT cell-deficient mice and chemically induced dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis have led to inconsistent results. In this study, we show that CD1d-deficient mice, which lack all NKT cells, harbor an altered intestinal microbiota that is associated with exacerbated intestinal inflammation at steady-state and following DSS treatment. This altered microbiota, characterized by increased abundance of the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria, Deferribacteres, and TM7, among which the mucin-eating Mucispirillum, as well as members of the genus Prevotella and segmented filamentous bacteria, was transmissible upon fecal transplant, along with the procolitogenic phenotype. Our results also demonstrate that this proinflammatory microbiota influences iNKT cell function upon activation during DSS colitis. Collectively, alterations of the microbiota have a major influence on colitis outcome and therefore have to be accounted for in such experimental settings and in studies focusing on iNKT cells. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Colonic inflammation in mice is improved by cigarette smoke through iNKT cells recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Montbarbon

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS protects against intestinal inflammation during ulcerative colitis. Immunoregulatory mechanisms sustaining this effect remain unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of CS on experimental colitis and to characterize the intestinal inflammatory response at the cellular and molecular levels. Using the InExpose® System, a smoking device accurately reproducing human smoking habit, we pre-exposed C57BL/6 mice for 2 weeks to CS, and then we induced colitis by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS. This system allowed us to demonstrate that CS exposure improved colonic inflammation (significant decrease in clinical score, body weight loss and weight/length colonic ratio. This improvement was associated with a significant decrease in colonic proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cytokine expression, as compared to unexposed mice (TNF (p=0.0169, IFNγ (p<0.0001, and IL-17 (p=0.0008. Smoke exposure also induced an increased expression of IL-10 mRNA (p=0.0035 and a marked recruitment of iNKT (invariant Natural Killer T; CD45+ TCRβ+ CD1d tetramer+ cells in the colon of DSS-untreated mice. Demonstration of the role of iNKT cells in CS-dependent colitis improvement was performed using two different strains of NKT cells deficient mice. Indeed, in Jα18KO and CD1dKO animals, CS exposure failed to induce significant regulation of DSS-induced colitis both at the clinical and molecular levels. Thus, our study demonstrates that iNKT cells are pivotal actors in the CS-dependent protection of the colon. These results highlight the role of intestinal iNKT lymphocytes and their responsiveness to environmental stimuli. Targeting iNKT cells would represent a new therapeutic way for inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. NKT cell self-reactivity: evolutionary master key of immune homeostasis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shohreh Issazadeh-Navikas

    2012-01-01

    Complex immune responses have evolved to protect multicellular organisms against the invasion of pathogens.This has exerted strong developmental pressure for specialized functions that can also limit damage to self-tissue.Two arms of immunity,the innate and adaptive immune systems,have evolved for quick,non-specific immune responses to pathogens and more efficient,long-lasting ones upon specific recognition of recurrent pathogens.Specialized cells have arisen as the sentinels of these functions,including macrophages,natural killer (NK),and T and B-lymphocytes.Interestingly,a population of immune cells that can exert both of these complex functions,NKT cells,not only share common functions but also exhibit shared cell surface markers of cells of both arms of the Immune system.These features,in combination with sophisticated maintenance of immune homeostasis,will be discussed.The recent finding of self-peptide reactivity of NKT cells in the context of CD1d,with capacity to regulate multiple autoimmune and inflammatory conditions,motivates the current proposal that self-reactive NKT cells might be the ancestral link between present NK and T cells.Their parallel selection through evolution by higher vertebrates could be related to their central function as master regulators of immune homeostasis that in part is shared with regulatory T cells,Hypothetical views on how self-reactive NKT cells secure such a central role will also be proposed.

  14. NKT cell activation by local α-galactosylceramide administration decreases susceptibility to HSV-2 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie Beck; Jensen, Simon Kok; Hansen, Anne Louise;

    2015-01-01

    NKT cells are a subgroup of T cells, which express a restricted TCR repertoire and are critical for the innate immune responses to viral infections. Activation of NKT cells depends on the major histocompatibility complex-related molecule CD1d, which presents bioactive lipids to NKT cells....... The marine sponge derived lipid αGalCer has recently been demonstrated as a specific agonist for activation of human and murine NKT cells. In the present study we investigated the applicability of αGalCer pre-treatment for immune protection against intra-vaginal HSV-2 infection. We found that C57BL/6 WT mice...... that received local pre-treatment with αGalCer prior to intra-vaginal HSV-2 infection had a lower mean disease score, mortality and viral load in the vagina following infection, compared to mice that did not receive αGalCer pre-treatment. Further, we found increased numbers of CD45 and NK1.1 positive cells...

  15. Hiding Lipid Presentation: Viral Interference with CD1d-Restricted Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike E. Ressing

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The immune system plays a major role in protecting the host against viral infection. Rapid initial protection is conveyed by innate immune cells, while adaptive immunity (including T lymphocytes requires several days to develop, yet provides high specificity and long-lasting memory. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are an unusual subset of T lymphocytes, expressing a semi-invariant T cell receptor together with markers of the innate NK cell lineage. Activated iNKT cells can exert direct cytolysis and can rapidly release a variety of immune-polarizing cytokines, thereby regulating the ensuing adaptive immune response. iNKT cells recognize lipids in the context of the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Intriguingly, CD1d-restricted iNKT cells appear to play a critical role in anti-viral defense: increased susceptibility to disseminated viral infections is observed both in patients with iNKT cell deficiency as well as in CD1d- and iNKT cell-deficient mice. Moreover, viruses have recently been found to use sophisticated strategies to withstand iNKT cell-mediated elimination. This review focuses on CD1d-restricted lipid presentation and the strategies viruses deploy to subvert this pathway.

  16. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin disrupts TCR signaling in CD1d-restricted NKT cells leading to functional anergy.

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    Sunil K Joshi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous CD1d-binding glycolipid (alpha-Galactosylceramide, alpha-GC stimulates TCR signaling and activation of type-1 natural killer-like T (NKT cells. Activated NKT cells play a central role in the regulation of adaptive and protective immune responses against pathogens and tumors. In the present study, we tested the effect of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT on NKT cells both in vivo and in vitro. LT is a binary toxin known to suppress host immune responses during anthrax disease and intoxicates cells by protective antigen (PA-mediated intracellular delivery of lethal factor (LF, a potent metalloprotease. We observed that NKT cells expressed anthrax toxin receptors (CMG-2 and TEM-8 and bound more PA than other immune cell types. A sub-lethal dose of LT administered in vivo in C57BL/6 mice decreased expression of the activation receptor NKG2D by NKT cells but not by NK cells. The in vivo administration of LT led to decreased TCR-induced cytokine secretion but did not affect TCR expression. Further analysis revealed LT-dependent inhibition of TCR-stimulated MAP kinase signaling in NKT cells attributable to LT cleavage of the MAP kinase kinase MEK-2. We propose that Bacillus anthracis-derived LT causes a novel form of functional anergy in NKT cells and therefore has potential for contributing to immune evasion by the pathogen.

  17. Invariant NKT cells promote skin wound healing by preventing a prolonged neutrophilic inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Kanno, Emi; Suzuki, Aiko; Takagi, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Hideki; Ishii, Keiko; Imai, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2017-09-23

    The wound-healing process consists of the inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling phases. In chronic wounds, the inflammation phase is prolonged with persistent neutrophil infiltration. The inflammatory response is critically regulated by cytokines and chemokines that are secreted from various immune cells. Recently, we showed that skin wound healing was delayed and the healing process was impaired under conditions lacking invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, an innate immune lymphocyte with potent immuno-regulatory activity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of iNKT cell deficiency on the neutrophilic inflammatory response during the wound healing process. Neutrophil infiltration was prolonged in wound tissue in mice genetically lacking iNKT cells (Jα18KO mice) compared with wild-type (WT) control mice on days 1 and 3 after wounding. MIP-2, KC, and IL-17A were produced at a significantly higher level in Jα18KO mice than in WT mice. In addition, neutrophil apoptosis was significantly reduced in the wound tissue in Jα18KO mice compared with WT mice. Treatment with either anti-IL-17A mAb, anti-Gr-1 mAb, or neutrophil elastase inhibitor reversed the impaired wound healing in Jα18KO mice. These results suggest that iNKT cells may promote the wound healing process through preventing the prolonged inflammatory response mediated by neutrophils. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  18. Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT Cells Prevent Autoimmunity, but Induce Pulmonary Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis

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    Nanna Siegmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammation is a major and critical component of the lung pathology in the hereditary disease cystic fibrosis. The molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammation in cystic fibrosis require definition. Methods: We used several genetic mouse models to test a role of iNKT cells and ceramide in pulmonary inflammation of cystic fibrosis mice. Inflammation was determined by the pulmonary cytokine profil and the abundance of inflammatory cells in the lung. Results: Here we provide a new concept how inflammation in the lung of individuals with cystic fibrosis is initiated. We show that in cystic fibrosis mice the mutation in the Cftr gene provokes a significant up-regulation of iNKT cells in the lung. Accumulation of iNKT cells serves to control autoimmune disease, which is triggered by a ceramide-mediated induction of cell death in CF organs. Autoimmunity becomes in particular overt in cystic fibrosis mice lacking iNKT cells and although suppression of the autoimmune response by iNKT cells is beneficial, IL-17+ iNKT cells attract macrophages and neutrophils to CF lungs resulting in chronic inflammation. Genetic deletion of iNKT cells in cystic fibrosis mice prevents inflammation in CF lungs. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate an important function of iNKT cells in the chronic inflammation affecting cystic fibrosis lungs. iNKT cells suppress the auto-immune response induced by ceramide-mediated death of epithelial cells in CF lungs, but also induce a chronic pulmonary inflammation.

  19. A Novel Glycolipid Antigen for NKT Cells That Preferentially Induces IFN-γ Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Girardi, Enrico; Wingender, Gerhard; Khurana, Archana; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Meng; Zahner, Sonja; Illarionov, Petr A; Wen, Xiangshu; Li, Michelle; Yuan, Weiming; Porcelli, Steven A; Besra, Gurdyal S; Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we characterize a novel Ag for invariant NKT (iNKT) cells capable of producing an especially robust Th1 response. This glycosphingolipid, DB06-1, is similar in chemical structure to the well-studied α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), with the only change being a single atom: the substitution of a carbonyl oxygen with a sulfur atom. Although DB06-1 is not a more effective Ag in vitro, the small chemical change has a marked impact on the ability of this lipid Ag to stimulate iNKT cells in vivo, with increased IFN-γ production at 24 h compared with αGalCer, increased IL-12, and increased activation of NK cells to produce IFN-γ. These changes are correlated with an enhanced ability of DB06-1 to load in the CD1d molecules expressed by dendritic cells in vivo. Moreover, structural studies suggest a tighter fit into the CD1d binding groove by DB06-1 compared with αGalCer. Surprisingly, when iNKT cells previously exposed to DB06-1 are restimulated weeks later, they have greatly increased IL-10 production. Therefore, our data are consistent with a model whereby augmented and or prolonged presentation of a glycolipid Ag leads to increased activation of NK cells and a Th1-skewed immune response, which may result, in part, from enhanced loading into CD1d. Furthermore, our data suggest that strong antigenic stimulation in vivo may lead to the expansion of IL-10-producing iNKT cells, which could counteract the benefits of increased early IFN-γ production.

  20. Diabetes Mellitus Directs NKT Cells Toward Type 2 and Regulatory Phenotype / Diabetes Melitus Usmerava Diferencijaciju NKT Celija U Pravcu Tip 2 I Regulatornog Fenotipa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajovic Nevena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is chronic disorder characterized by hyperglycaemia. Hyperglycaemia induces mitochondrial dysfunction, enhances oxidative stress and thus promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Earlier studies suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS are involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Previous studies have revealed that hyperglycaemia changes the functional phenotype of monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells and CD8+ T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether diabetes affects the functional phenotype of NKT cells.

  1. The Lysine Acetyltransferase GCN5 Is Required for iNKT Cell Development through EGR2 Acetylation

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    Yajun Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells, a population that is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity, is regulated by multiple transcription factors, but the molecular mechanisms underlying how the transcriptional activation of these factors are regulated during iNKT development remain largely unknown. We found that the histone acetyltransferase general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5 is essential for iNKT cell development during the maturation stage. GCN5 deficiency blocked iNKT cell development in a cell-intrinsic manner. At the molecular level, GCN5 is a specific lysine acetyltransferase of early growth responsive gene 2 (EGR2, a transcription factor required for iNKT cell development. GCN5-mediated acetylation positively regulated EGR2 transcriptional activity, and both genetic and pharmacological GCN5 suppression specifically inhibited the transcription of EGR2 target genes in iNKT cells, including Runx1, promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF, interleukin (IL-2Rb, and T-bet. Therefore, our study revealed GCN5-mediated EGR2 acetylation as a molecular mechanism that regulates iNKT development.

  2. Lack of PD-L1 expression by iNKT cells improves the course of influenza A infection.

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    Hadi Maazi

    Full Text Available There is evidence indicating that invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT cells play an important role in defense against influenza A virus (IAV. However, the effect of inhibitory receptor, programmed death-1 (PD-1, and its ligands, programmed death ligand (PD-L 1 and 2 on iNKT cells in protection against IAV remains to be elucidated. Here we investigated the effects of these co-stimulatory molecules on iNKT cells in the response to influenza. We discovered that compare to the wild type, PD-L1 deficient mice show reduced sensitivity to IAV infection as evident by reduced weight loss, decreased pulmonary inflammation and cellular infiltration. In contrast, PD-L2 deficient mice showed augmented weight loss, pulmonary inflammation and cellular infiltration compare to the wild type mice after influenza infection. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells from wild type, PD-L1 or PD-L2 deficient mice into iNKT cell deficient mice recapitulated these findings. Interestingly, in our transfer system PD-L1(-/--derived iNKT cells produced high levels of interferon-gamma whereas PD-L2(-/--derived iNKT cells produced high amounts of interleukin-4 and 13 suggesting a role for these cytokines in sensitivity to influenza. We identified that PD-L1 negatively regulates the frequency of iNKT cell subsets in the lungs of IAV infected mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that lack of PD-L1 expression by iNKT cells reduces the sensitivity to IAV and that the presence of PD-L2 is important for dampening the deleterious inflammatory responses after IAV infection. Our findings potentially have clinical implications for developing new therapies for influenza.

  3. Leishmania infantum Exoproducts Inhibit Human Invariant NKT Cell Expansion and Activation

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    Renata Belo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum is one of the major parasite species associated with visceral leishmaniasis, a severe form of the disease that can become lethal if untreated. This obligate intracellular parasite has developed diverse strategies to escape the host immune response, such as exoproducts (Exo carrying a wide range of molecules, including parasite virulence factors, which are potentially implicated in early stages of infection. Herein, we report that L. infantum Exo and its two fractions composed of extracellular vesicles (EVs and vesicle-depleted-exoproducts (VDEs inhibit human peripheral blood invariant natural killer T (iNKT cell expansion in response to their specific ligand, the glycolipid α-GalactosylCeramide (α-GalCer, as well as their capacity to promptly produce IL-4 and IFNγ. Using plate-bound CD1d and α-GalCer, we found that Exo, EV, and VDE fractions reduced iNKT cell activation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that they prevented α-GalCer presentation by CD1d molecules. This direct effect on CD1d was confirmed by the observation that CD1d:α-GalCer complex formation was impaired in the presence of Exo, EV, and VDE fractions. Furthermore, lipid extracts from the three compounds mimicked the inhibition of iNKT cell activation. These lipid components of L. infantum exoproducts, including EV and VDE fractions, might compete for CD1-binding sites, thus blocking iNKT cell activation. Overall, our results provide evidence for a novel strategy through which L. infantum can evade immune responses of mammalian host cells by preventing iNKT lymphocytes from recognizing glycolipids in a TCR-dependent manner.

  4. Leishmania infantum Exoproducts Inhibit Human Invariant NKT Cell Expansion and Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Renata; Santarém, Nuno; Pereira, Cátia; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Macedo, Fátima; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2017-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is one of the major parasite species associated with visceral leishmaniasis, a severe form of the disease that can become lethal if untreated. This obligate intracellular parasite has developed diverse strategies to escape the host immune response, such as exoproducts (Exo) carrying a wide range of molecules, including parasite virulence factors, which are potentially implicated in early stages of infection. Herein, we report that L. infantum Exo and its two fractions composed of extracellular vesicles (EVs) and vesicle-depleted-exoproducts (VDEs) inhibit human peripheral blood invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell expansion in response to their specific ligand, the glycolipid α-GalactosylCeramide (α-GalCer), as well as their capacity to promptly produce IL-4 and IFNγ. Using plate-bound CD1d and α-GalCer, we found that Exo, EV, and VDE fractions reduced iNKT cell activation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that they prevented α-GalCer presentation by CD1d molecules. This direct effect on CD1d was confirmed by the observation that CD1d:α-GalCer complex formation was impaired in the presence of Exo, EV, and VDE fractions. Furthermore, lipid extracts from the three compounds mimicked the inhibition of iNKT cell activation. These lipid components of L. infantum exoproducts, including EV and VDE fractions, might compete for CD1-binding sites, thus blocking iNKT cell activation. Overall, our results provide evidence for a novel strategy through which L. infantum can evade immune responses of mammalian host cells by preventing iNKT lymphocytes from recognizing glycolipids in a TCR-dependent manner.

  5. Secretion of IFN-γ but Not IL-17 by CD1d-Restricted NKT Cells Enhances Rejection of Skin Grafts Expressing Epithelial Cell-Derived Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Mattarollo, Stephen R; Yong, Michelle; Tan, Lieven; Frazer, Ian H; Leggatt, Graham R

    2010-01-01

    NKT cells are key regulators of autoimmunity, tumor immune surveillance, and the immune response to pathogens. The role of NKT cells in regulating adaptive immunity to cutaneous Ags is largely unknown. This study explores the role of CD1d-restricted NKT cells in cross-priming of CD8 effector T cells to OVA expressed in epithelial keratinocytes (K5mOVA transgenic mouse). In a skin grafting model, we show that NKT cells enhance the rejection of K5mOVA skin grafts by promoting generation of OVA-...

  6. Primary NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type of the stomach with skin involvement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kobold

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Since nasal NK/T cell lymphoma and NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type are rare diseases, gastric involvement has seldom been seen. We report a unique case of a patient with a primary NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type of the stomach with skin involvement. The patient had no history of malignant diseases and was diagnosed with hematemesis and intense bleeding from his gastric primary site. Shortly after this event, exanthemic skin lesions appeared with concordant histology to the primary site. Despite chemotherapy, the patient died one month after the first symptomatic appearance of disease.

  7. Cross-talk between cd1d-restricted nkt cells and γδ cells in t regulatory cell response

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    Huber Sally A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CD1d is a non-classical major histocompatibility class 1-like molecule which primarily presents either microbial or endogenous glycolipid antigens to T cells involved in innate immunity. Natural killer T (NKT cells and a subpopulation of γδ T cells expressing the Vγ4 T cell receptor (TCR recognize CD1d. NKT and Vγ4 T cells function in the innate immune response via rapid activation subsequent to infection and secrete large quantities of cytokines that both help control infection and modulate the developing adaptive immune response. T regulatory cells represent one cell population impacted by both NKT and Vγ4 T cells. This review discusses the evidence that NKT cells promote T regulatory cell activation both through direct interaction of NKT cell and dendritic cells and through NKT cell secretion of large amounts of TGFβ, IL-10 and IL-2. Recent studies have shown that CD1d-restricted Vγ4 T cells, in contrast to NKT cells, selectively kill T regulatory cells through a caspase-dependent mechanism. Vγ4 T cell elimination of the T regulatory cell population allows activation of autoimmune CD8+ effector cells leading to severe cardiac injury in a coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 myocarditis model in mice. CD1d-restricted immunity can therefore lead to either immunosuppression or autoimmunity depending upon the type of innate effector dominating during the infection.

  8. Slam haplotypes modulate the response to lipopolysaccharide in vivo through control of NKT cell number and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktan, Idil; Chant, Alan; Borg, Zachary D; Damby, David E; Leenstra, Paige C; Lilley, Graham W J; Lilley, Graham W G; Petty, Joseph; Suratt, Benjamin T; Teuscher, Cory; Wakeland, Edward K; Poynter, Matthew E; Boyson, Jonathan E

    2010-07-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells make up an innate-like T cell subset that plays a role in amplifying the response of innate immune leukocytes to TLR ligands. The Slam locus contains genes that have been implicated in innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that divergent Slam locus haplotypes modulate the response of macrophages to the TLR4 ligand LPS through their control of NKT cell number and function. In response to LPS challenge in vivo, macrophage TNF production in Slam haplotype-2(+) 129S1/SvImJ and 129X1/SvJ mice was significantly impaired in comparison with macrophage TNF production in Slam haplotype-1(+) C57BL/6J mice. Although no cell-intrinsic differences in macrophage responses to LPS were observed between strains, 129 mice were found to be deficient in liver NKT cell number, in NKT cell cytokine production in response to the CD1d ligand alpha-galactosylceramide, and in NKT cell IFN-gamma production after LPS challenge in vivo. Using B6.129c1 congenic mice and adoptive transfer, we found that divergent Slam haplotypes controlled the response to LPS in vivo, as well as the diminished NKT cell number and function, and that these phenotypes were associated with differential expression of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family receptors on NKT cells. These data suggest that the polymorphisms that distinguish two Slam haplotypes significantly modulate the innate immune response in vivo through their effect on NKT cells.

  9. A case of primary pulmonary NK/T cell lymphoma presenting as pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangho; Shin, Bongkyung; Yoon, Hyungseok; Lee, Jung Yeon; Chon, Gyu Rak

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphoma, particularly non-B cell lymphomas involving lung parenchyma, is very rare. A 46-year-old male was admitted to the hospital with fever and cough. Chest X-ray showed left lower lobe consolidation, which was considered pneumonia. However, because the patient showed no response to empirical antibiotic therapy, bronchoscopic biopsy was performed for proper diagnosis. The biopsied specimen showed infiltrated atypical lymphocytes with angiocentric appearance. On immunohistochemical staining, these atypical cells were positive for CD3, CD30, CD56, MUM-1, and granzyme B, and labeled for Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA in situ hybridization. These findings were consistent with NK/T cell lymphoma. We report on a case of primary pulmonary NK/T cell lymphoma presenting as pneumonic symptoms and review the literature on the subject.

  10. Type I NKT-cell-mediated TNF-α is a positive regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Melvyn T; Duret, Helene; Andrews, Daniel M; Faveeuw, Christelle; Möller, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J; Paget, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a crucial role in the innate immune response to pathogens and exogenous or endogenous danger signals. Its activity must be precisely and tightly regulated to generate tailored immune responses. However, the immune cell subsets and cytokines controlling NLRP3 inflammasome activity are still poorly understood. Here, we have shown a link between NKT-cell-mediated TNF-α and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. The NLRP3 inflammasome in APCs was critical to potentiate NKT-cell-mediated immune responses, since C57BL/6 NLRP3 inflammasome-deficient mice exhibited reduced responsiveness to α-galactosylceramide. Importantly, NKT cells were found to act as regulators of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling, as NKT-cell-derived TNF-α was required for optimal IL-1β and IL-18 production by myeloid cells in response to α-galactosylceramide, by acting on the NLRP3 inflammasome priming step. Thus, NKT cells play a role in the positive regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome priming by mediating the production of TNF-α, thus demonstrating another means by which NKT cells control early inflammation.

  11. Activated iNKT cells promote memory CD8+ T cell differentiation during viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Reilly

    Full Text Available α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer is the prototypical lipid ligand for invariant NKT cells. Recent studies have proposed that α-GalCer is an effective adjuvant in vaccination against a range of immune challenges, however its mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. A variety of delivery methods have been examined including pulsing dendritic cells with α-GalCer to optimize the potential of α-GalCer. These methods are currently being used in a variety of clinical trials in patients with advanced cancer but cannot be used in the context of vaccine development against pathogens due to their complexity. Using a simple delivery method, we evaluated α-GalCer adjuvant properties, using the mouse model for cytomegalovirus (MCMV. We measured several key parameters of the immune response to MCMV, including inflammation, effector, and central memory CD8(+ T cell responses. We found that α-GalCer injection at the time of the infection decreases viral titers, alters the kinetics of the inflammatory response, and promotes both increased frequencies and numbers of virus-specific memory CD8(+ T cells. Overall, our data suggest that iNKT cell activation by α-GalCer promotes the development of long-term protective immunity through increased fitness of central memory CD8(+ T cells, as a consequence of reduced inflammation.

  12. Invariant NKT cells and CD1d(+) cells amass in human omentum and are depleted in patients with cancer and obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Lydia

    2012-02-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d and respond rapidly by killing tumor cells and release cytokines that activate and regulate adaptive immune responses. They are essential for tumor rejection in various mouse models, but clinical trials in humans involving iNKT cells have been less successful, partly due to their rarity in humans compared with mice. Here we describe an accumulation of functional iNKT cells in human omentum, a migratory organ with healing properties. Analysis of 39 omental samples revealed that T cells are the predominant lymphoid cell type and of these, 10% expressed the invariant Valpha24Jalpha18 TCR chain, found on iNKT cells, higher than in any other human organ tested to date. About 15% of omental hematopoietic cells expressed CD1d, compared with 1% in blood (p<0.001). Enriched omental iNKT cells killed CD1d(+) targets and released IFN-gamma and IL-4 upon activation. Omental iNKT-cell frequencies were lower in patients with severe obesity (p=0.005), and with colorectal carcinoma (p=0.004) compared with lean healthy subjects. These data suggest a novel role for the omentum in immune regulation and tumor immunity and identify it as a potential source of iNKT cells for therapeutic use.

  13. Exploiting Antitumor Immunotherapeutic Novel Strategies by Deciphering the Cross Talk between Invariant NKT Cells and Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Fujii

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint blockade therapy has prevailed for several types of cancer; however, its effectiveness as a single therapy is still limited. In principle, dendritic cells (DCs should be able to control the post-therapy immune response, in particular since they can link the two major arms of the immune system: innate and adaptive immunity. Therefore, DCs would be a logical and ideal target for the development of immunotherapies. Since DCs are not activated in the steady state, an adjuvant to convert their function from tolerogenic to immunogenic would be desirable. Upon ligand activation, invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells simultaneously activate NK cells and also energize the DCs, resulting in their full maturation. To utilize such iNKT-licensed “fully” matured DCs as adjuvants, mechanisms of both intercellular communication between DC subsets and iNKT cells and intracellular molecular signaling in DCs have to be clarified and optimized. To generate both innate and adaptive immunity against cancer, a variety of strategies with the potential to target iNKT-licensed DCs in situ have been studied. The benchmark of success in these studies, each with distinct approaches, will be the development of functional NK cells and cytotoxic T cells (CTLs as well as generation of long-term, memory CTL. In this review, we provide a framework for NKT-mediated immunotherapy through selective DC targeting in situ, describe progress in the design of licensed therapies for iNKT cell targeting of DCs, and highlight the challenge to provide maximal benefit to patients.

  14. iNKT-CELL ACTIVATION INDUCES LATE PRETERM BIRTH THAT IS ATTENUATED BY ROSIGLITAZONE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Louis, Derek; Romero, Roberto; Plazyo, Olesya; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia; Panaitescu, Bogdan; Xu, Yi; Milovic, Tatjana; Xu, Zhonghui; Bhatti, Gaurav; Qing-Sheng, Mi; Drewlo, Sascha; Tarca, Adi L.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality; however, its non-infection-related mechanisms are poorly understood. Herein, we show that the expansion of activated CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in the third trimester by administration of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) induces late PTB and neonatal mortality. In vivo imaging revealed that fetuses from mice that underwent α-GalCer-induced late PTB had bradycardia and died shortly after delivery. Yet, administration of α-GalCer in the second trimester did not cause pregnancy loss. PPARγ activation, through rosiglitazone treatment, reduced the rate of α-GalCer-induced late PTB and improved neonatal survival. Administration of α-GalCer in the third trimester suppressed PPARγ activation as shown by the down-regulation of Fabp4 and Fatp4 in myometrial and decidual tissues, respectively; this suppression was rescued by rosiglitazone treatment. Administration of α-GalCer in the third trimester induced an increase in the activation of conventional CD4+ T cells in myometrial tissues and the infiltration of activated macrophages, neutrophils and mature DCs to myometrial and/or decidual tissues. All of these effects were blunted after rosiglitazone treatment. Administration of α-GalCer also up-regulated the expression of inflammatory genes at the maternal-fetal interface and systemically, and rosiglitazone treatment partially attenuated these responses. Finally, an increased infiltration of activated iNKT-like cells in human decidual tissues is associated with non-infection-related preterm labor/birth. Collectively, these results demonstrate that iNKT-cell activation in vivo leads to late PTB by initiating innate and adaptive immune responses and suggest that the PPARγ pathway has potential as a target for prevention of this syndrome. PMID:26740111

  15. Differential requirement for the CD45 splicing regulator hnRNPLL for accumulation of NKT and conventional T cells.

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    Mehmet Yabas

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells represent an important regulatory T cell subset that develops in the thymus and contains immature (NK1.1(lo and mature (NK1.1(hi cell subsets. Here we show in mice that an inherited mutation in heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein L-like protein (hnRNPLL(thunder, that shortens the survival of conventional T cells, has no discernible effect on NKT cell development, homeostasis or effector function. Thus, Hnrpll deficiency effectively increases the NKT∶T cell ratio in the periphery. However, Hnrpll mutation disrupts CD45RA, RB and RC exon silencing of the Ptprc mRNA in both NKT and conventional T cells, and leads to a comparably dramatic shift to high molecular weight CD45 isoforms. In addition, Hnrpll mutation has a cell intrinsic effect on the expression of the developmentally regulated cell surface marker NK1.1 on NKT cells in the thymus and periphery but does not affect cell numbers. Therefore our results highlight both overlapping and divergent roles for hnRNPLL between conventional T cells and NKT cells. In both cell subsets it is required as a trans-acting factor to regulate alternative splicing of the Ptprc mRNA, but it is only required for survival of conventional T cells.

  16. Spontaneous focal activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells in mouse liver and kidney

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    Zeng Jia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells differ from other T cells by their hyperactive effector T-cell status, in addition to the expression of NK lineage receptors and semi-invariant T-cell receptors. It is generally agreed that the immune phenotype of iNKT cells is maintained by repeated activation in peripheral tissues although no explicit evidence for such iNKT cell activity in vivo has so far been reported. Results We used an interferon (IFN-γ-inducible cytoplasmic protein, Irga6, as a histological marker for local IFN-γ production. Irga6 was intensely expressed in small foci of liver parenchymal cells and kidney tubular epithelium. Focal Irga6 expression was unaffected by germ-free status or loss of TLR signalling and was totally dependent on IFN-γ secreted by T cells in the centres of expression foci. These were shown to be iNKT cells by diagnostic T cell receptor usage and their activity was lost in both CD1 d and Jα-deficient mice. Conclusions This is the first report that supplies direct evidence for explicit activation events of NKT cells in vivo and raises issues about the triggering mechanism and consequences for immune functions in liver and kidney.

  17. Antigen-specific cytotoxicity by invariant NKT cells in vivo is CD95/CD178-dependent and is correlated with antigenic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Gerhard; Krebs, Philippe; Beutler, Bruce; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions following activation with glycolipid Ags, such as the model Ag alpha-galactosylceramide. Numerous studies have investigated the mechanisms leading to Th1 and Th2 cytokine production by iNKT cells, as well as the effects of the copious amounts of cytokines these cells produce. Less is known, however, about the mechanisms of iNKT cell cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effect of Ag availability and strength, as well as the molecules involved in iNKT cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that the iNKT cell cytotoxicity in vivo correlates directly with the amount of CD1d expressed by the targets as well as the TCR affinity for the target glycolipid Ag. iNKT cells from spleen, liver, and thymus were comparable in their cytotoxicity in vitro. Surprisingly, we show that the Ag-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo depended almost exclusively on the interaction of CD95 (Fas) with CD178 (FasL), and that this mechanism can be efficiently used for tumor protection. Therefore, unlike NK cells, which rely mostly on perforin/granzyme-mediated mechanisms, the Ag-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo is largely restricted to the CD95/CD178 pathway.

  18. Antigen-specific cytotoxicity by invariant NKT cells in vivo is CD95/CD178 dependent and is correlated with antigenic potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Gerhard; Krebs, Philippe; Beutler, Bruce; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of T lymphocytes that rapidly carry out effector functions following activation with glycolipid Ags, such as the model Ag α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer). Numerous studies have investigated the mechanisms leading to Th1- and Th2 cytokine production by iNKT cells, and the effects of the copious amounts of cytokines these cells produce. Less is known, however, about the mechanisms of iNKT cell cytotoxicity. Here we investigated the effect of antigen availability and strength, as well as the molecules involved in iNKT cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that the iNKT cell cytotoxicity in vivo correlates directly with the amount of CD1d expressed by the targets as well as the TCR affinity for the target glycolipid Ag. iNKT cells from spleen, liver and thymus were comparable in their cytotoxicity in vitro. Surprisingly, we show that the antigen-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo depended almost exclusively on the interaction of CD95 (Fas) with CD178 (FasL), and that this mechanism can be efficiently utilized for tumor protection. Therefore unlike NK cells, which rely mostly on perforin/granzyme mediated mechanisms, the antigen-specific cytotoxicity of iNKT cells in vivo is largely restricted to the CD95/CD178 pathway. PMID:20660713

  19. The percentage of iNKT cells among other immune cells at various clinical stages of laryngeal cancer

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    Janusz Klatka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells constitute a small population of immune cells that share functional and phenotypic characteristics of T lymphocytes and NK cells. Due to their involvement in specific and non-specific immune responses, iNKT cells may represent an important component of antitumor and anti-infectious immunity. Material and methods: Using flow cytometry, we analyzed the percentages of iNKT cells as well as T and B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of 50 laryngeal cancer patients at various clinical stages in comparison to healthy controls (n=15. Moreover, we determined the expression of CD25, CD69 and CD95 antigens on T lymphocytes.Results: The percentage of CD4+/CD3+ T lymphocytes in the controls was higher than in laryngeal cancer patients, both with early and late stages of the disease. The percentage of CD8+/CD3+ T lymphocytes in healthy controls was lower than in patients with early and late clinical stages of laryngeal cancer. Patients with advanced laryngeal cancer showed a lower percentage of iNKT cells and higher frequencies of T regulatory cells (Tregs than the controls. Advanced clinical stages of laryngeal cancer are associated with impaired activation of lymphocytes.Conclusions: Our study confirmed that laryngeal cancer cells exert a strong suppressor effect on the immune system of the host. This is reflected by a decrease in the percentage of iNKT cells that are capable of cancer cell elimination, and a concomitant increase in the percentage of Tregs. However, further studies are needed in order to explain the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppression and understand interactions between immune and cancer cells.

  20. Role of NKT cells in the digestive system. IV. The role of canonical natural killer T cells in mucosal immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    Lymphocytes that combine features of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells are named natural killer T (NKT) cells. The majority of NKT cells in mice bear highly conserved invariant Valpha chains, and to date two populations of such canonical NKT cells are known in mice: those that express Valpha14 and those that express Valpha7.2. Both populations are selected by nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex class I-like antigen-presenting molecules expressed by hematopoietic cells in the thymus: CD1d for Valpha14-expressing NKT cells and MR1 for those cells expressing Valpha7.2. The more intensely studied Valpha14 NKT cells have been implicated in diverse immune reactions, including immune regulation and inflammation in the intestine; the Valpha7.2 expressing cells are most frequently found in the lamina propria. In humans, populations of canonical NKT cells are found to be highly similar in terms of the expression of homologous, invariant T cell antigen-receptor alpha-chains, specificity, and function, although their frequency differs from those in the mouse. In this review, we will focus on the role of both of these canonical NKT cell populations in the mucosal tissues of the intestine.

  1. Dissection of SAP-dependent and SAP-independent SLAM family signaling in NKT cell development and humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shasha; Cai, Chenxu; Li, Zehua; Liu, Guangao; Wang, Yuande; Blonska, Marzenna; Li, Dan; Du, Juan; Lin, Xin; Yang, Meixiang; Dong, Zhongjun

    2017-02-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) mutations in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) lead to defective NKT cell development and impaired humoral immunity. Because of the redundancy of SLAM family receptors (SFRs) and the complexity of SAP actions, how SFRs and SAP mediate these processes remains elusive. Here, we examined NKT cell development and humoral immunity in mice completely deficient in SFR. We found that SFR deficiency severely impaired NKT cell development. In contrast to SAP deficiency, SFR deficiency caused no apparent defect in follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation. Intriguingly, the deletion of SFRs completely rescued the severe defect in TFH cell generation caused by SAP deficiency, whereas SFR deletion had a minimal effect on the defective NKT cell development in SAP-deficient mice. These findings suggest that SAP-dependent activating SFR signaling is essential for NKT cell selection; however, SFR signaling is inhibitory in SAP-deficient TFH cells. Thus, our current study revises our understanding of the mechanisms underlying T cell defects in patients with XLP. © 2017 Chen et al.

  2. Defective NKT cell activation by CD1d+ TRAMP prostate tumor cells is corrected by interleukin-12 with α-galactosylceramide.

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    Michael Nowak

    Full Text Available Numerical and functional defects of invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT have been documented in human and mouse cancers, resulting in a defect in IFN production in several malignancies. iNKT cells recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d molecules by dendritic and related cells, leading to their activation and thereby regulating immune reactions. Activated iNKT cells cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity can inhibit existing and spontaneous tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. We have identified functional iNKT cell defects in the murine TRAMP prostate cancer model. We found that iNKT cells show the ability to migrate into TRAMP prostate tumors. This infiltration was mediated through CCL2: CCR5 chemokine: receptor interaction. Prostate tumor cells expressing CD1d partially activated iNKT cells, as appreciated by up-regulation of CD25, PD-1 and the IL-12R. However, despite inducing up-regulation of these activation markers and, hence, delivering positive signals, prostate tumor cells inhibited the IL-12-induced STAT4 phosphorylation in a cell-cell contact dependent but CD1d-independent manner. Consequently, tumor cells did not induce secretion of IFNgamma by iNKT cells. Blocking the inhibitory Ly49 receptor on iNKT cells in the presence of alpha-GalCer restored their IFNgamma production in vivo and in vitro. However, Ly49 blockade alone was not sufficient. Importantly, this defect could be also be reversed into vigorous secretion of IFNgamma by the addition of both IL-12 and the exogenous CD1d ligand alpha-galactosylceramide, but not by IL-12 alone, both in vivo and in vitro. These data underscore the potential to optimize iNKT-based therapeutic approaches.

  3. Co-receptor choice by V alpha14i NKT cells is driven by Th-POK expression rather than avoidance of CD8-mediated negative selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Isaac; Hammond, Kirsten; Sullivan, Barbara A; He, Xi; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kappes, Dietmar; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-05-10

    Mouse natural killer T (NKT) cells with an invariant V alpha14-J alpha18 rearrangement (V alpha14 invariant [V alpha14i] NKT cells) are either CD4(+)CD8(-) or CD4(-)CD8(-). Because transgenic mice with forced CD8 expression in all T cells exhibited a profound NKT cell deficit, the absence of CD8 has been attributed to negative selection. We now present evidence that CD8 does not serve as a coreceptor for CD1d recognition and that the defect in development in CD8 transgene homozygous mice is the result of a reduction in secondary T cell receptor alpha rearrangements. Thymocytes from mice hemizygous for the CD8 transgene have a less severe rearrangement defect and have functional CD8(+) V alpha14i NKT cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transcription factor Th, Poxviruses and Zinc finger, and Krüppel family (Th-POK) is expressed by V alpha14i NKT cells throughout their differentiation and is necessary both to silence CD8 expression and for the functional maturity of V alpha14i NKT cells. We therefore suggest that Th-POK expression is required for the normal development of V alpha14i NKT cells and that the absence of CD8 expression by these cells is a by-product of such expression, as opposed to the result of negative selection of CD8-expressing V alpha14i NKT cells.

  4. T, B, and NKT Cells in Systemic Inflammation in Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

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    Joanna Domagała-Kulawik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS brings risk of serious complications. The study objective was to assess elements of the cellular immune response in the course of OSAS. Methods. Peripheral blood (PB lymphocytes: T, B, NK, NKT-like, Th, Tc, and HLA DR+ T cells were evaluated by flow cytometry of 48 OSA patients; the concentration of adiponectin, interleukin 1β, and TNFα was measured by ELISA method. The OSA complication score was developed and used for statistical analysis. Results. The proportion of B cells and Th/Tc ratio were significantly lower in the BP of OSA patients when compared with control subjects (median 7.9 versus 10.9%, 0.9 versus 1.5, p<0.05. The proportion of Tc, NK, NKT-like, and HLADR positive T cells were elevated in OSA patients when compared with healthy subjects (36.4 versus 26.8, 15.5 versus 8.5, 5.7 versus 3.0, and 8.4 versus 4.5%, p<0.05, resp. and were more pronounced in patients with metabolic syndrome. The grade of OSA complication score correlated with systemic inflammation markers and the proportion of B cells. The value of adiponectin/BMI ratio correlated significantly with SpO2 (r=0.31, p<0.05, CRP (r=-0.35, p<0.05, TNFα concentration (r=-0.36, p<0.05, and proportion of B cells (r=0.32, p<0.05. Conclusion. Lymphocytes B, Tc, NK, NKT-like, and adiponectin are involved in systemic immune response in OSA patients possibly predisposing them to cardiovascular and metabolic complications.

  5. Altered development of NKT cells, γδ T cells, CD8 T cells and NK cells in a PLZF deficient patient.

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    Maggie Eidson

    Full Text Available In mice, the transcription factor, PLZF, controls the development of effector functions in invariant NKT cells and a subset of NKT cell-like, γδ T cells. Here, we show that in human lymphocytes, in addition to invariant NKT cells, PLZF was also expressed in a large percentage of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, PLZF was also found to be expressed in all γδ T cells and in all NK cells. Importantly, we show that in a donor lacking functional PLZF, all of these various lymphocyte populations were altered. Therefore, in contrast to mice, PLZF appears to control the development and/or function of a wide variety of human lymphocytes that represent more than 10% of the total PBMCs. Interestingly, the PLZF-expressing CD8+ T cell population was found to be expanded in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic melanoma but was greatly diminished in patients with autoimmune disease.

  6. Α-galactosylceramide analogs with weak agonist activity for human iNKT cells define new candidate anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricard, Gabriel; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Yu, Karl O A; Im, Jin S; Ndonye, Rachel M; Howell, Amy R; Veerapen, Natacha; Illarionov, Petr A; Besra, Gurdyal S; Li, Qian; Chang, Young-Tae; Porcelli, Steven A

    2010-12-17

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells with invariant T cell receptor α chains (iNKT cells) are a unique lymphocyte subset that responds to recognition of specific lipid and glycolipid antigens. They are conserved between mice and humans and exert various immunoregulatory functions through their rapid secretion of a variety of cytokines and secondary activation of dendritic cells, B cells and NK cells. In the current study, we analyzed the range of functional activation states of human iNKT cells using a library of novel analogs of α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), the prototypical iNKT cell antigen. Measurement of cytokines secreted by human iNKT cell clones over a wide range of glycolipid concentrations revealed that iNKT cell ligands could be classified into functional groups, correlating with weak versus strong agonistic activity. The findings established a hierarchy for induction of different cytokines, with thresholds for secretion being consistently lowest for IL-13, higher for interferon-γ (IFNγ), and even higher for IL-4. These findings suggested that human iNKT cells can be intrinsically polarized to selective production of IL-13 by maintaining a low level of activation using weak agonists, whereas selective polarization to IL-4 production cannot be achieved through modulating the strength of the activating ligand. In addition, using a newly designed in vitro system to assess the ability of human iNKT cells to transactivate NK cells, we found that robust secondary induction of interferon-γ secretion by NK cells was associated with strong but not weak agonist ligands of iNKT cells. These results indicate that polarization of human iNKT cell responses to Th2-like or anti-inflammatory effects may best be achieved through selective induction of IL-13 and suggest potential discrepancies with findings from mouse models that may be important in designing iNKT cell-based therapies in humans.

  7. Α-galactosylceramide analogs with weak agonist activity for human iNKT cells define new candidate anti-inflammatory agents.

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    Gabriel Bricard

    Full Text Available CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells with invariant T cell receptor α chains (iNKT cells are a unique lymphocyte subset that responds to recognition of specific lipid and glycolipid antigens. They are conserved between mice and humans and exert various immunoregulatory functions through their rapid secretion of a variety of cytokines and secondary activation of dendritic cells, B cells and NK cells. In the current study, we analyzed the range of functional activation states of human iNKT cells using a library of novel analogs of α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer, the prototypical iNKT cell antigen. Measurement of cytokines secreted by human iNKT cell clones over a wide range of glycolipid concentrations revealed that iNKT cell ligands could be classified into functional groups, correlating with weak versus strong agonistic activity. The findings established a hierarchy for induction of different cytokines, with thresholds for secretion being consistently lowest for IL-13, higher for interferon-γ (IFNγ, and even higher for IL-4. These findings suggested that human iNKT cells can be intrinsically polarized to selective production of IL-13 by maintaining a low level of activation using weak agonists, whereas selective polarization to IL-4 production cannot be achieved through modulating the strength of the activating ligand. In addition, using a newly designed in vitro system to assess the ability of human iNKT cells to transactivate NK cells, we found that robust secondary induction of interferon-γ secretion by NK cells was associated with strong but not weak agonist ligands of iNKT cells. These results indicate that polarization of human iNKT cell responses to Th2-like or anti-inflammatory effects may best be achieved through selective induction of IL-13 and suggest potential discrepancies with findings from mouse models that may be important in designing iNKT cell-based therapies in humans.

  8. Interruption of CXCL13-CXCR5 axis increases upper genital tract pathology and activation of NKT cells following chlamydial genital infection.

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    Janina Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulation of immune responses is critical for controlling inflammation and disruption of this process can lead to tissue damage. We reported that CXCL13 was induced in fallopian tube tissue following C. trachomatis infection. Here, we examined the influence of the CXCL13-CXCR5 axis in chlamydial genital infection. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Disruption of the CXCL13-CXCR5 axis by injecting anti-CXCL13 Ab to BALB/c mice or using Cxcr5-/- mice increased chronic inflammation in the upper genital tract (UGT; uterine horns and oviducts after Chlamydia muridarum genital infection (GT. Further studies in Cxcr5-/- mice showed an elevation in bacterial burden in the GT and increased numbers of neutrophils, activated DCs and activated NKT cells early after infection. After resolution, we noted increased fibrosis and the accumulation of a variety of T cells subsets (CD4-IFNγ, CD4-IL-17, CD4-IL-10 & CD8-TNFα in the oviducts. NKT cell depletion in vitro reduced IL-17α and various cytokines and chemokines, suggesting that activated NKT cells modulate neutrophils and DCs through cytokine/chemokine secretion. Further, chlamydial glycolipids directly activated two distinct types of NKT cell hybridomas in a cell-free CD1d presentation assay and genital infection of Cd1d-/- mice showed reduced oviduct inflammation compared to WT mice. CXCR5 involvement in pathology was also noted using single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis in C. trachomatis infected women attending a sub-fertility clinic. Women who developed tubal pathology after a C. trachomatis infection had a decrease in the frequency of CXCR5 SNP +10950 T>C (rs3922. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments indicate that disruption of the CXCL13-CXCR5 axis permits increased activation of NKT cells by type I and type II glycolipids of Chlamydia muridarum and results in UGT pathology potentially through increased numbers of neutrophils and T cell subsets associated with UGT pathology

  9. Cellular Adjuvant Properties, Direct Cytotoxicity of Re-differentiated Vα24 Invariant NKT-like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Shuichi Kitayama

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vα24 invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a subset of T lymphocytes implicated in the regulation of broad immune responses. They recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d on antigen-presenting cells and induce both innate and adaptive immune responses, which enhance effective immunity against cancer. Conversely, reduced iNKT cell numbers and function have been observed in many patients with cancer. To recover these numbers, we reprogrammed human iNKT cells to pluripotency and then re-differentiated them into regenerated iNKT cells in vitro through an IL-7/IL-15-based optimized cytokine combination. The re-differentiated iNKT cells showed proliferation and IFN-γ production in response to α-galactosylceramide, induced dendritic cell maturation and downstream activation of both cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells, and exhibited NKG2D- and DNAM-1-mediated NK cell-like cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines. The immunological features of re-differentiated iNKT cells and their unlimited availability from induced pluripotent stem cells offer a potentially effective immunotherapy against cancer.

  10. Mechanisms for glycolipid antigen-driven cytokine polarization by Valpha14i NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Barbara A; Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Wingender, Gerhard; Wang, Jing; Scott, Iain; Tsuji, Moriya; Franck, Richard W; Porcelli, Steven A; Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Certain glycolipid Ags for Valpha14i NKT cells can direct the overall cytokine balance of the immune response. Th2-biasing OCH has a lower TCR avidity than the most potent agonist known, alpha-galactosylceramide. Although the CD1d-exposed portions of OCH and alpha-galactosylceramide are identical, structural analysis indicates that there are subtle CD1d conformational differences due to differences in the buried lipid portion of these two Ags, likely accounting for the difference in antigenic potency. Th1-biasing C-glycoside/CD1d has even weaker TCR interactions than OCH/CD1d. Despite this, C-glycoside caused a greater downstream activation of NK cells to produce IFN-gamma, accounting for its promotion of Th1 responses. We found that this difference correlated with the finding that C-glycoside/CD1d complexes survive much longer in vivo. Therefore, we suggest that the pharmacokinetic properties of glycolipids are a major determinant of cytokine skewing, suggesting a pathway for designing therapeutic glycolipids for modulating invariant NKT cell responses.

  11. NKT cell self-reactivity: evolutionary master key of immune homeostasis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh

    2011-01-01

    Complex immune responses have evolved to protect multicellular organisms against the invasion of pathogens. This has exerted strong developmental pressure for specialized functions that can also limit damage to self-tissue. Two arms of immunity, the innate and adaptive immune system, have evolved...... for quick, non-specific immune responses to pathogens and more efficient, long-lasting ones upon specific recognition of recurrent pathogens. Specialized cells have arisen as the sentinels of these functions, including macrophages, natural killer (NK), and T and B-lymphocytes. Interestingly, a population...... of immune cells that can exert both of these complex functions, NKT cells, not only share common functions but also exhibit shared cell surface markers of cells of both arms of the immune system. These features, in combination with sophisticated maintenance of immune homeostasis, will be discussed...

  12. Immune modulating effects of NKT cells in a physiologically low dose Leishmania major infection model after αGalCer analog PBS57 stimulation.

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    Klaus G Griewank

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection affecting ∼12 million people worldwide, mostly in developing countries. Treatment options are limited and no effective vaccines exist to date. Natural Killer T (NKT cells are a conserved innate-like lymphocyte population with immunomodulating effects in various settings. A number of reports state a role of NKT cells in different models of Leishmania infection. Here, we investigated the effect of NKT cells in a physiologically relevant, intradermal low dose infection model. After inoculation of 103 infectious-stage L. major, comparable numbers of skin-immigrating NKT cells in both susceptible BALB/c mice and resistant C57BL/6 mice were noted. Compared to their wild type counterparts, NKT cell-deficient mice on a C57BL/6 background were better able to contain infection with L. major and showed decreased IL-4 production in cytokine analysis performed 5 and 8 weeks after infection. Low doses of the NKT cell stimulating αGalCer analog PBS57 applied at the time of infection led to disease exacerbation in C57BL/6 wild-type, but not NKT-deficient mice. The effect was dependent both on the timing and amount of PBS57 administered. The effect of NKT cell stimulation by PBS57 proved to be IL-4 dependent, as it was neutralized in IL-4-deficient C57BL/6 or anti-IL-4 antibody-treated wild-type mice. In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, administration of PBS57 in susceptible BALB/c mice resulted in an improved course of disease. Our results reveal a strain- and cytokine-dependent regulatory role of NKT cells in the development of immunity to low dose L. major infections. These effects, probably masked in previous studies using higher parasite inocula, should be considered in future therapy and immunization approaches.

  13. A case of rapid growing colonic NK/T cell lymphoma complicated by Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shumei Zheng; Hui Xu; Qin Ouyang; Linyun Xue; Yong Zhang; Dejun Cui

    2013-01-01

    A 37-year-old man developed abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea 11 months before admission.The colonoscopy revealed multifocal ulcers in the colon.Histology showed active chronic inflammation.Although anti-tuberculosis medication was effective,his symptoms repeated 2 months later.The subsequent colonoscopy revealed more extensive irregular ulcers than before,and he was clinically suspected with intestinal malignant lymphoma.He underwent subtotal colectomy and was histologically suggested Crohn's disease,then 5-aminosalicylic and a combination of prednisone and azathioprine were administered in succession postoperatively,but they achieved minimal relief of symptoms for a period of 7 months.The third colonoscopy showed a large irregular ulcer in the ileocolon stomas,and primary colonic NK/T cell lymphoma was diagnosed through histological and immunophenotypic studies.Malignant lymphoma should be taken into consideration when clinically diagnosed Crohn's disease was refractory to medication or when its clinical course became aggressive.

  14. NKT sublineage specification and survival requires the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme TNF AIP3/A20

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drennan, M.B. (Michael B.); Govindarajan, S. (Srinath); Verheugen, E. (Eveline); Coquet, J.M. (Jonathan M.); Staal, J. (Jens); McGuire, C. (Conor); T. Taghon (Tom); G. Leclercq (Georges); R. Beyaert (Rudi); G. van Loo (Geert); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); Elewaut, D. (Dirk)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNatural killer T (NKT) cells are innate lymphocytes that differentiate into NKT1, NKT2, and NKT17 sublineages during development. However, the signaling events that control NKT sublineage specification and differentiation remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ubiquitin-

  15. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter ABCA7 Regulates NKT Cell Development and Function by Controlling CD1d Expression and Lipid Raft Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowyhed, Heba N.; Chandra, Shilpi; Kiosses, William; Marcovecchio, Paola; Andary, Farah; Zhao, Meng; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2017-01-01

    ABCA7 is an ABC transporter expressed on the plasma membrane, and actively exports phospholipid complexes from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of membranes. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a subpopulation of T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens in the context of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. In this study, we demonstrate that ABCA7 regulates the development of NKT cells in a cell-extrinsic manner. We found that in Abca7−/− mice there is reduced expression of CD1d accompanied by an alteration in lipid raft content on the plasma membrane of thymocytes and antigen presenting cells. Together, these alterations caused by absence of ABCA7 negatively affect NKT cell development and function. PMID:28091533

  16. NK and NKT Cell Depletion Alters the Outcome of Experimental Pneumococcal Pneumonia: Relationship with Regulation of Interferon-γ Production

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    Eirini Christaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Natural killer (NK and natural killer T (NKT cells contribute to the innate host defense but their role in bacterial sepsis remains controversial. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were infected intratracheally with 5 × 105 cfu of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Animals were divided into sham group (Sham; pretreated with isotype control antibody (CON group; pretreated with anti-asialo GM1 antibody (NKd group; and pretreated with anti-CD1d monoclonal antibody (NKTd group before bacterial challenge. Serum and tissue samples were analyzed for bacterial load, cytokine levels, splenocyte apoptosis rates, and cell characteristics by flow cytometry. Splenocyte miRNA expression was also analyzed and survival was assessed. Results. NK cell depletion prolonged survival. Upon inhibition of NKT cell activation, spleen NK (CD3−/NK1.1+ cells increased compared to all other groups. Inhibition of NKT cell activation led to higher bacterial loads and increased levels of serum and splenocyte IFN-γ. Splenocyte miRNA analysis showed that miR-200c and miR-29a were downregulated, while miR-125a-5p was upregulated, in anti-CD1d treated animals. These changes were moderate after NK cell depletion. Conclusions. NK cells appear to contribute to mortality in pneumococcal pneumonia. Inhibition of NKT cell activation resulted in an increase in spleen NK (CD3−/NK1.1+ cells and a higher IFN-γ production, while altering splenocyte miRNA expression.

  17. Vγ4 γδ T cell-derived IL-17A negatively regulates NKT cell function in Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Hao, Jianlei; Ni, Yuanyuan; Luo, Wei; Liang, Ruifang; Cao, Guangchao; Zhao, Yapu; Wang, Puyue; Zhao, Liqing; Tian, Zhigang; Flavell, Richard; Hong, Zhangyong; Han, Jihong; Yao, Zhi; Wu, Zhenzhou; Yin, Zhinan

    2011-11-15

    Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis is a well-known animal model for acute liver failure. However, the role of γδ T cells in this model is undefined. In this report, using TCR δ(-/-) mice, we demonstrated a protective role of γδ T cells in Con A-induced hepatitis model. TCR δ(-/-) mice showed significantly decreased levels of IL-17A and IL-17F in the Con A-treated liver tissue, and reconstitution of TCR δ(-/-) mice with wild-type (Wt), but not IL-17A(-/-), γδ T cells significantly reduced hepatitis, strongly suggesting a critical role of IL-17A in mediating the protective effect of γδ T cells. Interestingly, only Vγ4, but not Vγ1, γδ T cells exerted such a protective effect. Furthermore, depletion of NKT cells in TCR δ(-/-) mice completely abolished hepatitis, and NKT cells from Con A-challenged liver tissues of TCR δ(-/-) mice expressed significantly higher amounts of proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ than those from Wt mice, indicating that γδ T cells protected hepatitis through targeting NKT cells. Finally, abnormal capacity of IFN-γ production by NKT cells of TCR δ(-/-) mice could only be downregulated by transferring Wt, but not IL-17(-/-), Vγ4 γδ T cells, confirming an essential role of Vγ4-derived IL-17A in regulating the function of NKT cells. In summary, our report thus demonstrated a novel function of Vγ4 γδ T cells in mediating a protective effect against Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis through negatively regulating function of NKT cells in an IL-17A-dependent manner, and transferring Vγ4 γδ T cells may provide a novel therapeutic approach for this devastating liver disease.

  18. Human Invariant NKT Cells Induce IL-1β Secretion by Peripheral Blood Monocytes via a P2X7-Independent Pathway.

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    Felley, Laura E; Sharma, Akshat; Theisen, Erin; Romero-Masters, James C; Sauer, John-Demian; Gumperz, Jenny E

    2016-09-15

    The cytokine IL-1β plays a central role in inflammatory responses that are initiated by microbial challenges, as well as in those that are due to endogenous processes (often called sterile inflammation). IL-1β secretion that occurs independently of microbial stimulation is typically associated with the presence of endogenous alarmins, such as extracellular ATP (an indicator of cytopathic damage). In this study, we show that IL-2-activated human invariant NKT (iNKT) cells stimulate the secretion of IL-1β protein by human peripheral blood monocytes in a manner that requires neither the presence of microbial compounds nor signaling through the extracellular ATP receptor P2X7 Monocyte IL-1β production was specifically induced by iNKT cells, because similarly activated polyclonal autologous T cells did not have this effect. Secretion of IL-1β protein occurred rapidly (within 3-4 h) and required cell contact between the iNKT cells and monocytes. Similar to IL-1β production induced by TLR stimulation, the iNKT-induced pathway appeared to entail a two-step process involving NF-κB signaling and IL1B gene transcription, as well as assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome and activation of caspase-1. However, in contrast to the classical inflammasome-mediated pathway of IL-1β production, activation of monocytes via P2X7 was dispensable for iNKT-induced IL-1β secretion, and potassium efflux was not required. Moreover, the iNKT-induced effect involved caspase-8 activity, yet it induced little monocyte death. These results suggest that IL-2-activated human iNKT cells induce monocytes to produce IL-1β through a distinctive pathway that does not require the presence of microbial danger signals or alarmins associated with cytopathic damage.

  19. Unique interplay between sugar and lipid in determining the antigenic potency of bacterial antigens for NKT cells.

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    Enrico Girardi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are an evolutionary conserved T cell population characterized by features of both the innate and adaptive immune response. Studies have shown that iNKT cells are required for protective responses to Gram-positive pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, and that these cells recognize bacterial diacylglycerol antigens presented by CD1d, a non-classical antigen-presenting molecule. The combination of a lipid backbone containing an unusual fatty acid, vaccenic acid, as well as a glucose sugar that is weaker or not stimulatory when linked to other lipids, is required for iNKT cell stimulation by these antigens. Here we have carried out structural and biophysical studies that illuminate the reasons for the stringent requirement for this unique combination. The data indicate that vaccenic acid bound to the CD1d groove orients the protruding glucose sugar for TCR recognition, and it allows for an additional hydrogen bond of the glucose with CD1d when in complex with the TCR. Furthermore, TCR binding causes an induced fit in both the sugar and CD1d, and we have identified the CD1d amino acids important for iNKT TCR recognition and the stability of the ternary complex. The studies show also how hydrogen bonds formed by the glucose sugar can account for the distinct binding kinetics of the TCR for this CD1d-glycolipid complex. Therefore, our studies illuminate the mechanism of glycolipid recognition for antigens from important pathogens.

  20. Abnormal changes in NKT cells, the IGF-1 axis, and liver pathology in an animal model of ALS.

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    Arseny Finkelstein

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a rapidly progressing fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective death of motor neurons (MN in the spinal cord, and is associated with local neuroinflammation. Circulating CD4(+ T cells are required for controlling the local detrimental inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, and for supporting neuronal survival, including that of MN. T-cell deficiency increases neuronal loss, while boosting T cell levels reduces it. Here, we show that in the mutant superoxide dismutase 1 G93A (mSOD1 mouse model of ALS, the levels of natural killer T (NKT cells increased dramatically, and T-cell distribution was altered both in lymphoid organs and in the spinal cord relative to wild-type mice. The most significant elevation of NKT cells was observed in the liver, concomitant with organ atrophy. Hepatic expression levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 decreased, while the expression of IGF binding protein (IGFBP-1 was augmented by more than 20-fold in mSOD1 mice relative to wild-type animals. Moreover, hepatic lymphocytes of pre-symptomatic mSOD1 mice were found to secrete significantly higher levels of cytokines when stimulated with an NKT ligand, ex-vivo. Immunomodulation of NKT cells using an analogue of α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer, in a specific regimen, diminished the number of these cells in the periphery, and induced recruitment of T cells into the affected spinal cord, leading to a modest but significant prolongation of life span of mSOD1 mice. These results identify NKT cells as potential players in ALS, and the liver as an additional site of major pathology in this disease, thereby emphasizing that ALS is not only a non-cell autonomous, but a non-tissue autonomous disease, as well. Moreover, the results suggest potential new therapeutic targets such as the liver for immunomodulatory intervention for modifying the disease, in addition to MN-based neuroprotection and systemic

  1. [Clinical observation on LOP regimen combined with IMRT treatment for early nasal NK/T cell lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y F; Huang, Y H; Wu, T; Zhang, Y; Liu, X M; Song, Y; Gan, J Y

    2017-02-14

    Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy and safety of the LOP regimen (L-asparaginase, vincristine, dexamethasone) combined with intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)in the treatment of early nasal NK/T cell lymphoma. Method: Clinical data of 65 patients with nasal NK/T cell lymphoma treated with LOP chemotherapy combined with IMRT at the Guizhou Province Tumor Hospital between March 2010 and January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Among the 65 patients, 39 cases obtained complete remission (CR), 18 cases obtained partial remission(PR), 1 case obtained stable disease (SD), 7 cases had progressive disease(PD). The objective response rate (ORR) was 87.7%, the disease control rates (DCR) was 89.2%. The DCR was lower in the patients with B symptoms or over age of 60. Patients with super cavity obtained a worse progression-free survival(PFS). The 1-, 2-, 3-year PFS were 91.7%, 74.8% and 61.3%, the overall survival(OS) were 91.8%, 81.3% and 78.9%, respectively. Main adverse reactions were myelosuppression, gastrointestinal reaction, hepatic lesion, hypoproteinemia, percutaneous reaction and oral mucosa reaction. No severe pancreatitis, severe anaphylaxis and toxic related death were observed. Conclusion: The LOP regimen combined with IMRT treatment for nasal NK/T cell lymphoma may have a good therapeutic effect, low toxicity, and good tolerance.

  2. Impact of Foxp3+ regulatory invariant NKT cells in the allergic airways disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Marta Isabel de Carvalho Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Tese de mestrado em Bioquímica, apresentada à Universidade de Lisboa, através da Faculdade de Ciências, 2013 As células NKT invariantes Foxp3+ demonstram propriedades imunossupressoras após indução da expressão de Foxp3, tendo por isso sido designadas “células NKT reguladoras Foxp3+”. Estas células partilham vários marcadores fenotípicos com as células T reguladoras, tais como a expressão de CD25, GITR e CTLA-4, não perdendo, contudo, as suas características de células iNKT, nomeadamente a...

  3. Blockade of IL-33 ameliorates Con A-induced hepatic injury by reducing NKT cell activation and IFN-γ production in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Duan, Lihua; Xiong, Ali; Zhang, Hongwei; Zheng, Fang; Tan, Zheng; Gong, Feili; Fang, Min

    2012-12-01

    IL-33, a recently described member of the IL-1 family, has been identified as a cytokine endowed with pro-Th2 type functions. To date, there are only limited data on its role in physiological and pathological hepatic immune responses. In this study, we examined the role of IL-33 in immune-mediated liver injury by exploring the model of concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis. We observed that the level of IL-33 expression in the liver was dramatically increased at 12 h after Con A injection. Meanwhile, ST2L, the receptor of IL-33, was significantly up-regulated in lymphocytes including T and natural killer T (NKT) cells, especially in NKT cells. Moreover, administration of recombinant IL-33 exacerbated Con A-induced hepatitis, while pretreatment of IL-33-blocking antibody or psST2-Fc plasmids showed a protective effect probably by inhibiting the activation of late stage of T cells and NKT cells and also decreasing the production of the cytokine IFN-γ. Furthermore, depletion of NKT cells abolished the protective effect of IL-33-blocking antibody, and IL-33 failed to exacerbate Con A-induced hepatitis in IFN-γ(-/-) mice. These data suggested the critical roles of NKT cells and IFN-γ in the involvement of IL-33 in Con A-induced hepatitis. Blockade of IL-33 may represent a novel therapeutic strategy through IL-33/ST2L signal to prevent immune-mediated liver injury.

  4. Interactions between NKT cells and Tregs are required for tolerance to combined bone marrow and organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, David; Tang, Xiaobin; Dutt, Suparna; Nador, Roland G; Strober, Samuel

    2012-02-09

    We used a model of combined bone marrow and heart transplantation, in which tolerance and stable chimerism is induced after conditioning with fractionated irradiation of the lymphoid tissues and anti-T-cell antibodies. Graft acceptance and chimerism required host CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg production of IL-10 that was in-turn enhanced by host invariant natural killer (NK) T-cell production of IL-4. Up-regulation of PD-1 on host Tregs, CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T (Tcon) cells, and CD8(+) T cells was also enhanced by NKT cell production of IL-4. Up-regulated PD-1 expression on Tregs was linked to IL-10 secretion, on CD8(+) T cells was linked to Tim-3 expression, and on CD4(+) Tcon cells was associated with reduced IFNγ secretion. Changes in the expression of PD-1 were induced by the conditioning regimen, and declined after bone marrow transplantation. In conclusion, NKT cells in this model promoted changes in expression of negative costimulatory receptors and anti-inflammatory cytokines by Tregs and other T-cell subsets in an IL-4-dependent manner that resulted in tolerance to the bone marrow and organ grafts.

  5. Alcohol facilitates CD1d loading, subsequent activation of NKT cells, and reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice.

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    Karsten Buschard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ethanol ('alcohol' is a partly hydrophobic detergent that may affect the accessibility of glycolipids thereby influencing immunological effects of these molecules. METHODS: The study included cellular in vitro tests using α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer, and in vivo NOD mice experiments detecting diabetes incidence and performing behavioural and bacterial analyses. RESULTS: Alcohol in concentrations from 0.6% to 2.5% increased IL-2 production from NKT cells stimulated with αGalCer by 60% (p<0.05. CD1d expressed on HeLa cells contained significantly increasing amounts of αGalCer with increasing concentrations of alcohol, suggesting that alcohol facilitated the passive loading of αGalCer to CD1d. NOD mice were found to tolerate 5% ethanol in their drinking water without signs of impairment in liver function. Giving this treatment, the diabetes incidence declined significantly. Higher numbers of CD3+CD49b+ NKT cells were found in spleen and liver of the alcohol treated compared to the control mice (p<0.05, whereas the amount of CD4+Foxp3+ regulator T cells did not differ. Increased concentrations of IFN-γ were detected in 24-hour blood samples of alcohol treated mice. Behavioural studies showed no change in attitude of the ethanol-consuming mice, and bacterial composition of caecum samples was not affected by alcohol, disqualifying these as protective mechanisms. CONCLUSION: Alcohol facilitates the uptake of glycolipids and the stimulation of NKT cells, which are known to counteract Type 1 diabetes development. We propose that this is the acting mechanism by which treatment with alcohol reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice. This is corroborated by epidemiology showing beneficial effect of alcohol to reduce the severity of atherosclerosis and related diseases.

  6. Invariant NKT cells act as an adjuvant to enhance Th2 inflammatory response in an OVA-induced mouse model of asthma.

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    Hanxiang Nie

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells are a unique subset of T lymphocytes and are considered to play an important role in the development of allergic bronchial asthma. Recently, iNKT cells were shown to play an immunoregulatory role in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated adaptive immune response. Allergen-specific Th2 inflammatory responses are an important part of the adaptive immune response in asthma. However, the regulatory functions of the Th2 inflammatory response in asthma have not been studied in detail.In this study, we have investigated the regulatory functions of iNKT cells on the Th2 inflammatory response in an ovalbumin (OVA-induced murine model of asthma.Our results demonstrate that α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer administration activated iNKT cells but could not induce the Th2 inflammatory response in wild-type (WT mice. In the OVA-induced asthma model, α-GalCer administration and adoptive transfer of iNKT cells significantly augmented the Th2 inflammatory responses, including elevated inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF; increased levels of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in the BALF and splenocyte culture supernatant; and increased serum levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1. In addition, the Th2 inflammatory response was reduced, but not completely abrogated in CD1d-/- mice immunized and challenged with OVA, compared with WT mice.These results suggest that iNKT cells may serve as an adjuvant to enhance Th2 inflammatory response in an OVA-induced murine model of asthma.

  7. Activation of invariant NKT cells ameliorates experimental ocular autoimmunity by a mechanism involving innate IFN-gamma production and dampening of the adaptive Th1 and Th17 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajewski, Rafael S; Hansen, Anna M; Agarwal, Rajeev K; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sidobre, Stephane; Su, Shao Bo; Silver, Phyllis B; Tsuji, Moriya; Franck, Richard W; Lawton, Anne P; Chan, Chi-Chao; Caspi, Rachel R

    2008-10-01

    Invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) have been reported to play a role not only in innate immunity but also to regulate several models of autoimmunity. Furthermore, iNKT cells are necessary for the generation of the prototypic eye-related immune regulatory phenomenon, anterior chamber associated immune deviation (ACAID). In this study, we explore the role of iNKT cells in regulation of autoimmunity to retina, using a model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) in mice immunized with a uveitogenic regimen of the retinal Ag, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein. Natural strain-specific variation in iNKT number or induced genetic deficiencies in iNKT did not alter baseline susceptibility to EAU. However, iNKT function seemed to correlate with susceptibility and its pharmacological enhancement in vivo by treatment with iNKT TCR ligands at the time of uveitogenic immunization reproducibly ameliorated disease scores. Use of different iNKT TCR ligands revealed dependence on the elicited cytokine profile. Surprisingly, superior protection against EAU was achieved with alpha-C-GalCer, which induces a strong IFN-gamma but only a weak IL-4 production by iNKT cells, in contrast to the ligands alpha-GalCer (both IFN-gamma and IL-4) and OCH (primarily IL-4). The protective effect of alpha-C-GalCer was associated with a reduction of adaptive Ag-specific IFN-gamma and IL-17 production and was negated by systemic neutralization of IFN-gamma. These data suggest that pharmacological activation of iNKT cells protects from EAU at least in part by a mechanism involving innate production of IFN-gamma and a consequent dampening of the Th1 as well as the Th17 effector responses.

  8. CD1d-dependent expansion of NKT follicular helper cells in vivo and in vitro is a product of cellular proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampuria, Pragya; Lang, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    NKT follicular helper cells (NKTfh cells) are a recently discovered functional subset of CD1d-restricted NKT cells. Given the potential for NKTfh cells to promote specific antibody responses and germinal center reactions, there is much interest in determining the conditions under which NKTfh cells proliferate and/or differentiate in vivo and in vitro. We confirm that NKTfh cells expressing the canonical semi-invariant Vα14 TCR were CXCR5(+)/ICOS(+)/PD-1(+)/Bcl6(+) and increased in number following administration of the CD1d-binding glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) to C57Bl/6 mice. We show that the α-GC-stimulated increase in NKTfh cells was CD1d-dependent since the effect was diminished by reduced CD1d expression. In vivo and in vitro treatment with α-GC, singly or in combination with IL-2, showed that NKTfh cells increased in number to a greater extent than total NKT cells, but proliferation was near-identical in both populations. Acquisition of the NKTfh phenotype from an adoptively transferred PD-1-depleted cell population was also evident, showing that peripheral NKT cells differentiated into NKTfh cells. Therefore, the α-GC-stimulated, CD1d-dependent increase in peripheral NKTfh cells is a result of cellular proliferation and differentiation. These findings advance our understanding of the immune response following immunization with CD1d-binding glycolipids.

  9. Group 2 innate lymphoid cell production of IL-5 is regulated by NKT cells during influenza virus infection.

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    Stacey Ann Gorski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory virus infections, such as influenza, typically induce a robust type I (pro-inflammatory cytokine immune response, however, the production of type 2 cytokines has been observed. Type 2 cytokine production during respiratory virus infection is linked to asthma exacerbation; however, type 2 cytokines may also be tissue protective. Interleukin (IL-5 is a prototypical type 2 cytokine that is essential for eosinophil maturation and egress out of the bone marrow. However, little is known about the cellular source and underlying cellular and molecular basis for the regulation of IL-5 production during respiratory virus infection. Using a mouse model of influenza virus infection, we found a robust transient release of IL-5 into infected airways along with a significant and progressive accumulation of eosinophils into the lungs, particularly during the recovery phase of infection, i.e. following virus clearance. The cellular source of the IL-5 was group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 infiltrating the infected lungs. Interestingly, the progressive accumulation of eosinophils following virus clearance is reflected in the rapid expansion of c-kit⁺ IL-5 producing ILC2. We further demonstrate that the enhanced capacity for IL-5 production by ILC2 during recovery is concomitant with the enhanced expression of the IL-33 receptor subunit, ST2, by ILC2. Lastly, we show that NKT cells, as well as alveolar macrophages (AM, are endogenous sources of IL-33 that enhance IL-5 production from ILC2. Collectively, these results reveal that c-kit⁺ ILC2 interaction with IL-33 producing NKT and AM leads to abundant production of IL-5 by ILC2 and accounts for the accumulation of eosinophils observed during the recovery phase of influenza infection.

  10. NK/T细胞淋巴瘤细胞凋亡和细胞增殖特征及意义%The significance and features of apoptosis and proliferation of NK/T cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dabin Wang; Meng Ming; Junhua Liu; Jianhua Yi; Dianding Zou

    2011-01-01

    Objective:The aim was to study the features and clinical significance of cell apoptosis and proliferation of NK/T cell lymphoma. Methods:TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling and immunohistochemical Streptavidin-peroxidase method were used to study cell apoptosis and the expression of proliferation cell nuclear antigen in 25 NK/T cell lymphoma and 10reactive lymphoid tissues. Results:Apoptotic index (AI) and proliferative index (PI) averaged (1.92% ± 0.86%) and (41.48%± 5.10%) respectively in the 25 NK/T cell lymphomas and (6.70% ± 1.89%) and (20.10% ± 2.77%) in the 10 reactive lymphoid tissues. Compared with reactive lymphoid tissues, AI was significantly reduced in NK/T cell lymphoma (t = 10.80, P < 0.01)while PI significantly increased (t = 12.39, P < 0.01). In addition, in NK/T cell lymphoma, AI and PI were positively related (r = 0.69, P < 0.01). Conclusion:In NK/T cell lymphoma, cell apoptosis is reduced while cell proliferation increased. The imbalance between cell apoptosis and cell proliferation is closely related to the development and progression of NK/T cell lymphoma.

  11. The Hypothesis of the Human iNKT/Innate CD8(+) T-Cell Axis Applied to Cancer: Evidence for a Deficiency in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomet, Florence; Cayssials, Emilie; Barbarin, Alice; Desmier, Deborah; Basbous, Sara; Lefèvre, Lucie; Levescot, Anaïs; Robin, Aurélie; Piccirilli, Nathalie; Giraud, Christine; Guilhot, François; Roy, Lydia; Herbelin, André; Gombert, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    We recently identified a new human subset of NK-like [KIR/NKG2A(+)] CD8(+) T cells with a marked/memory phenotype, high Eomesodermin expression, potent antigen-independent cytotoxic activity, and the capacity to generate IFN-γ rapidly after exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines. These features support the hypothesis that this new member of the innate T cell family in humans, hereafter referred to as innate CD8(+) T cells, has a role in cancer immune surveillance analogous to invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Here, we report the first quantitative and functional analysis of innate CD8(+) T cells in a physiopathological context in humans, namely chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a well-characterized myeloproliferative disorder. We have chosen CML based on our previous report that IL-4 production by iNKT cells was deficient in CML patients at diagnosis and considering the recent evidence in mice that IL-4 promotes the generation/differentiation of innate CD8(+) T cells. We found that the pool of innate CD8(+) T cells was severely reduced in the blood of CML patients at diagnosis. Moreover, like iNKT and NK cells, innate CD8(+) T cells were functionally impaired, as attested by their loss of antigen-independent cytotoxic activity and IFN-γ production in response to innate-like stimulation with IL-12 + IL-18. Remarkably, as previously reported for IL-4 production by iNKT cells, both quantitative and functional deficiencies of innate CD8(+) T cells were at least partially corrected in patients having achieved complete cytogenetic remission following tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Finally, direct correlation between the functional potential of innate CD8(+) T and iNKT cells was found when considering all healthy donors and CML patients in diagnosis and remission, in accordance with the iNKT cell-dependent generation of innate CD8(+) T cells reported in mice. All in all, our data demonstrate that CML is associated with deficiencies of innate CD8(+) T cells

  12. CD1d-dependent NKT cells play a protective role in acute and chronic arthritis models by ameliorating antigen-specific Th1 responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teige, Anna; Bockermann, Robert; Hasan, Maruf

    2010-01-01

    A protective and anti-inflammatory role for CD1d-dependent NKT cells (NKTs) has been reported in experimental and human autoimmune diseases. However, their role in arthritis has been unclear, with conflicting reports of CD1d-dependent NKTs acting both as regulatory and disease-promoting cells...

  13. Enhancement of Mucosal Immunogenicity of Viral Vectored Vaccines by the NKT Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide as Adjuvant

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    Shailbala Singh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccination strategies, specifically viral vectors encoding vaccine immunogens are effective at priming strong immune responses. Mucosal routes offer practical advantages for vaccination by ease of needle-free administration, and immunogen delivery at readily accessible oral/nasal sites to efficiently induce immunity at distant gut and genital tissues. However, since mucosal tissues are inherently tolerant for induction of immune responses, incorporation of adjuvants for optimal mucosal vaccination strategies is important. We report here the effectiveness of alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, a synthetic glycolipid agonist of natural killer T (NKT cells, as an adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of vaccine antigens delivered using viral vectors by mucosal routes in murine and nonhuman primate models. Significant improvement in adaptive immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues was observed by including α-GalCer adjuvant for intranasal immunization of mice with vesicular stomatitis virus vector encoding the model antigen ovalbumin and adenoviral vectors expressing HIV env and Gag antigens. Activation of NKT cells in systemic and mucosal tissues along with significant increases in adaptive immune responses were observed in rhesus macaques immunized by intranasal and sublingual routes with protein or adenovirus vectored antigens when combined with α-GalCer adjuvant. These results support the utility of α-GalCer adjuvant for enhancing immunogenicity of mucosal vaccines delivered using viral vectors.

  14. Slam haplotype 2 promotes NKT but suppresses Vγ4+ T-cell activation in coxsackievirus B3 infection leading to increased liver damage but reduced myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sally Ann; Roberts, Brian; Moussawi, Mohamad; Boyson, Jonathan E

    2013-02-01

    There are two major haplotypes of signal lymphocytic activation molecule (Slam) in inbred mouse strains, with the Slam haplotype 1 expressed in C57Bl/6 mice and the Slam haplotype 2 expressed in most other commonly used inbred strains, including 129 mice. Because signaling through Slam family receptors can affect innate immunity [natural killer T cell (NKT) and γ-δ T-cell receptor], and innate immunity can determine susceptibility to coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection, the present study evaluated the response of C57Bl/6 and congenic B6.129c1 mice (expressing the 129-derived Slam locus) to CVB3. CVB3-infected C57Bl/6 male mice developed increased myocarditis but reduced hepatic injury compared with infected B6.129c1 mice. C57Bl/6 mice also had increased γδ(+) and CD8(+)interferon-γ(+) cells but decreased numbers of NKT (T-cell receptor β chain + mCD1d tetramer(+)) and CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells compared with B6.129c1 mice. C57Bl/6 mice were infected with CVB3 and treated with either α-galactosylceramide, an NKT cell-specific ligand, or vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide/PBS). Mice treated with α-galactosylceramide showed significantly reduced myocarditis. Liver injuries, as determined by alanine aminotransferase levels in plasma, were increased significantly, confirming that NKT cells are protective for myocarditis but pathogenic in the liver.

  15. iNKT Cells Are Responsible for the Apoptotic Reduction of Basophils That Mediate Th2 Immune Responses Elicited by Papain in Mice Following γPGA Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Sung Won; Park, Se-Ho; Hong, Seokmann

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Bacillus subtilis-derived poly-gamma glutamic acid (γPGA) treatment suppresses the development of allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD). Although basophils, an innate immune cell, are known to play critical roles in allergic immune responses and repeated long-term administration of γPGA results in decreased splenic basophils in an AD murine model, the underlying mechanisms by which γPGA regulates basophil frequency remain unclear. To investigate how γPGA modulates basophils, we employed basophil-mediated Th2 induction in vivo model elicited by the allergen papain protease. Repeated injection of γPGA reduced the abundance of basophils and their production of IL4 in mice, consistent with our previous study using NC/Nga AD model mice. The depletion of basophils by a single injection of γPGA was dependent on the TLR4/DC/IL12 axis. CD1d-dependent Vα14 TCR invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are known to regulate a variety of immune responses, such as allergy. Because iNKT cell activation is highly sensitive to IL12 produced by DCs, we evaluated whether the effect of γPGA on basophils is mediated by iNKT cell activation. We found that in vivo γPGA treatment did not induce the reduction of basophils in iNKT cell-deficient CD1d KO mice, suggesting the critical role of iNKT cells in γPGA-mediated basophil depletion at the early time points. Furthermore, increased apoptotic basophil reduction triggered by iNKT cells upon γPGA stimulation was mainly attributed to Th1 cytokines such as IFNγ and TNFα, consequently resulting in inhibition of papain-induced Th2 differentiation via diminishing basophil-derived IL4. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that γPGA-induced iNKT cell polarization toward the Th1 phenotype induces apoptotic basophil depletion, leading to the suppression of Th2 immune responses. Thus, elucidation of the crosstalk between innate immune cells will contribute to the design and

  16. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract.

  17. Cooperation of invariant NKT cells and CD46+CD256+ T regulatory cells in prevention of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice treated with α-galactosylceramide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weipeng Li; Fang Ji; Yong Zhang; Ying Wang; Neng yang; Hailiang Ge; Fuqing Wang

    2008-01-01

    CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells and CD4+CD25+regulatory T (Treg) cells are two thymus-derived subsets of regulatory T cells that play an important role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. Yet the functional changes of the two subsets of regulatory T cells in the development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice remain unclear, and how NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells cooperate functionally in the regulation of autoimmune diabetes is also uncertain.We provide evidence that in NOD mice, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes, the functions of both NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells decrease in an age-dependent manner.We show that treatment with α-galactosylceramide increases the size of the CD4+CD25+ Treg cell compartment in NOD mice, and augments the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor and the potency of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to inhibit proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells. Our data indicate that NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells might cooperate in the prevention of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice treated with α-galactosylceramide. Induced cooperation of NKT cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cells could serve as a strategy to treat human autoimmune disease, such as type 1 diabetes.

  18. Identification of iGb3 and iGb4 in melanoma B16F10-Nex2 cells and the iNKT cell-mediated antitumor effect of dendritic cells primed with iGb3

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    Almeida Igor C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD1d-restricted iNKT cells are protective against murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 growing subcutaneously in syngeneic C57Bl/6 mice as inferred from the fast tumor development in CD1d-KO in comparison with wild type animals. CD1d glycoproteins are related to the class I MHC molecules, and are involved in the presentation, particularly by dentritic cells (DC, of lipid antigens to iNKT cells. In the present work we attempted to identify the endogenous lipid mediator expressed in melanoma cells inducing such immunesurveillance response and study the possibility of protecting animals challenged with tumor cells with lipid-primed DC. Results Crude cytosolic and membrane fractions from in vivo growing melanoma contained iNKT-stimulating substances. Lipids were then extracted from these cells and one of the fractions (i.e. F3A was shown to prime bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC to stimulate iNKT murine hybridoma (DN32D3 cells to produce IL-2. The active fraction was analyzed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-LIT-MS and both iGb3 and iGb4 were identified along with GM3. When iGb3 was incubated with BMDC and tested with DN32D3 cells, IL-2 was equally produced indicating iNKT cell activation. GM3 consistently inhibited this response. To assess the antitumor response-induced by iGb3, a cytotoxicity assay in vitro was used with [3H]-thymidine labeled B16F10-Nex2 cells. At target/effector (iGb3-activated iNKT cell ratio of 100-1-100-4 tumor cell lysis was shown. The antitumor activity in vivo was tested in mice challenged i.v. with B16F10-Nex2 cells and treated with iGb3- or α-galactosylceramide-primed DCs. A 4-fold lower tumor load in the lungs was observed with either treatment. Conclusion Our results show the expression of globo and isoglobohexosylceramides in murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2. The expression of iGb3 and its precursor, iGb4, on tumor cells may prime an effective iNKT cell-dependent antitumor response

  19. Unusual Suspects in the Development of Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance: NK cells, iNKT cells, and ILCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamichi, Beatriz Dal Santo Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The notion that obesity-induced inflammation mediates the development of insulin resistance in animal models and humans has been gaining strong support. It has also been shown that immune cells in local tissues, in particular in visceral adipose tissue, play a major role in the regulation of obesity-induced inflammation. Specifically, obesity increases the numbers and activation of proinflammatory immune cells, including M1 macrophages, neutrophils, Th1 CD4 T cells, and CD8 T cells, while simultaneously suppressing anti-inflammatory cells such as M2 macrophages, CD4 regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, and eosinophils. Recently, however, new cell types have been shown to participate in the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. Some of these cell types also appear to regulate obesity. These cells are natural killer (NK) cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which are closely related, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. It should be noted that, although iNKT cells resemble NK cells in name, they are actually a completely different cell type in terms of their development and functions in immunity and metabolism. In this review, we will focus on the roles that these relatively new players in the metabolism field play in obesity-induced insulin resistance and the regulation of obesity. PMID:28537058

  20. IL-10 Production Is Critical for Sustaining the Expansion of CD5+ B and NKT Cells and Restraining Autoantibody Production in Congenic Lupus-Prone Mice.

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    Yuriy Baglaenko

    Full Text Available The development and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus is mediated by the complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. To decipher the genetics that contribute to pathogenesis and the production of pathogenic autoantibodies, our lab has focused on the generation of congenic lupus-prone mice derived from the New Zealand Black (NZB strain. Previous work has shown that an NZB-derived chromosome 4 interval spanning 32 to 151 Mb led to expansion of CD5+ B and Natural Killer T (NKT cells, and could suppress autoimmunity when crossed with a lupus-prone mouse strain. Subsequently, it was shown that CD5+ B cells but not NKT cells derived from these mice could suppress the development of pro-inflammatory T cells. In this paper, we aimed to further resolve the genetics that leads to expansion of these two innate-like populations through the creation of additional sub-congenic mice and to characterize the role of IL-10 in the suppression of autoimmunity through the generation of IL-10 knockout mice. We show that expansion of CD5+ B cells and NKT cells localizes to a chromosome 4 interval spanning 91 to 123 Mb, which is distinct from the region that mediates the majority of the suppressive phenotype. We also demonstrate that IL-10 is critical to restraining autoantibody production and surprisingly plays a vital role in supporting the expansion of innate-like populations.

  1. Humans lack iGb3 due to the absence of functional iGb3-synthase: implications for NKT cell development and transplantation.

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    Dale Christiansen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The glycosphingolipid isoglobotrihexosylceramide, or isogloboside 3 (iGb3, is believed to be critical for natural killer T (NKT cell development and self-recognition in mice and humans. Furthermore, iGb3 may represent an important obstacle in xenotransplantation, in which this lipid represents the only other form of the major xenoepitope Galalpha(1,3Gal. The role of iGb3 in NKT cell development is controversial, particularly with one study that suggested that NKT cell development is normal in mice that were rendered deficient for the enzyme iGb3 synthase (iGb3S. We demonstrate that spliced iGb3S mRNA was not detected after extensive analysis of human tissues, and furthermore, the iGb3S gene contains several mutations that render this product nonfunctional. We directly tested the potential functional activity of human iGb3S by expressing chimeric molecules containing the catalytic domain of human iGb3S. These hybrid molecules were unable to synthesize iGb3, due to at least one amino acid substitution. We also demonstrate that purified normal human anti-Gal immunoglobulin G can bind iGb3 lipid and mediate complement lysis of transfected human cells expressing iGb3. Collectively, our data suggest that iGb3S is not expressed in humans, and even if it were expressed, this enzyme would be inactive. Consequently, iGb3 is unlikely to represent a primary natural ligand for NKT cells in humans. Furthermore, the absence of iGb3 in humans implies that it is another source of foreign Galalpha(1,3Gal xenoantigen, with obvious significance in the field of xenotransplantation.

  2. Functional CD1d and/or NKT cell invariant chain transcript in horse, pig, African elephant and guinea pig, but not in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looringh van Beeck, Frank A; Reinink, Peter; Hermsen, Roel; Zajonc, Dirk M; Laven, Marielle J; Fun, Axel; Troskie, Milana; Schoemaker, Nico J; Morar, Darshana; Lenstra, Johannes A; Vervelde, Lonneke; Rutten, Victor P M G; van Eden, Willem; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2009-04-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (NKT cells) have been well characterized in humans and mice, but it is unknown whether they are present in other species. Here we describe the invariant TCR alpha chain and the full length CD1d transcript of pig and horse. Molecular modeling predicts that porcine (po) invariant TCR alpha chain/poCD1d/alpha-GalCer and equine (eq) invariant TCR alpha chain/eqCD1d/alpha-GalCer form complexes that are highly homologous to the human complex. Since a prerequisite for the presence of NKT cells is the expression of CD1d protein, we performed searches for CD1D genes and CD1d transcripts in multiple species. Previously, cattle and guinea pig have been suggested to lack CD1D genes. The CD1D genes of European taurine cattle (Bos taurus) are known to be pseudogenes because of disrupting mutations in the start codon and in the donor splice site of the first intron. Here we show that the same mutations are found in six other ruminants: African buffalo, sheep, bushbuck, bongo, N'Dama cattle, and roe deer. In contrast, intact CD1d transcripts were found in guinea pig, African elephant, horse, rabbit, and pig. Despite the discovery of a highly homologous NKT/CD1d system in pig and horse, our data suggest that functional CD1D and CD1d-restricted NKT cells are not universally present in mammals.

  3. Thymus medulla fosters generation of natural Treg cells, invariant γδ T cells, and invariant NKT cells: what we learn from intrathymic migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jennifer E; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2015-03-01

    The organization of the thymus into distinct cortical and medullary regions enables it to control the step-wise migration and development of immature T-cell precursors. Such a process provides access to specialized cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells at defined stages of maturation, ensuring the generation of self-tolerant and MHC-restricted conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) αβ T cells. The migratory cues and stromal cell requirements that regulate the development of conventional αβ T cells have been well studied. However, the thymus also fosters the generation of several immunoregulatory T-cell populations that form key components of both innate and adaptive immune responses. These include Foxp3(+) natural regulatory T cells, invariant γδ T cells, and CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). While less is known about the intrathymic requirements of these nonconventional T cells, recent studies have highlighted the importance of the thymus medulla in their development. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanisms controlling the intrathymic migration of distinct T-cell subsets, and relate this to knowledge of the microenvironmental requirements of these cells.

  4. The receptor Ly108 functions as a SAP adaptor-dependent on-off switch for T cell help to B cells and NKT cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Robin; Cannons, Jennifer L; Zhao, Fang; Yusuf, Isharat; Lao, Christopher; Locci, Michela; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Crotty, Shane

    2012-06-29

    Humans and mice deficient in the adaptor protein SAP (Sh2d1a) have a major defect in humoral immunity, resulting from a lack of T cell help for B cells. The role of SAP in this process is incompletely understood. We found that deletion of receptor Ly108 (Slamf6) in CD4(+) T cells reversed the Sh2d1a(-/-) phenotype, eliminating the SAP requirement for germinal centers. This potent negative signaling by Ly108 required immunotyrosine switch motifs (ITSMs) and SHP-1 recruitment, resulting in high amounts of SHP-1 at the T cell:B cell synapse, limiting T cell:B cell adhesion. Ly108-negative signaling was important not only in CD4(+) T cells; we found that NKT cell differentiation was substantially restored in Slamf6(-/-)Sh2d1a(-/-) mice. The ability of SAP to regulate both positive and negative signals in T cells can explain the severity of SAP deficiency and highlights the importance of SAP and SHP-1 competition for Ly108 ITSM binding as a rheostat for the magnitude of T cell help to B cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin as a vaccine delivery vector for viral antigens by incorporation of glycolipid activators of NKT cells.

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    Manjunatha M Venkataswamy

    Full Text Available Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag. We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors.

  6. Improving Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a Vaccine Delivery Vector for Viral Antigens by Incorporation of Glycolipid Activators of NKT Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Carreño, Leandro J.; Johnson, Alison J.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Jervis, Peter J.; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Wen, Xiangshu; Yuan, Weiming; Tsuji, Moriya; Li, Xiangming; Ho, David D.; Chan, John; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard; Haynes, Barton F.; Panas, Michael W.; Gillard, Geoffrey O.; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Schmitz, Joern E.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG) has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag). We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors. PMID:25255287

  7. The receptor Ly108 functions as a SAP adaptor dependent on-off switch for T cell help to B cells and NKT cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Robin; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Zhao, Fang; Yusuf, Isharat; Lao, Christopher; Locci, Michela; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Crotty, Shane

    2012-01-01

    Humans and mice deficient in the adaptor protein SAP (Sh2d1a) have a major defect in humoral immunity, due to lack of T cell help for B cells. The role of SAP in this process is incompletely understood. We found that deletion of receptor Ly108 (Slamf6) in CD4+ T cells reversed the Sh2d1a−/− phenotype, eliminating the SAP requirement for germinal centers. This potent negative signaling by Ly108 required immunotyrosine switch motifs (ITSMs) and SHP-1 recruitment, resulting in high amounts of SHP-1 at the T:B synapse, limiting T:B adhesion. Ly108 negative signaling was not only important in CD4+ T cells, as we found that NKT cell differentiation was substantially restored in Slamf6−/−Sh2d1a−/− mice. The ability of SAP to regulate both positive and negative signals in T cells can explain the severity of SAP-deficiency and highlights the importance of SAP and SHP-1 competition for Ly108 ITSM binding as a rheostat for the magnitude of T cell help to B cells. PMID:22683125

  8. Cutting edge: Ly9 (CD229), a SLAM family receptor, negatively regulates the development of thymic innate memory-like CD8+ T and invariant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, Jordi; Cuenca, Marta; Romero, Xavier; Bastos, Ricardo; Terhorst, Cox; Angulo, Ana; Engel, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family receptors and the specific adapter signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein modulate the development of innate-like lymphocytes. In this study, we show that the thymus of Ly9-deficient mice contains an expanded population of CD8 single-positive cells with the characteristic phenotype of innate memory-like CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, the proportion of these innate CD8(+) T cells increased dramatically postinfection with mouse CMV. Gene expression profiling of Ly9-deficient mice thymi showed a significant upregulation of IL-4 and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger. Analyses of Ly9(-/-)IL4ra(-/-) double-deficient mice revealed that IL-4 was needed to generate the thymic innate CD8(+) T cell subset. Furthermore, increased numbers of invariant NKT cells were detected in Ly9-deficient thymi. In wild-type mice, IL-4 levels induced by α-galactosylceramide injection could be inhibited by a mAb against Ly9. Thus, Ly9 plays a unique role as an inhibitory cell surface receptor regulating the size of the thymic innate CD8(+) T cell pool and the development of invariant NKT cells.

  9. Ly9 (CD229), a SLAM family receptor, negatively regulates the development of thymic innate memory-like CD8+ T and iNKT cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, Jordi; Cuenca, Marta; Romero, Xavier; Bastos, Ricardo; Terhorst, Cox; Angulo, Ana; Engel, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family (SLAMF) receptors and the specific adapter SLAM-associated protein (SAP) modulate the development of innate-like lymphocytes. Here, we show that the thymus of Ly9-deficient mice contains an expanded population of CD8 single-positive cells with the characteristic phenotype of innate memory-like CD8+ T-cells. Moreover, the proportion of these innate CD8+ T-cells increased dramatically after infection with mouse cytomegalovirus. Gene expression profiling of Ly9-deficient mice thymi showed a significant up-regulation of IL-4 and PLZF. Analyses of Ly9−/−IL4ra−/− double-deficient mice revealed that IL-4 was needed to generate the thymic innate CD8+ T-cell subset. Furthermore, increased numbers of iNKT cells were detected in Ly9-deficient thymi. In wild-type mice IL-4 levels induced by αGalCer injection could be inhibited by a monoclonal antibody against Ly9. Thus, Ly9 plays a unique role as an inhibitory cell-surface receptor regulating the size of the thymic innate CD8+ T-cell pool and the development of iNKT cells. PMID:23225888

  10. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting natural killer T cell responses in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shissler, Susannah C; Bollino, Dominique R; Tiper, Irina V; Bates, Joshua P; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while type I NKT cells can enhance anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer.

  11. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Natural killer T cell responses in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shissler, Susannah C.; Bollino, Dominique R.; Tiper, Irina V.; Bates, Joshua; Derakhshandeh, Roshanak; Webb, Tonya J.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of lymphocytes that bridge the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells possess a classic αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) that is able to recognize self and foreign glycolipid antigens presented by the nonclassical class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, CD1d. Type I NKT cells (referred to as invariant NKT cells) express a semi-invariant Vα14Jα18 TCR in mice and Vα24Jα18 TCR in humans. Type II NKT cells are CD1d-restricted T cells that express a more diverse set of TCR α chains. The two types of NKT cells often exert opposing effects especially in tumor immunity, where Type II cells generally suppress tumor immunity while Type I NKT cells can enhance antitumor immune responses. In this review, we focus on the role of NKT cells in cancer. We discuss their effector and suppressive functions, as well as describe preclinical and clinical studies utilizing therapeutic strategies focused on harnessing their potent anti-tumor effector functions, and conclude with a discussion on potential next steps for the utilization of NKT cell targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. PMID:27393665

  12. Primary NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon

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    Ana María Chirife

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type are rare diseases, colonic involvement has seldom been seen. We report a case of a patient with a primary NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon. The patient had no history of malignant diseases and was diagnosed after exhaustive study in the context of fever of unknown origin. The first therapeutic approach followed the DAEPOCH-protocol: etoposide, prednisone, doxor-rubicin, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The persistence of constitutional symptoms after the first treatment course motivated the switch to a second line following the SMILE-protocol: dexamethasone, metotrexate, ifosfamide, E.coli L-asparaginase, and etoposide. Despite intensive chemotherapy, the patient died 2 months after the diagnose of an extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma of the colon and 4 months after the first symptomatic appearance of disease.

  13. [Aggressive NK/T cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with EBV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Jamira; Cabezuelo, Lourdes; Almeida, Sérgio; Filipe, Carlos; Simão, Adélia; Carvalho, Armando; Nascimento Costa, J

    2011-12-01

    The authors describe an unusual case of a young man presenting with fever, asthenia, anorexia and jaundice, associated to hepatosplenomegaly, evolving rapidly to multiorganic failure. Final diagnosis revealed an aggressive NK cell leukemia/lymphoma associated to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The diagnosis, suggested clinically and after bone marrow immunophenotyping, was confirmed by morphologic and immunohistochemical findings on the post-mortem hepatic and splenic biopsy .The tumor cells were positive for CD3 and cytotoxic molecules, TIA, granzyme B and perforin. The herein reported case is a rare clinical entity, only recently recognized and with a difficult early diagnosis. We emphasize the necessity to exclude a Natural Killer cell malignancy in cases with identical characteristics.

  14. Emerging Insights on the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphomas (ENKTL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Coleman, Carrie; Gru, Alejandro A.; Pan, Zenggang; Brammer, Jonathan; Rochford, Rosemary; Mishra, Anjali; Oakes, Christopher C.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Freud, Aharon G.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2017-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) is a rare aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) universally associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). ENKTL most commonly occurs in non-elderly immune competent males in Asia and South America. A number of antecedent lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) have been described in Asian and South American patients, but the majority of Caucasian ENKTL patients have no known preceding LPD or underlying immunodeficiency. Other than EBV, no environmental or extrinsic factor has been implicated in oncogenesis. The precise mechanisms by which EBV infects NK or T cells and the virus’ role in the pathogenesis of ENKTL have not been fully deciphered. However, a number of recent discoveries including disturbances in cell signaling and mutations in tumor suppressor genes have been identified, which are providing insights into the pathogenesis of ENKTL. In this review, we highlight the molecular, viral, and genetic underpinnings of ENKTL and discuss potential therapeutic implications. PMID:28472613

  15. Hepatocyte-specific NEMO deletion promotes NK/NKT cell- and TRAIL-dependent liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraza, Naiara; Malato, Yann; Sander, Leif E; Al-Masaoudi, Malika; Freimuth, Julia; Riethmacher, Dieter; Gores, Gregory J; Roskams, Tania; Liedtke, Christian; Trautwein, Christian

    2009-08-03

    Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) is one of the main transcription factors involved in regulating apoptosis, inflammation, chronic liver disease, and cancer progression. The IKK complex mediates NF-kappaB activation and deletion of its regulatory subunit NEMO in hepatocytes (NEMO(Delta hepa)) triggers chronic inflammation and spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma development. We show that NEMO(Delta hepa) mice were resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis but hypersensitive to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as the result of a strong up-regulation of its receptor DR5 on hepatocytes. Additionally, natural killer (NK) cells, the main source of TRAIL, were activated in NEMO(Delta hepa) livers. Interestingly, depletion of the NK1.1(+) cells promoted a significant reduction of liver inflammation and an improvement of liver histology in NEMO(Delta hepa) mice. Furthermore, hepatocyte-specific NEMO deletion strongly sensitized the liver to concanavalin A (ConA)-mediated injury. The critical role of the NK cell/TRAIL axis in NEMO(Delta hepa) livers during ConA hepatitis was further confirmed by selective NK cell depletion and adoptive transfer of TRAIL-deficient(-/-) mononuclear cells. Our results uncover an essential mechanism of NEMO-mediated protection of the liver by preventing NK cell tissue damage via TRAIL/DR5 signaling. As this mechanism is important in human liver diseases, NEMO(Delta hepa) mice are an interesting tool to give insight into liver pathophysiology and to develop future therapeutic strategies.

  16. Concurrent Epstein-Barr virus associated NK/T cell lymphoma after immunosuppressive therapy for aplastic anemia: report of a case and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guangli; Ni, Ying; Xiao, Zhengrui; He, Guangsheng; Miao, Kourong

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) patients with prolonged immunosuppression have a risk of development of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), especially combined with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. However, development of nature killer/T (NK/T) cell lymphoma, in a nontransplantation setting, has not been documented for AA patients with immunosuppressive therapy (IST). Herein, we described a middle-aged man, Han ethnic, who presented with swelled parotid gland after a long history of IST for AA. Fever, night sweating, weight loss had not been found. Increased heterotypic lymphocytes had been detected in the left side of parotid gland demonstrated as cCD3(+), CD56(+), GranB(+), TIA-1(+), MUM-1(+), KI-67 (50%-75%)(++), Bcl-6(-), MPO(-) by immunohistochemistry, and in-situ hybridization (ISH) indicated EBER positive. Chromosome analysis by R banding method revealed 46, XY [20]. NK/T cell lymphoma concurrent with aplastic anemia was diagnosed and a mild chemotherapy regimen including vincristine, prednisone, L-asparaginase was administered. The parotid mass was gradually regressed after the first cycle of chemotherapy. The patient discharged from the hospital voluntarily and lost the follow-up.

  17. Assessment of Some Immune Parameters in Occupationally Exposed Nuclear Power Plants Workers: Flowcytometry Measurements of T, B, NK and NKT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyuleva, Ilona; Panova, Delyana; Djounova, Jana; Rupova, Ivanka; Penkova, Kalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the results of a 10-year survey of the radiation effects of some immune parameters of occupationally exposed personnel from the Nuclear Power Plant "Kozloduy", Bulgaria. 438 persons working in NPP with cumulative doses between 0.06 mSv and 766.36mSv and a control group with 65 persons were studied. Flow cytometry measurements of T, B, natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cell lymphocyte populations were performed. Data were interpreted with regard to cumulative doses, length of service and age. The average values of the studied parameters of cellular immunity were in the reference range relative to age and for most of the workers were not significantly different from the control values. Low doses of ionizing radiation showed some trends of change in the number of CD3+CD4+ helper-inducer lymphocytes, CD3+ CD8+ and NKT cell counts. The observed changes in some of the studied parameters could be interpreted in terms of adaptation processes at low doses. At doses above 100-200 mSv, compensatory mechanisms might be involved to balance deviations in lymphocyte subsets. The observed variations in some cases could not be attributed only to the radiation exposure because of the impact of a number of other exogenous and endogenous factors on the immune system.

  18. Study of the correlation between the percentage of iNKT cells and the ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis%类风湿关节炎患者 iNKT 细胞频率与 IFN-γ/IL-4的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟明; 陈丹; 许鸣华; 侯明辉; 瓮沛杉; 魏芳; 王勇; 陈冬志

    2015-01-01

    目的:检测类风湿关节炎患者外周血中恒定自然杀伤T细胞( invariant nature killer T, iNKT)的频率及功能的变化,分析iNKT细胞频率与血清中IFN-γ/IL-4比值的相关性,进一步明确iNKT细胞在类风湿关节炎( rheumatoid arthritis, RA)发病中的意义。方法收集70例RA患者(并对其中30例患者在缓解期连续跟踪)和40例健康人外周静脉抗凝血并分离单个核细胞( peripheral blood mononuclear,PBMC),采用流式细胞技术(fluorescence-activated cell sorting,FACS)分析样本中iNKT细胞频率;再对PBMC体外培养,FACS动态检测iNKT细胞增殖频率;MILLIPLEX MAP Human Cytokine/Chemokine kit检测相应血清及PBMC培养上清中IFN-γ/IL-4的水平;RT-PCR检测iNKT细胞中IFN-γmRNA与IL-4 mRNA表达水平。结果与健康对照组相比,RA患者iNKT细胞频率及增殖频率显著降低(P<0.05),增殖延迟。治疗后缓解期患者iNKT细胞频率及增殖频率有所恢复,与活动期RA患者比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),与健康对照组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);与健康对照组相比,活动期RA患者血清及PBMC培养上清中IFN-γ/IL-4比值升高,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。缓解期RA患者血清中IFN-γ/IL-4比值下降,与活动期比较差异有统计学意义( P<0.05),与健康对照组比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);活动期RA患者iNKT细胞中IFN-γmRNA表达升高、IL-4 mRNA表达降低。缓解期RA患者与健康对照组间IFN-γmRNA、IL-4 mRNA表达水平的差异不明显;RA患者外周血中iNKT细胞频率与IFN-γ/IL-4比值呈负相关( P<0.05)。结论RA患者存在iNKT细胞频率低下与功能缺陷。 iNKT细胞参与RA发病过程,且与病情活动性密切相关。%Objective To investigate the alterations of invariant nature killer T( iNKT) cells in peripheral blood samples

  19. Clinicoradiological changes of brain NK/T cell lymphoma manifesting pure akinesia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimokawa Reiko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pure akinesia (PA is a distinct form of parkinsonism characterized by freezing phenomena. Little is known about brain tumor-associated PA. We highlight the clinicoradiological changes in a patient with PA and central nervous system (CNS metastases of natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL. Case presentation A 68-year-old man with stage IVB extranodal NKTL developed a gait disturbance. Neurological examination of his gait revealed freezing, start hesitation, short step, forward flexion posture, festination and postural instability. Mild facial hypomimia and micrographia were observed. There was no rigidity or tremor in any of the four extremities. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI displayed T2-hyperintense lesions in the dorsal brainstem, cerebellum and periventricular white matter. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC revealed hyperintensity in these regions. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology revealed CD56-positive cells on immunohistochemical staining. The patient's neurological deficits did not respond to L-dopa treatment and intrathecal administration of methotrexate (MTX. Two weeks later, he displayed confusion and generalized convulsions. T2-hyperintense lesions spread to the basal ganglia and the infratentorial regions. Gadolinium enhancement was observed in the cerebellum and frontal subcortex. DWI and the ADC revealed diffusion-restricted lesions in the middle cerebellar peduncles, left internal capsules and cerebral white matter. MTX pulse therapy and intrathecal administration of cytosine arabinoside and MTX were performed. Two months later, his ambulatory state was normalized. Brain MRI also revealed marked alleviation of the infratentorial and supratentorial lesions. Conclusions The clinicoradiological profile of our patient suggested that dorsal ponto-mesencephalic lesions could contribute to the pathogenesis of PA. Physicians should pay more attention to striking CNS seeding

  20. Developmental dynamics of post-selection thymic DN iNKT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassai, Maryam; Cooley, Brian; Gorski, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells develop in the thymus and branch off from the maturation pathway of conventional T cell at the DP stage. While different stages of iNKT cellular development have been defined, the actual time that iNKT cell precursors spend at each stage is still unknown. Here we report on maturation dynamics of post-selection DN iNKT cells by injecting wild-type DP(dim) thymocytes into the thymus of TCRα(-/-) mice and using the Vα14-Jα18 rearrangements as a molecular marker to follow the maturation dynamics of these cells. This study shows that the developmental dynamics of DN iNKT cells in DP(dim) are very rapid and that it takes less than 1 day to down-regulate CD4 and CD8 and become DN. These DN cells are precursors of peripheral DN iNKT cells and appear in the spleen in 1-2 days. Thymic DN iNKT residents are predominantly derived from cells that quickly return from the periphery. The expansion of a very small subset of DN iNKT precursors could also play a small role in this process. These data are an example of measuring T cell maturation in the thymus and show that the maturation dynamics of selected DN iNKT cells fall within the same general time frame as conventional αβ T cells.

  1. 狼疮性肾炎患者外周血中调节性T细胞与NKT细胞变化的研究%Patients with lupus nephritis regulatory cells and NKT cells in peripheral blood of change research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张羽; 杨秀华; 朱文静; 郭存丽

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察狼疮性肾炎(LN)患者外周血中的CD4+ CD25+调节性T细胞(Tregs)、NK/NKT细胞变化规律及其与LN的关系,并探讨其意义.方法 选择系统性红斑狼疮患者(无肾脏受累)17例,狼疮性肾炎患者23例,健康志愿者24例,分别做为SLE组、LN组和对照组.应用流式细胞仪检测其外周血中CD4+ CD25+ Tregs、CD3+ CD57+ NKT细胞、CD3-CD57+NKT细胞、CD3+ CD56+ NKT细胞、CD3-CD56+ NKT细胞、CD3-CD20+B细胞,并且对狼疮性肾炎患者进行肾脏活检以及尿蛋白、抗核抗体等检测.结果 LN组外周血中CD4+ CD25+ Tregs比例显著低于对照组(t=1.99,P=0.03),CD3+ CD57+ NKT细胞群比例显著高于对照组(t=1.98,P=0.02);CD3-CD57+ NKT细胞、CD3+ CD56+NKT细胞、CD3-CD56+ NKT细胞、CD3-CD20+B细胞变化不明显.结论 CD4+ CD25+ Tregs是阻止LN发生和发展的关键,CD3+ CD57+ NKT细胞对LN患者的肾脏受损起重要作用.%Objective To investigate the ratios of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory cells (Tregs) and NK/NKT cells in peripheral blood of patients of lupus nephritis and to explore their contribution on the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.Methods Patients of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with no renal involvement,lupus nephritis and healthy controls were studied.Flow cytometry was utilized to quantify the percentage of CD4 + CD25 + Tregs,CD3 + CD57 + NKT cells,CD3-CD57 + NK,CD3 + CD56 + NKT cells,CD3-CD56 + NK cells and CD3-CD20 + B cells in peripheral blood.Renal biopsy was performed for patients with lupus nephritis.Urine protein and antinuclear antibody were also detected.Results The mean percentage of CD4 + CD25 + Tregs in the peripheral blood of patients with lupus nephritis was significantly lower than the control group (t =1.99,P =0.03),while CD3+ CD57+ NKT from lupus nephritis was significantly higher compared with control (t =1.98,P =0.02).However,levels of CD3-CD57 + NKT cells,CD3 + CD56 + NKT cells,CD3-CD56 + NKT cells and CD3-CD20 + B cells did not show a

  2. Circulating and Tumor-Infiltrating Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cell Subset in Chinese Patients with Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rou-Jun Peng, Zhou-Feng Huang, Yi-Lan Zhang, Zhong-Yu Yuan, Yi Xia, Wen-Qi Jiang, Yi-Xin Zeng, Jiang Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Foxp3+ regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs usually act as an immune suppressor and correlate with poorer survival in malignancies. This study aims to investigate the distribution and characterization of Foxp3+ subset in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and tumor tissues from extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTL. Our study showed the percentage of Foxp3+ subset from PBMC was significantly higher than that of healthy individuals (P<0.001. The Foxp3+ subset from PBMCs expressed CD45RO, CTLA4, GITR, CCR7, and had an IL-10highIFNγ+TGFβ+IL-2lowIL-17low cytokine secreting phenotype. Interestingly, the existence of EBV antigen-specific CD8+Foxp3+ Tregs was discovered in ENKTL. Furthermore, the high density of Foxp3+ TILs was associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS in ENKTL patients (P<0.05. Collectively, our study implicates that EBV antigens could induce antigen-specific CD8+Foxp3+ Tregs in ENKTL, and Foxp3+ TILs is an independent factor for PFS in ENKTL.

  3. Critical Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Tumor-Induced Liver Immune Suppression through Inhibition of NKT Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongru; Li, Zheng; Wang, Li; Tian, Gaofei; Tian, Jun; Yang, Zishan; Cao, Guangchao; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Liqing; Wu, Zhenzhou; Yin, Zhinan

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis followed by the tumor development is the primary cause of death for cancer patients. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the growth of tumor resulted in the immune suppression, especially at the blood-enriched organ such as liver, were largely unknown. In this report, we studied the liver immune response of tumor-bearing (TB) mice using concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis model. We demonstrated that TB mice displayed an immune suppression phenotype, with attenuated alanine aminotransferase levels and liver damage upon Con A treatment. We also elucidated that large amounts of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) being influx into the liver in TB mice and these MDSCs were essential for liver immune suppression through both depletion and reconstitution approaches. We further determined that these MDSCs selectively suppressed the IFN-γ production deriving from NKT cells through membrane-bound transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Finally, we defined a tumor-derived TGF-β-triggered CXCL1/2/5- and CXCR2-dependent recruitment of MDSC into the liver. In summary, our results defined a novel mechanism of liver immune suppression triggered by growing living tumor and provided possible therapeutic targets against these MDSCs.

  4. The in vitro proliferation and cytokine production of Vα24+Vβ11+natural killer T cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xue-man; WANG Xiao-fei

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation in vitro of natural killer T (NKT) cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and dendritic cells (DC) may affect the immunoregulatory role of NKT cells. This study was designed to compare the number of NKT cells in patients with SLE to the number in healthy volunteers and measure the cytokines secreted from these NKT cells in vitro.Methods Three sets of culture conditions using (i) α-GalCer, (ii) DC, or (iii) both α-GalCer and DC (α-GalCer+DC) were adopted to expand NKT cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with SLE and healthy volunteers. Flow cytometry was used to assess the levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, interferon (IFN)-y and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α produced by the Vα24+Vβ11+ NKT cells.Results After 14 days in culture, the total cell count and percentage of Vα24+Vβ11+ NKT cells were increased under all conditions but were highest in the α-GalCer+DC group. The level of IL-4 and IL-10 secreted by Vα24+Vβ11+ NKT cells from patients with active SLE was found to be higher than that of inactive patients and the control group (P <0.05), while the levels of IFN-y and TNF-α were lower than those found in the inactive and control groups (P <0.05).Conclusions Vα24+Vβ11+ NKT cells showed the greatest expansion in vitro with α-GalCer and DC. Th2-type cytokines from Vα24+Vβ11+ NKT cells are the predominant type in patients with SLE, while Th1 cytokines predominate in the control group. This evolution of NKT cell function during the progression of the disease may have important implications in understanding the mechanism of SLE and for the development of possible therapies using NKT cell agonists.

  5. Interplay between carbohydrate and lipid in recognition of glycolipid antigens by natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Bo; Vela, Jose Luis; Zajonc, Dirk; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2012-04-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a T cell subpopulation that were named originally based on coexpression of receptors found on natural killer (NK) cells, cells of the innate immune system, and by T lymphocytes. The maturation and activation of NKT cells requires presentation of glycolipid antigens by CD1d, a cell surface protein distantly related to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded antigen presenting molecules. This specificity distinguishes NKT cells from most CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that recognize peptides presented by MHC class I and class II molecules. The rapid secretion of a large amount of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines by activated NKT cells endows them with the ability to play a vital role in the host immune defense against various microbial infections. In this review, we summarize progress on identifying the sources of microbe-derived glycolipid antigens recognized by NKT cells and the biochemical basis for their recognition.

  6. Progress on iNKT cell in the pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus%iNKT细胞在系统性红斑狼疮发病机制中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪玫; 瞿金涛; 周琳

    2010-01-01

    iNKT细胞是T细胞的一个亚群,表达T细胞表面受体(TCR)和NK细胞表面标志物NK1.1(人类为CD161),能够被非经典MHC-I类分子CDld提呈的糖脂抗原所激活,不仅具有T细胞的免疫调节作用,也具有NK细胞的自然杀伤作用.近年来的研究发现iNKT细胞在多种自身免疫性疾病,包括系统性红斑狼疮(Systemic Lupus Erythematosus,SLE)的发生中扮演重要角色,但具体机制还不明确.%Invariant natural killer T cells(iNKT)is a unique T cell lineage,which bearing an invariant T cell veceptcor(TCR)and NK1.1(human CD161),and can recognize a small variety of glycolipid antigens when CD1d(non-classical MHC-I)presents.iNKT cells play a regulatory role during immune responses by producing cytokines,and have the ability to destroy other cells as NK cells.Despite the ambiguous mechanism,recent researches show that iNKT plays all vital role in many autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE).

  7. NKT Phototonics A/S

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben; Kurdahl, Githa

    2016-01-01

    for accomplishing this goal: (1) establishing strategic partnerships with system integrators in order to gain access to commercial customers, or (2) repositioning NKT as a system integrator by embarking on an acquisition strategy. Turning the company into a more commercial entity would mean a complete change......To improve its profitability, NKT Photonics A/S (NKT), a small Danish company operating in the global photonics industry, was getting ready to undertake the commercialization process of its highly advanced optical fibre technology. NKT's chief executive officer (CEO) was considering two options...... of culture. It might also result in the loss of some top engineering and scientific minds and perhaps even the company's reputation. The CEO wondered if there a way to effectively introduce a business mindset to the organization while still preserving its innovation-based DNA....

  8. NKT cell modulates NAFLD potentiation of metabolic oxidative stress-induced mesangial cell activation and proximal tubular toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhasson, Firas; Dattaroy, Diptadip; Das, Suvarthi; Chandrashekaran, Varun; Seth, Ratanesh Kumar; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are associated with the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. We recently showed that NAFLD induces liver-specific cytochrome P-450 (CYP)2E1-mediated metabolic oxidative stress after administration of the CYP2E1 substrate bromodichloromethane (BDCM) (Seth RK, Das S, Kumar A, Chanda A, Kadiiska MB, Michelotti G, Manautou J, Diehl AM, Chatterjee S. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 274: 42–54, 2014; Seth RK, Kumar A, Das S, Kadiiska MB, Michelotti G, Diehl AM, Chatterjee S. Toxicol Sci 134:291–303, 2013). The present study examined the effects of CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress in NAFLD leading to kidney toxicity. Mice were fed a high-fat diet for 12 wk to induce NAFLD. NAFLD mice were exposed to BDCM, a CYP2E1 substrate, for 4 wk. NAFLD + BDCM increased CYP2E1-mediated lipid peroxidation in proximal tubular cells compared with mice with NAFLD alone or BDCM-treated lean mice, thus ruling out the exclusive role of BDCM. Lipid peroxidation increased IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. In parallel, mesangial cell activation was observed by increased α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor-β, which was blocked by the CYP2E1 inhibitor diallyl sulphide both in vivo and in vitro. Mice lacking natural killer T cells (CD1d knockout mice) showed elevated (>4-fold) proinflammatory mediator release, increased Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 and PDGF2 mRNA, and mesangial cell activation in the kidney. Finally, NAFLD CD1D knockout mice treated with BDCM exhibited increased high mobility group box 1 and Fas ligand levels and TUNEL-positive nuclei, indicating that higher cell death was attenuated in TLR4 knockout mice. Tubular cells showed increased cell death and cytokine release when incubated with activated mesangial cells. In summary, an underlying condition of progressive NAFLD causes renal immunotoxicity and aberrant glomerular function possibly through high mobility group box 1-dependent TLR4 signaling

  9. Deficiencies of Circulating Mucosal-associated Invariant T Cells and Natural Killer T Cells in Patients with Multiple Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young Goun; Choi, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jung Chul; Cho, Young Nan; Kang, Jeong Hwa; Jin, Hye Mi; Kee, Seung Jung; Park, Yong Wook

    2017-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells are known to play important roles in autoimmunity, infectious diseases and cancers. However, little is known about the roles of these invariant T cells in multiple trauma. The purposes of this study were to examine MAIT and NKT cell levels in patients with multiple trauma and to investigate potential relationships between these cell levels and clinical parameters. The study cohort was composed of 14 patients with multiple trauma and 22 non-injured healthy controls (HCs). Circulating MAIT and NKT cell levels in the peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. The severity of injury was categorised according to the scoring systems, such as Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Circulating MAIT and NKT cell numbers were significantly lower in multiple trauma patients than in HCs. Linear regression analysis showed that circulating MAIT cell numbers were significantly correlated with age, APACHE II, SAPS II, ISS category, hemoglobin, and platelet count. NKT cell numbers in the peripheral blood were found to be significantly correlated with APACHE II, SAPS II, and ISS category. This study shows numerical deficiencies of circulating MAIT cells and NKT cells in multiple trauma. In addition, these invariant T cell deficiencies were found to be associated with disease severity. These findings provide important information for predicting the prognosis of multiple trauma. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  10. 鼻腔NK/T细胞淋巴瘤的影像学诊断%Diagnosis of Primary Nasal Cavity NK/T Cell Lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宽; 彭通略

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨鼻腔NK/T细胞淋巴瘤的CT及MRI表现特征.材料和方法 回顾性分析21例经病理证实的鼻腔NK/T细胞淋巴瘤患者的CT和MRI影像学资料及临床资料.结果 本组21例中单侧7例,双侧14例,依据病变范围将本病分为局限型和弥漫型两种类型.局限型13例,主要位于鼻腔内,其中鼻腔前部11例,鼻腔后部2例;骨质改变不明显,浸润鼻旁或面部皮下组织9例,弥漫型8例,肿瘤范围广泛并向鼻腔周围结构浸润扩展,其中累及鼻旁窦7例,侵入眼眶1例、颞下窝2例,延伸至鼻咽、口咽部并累及咽旁间隙6例,骨质破坏7例,颈部淋巴结受累1例.CT显示肿瘤呈软组织密度充填鼻腔并沿鼻黏膜蔓延,增强后轻到中度不均匀强化.MRI T1WI肿瘤呈等信号,信号强度类似或稍低于肌肉;T2WI呈不均匀稍高信号,信号强度高于肌肉,但低于鼻黏膜,增强后轻到中度不均匀强化.结论 鼻腔NK/T细胞型淋巴瘤影像学表现有一定特征,CT、MRI检查可提示诊断,有利于确定病变范围及临床分期.%Purpose To characterize CT and MRI features of primary nasal cavity NK/T cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Materials and Methods CT or/and MRI findings of 21 cases with nasal cavity NK/T cell lymphoma verified by pathologically were analyzed retrospectively. Results Of all 21 cases, 7 were involved in unilateral nasal cavity, 14 were involved in bilateral nasal cavity. Nasal cavity NK/T cell lymphoma was divided into localized type and diffuse type according to the range of lesion. A total of 13 cases were localized type, mainly located in the nasal cavity, 11 of them located in front of the nasal cavity, 2 located in posterior nasal cavity, bone mass showed no obvious change, 9 were involved in paranasal or facial subcutaneous tissue. A total of 8 cases were diffuse type, the lesion was involved extensively and infiltrated to the adjacent structures of nasal cavity, 7 cases among them involved the paranasal

  11. Efficacy and tolerance of pegaspargase, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with sandwiched radiotherapy in the treatment of newly-diagnosed extranodal nature killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Shi-Chuan; Ren, Yuan-Rong; Xiong, Zhu-Juan; Wei, Wen; Luo, Lei; Li, Li

    2016-08-01

    Extranodal nature killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma (ENKL), nasal type, is a highly aggressive and heterogeneous disease. Here we report a retrospective study of 38 newly-diagnosed ENKL patients treated with pegaspargase, gemcitabine, oxaliplatin (P-Gemox) and sandwiched radiotherapy in our department during 2012-2016. A median of 4 (range, 2-6) (total=141) cycles of P-Gemox were administered. Interim restaging after at least 2 cycles showed complete remission (CR) rate of 23.68%, partial remission (PR) rate of 63.16%, giving an overall response rate (ORR) of 86.84%. On treatment completion, the ORR became 92.1% (CR=86.84%, PR=5.26%). Only one patient experienced disease progression during therapy. Multivariate analysis showed gender was a significant independent factor impacting on CR. Hematologic toxicity was common yet nonhematologic toxicity was mild, both of them can be well controlled by supportive treatments and only one treatment-related death was observed. At a median follow-up of 15.5 months, 4 patients (10.53%) experienced disease progression and died of disease. 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate and 1-year overall survival (OS) rate for the whole cohort were 86.7% and 86.6%. The P-Gemox regimen with sandwiched radiotherapy may be a promising option in the treatment of newly-diagnosed ENKL due to its high efficacy yet low toxicity.

  12. Natural IgM and TLR Agonists Switch Murine Splenic Pan-B to “Regulatory” Cells That Suppress Ischemia-Induced Innate Inflammation via Regulating NKT-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter I. Lobo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural IgM anti-leukocyte autoantibodies (IgM-ALAs inhibit inflammation by several mechanisms. Here, we show that pan-B cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs are switched to regulatory cells when pretreated ex vivo with IgM. B cells are also switched to regulatory cells when pretreated ex vivo with CpG but not with LPS. Pre-emptive infusion of such ex vivo induced regulatory cells protects C57BL/6 mice from ischemia-induced acute kidney injury (AKI via regulation of in vivo NKT-1 cells, which normally amplify the innate inflammatory response to DAMPS released after reperfusion of the ischemic kidney. Such ex vivo induced regulatory pan-B cells and BMDC express low CD1d and inhibit inflammation by regulating in vivo NKT-1 in the context of low-lipid antigen presentation and by a mechanism that requires costimulatory molecules, CD1d, PDL1/PD1, and IL10. Second, LPS and CpG have opposite effects on induction of regulatory activity in BMDC and B cells. LPS enhances regulatory activity of IgM-pretreated BMDC but negates the IgM-induced regulatory activity in B cells, while CpG, with or without IgM pretreatment, induces regulatory activity in B cells but not in BMDC. Differences in the response of pan-B and dendritic cells to LPS and CpG, especially in the presence of IgM-ALA, may have relevance during infections and inflammatory disorders where there is an increased IgM-ALA and release of TLRs 4 and 9 ligands. Ex vivo induced regulatory pan-B cells could have therapeutic relevance as these easily available cells can be pre-emptively infused to prevent AKI that can occur during open heart surgery or in transplant recipients receiving deceased donor organs.

  13. Natural IgM and TLR Agonists Switch Murine Splenic Pan-B to “Regulatory” Cells That Suppress Ischemia-Induced Innate Inflammation via Regulating NKT-1 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Peter I.; Schlegel, Kailo H.; Bajwa, Amandeep; Huang, Liping; Okusa, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Natural IgM anti-leukocyte autoantibodies (IgM-ALAs) inhibit inflammation by several mechanisms. Here, we show that pan-B cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) are switched to regulatory cells when pretreated ex vivo with IgM. B cells are also switched to regulatory cells when pretreated ex vivo with CpG but not with LPS. Pre-emptive infusion of such ex vivo induced regulatory cells protects C57BL/6 mice from ischemia-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) via regulation of in vivo NKT-1 cells, which normally amplify the innate inflammatory response to DAMPS released after reperfusion of the ischemic kidney. Such ex vivo induced regulatory pan-B cells and BMDC express low CD1d and inhibit inflammation by regulating in vivo NKT-1 in the context of low-lipid antigen presentation and by a mechanism that requires costimulatory molecules, CD1d, PDL1/PD1, and IL10. Second, LPS and CpG have opposite effects on induction of regulatory activity in BMDC and B cells. LPS enhances regulatory activity of IgM-pretreated BMDC but negates the IgM-induced regulatory activity in B cells, while CpG, with or without IgM pretreatment, induces regulatory activity in B cells but not in BMDC. Differences in the response of pan-B and dendritic cells to LPS and CpG, especially in the presence of IgM-ALA, may have relevance during infections and inflammatory disorders where there is an increased IgM-ALA and release of TLRs 4 and 9 ligands. Ex vivo induced regulatory pan-B cells could have therapeutic relevance as these easily available cells can be pre-emptively infused to prevent AKI that can occur during open heart surgery or in transplant recipients receiving deceased donor organs. PMID:28878768

  14. The Genetic Deletion of 6q21 and PRDM1 and Clinical Implications in Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type

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    Li Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 6q21 genetic deletion has been frequently detected in extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (EN-NK/T-NT, and PRDM1 is considered as candidate gene. However, direct detection of PRDM1 deletion has not been well documented. We investigated genetic alterations of 6q21 and PRDM1 in 43 cases of EN-NK/T-NT and cell lines by FISH. PRDM1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The correlation between genetic alteration and PRDM1 expression and the significance in clinic-pathologic were analyzed. Heterozygous deletion of 6q21 and/or PRDM1 was observed in 24 of 43 cases (55.81% of EN-NK/T-NT including 16 cases (37.21% for 6q21 deletion and 19 cases (44.19% for PRDM1 deletion. Similarly, heterozygous codeletion of 6q21 and PRDM1 was identified in NK92 and NKL cells. The heterozygous deletion of 6q21 and/or PRDM1 was correlated with PRDM1 expression. However, genetic deletion of 6q21 and/or PRDM1 was not correlated with clinicopathological features of EN-NK/T-NT, while PRDM1 expression showed positive effect on the outcome of patients as those as disease site, B symptom, and clinical stage. Thus, heterozygous deletion of 6q21 and/or PRDM1 was frequently detected in EN-NK/T-NT and correlated with downregulation of PRDM1. But the prognostic role of genetic deletion needs to be further evaluated in larger cohort.

  15. 早期鼻腔NK/T细胞淋巴瘤放疗模式的研究现状%Current study status of radiotherapy modality on early stage nasal NK/T cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩宝林

    2012-01-01

    鼻腔NK/T细胞淋巴瘤属于结外非霍奇金淋巴瘤的一种少见特殊类型,目前研究已经确立了放疗在其治疗中的地位和作用,但对于具体的放疗模式,如适宜的放疗靶区、放疗剂量以及颈部预防照射等问题仍存在着较大的争议.多数研究表明扩大野放疗和较高的放疗剂量是取得较好放疗疗效的关键;局限期病例多不主张颈部预防照射,但对于病变范围广泛者仍有较大争论.%Nasal NK/T cell lymphoma is a rare and distinct type of extranodal Non-Hodgkin' s lymphoma. Current study has proved that Radiotherapy is the most effective treatment method in the early stage nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, but there is no universal standard for concrete radiotherapy modality, such as the radiation target, the radiation dose and preventive neck radiation. Most studies have proved that radiotherapy of extended field and higher dose achieved good effect in early stage nasal NK/T cell lymphoma.And the studies also do not suggested preventive neck radiation in local stage patients, but it need further study in the extensive stage patients.

  16. The extended family of CD1d-restricted T cells: sifting through a mixed bag of TCRs, antigens and functions

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    Elodie eMacho-Fernandez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells comprise a family of specialized T cells that recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d. Based on their T cell receptor (TCR usage and antigen-specificities, CD1d-restricted NKT cells have been divided into two main subsets: type I NKT cells that use a canonical invariant TCR α-chain and recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, and type II NKT cells that use a more diverse αβ TCR repertoire and do not recognize α-GalCer. In addition, α-GalCer-reactive NKT cells that use non-canonical αβ TCRs and CD1d-restricted T cells that use γδ or δ/αβ TCRs have recently been identified, revealing further diversity among CD1d-restricted T cells. Importantly, in addition to their distinct antigen specificities, functional differences are beginning to emerge between the different members of the CD1d-restricted T cell family. In this review, while using type I NKT cells as comparison, we will focus on type II NKT cells and the other non-invariant CD1d-restricted T cell subsets, and discuss our current understanding of the antigens they recognize, the formation of stimulatory CD1d/antigen complexes, the modes of TCR-mediated antigen recognition, and the mechanisms and consequences of their activation that underlie their function in antimicrobial responses, antitumor immunity, and autoimmunity.

  17. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells.

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    Ilona Hromadnikova

    Full Text Available Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450-463 plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1 and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A by CD3+CD56+ (NKT, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by

  18. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD) on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Li, Shuang; Kotlabova, Katerina; Dickinson, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450-463) plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1) and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A) by CD3+CD56+ (NKT), CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by the treatment

  19. Nasal Type Extranodal Natural Killer/T (NK/T) Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Periorbital Cellulitis: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawabkeh, Ma’in Ali Al; Sulaiti, Mansour Al; Sa’ey, Hamad Al; Ganesan, Shanmugam

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Nasal type • extra nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma Symptoms: Left periorbital swelling • redness • pain for 25 days • yellowish eye discharge associated • headache • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Otolaryngology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Extranodal lymphoma of the paranasal sinuses is a rare clinical entity seen in only 5–8% of extranodal lymphomas of the head and neck. Nasal natural killer/T cell lymphoma (Nasal NKTCL), which is a subtype of peripheral T cell lymphoma, constitutes about 1.4% of all lymphomas. NKTCL is usually diagnosed at a late stage because it presents with nonspecific symptoms in the early stages. Case Report: We report the case of a 25-year-old male patient who presented with periorbital swelling treated as fungal sinusitis but proven to have NKTCL. We review the literature and discuss the clinical manifestations of the disease, its relation to EBV virus, the histological and radiological characteristics, the prognostic indicators, and treatment options. This case report shows physicians that NKTCL lymphoma can present as periorbital cellulitis, although few similar cases are found in the literature. Conclusions: NKTCL is a destructive midline tumor that should be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis of paranasal sinus lesions to help in early diagnosis, which can improve the prognosis. PMID:27932776

  20. Serum EBV EA-IgA and VCA-IgA antibodies can be used for risk group stratification and prognostic prediction in extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma: 24-year experience at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhua; Rao, Huilan; Yan, Shumei; Wang, Fang; Wu, Qinian; Feng, Yanfen; Zhang, Yujing

    2017-08-01

    Although extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) is consistently associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, the manifestation and prognostic value of serum EBV antibodies still remain unknown. One hundred and forty-one patients with ENKTCL were evaluated for serum EBV EA-IgA and VCA-IgA antibodies levels in the past 24 years in our institution. Their correlation with clinicopathological features, plasma EBV DNA load, and patients' outcomes was analyzed. EBV EA-IgA ≥1:10 and VCA-IgA ≥1:160 were found in 18.4 and 16.3% of patients, respectively. They correlated with adverse ENKTCL profile and inferior overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). EA-IgA ≥1:10 was an independent prognostic factor on OS (RR = 2.276, p = 0.008) and associated with lower complete response (CR) rate (34.8 vs 70.6%, p = 0.001) and higher relapse rate in CR patients (62.5 vs 34.7%, p = 0.016). In subgroup analysis, both EA-IgA ≥1:10 and VCA-IgA ≥1:160 significantly correlated with inferior OS and PFS in patients with stage I/II, IPI score 0-1, plasma EBV DNA (+), and CR. Patients with plasma EBV DNA (+) and EA-IgA ≥1:10 (or VCA-IgA ≥1:160) had significantly shorter periods of OS and PFS in comparison with other corresponding groups. Elevated serum EBV EA-IgA and VCA-IgA levels were related to adverse ENKTCL profile and correlated with poor treatment response, early relapse, and poor prognosis in patients with ENKTCL. These findings provide convincing evidence for the use of serum EBV EA-IgA and VCA-IgA antibodies for risk group stratification and prognostic prediction in ENKTCL.

  1. Aggressive NK/T Lymphoma with Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation%自体造血干细胞移植治疗侵袭性NK/T细胞淋巴瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛挺; 陈心传; 薛红利; 李建军; 刘志刚; 刘霆

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the therapeutic effect of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) on aggressive NK/T lymphoma. Methods The clinical data of one patient with aggressive NK/T lymphoma diagnosed in January 2005 were retrospectively analyzed, and the relevant domestic literatures were analyzed. Results This thirty-seven-year-old female patient had good disease control after undergoing chemotherapy with CHOAP and ICE regimens, surgery, and locoregional radiotherapy. After that, she had been collected enough bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells, then underwent auto-HSCT with these cells. The conditioning regimen was TBI plus Ecy. On the +29th day after transplantation, the hematopoietic reconstruction was successful. During the follow-up period, the patient was in complete remission status all along and her disease-free survival (DFS) was 67 months. Conclusion Auto-HSCT is effective on aggressive NK/T lymphoma.%目的 探讨自体造血干细胞移植(autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation,auto-HSCT)治疗侵袭性NK/T细胞淋巴瘤的疗效.方法 对我科2005年1月16日收治的1例侵袭性NK/T细胞淋巴瘤患者的造血干细胞移植和随访资料进行回顾性分析,并复习国内外相关文献.结果 患者为37岁女性,诊断结外鼻型NK/T细胞淋巴瘤,系统性,经CHOAP和ICE方案化学疗法、手术、局部放射治疗控制病情良好后,采集自体骨髓造血干细胞,行auto-HSCT,预处理方案为全身放射治疗+ECy;移植+29 d造血功能即顺利重建;移植后密切随访,患者一直处于完全缓解,至今已存活67个月.结论 auto-HSCT治疗侵袭性NK/T细胞淋巴瘤疗效肯定、可靠.

  2. Donor bone marrow cells are essential for iNKT cell-mediated Foxp3+ Treg cell expansion in a murine model of transplantation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyairi, Satoshi; Hirai, Toshihito; Ishii, Rumi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Nunoda, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-01-26

    Mixed chimerism induction is the most reliable method for establishing transplantation tolerance. We previously described a novel treatment using a suboptimal dose of anti-CD40 ligand (anti-CD40L) and liposomal formulation of a ligand for invariant natural killer T cells administered to sub-lethally irradiated recipient mice after donor bone marrow cell (BMC) transfer. Recipient mice treated with this regimen showed expansion of a Foxp3-positive regulatory T(Treg) cell phenotype, and formation of mixed chimera. However, the mechanism of expansion and bioactivity of Treg cells remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of donor BMCs in the expansion of bioactive Treg cells. The mouse model was transplanted with a heart allograft the day after treatment. The results showed that transfer of spleen cells in place of BMCs failed to deplete host interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells, expand host Ki67(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg cells, and prolong graft survival. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice who received Treg cells obtained from BMC-recipients accepted skin grafts in an allo-specific manner. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which were a copious cell subset in BMCs, enhanced the Ki67 expression of Treg cells. This suggests that donor BMCs are indispensable for the expansion of host bioactive Treg cells in our novel treatment for transplant tolerance induction.

  3. Cell-autonomous requirement for TCF1 and LEF1 in the development of Natural Killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Zhu, Wandi S; Steinke, Farrah C; Xue, Hai-Hui; Sen, Jyoti Misra

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells develop from common CD4(+) CD8(+) thymocyte precursors. Transcriptional programs that regulate the development of NKT cells in the thymus development remain to be fully delineated. Here, we demonstrate a cell-intrinsic requirement for transcription factors TCF1 and LEF1 for the development of all subsets of NKT cells. Conditional deletion of TCF1 alone results in a substantial reduction in NKT cells. The remaining NKT cells are eliminated when TCF1 and LEF1 are both deleted. These data reveal an essential role for TCF1 and LEF1 in development of NKT cells.

  4. Recognition of microbial glycolipids by Natural Killer T cells

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    Dirk Michael Zajonc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the Major Histocompatibility (MHC family (MHC I and II, lipids, glycolipids and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are Type I Natural killer T (iNKT cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi the causative agents of Lyme disease and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR, leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18 and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  5. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  6. Expression and Clinical Significance of CD8+Natural Killer T Cell Stimulatory Receptor NKG2D in Peripheral Blood of Lung Cancer Patients

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    Ni CHENG

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective NKG2D-expressing CD8+NKT cells and soluble major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (sMICA is one of recently emerged general interests in tumor research area. The aim of this study is to investigate the levels of NKG2D-expressing CD8+NKT cells in peripheral blood of lung cancer patients, which are remarkably related to clinical significance, and to analyze the correlation between NKG2D-expressing CD8+NKT cells and sMICA levels, and to explore the role of NKG2D and sMICA in immune surveillance. Methods Flow cytometry was used to determine the percentage of NKG2D-expressing CD8+NKT cells, and ELISA was used to measure the levels of sMICA in peripheral blood of 82 untreated lung cancer patients and 45 healthy controls. The association of NKG2D levels with clinical features was analyzed. Results The expression of NKG2D on CD8+NKT cells in lung cancer group was significantly lower than that in healthy group, with statistically significant difference (P < 0.001. And with the increase of TNM stage, NKG2D expression rate reduced gradually. NKG2D expression in stage IV disease was significantly lower than which stage I-II and III disease (P < 0.001. The expression of NKG2D on CD8+NKT cells was remarkably lower in that in smokers than that in non-smokers, with statistically significant difference (P < 0.05. NKG2D exhibited negative correlation with sMICA (r=-0.598, P < 0.001. Conclusion Lung cancer has low expression of NKG2D in CD8+NKT cells which correlate with pathological stage. Detection of NKG2D and sMICA might be helpful to understand immune functions and provide evaluation of combined treatment for clinical cancer.

  7. Post-treatment plasma EBV-DNA positivity predicts early relapse and poor prognosis for patients with extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma in the era of asparaginase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hua; Wang, Jing-hua; Xia, Zhong-jun; Lu, Yue; Huang, Hui-qiang; Jiang, Wen-qi; Zhang, Yu-jing

    2015-10-06

    Circulating Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA is a biomarker of EBV-associated malignancies. Its prognostic value in early stage NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) in the era of asparaginase was investigated. 68 patients were treated with a median of 4 cycles of asparaginase-based chemotherapy followed by a median of 54.6 Gy (range 50-60 Gy) radiation. The amount of EBV-DNA was prospectively measured in both pretreatment and post-treatment plasma samples by real-time quantitative PCR. At the end of treatment, complete response (CR) rate was 79.4%, and overall response rate (ORR) was 88.2%. Patients with negative pretreatment EBV-DNA had a higher CR rate (96.0% vs. 69.8%, p = 0.023). The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate and overall survival (OS) rate was 71% and 83%, respectively. In multivariate survival analysis, post-treatment EBV-DNA positivity and treatment response (non-CR) were prognostic factors for both worse PFS and OS (p EBV-DNA positivity correlated with inferior PFS and OS (both p EBV-DNA, negative post-treatment EBV-DNA correlated with better PFS and OS (both p EBV-DNA positivity can predict early relapse and poor prognosis for patients with early stage NKTCL in the era of asparaginase, and may be used as an indicator of minimal residual disease.

  8. 食管癌患者外周血中自然杀伤性T细胞含量的检测及其临床意义%NKT cells in peripheral blood of patients with esophageal carcinoma and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路鹏; 苏文; 王艳峰; 马克蓉; 张羽捷

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究食管癌患者外周血中自然杀伤性(NK)T细胞在手术前后的表达情况.方法 采用流式细胞术(FCM)分析59例食管癌患者手术前后外周血中CD3、CD56、CD4、CD8抗体的表达,研究NKT细胞及其亚群的表达情况及所占比例.结果 随着CD+3 CD+56 CD+8/CD+3 CD+56 CD+4的比值逐渐升高,Ⅲ~Ⅳ期食管癌患者的比例逐渐降低,ANOVA示组间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);CD+3 CD+56 CD+8/CD+3CD+56 CD+4的比值与CD+3 CD+56 CD+4NKT细胞非线性相关;CD+3 CD+56 CD+8 NKT细胞与NK细胞正相关,与CD+3T细胞负相关.结论 CD+3 CD+56 CD+8/CD+3 CD+56 CD+4的比值可能与肿瘤负荷有关,并且有助于判断食管癌患者的疾病程度及预后.%Objective To explore the expression, as well as the proportion of subsets of the natural killer (NK) T cells in peripheral blood of patients with esophageal carcinoma before and after surgery, and provide ideas and experimental basis for immune treatment through tests. Methods Using CD3, CD56, CD4 and CD8 antibody to study the NKT cells and its subsets. Peripheral NKT cell subsets in 59 patients with esophageal carcinoma were analysed by flow cytometer. Results With the ratio of CD+3 CD+56 CD+8/CD+3 CD+56 CD+4 gradually increased, the proportion of phase Ⅲ- Ⅳ patients with esophageal carcinoma is gradually decreased between the groups. One-way ANOVA analysis showed that there were differences between the groups (P <0.05). The ratio of CD+3 CD+56 CD+8/CD+3 CD+56 CD+4 was in Non-linear related to CD+3 CD+56 CD+4NKT cells; CD+3 CD+56 CD+8; NKT cells were positively correlated with CD-3 CD+56 NK cells and negatively correlated with CD+3 T cells.Conclusion The ratio of CD+3 CD+56 CD+8/CD+3 CD+56 CD+4 may relate to tumor burden, and is helpful to determine the extent of disease in patients with esophageal carcinoma and prognosis.

  9. Clinical analysis of 27 cases with nasal type extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma%结外鼻型NK/T细胞淋巴瘤27例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李楠; 李彩霞; 刘红; 叶璐; 马超; 吴德沛

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristic of the nasal type extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKL) as well as the therapeutic effects for different treatment methods and element that would affect prognosis.Methods Review and analyze the 27 patients with pathologically confirmed ENKL patients received radiotherapy (3 cases),chemotherapy (9 cases),combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy (15 cases),3 of whom received auto-HSCT.Detailed B symptoms,lactate dehydrogenase (LDH),performance status (PS) scores,international prognostic index (IPI),Ann Arbor stage and therapeutic modality were included in univariate analysis.Results The average overall survival time was 32 (2-42) months.The 1,2and 3 year overall survival (OS) rates were 79.5 %,71.6 %,53.7 %,respectively.The 2-year overall survival of patients who was early stage (stage Ⅰ + Ⅱ ) was 83.3 %,and those who was advanced stage(stage Ⅲ+Ⅳ) was 62.3 % (P =0.368).Among the patients in early stage,after radiotherapy or chemotherapy,4 cases achieved OR (overall response) which is complete remission (CR) or partial remission (PR),9/10 in combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy achieved OR. While among those in their advantage stage,the OR in chemotherapy is 2 cases,2/5 in combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.In univariate analysis,age and short-term response were main factors of survival (P <0.05).Conclusion To treat the nasal ENKL in the early stage,radiotherapy can achieve a better effect,while combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy is an important method for patients in advantage stage.Age and short-term response may be.prognostic factors of nasal type ENKL.%目的 分析结外鼻型NK/T细胞淋巴瘤(ENKL)的临床特征、不同治疗方法的疗效及影响预后的因素.方法 回顾性分析27例ENKL患者,予单纯放疗3例,单纯化疗9例,其余15例采用放化疗联合治疗,其中3例患者行自体造血干细胞移植(auto-HSCT).对B组症状、乳酸脱

  10. A phase II prospective study of the "Sandwich" protocol, L-asparaginase, cisplatin, dexamethasone and etoposide chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiation and cisplatin, in newly diagnosed, I/II stage, nasal type, extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Zhang, Li; Xie, Li; Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Yu; Liu, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Rong; Deng, Yao-Tiao; Zhao, Sha; Zou, Li-Qun

    2017-07-25

    Nasal-type, extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) is a special type of lymphomas with geographic and racial specificity. Up to now, the standard first-line treatment is still not unified. In our previous report, the "sandwich" protocol produced good results. Continuing to use the "sandwich" mode, a new chemotherapy composed of L-asparaginase, cisplatin, etoposide and dexamethasone (LVDP) plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was conducted in more patients with newly diagnosed, I/II stage ENKTCL. The results showed that 66 patients were enrolled. Overall response rate was 86.4% including 83.3% complete response and 3.0% partial remission. With the median follow-up of 23.5 months, 3-year overall survival and 3-year progression-free survival were 70.1% and 67.4%, respectively. The survival rate in stage II and extra-cavity stage I was significantly less than that in limited stage I (p < 0.05). Therefore, we thought that the "sandwich" mode was worthy of being generalized and LVDP combined with CCRT was an effective protocol for I/II stage ENKTCL. But this regimen was not suitable for all stage I/II patients and warrants larger sample and layering investigation. This study was a registered clinical trial with number ChiCTR-TNC-12002353.

  11. iNKT/CD1d-antitumor immunotherapy significantly increases the efficacy of therapeutic CpG/peptide-based cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corgnac, Stéphanie; Perret, Rachel; Zhang, Lianjun; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Romero, Pedro; Donda, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines aim to boost the natural immunity against transformed cancer cells, and a series of adjuvants and co-stimulatory molecules have been proposed to enhance the immune response against weak self-antigens expressed on cancer cells. For instance, a peptide/CpG-based cancer vaccine has been evaluated in several clinical trials and was shown in pre-clinical studies to favor the expansion of effector T versus Tregs cells, resulting in a potent antitumor activity, as compared to other TLR ligands. Alternatively, the adjuvant activity of CD1d-restricted invariant NKT cells (iNKT) on the innate and adaptive immunity is well demonstrated, and several CD1d glycolipid ligands are under pre-clinical and clinical evaluation. Importantly, additive or even synergistic effects have been shown upon combined CD1d/NKT agonists and TLR ligands. The aim of the present study is to combine the activation and tumor targeting of activated iNKT, NK and T cells. Activation and tumor targeting of iNKT cells via recombinant α-galactosylceramide (αGC)-loaded CD1d-anti-HER2 fusion protein (CD1d-antitumor) is combined or not with OVA peptide/CpG vaccine. Circulating and intratumoral NK and H-2Kb/OVA-specific CD8 responses are monitored, as well as the state of activation of dendritic cells (DC) with regard to activation markers and IL-12 secretion. The resulting antitumor therapy is tested against established tumor grafts of B16 melanoma cells expressing human HER2 and ovalbumin. The combined CD1d/iNKT antitumor therapy and CpG/peptide-based immunization leads to optimized expansion of NK and OVA-specific CD8 T cells (CTLs), likely resulting from the maturation of highly pro-inflammatory DCs as seen by a synergistic increase in serum IL-12. The enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses result in higher tumor inhibition that correlates with increased numbers of OVA-specific CTLs at the tumor site. Antibody-mediated depletion experiments further demonstrate that in

  12. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1......MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  13. Innate immune control of EBV-infected B cells by invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Brian K; Tsai, Kevin; Allan, Lenka L; Zheng, Dong Jun; Nie, Johnny C; Biggs, Catherine M; Hasan, Mohammad R; Kozak, Frederick K; van den Elzen, Peter; Priatel, John J; Tan, Rusung

    2013-10-10

    Individuals with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease lack invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and are exquisitely susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. To determine whether iNKT cells recognize or regulate EBV, resting B cells were infected with EBV in the presence or absence of iNKT cells. The depletion of iNKT cells increased both viral titers and the frequency of EBV-infected B cells. However, EBV-infected B cells rapidly lost expression of the iNKT cell receptor ligand CD1d, abrogating iNKT cell recognition. To determine whether induced CD1d expression could restore iNKT recognition in EBV-infected cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) were treated with AM580, a synthetic retinoic acid receptor-α agonist that upregulates CD1d expression via the nuclear protein, lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1). AM580 significantly reduced LEF-1 association at the CD1d promoter region, induced CD1d expression on LCL, and restored iNKT recognition of LCL. CD1d-expressing LCL elicited interferon γ secretion and cytotoxicity by iNKT cells even in the absence of exogenous antigen, suggesting an endogenous iNKT antigen is expressed during EBV infection. These data indicate that iNKT cells may be important for early, innate control of B cell infection by EBV and that downregulation of CD1d may allow EBV to circumvent iNKT cell-mediated immune recognition.

  14. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells to generate invariant natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Drake J; Liu, Siyuan; Ji, Sunjong; Li, Bo; McLaughlin, Jami; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N; Yang, Lili

    2015-02-03

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a small population of αβ T lymphocytes. They bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems and mediate strong and rapid responses to many diseases, including cancer, infections, allergies, and autoimmunity. However, the study of iNKT cell biology and the therapeutic applications of these cells are greatly limited by their small numbers in vivo (∼0.01-1% in mouse and human blood). Here, we report a new method to generate large numbers of iNKT cells in mice through T-cell receptor (TCR) gene engineering of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We showed that iNKT TCR-engineered HSCs could generate a clonal population of iNKT cells. These HSC-engineered iNKT cells displayed the typical iNKT cell phenotype and functionality. They followed a two-stage developmental path, first in thymus and then in the periphery, resembling that of endogenous iNKT cells. When tested in a mouse melanoma lung metastasis model, the HSC-engineered iNKT cells effectively protected mice from tumor metastasis. This method provides a powerful and high-throughput tool to investigate the in vivo development and functionality of clonal iNKT cells in mice. More importantly, this method takes advantage of the self-renewal and longevity of HSCs to generate a long-term supply of engineered iNKT cells, thus opening up a new avenue for iNKT cell-based immunotherapy.

  15. Selective Loss of Innate CD4+ Vα24 Natural Killer T Cells in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Johan K.; Fast, Noam M.; Palacios, Emil H.; Fennelly, Glenn; Dobroszycki, Joanna; Palumbo, Paul; Wiznia, Andrew; Grant, Robert M.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Rosenberg, Michael G.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2002-01-01

    Vα24 natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate immune cells involved in regulation of immune tolerance, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. However, the effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection on these cells is unknown. Here, we report that the Vα24 NKT cells can be subdivided into CD4+ or CD4− subsets that differ in their expression of the homing receptors CD62L and CD11a. Furthermore, both CD4+ and CD4− NKT cells frequently express both CXCR4 and CCR5 HIV coreceptors. We find that the numbers of NKT cells are reduced in HIV-infected subjects with uncontrolled viremia and marked CD4+ T-cell depletion. The number of CD4+ NKT cells is inversely correlated with HIV load, indicating depletion of this subset. In contrast, CD4− NKT-cell numbers are unaffected in subjects with high viral loads. HIV infection experiments in vitro show preferential depletion of CD4+ NKT cells relative to regular CD4+ T cells, in particular with virus that uses the CCR5 coreceptor. Thus, HIV infection causes a selective loss of CD4+ lymph node homing (CD62L+) NKT cells, with consequent skewing of the NKT-cell compartment to a predominantly CD4− CD62L− phenotype. These data indicate that the key immunoregulatory NKT-cell compartment is compromised in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:12097565

  16. T lymphocytes and dendritic cells are activated by the deletion of peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eun-Yi; Noh, Young-Wook; Han, Ying-Hao; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Jin-Man; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2006-02-15

    Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) is a member of antioxidant enzyme family and it plays a protective role against oxidative damage. Constitutive production of endogenous reactive oxygen species was detected in spleen and bone marrow cells lacking Prx II. Here, we investigated the role of Prx II in immune responses. The total number of splenocytes (especially, the population of S-phase cells and CD3(+) T cells) was significantly higher in Prx II(-/-) mice than in wild type. Number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in Prx II(-/-) mice was also higher than wild type. Differentiation of Prx II(-/-) mouse bone marrow cells into CD11c-positive dendritic cells was greater than that of wild type. Transplantation of Prx II(-/-) bone marrow cells into wild type mice increased PBMCs in blood and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Prx II deletion enhances concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenocyte proliferation and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) activity of bone marrow-derived CD11c-positive dendritic cells to stimulate recipient splenocytes. Collectively, these data suggest that Prx II inhibits the immune cell responsiveness, which may be regulated by scavenging the low amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  17. 持续肾脏替代治疗侵袭性NK/T细胞淋巴瘤并发急性肿瘤溶解综合征1例并文献复习%Continuous renal replacement therapy on acute tumor lysis syndrome in an aggressive NK/T cell lymphoma:A case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈芯仪; 吴俣

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To improve the recognition of acute tumor lysis syndrome (ATLS) and to explore the role of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in its emergency.Method:A case of ATLS in an aggressive NK/T cell lymphoma was emergently cured by CRRT.Result:After CRRT,the patient with heart failure symptoms quickly eased,urine output increased,potassium and metabolic acidosis were corrected promptly,and renal function improved quickly.Conclusion:ATLS patients should be considered early CRRT if efficacy of drugs is poor.In ATLS patients of unstable hemodynamics and intolerance for routine hemodialysis,CRRT should be a superior option.%目的:提高对急性肿瘤溶解综合征(ATLS)的认识和探讨持续肾脏替代治疗(CRRT)在其急救中的作用.方法:对1例侵袭性NK/T细胞淋巴瘤化疗后并发ATLS患者,采用CRRT救治.结果:通过CRRT,患者心力衰竭症状很快得到缓解,尿量增多,高钾、代谢性酸中毒及时得到纠正,肾功能也很快得到改善,疗效显著.结论:对于ATLS患者,如果药物疗效欠佳,应及早考虑CRRT;如果患者血流动力学不稳定,不能耐受普通血液透析治疗,CRRT应成为优先考虑的治疗选择.

  18. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Henk S; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Venken, Koen; Koppen, Arjen; Stienstra, Rinke; Prop, Serge; Meerding, Jenny; Hamers, Nicole; Besra, Gurdyal; Boon, Louis; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Elewaut, Dirk; Prakken, Berent; Kersten, Sander; Boes, Marianne; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased iNKT cell numbers and marginal effects of iNKT cell depletion on insulin resistance under high-fat diet conditions. Here, we focused on the role of iNKT cells under normal conditions. We showed that iNKT cell-deficient mice on a low-fat diet, considered a normal diet for mice, displayed a distinctive insulin resistance phenotype without overt adipose tissue inflammation. Insulin resistance was characterized by adipocyte dysfunction, including adipocyte hypertrophy, increased leptin, and decreased adiponectin levels. The lack of liver abnormalities in CD1d-null mice together with the enrichment of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells in both mouse and human adipose tissue indicated a specific role for adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells in the development of insulin resistance. Strikingly, iNKT cell function was directly modulated by adipocytes, which acted as lipid antigen-presenting cells in a CD1d-mediated fashion. Based on these findings, we propose that, especially under low-fat diet conditions, adipose tissue-resident iNKT cells maintain healthy adipose tissue through direct interplay with adipocytes and prevent insulin resistance.

  19. IL-12 and IL-18 Induction and Subsequent NKT Activation Effects of the Japanese Botanical Medicine Juzentaihoto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Taniguchi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we first measured some cytokine concentrations in the serum of patients treated with Juzentaihoto (JTT. Of the cytokines measured interleukin (IL -18 was the most prominently up-regulated cytokine in the serum of patients under long term JTT administration. We next evaluated the effects of JTT in mice, focusing especially on natural killer T (NKT cell induction. Mice fed JTT were compared to control group ones. After sacrifice, the liver was fixed, embedded and stained. Transmission electron microscope (TEM observations were performed. Although the mice receiving the herbal medicine had same appearance, their livers were infiltrated with massive mononuclear cells, some of which were aggregated to form clusters. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that there was abundant cytokine expression of IL-12 and IL-18 in the liver of JTT treated mice. To clarify what the key molecules that induce immunological restoration with JTT might be, we next examined in vitro lymphocyte cultures. Mononuclear cells isolated and prepared from healthy volunteers were cultured with and without JTT. Within 24 hours, JTT induced the IL-12 and IL-18 production and later (72 hours induction of interferon (IFN-gamma. Oral administration of JTT may induce the expression of IL-12 in the early stage, and IL-18 in the chronic stage, followed by NKT induction. Their activation, following immunological restoration could contribute to anti-tumor effects.

  20. In vitro expanded human invariant natural killer T-cells promote functional activity of natural killer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, M.; Molling, J.W.; Mensdorff-Pouilly, S von; Verheijen, R.H.; Blomberg, B.M.E. von; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Scheper, R.J.; Bontkes, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells play a pivotal role in cancer immunity through trans-activation of effector cells via swift cytokine secretion. In mice, iNKT cell activation by alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GC) induces potent NK cell-mediated anti-tumour effects. Here we investigated

  1. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue are activated in lean mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Taisuke; Toyoshima, Yujiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues are closely connected with the immune system. It has been suggested that metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes, arteriosclerosis and liver steatosis can be attributed to adipose tissue inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration. To understand a physiological and pathological role of natural killer T (NKT) cells on inflammation in adipose tissue, we characterized a subset of NKT cells in abdominal and subcutaneous adipose tissues in C57BL/6J mice fed normal or high-fat diets. NKT cells comprised a larger portion of lymphocytes in adipose tissues compared with the spleen and peripheral blood, with epididymal adipose tissue having the highest number of NKT cells. Furthermore, some NKT cells in adipose tissues expressed higher levels of CD69 and intracellular interferon-γ, whereas the Vβ repertoires of NKT cells in adipose tissues were similar to other cells. In obese mice fed a high-fat diet, adipose tissue inflammation had little effect on the Vβ repertoire of NKT cells in epididymal adipose tissues. We speculate that the NKT cells in adipose tissues may form an equivalent subset in other tissues and that these subsets are likely to participate in adipose tissue inflammation. Additionally, the high expression level of CD69 and intracellular IFN-γ raises the possibility that NKT cells in adipose tissue may be stimulated by some physiological mechanism.

  2. Influence of Arsenic (III, Cadmium (II, Chromium (VI, Mercury (II, and Lead (II Ions on Human Triple Negative Breast Cancer (HCC1806 Cell Cytotoxicity and Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsdale F. Mehari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hazardous consequences of heavy metal ions (HMIs on human health necessitate the immediate need to probe fundamentally the interactions and cytotoxic effects of HMIs on humans. This study investigated the influence of five toxic HMIs (arsenic (As (III, cadmium (Cd (II, chromium (Cr (VI, mercury (Hg (II, and lead (Pb (II on human TNBC (HCC 1806 cell viability using optical microscopy, trypan blue dye-exclusion assays, and flow cytometry. The TNBC cells were exposed to varying concentrations of HMIs for 24 and 48 hours. We evaluated the influence of the concentrations and duration of HMIs exposure on TNBC cell viability. Light microscopy, cell viability assays, revealed that after 48-hour treatment of TNBC cells with 1 x 10-5 M of As (III, Cd (II, Hg (II, Cr (IV, and Pb (II resulted in cell viabilities of 23%, 34%, 35%, 56%, 91% respectively, suggesting that As (III has the greatest cytotoxicity (77% cell death while Pb (II showed the least (9% cell death. Furthermore, flow cytometry revealed that while Pb (II, As (III and Cr (IV had significant increases in cell death, Hg (II caused a G1 arrest. Together, this study revealed that HMIs cause a differential cytotoxic effect on TNBC cells and suggest that they may have very different genotoxic targets and implications in their mutagenic potential.

  3. Resetting the T Cell Repertoire in Prostate Cancer Bearing Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Immunol 15: 535 562. 16. Kronenberg M, Gapin L (2002) The unconventional lifestyle of NKT cells. Nat Rev Immunol 2: 557 568. 17. Matsuda JL, Gapin L...cells. Curr Opin Immunol 14: 250 254. 24. Gapin L, Matsuda JL, Surh CD, Kronenberg M (2001) NKT cells derive from double-positive thymocytes that are

  4. Mutagenesis of AS52 cells by low concentrations of lead(II) and mercury(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, M E; Williams, M V

    1996-01-01

    Little is known at the molecular level concerning the genotoxic effects following the acute exposure of eukaryotic cells to low concentrations of lead (II) or mercury (II). There have been conflicting reports concerning the mutagenic potential of these heavy metals, and there have not been any studies performed to determine the molecular mechanism(s) by which these metals are mutagenic. The Chinese hamster ovary cell line, AS52, contains a stably integrated single functional copy of the Escherichia coli xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (gpt) gene. Mutations in the gpt gene confer resistance to 6-thioguanine (TG). There was little effect on viability, as measured by relative cloning efficiency, of AS52 cells exposed to lead (II) or mercury (II) up to concentrations of 0.5 microM and 0.3 microM, respectively. However, higher concentrations of the metals caused a significant increase in cell death. There was also a dose-dependent increase in the isolation of mutants resistant to TG in treated cells when compared to non-treated controls. Concentrations of the metals as low as 0.1 microM caused a significant increase in the number of mutants resistant to TG when compared to the number of spontaneous mutants obtained in nontreated controls. While the molecular mechanism(s) by which lead and mercury (II) are genotoxic is unknown, the results of this study demonstrate that low concentrations of lead (II) and mercury (II) are mutagenic in eukaryotic cells.

  5. Inflammatory mechanisms in sepsis: elevated invariant natural killer T-cell numbers in mouse and their modulatory effect on macrophage function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Daithi S; Monaghan, Sean F; Thakkar, Rajan K; Tran, Mai L; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Gregory, Stephen H; Cioffi, William G; Ayala, Alfred

    2013-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) cells are emerging as key mediators of innate immune cellular and inflammatory responses to sepsis and peritonitis. Invariant natural killer T cells mediate survival following murine septic shock. Macrophages are pivotal to survival following sepsis. Invariant natural killer T cells have been shown to modulate various mediators of the innate immune system, including macrophages. We demonstrate sepsis-inducing iNKT-cell exodus from the liver appearing in the peritoneal cavity, the source of the sepsis. This migration was affected by programmed death receptor 1. Programmed death receptor 1 is an inhibitory immune receptor, reported as ubiquitously expressed at low levels on iNKT cells. Programmed death receptor 1 has been associated with markers of human critical illness. Programmed death receptor 1-deficient iNKT cells failed to demonstrate similar migration. To the extent that iNKT cells affected peritoneal macrophage function, we assessed peritoneal macrophages' ability to phagocytose bacteria. Invariant natural killer T(-/-) mice displayed dysfunctional macrophage phagocytosis and altered peritoneal bacterial load. This dysfunction was reversed when peritoneal macrophages from iNKT(-/-) mice were cocultured with wild-type iNKT cells. Together, our results indicate that sepsis induces liver iNKT-cell exodus into the peritoneal cavity mediated by programmed death receptor 1, and these peritoneal iNKT cells appear critical to regulation of peritoneal macrophage phagocytic function. Invariant natural killer T cells offer therapeutic targets for modulating immune responses and detrimental effects of sepsis.

  6. Characterization of cloned cells from an immortalized fetal pulmonary type II cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    A cultured cell line that maintained expression of pulmonary type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous to generate a large number of homogenous cells in which to study the biochemical functions of type II cells. Type II epithelial cells are the source of pulmonary surfactant and a cell of origin for pulmonary adenomas. Last year our laboratory reported the induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant lipid synthesis) in cultured fetal rat lung epithelial (FRLE) cells, a spontaneously immortalized cell line of fetal rat lung type II cell origin. Subsequently, the induction of the ability to synthesize surfactant lipid became difficult to repeat. We hypothesized that the cell line was heterogenuous and some cells were more like type II cells than others. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis and to obtain a cultured cell line with type II cell phenotypic markers by cloning several FRLE cells and characterizing them for phenotypic markers of type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and presence of surfactant lipids). Thirty cloned cell lines were analyzed for induced alkaline phosphatase activity (on x-axis) and for percent of phospholipids that were disaturated (i.e., surfactant).

  7. Comparative Study of L-Asparaginase-Based LOP Regimen Over CHOP Regimen Before Radiotherapy for Stage IIE Extranodal Nasal Type NK/T Cell Lymphoma: A Study of 2 Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Limin; Yuan, Bin; Wu, Haixia; Chu, Hongliang; Liu, Yayun; Wu, Shuang; Li, Hong; Lu, He; Chen, Hui

    2017-03-01

    In this study we evaluated the efficacy of an L-asparaginase-based LOP (L-asparaginase, vincristine, and dexamethasone) regimen in extranodal Natural Killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) patients in the Guizhou province of China. Forty-eight patients were treated with the LOP (L-asparaginase, vincristine and dexamethasone) regimen chemotherapy (CT) and 32 patients with the CHOP (cyclophosphamide, tetrahydropyanyl adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone) regimen. These patients then received involved-field radiotherapy (RT) with the doses of DT = 49-59 Gy. A significant improvement of clinical end points with the LOP regimen was noticed compared with the CHOP regimen: 33 (68.8%) versus 16 (50.0%) for complete responses; 10 (20.8%) versus 5 (15.6%) for partial responses. There were statistical differences in objective response rates (43 [89.6%] for LOP vs. 21 [65.6%] for CHOP; P = .009), 3 years of overall survival (42 [87.5%] for LOP vs. 20 [62.5%] for CHOP; P = .006) and progression-free survival (32 [79.2%] for LOP vs. 16 [50.0%] for CHOP; P = .007). The results showed that the LOP regimen is safe and much more efficient than the CHOP regimen for stage IIE ENKTL patients. They indicate that the LOP regimen is a satisfying alternative protocol among the other L-asparaginase-based regimens reported so far, such as SMILE (dexamethasone, methotrexate, ifosfamide, L-asparaginase, and etoposide), GELOX (gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and L-asparaginase), CHOP-L, and sandwich (CT, then RT, then CT). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Native Escherichia Coli L-Asparaginase Versus Pegylated Asparaginase, in Combination with Ifosfamide, Methotrexate, Etoposide, and Prednisolone (IMEP), in Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type (NTCL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jee; Ock, Chan-Young; Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Sung Hee; Lee, Ju-Yeun; Jung, Sun Hoi; Cho, Yoon Sook; Kim, Miso; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Il Han; Heo, Dae Seog

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this study was to compare asparaginase-related toxicities in two asparaginase preparations, namely native Escherichia coli (E. coli) L-asparaginase (L-ASP) and pegylated asparaginase (PEG-ASP) in combination with ifosfamide, methotrexate, etoposide, and prednisolone (IMEP) in NK/T-cell lymphoma (NTCL). A total of 41 NTCL patients who received IMEP plus native E. coli L-ASP or PEG-ASP at Seoul National University Hospital were included in this study between January 2013 and March 2016. IMEP/ASP treatment consisted of ifosfamide, methotrexate, etoposide, plus native E. coli L-ASP (6000 IU/m2 on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11) or PEG-ASP (2500 IU/m2 on day 1) every 3 weeks. ASP-related toxicities, toxicity patterns, length of hospital stay and clinical outcomes were compared between the different treatment groups. The frequency of ASP-related toxicities was similar between the IMEP plus native E. coli L-ASP group and the PEG-ASP group apart from hypofibrinogenemia (native E. coli L-ASP vs. PEG-ASP group, 86.4% vs. 36.8%, p=0.001). Although post-treatment transaminase and albumin levels were significantly high and low, respectively, hepatotoxicity gradients before and after treatment did not differ significantly between the groups. Since PEG-ASP was given at an outpatient clinic in some patients, length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the IMEP plus PEG-ASP group (median 4.0 vs. 6.0 days, p=0.002). A favorable tendency of clinical outcomes was observed in NTCL patients treated with IMEP plus PEG-ASP (complete remission rate, 73.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.067). IMEP plus PEG-ASP showed similar ASP-related toxicities, shorter length of hospital stay, and a trend towards improved clinical outcomes compared with IMEP plus native E. coli L-ASP in NTCL.

  9. Prognostic analysis of 61 cases of nasal type NK/T cell lymphoma%鼻型NK/T细胞淋巴瘤61例预后因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋拯; 王华庆; 崔秀珍; 郝希山

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features and prognostic factors of nasal type NIGT cell lymphoma(NKTCL).Methods Records of 61 patients with pathologically confirmed nasal type NKTCL were reviewed.Detailed clinical and laboratory data were included in univariate analysis, and statistically significant factors in univariate analysis were then included in multivariate analysis.Results In univariate analysis,Ann Arbor stage,performance status,IPI,number of extra-lymphatic site,B symptoms,LDH and β-MG level.were found to be the prognostic factors associated with time to overall survival in nasal type NKTCL.In multivariate analysis, Ann Arbor stage,performance status,LDH and β2-MG level were independent prognostic factors of overall survival.Conclusion Ann Arbor stage,performance status,LDH and β2-MG level were demonstrated as independent prognostic factors of the overall survival in nasal type NKTCL.%目的 探讨鼻型NK/T细胞淋巴瘤(NKTCL)的临床特点和预后因素.方法 回顾性分析61例鼻型NKTCL患者的临床资料并进行随访.详细的临床特点及实验室检查结果均纳入单因素分析,单因素分析中有统计学意义的指标纳入多因素分析.结果单因素分析显示,Ann Arbor分期、PS评分、IPI、B症状、结外侵犯数、LDH及β-MG水平与鼻型NKTCL患者的生存期有关.多因素分析显示,PS评分、Ann Arbor分期、LDH及β2-MG水平为生存期的独立影响因素.结论 PS评分、Ann Arbor分期、LDH及β2-MG水平为鼻型NKTCL预后的独立影响因素.

  10. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  11. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...

  12. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  13. Activation of Type II Cells into Regenerative Stem Cell Antigen-1+ Cells during Alveolar Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Varsha Suresh; Zhang, Wei; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is composed of two cell types: type I cells comprise 95% of the gas exchange surface area, whereas type II cells secrete surfactant, while retaining the ability to convert into type I cells to induce alveolar repair. Using lineage-tracing analyses in the mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung injury, we identified a population of stem cell antigen (Sca)-1–expressing type II cells with progenitor cell properties that mediate alveolar repair. These cells were shown to be distinct from previously reported Sca-1–expressing bronchioalveolar stem cells. Microarray and Wnt reporter studies showed that surfactant protein (Sp)-C+Sca-1+ cells expressed Wnt signaling pathway genes, and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling prevented the regenerative function of Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells in vitro. Thus, P. aeruginosa–mediated lung injury induces the generation of a Sca-1+ subset of type II cells. The progenitor phenotype of the Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells that mediates alveolar epithelial repair might involve Wnt signaling. PMID:25474582

  14. Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions alter the dynamics and distribution of Mn(II) in cultured chick glial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedler, F.C.; Ley, B.W. (Dept. of Molecular Cell Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Previous studies revealed that Mn(II) is accumulated in cultured glial cells to concentrations far above those present in whole brain or in culture medium. The data indicated that Mn(II) moves across the plasma membrane into the cytoplasm by facilitated diffusion or counter-ion transport with Ca(II), then into mitochondria by active transport. The fact that 1-10 microM Mn(II) ions activate brain glutamine synthetase makes important the regulation of Mn(II) transport in the CNS. Since Cu(II) and Zn(II) caused significant changes in the accumulation of Mn(II) by glia, the mechanisms by which these ions alter the uptake and efflux of Mn(II) ions has been investigated systematically under chemically defined conditions. The kinetics of (54MN)-Mn(II) uptake and efflux were determined and compared under four different sets of conditions: no adducts, Cu(II) or Zn(II) added externally, and with cells preloaded with Cu(II) or Zn(II) in the presence and absence of external added metal ions. Zn(II) ions inhibit the initial velocity of Mn(II) uptake, increase total Mn(II) accumulated, but do not alter the rate or extent Mn(II) efflux. Cu(II) ions increase both the initial velocity and the net Mn(II) accumulated by glia, with little effect on rate or extent of Mn(II) efflux. These results predict that increases in Cu(II) or Zn(II) levels may also increase the steady-state levels of Mn(II) in the cytoplasmic fraction of glial cells, which may in turn alter the activity of Mn(II)-sensitive enzymes in this cell compartment.

  15. Workshop II: Nanotechnology and Advanced Cell Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Workshop focused on few emerging concepts(beyond tandem cells): 1. Engineering incident sun spectrum and transparency losses a) Nano emitters (dot concentrator); b) Surface plasmonics; c) Up converters; d) Down converter. 2. Intermediate band solar cells a) Efficiency projections (detail energy balance projections); b) Inserting 0,1 and 2D semiconductor structures in solar cells 3. Polymer and hybrid cells a) Nanotubes/dot polymers; b) Exciton dissociation.

  16. STAGING OF FUEL CELLS - PHASE II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Per Onnerud; Suresh Sriramulu

    2002-08-29

    TIAX has executed a laboratory-based development program aiming at the improvement of stationary fuel cell systems. The two-year long development program resulted in an improved understanding of staged fuel cells and inorganic proton conductors through evaluation of results from a number of laboratory tasks: (1) Development of a fuel cell modeling tool--Multi-scale model was developed, capable of analyzing the effects of materials and operating conditions; and this model allowed studying various ''what-if'' conditions for hypothetically staged fuel cells; (2) Study of new high temperature proton conductor--TIAX discovery of a new class of sulfonated inorganics capable of conducting protons when exposed to water; and study involved synthesis and conductivity measurements of novel compounds up to 140 C; (3) Electrochemical fuel cell measurements--the feasibility of staged fuel cells was tested in TIAX's fuel cell laboratories experimental design was based on results from modeling.

  17. Coevolution of MHC genes (LMP/TAP/class Ia, NKT-class Ib, NKp30-B7H6): lessons from cold-blooded vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin F

    2015-09-01

    Comparative immunology provides the long view of what is conserved across all vertebrate taxa versus what is specific to particular organisms or group of organisms. Regarding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and coevolution, three striking cases have been revealed in cold-blooded vertebrates: lineages of class Ia antigen-processing and -presenting genes, evolutionary conservation of NKT-class Ib recognition, and the ancient emergence of the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp30 and its ligand B7H6. While coevolution of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and class Ia has been documented in endothermic birds and two mammals, lineages of LMP7 are restricted to ectotherms. The unambiguous discovery of natural killer T (NKT) cells in Xenopus demonstrated that NKT cells are not restricted to mammals and are likely to have emerged at the same time in evolution as classical α/β and γ/δ T cells. NK cell receptors evolve at a rapid rate, and orthologues are nearly impossible to identify in different vertebrate classes. By contrast, we have detected NKp30 in all gnathostomes, except in species where it was lost. The recently discovered ligand of NKp30, B7H6, shows strong signs of coevolution with NKp30 throughout evolution, i.e. coincident loss or expansion of both genes in some species. NKp30 also offers an attractive IgSF candidate for the invasion of the RAG transposon, which is believed to have initiated T-cell receptor/immunoglobulin adaptive immunity. Besides reviewing these intriguing features of MHC evolution and coevolution, we offer suggestions for future studies and propose a model for the primordial or proto MHC.

  18. Coevolution of MHC genes (LMP/TAP/class Ia; NKT-class Ib; NKp30-B7H6): Lessons from cold-blooded vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Comparative immunology provides the long view of what is conserved across all vertebrate taxa versus what is specific to particular organisms or group of organisms. Regarding the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and coevolution, three striking cases have been revealed in cold-blooded vertebrates: lineages of class Ia antigen-processing and -presenting genes, evolutionary conservation of NKT-class Ib recognition, and the ancient emergence of the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp30 and its ligand B7H6. While coevolution of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and class Ia has been documented in endothermic birds and two mammals, lineages of LMP7 are restricted to ectotherms. The unambiguous discovery of natural killer T (NKT) cells in Xenopus demonstrated that NKT cells are not restricted to mammals and are likely to have emerged at the same time in evolution as classical α/β and γ/δ T cells. NK cell receptors evolve at a rapid rate, and orthologues are nearly impossible to identify in different vertebrate classes. By contrast, we have detected NKp30 in all gnathostomes, except in species where it was lost. The recently discovered ligand of NKp30, B7H6, shows strong signs of coevolution with NKp30 throughout evolution, i.e. coincident loss or expansion of both genes in some species. NKp30 also offers an attractive IgSF candidate for the invasion of the RAG transposon, which is believed to have initiated T-cell receptor/immunoglobulin adaptive immunity. Besides reviewing these intriguing features of MHC evolution and coevolution, we offer suggestions for future studies and propose a model for the primordial or proto MHC. PMID:26284468

  19. Copper(II) complexes encapsulated in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, R P; De Flora, A; Rizzarelli, E; Santoro, A M; Tabbí, G; Tonetti, M

    1995-09-01

    Copper(II) complexes were encapsulated in human red blood cells in order to test their possible use as antioxidant drugs by virtue of their labile character. ESR spectroscopy was used to verify whether encapsulation in red blood cells leads to the modification of such complexes. With copper(II) complexes bound to dipeptides or tripeptides, an interaction with hemoglobin was found to be present, the hemoglobin having a strong coordinative site formed by four nitrogen donor atoms. Instead, with copper(II) complexes with TAD or PheANN3, which have the greatest stability. ESR spectra always showed the original species. Only the copper(II) complex with GHL gave rise to a complicated behavior, which contained signals from iron(III) species probably coming from oxidative processes. Encapsulation of all copper(II) complexes in erythrocytes caused a slight oxidative stress, compared to the unloaded and to the native cells. However, no significant differences were observed in the major metabolic properties (GSH, glycolytic rate, hexose monophosphate shunt, Ca(2+)-ATPase) of erythrocytes loaded with different copper(II) complexes, with the exception of methemoglobin levels, which were markedly increased in the case of [Cu(GHL)H-1] compared to [Cu(TAD)]. This latter finding suggests that methemoglobin formation can be affected by the type of complex used for encapsulation, depending on the direct interaction of the copper(II) complex with hemoglobin.

  20. Synthesis and cytotoxic effect on RD cell line of Pd(II and Cu(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahasin Alias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of Cr(III, Cd(II, Ni(II, Pd(II and Cu(II with new ligand sodium [5-(p-nitro phenyl-/4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-dithiocarbamato hydrazide] (TRZ.DTC have been prepared and characterized in solid state by using flame atomic absorption, elemental analysis C.H.N.S, FT-IR, UV–vis spectrophotometry, thermal analysis TGA, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The ratio of M:L and logK was determined by molar ratio method. From the spectral studies, an octahedral monomer structure was proposed for all complexes except copper(II which has a dimeric structure. Cadmium(II has tetrahedral geometry. Structural geometries of these compounds were also suggested in gas phase by using hyper chem-8 program. The heat of formation, binding energy, and dipole moment were calculated by PM3 and ZINDO/1 methods. ZINDO/1 was used to evaluate the vibration spectra of the (TRZ.DTC ligand and starting material as authentic compound. Cytotoxic effect of Pd, Cu and ligand was evaluated against Rhabdomyosarcoma cell line by using four different concentrations (500, 250, 125 & 62.5 μg/ml in three exposure times 24, 48 and 72 h and compared this effect with control positive Cis-Pt. The efficiency of these new compounds on RD cell line may be attributed to blocking the protein synthesis of the cells.

  1. Innate-like functions of natural killer T cell subsets result from highly divergent gene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Isaac; Seumois, Grégory; Chavez, Lukas; Samaniego-Castruita, Daniela; White, Brandie; Chawla, Ashu; Mock, Dennis; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) have stimulatory or inhibitory effects on the immune response that can be attributed in part to the existence of functional subsets of NKT cells. These subsets have been characterized only on the basis of the differential expression of a few transcription factors and cell-surface molecules. Here we have analyzed purified populations of thymic NKT cell subsets at both the transcriptomic level and epigenomic level and by single-cell RNA sequencing. Our data indicated that despite their similar antigen specificity, the functional NKT cell subsets were highly divergent populations with many gene-expression and epigenetic differences. Therefore, the thymus 'imprints' distinct gene programs on subsets of innate-like NKT cells that probably impart differences in proliferative capacity, homing, and effector functions.

  2. Invariant natural killer T cells in adipose tissue: novel regulators of immune-mediated metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, M; Kalkhoven, E; Boes, M

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) represents a microenvironment where intersection takes place between immune processes and metabolic pathways. A variety of immune cells have been characterized in AT over the past decades, with the most recent addition of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. As members of the T cell family, iNKT cells represent a subset that exhibits both innate and adaptive characteristics and directs ensuing immune responses. In disease conditions, iNKT cells have established roles that include disorders in the autoimmune spectrum in malignancies and infectious diseases. Recent work supports a role for iNKT cells in the maintenance of AT homeostasis through both immune and metabolic pathways. The deficiency of iNKT cells can result in AT metabolic disruptions and insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent work on iNKT cells in immune regulation, with an emphasis on AT-resident iNKT cells, and identify the potential mechanisms by which adipocytes can mediate iNKT cell activity.

  3. Targeting natural killer cells and natural killer T cells in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivier, Eric; Ugolini, Sophie; Blaise, Didier; Chabannon, Christian; Brossay, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Preface text Natural killer (NK) and NKT cells are subsets of lymphocytes that share some phenotypic and functional similarities. Both cell types can rapidly respond to the presence of tumour cells and participate in antitumour immune responses. This has prompted interest in the development of innovative anticancer therapies that are based on the manipulation of NK and NKT cells. Recent studies have highlighted how the immune reactivity of NK and NKT cells is shaped by the environment in which they develop. The rationale use of these cells for cancer immunotherapies awaits a better understanding of their effector functions, migratory patterns and survival properties in humans. PMID:22437937

  4. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by GDP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Shengyu; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Puyuan; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the majority of ENKTL cases are diagnosed at the localized stage. Radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has been used for localized ENKTL, but the optimal combination treatment modality and the best first-line chemotherapy regimen have not been defined. In this retrospective study, 44 patients with newly diagnosed, stages I/II ENKTL were enrolled and received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 50-56 Gy) followed by GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 (range, 2-6 cycles). At the end of treatment, the overall response rate was 95% (42/44), including 39 patients (89%) who attained complete response. Two patients developed systemic progression after IMRT. With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 85% (95% CI, 74 to 96%) and 77% (95% CI, 64 to 91%), respectively. Locoregional and systemic failure rates for this treatment were 9% (4/44) and 14% (6/44), respectively. The most common grades 3 to 4 adverse events included leukopenia (37%), neutropenia (34%), and mucositis (25%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. This study suggested high efficacy and low toxicity of IMRT followed by GDP regimen chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II ENKTL patients. These results require further investigation in prospective trials.

  6. Cigarette smoke alters the invariant natural killer T cell function and may inhibit anti-tumor responses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Andrew E

    2011-09-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a minor subset of human T cells which express the invariant T cell receptor Vα24 Jα18 and recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d. Invariant NKT cells are important immune regulators and can initiate anti-tumor responses through early potent cytokine production. Studies show that iNKT cells are defective in certain cancers. Cigarette smoke contains many carcinogens and is implicated directly and indirectly in many cancers. We investigated the effects of cigarette smoke on the circulating iNKT cell number and function. We found that the iNKT cell frequency is significantly reduced in cigarette smoking subjects. Invariant NKT cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) showed significant defects in cytokine production and the ability to kill target cells. CSE inhibits the upregulation of CD107 but not CD69 or CD56 on iNKT cells. These findings suggest that CSE has a specific effect on iNKT cell anti-tumor responses, which may contribute to the role of smoking in the development of cancer.

  7. Invariant natural killer T cells play dual roles in the development of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masashi; Namba, Ken-Ichi; Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi; Endo, Noriko; Kitamei, Hirokuni; Iwata, Daiju; Ohno, Shigeaki; Ishida, Susumu; Onoé, Kazunori; Watarai, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Masaru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Stein-Streilein, Joan; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Van Kaer, Luc; Iwabuchi, Kazuya

    2016-12-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) represents an experimental model for human endogenous uveitis, which is caused by Th1/Th17 cell-mediated inflammation. Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigens and produce large amounts of cytokines upon activation. To examine the role of NKT cells in the development of uveitis, EAU was elicited by immunization with a peptide from the human interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (hIRBP1-20) in complete Freund's adjuvant and histopathology scores were evaluated in C57BL/6 (WT) and NKT cell-deficient mice. NKT cell-deficient mice developed more severe EAU pathology than WT mice. When WT mice were treated with ligands of the invariant subset of NKT cells (α-GalCer or RCAI-56), EAU was ameliorated in mice treated with RCAI-56 but not α-GalCer. IRBP-specific Th1/Th17 cytokines were reduced in RCAI-56-treated compared with vehicle-treated mice. Although the numbers of IRBP-specific T cells detected by hIRBP3-13/I-A(b) tetramers in the spleen and the draining lymph node were the same for vehicle and RCAI-56 treatment groups, RORγt expression by tetramer-positive cells in RCAI-56-treated mice was lower than in control mice. Moreover, the eyes of RCAI-56-treated mice contained fewer IRBP-specific T cells compared with control mice. These results suggest that invariant NKT (iNKT) cells suppress the induction of Th17 cells and infiltration of IRBP-specific T cells into the eyes, thereby reducing ocular inflammation. However, in sharp contrast to the ameliorating effects of iNKT cell activation during the initiation phase of EAU, iNKT cell activation during the effector phase exacerbated disease pathology. Thus, we conclude that iNKT cells exhibit dual roles in the development of EAU. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Eclalbasaponin II induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in human ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jin Cho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenoids echinocystic acid and its glycosides, isolated from several Eclipta prostrata, have been reported to possess various biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-diabetic activity. However, the cytotoxicity of the triterpenoids in human cancer cells and their molecular mechanism of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we found that eclalbasaponin II with one glucose moiety has potent cytotoxicity in three ovarian cancer cells and two endometrial cancer cells compared to an aglycone echinocystic acid and eclalbasaponin I with two glucose moiety. Eclalbasaponin II treatment dose-dependently increased sub G1 population. Annexin V staining revealed that eclalbasaponin II induced apoptosis in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. In addition, eclalbasaponin II-induced cell death was associated with characteristics of autophagy; an increase in acidic vesicular organelle content and elevation of the levels of LC3-II. Interestingly, autophagy inhibitor BaF1 suppressed the eclalbasaponin II-induced apoptosis. Moreover, eclalbasaponin II activated JNK and p38 signaling and inhibited the mTOR signaling. We further demonstrated that pre-treatment with a JNK and p38 inhibitor and mTOR activator attenuated the eclalbasaponin II-induced autophagy. This suggests that eclalbasaponin II induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death through the regulation of JNK, p38, and mTOR signaling in human ovarian cancer cells.

  9. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  10. Intracellular Angiotensin II and cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Henning, RH; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, A

    2001-01-01

    1 We recently demonstrated that intracellular application of Angiotensin II (Angiotensin IIintr) induces rat aorta contraction independent of plasma membrane Angiotensin II receptors. In this study we investigated the effects of Angiotensin IIintr on cell growth in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. 2 DNA-sy

  11. Cord blood Vα24-Vβ11 natural killer T cells display a Th2-chemokine receptor profile and cytokine responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Harner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fetal immune system is characterized by a Th2 bias but it is unclear how the Th2 predominance is established. Natural killer T (NKT cells are a rare subset of T cells with immune regulatory functions and are already activated in utero. To test the hypothesis that NKT cells are part of the regulatory network that sets the fetal Th2 predominance, percentages of Vα24(+Vβ11(+ NKT cells expressing Th1/Th2-related chemokine receptors (CKR were assessed in cord blood. Furthermore, IL-4 and IFN-γ secreting NKT cells were quantified within the single CKR(+ subsets. RESULTS: Cord blood NKT cells expressed the Th2-related CCR4 and CCR8 at significantly higher frequencies compared to peripheral blood NKT cells from adults, while CXCR3(+ and CCR5(+ cord blood NKT cells (Th1-related were present at lower percentages. Within CD4(negCD8(neg (DN NKT cells, the frequency of IL-4 producing NKT cells was significantly higher in cord blood, while frequencies of IFN-γ secreting DN NKT cells tended to be lower. A further subanalysis showed that the higher percentage of IL-4 secreting DN NKT cells was restricted to CCR3(+, CCR4(+, CCR5(+, CCR6(+, CCR7(+, CCR8(+ and CXCR4(+ DN subsets in cord blood. This resulted in significantly decreased IFN-γ /IL-4 ratios of CCR3(+, CCR6(+ and CCR8(+ cord blood DN NKT cells. Sequencing of VA24AJ18 T cell receptor (TCR transcripts in sorted cord blood Vα24Vβ11 cells confirmed the invariant TCR alpha-chain ruling out the possibility that these cells represent an unusual subset of conventional T cells. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the heterogeneity of cord blood NKT cells, we observed a clear Th2-bias at the phenotypic and functional level which was mainly found in the DN subset. Therefore, we speculate that NKT cells are important for the initiation and control of the fetal Th2 environment which is needed to maintain tolerance towards self-antigens as well as non-inherited maternal antigens.

  12. Human dendritic cells derived from embryonic stem cells stably modified with CD1d efficiently stimulate antitumor invariant natural killer T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jieming; Wang, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a unique lymphocyte subpopulation that mediates antitumor activities upon activation. A current strategy to harness iNKT cells for cancer treatment is endogenous iNKT cell activation using patient-derived dendritic cells (DCs). However, the limited number and functional defects of patient DCs are still the major challenges for this therapeutic approach. In this study, we investigated whether human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) with an ectopically expressed CD1d gene could be exploited to address this issue. Using a lentivector carrying an optimized expression cassette, we generated stably modified hESC lines that consistently overexpressed CD1d. These modified hESC lines were able to differentiate into DCs as efficiently as the parental line. Most importantly, more than 50% of such derived DCs were CD1d+. These CD1d-overexpressing DCs were more efficient in inducing iNKT cell response than those without modification, and their ability was comparable to that of DCs generated from monocytes of healthy donors. The iNKT cells expanded by the CD1d-overexpressing DCs were functional, as demonstrated by their ability to lyse iNKT cell-sensitive glioma cells. Therefore, hESCs stably modified with the CD1d gene may serve as a convenient, unlimited, and competent DC source for iNKT cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Origin of the angiotensin II secreted by cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1994-03-01

    Circulating angiotensin II is unique in that it is formed in the blood by the interaction of circulating proteins. There are in addition many local renin-angiotensin systems in tissues in which angiotensin II is apparently secreted by various types of cells. This brief review considers the possible pathways for synthesis of locally produced angiotensin II in the brain, the anterior pituitary, the testes, the ovaries, the adrenal cortex, the kidneys, the heart, blood vessel walls, and brown and white fat. Synthesis by cells in culture is also reviewed. The possibility that certain cells contain a complete intracellular renin-angiotensin system is not ruled out, but there are problems with this hypothesis. Proteases other than renin may be involved, and there may be different pathways in different tissues. However, it appears that at least in some tissues, angiotensinogen is produced in one population of cells and transported in a paracrine fashion to other renin-containing cells, where it serves as the substrate for production of angiotensin II.

  14. Invariant natural killer T cells as sensors and managers of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kaer, Luc; Parekh, Vrajesh V; Wu, Lan

    2013-02-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of innate-like lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigens bound by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class-I-related protein CD1d. iNKT cells are activated early during a variety of infections and inflammatory diseases and contribute to the subsequent development of adaptive immune responses. Consequently, iNKT cells play a critical role in the development and resolution of inflammatory diseases and represent attractive targets for the development of immunotherapies. Recent studies have provided important insight into the mechanisms by which iNKT cells become activated in response to diverse inflammatory stimuli. These new findings should be instrumental to promote the immunomodulatory properties of iNKT cells for treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  15. Giant cell arteritis. Part II. Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for giant cell arteritis (GCA and its complications are considered. GCA is treatable with glucocorticoids (GC. The data available in the literature suggest that it is necessary to hospitalize GCA patients with acute vision loss or brain ischemia to administer intravenous megadose methylprednisolone and to control and prevent complications of GC therapy. It is expedient to use aspirin in these cases. The evidence for the use of methotrexate and other disease-modifying antirheumatic and genetically engineered drugs as GC-saving drugs is discussed.

  16. Activation of decidual invariant natural killer T cells promotes lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liping; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Yao; Tu, Jiaoqin; Schust, Danny J

    2015-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are crucial for host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens, but the underlying mechanisms of iNKT cells activation by microbes are not fully explained. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of iNKT cell activation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated preterm birth using an adoptive transfer system and diverse neutralizing antibodies (Abs) and inhibitors. We found that adoptive transfer of decidual iNKT cells to LPS-stimulated iNKT cell deficient Jα18(-/-) mice that lack invariant Vα14Jα281T cell receptor (TCR) expression significantly decreased the time to delivery and increased the percentage of decidual iNKT cells. Neutralizing Abs against Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), CD1d, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18, and inhibitors blocking the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly reduced in vivo percentages of decidual iNKT cells, their intracellular interferon (IFN)-γ production and surface CD69 expression. In vitro, in the presence of the same Abs and inhibitors used as in vivo, decidual iNKT cells co-cultured with LPS-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) showed significantly decreased extracellular and intracellular IFN-γ secretion and surface CD69 expression. Our data demonstrate that the activation of decidual iNKT cells plays an important role in inflammation-induced preterm birth. Activation of decidual iNKT cells also requires TLR4-mediated NF-κB, MAPK p38 and ERK pathways, the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18, and endogenous glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysia M. Birkholz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells, are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  18. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  19. Building new businesses through corporate venturing at the danish NKT group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skat-Rørdam, Peter

    2005-01-01

    An in depth case study of how the danish NKT group used corporate venturing over a 25 year period to build new businesses. The study provides insights on purposes, drivers and results of corporate venturing and examines factors contributing to venture success and failure....

  20. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Stoop (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies

  1. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Stoop (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies pr

  2. Characterization of type II alveolar epithelial cells by flow cytometry and fluorescent markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, T R; Casale, J M; Hunninghake, G W

    1988-10-01

    Type II alveolar epithelial cells play a crucial role in maintaining the structure and functions of pulmonary alveoli. A number of techniques have been described to isolate type II cells for in vitro studies; however, type II cell suspensions isolated by each technique are still contaminated by macrophages or monocytes. The present studies describe the use of flow cytometry to accurately characterize the composition of these cell suspensions. With freshly isolated type II cell suspensions, type II cells could be distinguished from macrophages and monocytes by two methods: (1) the combination of natural fluorescence and orthogonal light scatter, or (2) the use of monoclonal antibodies OX-1 (directed against a common leukocyte antigen present on rat macrophages and monocytes) and PKK-1 (directed against cytokeratin intermediate filaments present in type II cells). With cultured type II cells, the combination of natural fluorescence and orthogonal light scatter did not distinguish between type II cells and macrophages or monocytes; however, the monoclonal antibodies OX-I and PKK-1 continued to distinguish between these cell types. As an example of the use of these techniques, the methods were used to define the sequential expression of class I and II major histocompatibility antigens on both type II cells and on macrophages or monocytes in the same cell preparations. These methods are of potential value in isolating pure populations either of type II cells or of macrophages or monocytes by cell sorting and in accurately identifying the cells present in type II cell suspensions or cultures.

  3. MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells is important to activate CD4+ T cells that stimulate the B cell to produce antibodies. Besides this, disruption of MHC class II antigen presentation could play a role in immune escape by tumor cells. This thesis describes MHC class II antigen presentation

  4. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2 cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today.

  5. [Therapeutic use of stem cells. II. Adult stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Georges

    2004-09-30

    Many degenerative diseases are not curable by means of classical medicine. The long term objective of cell therapy is to treat the patients with their own stem cells that could be either purified from the diseased organ or from "reservoirs" of stem cells such as that constituted by the bone marrow. The existence of stem cells in the organs or reservoirs is now established in vitro and in some cases, in animal models. Numbers of technical problems linked to the scarcity of these cells still delay the clinical use of purified stem cells. However, clinical protocols using heterogeneous cell populations have already started to treat a growing number of diseases. In some case, autologous cells can be used, as it is the case for bone marrow transplantation in blood diseases. Mesenchymal cells, also purified from the bone marrow are currently used in orthopaedic diseases. Because these cells reveal a broad differentiation potential, active research programs explore their possible use for treatment of other diseases. Bone marrow also contains vascular stem cells that could be active in reappearing defective vessels responsible for ischaemic diseases. Indeed, clinical trials in which bone marrow cells are injected in the cardiac muscle of patients with myocardial infarction or in the leg muscle (gastrocnemius) of patients with hind limb ischaemia have already started. Artificial skin prepared from skin biopsies is used for the reconstitution of the derma of severely burned patients. Clinical trials have also started, using allogenic cells. The patients must be treated by immunosuppressive drugs. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson have been successfully treated by intra-cerebral injection of foetal neurones. Pancreatic islets implanted in the liver have shown to re-establish a normal glycaemia in diabetic patients. However, all these clinical trials use differentiated cells or at least progenitors which display differentiation potential and lifetime much more

  6. Icarisid II inhibits the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Mao; Jiang, Neng; Huang, Feifei; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Ruishan; Lu, Jingjing; Liao, Shijie; Liu, Yun

    2017-06-01

    Icarisid II, one of the main active components of Herba Epimedii extracts, shows potent antitumor activity in various cancer cell lines, including osteosarcoma cells. However, the anticancer mechanism of icarisid II against osteosarcoma U2OS needs further exploration. This study aims to investigate further antitumor effects of icarisid II on human osteosarcoma cells and elucidate the underlying mechanism. We cultivated human osteosarcoma USO2 cells in vitro using different concentrations of icarisid II (0-30 µM). Cell viability was detected at 24, 48, and 72 h using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis. Cell cycle was tested by flow cytometry after treatment with icarisid II for 48 h. Annexin V-allophycocyanin and 7-aminoactinomycin D staining were conducted to detect cell apoptosis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay were performed to measure the levels of genes and proteins related to cell cycle and apoptosis. Results showed that icarisid II significantly inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. The half maximal inhibitory concentration values were 14.44, 11.02, and 7.37 µM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. Cell cycle was arrested in the G2/M phase in vitro. In addition, icarisid II upregulated the expression levels of P21 and CyclinB1 whereas downregulated the expression levels of CyclinD1, CDC2, and P-Cdc25C, which were related to cell cycle arrest in U2OS cells. The cell apoptotic rate increased in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with icarisid II for 48 h. Icarisid II induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax, downregulating Bcl-2, and activating apoptosis-related proteins, including cleaved caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. These data indicate that icarisid II exhibits an antiproliferation effect on human osteosarcoma cells and induces apoptosis by activating the caspase family in a time- and dose

  7. Primary intestinal T cell lymphomas in Indian patients - In search of enteropathic T cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shet Tanuja

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This series of six intestinal T cell lymphomas (ITCL attempts to document enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATCL in India. Materials and Methods: A total of six ITCL were selected from 170 gastrointestinal lymphomas in last 10 years. Results: The cases studied included EATCL (4, ITCL with a CD4 positive phenotype (1 and ITCL NK/T cell type (1. Of the four EATCL, two occurred in the ileum, one in right colon and one in duodenum. In three EATCL cases, there was history of celiac disease or lactose intolerance and enteropathic changes were noted in the adjacent mucosa. These tumors had CD3+/CD8+/CD56 (+/-/CD4-/ Granzyme B+ immunophenotype. One EATCL was monomorphic small cell type (type II EATCL with a CD3+/CD8-CD56+/CD4-/ Granzyme B+ phenotype. EBER- ISH (Epstein Barr virus coded RNA′s- in situ hybridization revealed positive tumor cells in ITCL NK/T cell type and in bystander cells in three EATCL. Conclusion: ITCL are rare in Indian patients but do occur and comprise a mixture of the enteropathic and non-enteropathic subtypes.

  8. The Bacillus cereus spoIIS programmed cell death system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eMelnicakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death in bacteria is generally associated with two¬ component toxin antitoxin systems. The SpoIIS toxin-antitoxin system, consisting of a membrane bound SpoIISA toxin and a small, cytosolic antitoxin SpoIISB, was originally identified in Bacillus subtilis. In this work we describe the Bacillus cereus SpoIIS system which is a three-component system, harbouring an additional gene spoIISC. Its protein product serves as an antitoxin, and similarly as SpoIISB, is able to bind SpoIISA and abolish its toxic effect. Our results indicate that SpoIISC seems to be present not only in B. cereus but also in other Bacilli containing a SpoIIS toxin antitoxin system. In addition, we show that B. cereus SpoIISA can form higher oligomers and we discuss the possible role of this multimerization for the protein’s toxic function.

  9. Stem cells in dentistry--Part II: Clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-10-01

    New technologies that facilitate solid alveolar ridge augmentation are receiving considerable attention in the field of prosthodontics because of the growing requirement for esthetic and functional reconstruction by dental implant treatments. Recently, several studies have demonstrated potential advantages for stem-cell-based therapies in regenerative treatments. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are now an excellent candidate for tissue replacement therapies, and tissue engineering approaches and chair-side cellular grafting approaches using autologous MSCs represent the clinical state of the art for stem-cell-based alveolar bone regeneration. Basic studies have revealed that crosstalk between implanted donor cells and recipient immune cells plays a key role in determining clinical success that may involve the recently observed immunomodulatory properties of MSCs. Part II of this review first overviews progress in regenerative dentistry to consider the implications of the stem cell technology in dentistry and then highlights cutting-edge stem-cell-based alveolar bone regenerative therapies. Factors that affect stem-cell-based bone regeneration as related to the local immune response are then discussed. Additionally, pre-clinical stem cell studies for the regeneration of teeth and other oral organs as well as possible applications of MSC-based immunotherapy in dentistry are outlined. Finally, the marketing of stem cell technology in dental stem cell banks with a view toward future regenerative therapies is introduced. Copyright © 2012 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Invariant natural killer T cells: front line fighters in the war against pathogenic microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Catherine M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells constitute a unique subset of innate-like T cells that have been shown to have crucial roles in a variety of immune responses. iNKT cells are characterized by their expression of both NK cell markers and an invariant T cell receptor (TCR) α chain, which recognizes glycolipids presented by the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d. Despite having a limited antigen repertoire, the iNKT cell response can be very complex, and participate in both protective and harmful immune responses. The protective role of these cells against a variety of pathogens has been particularly well documented. Through the use of these pathogen models, our knowledge of the breadth of the iNKT cell response has been expanded. Specific iNKT cell antigens have been isolated from several different bacteria, from which iNKT cells are critical for protection in mouse models. These responses can be generated by direct, CD1d-mediated activation, or indirect, cytokine-mediated activation, or a combination of the two. This can lead to secretion of a variety of different Th1, Th2, or Th17 cytokines, which differentially impact the downstream immune response against these pathogens. This critical role is emphasized by the conservation of these cells between mice and humans, warranting further investigation into how iNKT cells participate in protective immune responses, with the ultimate goal of harnessing their potential for treatment.

  11. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  12. The role of invariant natural killer T cells in microbial immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Yuki; Kitano, Naoki; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2013-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are unique lymphocytes with characteristic features, such as expression of an invariant T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) α-chain, recognition of glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d molecules, and ability to rapidly produce large amounts of cytokines, including interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) upon TCR stimulation. Many studies have demonstrated that iNKT cells participate in immune response against diverse microbes, including bacteria, fungi, protozoan parasites, and viruses. Generally, these cells play protective roles in host defense against infections. However, in some contexts they play pathogenic roles, by inducing or augmenting inflammation. Recent reports show that iNKT cells recognize glycolipid antigens from pathogenic bacteria including Streptococcus pneumoniae, and they contribute to host defense against infection. iNKT cell responses to these microbial glycolipid antigens are highly conserved between rodents and humans, suggesting that iNKT cells are evolutionally conserved because their invariant TCR is useful in detecting certain pathogens. Furthermore, glycolipid-mediated iNKT cell activation during immunization has adjuvant activity, enhancing humoral and cell-mediated responses. Therefore, iNKT cell activation is an attractive target for developing new vaccines for infectious diseases.

  13. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Stoop, Hans

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies presented here show valuable additional information on the microscopic diagnostics in daily practice. This enables proper and complete diagnosis of this relative rare variant of cancer ensuring the b...

  14. Signal transduction by HLA class II antigens expressed on activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    Human T cells express HLA class II antigens upon activation. Although activated, class II+ T cells can present alloantigens under certain circumstances, the functional role of class II antigens on activated T cells remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cross-linking of HLA-DR molecules ex...

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  12. Innate Valpha14(+) natural killer T cells mature dendritic cells, leading to strong adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Steinman, Ralph M

    2007-12-01

    The observation that the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) is a potent stimulator of natural killer T (NKT) cells has provided an important means for investigating NKT cell biology. alpha-GalCer is presented on CD1d to the invariant NKT receptor, leading to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production by dendritic cells (DCs) and to NK cell activation. We review our research on the tumor-protective properties of alpha-GalCer, particularly the major role played by DCs. We compared administration of alpha-GalCer on mature DCs with soluble glycolipid and found that DCs induced more prolonged interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by NKT cells and better protection against B16 melanoma. Human alpha-GalCer-loaded DCs also expanded NKT cell numbers in cancer patients. alpha-GalCer-activated NKT cells were then found to induce DC maturation in vivo. The maturing DCs produced IL-12, upregulated co-stimulatory molecules, and induced adaptive immunity to captured cellular antigens, including prolonged, combined CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-cell immunity to dying tumor cells. Surprisingly, co-stimulator-poor tumor cells, if directly loaded with alpha-GalCer ('tumor/Gal') and injected intravenously, also induced strong NKT- and NK-cell responses. The latter killed the tumor/Gal, which were subsequently cross presented by CD1d on DCs to elicit DC maturation and prolonged adaptive T-cell immunity, which lasted 6-12 months. These findings help explain tumor protection via alpha-GalCer and urge development of the DC-NKT axis to provide innate and adaptive immunity to human cancers.

  13. Reciprocal Crosstalk between Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Christian W.; Freigang, Stefan; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T cells carrying a highly conserved, semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) [invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells] are a subset of unconventional T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d molecules. Although CD1d is expressed on a variety of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are key presenters of glycolipid antigen in vivo. When stimulated through their TCR, iNKT cells rapidly secrete copious amounts of cytokines and induce maturation of DCs, thereby facilitating coordinated stimulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The bidirectional crosstalk between DCs and iNKT cells determines the functional outcome of iNKT cell-targeted responses and iNKT cell agonists are used and currently being evaluated as adjuvants to enhance the efficacy of antitumor immunotherapy. This review illustrates mechanistic underpinnings of reciprocal DCs and iNKT cell interactions and discusses how those can be harnessed for cancer therapy. PMID:28596767

  14. Fast transcription rates of RNA polymerase II in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Paolo; Knezevich, Anna; De Marco, Alex; Mazza, Davide; Kula, Anna; McNally, Jim G; Marcello, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Averaged estimates of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation rates in mammalian cells have been shown to range between 1.3 and 4.3 kb min−1. In this work, nascent RNAs from an integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1-derived vector were detectable at the single living cell level by fluorescent RNA tagging. At steady state, a constant number of RNAs was measured corresponding to a minimal density of polymerases with negligible fluctuations over time. Recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching was complete within seconds, indicating a high rate of RNA biogenesis. The calculated transcription rate above 50 kb min−1 points towards a wide dynamic range of RNAPII velocities in living cells. PMID:22015688

  15. Effect of arginase II on L-arginine depletion and cell growth in murine cell lines of renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson John R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arginine is the common substrate for the two isoforms of arginase. Arginase I, highly expressed in the liver and arginase II mainly expressed in the kidney. Arginase I-producing myeloid derived suppressor cells have been shown to inhibit T-cell function by the depletion of L-arginine. On the other hand, arginase II has been detected in patients with cancer and is thought to metabolize L-arginine to L-ornithine needed to sustain rapid tumor growth; however its role in L-arginine depletion is unclear. Thus, in tumor biology, L-arginine metabolism may play a dual role in tumor growth and in the induction of T cell dysfunction. Therefore, we studied in murine renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines, the effect of arginase II on tumor cell proliferation and L-arginine depletion. The effect of arginase inhibitors on cell proliferation was also tested. Methods Three murine renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cell lines were tested for the presence of arginase. nor-NOHA, an arginase inhibitor was used to substantiate the effect of arginase on cell growth and L-arginine depletion. Amino acid levels were tested by HPLC. Results Our results show that mRCC cell lines express only arginase II and were able to deplete L-arginine from the medium. Cell growth was independent of the amount of arginase activity expressed by the cells. nor-NOHA significantly (P = 0.01 reduced arginase II activity and suppressed cell growth in cells exhibiting high arginase activity. The depletion of L-arginine by mRCC induced the decrease expression of CD3ζ a key element for T-cell function. Conclusion The results of this study show for the first time that arginase II produced by RCC cell lines depletes L-arginine resulting in decreased expression of CD3ζ. These results indicate that RCC cell lines expressing arginase II can modulate the L-arginine metabolic pathway to regulate both cell growth and T-cell function. Blocking arginase may lead to a decrease in RCC cell

  16. In vitro and in vivo anti-tumor effects of selected platinum(IV) and dinuclear platinum(II) complexes against lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenijevic, Milos; Milovanovic, Marija; Jovanovic, Snezana; Arsenijevic, Natalija; Markovic, Bojana Simovic; Gazdic, Marina; Volarevic, Vladislav

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, cytotoxic effects of cisplatin, the most usually used chemotherapeutic agent, were compared with new designed platinum(IV) ([PtCl4(en)] (en = ethylenediamine) and [PtCl4(dach)]) (dach = (±)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane) and platinum(II) complexes ([{trans-Pt(NH3)2Cl}2(μ-pyrazine)](ClO4)2 (Pt1), [{trans-Pt(NH3)2Cl}2(μ-4,4'-bipyridyl)](ClO4)2DMF(Pt2),[{trans-Pt(NH3)2Cl}2(μ-1,2-bis(4pyridyl)ethane)](ClO4)2 (Pt3)), in vitro and in vivo against human and murine lung cancer cells, to determine anti-tumor potential of newly synthesized platinum-based drugs in the therapy of lung cancer. Results obtained by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide], Lactate dehydrogenase and Annexin V/Propidium Iodide assays showed that, among all tested complexes, [PtCl4(en)] had the highest cytotoxicity against human and murine lung carcinoma cells in vitro. [PtCl4(en)] showed significantly higher cytotoxicity then cisplatin in all tested concentrations, mainly by inducing apoptosis in lung cancer cells. [PtCl4(en)] was well tolerated in vivo. Clinical signs of [PtCl4(en)]-induced toxicity, such as changes in food, water consumption or body weight, nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity was not observed in [PtCl4(en)]-treated mice. [PtCl4(en)] managed to increase presence of CD45+ leukocytes, including F4/80+ macrophages, CD11c+ dendritic cells, CD4+ helper and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) in the lungs, cytotoxic NK, NKT and CTLs in the spleens of tumor bearing mice, resulting with reduction of metastatic lesions in the lungs, indicating its potential to stimulate anti-tumor immune response in vivo. Due to its anti-tumor cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, and potential for stimulation of anti-tumor immune response, [PtCl4(en)] may be a good candidate for further testing in the field of medicinal chemistry.

  17. Association of the frequency of peripheral natural killer T cells with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Fu Xu; Chao-Hui Yu; You-Ming Li; Lei Xu; Juan Du; Zhe Shen

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether changes in the frequency of peripheral natural killer T (NKT) cells were correlated with liver disease in patients who had metabolic predispositions to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 60 Chinese NAFLD patients and 60 age and gender matched healthy controls. The frequency of peripheral NKT cells was detected by flow cytometry. Clinical and laboratory data were collected for further analysis.RESULTS: NAFLD patients had a lower frequency of peripheral NKT cells than healthy controls (1.21% ± 0.06% vs 1.62% ± 0.07%, P < 0.001). Further analysis revealed that the frequency of peripheral NKT cells was negatively correlated with body mass index, waist circumference and serum levels of alanine aminotransferase. Logistic regression analysis revealed that elevated body mass index [hazard ratio (HR):2.991], aspartate aminotransferase levels (HR: 1.148)and fasting blood sugar (HR: 3.133) increased the risk of NAFLD, whereas an elevated frequency of peripheral NKT cells (HR: 0.107) decreased the risk.CONCLUSION: Changes in the frequency of peripheral NKT cells were correlated with NAFLD and a decreased frequency of peripheral NKT cells was a risk factor for NAFLD.

  18. Papel de las células nkt invariantes en la respuesta inmune anti-viral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Román

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Las células T asesinas naturales con receptor de células T invariante y restringidas por la molécula CD1d (iNKT son un subgrupo de linfocitos con potente actividad inmunorreguladora; su respuesta casi inmediata y la capacidad de producir citoquinas tanto Th1 como Th2 son factores determinantes en el desarrollo de la respuesta inmune innata y adaptativa. El papel fisiológico de las células iNKT se ha documentado ampliamente en la respuesta anti-tumoral, el desarrollo de la tolerancia en los órganos inmunoprivilegiados y el control de las reacciones autoinmunes. A pesar de la demostrada potencia inmunomoduladora de las células iNKT, hasta el momento se conoce poco de su acción en la respuesta inmune anti-infecciosa, en particular en el ser humano y contra los virus patógenos. Este artículo sintetiza los resultados de una búsqueda en las principales bases de datos biomédicas (Pubmed, Medline y OVID, e incluye los estudios realizados para caracterizar estas células y evaluar su papel en la interacción del hospedero con los virus. Las células iNKT participan en la respuesta inmune antiviral, aunque de una manera diferente según el tipo de virus; incluso, podrían estar comprometidas en los daños mediados por mecanismos inmunes. En el ser humano, las células iNKT son aparentemente esenciales en la respuesta inmune contra el virus Varicela Zoster, mientras que todavía hay controversia sobre su función en el control de otros virus. Los modelos animales han aportado las primeras evidencias sobre el potencial de la manipulación terapéutica específica de este subgrupo de linfocitos.

  19. Papel de las células nkt invariantes en la respuesta inmune anti-viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Román

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Las células T asesinas naturales con receptor de células T invariante y restringidas por la molécula CD1d (iNKT son un subgrupo de linfocitos con potente actividad inmunorreguladora; su respuesta casi inmediata y la capacidad de producir citoquinas tanto Th1 como Th2 son factores determinantes en el desarrollo de la respuesta inmune innata y adaptativa. El papel fisiológico de las células iNKT se ha documentado ampliamente en la respuesta anti-tumoral, el desarrollo de la tolerancia en los órganos inmunoprivilegiados y el control de las reacciones autoinmunes. A pesar de la demostrada potencia inmunomoduladora de las células iNKT, hasta el momento se conoce poco de su acción en la respuesta inmune anti-infecciosa, en particular en el ser humano y contra los virus patógenos. Este artículo sintetiza los resultados de una búsqueda en las principales bases de datos biomédicas (Pubmed, Medline y OVID, e incluye los estudios realizados para caracterizar estas células y evaluar su papel en la interacción del hospedero con los virus. Las células iNKT participan en la respuesta inmune antiviral, aunque de una manera diferente según el tipo de virus; incluso, podrían estar comprometidas en los daños mediados por mecanismos inmunes. En el ser humano, las células iNKT son aparentemente esenciales en la respuesta inmune contra el virus Varicela Zoster, mientras que todavía hay controversia sobre su función en el control de otros virus. Los modelos animales han aportado las primeras evidencias sobre el potencial de la manipulación terapéutica específica de este subgrupo de linfocitos.

  20. Computer simulation study of hexokinase II from Ehrlich ascites cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, L

    1975-02-21

    A study of the mechanism of hexokinase II from ascites cells the effects of its binding to mitochondrial membranes has been carried out by computer simulation. This is based on experimental data of Kosow and Rose and of Gumaa and McLean, and the theoretical methods of cleveland. For the soluble enzyme the mechanism is random with ternary produce-inhibition complexes; when bound to mitochondria, the mechanism becomes ordered-on, random-off, as the binding of ATP to the free enzymes becomes negligibly slow. The requirements of experimental data for mechanistic studies are discussed.

  1. Natural Killer T Cell-Targeted Immunotherapy Mediating Long-term Memory Responses and Strong Antitumor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyambayar Dashtsoodol

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Current tumor therapies, including immunotherapies, focus on passive eradication or at least reduction of the tumor mass. However, cancer patients quite often suffer from tumor relapse or metastasis after such treatments. To overcome these problems, we have developed a natural killer T (NKT cell-targeted immunotherapy focusing on active engagement of the patient’s immune system, but not directly targeting the tumor cells themselves. NKT cells express an invariant antigen receptor α chain encoded by Trav11 (Vα14-Traj18 (Jα18 gene segments in mice and TRAV10 (Vα24-TRAJ18 (Jα18 in humans and recognize glycolipid ligand in conjunction with a monomorphic CD1d molecule. The NKT cells play a pivotal role in the orchestration of antitumor immune responses by mediating adjuvant effects that activate various antitumor effector cells of both innate and adaptive immune systems and also aid in establishing a long-term memory response. Here, we established NKT cell-targeted therapy using a newly discovered NKT cell glycolipid ligand, RK, which has a stronger capacity to stimulate both human and mouse NKT cells compared to previous NKT cell ligand. Moreover, RK mediates strong adjuvant effects in activating various effector cell types and establishes long-term memory responses, resulting in the continuous attack on the tumor that confers long-lasting and potent antitumor effects. Since the NKT cell ligand presented by the monomorphic CD1d can be used for all humans irrespective of HLA types, and also because NKT cell-targeted therapy does not directly target tumor cells, this therapy can potentially be applied to all cancer patients and any tumor types.

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  4. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Prs.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Embryo h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Muscle h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Dig.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Digestive... tract SRX112957,SRX143802 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Dig.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Placenta ...SRX160402,SRX112969 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Plc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Neu.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Larvae SR...SRX661503,SRX026742,SRX013070,SRX013072,SRX182775,SRX151961,SRX013082,SRX013113 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Prostate...363,SRX173198,SRX173197 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Muscle SR.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Embryo SR...SRX099707 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Pancreas ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Cardiovas...X373591,SRX373605,SRX680476,SRX346170,SRX346169 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.YSt.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Yeast... strain SRX092435,SRX497381,SRX360914,SRX497380,SRX497382,SRX360917 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pluripot...833412,SRX149642,SRX702059 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX800016,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Muscle SR.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Kidney SR...X661587,SRX062964,SRX143850,SRX236087,SRX020250 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Kid.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Prostate...866,SRX173198,SRX173197 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pancreas... SRX190244 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Unclassif...ied SRX254629 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Lung SRX1...43816,SRX062976,SRX020252 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Yeast... strain SRX092435,SRX360917,SRX360914,SRX497380,SRX497382,SRX497381,SRX360915 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.PSC.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Pluripote...SRX213760,SRX355582 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Adl.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Dig.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Liv.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Pan.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Brs.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Brs.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Pan.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Brs.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Bld.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Adl.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Muscle h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pupae SRX...013069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Yeast... strain http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pupae SRX...013069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo SR...7582,SRX013077,SRX050604,SRX050605 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pluripot...670820,SRX702057,SRX702061 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pancreas... SRX190244 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...247,SRX080162,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pancreas... SRX190244 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Dig.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Digestiv...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Prs.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Utr.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Gonad ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Gonad ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Yeast... strain http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cardiova...,SRX080152,SRX080153,SRX367018,SRX367016 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. Phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from lung, isolated alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, G L; Bubacz, D G; Lumb, R H; Mason, R J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from rat and mouse whole lung, isolated rat alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived mouse pulmonary adenomas. We report an enrichment in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (but not phosphatidylinositol) protein-catalysed transfer in the type II cell and adenoma cytosols compared with the whole-lung cytosols. The activities from these cytosols were resolved using column chromatofocusing, which clearly demonstrated the presence of a phosphatidylcholine-specific transfer protein in each of the four tissues. In addition, two proteins (rat) or three proteins (mouse) catalysing both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol transfer were resolved from whole lung, whereas in both the rat isolated alveolar type II cells and the mouse type II cell-derived adenomas one of these less specific proteins is not present. PMID:6661189

  11. NDCX-II PULSED POWER SYSTEM AND INDUCTION CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, W.L.; Reginato, L.L.; Leitner, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is currently finalizing the design of NDCX-II, the second phase of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, which will use an ion beam to explore Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) target hydrodynamics. The ion induction accelerator will include induction cells and Blumleins from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A test stand has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to test refurbished ATA induction cells and pulsed power hardware for voltage holding and ability to produce various compression and acceleration waveforms. The performance requirements, design modifications, and test results will be presented.

  12. Peroxiredoxin II Is Essential for Maintaining Stemness by Redox Regulation in Liver Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taeho; Bak, Yesol; Park, Young-Ho; Jang, Gyu-Beom; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Yoo, Jeong Eun; Park, Young Nyun; Bak, In Seon; Kim, Jin-Man; Yoon, Do-Young; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2016-05-01

    Redox regulation in cancer stem cells (CSCs) is viewed as a good target for cancer therapy because redox status plays an important role in cancer stem-cell maintenance. Here, we investigated the role of Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II), an antioxidant enzyme, in association with maintenance of liver CSCs. Our study demonstrates that Prx II overexpressed in liver cancer cells has high potential for self-renewal activity. Prx II expression significantly corelated with expression of epithelial-cell adhesion molecules (EpCAM) and cytokerain 19 in liver cancer tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Downregulation of Prx II in Huh7 cells with treatment of siRNA reduced expression of EpCAM and CD133 as well as Sox2 in accordance with increased ROS and apoptosis, which were reversed in Huh7-hPrx II cells. Huh7-hPrx II cells exhibited strong sphere-formation activity compared with mock cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) exposure enhanced sphere formation, cell-surface expression of EpCAM and CD133, and pSTAT3 along with activation of VEGF receptor 2 in Huh7-hPrx II cells. The result also emerged in Huh7-H-ras(G12V) and SK-HEP-1-H-ras(G12V) cells with high-level expression of Prx II. Prx II was involved in regulation of VEGF driving cancer stem cells through VEGFR-2/STAT3 signaling to upregulate Bmi1 and Sox2. In addition, knockdown of Prx II in Huh7-H-ras(G12V) cells showed significant reduction in cell migration in vitro and in tumorigenic potential in vivo. Taken together, all the results demonstrated that Prx II plays a key role in the CSC self-renewal of HCC cells through redox regulation. Stem Cells 2016;34:1188-1197.

  13. Intracellular angiotensin II elicits Ca2+ increases in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Brailoiu, E; Kok, JW; Henning, RH; De Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, SA

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies show that angiotensin II can act within the cell, possibly via intracellular receptors pharmacologically different from typical plasma membrane angiotensin II receptors. The signal transduction of intracellular angiotensin LI is unclear. Therefore. we investigated the effects of intra

  14. Invariant Natural Killer T Cells As Suppressors of Graft-versus-Host Disease in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Mavers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells serve as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity and have been shown to play an important role in immune regulation, defense against pathogens, and cancer immunity. Recent data also suggest that this compartment of the immune system plays a significant role in reducing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Murine studies have shown that boosting iNKT numbers through certain conditioning regimens or adoptive transfer leads to suppression of acute or chronic GVHD. Preclinical work reveals that iNKT cells exert their suppressive function by expanding regulatory T cells in vivo, though the exact mechanism by which this occurs has yet to be fully elucidated. Human studies have demonstrated that a higher number of iNKT cells in the graft or in the peripheral blood of the recipient post-transplantation are associated with a reduction in GVHD risk, importantly without a loss of graft-versus-tumor effect. In two separate analyses of many immune cell subsets in allogeneic grafts, iNKT cell dose was the only parameter associated with a significant improvement in GVHD or in GVHD-free progression-free survival. Failure to reconstitute iNKT cells following allogeneic transplantation has also been associated with an increased risk of relapse. These data demonstrate that iNKT cells hold promise for future clinical application in the prevention of GVHD in allogeneic stem cell transplantation and warrant further study of the immunoregulatory functions of iNKT cells in this setting.

  15. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular and lysates (intracellular blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway.

  16. Targeted delivery of lipid antigen to macrophages via the CD169/sialoadhesin endocytic pathway induces robust invariant natural killer T cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Norihito; Vela, Jose Luis; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Rademacher, Christoph; Khurana, Archana; van Rooijen, Nico; Crocker, Paul R.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Paulson, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells induce a protective immune response triggered by foreign glycolipid antigens bound to CD1d on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). A limitation of using glycolipid antigens to stimulate immune responses in human patients has been the inability to target them to the most effective APCs. Recent studies have implicated phagocytic CD169+ macrophages as major APCs in lymph nodes for priming iNKT cells in mice immunized with glycolipid antigen in particulate form. CD169 is known as sialoadhesin (Sn), a macrophage-specific adhesion and endocytic receptor of the siglec family that recognizes sialic acid containing glycans as ligands. We have recently developed liposomes decorated with glycan ligands for CD169/Sn suitable for targeted delivery to macrophages via CD169/Sn-mediated endocytosis. Here we show that targeted delivery of a lipid antigen to CD169+ macrophages in vivo results in robust iNKT cell activation in liver and spleen using nanogram amounts of antigen. Activation of iNKT cells is abrogated in Cd169−/− mice and is macrophage-dependent, demonstrating that targeting CD169+ macrophages is sufficient for systemic activation of iNKT cells. When pulsed with targeted liposomes, human monocyte–derived dendritic cells expressing CD169/Sn activated human iNKT cells, demonstrating the conservation of the CD169/Sn endocytic pathway capable of presenting lipid antigens to iNKT cells. PMID:23610394

  17. Making memory at birth: understanding the differentiation of natural killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Isaac; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2012-04-01

    Glycolipid reactive natural killer T cells with an invariant TCR α-chain (iNKT cells) are a conserved population of T lymphocytes with a distinct anatomical distribution and functional properties. The differentiation pathway of iNKT cells branches off from mainstream thymocyte differentiation at the double positive stage, and recent work has revealed how signaling events early in the iNKT cell pathway imprint a memory-like behavior on these cells. Additionally, unique molecular interactions governing iNKT cell development and tissue distribution have been uncovered recently, building up our knowledge of the complex network of interactions that form this population. Novel autologous antigens for these cells have been identified, although it has not yet been resolved if there is single endogenous antigen responsible for both positive selection and/or peripheral activation.

  18. Cutting edge: activation by innate cytokines or microbial antigens can cause arrest of natural killer T cell patrolling of liver sinusoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Peter; Cameron, Thomas O; Kinjo, Yuki; Nagarajan, Niranjana; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Dustin, Michael L

    2008-02-15

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that rapidly secrete large amounts of effector cytokines upon activation. Recognition of alpha-linked glycolipids presented by CD1d leads to the production of IL-4, IFN-gamma, or both, while direct activation by the synergistic action of IL-12 and IL-18 leads to IFN-gamma production only. We previously reported that in vitro cultured dendritic cells can modulate NKT cell activation and, using intravital fluorescence laser scanning microscopy, we reported that the potent stimulation of NKT cells results in arrest within hepatic sinusoids. In this study, we examine the relationship between murine NKT cell patrolling and activation. We report that NKT cell arrest results from activation driven by limiting doses of a bacteria-derived weak agonist, galacturonic acid-containing glycosphingolipid, or a synthetic agonist, alpha-galactosyl ceramide. Interestingly, NKT cell arrest also results from IL-12 and IL-18 synergistic activation. Thus, innate cytokines and natural microbial TCR agonists trigger sinusoidal NKT cell arrest and an effector response.

  19. Plectasin, a Fungal Defensin, Targets the Bacterial Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Tanja; Kruse, Thomas; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    that plectasin, a fungal defensin, acts by directly binding the bacterial cell-wall precursor Lipid II. A wide range of genetic and biochemical approaches identify cell-wall biosynthesis as the pathway targeted by plectasin. In vitro assays for cell-wall synthesis identified Lipid II as the specific cellular...

  20. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Ty...

  1. II-IV-V Based Thin Film Tandem Photovoltaic Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Nathan [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); van Schilfgaarde, Mark [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2012-10-04

    [Through a combination of theory and experiment that, absent unknown mitigating factors, a tandem cell whose (wide-gap. 1.8 eV) top layer is made of ZnSnP2 and whose (narrow gap, 1.1 eV) bottom layer consisting of ZnGeAs2 are near-ideal materials for a tandem cell. Not only are there gaps optimally adjusted to the solar spectrum, but the two compounds are lattice-matched, and their energy band structure and optical absorption are also near-ideal (they closely resemble that of GaAs). Our first major challenge is to establish that high-quality II-IV-V thin films can be synthesized. We have begun growing and characterizing films of ZnGeAs2 and ZnSnP2, initially grown on Ge substrates (the lattice constant of Ge matches these compounds) by pulsed laser ablation and sputtering. In tandem are theoretical calculations to guide the experiments. The goal is to develop methods that can be used to produce a pair of lattice-matched thin films that will be useful in tandem cells.

  2. MHC class II polymorphisms, autoreactive T-cells and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eTsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, also known as human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA in humans, are the prevailing contributors of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D, Multiple Sclerosis (MS, and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, among others (Todd and Wicker, 2001;MacKay et al., 2002;Hafler et al., 2007. Although the pathways through which MHC molecules afford autoimmune risk or resistance remain to be fully mapped out, it is generally accepted that they do so by shaping the central and peripheral T cell repertoires of the host towards autoimmune proclivity or resistance, respectively. Disease-predisposing MHC alleles would both spare autoreactive thymocytes from central tolerance and bias their development towards a pathogenic phenotype. Protective MHC alleles, on the other hand, would promote central deletion of autoreactive thymocytes and skew their development towards non-pathogenic phenotypes. This interpretation of the data is at odds with two other observations: that in MHC-heterozygous individuals, resistance is dominant over susceptibility; and that it is difficult to understand how deletion of one or a few clonal autoreactive T cell types would suffice to curb autoimmune responses driven by hundreds if not thousands of autoreactive T cell specificities. This review provides an update on current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying MHC class II-associated autoimmune disease susceptibility and/or resistance and attempts to reconcile these seemingly opposing concepts.

  3. ACTIVATION OF INKT CELLS AMELIORATES EXPERIMENTAL OCULAR AUTOIMMUNITY BY A MECHANISM INVOLVING INNATE IFN-γ PRODUCTION AND DAMPENING OF THE ADAPTIVE TH1 AND TH17 RESPONSES1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajewski, Rafael S.; Hansen, Anna M; Agarwal, Rajeev K.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sidobre, Stephane; Su, Shao Bo; Silver, Phyllis B.; Tsuji, Moriya; Franck, Richard W.; Lawton, Anne P.; Chan, Chi-Chao; Caspi, Rachel R.

    2008-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T cells (iNKT cells) have been reported to play a role not only in innate immunity but also to regulate several models of autoimmunity. Furthermore, iNKT cells are necessary for the generation of the prototypic eye-related immune regulatory phenomenon, anterior chamber associated immune deviation (ACAID). Here we explore the role of iNKT cells in regulation of autoimmunity to retina, using a model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) in mice immunized with a uveitogenic regimen of the retinal antigen (Ag), IRBP. Natural strain-specific variation in iNKT number or induced genetic deficiencies in iNKT did not alter baseline susceptibility to EAU. However, iNKT function seemed to correlate with susceptibility and its pharmacological enhancement in vivo by treatment with iNKT TCR ligands at the time of uveitogenic immunization reproducibly ameliorated disease scores. Use of different iNKT TCR ligands revealed dependence on the elicited cytokine profile. Surprisingly, superior protection against EAU was achieved with α-C-GalCer, which induces a strong IFN-γ but only a weak IL-4 production by iNKT cells, in contrast to the ligands α-GalCer (both IFN-γ and IL-4) and OCH (primarily IL-4). The protective effect of α-C-Gal-Cer was associated with a reduction of adaptive Ag specific IFN-γ and IL-17 production and was negated by systemic neutralization of IFN-γ. These data suggest that pharmacological activation of iNKT cells protects from EAU at least in part by a mechanism involving innate production of IFN-γ and a consequent dampening of the Th1 as well as the Th17 effector responses. PMID:18802082

  4. Up-regulation of hexokinaseII in myeloma cells: targeting myeloma cells with 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Ayako; Miki, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Shingen; Harada, Takeshi; Oda, Asuka; Amou, Hiroe; Fujii, Shiro; Kagawa, Kumiko; Takeuchi, Kyoko; Ozaki, Shuji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Hexokinase II (HKII), a key enzyme of glycolysis, is widely over-expressed in cancer cells. However, HKII levels and its roles in ATP production and ATP-dependent cellular process have not been well studied in hematopoietic malignant cells including multiple myeloma (MM) cells.We demonstrate herein that HKII is constitutively over-expressed in MM cells. 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA), an inhibitor of HKII, promptly and substantially suppresses ATP production and induces cell death in MM cells. Interestingly, cocultures with osteoclasts (OCs) but not bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt along with an increase in HKII levels and lactate production in MM cells. The enhancement of HKII levels and lactate production in MM cells by OCs were mostly abrogated by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, suggesting activation of glycolysis in MM cells by OCs via the PI3K-Akt-HKII pathway. Although BMSCs and OCs stimulate MM cell growth and survival, 3BrPA induces cell death in MM cells even in cocultures with OCs as well as BMSCs. Furthermore, 3BrPA was able to diminish ATP-dependent ABC transporter activity to restore drug retention in MM cells in the presence of OCs. These results may underpin possible clinical application of 3BrPA in patients with MM.

  5. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun, E-mail: majuntongrensh1@126.com; Zhuang, Wen-Fang, E-mail: wenfangzhuangmd@163.com

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  6. Multifocal primary cutaneous extranodal NK/T lymphoma nasal type*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Pedro; Ferreira, Cristina; Soares-Almeida, Luís; Filipe, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Nasal type extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma is a distinct entity according to the World Health Organization classification. Although 60% to 90% of patients with this disease present with a destructive mass in the midline facial tissues, it may also primarily or secondarily involve extranasal sites, like the skin. We report the case of a 77-year-old patient that came to our department with erythematous plaques of the right leg and eczematous lesions of the trunk. These lesions were biopsied and the patient was diagnosed with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. He was treated with multi-agent systemic chemotherapy but died 5 months after diagnosis. This case highlights the rarity and variability of cutaneous features of this disease and its aggressive course and poor prognosis. PMID:27192524

  7. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie, C.C.; McCormick-Shannon, K.; Robinson, P.C.; Mason, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Restoration of the alveolar epithelium after injury is thought to be dependent on the proliferation of alveolar type II cells. To understand the factors that may be involved in promoting type II cell proliferation in vivo, we determined the effect of potential mitogens and culture substrata on DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. Type II cells cultured in basal medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) exhibited essentially no DNA synthesis. Factors that stimulated /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation included cholera toxin, epidermal growth factor, and rat serum. The greatest degree of stimulation was achieved by plating type II cells on an extracellular matrix prepared from bovine corneal endothelial cells and then by culturing the pneumocytes in medium containing rat serum, cholera toxin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor. Under conditions of stimulation of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation there was an increased DNA content per culture dish but no increase in cell number. The ability of various culture conditions to promote DNA synthesis in type II cells was verified by autoradiography. Type II cells were identified by the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions, which were visualized by tannic acid staining before autoradiography. These results demonstrate the importance of soluble factors and culture substratum in stimulating DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture.

  8. Myosin-II dependent cell contractility contributes to spontaneous nodule formation of mesothelioma cells

    CERN Document Server

    Tárnoki-Zách, Julia; Méhes, Elod; Paku, Sándor; Neufeld, Zoltán; Hegedus, Balázs; Döme, Balázs; Czirok, Andras

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that characteristic nodules emerge in cultures of several malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cell lines. Instead of excessive local cell proliferation, the nodules arise by Myosin II-driven cell contractility. The aggregation process can be prevented or reversed by suitable pharmacological inhibitors of acto-myosin contractility. A cell-resolved elasto-plastic model of the multicellular patterning process indicates that the morphology and size of the nodules as well as the speed of their formation is determined by the mechanical tension cells exert on their neighbors, and the stability of cell-substrate adhesion complexes. A linear stability analysis of a homogenous, self-tensioned Maxwell fluid indicates the unconditional presence of a patterning instability.

  9. Pavlovian Conditioning of Rat Mucosal Mast Cells to Secrete Rat Mast Cell Protease II

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Marshall, Jean; Perdue, Mary; Siegel, Shepard; Bienenstock, John

    1989-01-01

    Antigen (egg albumin) injections, which stimulate mucosal mast cells to secrete mediators, were paired with an audiovisual cue. After reexposure to the audiovisual cue, a mediator (rat mast cell protease II) was measured with a sensitive and specific assay. Animals reexposed to only the audiovisual cue released a quantity of protease not significantly different from animals reexposed to both the cue and the antigen; these groups released significantly more protease than animals that had received the cue and antigen in a noncontingent manner. The results support a role for the central nervous system as a functional effector of mast cell function in the allergic state.

  10. Casein kinase II inhibition induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Rainer; Saur, Dieter; Fritsch, Ralph; Reichert, Maximilian; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Günter

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death in western civilization. The five-year survival rate is below 1% and of the 10% of patients with resectable disease only around one-fifth survives 5 years. Survival rates have not changed much during the last 20 years, demonstrating the inefficacy of current available therapies. To improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer, there is the need to develop effective non-surgical treatment for this disease. The protein kinase casein kinase II (CK2) is a ubiquitously expressed serine-threonine kinase and its activity is enhanced in all human tumors examined so far. The contribution of CK2 to the tumor maintenance of pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. To investigate the function of CK2 in pancreatic cancer cells we used the CK2 specific inhibitors 5,6-Dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole and Apigenin. Furthermore, we interfered with CK2 expression using CK2 specific siRNAs. Interfering with CK2 function led to a reduction of pancreatic cancer cell viability, which was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis correlated with a reduced NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity. This study validates CK2 as a molecular drug target in a preclinical in vitro model of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Vogel, Maria C; Rabeh, Wael M; Magzoub, Mazin

    2017-05-01

    Overexpression of mitochondria-bound hexokinase II (HKII) in cancer cells plays an important role in their metabolic reprogramming and protects them against apoptosis, thereby facilitating their growth and proliferation. Here, we show that covalently coupling a peptide corresponding to the mitochondrial membrane-binding N-terminal 15 aa of HKII (pHK) to a short, penetration-accelerating sequence (PAS) enhances the cellular uptake, mitochondrial localization, and cytotoxicity of the peptide in HeLa cells. Further analysis revealed that pHK-PAS depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and depleted intracellular ATP levels. The effects of pHK-PAS were correlated with dissociation of endogenous full-length HKII from mitochondria and release of cytochrome c Of significance, pHK-PAS treatment of noncancerous HEK293 cells resulted in substantially lower cytotoxicity. Thus, pHK-PAS effectively disrupted the mitochondria-HKII association in cancer cells, which led to mitochondrial dysfunction and, finally, apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the potential of the pHK-PAS cell-penetrating peptide as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer.-Woldetsadik, A. D., Vogel, M. C., Rabeh, W. M., Magzoub, M. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells. © The Author(s).

  12. Proteolysis of synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, U J; Malek, S K; Liu, L; Li, H L

    1999-10-01

    Synaptobrevin-2, syntaxin-1, and SNAP-25 were identified in rat alveolar epithelial type II cells by Western blot analysis. Synaptobrevin-2 was localized in the lamellar bodies, and syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 were found in 0.4% Nonidet P40-soluble and -insoluble fractions, respectively, of the type II cells. When the isolated type II cells were stimulated for secretion with calcium ionophore A23187 or with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, these proteins were found to have been proteolyzed. Preincubation of cells with calpain inhibitor II (N-acetylleucylleucylmethionine), however, prevented the proteolysis. Treatment of the cell lysate with exogenous calpain resulted in a time-dependent decrease of these proteins. The data suggest that synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 are subject to proteolytic modification by activated calpain in intact type II cells stimulated for secretion.

  13. Angiotensin II Inhibits Insulin Binding to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Oh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInsulin-mediated glucose uptake in insulin target tissues is correlated with interstitial insulin concentration, rather than plasma insulin concentration. Therefore, insulin delivery to the interstitium of target tissues is very important, and the endothelium may also play an important role in the development of insulin resistance.MethodsAfter treating bovine aortic endothelial cells with angiotensin II (ATII, we observed the changes in insulin binding capacity and the amounts of insulin receptor (IR on the cell membranes and in the cytosol.ResultsAfter treatment of 10-7M ATII, insulin binding was decreased progressively, up to 60% at 60 minutes (P<0.05. ATII receptor blocker (eprosartan dose dependently improved the insulin binding capacity which was reduced by ATII (P<0.05. At 200 µM, eprosartan fully restored insulin binding capacity, althogh it resulted in only a 20% to 30% restoration at the therapeutic concentration. ATII did not affect the total amount of IR, but it did reduce the amount of IR on the plasma membrane and increased that in the cytosol.ConclusionATII decreased the insulin binding capacity of the tested cells. ATII did not affect the total amount of IR but did decrease the amount of IR on the plasma membrane. Our data indicate that ATII decreases insulin binding by translocating IR from the plasma membrane to the cytosol. The binding of insulin to IR is important for insulin-induced vasodilation and transendothelial insulin transport. Therefore, ATII may cause insulin resistance through this endothelium-based mechanism.

  14. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki, E-mail: tishizu@ndmc.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro [Department of Pharmacology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT{sub 1}R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression

  15. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  16. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  17. Detection of PIVKA II produced by human hepatoma cells in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, H; Ono, M; Sekiya, C; Ohta, H; Ohhira, M; Ohhira, M; Yoshida, Y; Ikeda, N; Namiki, M

    1991-03-01

    A novel experimental nude mouse model, which is useful for investigation of the mechanisms of PIVKA II synthesis, was established by inoculation with PIVKA II-producing human hepatoma cells (huH-1). We have found markedly elevated levels of PIVKA II in the plasma of nude mice transplanted with huH-1 cells and increased PIVKA II content in huH-1 tumor tissues. Whereas we have not found detectable level of PIVKA II neither in the plasma nor in tumor tissues of nude mice transplanted different human hepatoma cells (HLF) which is not producing PIVKA II. Histology of the tumor tissues produced by huH-1 cells revealed a thick trabecular pattern with blood spaces.

  18. Antigen-B Cell Receptor Complexes Associate with Intracellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II Molecules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Margarida; Tucker, Heidi; Drake, Lisa; Nichol, Kathleen; Drake, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen processing and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells and B cells allows the activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and cognate interactions between B cells and effector CD4+ T cells, respectively. B cells are unique among class II-restricted antigen-presenting cells in that they have a clonally restricted antigen-specific receptor, the B cell receptor (BCR), which allows the cell to recognize and respond to trace amounts of foreign antigen present in a sea of self-antigens. Moreover, engagement of peptide-class II complexes formed via BCR-mediated processing of cognate antigen has been shown to result in a unique pattern of B cell activation. Using a combined biochemical and imaging/FRET approach, we establish that internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular class II molecules. We demonstrate that the M1-paired MHC class II conformer, shown previously to be critical for CD4 T cell activation, is incorporated selectively into these complexes and loaded selectively with peptide derived from BCR-internalized cognate antigen. These results demonstrate that, in B cells, internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules, potentially defining a site of class II peptide acquisition, and reveal a selective role for the M1-paired class II conformer in the presentation of cognate antigen. These findings provide key insights into the molecular mechanisms used by B cells to control the source of peptides charged onto class II molecules, allowing the immune system to mount an antibody response focused on BCR-reactive cognate antigen. PMID:26400081

  19. Contribution of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells to Skin Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Ritsu, Masae; Kanno, Emi; Suzuki, Aiko; Kamimatsuno, Rina; Takagi, Naoyuki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Imai, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Ryoko; Tachi, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we determined the contribution of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to the skin wound healing process. In iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18KO) mice lacking iNKT cells, wound closure was significantly delayed compared with wild-type mice. Collagen deposition, expression of α-smooth muscle actin and CD31, and wound breaking strength were significantly attenuated in Jα18KO mice. The adoptive transfer of liver mononuclear cells from wild-type but not from Jα18KO or interferon (IFN)-γ gene-disrupted (IFN-γKO) mice resulted in the reversal of this impaired wound healing in Jα18KO mice. IFN-γ expression was induced in the wounded tissues, which was significantly decreased at 6, 12, and 24 hours, but increased on day 3 after wounding in Jα18KO mice. The main source of the late-phase IFN-γ production in Jα18KO mice were neutrophils rather than NK cells and T cells. Administration of α-galactosylceramide, an activator of iNKT cells, resulted in the acceleration of wound healing on day 3 in wild-type mice. This effect was not observed in IFN-γKO mice. These results indicate that iNKT cells play important roles in wound healing. The iNKT cell-induced IFN-γ production may regulate the wound healing process in the early phase.

  20. Characterization of the natural killer T-cell response in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderLaan, Paul A; Reardon, Catherine A; Sagiv, Yuval; Blachowicz, Lydia; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Getz, Godfrey S

    2007-03-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells have recently been implicated in atherogenesis, primarily for their ability to recognize and respond to lipid antigens. Because the atherosclerotic lesion is characterized by the retention and modification of lipids in the vascular wall, NKT cells may be involved in promoting the local vascular inflammatory response. Here, we investigate the proatherogenic role of NKT cells in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis, using as recipients immune-deficient, atherosclerosis-susceptible RAG1(-/-)LDLR(-/-) mice. The adoptive transfer of an NKT cell-enriched splenocyte population from Valpha14Jalpha18 T-cell receptor transgenic mice resulted in a 73% increase in aortic root lesion area compared with recipients of NKT cell-deficient splenocytes derived from CD1d(-/-) mice after 12 weeks of Western-type diet feeding. The total serum from hypercholesterolemic mice leads to a small but significant activation of Valpha14Jalpha18 T-cell receptor-expressing hybridoma line by dendritic cells that is CD1d-dependent. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that NKT cells are proatherogenic in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and this activity is likely associated with endogenous lipid antigens carried by lipoproteins in the circulation and perhaps also in the atherosclerotic plaque.

  1. Production of dammarenediol-II triterpene in a cell suspension culture of transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung-Yeon; Wang, Hong-Yan; Choi, Yong-Eui

    2014-02-01

    Dammarenediol-II is biologically active tetracyclic triterpenoid, which is basic compound of ginsenoside saponin. Here, we established the dammarenediol-II production via a cell suspension culture of transgenic tobacco overexpressing PgDDS. Dammarenediol-II synthase catalyzes the cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene to dammarenediol-II, which is the basic triterpene skeleton in dammarene-type saponin (ginsenosides) in Panax ginseng. Dammarenediol-II is a useful candidate both for pharmacologically active triterpenes and as a defense compound in plants. Dammarenediol-II is present in the roots of P. ginseng in trace amounts because it is an intermediate product in triterpene biosynthesis. In this work, we established the production of dammarenediol-II via cell suspension culture of transgenic tobacco. The dammarenediol-II synthase gene (PgDDS) isolated from P. ginseng was introduced into the Nicotiana tobacum genome under the control of 35S promoter by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Accumulation of dammarenediol-II in transgenic tobacco plants occurred in an organ-specific manner (roots > stems > leaves > flower buds), and transgenic line 14 (T14) exhibited a high amount (157.8 μg g⁻¹ DW) of dammarenediol-II in the roots. Dammarenediol-II production in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in reduced phytosterol (β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol) contents. A cell suspension culture was established as a shake flask culture of a callus derived from root segments of transgenic (T14) plants. The amount of dammarenediol-II production in the cell suspension reached 573 μg g⁻¹ dry weight after 3 weeks of culture, which is equivalent to a culture volume of 5.2 mg dammarenediol-II per liter. Conclusively, the production of dammarenediol-II in a cell suspension culture of transgenic tobacco can be applied to the large-scale production of this compound and utilized as a source of pharmacologically active medicinal materials.

  2. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Truong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a "ribozyme" and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed "retrohoming". Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have

  3. Angiotensin II inactivation process in cultured mouse spinal cord cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, M.; Simonnet, G.; Dupouy, B.; Vincent, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    The pattern of hydrolysis of (/sup 3/H)angiotensin II ( (/sup 3/H)AII; 20 nM) by intact cells was studied on cultured mouse spinal cord cells. Degradation products were identified by HPLC analysis after incubation for 2 h at 37 degrees C. In the absence of peptidase inhibitors, 70% of (/sup 3/H)AII was degraded, and the main labeled metabolite was (/sup 3/H)tyrosine (40% of total radioactivity). Minor quantities of (/sup 3/H)AII1-5 and (/sup 3/H)AII4-8 were formed. Results obtained in the presence of various inhibitors indicate that several enzymes were involved in the AII-hydrolyzing process. Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase III (EC 3.4.14.4) could play a critical role, as suggested by the formation of (/sup 3/H)Val3-Tyr4 and (/sup 3/H)-Tyr4-Ile5 in the presence of bestatin (2 X 10(-5) M). This hypothesis was confirmed by the potency of dipeptidyl amino-peptidase III inhibitors to inhibit both (/sup 3/H)AII hydrolysis and formation of these /sup 3/H-labeled dipeptides. An arylamidase-like activity could also be participating in (/sup 3/H)AII hydrolysis, because higher concentrations of bestatin (10(-4) M) in association with dipeptidyl aminopeptidase III inhibitors totally inhibited (/sup 3/H)tyrosine formation, increased protection of (/sup 3/H)AII and (/sup 3/H)AII1-7 formed, and provoked a slight accumulation of (/sup 3/H)AII2-8. These results suggest that the formation of (/sup 3/H)AII2-8 is due to the action of a bestatin-insensitive acidic aminopeptidase and that the Pro7-Phe8 cleavage is also a step of AII hydrolysis, resulting from the action of an unidentified peptidase different from prolyl endopeptidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Angiotensin II upregulates the expression of placental growth factor in human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yingqiang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is now recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Angiotensin II (Ang II is a critical factor in inflammatory responses, which promotes the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Placental growth factor (PlGF is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family cytokines and is associated with inflammatory progress of atherosclerosis. However, the potential link between PlGF and Ang II has not been investigated. In the current study, whether Ang II could regulate PlGF expression, and the effect of PlGF on cell proliferation, was investigated in human vascular endothelial cells (VECs and smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Results In growth-arrested human VECs and VSMCs, Ang II induced PlGF mRNA expression after 4 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. 10-6 mol/L Ang II increased PlGF protein production after 8 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. Stimulation with Ang II also induced mRNA expression of VEGF receptor-1 and -2(VEGFR-1 and -2 in these cells. The Ang II type I receptor (AT1R antagonist blocked Ang II-induced PlGF gene expression and protein production. Several intracellular signals elicited by Ang II were involved in PlGF synthesis, including activation of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and PI3-kinase. A neutralizing antibody against PlGF partially inhibited the Ang II-induced proliferation of VECs and VSMCs. However, this antibody showed little effect on the basal proliferation in these cells, whereas blocking antibody of VEGF could suppress both basal and Ang II-induced proliferation in VECs and VSMCs. Conclusion Our results showed for the first time that Ang II could induce the gene expression and protein production of PlGF in VECs and VSMCs, which might play an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  5. Effects of valsartan on angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Ohmori, K; Nozaki, S; Mizushige, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-11-01

    The migration as well as proliferation of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMC) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist valsartan on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMC using Boyden's chamber methods. Ang II significantly stimulated human coronary artery SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-8) mol/l when cells of passage 4 to 6 were used. However, the migration response to Ang II was moderately decreased in cells of passage 10 to 12, and was markedly decreased in cells of passage 15 to 17, compared to that of passage 4 to 6. Ang II-induced migration was blocked by the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist valsartan in a concentration-dependent manner. By contrast, the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist PD 123319 did not affect Ang II-induced migration. Ang II modestly increased the cell number of human coronary artery SMC after a 24-h incubation. This increase in cell numbers was also clearly blocked by valsartan, but not by PD 123319. These results indicate that Ang II stimulates migration as well as proliferation via AT1 receptors in human coronary artery SMC when cells of passage 4 to 6 are used. Valsartan may prevent the progression of coronary atherosclerosis through an inhibition of Ang II-induced migration and proliferation in these cells, although in vivo evidence is lacking.

  6. Sulforaphane Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Testicular Cell Death via Activation of NRF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonggang; Xin, Ying; Tan, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Although angiotensin II (Ang II) was reported to facilitate sperm motility and intratesticular sperm transport, recent findings shed light on the efficacy of Ang II in stimulating inflammatory events in testicular peritubular cells, effect of which may play a role in male infertility. It is still unknown whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death, which may be a more direct action of Ang II in male infertility. Therefore, the present study aims to determine whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death and whether this action can be prevented by sulforaphane (SFN) via activating nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), the governor of antioxidant-redox signalling. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and Nrf2 gene knockout mice were treated with Ang II, in the presence or absence of SFN. In WT mice, SFN activated testicular NRF2 expression and function, along with a marked attenuation in Ang II-induced testicular oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic cell death. Deletion of the Nrf2 gene led to a complete abolishment of these efficacies of SFN. The present study indicated that Ang II may result in testicular apoptotic cell death, which can be prevented by SFN via the activation of NRF2. PMID:28191275

  7. Sulforaphane Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Testicular Cell Death via Activation of NRF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although angiotensin II (Ang II was reported to facilitate sperm motility and intratesticular sperm transport, recent findings shed light on the efficacy of Ang II in stimulating inflammatory events in testicular peritubular cells, effect of which may play a role in male infertility. It is still unknown whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death, which may be a more direct action of Ang II in male infertility. Therefore, the present study aims to determine whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death and whether this action can be prevented by sulforaphane (SFN via activating nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2, the governor of antioxidant-redox signalling. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J wild type (WT and Nrf2 gene knockout mice were treated with Ang II, in the presence or absence of SFN. In WT mice, SFN activated testicular NRF2 expression and function, along with a marked attenuation in Ang II-induced testicular oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic cell death. Deletion of the Nrf2 gene led to a complete abolishment of these efficacies of SFN. The present study indicated that Ang II may result in testicular apoptotic cell death, which can be prevented by SFN via the activation of NRF2.

  8. Interferon-γ Expression in Natural Killer Cells and Natural Killer T Cells Is Suppressed in Early Pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongyun Shi; Bin Ling; Ying Zhou; Ting Gao; Dingqing Feng; Min Xiao; Lin Feng

    2007-01-01

    Recent study has suggested that innate immune system might play an important role in pregnancy progression. In this study, to investigate whether NK cells and NKT cells, instead of T cells, are the dominant populations of peripheral blood in early pregnancy, flow cytometry was used to detect the percentage and intracellular cytokine expressions of T cells, NK cells, NKT cells in peripheral blood of non-pregnant women and early pregnant women.In our result, the percentages of NK cells and NKT cells were significantly increased in pregnancy compared to non-pregnancy. However, the percentage of T cells was not changed. We did not detect the Th2-dominance of total lymphocytes or T cells in peripheral blood of early pregnant women and there were also no significant changes of type 1 and type 2 cytokines in T cells, but IFN-γ production in both NK and NKT cells was decreased in early pregnancy. These results suggest that the innate immune system including NK cells and NKT cells should play a pivotal role in pregnancy progression. Type 1/type 2 shift mechanisms in innate immune system during the human early pregnancy should be paid more attention.

  9. Binding of transcobalamin II by human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Y; Lönnerdal, B

    2001-01-01

    The presence of nutrient binders in milk may have an important role during milk production and may influence the nutrient's bioavailability to the infant. Human milk and plasma contain at least two types of vitamin B12 binders: transcobalamin II (TCII) and haptocorrin (Hc). Vitamin B12 in milk is exclusively bound to Hc (Hc-B12). In plasma, the major vitamin B12 binding protein that is responsible for delivering absorbed vitamin B12 to most tissues and cells is TCII (TCII-B12). Currently, little is known about the route of secretion of vitamin B12 into human milk. It is possible that a receptor-mediated pathway is involved, since maternal vitamin B12 supplementation increases the amount of the vitamin secreted into human milk if the mother's vitamin B12 consumption is low, but remains unchanged if her intake is adequate. In this study, we investigated the process by which the mammary gland acquires vitamin B12 from maternal circulation, whether as a free vitamin or as a Hc-B12 or TCII-B12 complex. TCII was purified from plasma incubated with [57Co]vit B12 (B12*), while Hc was purified from whey incubated with B12*. Both proteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography using gel filtration and anion-exchange columns. Purity of the separated proteins was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding studies were carried out on a monolayer of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) at 4 degrees C using free B12* and TCII-B12* and Hc-B12* complexes. Minimal binding of free B12* and Hc-B12* to HMEC was observed; however, HMEC exhibited a high affinity for the TCII-B12* complex. This study suggests that a specific cell surface receptor for the TCII-B12 complex exists in the mammary gland. It is possible that once vitamin B12 is in the mammary gland it is transferred to Hc (which may be synthesized by the mammary gland) and then secreted into milk as a Hc-B12 complex.

  10. Myosin-II-Mediated Directional Migration of Dictyostelium Cells in Response to Cyclic Stretching of Substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Okimura, Chika; Sato, Katsuya; Nakashima, Yuta; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Minami, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to various mechanical stimulations, such as shear flow, osmotic pressure, and hardness of substratum. They must sense the mechanical aspects of their environment and respond appropriately for proper cell function. Cells adhering to substrata must receive and respond to mechanical stimuli from the substrata to decide their shape and/or migrating direction. In response to cyclic stretching of the elastic substratum, intracellular stress fibers in fibroblasts and endothelial, osteosarcoma, and smooth muscle cells are rearranged perpendicular to the stretching direction, and the shape of those cells becomes extended in this new direction. In the case of migrating Dictyostelium cells, cyclic stretching regulates the direction of migration, and not the shape, of the cell. The cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to that of the stretching. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce the directional migration remain unknown. Here, using a microstretching device, we recorded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-myosin-II dynamics in Dictyostelium cells on an elastic substratum under cyclic stretching. Repeated stretching induced myosin II localization equally on both stretching sides in the cells. Although myosin-II-null cells migrated randomly, myosin-II-null cells expressing a variant of myosin II that cannot hydrolyze ATP migrated perpendicular to the stretching. These results indicate that Dictyostelium cells accumulate myosin II at the portion of the cell where a large strain is received and migrate in a direction other than that of the portion where myosin II accumulated. This polarity generation for migration does not require the contraction of actomyosin. PMID:23442953

  11. Toxic variability and radiation sensitization by Pt(II) analogs in Salmonella typhimurium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, R.C.; Khokhar, A.R.; Teicher, B.A.; Douple, E.B.

    1984-09-01

    A rationale is presented for the development of toxic, i.e., cytocidal, antitumor drugs as clinical hypoxic cell radiation sensitizers. Pt(II) complex-induced hypoxic cell radiation sensitization may occur from Pt(II) complex in free solution and Pt(II) bound to DNA. Although both the free solution and the bound compartments may operate, the free solution compartment is more likely amenable to experimental and clinical control in the case of systemically active Pt drugs. Assuming equivalent cell uptake of different Pt(II) complexes, the free solution compartment of Pt(II) sensitization can be increased by utilizing less toxic analogs of the antitumor drug cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II). One such less toxic Pt(II) sensitizer currently in clinical use is found to be cis-(1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylato)diammineplatinum(II). A new finding of both clinical and mechanistic usefulness is described: irradiation of hypoxic solutions of four cis-Pt(II) complexes, but not two trans-Pt(II) complexes, creates products that cause toxicity in excees of the unirradiated solutions.

  12. Estudio del reconocimiento y de la respuesta inmune frente a lípidos de polen por células iNKT

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    CD1d es una molécula de tipo MHC no polimórfica que presenta antígenos de naturaleza lipídica, tanto endógenos como exógenos, a células NKT (Natural Killer T). Las células NKT invariantes (iNKT) poseen un TCRαβ muy conservado (Vα24/Vβ11, en humanos) y expresan marcadores de células NK. Estas células tienen una gran capacidad de producir citoquinas Th1 y Th2, por lo que se les atribuyen funciones reguladoras de la respuesta inmune. Se ha descrito la participación de las células iNKT en reaccio...

  13. Altered effector function of peripheral cytotoxic cells in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corne Jonathan M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is mounting evidence that perforin and granzymes are important mediators in the lung destruction seen in COPD. We investigated the characteristics of the three main perforin and granzyme containing peripheral cells, namely CD8+ T lymphocytes, natural killer (NK; CD56+CD3- cells and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated and cell numbers and intracellular granzyme B and perforin were analysed by flow cytometry. Immunomagnetically selected CD8+ T lymphocytes, NK (CD56+CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells were used in an LDH release assay to determine cytotoxicity and cytotoxic mechanisms were investigated by blocking perforin and granzyme B with relevant antibodies. Results The proportion of peripheral blood NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells in smokers with COPD (COPD subjects was significantly lower (0.6% than in healthy smokers (smokers (2.8%, p +CD3- cells from COPD subjects were significantly less cytotoxic than in smokers (16.8% vs 51.9% specific lysis, p +CD3+ cells (16.7% vs 52.4% specific lysis, p +CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells from smokers and HNS. Conclusion In this study, we show that the relative numbers of peripheral blood NK (CD56+CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells in COPD subjects are reduced and that their cytotoxic effector function is defective.

  14. File list: Pol.CeL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CeL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cell line...70,SRX749072,SRX749071,SRX749073,SRX017852,SRX529168 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.CeL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.CeL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CeL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cell line...15,SRX331420,SRX749072,SRX017852,SRX749073,SRX529168 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.CeL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cell line...70,SRX749072,SRX749071,SRX749073,SRX017852,SRX529168 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. Astrocyte cytolysis by MHC class II-specific mouse T cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, A T; Lascola, C D; Flanders, S A; Maimone, D; Jensen, M A; Skias, D D; Lancki, D W

    1993-08-01

    The brain is "immunologically privileged," in part because class I and II MHC antigens are not normally present on glia or neurons. However, under certain conditions such as transplantation, glial cells express MHC proteins at levels sufficient for glia to become targets of immune responses. Cultured astrocytes expressing very low levels of MHC class I protein are killed efficiently by MHC class I antigen-specific CTL. Mouse brain allografts, however, are rejected by CD4+ T cells that are likely to be class II MHC-specific. The level of expression of MHC class II antigen needed to trigger specific killing of astrocytes by CD4+ T cells, independent of exogenous antigen, has not been studied. We examined the role of glial class II MHC in the lysis of cultured neonatal mouse astrocytes by an alloreactive murine CD4+ CTL alone. IFN-gamma induced functionally relevant increases in MHC class II antigen on target cells. Astrocytes were lysed by the CD4+ clone only when class II MHC antigens reached levels readily detectable by flow cytometry. MHC class II expression and lysis increased when astrocytes were coincubated with IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Conversely, lysis decreased when class II expression was downregulated by IFN-alpha/beta or dbcAMP. Cytolysis by CD4+ clones was blocked by antibodies to CD4 and LFA-1 on T cells, and to ICAM-1 and class II molecules on astrocytes. The role of LFA-1 in CD4+ cell-mediated lysis was greater than that of LFA-1/ICAM-1 in CD8+ T cell-mediated lysis. CD4+ cells may lyse activated astrocytes when the immune privilege of the brain is compromised as in transplantation, tumors, and inflammatory diseases.

  18. T cells induce extended class II MHC compartments in dendritic cells in a Toll-like receptor-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Marianne; Bertho, Nicolas; Cerny, Jan; Op den Brouw, Marjolein; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Ploegh, Hidde

    2003-10-15

    Interaction of Ag-loaded dendritic cells with Ag-specific CD4 T cells induces the formation of long tubular class II MHC-positive compartments that polarize toward the T cell. We show involvement of a Toll-like receptor-mediated signal in this unusual form of intracellular class II MHC trafficking. First, wild-type dendritic cells loaded with LPS-free Ag failed to show formation of class II-positive tubules upon Ag-specific T cell engagement, but did so upon supplementation of the Ag with low concentrations of LPS. Second, Ag-loaded myeloid differentiation factor 88 -deficient dendritic cells failed to form these tubules upon interaction with T cells, regardless of the presence of LPS. Finally, inclusion of a cell-permeable peptide that blocks TNFR-associated factor 6 function, downstream of myeloid differentiation factor 88, blocked T cell-dependent tubulation. A Toll-like receptor-dependent signal is thus required to allow Ag-loaded dendritic cells to respond to T cell contact by formation of extended endosomal compartments. This activation does not result in massive translocation of class II MHC molecules to the cell surface.

  19. Pentostatin in T-cell malignancies - a phase II trial of the EORTC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, AD; Suciu, S; Stryckmans, P; De Cataldo, F; Willemze, R; Thaler, J; Peetermans, M; Dohner, H; Solbu, G; Dardenne, M; Zittoun, R

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Within this phase II EORTC trial, we have investigated the safety and efficacy of pentostatin in lymphoid malignancies. We have previously reported the results in T- and B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and hairy cell leukemia. This report focuses

  20. Pentostatin in T-cell malignancies - a phase II trial of the EORTC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, AD; Suciu, S; Stryckmans, P; De Cataldo, F; Willemze, R; Thaler, J; Peetermans, M; Dohner, H; Solbu, G; Dardenne, M; Zittoun, R

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Within this phase II EORTC trial, we have investigated the safety and efficacy of pentostatin in lymphoid malignancies. We have previously reported the results in T- and B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and hairy cell leukemia. This report focuses

  1. Phenoxide-bridged Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) Probes for Molecular Imaging of Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Clear, Kasey J.; Harmatys, Kara M.; Rice, Douglas R.; Wolter, William R.; Suckow, Mark A.; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is involved in many pathological conditions, and there is a need for clinical and preclinical imaging agents that can target and report cell death. One of the best known biomarkers of cell death is exposure of the anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of dead and dying cells. Synthetic zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn2BDPA) coordination complexes are known to selectively recognize PS-rich membranes and act as cell death molecular imaging agents. However, there...

  2. Detection of autoreactive CD4 T cells using major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers

    OpenAIRE

    Kuszynski Charles; Gangaplara Arunakumar; Upadhyaya Bijaya; Massilamany Chandirasegaran; Reddy Jay

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Tetramers are useful tools to enumerate the frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. However, unlike CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells - especially self-reactive cells - are challenging to detect with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II tetramers because of low frequencies and low affinities of their T cell receptors to MHC-peptide complexes. Here, we report the use of fluorescent multimers, designated MHC dextramers that contain a large number of peptide-MHC complexes ...

  3. Non-muscle Myosin II Isoforms Co-assemble in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R.; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-muscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique, as well as redundant, cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear if NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments, or if filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently-tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms co-assemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly-spread cells, arguing for the existence of sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while co-assembled with other NM II isoforms. PMID:24814144

  4. Nuclear annexin II negatively regulates growth of LNCaP cells and substitution of ser 11 and 25 to glu prevents nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of annexin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala-Sanmartin Jesus

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annexin II heavy chain (also called p36, calpactin I is lost in prostate cancers and in a majority of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN. Loss of annexin II heavy chain appears to be specific for prostate cancer since overexpression of annexin II is observed in a majority of human cancers, including pancreatic cancer, breast cancer and brain tumors. Annexin II exists as a heterotetramer in complex with a protein ligand p11 (S100A10, and as a monomer. Diverse cellular functions are proposed for the two forms of annexin II. The monomer is involved in DNA synthesis. A leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES in the N-terminus of annexin II regulates its nuclear export by the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutation of the NES sequence results in nuclear retention of annexin II. Results Annexin II localized in the nucleus is phosphorylated, and the appearance of nuclear phosphorylated annexin II is cell cycle dependent, indicating that phosphorylation may play a role in nuclear entry, retention or export of annexin II. By exogenous expression of annexin II in the annexin II-null LNCaP cells, we show that wild-type annexin II is excluded from the nucleus, whereas the NES mutant annexin II localizes in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear retention of annexin II results in reduced cell proliferation and increased doubling time of cells. Expression of annexin II, both wild type and NES mutant, causes morphological changes of the cells. By site-specific substitution of glutamic acid in the place of serines 11 and 25 in the N-terminus, we show that simultaneous phosphorylation of both serines 11 and 25, but not either one alone, prevents nuclear localization of annexin II. Conclusion Our data show that nuclear annexin II is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner and that substitution of serines 11 and 25 inhibit nuclear entry of annexin II. Aberrant accumulation of nuclear annexin II retards proliferation of LNCa

  5. Establishment and evaluation of a stable cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Su

    Full Text Available Macrophages and dendritic cells are recognized as key players in the defense against mycobacterial infection. Recent research has confirmed that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs also play important roles against mycobacterium infections. Thus, establishing a stable cattle AEC line for future endogenous immune research on bacterial invasion is necessary. In the present study, we first purified and immortalized type II AECs (AEC II cells by transfecting them with a plasmid containing the human telomerase reverse trancriptase gene. We then tested whether or not the immortalized cells retained the basic physiological properties of primary AECs by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Finally, we tested the secretion capacity of immortalized AEC II cells upon stimulation by bacterial invasion. The cattle type II alveolar epithelial cell line (HTERT-AEC II that we established retained lung epithelial cell characteristics: the cells were positive for surfactants A and B, and they secreted tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in response to bacterial invasion. Thus, the cell line we established is a potential tool for research on the relationship between AECs and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  6. Myosin II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in three dimensions by minimizing cell-surface curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert S; Myers, Kenneth A; Desai, Ravi A; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S; Adelstein, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-02-01

    In many cases, cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We used endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell-surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell-surface curvature. Using microfabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between regulation of myosin II by curvature and control of curvature by myosin II drives cycles of localized cortical myosin II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration.

  7. Stimulation of Natural Killer T Cells by Glycolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L. Anderson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d protein. The initial discovery of immunostimulatory glycolipids from a marine sponge and the T cells that respond to the compounds has led to extensive research by chemists and immunologists to understand how glycolipids are recognized, possible responses by NKT cells, and the structural features of glycolipids necessary for stimulatory activity. The presence of this cell type in humans and most mammals suggests that it plays critical roles in antigen recognition and the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Both endogenous and exogenous natural antigens for NKT cells have been identified, and it is likely that glycolipid antigens remain to be discovered. Multiple series of structurally varied glycolipids have been synthesized and tested for stimulatory activity. The structural features of glycolipids necessary for NKT cell stimulation are moderately well understood, and designed compounds have proven to be much more potent antigens than their natural counterparts. Nevertheless, control over NKT cell responses by designed glycolipids has not been optimized, and further research will be required to fully reveal the therapeutic potential of this cell type.

  8. Obligatory Role for B Cells in the Development of Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christopher T; Sobey, Christopher G; Lieu, Maggie; Ferens, Dorota; Kett, Michelle M; Diep, Henry; Kim, Hyun Ah; Krishnan, Shalini M; Lewis, Caitlin V; Salimova, Ekaterina; Tipping, Peter; Vinh, Antony; Samuel, Chrishan S; Peter, Karlheinz; Guzik, Tomasz J; Kyaw, Tin S; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alexander; Drummond, Grant R

    2015-11-01

    Clinical hypertension is associated with raised serum IgG antibodies. However, whether antibodies are causative agents in hypertension remains unknown. We investigated whether hypertension in mice is associated with B-cell activation and IgG production and moreover whether B-cell/IgG deficiency affords protection against hypertension and vascular remodeling. Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day; 28 days) was associated with (1) a 25% increase in the proportion of splenic B cells expressing the activation marker CD86, (2) an 80% increase in splenic plasma cell numbers, (3) a 500% increase in circulating IgG, and (4) marked IgG accumulation in the aortic adventitia. In B-cell-activating factor receptor-deficient (BAFF-R(-/-)) mice, which lack mature B cells, there was no evidence of Ang II-induced increases in serum IgG. Furthermore, the hypertensive response to Ang II was attenuated in BAFF-R(-/-) (Δ30±4 mm Hg) relative to wild-type (Δ41±5 mm Hg) mice, and this response was rescued by B-cell transfer. BAFF-R(-/-) mice displayed reduced IgG accumulation in the aorta, which was associated with 80% fewer aortic macrophages and a 70% reduction in transforming growth factor-β expression. BAFF-R(-/-) mice were also protected from Ang II-induced collagen deposition and aortic stiffening (assessed by pulse wave velocity analysis). Finally, like BAFF-R deficiency, pharmacological depletion of B cells with an anti-CD20 antibody attenuated Ang II-induced hypertension by ≈35%. Hence, these studies demonstrate that B cells/IgGs are crucial for the development of Ang II-induced hypertension and vessel remodeling in mice. Thus, B-cell-targeted therapies-currently used for autoimmune diseases-may hold promise as future treatments for hypertension.

  9. Human CD1d-Restricted Natural Killer T (NKT) Cell Cytotoxicity Against Myeloid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    Jason M. Keaton1, Faye Reddington2, Petr A. Illarionov2, Gurdyal S. Besra2, Jenny E. Gumperz1 1Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology...Corresponding Author: Jenny E. Gumperz, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, 1300 University Ave., Madison

  10. Invariant natural killer T cells developing in the human fetus accumulate and mature in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, L; Ivarsson, M A; Michaëlsson, J; Sandberg, J K; Nixon, D F

    2014-09-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are CD1d-restricted immunoregulatory lymphocytes that share characteristics of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Although it has been reported that iNKT cells are present in the human fetal thymus, it is currently unknown how they distribute, differentiate, and function in fetal peripheral lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. Here, we show that functional human fetal iNKT cells develop and differentiate in a tissue-specific manner during the second trimester. Fetal iNKT cells accumulated in the small intestine, where they gained a mature phenotype and mounted robust interferon (IFN)-γ responses. In contrast, iNKT cells in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were less frequently detected, less differentiated, mounted poor IFN-γ responses, but proliferated vigorously upon stimulation with α-galactosylceramide. These data demonstrate that fetal iNKT cells can differentiate and acquire potent effector functions in utero before the establishment of the commensal microflora.

  11. Insect Cells Encode a Class II α-Mannosidase with Unique Properties*

    OpenAIRE

    Kawar, Ziad; Karaveg, Khanita; Moremen, Kelley W.; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    Previously, we cloned and characterized an insect (Sf9) cell cDNA encoding a class II α-mannosidase with amino acid sequence and biochemical similarities to mammalian Golgi α-mannosidase II. Since then, it has been demonstrated that other mammalian class II α-mannosidases can participate in N-glycan processing. Thus, the present study was performed to evaluate the catalytic properties of the Sf9 class II α-mannosidase and to more clearly determine its relationship to mammalian Golgi α-mannosi...

  12. Zn(II)-curc targets p53 in thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Valerio; Crispini, Alessandra; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2015-10-01

    TP53 mutation is a common event in many cancers, including thyroid carcinoma. Defective p53 activity promotes cancer resistance to therapies and a more malignant phenotype, acquiring oncogenic functions. Rescuing the function of mutant p53 (mutp53) protein is an attractive anticancer therapeutic strategy. Zn(II)-curc is a novel small molecule that has been shown to target mutp53 protein in several cancer cells, but its effect in thyroid cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether Zn(II)-curc could affect p53 in thyroid cancer cells with both p53 mutation (R273H) and wild-type p53. Zn(II)-curc induced mutp53H273 downregulation and reactivation of wild-type functions, such as binding to canonical target promoters and target gene transactivation. This latter effect was similar to that induced by PRIMA-1. In addition, Zn(II)-curc triggered p53 target gene expression in wild-type p53-carrying cells. In combination treatments, Zn(II)-curc enhanced the antitumor activity of chemotherapeutic drugs, in both mutant and wild-type-carrying cancer cells. Taken together, our data indicate that Zn(II)-curc promotes the reactivation of p53 in thyroid cancer cells, providing in vitro evidence for a potential therapeutic approach in thyroid cancers.

  13. SKI-II reverses the chemoresistance of SGC7901/DDP gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhu, Zuan; Cai, Hongxing; Liu, Qinghua; Zhou, Honglian; Zhu, Zhengqiu

    2014-07-01

    Cisplatin is frequently used in treating gastric cancers; however, acquired resistance to the drug often reduces the efficacy of therapy. The present study analyzed the efficacy of the combination of 4-[4-(4-chloro-phenyl)-thiazol-2-ylamino]-phenol (SKI-II) and cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); DDP] on the gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cell line. The results revealed that SKI-II and DDP had a clear synergistic effect. Glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) levels decreased significantly subsequent to the cells being treated with the combination of DDP and SKI-II compared with the cells that were treated with DDP or SKI-II alone. Phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) expression levels also decreased following treatment with SKI-II. The results suggested that SKI-II is able to reverse the drug resistance in human gastric carcinoma cells and enhance the antitumor effect of DDP through the ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proliferation pathway.

  14. Myosin II does not contribute to wound repair in Dictyostelium cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiko Yumura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells are always subjected to mechanical stresses, resulting in wounds of the cell membrane, but cells are able to repair and reseal their wounded membrane. Previous reports have shown that actin and myosin II accumulate around the wound and that the constriction of this purse-string closes the membrane pore. Here, we developed a microsurgical wound assay to assess wound repair in Dictyostelium cells. Fluorescent dye that had been incorporated into the cells leaked out for only 2–3 sec after wounding, and a GFP-derived, fluorescent Ca2+ sensor showed that intracellular Ca2+ transiently increased immediately after wounding. In the absence of external Ca2+, the cell failed to repair itself. During the repair process, actin accumulated at the wounded sites but myosin II did not. The wounds were repaired even in myosin II null cells to a comparable degree as the wild-type cells, suggesting that myosin II does not contribute to wound repair. Thus, the actomyosin purse-string constriction model is not a common mechanism for wound repair in eukaryotic cells, and this discrepancy may arise from the difference in cell size.

  15. Two isoforms of trimming glucosidase II exist in mammalian tissues and cell lines but not in yeast and insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziak, M; Meier, M; Etter, K S; Roth, J

    2001-01-12

    We previously cloned glucosidase II and provided in vivo evidence for its involvement in protein folding quality control. DNA-sequencing of different clones demonstrated the existence of two isoforms of glucosidase II which differed by 66 nucleotides due to alternative splicing. The existence of two enzyme isoforms in various organs of pig and rat as well as human, bovine, rat, and mouse cell lines could be demonstrated by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Furthermore, the two isoforms of glucosidase II could be detected in embryonic and postnatal rat kidney and liver. In yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in insects, Drosophila S2 cells, only one isoforms of the enzyme was detectable. The ubiquitous occurrence of the two glucosidase II isoforms in mammalian tissues and cell lines might be indicative of a special function of each isoform.

  16. Peroxiredoxin I and II inhibit H2O2-induced cell death in MCF-7 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Soo-Jung; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young

    2007-07-01

    Apoptosis is known to be induced by direct oxidative damage due to oxygen-free radicals or hydrogen peroxide or by their generation in cells by the actions of injurious agents. Together with glutathione peroxidase and catalase, peroxiredoxin (Prx) enzymes play an important role in eliminating peroxides generated during metabolism. We investigated the role of Prx enzymes during cellular response to oxidative stress. Using Prx isoforms-specific antibodies, we investigated the presence of Prx isoforms by immunoblot analysis in cell lysates of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Treatment of MCF-7 with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) resulted in the dose-dependent expressions of Prx I and II at the protein and mRNA levels. To investigate the physiologic relevance of the Prx I and II expressions induced by H2O2, we compared the survivals of MCF10A normal breast cell line and MCF-7 breast cancer cell line following exposure to H2O2. The treatment of MCF10A with H2O2 resulted in rapid cell death, whereas MCF-7 was resistant to H2O2. In addition, we found that Prx I and II transfection enabled MCF10A cells to resist H2O2-induced cell death. These findings suggest that Prx I and II have important functions as inhibitors of cell death during cellular response to oxidative stress.

  17. CD3(+)CD56(+) natural killer T cell activity in children with different forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the influence of etanercept treatment on polyarticular subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Ding, Yuan; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Ye; Tang, Xuemei; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2017-03-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has three major onset types with widely varying clinical features. We assessed the natural killer T (NKT) cell function in patients with different JIA subtypes, and found systemic patients exhibited lower NKT cell counts, perforin and granzyme B expression, while the pauciarticular and polyarticular patients displayed higher perforin and granzyme B expression as compared with the controls. The synovial fluid had more NKT cells with higher levels of perforin, granzyme B, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α than peripheral cells. The polyarticular patients that responded to etanercept had lower NKT cell counts, intracellular perforin, granzyme B and the mean fluorescence intensity of TNF-α than the patients that did not respond. Treatment with etanercept reduced the granzyme B and perforin, interferon (IFN)-γ and TNF-α expression in NKT cells in the responsive group. Therefore, a higher NKT cell function may indicate a decreased response to etanercept in polyarticular patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Photodynamic response of an endothelial hybridoma cell line using zinc(II) tetrasubstituted phthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse-Sawyer, Janet E.; Dixon, B.; Roberts, David J.; Griffiths, John; Brown, Stanley B.

    1995-03-01

    The EAhy 926 cell is a hybridoma line derived from human endothelium and A549/8 cells. They display stable endothelial characteristics and may provide an indication of how endothelial cells respond to photodynamic therapy. Cells were grown as monolayers, seeded at a density of 104 cells/35 mm dish, and then incubated with zinc (II) tetrasubstituted phthalocyanines (carboxylated, sulphonated, pyridinium or diethanolamine sulphonamide). After 24 hours, the cells were illuminated with laser light at 680 nm or 692 nm as appropriate. The response to each photosensitizer was evaluated using cell proliferation, clonogenicity, and release of tissue factor.

  19. The role of peroxiredoxin II in chemoresistance of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tieli Wang,1 Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Yun Yen2 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, USA Abstract: Peroxiredoxin (PrxII belongs to a family of redox-active proteins that use redox-sensitive cysteine in the active site to reduce peroxides. PrxII is induced by various oxidative stimuli and plays an important protective role against oxidative radical damage by reactive oxygen species. PrxII expression levels are correlated with resistance to radiation therapy or certain anti-cancer drugs in radioresistant breast cancer cells, glioblastomas, and head and neck cancer cells as well as in tissue isolated from head and neck patients who do not respond to radiation therapy. Small interfering RNA (siRNA that inhibits the PrxII gene expression has been shown to partially reverse the radioresistant phenotype in radiation resistant breast cancer cells and sensitizes glioma cells to oxidative stress, highlighting the potential clinical importance of PrxII in radiation resistance in cancer. This article focuses on the role that PrxII may play in chemoresistant breast cancer cells. Keywords: siRNA, redox, cysteine disulfide bridges, targeted therapy, reactive oxygen species

  20. An emerging role of pectic rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Rebecca; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2012-02-01

    The plant cell wall is a complex network of different polysaccharides and glycoproteins, showing high diversity in nature. The essential components, tethering cell wall are under debate, as novel mutants challenge established models. The mutant ugd2,3 with a reduced supply of the important wall precursor UDP-glucuronic acid reveals the critical role of the pectic compound rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall stability. This polymer seems to be more important for cell wall integrity than the previously favored xyloglucan.