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Sample records for ii comparing substructure

  1. DISSECTING GALAXY FORMATION. II. COMPARING SUBSTRUCTURE IN PURE DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Shlosman, Isaac; Heller, Clayton; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    We compare the substructure evolution in pure dark matter (DM) halos with those in the presence of baryons, hereafter PDM and BDM models, respectively. The prime halos have been analyzed in the previous work. Models have been evolved from identical initial conditions which have been constructed by means of the constrained realization method. The BDM model includes star formation and feedback from stellar evolution onto the gas. A comprehensive catalog of subhalo populations has been compiled and individual and statistical properties of subhalos analyzed, including their orbital differences. We find that subhalo population mass functions in PDM and BDM are consistent with a single power law, M α sbh , for each of the models in the mass range of ∼2 x 10 8 M sun -2 x 10 11 M sun . However, we detect a nonnegligible shift between these functions, the time-averaged α ∼ -0.86 for the PDM and -0.98 for the BDM models. Overall, α appears to be a nearly constant in time, with variations of ±15%. Second, we find that the radial mass distribution of subhalo populations can be approximated by a power law, R γ sbh with a steepening that occurs at the radius of a maximal circular velocity, R vmax , in the prime halos. Here we find that γ sbh ∼ -1.5 for the PDM and -1 for the BDM models, when averaged over time inside R vmax . The slope is steeper outside this region and approaches -3. We detect little spatial bias (less than 10%) between the subhalo populations and the DM distribution of the main halos. Also, the subhalo population exhibits much less triaxiality in the presence of baryons, in tandem with the shape of the prime halo. Finally, we find that, counter-intuitively, the BDM population is depleted at a faster rate than the PDM one within the central 30 kpc of the prime halo. The reason for this is that although the baryons provide a substantial glue to the subhalos, the main halo exhibits the same trend. This assures a more efficient tidal disruption of the

  2. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  3. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  4. Proposed definition of crystal substructure and substructural similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lusann; Dacek, Stephen; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2014-08-01

    There is a clear need for a practical and mathematically rigorous description of local structure in inorganic compounds so that structures and chemistries can be easily compared across large data sets. Here a method for decomposing crystal structures into substructures is given, and a similarity function between those substructures is defined. The similarity function is based on both geometric and chemical similarity. This construction allows for large-scale data mining of substructural properties, and the analysis of substructures and void spaces within crystal structures. The method is validated via the prediction of Li-ion intercalation sites for the oxides. Tested on databases of known Li-ion-containing oxides, the method reproduces all Li-ion sites in an oxide with a maximum of 4 incorrect guesses 80% of the time.

  5. Dose to heart substructures is associated with non-cancer death after SBRT in stage I-II NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Barbara; Peulen, Heike; Guckenberger, Matthias; Mantel, Frederick; Hope, Andrew; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Belderbos, Jose; Grills, Inga; O'Connell, Nicolette; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2017-06-01

    To investigate potential associations between dose to heart (sub)structures and non-cancer death, in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 803 patients with early stage NSCLC received SBRT with predominant schedules of 3×18Gy (59%) or 4×12Gy (19%). All patients were registered to an average anatomy, their planned dose deformed accordingly, and dosimetric parameters for heart substructures were obtained. Multivariate Cox regression and a sensitivity analysis were used to identify doses to heart substructures or heart region with a significant association with non-cancer death respectively. Median follow-up was 34.8months. Two year Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate was 67%. Of the deceased patients, 26.8% died of cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that the maximum dose on the left atrium (median 6.5Gy EQD2, range=0.009-197, HR=1.005, p-value=0.035), and the dose to 90% of the superior vena cava (median 0.59Gy EQD2, range=0.003-70, HR=1.025, p-value=0.008) were significantly associated with non-cancer death. Sensitivity analysis identified the upper region of the heart (atria+vessels) to be significantly associated with non-cancer death. Doses to mainly the upper region of the heart were significantly associated with non-cancer death. Consequently, dose sparing in particular of the upper region of the heart could potentially improve outcome, and should be further studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sub-structure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sub-structure generally refers to those components of the building that are constructed below ground, although there are circumstances when sub-structure can also include components above ground such as supporting columns on steeply sloping ground...

  7. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF PORCELAIN FUSED TO METAL SUBSTRUCTURE FABRICATED USING CONVENTIONAL AND CONTEMPORARY TECHNIQUES: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhaske Prasad N, Nadgere Jyoti B, Ram Sabita M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Base metal alloys due to their low cost, are being used more often as the substructure because of their good mechanical properties, excellent metal ceramic bonding and biocompatibility. The bonding of porcelain to metal is an important point to be considered for the success of the restoration. Aim: To compare and evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain fused to metal substructure fabricated using conventional and contemporary techniques. Methods and Material: Thirty sample discs were fabricated – 10 of cast nickel chromium alloy, 10 of cast cobalt chromium alloys and 10 of laser sintered cobalt chromium alloy. Conventionally used feldspathic porcelain was used and fired over the metal discs. These samples were placed in a specially fabricated jig, which was held in a universal testing machine. The samples were subjected to shear stress until they fractured and the readings were noted. The fractured surface of the sample was then viewed under stereomicroscope. Results: The mean shear bond strength was highest in group C (porcelain fused to laser sintered cobalt chromium, followed by group A (porcelain fused to cast nickel chromium and group B (porcelain fused to cast cobalt chromium which was the least. The level of significance was fixed at p < 0.05. After applying Student’s Unpaired ‘t’ test there is no significant difference in shear bond strength in group A compared with group B, highly significant in group A and group C and very highly significant in group B and group C. Conclusions: All the three groups showed adequate, but laser sintered cobalt chromium alloy had the highest shear bond strength to porcelain. Nickel chromium alloy fabricated by conventional casting method showed lesser values of the shear bond strength, followed by cobalt chromium alloy fabricated by conventional casting, which had the least shear bond strength.

  8. Substructure of Highly Boosted Massive Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alon, Raz [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2012-10-01

    Modern particle accelerators enable researchers to study new high energy frontiers which have never been explored before. This realm opens possibilities to further examine known fields such as Quantum Chromodynamics. In addition, it allows searching for new physics and setting new limits on the existence of such. This study examined the substructure of highly boosted massive jets measured by the CDF II detector. Events from 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider were collected out of a total integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb$^{-1}$. They were selected to have at least one jet with transverse momentum above 400 GeV/c. The jet mass, angularity, and planar flow were measured and compared with predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics, and were found to be consistent with the theory. A search for boosted top quarks was conducted and resulted in an upper limit on the production cross section of such top quarks.

  9. Urban structures and substructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mierzejewska Lidia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In urban geography, a traditional but always important research problem has been the spatial-functional structure of towns and changes that occur in this field. Two approaches can be distinguished here: the sociological and the geographical. The former follows in the steps of the so-called Chicago school, i.e. Park, Burgess and Hoyt, and the other of Ullman and Harris. It seems, however, that those two approaches do not exhaust the range of spatial-structural studies which may be conducted in modern towns since there are areas within them endowed with specific properties that can be called their substructures. This paper will present the general characteristics of such substructures and identify factors responsible for their appearance and development. It will also propose an empirical research pattern. The term ‘substructures’ is taken to denote relatively autonomous, highly uniform wholes standing out in the spatial-functional structure of a town, distinguished on the basis of spatial relations generated by people. While structural elements of towns in the approach of the Chicago school or that of Harris and Ullman can be identified with structural regions, urban substructures show a similarity to functional regions in their organisation, structure and operation. Thus, towns with identified substructures have a polycentric spatial- functional structure, favourable in terms of both the level of service of their inhabitants and their sustainable development.

  10. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strengths of veneering porcelain to base metal alloy and zirconia substructures before and after aging – An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekala, Laju; Narayanan, Mahesh; Eerali, Sunil M.; Eerali, Susil M.; Varghese, Joju; Zainaba Fathima, A. l.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to base metal alloy and zirconia substructures before and after aging. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the failure pattern. Materials and Methods: Twenty rectangular blocks (9 mm length × 4 mm height × 4 mm width) of base metal alloy (Bellabond plus, Bego, Germany) and zirconia (Will ceramZ zirconia K block) were fabricated for shear bond strength test. Surface of the base metal alloy block (4 mm × 4 mm area) was veneered with corresponding veneering porcelain (Ivoclar, IPS classic, vivadent). Similarly, surface of the zirconia rectangular block (4 mm × 4 mm) was veneered with corresponding veneering ceramic (Cercon ceram kiss, Degudent). Out of forty rectangular porcelain veneered core specimen, ten porcelain veneered base metal alloy specimen and ten porcelain veneered zirconia specimen were immersed in water at 37°C for one month to simulate the oral environment. Results: On comparison, the highest shear bond strength value was obtained in porcelain veneered base metal alloy before aging group followed by porcelain veneered base metal alloy after aging group, Porcelain veneered zirconia before aging group, porcelain veneered zirconia after aging group. SEM analysis revealed predominantly cohesive failure of veneering ceramic in all groups. Conclusion: Porcelain veneered base metal alloy samples showed highest shear bond strength than porcelain veneered zirconia samples. Study concluded that aging had an influence on shear bond strength. Shear bond strength was found to be decreasing after aging. SEM analysis revealed cohesive failure of veneering ceramic in all groups suggestive of higher bond strength of the interface than cohesive strength of ceramic. Hence, it was concluded that veneering ceramic was the weakest link. PMID:26942121

  11. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strengths of veneering porcelain to base metal alloy and zirconia substructures before and after aging - An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekala, Laju; Narayanan, Mahesh; Eerali, Sunil M; Eerali, Susil M; Varghese, Joju; Zainaba Fathima, A L

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to base metal alloy and zirconia substructures before and after aging. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the failure pattern. Twenty rectangular blocks (9 mm length × 4 mm height × 4 mm width) of base metal alloy (Bellabond plus, Bego, Germany) and zirconia (Will ceramZ zirconia K block) were fabricated for shear bond strength test. Surface of the base metal alloy block (4 mm × 4 mm area) was veneered with corresponding veneering porcelain (Ivoclar, IPS classic, vivadent). Similarly, surface of the zirconia rectangular block (4 mm × 4 mm) was veneered with corresponding veneering ceramic (Cercon ceram kiss, Degudent). Out of forty rectangular porcelain veneered core specimen, ten porcelain veneered base metal alloy specimen and ten porcelain veneered zirconia specimen were immersed in water at 37°C for one month to simulate the oral environment. On comparison, the highest shear bond strength value was obtained in porcelain veneered base metal alloy before aging group followed by porcelain veneered base metal alloy after aging group, Porcelain veneered zirconia before aging group, porcelain veneered zirconia after aging group. SEM analysis revealed predominantly cohesive failure of veneering ceramic in all groups. Porcelain veneered base metal alloy samples showed highest shear bond strength than porcelain veneered zirconia samples. Study concluded that aging had an influence on shear bond strength. Shear bond strength was found to be decreasing after aging. SEM analysis revealed cohesive failure of veneering ceramic in all groups suggestive of higher bond strength of the interface than cohesive strength of ceramic. Hence, it was concluded that veneering ceramic was the weakest link.

  12. Transients by substructuring with DMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Automated substructuring in level 16 of NASTRAN was employed as a preface to the solution of a direct transient analysis. The DMAP ALTER statements written to adapt the substructuring for transient purposes are explained. Data recovery was accomplished with transfer functions. Proof of the success of the method is presented with an application to a missile structure.

  13. Characterising the Decays of High-pt Top Quarks and Addressing Naturalness with Jet Substructure in ATLAS Runs I and II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00397460

    The coupling of the Standard Model top quark to the Higgs boson is O(1), which leads to large quantum corrections in the perturbative expansion of the Higgs boson mass. Possible solutions to this so-called naturalness problem include supersymmetric models with gluinos and stop squarks whose masses are at the electroweak scale, O(1 TeV). If supersymmetry is realised in nature at this scale, these particles are expected to be accessible with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A search for gluino pair production with decays mediated by stop- and sbottom-squark loops in the initial 14.8 ifb of the ATLAS run 2 dataset is presented in terms of a pair of simplified models, which targets extreme regions of phase space using jet substructure techniques. No excess is observed and limits are set which greatly extend the previous exclusion region of this search, up to 1.9 TeV (1.95 TeV) for gluinos decaying through light stop (sbottom) squarks to the lightest neutralinos. A performance study of top tagging algorithms in ...

  14. Chemical Abundances of Planetary Nebulae in the Substructures of M31. II. The Extended Sample and a Comparison Study with the Outer-disk Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xuan; García-Benito, Rubén; Guerrero, Martín A.; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiaowei; Morisset, Christophe; Karakas, Amanda I.; Miller Bertolami, Marcelo M.; Yuan, Haibo; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    We report deep spectroscopy of 10 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). Our targets reside in different regions of M31, including halo streams and the dwarf satellite M32, and kinematically deviate from the extended disk. The temperature-sensitive [O III] λ4363 line is observed in all PNe. For four PNe, the GTC spectra extend beyond 1 μm, enabling the explicit detection of the [S III] λ6312 and λλ9069, 9531 lines and thus determination of the [S III] temperature. Abundance ratios are derived and generally consistent with AGB model predictions. Our PNe probably all evolved from low-mass (stream. We thus speculate that our halo PNe formed in the Giant Stream’s progenitor through extended star formation. Alternatively, they might have formed from the same metal-rich gas as did the outer-disk PNe but were displaced into their present locations as a result of galactic interactions. These interpretations are, although speculative, qualitatively in line with the current picture, as inferred from previous wide-field photometric surveys, that M31's halo is the result of complex interactions and merger processes. The behavior of the N/O of the combined sample of the outer-disk and our halo/substructure PNe signifies that hot bottom burning might actually occur at <3 M ⊙ but careful assessment is needed. Based on observations made with the Gran Telescopio Canarias, installed at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, in the island of La Palma. The observations presented in this paper are associated with GTC programs #GTC66-16A and #GTC25-16B.

  15. Galaxy Clusters: Substructure and Mass Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2010-07-01

    We calibrate the X-ray measured hydrostatic equilibrium (H.E.) mass and assess the origin of the H.E. mass systematics using 2-D spectrally measured X-ray properties. We obtained that the average X-ray mass derived from H.E. using XMM-Newton data is lower compared to the weak lensing mass from Subaru data for relaxed clusters in a sample of 12 clusters at z~0.2. This is comparable to the expectation of numerical simulations because of the non-thermal pressure support due to turbulence and bulk motions. The gas mass to weak lensing mass ratio shows no dependence on the cluster morphology, which indicates that the gas mass may be a good mass proxy regardless of the cluster dynamical state. To understand the origin of the systematics of the H.E. mass, we investigated 4 nearby clusters, for which the substructure is quantified by the radial fluctuations in the spectrally measured 2-D maps by a cumulative/differential scatter profile relative to the mean profile within/at a given radius. The amplitude of and the discontinuity in the scatter complements 2-D substructure diagnostics, e.g. indicating the most disturbed radial range. There is a tantalizing link between the substructure identified using the scatter of the entropy and pressure fluctuations and the deviation of the H.E. mass relative to the expected mass based on the representative scaling relation, e.g., M-Mgas, particularly at r500-the radius within which the over-density, Δ, is 500 with respect to the critical density. This indicates that at larger radii, the systematic error of the H.E. mass may well be caused by substructure.

  16. Efficient heuristics for maximum common substructure search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Péter; Kovács, Péter

    2015-05-26

    Maximum common substructure search is a computationally hard optimization problem with diverse applications in the field of cheminformatics, including similarity search, lead optimization, molecule alignment, and clustering. Most of these applications have strict constraints on running time, so heuristic methods are often preferred. However, the development of an algorithm that is both fast enough and accurate enough for most practical purposes is still a challenge. Moreover, in some applications, the quality of a common substructure depends not only on its size but also on various topological features of the one-to-one atom correspondence it defines. Two state-of-the-art heuristic algorithms for finding maximum common substructures have been implemented at ChemAxon Ltd., and effective heuristics have been developed to improve both their efficiency and the relevance of the atom mappings they provide. The implementations have been thoroughly evaluated and compared with existing solutions (KCOMBU and Indigo). The heuristics have been found to greatly improve the performance and applicability of the algorithms. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the applied methods and present the experimental results.

  17. NASTRAN GPWG tables for combined substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Tom

    1991-01-01

    A method for computing the mass and center of gravity for basic and combined substructures stored in the NASTRAN Substructure Operating File (SOF) is described. The three step method recovers SOF data blocks for the relevant substructure, processes these data blocks using a specially developed FORTRAN routine, and generates the NASTRAN gridpoint weight generator (GPWG) table for the substructure in a PHASE2 SOF execution using a Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) sequence. Verification data for the process is also provided.

  18. NASTRAN multipartitioning and one-shot substructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, A.

    1973-01-01

    For intermediate size problems where all the data is accessible, the present method of substructuring in three separate phases (for static analysis) is unneccessarily cumbersome. The versatility of NASTRAN's DMAP and internal logic lends itself to finding a practical alternative to these procedures whereby self-contained special-purpose ALTER packages can be written to be run in one pass. Two examples are presented here under the titles of multipartitioning and one-shot substructuring. The flow of multipartitioning resembles that of the present three-phase substructuring. The basic effect is to partition the structure into substructures and operate on each substructure separately. This can be used to reduce the bandwidth of a given problem as well as to store information which will allow a change to be made in one of the substructures in a later run. This latter procedure is carried out in a second program titled one-shot substructuring.

  19. Comparing Binaural Pre-processing Strategies II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Baumgärtel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several binaural audio signal enhancement algorithms were evaluated with respect to their potential to improve speech intelligibility in noise for users of bilateral cochlear implants (CIs. 50% speech reception thresholds (SRT50 were assessed using an adaptive procedure in three distinct, realistic noise scenarios. All scenarios were highly nonstationary, complex, and included a significant amount of reverberation. Other aspects, such as the perfectly frontal target position, were idealized laboratory settings, allowing the algorithms to perform better than in corresponding real-world conditions. Eight bilaterally implanted CI users, wearing devices from three manufacturers, participated in the study. In all noise conditions, a substantial improvement in SRT50 compared to the unprocessed signal was observed for most of the algorithms tested, with the largest improvements generally provided by binaural minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR beamforming algorithms. The largest overall improvement in speech intelligibility was achieved by an adaptive binaural MVDR in a spatially separated, single competing talker noise scenario. A no-pre-processing condition and adaptive differential microphones without a binaural link served as the two baseline conditions. SRT50 improvements provided by the binaural MVDR beamformers surpassed the performance of the adaptive differential microphones in most cases. Speech intelligibility improvements predicted by instrumental measures were shown to account for some but not all aspects of the perceptually obtained SRT50 improvements measured in bilaterally implanted CI users.

  20. Stellar substructures in the solar neighbourhood. II. Abundances of neutron-capture elements in the kinematic Group 3 of the Geneva-Copenhagen survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonkutė, E.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Nordström, B.; Ženovienė, R.

    2013-07-01

    Context. The evolution of chemical elements in a galaxy is linked to its star formation history. Variations in star formation history are imprinted in the relative abundances of chemical elements produced in different supernova events and asymptotic giant branch stars. Aims: We determine detailed elemental abundances of s- and r-process elements in stars belonging to Group 3 of the Geneva-Copenhagen survey and compare their chemical composition with Galactic disc stars. The aim is to look for possible chemical signatures that might give information about the formation history of this kinematic group of stars, which is suggested to correspond to remnants of disrupted satellites. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope, La Palma, and were analysed with a differential model atmosphere method. Comparison stars were observed and analysed with the same method. Results: Abundances of chemical elements produced mainly by the s-process are similar to those in the Galactic thin-disc dwarfs of the same metallicity, while abundances of chemical elements produced predominantly by the r-process are overabundant. The similar elemental abundances are observed in Galactic thick-disc stars. Conclusions: The chemical composition together with the kinematic properties and ages of stars in Group 3 of the Geneva-Copenhagen survey support a gas-rich satellite merger scenario as the most likely explanation for the origin. The similar chemical composition of stars in Group 3 and the thick-disc stars might suggest that their formation histories are linked.

  1. A Modal-Based Substructure Method Applied to Nonlinear Rotordynamic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut J. Holl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The discretisation of rotordynamic systems usually results in a high number of coordinates, so the computation of the solution of the equations of motion is very time consuming. An efficient semianalytic time-integration method combined with a substructure technique is given, which accounts for nonsymmetric matrices and local nonlinearities. The partitioning of the equation of motion into two substructures is performed. Symmetric and linear background systems are defined for each substructure. The excitation of the substructure comes from the given excitation force, the nonlinear restoring force, the induced force due to the gyroscopic and circulatory effects of the substructure under consideration and the coupling force of the substructures. The high effort for the analysis with complex numbers, which is necessary for nonsymmetric systems, is omitted. The solution is computed by means of an integral formulation. A suitable approximation for the unknown coordinates, which are involved in the coupling forces, has to be introduced and the integration results in Green's functions of the considered substructures. Modal analysis is performed for each linear and symmetric background system of the substructure. Modal reduction can be easily incorporated and the solution is calculated iteratively. The numerical behaviour of the algorithm is discussed and compared to other approximate methods of nonlinear structural dynamics for a benchmark problem and a representative example.

  2. A Comparison of Reduced Order Modeling Techniques Used in Dynamic Substructuring [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roettgen, Dan [Wisc; Seeger, Benjamin [Stuttgart; Tai, Wei Che [Washington; Baek, Seunghun [Michigan; Dossogne, Tilan [Liege; Allen, Matthew S [Wisc; Kuether, Robert J.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Mayes, Randall L.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental dynamic substructuring is a means whereby a mathematical model for a substructure can be obtained experimentally and then coupled to a model for the rest of the assembly to predict the response. Recently, various methods have been proposed that use a transmission simulator to overcome sensitivity to measurement errors and to exercise the interface between the substructures; including the Craig-Bampton, Dual Craig-Bampton, and Craig-Mayes methods. This work compares the advantages and disadvantages of these reduced order modeling strategies for two dynamic substructuring problems. The methods are first used on an analytical beam model to validate the methodologies. Then they are used to obtain an experimental model for structure consisting of a cylinder with several components inside connected to the outside case by foam with uncertain properties. This represents an exceedingly difficult structure to model and so experimental substructuring could be an attractive way to obtain a model of the system.

  3. A Comparison of Reduced Order Modeling Techniques Used in Dynamic Substructuring.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roettgen, Dan; Seegar, Ben; Tai, Wei Che; Baek, Seunghun; Dossogne, Tilan; Allen, Matthew; Kuether, Robert J.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-10-01

    Experimental dynamic substructuring is a means whereby a mathematical model for a substructure can be obtained experimentally and then coupled to a model for the rest of the assembly to predict the response. Recently, various methods have been proposed that use a transmission simulator to overcome sensitivity to measurement errors and to exercise the interface between the substructures; including the Craig-Bampton, Dual Craig-Bampton, and Craig-Mayes methods. This work compares the advantages and disadvantages of these reduced order modeling strategies for two dynamic substructuring problems. The methods are first used on an analytical beam model to validate the methodologies. Then they are used to obtain an experimental model for structure consisting of a cylinder with several components inside connected to the outside case by foam with uncertain properties. This represents an exceedingly difficult structure to model and so experimental substructuring could be an attractive way to obtain a model of the system.

  4. Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauchamp, R.O. Jr. [Center for Information on Toxicology and Environment, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  5. QUANTIFYING KINEMATIC SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE MILKY WAY'S STELLAR HALO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Xiangxiang; Zhao Gang; Luo Ali; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Koposov, Sergey E.; Kang, Xi; Liu, Chao; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Bullock, James S.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Morrison, Heather; Rockosi, Constance; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2011-01-01

    We present and analyze the positions, distances, and radial velocities for over 4000 blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars in the Milky Way's halo, drawn from SDSS DR8. We search for position-velocity substructure in these data, a signature of the hierarchical assembly of the stellar halo. Using a cumulative 'close pair distribution' as a statistic in the four-dimensional space of sky position, distance, and velocity, we quantify the presence of position-velocity substructure at high statistical significance among the BHB stars: pairs of BHB stars that are close in position on the sky tend to have more similar distances and radial velocities compared to a random sampling of these overall distributions. We make analogous mock observations of 11 numerical halo formation simulations, in which the stellar halo is entirely composed of disrupted satellite debris, and find a level of substructure comparable to that seen in the actually observed BHB star sample. This result quantitatively confirms the hierarchical build-up of the stellar halo through a signature in phase (position-velocity) space. In detail, the structure present in the BHB stars is somewhat less prominent than that seen in most simulated halos, quite possibly because BHB stars represent an older sub-population. BHB stars located beyond 20 kpc from the Galactic center exhibit stronger substructure than at r gc < 20 kpc.

  6. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XI. TEMPERATURES AND SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALACTIC CLUMPS BASED ON 350 μM OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merello, Manuel; Evans II, Neal J. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Astronomy, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, 4-181 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Ginsburg, Adam [European Southern Observatory, ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-95748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Bally, John [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Battersby, Cara; Dunham, Michael M., E-mail: manuel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present 107 maps of continuum emission at 350 μm from Galactic molecular clumps. Observed sources were mainly selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, with three additional maps covering star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy. The higher resolution of the SHARC-II images (8.″5 beam) compared with the 1.1 mm images from BGPS (33″ beam) allowed us to identify a large population of smaller substructures within the clumps. A catalog is presented for the 1386 sources extracted from the 350 μm maps. The color temperature distribution of clumps based on the two wavelengths has a median of 13.3 K and mean of 16.3 ± 0.4 K, assuming an opacity law index of 1.7. For the structures with good determination of color temperatures, the mean ratio of gas temperature, determined from NH{sub 3} observations, to dust color temperature is 0.88 and the median ratio is 0.76. About half the clumps have more than 2 substructures and 22 clumps have more than 10. The fraction of the mass in dense substructures seen at 350 μm compared to the mass of their parental clump is ∼0.19, and the surface densities of these substructures are, on average, 2.2 times those seen in the clumps identified at 1.1 mm. For a well-characterized sample, 88 structures (31%) exceed a surface density of 0.2 g cm{sup −2}, and 18 (6%) exceed 1.0 g cm{sup −2}, thresholds for massive star formation suggested by theorists.

  7. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XI. TEMPERATURES AND SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALACTIC CLUMPS BASED ON 350 μM OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merello, Manuel; Evans II, Neal J.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Dunham, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    We present 107 maps of continuum emission at 350 μm from Galactic molecular clumps. Observed sources were mainly selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, with three additional maps covering star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy. The higher resolution of the SHARC-II images (8.″5 beam) compared with the 1.1 mm images from BGPS (33″ beam) allowed us to identify a large population of smaller substructures within the clumps. A catalog is presented for the 1386 sources extracted from the 350 μm maps. The color temperature distribution of clumps based on the two wavelengths has a median of 13.3 K and mean of 16.3 ± 0.4 K, assuming an opacity law index of 1.7. For the structures with good determination of color temperatures, the mean ratio of gas temperature, determined from NH 3 observations, to dust color temperature is 0.88 and the median ratio is 0.76. About half the clumps have more than 2 substructures and 22 clumps have more than 10. The fraction of the mass in dense substructures seen at 350 μm compared to the mass of their parental clump is ∼0.19, and the surface densities of these substructures are, on average, 2.2 times those seen in the clumps identified at 1.1 mm. For a well-characterized sample, 88 structures (31%) exceed a surface density of 0.2 g cm −2 , and 18 (6%) exceed 1.0 g cm −2 , thresholds for massive star formation suggested by theorists

  8. Modelling the line-of-sight contribution in substructure lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despali, Giulia; Vegetti, Simona; White, Simon D. M.; Giocoli, Carlo; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate how Einstein rings and magnified arcs are affected by small-mass dark-matter haloes placed along the line of sight to gravitational lens systems. By comparing the gravitational signature of line-of-sight haloes with that of substructures within the lensing galaxy, we derive a mass-redshift relation that allows us to rescale the detection threshold (i.e. lowest detectable mass) for substructures to a detection threshold for line-of-sight haloes at any redshift. We then quantify the line-of-sight contribution to the total number density of low-mass objects that can be detected through strong gravitational lensing. Finally, we assess the degeneracy between substructures and line-of-sight haloes of different mass and redshift to provide a statistical interpretation of current and future detections, with the aim of distinguishing between cold dark matter and warm dark matter. We find that line-of-sight haloes statistically dominate with respect to substructures, by an amount that strongly depends on the source and lens redshifts, and on the chosen dark-matter model. Substructures represent about 30 percent of the total number of perturbers for low lens and source redshifts (as for the SLACS lenses), but less than 10 per cent for high-redshift systems. We also find that for data with high enough signal-to-noise ratio and angular resolution, the non-linear effects arising from a double-lens-plane configuration are such that one is able to observationally recover the line-of-sight halo redshift with an absolute error precision of 0.15 at the 68 per cent confidence level.

  9. Inspection of Asian Lacquer Substructures by Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Fukunaga, Kaori; Kohzuma, Yoshei

    2017-01-01

    Lacquering is considered one of the most representative Asian artistic techniques. While the decorative part of lacquerwares is the lacquer itself, their substructures serve as the backbone of the object itself. Very little is known about these hidden substructures. Since lacquerwares are mostly...... by inspecting the substructures of Asian lacquerwares by means of THz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Three different kinds of Asian lacquerwares were examined by THz-TDI, and the outcomes have been compared with those obtained by standard X-radiography. THz-TDI provides unique information on lacquerwares...

  10. Algebraic Sub-Structuring for Electromagnetic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.G.; Bai, Z.J.; Li, X.Y.S.; Lee, L.Q.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Davis /SLAC

    2006-06-30

    Algebraic sub-structuring refers to the process of applying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a large sparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectral components are extracted and combined to form approximate solutions to the original problem. In this paper, they show that algebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve generalized eigenvalue problems arising from the finite element analysis of an accelerator structure.

  11. Inspection of Asian Lacquer Substructures by Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Fukunaga, Kaori; Kohzuma, Yoshei; Kiriyama, Kyoko; Matsuda, Kazutaka; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2017-04-01

    Lacquering is considered one of the most representative Asian artistic techniques. While the decorative part of lacquerwares is the lacquer itself, their substructures serve as the backbone of the object itself. Very little is known about these hidden substructures. Since lacquerwares are mostly composed of organic materials, such as urushi, wood, carbon black, and fabrics which are very X-ray transparent, standard X-ray radiography has some problems in achieving clear X-ray radiographic images. Therefore, we wanted to contribute to the understanding of the lacquer manufacturing technique by inspecting the substructures of Asian lacquerwares by means of THz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Three different kinds of Asian lacquerwares were examined by THz-TDI, and the outcomes have been compared with those obtained by standard X-radiography. THz-TDI provides unique information on lacquerwares substructures, aiding in the comprehension of the manufacturing technology yielding to these precious artefacts.

  12. Efficient solution of the multiple seismic pounding problem using hierarchical substructure techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamer, Franz; Shi, Jianye; Markert, Bernd

    2017-12-01

    Structural pounding is one of the major reasons for severe structural damage or even collapse. Thus, detailed simulations, including dynamic contact formulations, are often required in order to obtain reliable response information of structures. This leads inevitably to computationally expensive analysis. Therefore, in this paper, an effective hierarchical substructure method, adapted to structural pounding problems, is introduced. Based on that, a hybrid substructure method is presented. Both strategies are presented on an academic multiple pounding example, applying both a sinusoidal and a real earthquake excitation. It is shown that both strategies enable accurate low-order representations of the complex full dynamic contact problem. Thereafter, the new approaches are compared with the classical modal truncation strategy and an improved controlled modal truncation strategy. It is shown that an extensive improvement of the approximation of the full response can be achieved applying the new hierarchical substructure and the new hybrid substructure approach.

  13. Nonlinear seismic response analysis of an embedded reactor building based on the substructure approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Nakai, S.; Watanabe, T.

    1987-01-01

    A practical method to calculate the elasto-plastic seismic response of structures considering the dynamic soil-structure interaction is presented. The substructure technique in the time domain is utilized in the proposed method. A simple soil spring system with the coupling effects which are usually evaluated by the impedance matrix is introduced to consider the soil-structure interaction for embedded structures. As a numerical example, the response of a BWR-MARK II type reactor building embedded in the layered soil is calculated. The accuracy of the present method is verified by comparing its numerical results with exact solutions. The nonlinear behaivor and the soil-structure interaction effects on the response of the reactor building are also discussed in detail. It is concluded that the present method is effective for the aseismic design considering both the material nonlinearity of the nuclear reactor building and the dynamic soil-structure interaction. (orig.)

  14. Nonlinear seismic response analysis of embedded reactor buildings based on the substructure approach in time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Nakai, S.; Watanabe, T.

    1985-01-01

    A practical method for elasto-plastic seismic response analysis is described under considerations of nonlinear material law of a structure and dynamic soil-structure interaction. The method is essentially based on the substructure approach of time domain analysis. Verification of the present method is carried out for typical BWR-MARK II type reactor building which is embedded in a soil, and the results are compared with those of the frequency response analysis which gives good accuracy for linear system. As a result, the present method exhibits sufficient accuracy. Furthermore, elasto-plastic analyses considering the soil-structure interaction are made as an application of the present method, and nonlinear behaviors of the structure and embedment effects are discussed. (orig.)

  15. The importance of calorimetry for highly-boosted jet substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Evan [Brown U.; Freytsis, Marat [Oregon U.; Hinzmann, Andreas [Hamburg U.; Narain, Meenakshi [Brown U.; Thaler, Jesse [MIT, Cambridge, CTP; Tran, Nhan [Fermilab; Vernieri, Caterina [Fermilab

    2017-09-25

    Jet substructure techniques are playing an essential role in exploring the TeV scale at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), since they facilitate the efficient reconstruction and identification of highly-boosted objects. Both for the LHC and for future colliders, there is a growing interest in using jet substructure methods based only on charged-particle information. The reason is that silicon-based tracking detectors offer excellent granularity and precise vertexing, which can improve the angular resolution on highly-collimated jets and mitigate the impact of pileup. In this paper, we assess how much jet substructure performance degrades by using track-only information, and we demonstrate physics contexts in which calorimetry is most beneficial. Specifically, we consider five different hadronic final states - W bosons, Z bosons, top quarks, light quarks, gluons - and test the pairwise discrimination power with a multi-variate combination of substructure observables. In the idealized case of perfect reconstruction, we quantify the loss in discrimination performance when using just charged particles compared to using all detected particles. We also consider the intermediate case of using charged particles plus photons, which provides valuable information about neutral pions. In the more realistic case of a segmented calorimeter, we assess the potential performance gains from improving calorimeter granularity and resolution, comparing a CMS-like detector to more ambitious future detector concepts. Broadly speaking, we find large performance gains from neutral-particle information and from improved calorimetry in cases where jet mass resolution drives the discrimination power, whereas the gains are more modest if an absolute mass scale calibration is not required.

  16. Spatial Substructure in the M87 Globular Cluster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuting; Zhang, Yunhao; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric; Lim, Sungsoon

    2018-01-01

    Based on the observation of Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) project, we obtained the u,g,r,i,z and Ks band photometric information of all the objects in the 2 degree × 2 degree area (Pilot Region) around M87, the major subcluster of Virgo. By adapting an Extreme Deconvolution method, which classifies objects into Globular Clusters (GCs), galaxies and foreground stars with their color and morphology data, we got a purer-than-ever GC distribution map with a depth to gmag=25 in Pilot Region. After masking galaxy GCs, smoothing with a 10arcmin Gaussian kernel and performing a flat field correction, we show the GC density map of M87, and got a good sersic fitting of GC radial distribution with a sersic index~2.2 in the central ellipse part (45arcmin semi major axis area of M87). We quantitatively compared our GC sample with a substructure-free mock data set, which was generated from the smoothed density map as well as the sersic fitting, by calculating the 2 point correlation function (TPCF) value in different parts of the map. After separately performing such comparison with mocks based on different galaxy masking radii which vary from 4 times g band effective radius to 10, we found signals of remarkable spatial enhancement in certain directions in the central ellipse of M87, as well as halo substructures shown as lumpiness and holes in the outer region. We present the estimated scales of these substructures from the TPCF results, and, managed to locate them with a statistical analysis of the pixelized GC map. Apart from all results listed above, we discuss the constant, extra-galactic substructure signal at a scale of ~3kpc, which does not diminish with masking sizes, as the evidence of merging and accretion history of M87.

  17. Disruption of dark matter substructure: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Ogiya, Go; Hahn, Oliver; Burkert, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Accurately predicting the demographics of dark matter (DM) substructure is of paramount importance for many fields of astrophysics, including gravitational lensing, galaxy evolution, halo occupation modelling, and constraining the nature of DM. Because of its strongly non-linear nature, DM substructure is typically modelled using N-body simulations, which reveal that large fractions of DM subhaloes undergo complete disruption. In this paper, we use both analytical estimates and idealized numerical simulations to investigate whether this disruption is mainly physical, due to tidal heating and stripping, or numerical (i.e. artificial). We show that, contrary to naive expectation, subhaloes that experience a tidal shock ΔE that exceeds the subhalo's binding energy, |Eb|, do not undergo disruption, even when ΔE/|Eb| is as large as 100. Along the same line, and contrary to existing claims in the literature, instantaneously stripping matter from the outskirts of a DM subhalo also does not result in its complete disruption, even when the instantaneous remnant has positive binding energy. In addition, we show that tidal heating due to high-speed (impulsive) encounters with other subhaloes (`harassment') is negligible compared to the tidal effects due to the host halo. Hence, we conclude that, in the absence of baryonic processes, the complete physical disruption of CDM substructure is extremely rare and that most disruption in numerical simulations therefore must be artificial. We discuss various processes that have been associated with numerical overmerging and conclude that inadequate force softening is the most likely culprit.

  18. Evolution variable dependence of jet substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaki, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Studies on jet substructure have evolved significantly in recent years. Jet substructure is essentially determined by QCD radiations and non-perturbative effects. Predictions of jet substructure are usually different among Monte Carlo event generators, and are governed by the parton shower algorithm implemented. For leading logarithmic parton shower, even though one of the core variables is the evolution variable, its choice is not unique. We examine evolution variable dependence of the jet substructure by developing a parton shower generator that interpolates between different evolution variables using a parameter α. Jet shape variables and associated jet rates for quark and gluon jets are used to demonstrate the α-dependence of the jet substructure. We find angular ordered shower predicts wider jets, while relative transverse momentum (p ⊥ ) ordered shower predicts narrower jets. This is qualitatively in agreement with the missing phase space of p ⊥ ordered showers. Such difference can be reduced by tuning other parameters of the showering algorithm, especially in the low energy region, while the difference tends to increase for high energy jets.

  19. Energy Correlation Functions for Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    We show how generalized energy correlation functions can be used as a powerful probe of jet substructure. These correlation functions are based on the energies and pair-wise angles of particles within a jet, with (N+1)-point correlators sensitive to N-prong substructure. Unlike many previous jet substructure methods, these correlation functions do not require the explicit identification of subjet regions. In addition, the correlation functions are better probes of certain soft and collinear features that are masked by other methods. We present three Monte Carlo case studies to illustrate the utility of these observables: 2-point correlators for quark/gluon discrimination, 3-point correlators for boosted W/Z/Higgs boson identification, and 4-point correlators for boosted top quark identification. For quark/gluon discrimination, the 2-point correlator is particularly powerful, as can be understood via a next-to-leading logarithmic calculation. For boosted 2-prong resonances the benefit depends on the mass of th...

  20. Response Amplification of Idealized Powerhouse Substructures to Earthquake Ground Motions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ebeling, Robert M; Perez-Marcial, Elvin J; Yule, Donald E

    2006-01-01

    ...; (3) construction of a series of finite element models of the substructures and subjecting these substructures to earthquake acceleration time-histories representing central/eastern United States ground...

  1. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fofanov Viacheslav Y

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. Results This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs. SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. Conclusions FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated

  2. A note on the substructural hierarchy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 62, 1-2 (2016), s. 102-110 ISSN 0942-5616 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : substructural hierarchy * full Lambek calculus * extension variables Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.250, year: 2016 http://dx. doi . org /10.1002/malq.201500066

  3. Fracture behaviour of zirconia FPDs substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, W; Sjögren, G

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of superficial flaws after machining and to identify fracture initiation and propagation in three-unit heat-treated machined fixed partial dentures (FPDs) substructures made of hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) after loaded to fracture. Four three-unit HIPed Y-TZP-based FPDs substructures were examined. To evaluate the occurrence of superficial flaws after machining, the surfaces were studied utilizing a fluorescent penetrant method. After static loading to fracture, characteristic fracture features on both mating halves of the fractured specimens were studied using a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope. Grinding grooves were clearly visible on the surfaces of the machined FPDs substructures, but no other flaws could be seen with the fluorescent penetrant method. After loading to fracture, the characteristic fracture features of arrest lines, compression curl, fracture mirror, fracture origin, hackle and twist hackle were detected. These findings indicated that the decisive fracture was initiated at the gingival embrasure of the pontic in association with a grinding groove. Thus, in three-unit heat-treated machined HIPed Y-TZP FPDs substructures, with the shape studied in this study, the gingival embrasure of the pontic seems to be a weak area providing a location for tensile stresses when they are occlusally loaded. In this area, fracture initiation may be located to a grinding groove.

  4. A note on the substructural hierarchy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 62, 1-2 (2016), s. 102-110 ISSN 0942-5616 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : substructural hierarchy * full Lambek calculus * extension variables Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.250, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/malq.201500066

  5. Jacket Substructure Fatigue Mitigation through Active Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanis, Tomas; Natarajan, Anand

    2014-01-01

    As offshore wind farms are being installed farther and in deeper waters offshore, new, and more sophisticated marine substructures such as jackets need to be used. Herein, a 10MW wind turbine mounted on a jacket sub structure at a mean water depth of 50 meters is investigated with regards to the ...

  6. COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF Co(II, Ni (II, Cu(II COORDINATION COMPOUNDS WITH SOME HYDRAZONES OF PYRUVIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pulya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Сonducted comparative analysis of the coordination compounds of Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ with condensation products of 2-(7-bromo-2-oxo-5-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,4-benzodiazepin-1-yl acetohydrazide – Hydazepam (Hydr, nicotinoyl- and isonicotinoyl hydrazones (H2N, H2I with pyruvic acid (HPv: [Co(HydrHPvCl2]·2H2O (I, [Ni(HydrPv2] (II, [Cu(HydrHPv (H2OCl2] (III, [CoCl(HNPv(H2O2] (IV, [CoCl(HIPv(H2O2] (V, [NiCl(HNPv(H2O2] (VI, [NiCl(HIPv(H2O2] (VII, [CuCl(HNPv]·H2O (VIII, [CuCl(HIPv]·H2O (IX. Complexes characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, electrical conductivity, and magnetic susceptibility. Thermal stability of the complexes has been characterized. Structure of the coordination node of the complexes has been determined by EXAFS-spectroscopy. Regardless of composition, structure by heterocyclic nitrogen-containing moiety of the molecules HydrHPv, H2NРv, H2IРv formation of I-IX complexes is due to binding of complexing with a hydrazide functional group ketone form of the ligands. Ni2+ complexes II, VI, VII are different by composition (Ni2+:HydrHPv в II = 1:2, Ni2+:H2NРv(H2IРv в VI, VII = 1:1. Co2+, Cu2+ complexes with the same composition (M2+:ligand = 1:1. H2NPv, H2IPv in all complexes IV-IX – tridentate, occurs deprotonation and bonding carboxylate group НPv. HydrHPv coordinated to the Co2+, Cu2+ bidentate (I, III, without participation of the carboxylic group, and to the Ni2+ – tridentate (II.

  7. Galaxy Cluster Mass Reconstruction Project - III. The impact of dynamical substructure on cluster mass estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Old, L.; Wojtak, R.; Pearce, F. R.; Gray, M. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Sifón, C.; Tempel, E.; Biviano, A.; Yee, H. K. C.; de Carvalho, R.; Müller, V.; Sepp, T.; Skibba, R. A.; Croton, D.; Bamford, S. P.; Power, C.; von der Linden, A.; Saro, A.

    2018-03-01

    With the advent of wide-field cosmological surveys, we are approaching samples of hundreds of thousands of galaxy clusters. While such large numbers will help reduce statistical uncertainties, the control of systematics in cluster masses is crucial. Here we examine the effects of an important source of systematic uncertainty in galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques: the presence of significant dynamical substructure. Dynamical substructure manifests as dynamically distinct subgroups in phase-space, indicating an `unrelaxed' state. This issue affects around a quarter of clusters in a generally selected sample. We employ a set of mock clusters whose masses have been measured homogeneously with commonly used galaxy-based mass estimation techniques (kinematic, richness, caustic, radial methods). We use these to study how the relation between observationally estimated and true cluster mass depends on the presence of substructure, as identified by various popular diagnostics. We find that the scatter for an ensemble of clusters does not increase dramatically for clusters with dynamical substructure. However, we find a systematic bias for all methods, such that clusters with significant substructure have higher measured masses than their relaxed counterparts. This bias depends on cluster mass: the most massive clusters are largely unaffected by the presence of significant substructure, but masses are significantly overestimated for lower mass clusters, by ˜ 10 per cent at 1014 and ≳ 20 per cent for ≲ 1013.5. The use of cluster samples with different levels of substructure can therefore bias certain cosmological parameters up to a level comparable to the typical uncertainties in current cosmological studies.

  8. Sexual dysfunction in type II diabetic females: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Bulent; Tefekli, Ahmet; Ozbey, Isa; Salman, Fatih; Dincag, Nevin; Kadioglu, Ates; Tellaloglu, Sedat

    2002-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is considered to play a principle role in the etiopathogenesis of sexual dysfunction both in men and women. The aim of this study is to evaluate sexual function in Type II diabetic women. A total of 72 young diabetic women (mean age: 38.8 years) with no other systemic diseases and 60 age-matched healthy women were enrolled in our study. We sought from them a detailed medical and sexual history and used the Index of Female Sexual function (IFSF) questionnaire (Kaplan et al., 1999). The mean IFSF score of diabetic women was 29.3 +/- 6.4 and was 37.7 +/- 3.5 in normal cases (p diabetics and was observed in 77% of the women. Diminished clitoral sensation was observed in 62.5% of the women, 37.5% complained of vaginal dryness and 41.6% had vaginal discomfort. Orgasmic dysfunction was found in 49% of the women. The incidence of all these related symptoms were significantly higher when compared to controls. We concluded that significant percentage of diabetic women that we observed experience sexual dysfunction of varying degrees that diminishes their quality of life.

  9. STRATUL DUBLU ELECTRIC AL MONTMORILONITULUI. II. ANALIZE COMPARATIVE ALE MODELELOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile RUSU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A fost analizată relaţia potenţial – distanţa de la suprafaţa solidului în volumul soluţiei în modelul Gouy-Chapman, modelul Stern şi modelul modificat Gouy-Chapman. Modelările efectuate conform modelului Stern pentru H-montmo­rilonit şi Al-montmorilonit intercalat cu oligomeri de aluminiu evidenţiază particularităţile stratului dublu electric în proximitatea suprafeţei bazale şi a suprafeţei laterale a montmorilonitului. Dinamica potenţialului în volumul soluţiei prin modelul modificat Gouy-Chapman devine identică modelului Stern, în condiţiile atribuirii caracteristicilor stratului compact din modelul Stern.EDL FOR MONTMORILLONITE. II. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MODELS The relationship potential - the distance from the surface of the solid towards the solution by the Gouy-Chapman model, the Stern model, and the modified Gouy-Chapman model were analyzed. Modeling performed according to the Stern model for H-montmorillonite and pillared Al-montmorillonite highlights the peculiarities of the double electric layer close to the basal and edge surfaces. The potential dynamics in the solution by the modified Gouy-Chapman model becomes identical to the Stern model if the main characteristics of Stern layer are attributed.

  10. An online substructure identification method for local structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Jilin; Ou, Jinping; Jankowski, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a substructure isolation method, which uses time series of measured local response for online monitoring of substructures. The proposed monitoring process consists of two key steps: construction of the isolated substructure, and its identification. The isolated substructure is an independent virtual structure, which is numerically isolated from the global structure by placing virtual supports on the interface. First, the isolated substructure is constructed by a specific linear combination of time series of its measured local responses. Then, the isolated substructure is identified using its local natural frequencies extracted from the combined responses. The substructure is assumed to be linear; the outside part of the global structure can have any characteristics. The method has no requirements on the initial state of the structure, and so the process can be carried out repetitively for online monitoring. Online isolation and monitoring is illustrated in a numerical example with a frame model, and then verified in a cantilever beam experiment. (paper)

  11. Practical applications of substructuring in shell dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sane, A.D.; Bitner, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Transient dynamic stress analysis of large shell structures is often required in many industrial designs. The asymmetry features of the structure often require a full three dimensional analysis. The difficulties experienced in performing the dynamic analysis of such large and complex structures result from economic feasibility and limitations on the available computer core memory. Substructuring techniques provide a way of overcoming these difficulties. The advantages and features associated with substructuring methods are discussed in general terms. The technique is then applied to perform a transient dynamic analysis of a typical shell structure. The discussion of the example problem focused to highlight the economy, flexibility and the data handling aspects of this method. The example problem demonstrates that this method can be applied with success to a wide range of structural dynamic problems and results in significant cost savings

  12. Tagging partially reconstructed objects with jet substructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Freytsis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a new tagger which aims at identifying partially reconstructed objects, in which only some of the constituents are collected in a single jet. As an example, we focus on top decays in which either part of the hadronically decaying W or the b jet is soft or falls outside of the top jet cone. We construct an observable to identify remnant substructure from the decay and employ aggressive jet grooming to reject QCD backgrounds. The tagger is complementary to existing ones and works well in the intermediate boost regime where jet substructure techniques usually fail. It is anticipated that a similar tagger can be used to identify non-QCD hadronic jets, such as those expected from hidden valleys.

  13. Towards an understanding of jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Marzani, Simone; Salam, Gavin P

    2013-01-01

    We present first analytic, resummed calculations of the rates at which widespread jet substructure tools tag QCD jets. As well as considering trimming, pruning and the mass-drop tagger, we introduce modified tools with improved analytical and phenomenological behaviours. Most taggers have double logarithmic resummed structures. The modified mass-drop tagger is special in that it involves only single logarithms, and is free from a complex class of terms known as non-global logarithms. The modification of pruning brings an improved ability to discriminate between the different colour structures that characterise signal and background. As we outline in an extensive phenomenological discussion, these results provide valuable insight into the performance of existing tools and help lay robust foundations for future substructure studies.

  14. Tagging partially reconstructed objects with jet substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytsis, Marat, E-mail: freytsis@uoregon.edu [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Volansky, Tomer [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Walsh, Jonathan R. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-06-10

    We present a new tagger which aims at identifying partially reconstructed objects, in which only some of the constituents are collected in a single jet. As an example, we focus on top decays in which either part of the hadronically decaying W or the b jet is soft or falls outside of the top jet cone. We construct an observable to identify remnant substructure from the decay and employ aggressive jet grooming to reject QCD backgrounds. The tagger is complementary to existing ones and works well in the intermediate boost regime where jet substructure techniques usually fail. It is anticipated that a similar tagger can be used to identify non-QCD hadronic jets, such as those expected from hidden valleys.

  15. Tagging partially reconstructed objects with jet substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytsis, Marat; Volansky, Tomer; Walsh, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new tagger which aims at identifying partially reconstructed objects, in which only some of the constituents are collected in a single jet. As an example, we focus on top decays in which either part of the hadronically decaying W or the b jet is soft or falls outside of the top jet cone. We construct an observable to identify remnant substructure from the decay and employ aggressive jet grooming to reject QCD backgrounds. The tagger is complementary to existing ones and works well in the intermediate boost regime where jet substructure techniques usually fail. It is anticipated that a similar tagger can be used to identify non-QCD hadronic jets, such as those expected from hidden valleys.

  16. Tagging partially reconstructed objects with jet substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytsis, Marat; Volansky, Tomer; Walsh, Jonathan R.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new tagger which aims at identifying partially reconstructed objects, in which only some of the constituents are collected in a single jet. As an example, we focus on top decays in which either part of the hadronically decaying W or the b jet is soft or falls outside of the top jet cone. We construct an observable to identify remnant substructure from the decay and employ aggressive jet grooming to reject QCD backgrounds. The tagger is complementary to existing ones and works well in the intermediate boost regime where jet substructure techniques usually fail. It is anticipated that a similar tagger can be used to identify non-QCD hadronic jets, such as those expected from hidden valleys.

  17. Smart variations: Functional substructures for part compatibility

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Youyi

    2013-05-01

    As collections of 3D models continue to grow, reusing model parts allows generation of novel model variations. Naïvely swapping parts across models, however, leads to implausible results, especially when mixing parts across different model families. Hence, the user has to manually ensure that the final model remains functionally valid. We claim that certain symmetric functional arrangements (sFarr-s), which are special arrangements among symmetrically related substructures, bear close relation to object functions. Hence, we propose a purely geometric approach based on such substructures to match, replace, and position triplets of parts to create non-trivial, yet functionally plausible, model variations. We demonstrate that starting even from a small set of models such a simple geometric approach can produce a diverse set of non-trivial and plausible model variations. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Vector boson tagged jets and jet substructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitev Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In these proceedings, we report on recent results related to vector boson-tagged jet production in heavy ion collisions and the related modification of jet substructure, such as jet shapes and jet momentum sharing distributions. Z0-tagging and γ-tagging of jets provides new opportunities to study parton shower formation and propagation in the quark-gluon plasma and has been argued to provide tight constrains on the energy loss of reconstructed jets. We present theoretical predictions for isolated photon-tagged and electroweak boson-tagged jet production in Pb+Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV at the LHC, addressing the modification of their transverse momentum and transverse momentum imbalance distributions. Comparison to recent ATLAS and CMS experimental measurements is performed that can shed light on the medium-induced radiative corrections and energy dissipation due to collisional processes of predominantly quark-initiated jets. The modification of parton splitting functions in the QGP further implies that the substructure of jets in heavy ion collisions may differ significantly from the corresponding substructure in proton-proton collisions. Two such observables and the implication of tagging on their evaluation is also discussed.

  19. Composite Octet Searches with Jet Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yang; /SLAC; Shelton, Jessie; /Yale U.

    2012-02-14

    Many new physics models with strongly interacting sectors predict a mass hierarchy between the lightest vector meson and the lightest pseudoscalar mesons. We examine the power of jet substructure tools to extend the 7 TeV LHC sensitivity to these new states for the case of QCD octet mesons, considering both two gluon and two b-jet decay modes for the pseudoscalar mesons. We develop both a simple dijet search using only the jet mass and a more sophisticated jet substructure analysis, both of which can discover the composite octets in a dijet-like signature. The reach depends on the mass hierarchy between the vector and pseudoscalar mesons. We find that for the pseudoscalar-to-vector meson mass ratio below approximately 0.2 the simple jet mass analysis provides the best discovery limit; for a ratio between 0.2 and the QCD-like value of 0.3, the sophisticated jet substructure analysis has the best discovery potential; for a ratio above approximately 0.3, the standard four-jet analysis is more suitable.

  20. Identifying a new particle with jet substructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chengcheng; Kim, Doojin; Kim, Minho; Postech, Pohang

    2017-01-01

    Here, we investigate a potential of determining properties of a new heavy resonance of mass O(1)TeV which decays to collimated jets via heavy Standard Model intermediary states, exploiting jet substructure techniques. Employing the Z gauge boson as a concrete example for the intermediary state, we utilize a "merged jet" defined by a large jet size to capture the two quarks from its decay. The use of the merged jet bene ts the identification of a Z-induced jet as a single, reconstructed object without any combinatorial ambiguity. We also find that jet substructure procedures may enhance features in some kinematic observables formed with subjet four-momenta extracted from a merged jet. This observation motivates us to feed subjet momenta into the matrix elements associated with plausible hypotheses on the nature of the heavy resonance, which are further processed to construct a matrix element method (MEM)-based observable. For both moderately and highly boosted Z bosons, we demonstrate that the MEM in combination with jet substructure techniques can be a very powerful tool for identifying its physical properties. Finally, we discuss effects from choosing different jet sizes for merged jets and jet-grooming parameters upon the MEM analyses.

  1. Identifying a new particle with jet substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Sung Hak; Kim, Doojin; Kim, Minho; Kong, Kyoungchul; Park, Myeonghun

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a potential of measuring properties of a heavy resonance X, exploiting jet substructure techniques. Motivated by heavy higgs boson searches, we focus on the decays of X into a pair of (massive) electroweak gauge bosons. More specifically, we consider a hadronic Z boson, which makes it possible to determine properties of X at an earlier stage. For $m_X$ of O(1) TeV, two quarks from a Z boson would be captured as a "merged jet" in a significant fraction of events. The use of the merged jet enables us to consider a Z-induced jet as a reconstructed object without any combinatorial ambiguity. We apply a conventional jet substructure method to extract four-momenta of subjets from a merged jet. We find that jet substructure procedures may enhance features in some kinematic observables formed with subjets. Subjet momenta are fed into the matrix element associated with a given hypothesis on the nature of X, which is further processed to construct a matrix element method (MEM)-based observable. For both ...

  2. Two innovative solutions based on fibre concrete blocks designed for building substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderka, J.; Hájek, P.

    2017-09-01

    Using of fibers in a high-strength concrete allows reduction of the dimensions of small precast concrete elements, which opens up new ways of solution for traditional construction details in buildings. The paper presents two innovative technical solutions for building substructure: The special shaped plinth block from fibre concrete and the fibre concrete elements for new technical solution of ventilated floor. The main advantages of plinth block from fibre concrete blocks (compared with standard plinth solutions) is: easier and faster assembly, higher durability and thanks to the air cavity between the vertical part of the block, the building substructure reduced moisture level of structures under the waterproofing layer and a comprehensive solution to the final surface of building plinth as well as the surface of adjacent terrain. The ventilated floor based on fibre concrete precast blocks is an attractive structural alternative for tackling the problem of increased moisture in masonry in older buildings, lacking a functional waterproof layer in the substructure.

  3. Biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions using mushrooms: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimala, R., E-mail: vimararagu@yahoo.co.in [School of Biotechnology, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Das, Nilanjana [School of Biotechnology, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2009-08-30

    Sorption capacity of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus platypus), button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and milky mushroom (Calocybe indica) were evaluated on biosorption of heavy metals, viz. cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions. The optimum sorption conditions were studied for each metal separately. The desired pH of the aqueous solution was found to be 6.0 for the removal of cadmium (II) and 5.0 for removal of lead (II) for all the mushrooms. The percent removal of both the metals was found to increase with the increase in biosorbent dosage and contact time. The fitness of the biosorption data for Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models was investigated. It was found that biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions onto the biomass of the three mushrooms were better suitable to Langmuir than Freundlich adsorption model. P. platypus showed the highest metal uptake potential for cadmium (q{sub max} 34.96 mg/g) whereas A. bisporus exhibited maximum potential for lead (q{sub max} 33.78 mg/g). Milky mushroom showed the lowest metal uptake capacity for both the metals. The present data confirms that mushrooms may be used as efficient biosorbent for the removal of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions from aqueous solution.

  4. Biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions using mushrooms: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vimala, R.; Das, Nilanjana

    2009-01-01

    Sorption capacity of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus platypus), button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and milky mushroom (Calocybe indica) were evaluated on biosorption of heavy metals, viz. cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions. The optimum sorption conditions were studied for each metal separately. The desired pH of the aqueous solution was found to be 6.0 for the removal of cadmium (II) and 5.0 for removal of lead (II) for all the mushrooms. The percent removal of both the metals was found to increase with the increase in biosorbent dosage and contact time. The fitness of the biosorption data for Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models was investigated. It was found that biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions onto the biomass of the three mushrooms were better suitable to Langmuir than Freundlich adsorption model. P. platypus showed the highest metal uptake potential for cadmium (q max 34.96 mg/g) whereas A. bisporus exhibited maximum potential for lead (q max 33.78 mg/g). Milky mushroom showed the lowest metal uptake capacity for both the metals. The present data confirms that mushrooms may be used as efficient biosorbent for the removal of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions from aqueous solution.

  5. A composite experimental dynamic substructuring method based on partitioned algorithms and localized Lagrange multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbiati, Giuseppe; La Salandra, Vincenzo; Bursi, Oreste S.; Caracoglia, Luca

    2018-02-01

    Successful online hybrid (numerical/physical) dynamic substructuring simulations have shown their potential in enabling realistic dynamic analysis of almost any type of non-linear structural system (e.g., an as-built/isolated viaduct, a petrochemical piping system subjected to non-stationary seismic loading, etc.). Moreover, owing to faster and more accurate testing equipment, a number of different offline experimental substructuring methods, operating both in time (e.g. the impulse-based substructuring) and frequency domains (i.e. the Lagrange multiplier frequency-based substructuring), have been employed in mechanical engineering to examine dynamic substructure coupling. Numerous studies have dealt with the above-mentioned methods and with consequent uncertainty propagation issues, either associated with experimental errors or modelling assumptions. Nonetheless, a limited number of publications have systematically cross-examined the performance of the various Experimental Dynamic Substructuring (EDS) methods and the possibility of their exploitation in a complementary way to expedite a hybrid experiment/numerical simulation. From this perspective, this paper performs a comparative uncertainty propagation analysis of three EDS algorithms for coupling physical and numerical subdomains with a dual assembly approach based on localized Lagrange multipliers. The main results and comparisons are based on a series of Monte Carlo simulations carried out on a five-DoF linear/non-linear chain-like systems that include typical aleatoric uncertainties emerging from measurement errors and excitation loads. In addition, we propose a new Composite-EDS (C-EDS) method to fuse both online and offline algorithms into a unique simulator. Capitalizing from the results of a more complex case study composed of a coupled isolated tank-piping system, we provide a feasible way to employ the C-EDS method when nonlinearities and multi-point constraints are present in the emulated system.

  6. CHEMTRAN and the Interconversion of Chemical Substructure Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Charles E.

    1973-01-01

    The need for the interconversion of chemical substructure systems is discussed and CHEMTRAN, a new service, designed especially for creating interconversion programs, is introduced. (7 references) (Author)

  7. A Search for Starless Core Substructure in Ophiuchus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Helen

    2017-06-01

    Density substructure is expected in evolved starless cores: a single peak to form a protostar, or multiple peaks from fragmentation. Searches for this substructure have had mixed success. In an ALMA survey of Ophiuchus, we find two starless cores with signs of substructure, consistent with simulation predictions. A similar survey in Chameleon (Dunham et al. 2016) had no detections, despite expecting at least two. Our results suggest that Chamleon may lack a more evolved starless cores. Future ALMA observations will better trace the influence of environment on core substructure formation.

  8. Substructure based modeling of nickel single crystals cycled at low plastic strain amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong

    subroutine DISP and URDFIL of ABAQUS, respectively, while constitutive formulations of the FEM model are coded and implemented in UMAT. The results of the simulations are compared to experiments. This model verified the validity of Winter's two-phase model and Taylor's uniform stress assumption, explored substructure evolution and "intrinsic" behavior in substructures and successfully simulated the process of PSB band formation and propagation.

  9. Universal parametrization for quark and lepton substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Keiichi; Terazawa, Hidezumi.

    1994-01-01

    A universal parametrization for possible quark and lepton substructure is advocated in terms of quark and lepton form factors. It is emphasized that the lower bounds on compositeness scale, Λ c , to be determined experimentally strongly depend on their definitions in composite models. From the recent HERA data, it is estimated to be Λ c > 50 GeV, 0.4 TeV and 10 TeV, depending on the parametrizations with a single-pole form factor, a contact interaction and a logarithmic form factor, respectively. (author)

  10. Property Graph vs RDF Triple Store: A Comparison on Glycan Substructure Search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Alocci

    Full Text Available Resource description framework (RDF and Property Graph databases are emerging technologies that are used for storing graph-structured data. We compare these technologies through a molecular biology use case: glycan substructure search. Glycans are branched tree-like molecules composed of building blocks linked together by chemical bonds. The molecular structure of a glycan can be encoded into a direct acyclic graph where each node represents a building block and each edge serves as a chemical linkage between two building blocks. In this context, Graph databases are possible software solutions for storing glycan structures and Graph query languages, such as SPARQL and Cypher, can be used to perform a substructure search. Glycan substructure searching is an important feature for querying structure and experimental glycan databases and retrieving biologically meaningful data. This applies for example to identifying a region of the glycan recognised by a glycan binding protein (GBP. In this study, 19,404 glycan structures were selected from GlycomeDB (www.glycome-db.org and modelled for being stored into a RDF triple store and a Property Graph. We then performed two different sets of searches and compared the query response times and the results from both technologies to assess performance and accuracy. The two implementations produced the same results, but interestingly we noted a difference in the query response times. Qualitative measures such as portability were also used to define further criteria for choosing the technology adapted to solving glycan substructure search and other comparable issues.

  11. Comparative studies in Chelicerata II. Epimerata (Palpigradi and Actinotrichida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der L.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study is made of two groups of Chelicerata (Palpigradi and Actinotrichid mites, together constituting the Epimerata, a chelicerate class), and models of the evolution of epimerate characters are prepared. The study is based on the same methods and principles as the first part of the

  12. Efficiency analysis of numerical integrations for finite element substructure in real-time hybrid simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinting; Lu, Liqiao; Zhu, Fei

    2018-01-01

    Finite element (FE) is a powerful tool and has been applied by investigators to real-time hybrid simulations (RTHSs). This study focuses on the computational efficiency, including the computational time and accuracy, of numerical integrations in solving FE numerical substructure in RTHSs. First, sparse matrix storage schemes are adopted to decrease the computational time of FE numerical substructure. In this way, the task execution time (TET) decreases such that the scale of the numerical substructure model increases. Subsequently, several commonly used explicit numerical integration algorithms, including the central difference method (CDM), the Newmark explicit method, the Chang method and the Gui-λ method, are comprehensively compared to evaluate their computational time in solving FE numerical substructure. CDM is better than the other explicit integration algorithms when the damping matrix is diagonal, while the Gui-λ (λ = 4) method is advantageous when the damping matrix is non-diagonal. Finally, the effect of time delay on the computational accuracy of RTHSs is investigated by simulating structure-foundation systems. Simulation results show that the influences of time delay on the displacement response become obvious with the mass ratio increasing, and delay compensation methods may reduce the relative error of the displacement peak value to less than 5% even under the large time-step and large time delay.

  13. Full Vehicle Vibration and Noise Analysis Based on Substructure Power Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhien Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining substructure and power flow theory, in this paper an external program is written to control MSC. Nastran solution process and the substructure frequency response are also formulated accordingly. Based on a simple vehicle model, characteristics of vibration, noise, and power flow are studied, respectively. After being compared with the result of conventional FEM (finite element method, the new method is confirmed to be feasible. When it comes to a vehicle with the problem of low-frequency noise, finite element models of substructures for vehicle body and chassis are established, respectively. In addition, substructure power flow method is also employed to examine the transfer characteristics of multidimensional vibration energy for the whole vehicle system. By virtue of the adjustment stiffness of drive shaft support and bushes at rear suspension lower arm, the vehicle interior noise is decreased by about 3 dB when the engine speed is near 1050 rpm and 1650 rpm in experiment. At the same time, this method can increase the computation efficiency by 78%, 38%, and 98% when it comes to the optimization of chassis structure, body structure, and vibration isolation components, respectively.

  14. Comparative neutronic analysis between MNSR and Slowpoke-II reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.; Khattab, K.

    1998-12-01

    It was found possible to lower the fuel enrichment of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) to 20% using Uo 2 as fuel instead of UAl 4 . The number of fuel elements required for the new core is 199. The use of double thickness of the bottom reflector in Slowpoke reactor made it possible to load the reactor with lower enriched fuel compared to MNSR. A neutronic model, dedicated mainly for the MNSR, has been developed to perform neutronic calculations for both reactors. values of reactivity flooding effects for single or combination of inner irradiation sites were obtained accurately. Results show good agreement with reported data for MNSR. (author)

  15. Diffuse Stellar Substructure in Virgo Ellipticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihos, Chris; Janowiecki, S.; Harding, P.; Feldmeier, J.; Rudick, C.; Morrison, H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of our deep wide-field imaging survey of the Virgo Cluster, we have studied in detail the extended stellar halos of the five bright Virgo ellipticals M49, M87, M86, M84, and M89. We examine substructure in these halos by fitting and subtracting elliptical isophotal models out to large radius and low surface brightness (r>100 kpc and muV 28). After subtraction of these isophotal models, these elliptical galaxies show a variety of diffuse structures, from extended stellar streams to complex systems of shells and loops. These features give insight into the accretion history of these galaxies and their dynamical history in the Virgo Cluster. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation.

  16. Rape in World War II film: comparing narrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzadevych, Tetyana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to show how the filmmaker’s genre of choice shapes the main discourse of the film. The author compares Helke Sander’s documentary Liberators Take Liberties (1991-1992 and Max Farberbock’s narrative feature A Woman in Berlin (2008 both dealing with the dramatic effect of the end of WWII, in particular with the instances of German women having been raped by the Allied troops, a theme first publicized in the anonymous diary A Woman in Berlin (1953. There is a clear connection between the book and the two films, but if Sander focuses on the rape itself and on the extraordinary female experience of war, Farberbock is more concerned with cross-national revenge. The author looks closer at the genre elements, particularly at the genres of the diary, the (feminist documentary, and the narrative film. Then, the author draws some parallels between the Helke Sander film and the diary A Woman of Berlin and discusses the documentaries within the feminist framework inspired by Sander’s accomplishments.

  17. Social-group identity and population substructure in admixed populations in New Mexico and Latin America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E Healy

    Full Text Available We examined the relationship between continental-level genetic ancestry and racial and ethnic identity in an admixed population in New Mexico with the goal of increasing our understanding of how racial and ethnic identity influence genetic substructure in admixed populations. Our sample consists of 98 New Mexicans who self-identified as Hispanic or Latino (NM-HL and who further categorized themselves by race and ethnic subgroup membership. The genetic data consist of 270 newly-published autosomal microsatellites from the NM-HL sample and previously published data from 57 globally distributed populations, including 13 admixed samples from Central and South America. For these data, we 1 summarized the major axes of genetic variation using principal component analyses, 2 performed tests of Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, 3 compared empirical genetic ancestry distributions to those predicted under a model of admixture that lacked substructure, 4 tested the hypotheses that individuals in each sample had 100%, 0%, and the sample-mean percentage of African, European, and Native American ancestry. We found that most NM-HL identify themselves and their parents as belonging to one of two groups, conforming to a region-specific narrative that distinguishes recent immigrants from Mexico from individuals whose families have resided in New Mexico for generations and who emphasize their Spanish heritage. The "Spanish" group had significantly lower Native American ancestry and higher European ancestry than the "Mexican" group. Positive FIS values, PCA plots, and heterogeneous ancestry distributions suggest that most Central and South America admixed samples also contain substructure, and that this substructure may be related to variation in social identity. Genetic substructure appears to be common in admixed populations in the Americas and may confound attempts to identify disease-causing genes and to understand the social causes of variation in health outcomes

  18. Synthesised H ∞ / μ Control Design for Dynamically Substructured Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Stoten, D. P.

    2016-09-01

    In the dynamically substructured system (DSS) testing technique, a controller that synchronises the responses of physical and numerical substructures is an essential part of the testing scheme to ensure synchronisation fidelity. This paper discusses a novel approach that generates a two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) output feedback controller for multi-input, multioutput (MIMO) DSS via control synthesis. This 2-DOF output feedback controller yields robust stability and robust performance of the physical/numerical substructure synchronisation and enables controller tuning in the frequency domain. Simulation and experimental results have been shown to validate the efficacy of the method.

  19. Substructuring by Lagrange multipliers for solids and plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandel, J.; Tezaur, R. [Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Farhat, C. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present principles and theoreretical foundation of a substructuring method for large structural problems. The algorithm is preconditioned conjugate gradients on a subspace for the dual problem. The preconditioning is proved asymptotically optimal and the method is shown to be parallel scalable, i.e., the condition number is bounded independently of the number of substructures. For plate problems, a special modification is needed that retains continuity of the displacement solution at substructure crosspoints, resulting in an asymptically optimal method. The results are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  20. Rapid bridge construction technology : precast elements for substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this research was to propose an alternate system of precast bridge substructures which can : substitute for conventional cast in place systems in Wisconsin to achieve accelerated construction. : Three types of abutment modules (hollow wal...

  1. Searches for new physics using jet grooming and substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Models predicting the production and decay of supersymmetric (SUSY) particles often have promising search channels involving decays through heavy intermediate states such as top quarks and heavy bosons. However, unlike in most exotics scenarios these heavy states are only moderately boosted which can make traditional substructure techniques less useful and motivates the development of alternative techniques. The results of several SUSY analyses using substructure techniques are presented.

  2. Boosted Higgs boson tagging using jet substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Shvydkin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Searching BSM particles via the Higgs boson final state has now become common. The mass of desired BSM particle is more than 1 TeV, thereby its decay products are highly Lorentz-boosted. Hence the jets from b quark-antiquark pair - which the Higgs boson mostly decays into - are very closed to each other, and merged into one jet, that is typically reconstructed using large jet sizes (∆R = 0.8). In this work regression technique is applied to AK8 jets (which defined by anti-kT algorithm, using ΔR = 0.8). The regression makes use of boosted jets with substructure information, coupled with the pecularities of a b quark decay, like the presence of a soft lepton (SL) inside the jet. It has allowed to improve the resolution of the mass reconstruction and transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. This application results in improvement of the mass reconstruction by 3-4 percent. These result may be improved firstly by making more careful pileup rejection. Then it is possible to combine base regression train for dif...

  3. Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2005-08-11

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

  4. Sub-structure formation in starless cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, C.; Galli, D.; Verdini, A.; Del Zanna, L.; Landi, S.

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by recent observational searches of sub-structure in starless molecular cloud cores, we investigate the evolution of density perturbations on scales smaller than the Jeans length embedded in contracting isothermal clouds, adopting the same formalism developed for the expanding Universe and the solar wind. We find that initially small amplitude, Jeans-stable perturbations (propagating as sound waves in the absence of a magnetic field) are amplified adiabatically during the contraction, approximately conserving the wave action density, until they either become non-linear and steepen into shocks at a time tnl, or become gravitationally unstable when the Jeans length decreases below the scale of the perturbations at a time tgr. We evaluate analytically the time tnl at which the perturbations enter the non-linear stage using a Burgers' equation approach, and we verify numerically that this time marks the beginning of the phase of rapid dissipation of the kinetic energy of the perturbations. We then show that for typical values of the rms Mach number in molecular cloud cores, tnl is smaller than tgr, and therefore density perturbations likely dissipate before becoming gravitational unstable. Solenoidal modes grow at a faster rate than compressible modes, and may eventually promote fragmentation through the formation of vortical structures.

  5. Development and Demonstration of a Magnesium-Intensive Vehicle Front-End Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Stephen D. [United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC, Southfield, MI (United States); Forsmark, Joy H. [United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC, Southfield, MI (United States); Osborne, Richard [United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC, Southfield, MI (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This project is the final phase (designated Phase III) of an extensive, nine-year effort with the objectives of developing a knowledge base and enabling technologies for the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of magnesium-intensive automotive front-end substructures intended to partially or completely replace all-steel comparators, providing a weight savings approaching 50% of the baseline. Benefits of extensive vehicle weight reduction in terms of fuel economy increase, extended vehicle range, vehicle performance and commensurate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are well known. An exemplary vehicle substructure considered by the project is illustrated in Figure 1, along with the exterior vehicle appearance. This unibody front-end “substructure” is one physical objective of the ultimate design and engineering aspects established at the outset of the larger collective effort.

  6. Fast and accurate protein substructure searching with simulated annealing and GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stivala Alex D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching a database of protein structures for matches to a query structure, or occurrences of a structural motif, is an important task in structural biology and bioinformatics. While there are many existing methods for structural similarity searching, faster and more accurate approaches are still required, and few current methods are capable of substructure (motif searching. Results We developed an improved heuristic for tableau-based protein structure and substructure searching using simulated annealing, that is as fast or faster and comparable in accuracy, with some widely used existing methods. Furthermore, we created a parallel implementation on a modern graphics processing unit (GPU. Conclusions The GPU implementation achieves up to 34 times speedup over the CPU implementation of tableau-based structure search with simulated annealing, making it one of the fastest available methods. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of a GPU to the protein structural search problem.

  7. Jet Substructure Measurements Sensitive to Soft QCD effects with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Asquith, Lily; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Calculations of jet substructure observables which are accurate beyond leading-logarithmic accuracy have recently become available. Such observables are significant not only for probing a new regime of QCD at a hadron collider, but also for improving the understanding of jet substructure properties that are used in many studies at the Large Hadron Collider. In this talk, we discuss first measurement of jet substructure quantities at a hadron collider, calculated at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm accuracy. The soft drop mass is measured in dijet events with the ATLAS detector at 13 TeV, unfolded to particle-level and compared to Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, we present a measurement of the splitting scales in the kt jet-clustering algorithm for final states containing a Z-boson candidate at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV.  The data are also corrected for detector effects and are compared to state-of-the-art Monte Carlo predictions.

  8. Adsorption of mercury (II) from aqueous solutions using FeS and pyrite: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Lv, Dan; Zhou, Jiasheng; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Lou, Zimo; Baig, Shams Ali; Xu, Xinhua

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a comparative evaluation of synthetic FeS and natural pyrite was performed to investigate their adsorptive potentials toward Hg(II) in aqueous system. Characterization analyses such as BET, SEM and TEM suggested that FeS had porous structures with abundant active sites, while pyrite with a hard and smooth surface relied mainly on surface adsorption to immobilize Hg(II). Results of batch tests revealed that FeS offered much greater Hg(II) maximum adsorption capacity (769.2 mg/g) as compared to pyrite (9.9 mg/g). Both iron sulfides showed high removal efficiency (>96%) with the initial Hg(II) concentration (1 mg/L) at pH = 7.0 ± 0.1, and the effluent could meet the permissible effluent concentration (reaction mechanisms involved in the adsorption process. In addition, it was also revealed that the structural changes of FeS before and after adsorption was much larger than pyrite. Findings from this study suggest FeS is a promising candidate for treatment of high-concentration Hg(II)-containing wastewater (<20 mg/L), while pyrite can be applied as a long-term adsorbing material in the immobilization of wastewater containing low Hg(II) concentration (<1 mg/L) due to its cost-effective property and local availability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. RESONANT CLUMPING AND SUBSTRUCTURE IN GALACTIC DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Shen, Juntai; Evans, N. Wyn

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method to extract resonant orbits from N-body simulations, exploiting the fact that they close in frames rotating with a constant pattern speed. Our method is applied to the N-body simulation of the Milky Way by Shen et al. This simulation hosts a massive bar, which drives strong resonances and persistent angular momentum exchange. Resonant orbits are found throughout the disk, both close to the bar and out to the very edges of the disk. Using Fourier spectrograms, we demonstrate that the bar is driving kinematic substructure even in the very outer parts of the disk. We identify two major orbit families in the outskirts of the disk, one of which makes significant contributions to the kinematic landscape, namely, the m:l = 3:−2 family, resonating with the bar. A mechanism is described that produces bimodal distributions of Galactocentric radial velocities at selected azimuths in the outer disk. It occurs as a result of the temporal coherence of particles on the 3:−2 resonant orbits, which causes them to arrive simultaneously at pericenter or apocenter. This resonant clumping, due to the in-phase motion of the particles through their epicycle, leads to both inward and outward moving groups that belong to the same orbital family and consequently produce bimodal radial velocity distributions. This is a possible explanation of the bimodal velocity distributions observed toward the Galactic anticenter by Liu et al. Another consequence is that transient overdensities appear and dissipate (in a symmetric fashion), resulting in a periodic pulsing of the disk’s surface density

  10. Comparative study of palatal rugae pattern in class II div 1 and class I individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar Gandikota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine if the palatal rugae have a characteristic pattern in untreated class II div 1 malocclusions compared to normal class I occlusions, and to provide a valuable insight whether palatal rugae can be taken up as additional criteria for classifying malocclusions. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on initial maxillary dental casts of 24 individuals with untreated class II div 1 malocclusion with an overjet of minimum of 5mm, of whom 12 were females and 12 were males, with age ranging from 16 to 24 years and compared with Class I patients casts. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the mean intermolar widths of the two groups. The first, second and third palatal rugae were shorter in class II div 1 patients than in class I patients which was statistically significant. All the patients with Angle′s class I occlusion had good pattern of palatal rugae falling in the score range of 1-3, whereas 22% of the patients with class II div 1 had poor pattern of palatal rugae, with score 4 and 2 patients exhibiting a score of 4 and 5, respectively, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: There was a significant constriction of the palatal rugae in class II div 1 individuals as compared to class I individuals, though they were matched for the same intermolar widths. There was a distinct pattern of palatal rugae between the two groups.

  11. Comparative study of palatal rugae pattern in class II div 1 and class I individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandikota, Chandrasekhar; Venkata, Yudhister Palla; Challa, Padmalatha; Juvvadi, Shubhaker Rao; Mathur, Anirudh

    2012-08-01

    To determine if the palatal rugae have a characteristic pattern in untreated class II div 1 malocclusions compared to normal class I occlusions, and to provide a valuable insight whether palatal rugae can be taken up as additional criteria for classifying malocclusions. The study was conducted on initial maxillary dental casts of 24 individuals with untreated class II div 1 malocclusion with an overjet of minimum of 5mm, of whom 12 were females and 12 were males, with age ranging from 16 to 24 years and compared with Class I patients casts. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean intermolar widths of the two groups. The first, second and third palatal rugae were shorter in class II div 1 patients than in class I patients which was statistically significant. All the patients with Angle's class I occlusion had good pattern of palatal rugae falling in the score range of 1-3, whereas 22% of the patients with class II div 1 had poor pattern of palatal rugae, with score 4 and 2 patients exhibiting a score of 4 and 5, respectively, but this was not statistically significant. There was a significant constriction of the palatal rugae in class II div 1 individuals as compared to class I individuals, though they were matched for the same intermolar widths. There was a distinct pattern of palatal rugae between the two groups.

  12. Substructures developed during creep and cyclic tests of type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Bhargava, R.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Moteff, J.

    1977-09-01

    Substructures developed in tested specimens of a reference heat of type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796) are examined. Data include dislocation densities, cell and subgrain sizes, and carbide precipitate sizes. Testing conditions range for temperatures from 482 to 649/sup 0/C, for stresses from 28 to 241 MPa, and for times from 4 to 15,000 hr. As expected, it is observed that temperature, stress, and time have strong influences on substructure. The change in the dislocation density is too small to measure for conditions which produce less than 1 percent monotonic strain. No cells form, and the major alteration of substructure is the precipitation of M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ carbides on grain boundaries, on twin boundaries, and on some dislocations. At stresses ranging from 69 to 172 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 482 to 593/sup 0/C, the dislocation density increases with increasing stress and is generally higher than expected from studies made at higher temperatures. Dislocations are arranged in fine networks stabilized by carbides. At stresses above 172 MPa and temperatures to 649/sup 0/C, the dislocation density is too great to measure. Cells develop which are finer in size than cells developed at similar stresses but at higher temperatures. Dislocation densities and cell sizes for cyclic specimens are comparable to data for creep-tested specimens. On the basis of the observed substructures, recommendations are made regarding further studies which would assist in the development of constitutive equations for high-temperature inelastic analysis of reactor components.

  13. DETECTION OF LENSING SUBSTRUCTURE USING ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DUSTY GALAXY SDP.81

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren; Blandford, Roger D.; Levasseur, Laurence Perreault; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Dalal, Neal; Wen, Di; Kemball, Athol; Vieira, Joaquin D. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana IL 61801 (United States); Marrone, Daniel P. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Carlstrom, John E. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fassnacht, Christopher D. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Holder, Gilbert P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Marshall, Philip J. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94305 (United States); Murray, Norman [CITA, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2016-05-20

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 10{sup 8.96±0.12} M {sub ⊙} subhalo near one of the images, with a significance of 6.9 σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ∼ 2 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙}, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.

  14. A novel substructure-based topology optimization method for the design of wing structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yu-bo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a substructure-based method dealing with the optimal material layout of the aircraft wing structure system. In this method, the topology optimization design domain of the aircraft wing is divided into multiple subordinate topological units which are called substructure. The material layout of each subordinate topology design unit is found for maximizing the total stiffness under a prescribed material usage constraint by using the Solid Isotropic Microstructures with Penalization (SIMP method. Firstly, the proposed method is implemented to find the optimal material layouts of a high aspect-ratio I-beam. Different division ways and material constraints of the substructure have proven important influence on the total stiffness. The design formulation is applied to the optimization of an aircraft wing. Compared with the traditional one, the proposed method can find a reasonable and clearer material layout of the wing, especially material piled up near the fixed end is pushed toward the tip or the middle of the wing. The optimized design indicates the proposed method can enhance the guidance of topology optimization in finding reasonable stiffener layouts of wing structure.

  15. CLOSE STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN YOUNG, SUBSTRUCTURED, DISSOLVING STAR CLUSTERS: STATISTICS AND EFFECTS ON PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, Jonathan; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Both simulations and observations indicate that stars form in filamentary, hierarchically clustered associations, most of which disperse into their galactic field once feedback destroys their parent clouds. However, during their early evolution in these substructured environments, stars can undergo close encounters with one another that might have significant impacts on their protoplanetary disks or young planetary systems. We perform N-body simulations of the early evolution of dissolving, substructured clusters with a wide range of properties, with the aim of quantifying the expected number and orbital element distributions of encounters as a function of cluster properties. We show that the presence of substructure both boosts the encounter rate and modifies the distribution of encounter velocities compared to what would be expected for a dynamically relaxed cluster. However, the boost only lasts for a dynamical time, and as a result the overall number of encounters expected remains low enough that gravitational stripping is unlikely to be a significant effect for the vast majority of star-forming environments in the Galaxy. We briefly discuss the implications of this result for models of the origin of the solar system, and of free-floating planets. We also provide tabulated encounter rates and orbital element distributions suitable for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation in a clustered environment.

  16. CLOSE STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN YOUNG, SUBSTRUCTURED, DISSOLVING STAR CLUSTERS: STATISTICS AND EFFECTS ON PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Jonathan; Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Both simulations and observations indicate that stars form in filamentary, hierarchically clustered associations, most of which disperse into their galactic field once feedback destroys their parent clouds. However, during their early evolution in these substructured environments, stars can undergo close encounters with one another that might have significant impacts on their protoplanetary disks or young planetary systems. We perform N-body simulations of the early evolution of dissolving, substructured clusters with a wide range of properties, with the aim of quantifying the expected number and orbital element distributions of encounters as a function of cluster properties. We show that the presence of substructure both boosts the encounter rate and modifies the distribution of encounter velocities compared to what would be expected for a dynamically relaxed cluster. However, the boost only lasts for a dynamical time, and as a result the overall number of encounters expected remains low enough that gravitational stripping is unlikely to be a significant effect for the vast majority of star-forming environments in the Galaxy. We briefly discuss the implications of this result for models of the origin of the solar system, and of free-floating planets. We also provide tabulated encounter rates and orbital element distributions suitable for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation in a clustered environment.

  17. Close Stellar Encounters in Young, Substructured, Dissolving Star Clusters: Statistics and Effects on Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jonathan; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-06-01

    Both simulations and observations indicate that stars form in filamentary, hierarchically clustered associations, most of which disperse into their galactic field once feedback destroys their parent clouds. However, during their early evolution in these substructured environments, stars can undergo close encounters with one another that might have significant impacts on their protoplanetary disks or young planetary systems. We perform N-body simulations of the early evolution of dissolving, substructured clusters with a wide range of properties, with the aim of quantifying the expected number and orbital element distributions of encounters as a function of cluster properties. We show that the presence of substructure both boosts the encounter rate and modifies the distribution of encounter velocities compared to what would be expected for a dynamically relaxed cluster. However, the boost only lasts for a dynamical time, and as a result the overall number of encounters expected remains low enough that gravitational stripping is unlikely to be a significant effect for the vast majority of star-forming environments in the Galaxy. We briefly discuss the implications of this result for models of the origin of the solar system, and of free-floating planets. We also provide tabulated encounter rates and orbital element distributions suitable for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation in a clustered environment.

  18. Dynamical Substructures of Galactic Globular Clusters III. NGC 7006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghwan Rhee

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of giant population on dynamical substructures of the central region of NGC 7006, we examine the radial variations of ellipticity and position angle on BV stellar photometry using ellipse fitting technique. Total variations of ellipticity and position angle lie in the range 0.02˜0.06 and -10° ˜ +90°, respectively, from the center out to three times the half light radius. Our ellipse fitting results, after removing giant populations, show that the apparent central dynamical substructures of NGC 7006 are mainly affected by red giant, horizontal branch stars. On the contrary, the contribution of light from subgiant stars to the inner dynamical substructure seems to be insignificant.

  19. Galactic substructure and energetic neutrinos from the sun and earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koushiappas, Savvas M; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-09-18

    We consider the effects of Galactic substructure on energetic neutrinos from annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles that have been captured by the Sun and Earth. Substructure gives rise to a time-varying capture rate and thus to time variation in the annihilation rate and resulting energetic-neutrino flux. However, there may be a time lag between the capture and annihilation rates. The energetic-neutrino flux may then be determined by the density of dark matter in the Solar System's past trajectory, rather than the local density. The signature of such an effect may be sought in the ratio of the direct- to indirect-detection rates.

  20. The comparative validity of MCMI-II and MMPI-2 personality disorder scales with forensic examinees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, E A

    2001-06-01

    This study demonstrated the convergent and discriminant validity of the MMPI-2 and MCMI-II personality disorder scales with forensic examinees. Based on averaged correlational data, the scales performed comparably with previous findings in psychiatric samples. Furthermore, the scales demonstrated increased convergent correlations. Improved convergence was obtained for the Antisocial, Sadistic, Borderline, Schizotypal and Paranoid scales. Decreased convergence on the Dependent and Avoidant scales was also obtained.

  1. Evaluation of a timber column bent substructure after more than 60 years in-service

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Wacker; Xiping Wang; Douglas R. Rammer; William J. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes both the field evaluation and laboratory testing of two timber-column-bent bridge substructures. These substructures served as intermediate pier supports for the East Deer Park Drive Bridge located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. A field evaluation of the bridge substructure was conducted in September 2008. Nondestructive testing was performed with a...

  2. Characterizing common substructures of ligands for GPCR protein subfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguner, Bekir; Hattori, Masahiro; Goto, Susumu; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily is the largest class of proteins with therapeutic value. More than 40% of present prescription drugs are GPCR ligands. The high therapeutic value of GPCR proteins and recent advancements in virtual screening methods gave rise to many virtual screening studies for GPCR ligands. However, in spite of vast amounts of research studying their functions and characteristics, 3D structures of most GPCRs are still unknown. This makes target-based virtual screenings of GPCR ligands extremely difficult, and successful virtual screening techniques rely heavily on ligand information. These virtual screening methods focus on specific features of ligands on GPCR protein level, and common features of ligands on higher levels of GPCR classification are yet to be studied. Here we extracted common substructures of GPCR ligands of GPCR protein subfamilies. We used the SIMCOMP, a graph-based chemical structure comparison program, and hierarchical clustering to reveal common substructures. We applied our method to 850 GPCR ligands and we found 53 common substructures covering 439 ligands. These substructures contribute to deeper understanding of structural features of GPCR ligands which can be used in new drug discovery methods.

  3. Gas expulsion in highly substructured embedded star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, J. P.; Fellhauer, M.; Smith, R.; Dominguez, R.; Dabringhausen, J.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the response of initially substructured, young, embedded star clusters to instantaneous gas expulsion of their natal gas. We introduce primordial substructure to the stars and the gas by simplistically modelling the star formation process so as to obtain a variety of substructure distributed within our modelled star forming regions. We show that, by measuring the virial ratio of the stars alone (disregarding the gas completely), we can estimate how much mass a star cluster will retain after gas expulsion to within 10% accuracy, no matter how complex the background structure of the gas is, and we present a simple analytical recipe describing this behaviour. We show that the evolution of the star cluster while still embedded in the natal gas, and the behavior of the gas before being expelled, are crucial processes that affect the timescale on which the cluster can evolve into a virialized spherical system. Embedded star clusters that have high levels of substructure are subvirial for longer times, enabling them to survive gas expulsion better than a virialized and spherical system. By using a more realistic treatment for the background gas than our previous studies, we find it very difficult to destroy the young clusters with instantaneous gas expulsion. We conclude that gas removal may not be the main culprit for the dissolution of young star clusters.

  4. New Developments for Jet Substructure Reconstruction in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo based studies showcasing several developments for jet substructure reconstruction in CMS. This include Quark/Gluon tagging algorithms using Boosted Decision Trees and Deep Neural Networks, the XCone jet clustering algorithm and the Boosted Event Shape Tagger (BEST).

  5. Full-degrees-of-freedom frequency based substructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozg, Armin; Čepon, Gregor; Boltežar, Miha

    2018-01-01

    Dividing the whole system into multiple subsystems and a separate dynamic analysis is common practice in the field of structural dynamics. The substructuring process improves the computational efficiency and enables an effective realization of the local optimization, modal updating and sensitivity analyses. This paper focuses on frequency-based substructuring methods using experimentally obtained data. An efficient substructuring process has already been demonstrated using numerically obtained frequency-response functions (FRFs). However, the experimental process suffers from several difficulties, among which, many of them are related to the rotational degrees of freedom. Thus, several attempts have been made to measure, expand or combine numerical correction methods in order to obtain a complete response model. The proposed methods have numerous limitations and are not yet generally applicable. Therefore, in this paper an alternative approach based on experimentally obtained data only, is proposed. The force-excited part of the FRF matrix is measured with piezoelectric translational and rotational direct accelerometers. The incomplete moment-excited part of the FRF matrix is expanded, based on the modal model. The proposed procedure is integrated in a Lagrange Multiplier Frequency Based Substructuring method and demonstrated on a simple beam structure, where the connection coordinates are mainly associated with the rotational degrees of freedom.

  6. Face-based selection of corners in 3D substructuring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šístek, Jakub; Čertíková, M.; Burda, P.; Novotný, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 10 (2012), s. 1799-1811 ISSN 0378-4754 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100760702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : domain decomposition * iterative substructuring * BDDC Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.836, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378475411001820

  7. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, H J; Zanichelli, A; Caballero, T; Bouillet, L; Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Fain, O; Fabien, V; Andresen, I

    2017-04-01

    Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1-INH-HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1-INH-AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1-INH-HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6-month intervals during patient follow-up visits. In the icatibant-treated population, 16 patients with C1-INH-AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33-64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70-15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1-INH-AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II versus C1-INH-AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P < 0·001). Median total attack duration was 5·0 h and 9·0 h for patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II, respectively. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  8. Common substructure in otoacoustic emission spectra of land vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Geoffrey A.; Köppl, Christine; Bergevin, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In humans, a similar spectral periodicity is found in all otoacoustic emission types and in threshold fine structure. This may reflect travelling wave phase and reflectance from "structural roughness" in the organ of Corti, or entrainment and suppressive interactions between emissions. To further understand these phenomena, we have examined spontaneous otoacoustic emission (SOAE) spectra in 9 lizard species and the barn owl and find a comparable periodicity. Importantly, the frequency spacing between SOAE peaks was independent of the physical spacing and of the frequency space constants in hearing organs. In 9 lizard species, median spectral gaps lay between 219 and 461 Hz, with no correlation to papillar length (0.3 to 2.1 mm). Similarly in much longer organs: In humans (35 mm), SOAE spectral gaps vary up to 220 Hz at 4 kHz; in the barn owl (11 mm), the median SOAE peak spacing was 395Hz. In the barn owl, a very large space constant between 5 and 10 kHz (5 mm/octave) contrasts with stable SOAE spacing between 1 and 11 kHz. Similar SOAE spectral gaps across all species suggests they represent a basic frequency grating revealing local phase-dependent interactions between active hair cells, a feature not determined by macro-structural anatomy. Emission spectral spacing is independent of cochlear length, of the frequency space constant, of the existence of travelling waves or of a tectorial membrane. Our data suggest that there are greater similarities between frequency selectivity reflected at the level of the hair cells' spontaneous mechanical output (OAEs) than there are at the level of the auditory nerve, where macro-structural anatomy links hair-cell activity differentially to the neural output. Apparently, all hair-cell arrays show a similar frequency substructure not directly replicated in neural tuning.

  9. A Comparative Study on the Sorption Characteristics of Pb(II and Hg(II onto Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Muthulakshmi Andal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption equilibrium and kinetics of Pb(II and Hg(II on coconut shell carbon (CSC were investigated by batch equilibration method. The effects of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, temperature and initial concentration of Pb(II and Hg(II on the activated carbon of coconut shell wastes were studied. Maximum adsorption of Pb(II occurred at pH 4.5 and Hg(II at pH 6. The sorptive mechanism followed the pseudo second order kinetics. The equilibrium data were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The equilibration data fitted well with both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm model. The Langmuir adsorption capacity for Pb(II was greater than Hg(II. The mean free energy of adsorption calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R isotherm model indicated that the adsorption of metal ions was found to be by chemical ion exchange. Thermodynamic parameter showed that the sorption process of Pb(II onto SDC was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic under studied conditions. A comparison was evaluated for the two metals.

  10. Floating substructure flexibility of large-volume 10MW offshore wind turbine platforms in dynamic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, Michael; Hansen, Anders Melchior; Bredmose, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Designing floating substructures for the next generation of 10MW and larger wind turbines has introduced new challenges in capturing relevant physical effects in dynamic simulation tools. In achieving technically and economically optimal floating substructures, structural flexibility may increase to the extent that it becomes relevant to include in addition to the standard rigid body substructure modes which are typically described through linear radiation-diffraction theory. This paper describes a method for the inclusion of substructural flexibility in aero-hydro-servo-elastic dynamic simulations for large-volume substructures, including wave-structure interactions, to form the basis of deriving sectional loads and stresses within the substructure. The method is applied to a case study to illustrate the implementation and relevance. It is found that the flexible mode is significantly excited in an extreme event, indicating an increase in predicted substructure internal loads. (paper)

  11. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of lineages I, II, and III strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hain Torsten

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that causes infections with a high-mortality rate and has served as an invaluable model for intracellular parasitism. Here, we report complete genome sequences for two L. monocytogenes strains belonging to serotype 4a (L99 and 4b (CLIP80459, and transcriptomes of representative strains from lineages I, II, and III, thereby permitting in-depth comparison of genome- and transcriptome -based data from three lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lineage III, represented by the 4a L99 genome is known to contain strains less virulent for humans. Results The genome analysis of the weakly pathogenic L99 serotype 4a provides extensive evidence of virulence gene decay, including loss of several important surface proteins. The 4b CLIP80459 genome, unlike the previously sequenced 4b F2365 genome harbours an intact inlB invasion gene. These lineage I strains are characterized by the lack of prophage genes, as they share only a single prophage locus with other L. monocytogenes genomes 1/2a EGD-e and 4a L99. Comparative transcriptome analysis during intracellular growth uncovered adaptive expression level differences in lineages I, II and III of Listeria, notable amongst which was a strong intracellular induction of flagellar genes in strain 4a L99 compared to the other lineages. Furthermore, extensive differences between strains are manifest at levels of metabolic flux control and phosphorylated sugar uptake. Intriguingly, prophage gene expression was found to be a hallmark of intracellular gene expression. Deletion mutants in the single shared prophage locus of lineage II strain EGD-e 1/2a, the lma operon, revealed severe attenuation of virulence in a murine infection model. Conclusion Comparative genomics and transcriptome analysis of L. monocytogenes strains from three lineages implicate prophage genes in intracellular adaptation and indicate that gene loss and decay may have led to the emergence

  12. Geographic substructure in craniometric estimates of admixture for contemporary American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates heterogeneity in craniometrically-derived estimates of admixture in order to reveal population substructure in a sample of Black, White, Hispanic, and Native American individuals from the FDB. It reports evidence of spatial trends in population-specific patterns of admixture and contextualizes its results in terms of demographic diversity in the United States. The FDB was sampled to capture the population variation within forensic casework, skeletal collections, and the U.S. population-at-large. Individuals were selected for the availability of population identifier, sex, and geographic information. Variation in inferred admixture proportions was evaluated, per population and by sex, for evidence of geographic substructure. Comparative data was sourced from the U.S. Census. This analysis identifies significant associations between the estimated Black, Native American and White component memberships and place of birth and recovery. The sampled populations differ significantly in admixture proportions, in a systematic way. Admixture patterns vary in accordance with the densities and relative proportions of the U.S. census populations. There is considerable variation in admixture estimates, not just between, but notably within, all four of the populations. This substructure can be explained by differences in geography, including regions, divisions, and states. This article's findings agree with census trends and speak broadly to admixture dynamics and ancestral diversity among contemporary Americans. They are also specifically relevant to those cases in the FDB. The presence of subpopulations has implications for cranial research, forensic identification, and studies of biological variation in the United States. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Searches for Exotic Physics in ATLAS using Substructure Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00348133; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The significant increase of the centre-of-mass energy of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from 8 to 13 TeV has allowed the LHC experiments to explore previously inaccessible kinematic regimes in their search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The sensitivity of these searches depends crucially on the efficient reconstruction and identification of hadronic decays of highly energetic (boosted) objects, the decay products of which are typically collimated into a single large jet with a characteristic substructure. In this contribution, the searches conducted by the ATLAS experiment on data recorded during 2015 and 2016 that rely on jet substructure techniques to identify signatures of interest are reviewed. A particular emphasis is placed on recent developments in the rapidly evolving field of boosted object tagging.

  14. Searches for Exotic Physics in ATLAS using substructure techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, Janna Katharina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase of the centre-of-mass energy of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from 8 to 13 TeV has allowed the experiments at the LHC to explore previously inaccessible kinematic regimes in their search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics. The sensitivity of these searches depends crucially on the efficient reconstruction and identification of hadronic decays of highly energetic (boosted) objects, the decay products of which are typically collimated into a single large jet with a characteristic substructure. In this contribution, I review the searches conducted by the ATLAS experiment on data recorded during 2015 and 2016 that rely on substructure techniques to identify signatures of interest. A particular emphasis is placed on recent developments in the rapidly evolving field of boosted object tagging.

  15. Towards an understanding of the correlations in jet substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.; Arce, A.; Asquith, L.; Backovic, M.; Barillari, T.; Menke, S.; Berta, P.; Bertolini, D.; Buckley, A.; Ferrando, J.; Pollard, C.; Butterworth, J.; Cooper, B.; Camacho Toro, R.C.; Picazio, A.; Caudron, J.; El Hedri, S.; Masetti, L.; Chien, Y.T.; Hornig, A.; Lee, C.; Cogan, J.; Nachman, B.; Nef, P.; Schwartzman, A.; Strauss, E.; Swiatlowski, M.; Curtin, D.; Debenedetti, C.; Dolen, J.; Rappoccio, S.; Eklund, M.; Embry, T.; Johns, K.; Lampl, W.; Leone, R.; Loch, P.; O'Grady, F.T.; Rutherfoord, J.; Veatch, J.; Ellis, S.D.; Ferencek, D.; Fleischmann, S.; Freytsis, M.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Schwartz, M.D.; Giulini, M.; Sosa Corral, D.E.; Han, Z.; Soper, D.; Hare, D.; Mishra, K.; Tran, N.V.; Harris, P.; Potter-Landua, B.; Potter, C.; Thomas, C.; Young, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoing, R.; Kogler, R.; Marchesini, I.; Usai, E.; Jankowiak, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Larkoski, A.J.; Marzani, S.; Thaler, J.; Lou, H.K.; Low, M.; Miller, D.W.; Maksimovic, P.; McCarthy, R.; Ovcharova, A.; Rojo, J.; Tseng, J.; Salam, G.P.; Schabinger, R.M.; Shuve, B.; Sinervo, P.; Spannowsky, M.; Thompson, E.; Valery, L.; Vos, M.; Waalewijn, W.; Wacker, J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. This is explored in the context of quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W boson tagging and boosted top quark tagging. (orig.)

  16. Observations of Cluster Substructure using Weakly Lensed Sextupole Moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, John

    2003-08-01

    Since dark matter clusters and groups may have substructure, we have examined the sextupole content of Hubble images looking for a curvature signature in background galaxies that would arise from galaxy-galaxy lensing. We describe techniques for extracting and analyzing sextupole and higher weakly lensed moments. Indications of substructure, via spatial clumping of curved background galaxies, were observed in the image of CL0024 and then surprisingly in both Hubble deep fields. We estimate the dark cluster masses in the deep field. Alternatives to a lensing hypothesis appear improbable, but better statistics will be required to exclude them conclusively. Observation of sextupole moments would then provide a means to measure dark matter structure on smaller length scales than heretofore.

  17. Jet, Missing ET, Jet Substructure and Tagging Performance in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lacey, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS has implemented and commissioned several new techniques to aid in the analysis and interpretation of the complex hadronic final states produced at the LHC. ATLAS’s high resolution longitudinally segmented calorimeters and inner detector allow for the development of advanced clustering and reconstruction algorithms, their validation and calibration in data is made possible with the large 2012 dataset. Included are event-by-event pile-up subtraction methods for jets and missing ET, along with jet tagging, quark-gluon discrimination, and jet substructure techniques for the identification of Lorentz boosted heavy particles. Presented here is a summary of the state of the art jet, missing ET, jet substructure and tagging techniques and tools developed in ATLAS, and their calibrations.

  18. Particle Reconstruction at the LHC using Jet Substructure Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Rathjens, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The LHC-era with √ s = 7 TeV allows for a new energy-regime to be accessed. Heavy mass-resonances up to 3.5 TeV/c 2 are in reach. If such heavy particles decay hadronically to much lighter Standard Model particles such as top, Z or W, the jets of the decay products have a sizeable probability to be merged into a single jet. The result is a boosted jet with substructure. This diploma thesis deals with the phenomena of boosted jets, algorithms to distinguish substructure in these jets from normal hadronization and methods to further improve searches with boosted jets. The impact of such methods is demonstrated in an example analysis of a Z’→ tt¯-scenario on 2 fb −1 of data.

  19. Stick-slip substructure in rapid tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2010-10-15

    The peeling of adhesive tape is known to proceed with a stick-slip mechanism and produces a characteristic ripping sound. The peeling also produces light and when peeled in a vacuum, even X-rays have been observed, whose emissions are correlated with the slip events. Here we present direct imaging of the detachment zone when Scotch tape is peeled off at high speed from a solid surface, revealing a highly regular substructure, during the slip phase. The typical 4-mm-long slip region has a regular substructure of transverse 220 μm wide slip bands, which fracture sideways at speeds over 300 m/s. The fracture tip emits waves into the detached section of the tape at ∼100 m/s, which promotes the sound, so characteristic of this phenomenon.

  20. Constraining the Milky Way potential using the dynamical kinematic substructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoja T.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to constrain the potential of the non-axisymmetric components of the Galaxy using the kinematics of stars in the solar neighborhood. The basic premise is that dynamical substructures in phase-space (i.e. due to the bar and/or spiral arms are associated with families of periodic or irregular orbits, which may be easily identified in orbital frequency space. We use the “observed” positions and velocities of stars as initial conditions for orbital integrations in a variety of gravitational potentials. We then compute their characteristic frequencies, and study the structure present in the frequency maps. We find that the distribution of dynamical substructures in velocity- and frequency-space is best preserved when the integrations are performed in the “true” gravitational potential.

  1. Power spectrum of dark matter substructure in strong gravitational lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Rivero, Ana; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Dvorkin, Cora

    2018-01-01

    Studying the smallest self-bound dark matter structure in our Universe can yield important clues about the fundamental particle nature of dark matter. Galaxy-scale strong gravitational lensing provides a unique way to detect and characterize dark matter substructures at cosmological distances from the Milky Way. Within the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm, the number of low-mass subhalos within lens galaxies is expected to be large, implying that their contribution to the lensing convergence field is approximately Gaussian and could thus be described by their power spectrum. We develop here a general formalism to compute from first principles the substructure convergence power spectrum for different populations of dark matter subhalos. As an example, we apply our framework to two distinct subhalo populations: a truncated Navarro-Frenk-White subhalo population motivated by standard CDM, and a truncated cored subhalo population motivated by self-interacting dark matter (SIDM). We study in detail how the subhalo abundance, mass function, internal density profile, and concentration affect the amplitude and shape of the substructure power spectrum. We determine that the power spectrum is mostly sensitive to a specific combination of the subhalo abundance and moments of the mass function, as well as to the average tidal truncation scale of the largest subhalos included in the analysis. Interestingly, we show that the asymptotic slope of the substructure power spectrum at large wave number reflects the internal density profile of the subhalos. In particular, the SIDM power spectrum exhibits a characteristic steepening at large wave number absent in the CDM power spectrum, opening the possibility of using this observable, if at all measurable, to discern between these two scenarios.

  2. Face-based selection of corners in 3D substructuring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šístek, Jakub; Čertíková, M.; Burda, P.; Novotný, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 10 (2012), s. 1799-1811 ISSN 0378-4754 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100760702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : domain decomposition * iterative substructuring * BDDC Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.836, year: 2012 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S0378475411001820

  3. Correlation between the sub-structure parameters and the manufacturing technologies of metal threads in historical textiles using X-ray line profile analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csiszar, Gabor; Ungar, Tamas [Eoetvoes University Budapest, Department of Materials Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Jaro, Marta [Hungarian National Museum, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-06-15

    Micro-structure can talk when documentation is missing. In ancient Roman or medieval periods, kings, queens, or just rich people decorated their clothes or even their horse covers richly with miniature jewels or metal threads. The origin or the fabrication techniques of these ancient threads is often unknown. Thirteen thread samples made of gold or gilt silver manufactured during the last sixteen hundred years are investigated for the micro-structure in terms of dislocation density, crystallite size, and planar defects. In a few cases, these features are compared with sub-structure of similar metallic threads prepared in modern, twentieth century workshops. The sub-structure is determined by X-ray line profile analysis, using high resolution diffractograms with negligible instrumental broadening. On the basis of the sub-structure parameters, we attempt to assess the metal-threads manufacturing procedures on samples stemming from the fourth century A.D. until now. (orig.)

  4. THE PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF A VAST STELLAR SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF M33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Irwin, Michael J.; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Dotter, Aaron; Ibata, Rodrigo; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2010-01-01

    We have surveyed approximately 40 deg 2 surrounding M33 with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope MegaCam/MegaPrime in the g and i filters out to a maximum projected radius from this galaxy of 50 kpc, as part of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). Our observations are deep enough to resolve the top ∼4 mag of the red giant branch population in this galaxy. We have previously shown that the disk of M33 is surrounded by a large, irregular, low surface brightness substructure. Here, we quantify the stellar populations and structure of this feature using the PAndAS data. We show that the stellar populations of this feature are consistent with an old population with ([Fe/H]) ∼ -1.6 dex and an interquartile range in metallicity of ∼0.5 dex. We construct a surface brightness map of M33 that traces this feature to μ V ≅ 33 mag arcsec -2 . At these low surface brightness levels, the structure extends to projected radii of ∼40 kpc from the center of M33 in both the northwest and southeast quadrants of the galaxy. Overall, the structure has an 'S-shaped' appearance that broadly aligns with the orientation of the H I disk warp. We calculate a lower limit to the integrated luminosity of the structure of -12.7 ± 0.5 mag, comparable to a bright dwarf galaxy such as Fornax or Andromeda II and slightly less than 1% of the total luminosity of M33. Further, we show that there is tentative evidence for a distortion in the distribution of young stars near the edge of the H I disk that occurs at similar azimuth to the warp in H I. The data also hint at a low-level, extended stellar component at larger radius that may be an M33 halo component. We revisit studies of M33 and its stellar populations in light of these new results and discuss possible formation scenarios for the vast stellar structure. Our favored model is that of the tidal disruption of M33 in its orbit around M31.

  5. The Photometric Properties of a Vast Stellar Substructure in the Outskirts of M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Irwin, Michael J.; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Dotter, Aaron; Ibata, Rodrigo; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2010-11-01

    We have surveyed approximately 40 deg2 surrounding M33 with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope MegaCam/MegaPrime in the g and i filters out to a maximum projected radius from this galaxy of 50 kpc, as part of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). Our observations are deep enough to resolve the top ~4 mag of the red giant branch population in this galaxy. We have previously shown that the disk of M33 is surrounded by a large, irregular, low surface brightness substructure. Here, we quantify the stellar populations and structure of this feature using the PAndAS data. We show that the stellar populations of this feature are consistent with an old population with lang[Fe/H]rang ~ -1.6 dex and an interquartile range in metallicity of ~0.5 dex. We construct a surface brightness map of M33 that traces this feature to μ V ~= 33 mag arcsec-2. At these low surface brightness levels, the structure extends to projected radii of ~40 kpc from the center of M33 in both the northwest and southeast quadrants of the galaxy. Overall, the structure has an "S-shaped" appearance that broadly aligns with the orientation of the H I disk warp. We calculate a lower limit to the integrated luminosity of the structure of -12.7 ± 0.5 mag, comparable to a bright dwarf galaxy such as Fornax or Andromeda II and slightly less than 1% of the total luminosity of M33. Further, we show that there is tentative evidence for a distortion in the distribution of young stars near the edge of the H I disk that occurs at similar azimuth to the warp in H I. The data also hint at a low-level, extended stellar component at larger radius that may be an M33 halo component. We revisit studies of M33 and its stellar populations in light of these new results and discuss possible formation scenarios for the vast stellar structure. Our favored model is that of the tidal disruption of M33 in its orbit around M31.

  6. Estimating cardiac substructures exposure from diverse radiotherapy techniques in treating left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Mei, Xin; Chen, Xingxing; Hu, Weigang; Hu, Silong; Zhang, Yingjian; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Xiaomao; Tuan, Jeffrey; Yu, Xiaoli

    2015-05-01

    The study compares the physical and biologically effective doses (BED) received by the heart and cardiac substructures using three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and simple IMRT (s-IMRT) in postoperative radiotherapy for patients with left-sided breast cancer. From October 2008 to February 2009, 14 patients with histologically confirmed left-sided breast cancer were enrolled and underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) simulation and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-CT to outline the left cardiac ventricle (LV) and other substructures. The linear-quadratic model was used to convert the physical doses received by critical points of inner heart to BED.The maximal dose, minimum dose, dose received by 99% of volume (D99) and dose received by 95% of volume (D95) in target areas were significantly better using IMRT and s-IMRT when compared with 3D-CRT (P technique, IMRT and s-IMRT had superior target dose coverage and dose uniformity. IMRT significantly reduced the maximal RT dose to heart and LV. IMRT and s-IMRT techniques did not reduce the volume of heart and LV receiving high doses.

  7. Coefficient of Friction at the Fingertips in Type II Diabetics Compared to Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thames, Beatriz H; Gorniak, Stacey L

    2017-07-01

    Clinical observations suggest that type II diabetes patients are more susceptible to skin changes, which may be associated with reduced coefficient of friction at the fingertips. Reduced coefficient of friction may explain recent reports of fine motor dysfunction in diabetic patients. Coefficient of friction was evaluated using slip force evaluation in a cross-sectional cohort of diabetic patients and age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Covariates of tactile sensation, disease duration, glycated hemoglobin, and clinical diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy were also assessed. A significant decrease in fingertip coefficient of friction in the diabetic group was found as compared to controls. Health state covariates did not alter the strength of between-group differences in statistical analyses. This finding of between-group differences for fingertip frictional properties suggests that causative factors of reported manual motor dysfunction lie in both the distal and proximal portions of the nervous system.

  8. [Functional reeducation of flexor tendons with associated lesions in zone II--comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa, I; Tamaş, Camelia; Perţea, Mihaela; Stamate, T

    2011-01-01

    Regaining satisfactory digital function after flexor tendon laceration and repair has long been one of the most important problems in hand surgery. But optimal therapy is often difficult to ascertain, given the plethora of immediat postoperative protocols published in the scientific literature. The purpose of this study is to compare the functional results between Kleinert, Silfverkiöld, Gratton and Strickland protocol towards evaluate them by interconnection and with the literature. The prospective study enorolled 75 patients who presented in our cabinet consecutives during 1.05.2008-1.12.2010. The subjects were evaluated regarding Total active motion test and Grip strenght test at 12 weeks postoperative. We found the best results to Gratton group, followed by Strickland, Silfverkiöld-May and Kleinert groups. We conclude that, for the tendinous lessions with associated injury (nervs and vessels) in zone II, our first therapeutical indication is to use the Gratton protocol.

  9. Reheating effects in the matter power spectrum and implications for substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Sigurdson, Kris

    2011-01-01

    The thermal and expansion history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis is unknown. We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations through the transition from an early matter era to radiation domination. We treat reheating as the perturbative decay of an oscillating scalar field into relativistic plasma and cold dark matter. After reheating, we find that subhorizon perturbations in the decay-produced dark matter density are significantly enhanced, while subhorizon radiation perturbations are instead suppressed. If dark matter originates in the radiation bath after reheating, this suppression may be the primary cutoff in the matter power spectrum. Conversely, for dark matter produced nonthermally from scalar decay, enhanced perturbations can drive structure formation during the cosmic dark ages and dramatically increase the abundance of compact substructures. For low reheat temperatures, we find that as much as 50% of all dark matter is in microhalos with M > or approx. 0.1M + at z≅100, compared to a fraction of ∼10 -10 in the standard case. In this scenario, ultradense substructures may constitute a large fraction of dark matter in galaxies today.

  10. The investigation of dynamic behaviour of a structure using wave-based substructuring method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Basri Ahmad Burhani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for accurate, efficient and economical methods for the investigation of the dynamic behaviour of large complex structures within the engineering community. The component mode synthesis (CMS has been perceived by the community to be an attractive efficient method for the investigation. However, the method has substantial shortcomings, particularly in analysing a structure having a large number of interface degrees of freedom (DOFs between substructures. This paper puts forward a method, based upon the wave-based substructuring (WBS for the investigation of the dynamic behaviour of a structure with a large number of interface DOFs. The finite element method is used to construct the full finite element model of the structure and NASTRAN 103 is used for the normal modes analysis. A new finite element model of the structure with reduced interface DOFs is constructed based on the WBS. The measurement of the dynamic behaviour of the structure is carried out using free-free boundary conditions and an impact hammer test. The predicted results of the proposed method are then compared with those from the full finite element model and experimental counterparts. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method are discussed and illustrated with two different case studies.

  11. Mapping substructures in dark matter haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebe, Alexander; Gill, Stuart P. D.; Kawata, Daisuke; Gibson, Brad K.

    2005-02-01

    We present a detailed study of the real and integrals-of-motion space distributions of a disrupting satellite obtained from a fully self-consistent high-resolution cosmological simulation of a galaxy cluster. The satellite has been re-simulated using various analytical halo potentials, and we find that its debris appears as a coherent structure in integrals-of-motion space in all models (`live' and analytical potential), although the distribution is significantly smeared for the live host halo. The primary mechanism for the dispersion is the mass growth of the host. However, when quantitatively comparing the effects of `live' and time-varying host potentials, we conclude that not all of the dispersion can be accounted for by the steady growth of the mass of the host. We ascribe the remaining discrepancies to additional effects in the `live' halo such as non-sphericity of the host and interactions with other satellites which have not been modelled analytically.

  12. Periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai, India: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontitis is referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, thereby compromising a patient's ability to maintain a proper diet and affecting the quality of life. Aim: To assess the periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai city. Materials and Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted among diabetics and nondiabetic population attending a government hospital in Chennai city. The WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997 was used to assess the periodontal status. The final sample size of the study was 1000 which included 500 diabetics and 500 nondiabetics. Results: This study showed a significant association between the diabetic status and periodontal disease. The severity of periodontal disease was high among diabetics when compared to nondiabetics. The mean number of sextants with shallow pockets was 0.76 ± 1.20 among diabetics and 0.49 ± 0.86 among nondiabetics (P < 0.0001. The mean number of sextants with Loss of Attachment score of 1 (4–5 mm was 0.67 ± 1.05 among diabetics and 0.32 ± 0.70 among nondiabetics. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more frequent and severe in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetics although there are a number of questions need to be answered in future research.

  13. Fundamentals of substructure dynamics : In-situ experiments and numerical simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Borthwick, Verity

    2010-01-01

    Substructure dynamics incorporate all features occurring on a subgrain-scale. The substructure governs the rheology of a rock, which in turn determines how it will respond to different processes during tectonic changes. This project details an in-depth study of substructural dynamics during post-deformational annealing, using single-crystal halite as an analogue for silicate materials. The study combines three different techniques; in-situ annealing experiments conducted inside the scanning e...

  14. Floating substructure flexibility of large-volume 10MW offshore wind turbine platforms in dynamic calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Michael; Hansen, Anders Melchior; Bredmose, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Designing floating substructures for the next generation of 10MW and larger wind turbines has introduced new challenges in capturing relevant physical effects in dynamic simulation tools. In achieving technically and economically optimal floating substructures, structural flexibility may increase...... to the extent that it becomes relevant to include in addition to the standard rigid body substructure modes which are typically described through linear radiation-diffraction theory. This paper describes a method for the inclusion of substructural flexibility in aero-hydro-servo-elastic dynamic simulations...

  15. Convergence of a Substructuring Method with LaGrange Multipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jan; Tezaur, Radek

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the convergence of a substructuring iterative method with Lagrange multipliers, proposed recently by Farhat and Roux. The method decomposes finite element discretization of an elliptic boundary value problem into Neumann problems on the subdomains and a coarse problem for the subdomain nullspace components. For linear conforming elements and preconditioning by the Dirichlet problems on the subdomains, we prove the asymptotic bound on the condition number C(1 + log(H/h))(sup gamma), gamma = 2 or 3, where h is the characteristic element size and H is the subdomain size.

  16. Dynamic analysis of clustered building structures using substructures methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leimbach, K.R.; Krutzik, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic substructure approach to the building cluster on a common base mat starts with the generation of Ritz-vectors for each building on a rigid foundation. The base mat plus the foundation soil is subjected to kinematic constraint modes, for example constant, linear, quadratic or cubic constraints. These constraint modes are also imposed on the buildings. By enforcing kinematic compatibility of the complete structural system on the basis of the constraint modes a reduced Ritz model of the complete cluster is obtained. This reduced model can now be analyzed by modal time history or response spectrum methods

  17. Mechanical strenght and niobium and niobium-base alloys substructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.; Andrade, A.H.P. de

    1986-01-01

    Niobium and some of its alloys have been used in several fields of technological applications such as the aerospace, chemical and nuclear industries. This is due to its excelent mechanical stringth at high temperatures and reasonable ductility at low temperatures. In this work, we review the main features of the relationship mechanical strength - substructure in niobium and its alloys, taking into account the presence of impurities, the influence of initial thermal and thermo - mechanical treatments as well as the irradiation by energetic particles. (Author) [pt

  18. Dislocation-Disclination Substructures Formed in FCC Polycrystals Under Large Plastic Deformations: Evolution and Association with Flow Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, É. V.; Koneva, N. A.; Trishkina, L. I.

    2014-06-01

    The evolution of dislocation substructures formed in polycrystalline Cu-Al and Cu-Mn alloys undergoing large plastic deformations is studied, using transmission electron microscopy. Microband and fragmented substructures are examined. The Al and Mn alloying element concentrations for which the substructures are formed have been found. The mechanisms involved in the formation of the substructures during the substructural evolution in the alloys subjected to deformation have been revealed. Parameters describing the substructures under study have been measured. The dependence of the parameters on the flow stress has been established.

  19. Substructure boosts to dark matter annihilation from Sommerfeld enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2009-01-01

    The recently introduced Sommerfeld enhancement of the dark matter annihilation cross section has important implications for the detection of dark matter annihilation in subhalos in the Galactic halo. In addition to the boost to the dark matter annihilation cross section from the high densities of these subhalos with respect to the main halo, an additional boost caused by the Sommerfeld enhancement results from the fact that they are kinematically colder than the Galactic halo. If we further believe the generic prediction of the cold dark matter paradigm that in each subhalo there is an abundance of substructure which is approximately self-similar to that of the Galactic halo, then I show that additional boosts coming from the density enhancements of these small substructures and their small velocity dispersions enhance the dark matter annihilation cross section even further. I find that very large boost factors (10 5 to 10 9 ) are obtained in a large class of models. The implications of these boost factors for the detection of dark matter annihilation from dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Galactic halo are such that, generically, they outshine the background gamma-ray flux and are detectable by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  20. Residuated lattices an algebraic glimpse at substructural logics

    CERN Document Server

    Galatos, Nikolaos; Kowalski, Tomasz; Ono, Hiroakira

    2007-01-01

    The book is meant to serve two purposes. The first and more obvious one is to present state of the art results in algebraic research into residuated structures related to substructural logics. The second, less obvious but equally important, is to provide a reasonably gentle introduction to algebraic logic. At the beginning, the second objective is predominant. Thus, in the first few chapters the reader will find a primer of universal algebra for logicians, a crash course in nonclassical logics for algebraists, an introduction to residuated structures, an outline of Gentzen-style calculi as well as some titbits of proof theory - the celebrated Hauptsatz, or cut elimination theorem, among them. These lead naturally to a discussion of interconnections between logic and algebra, where we try to demonstrate how they form two sides of the same coin. We envisage that the initial chapters could be used as a textbook for a graduate course, perhaps entitled Algebra and Substructural Logics. As the book progresses the f...

  1. Replaceable Substructures for Efficient Part-Based Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Han

    2015-05-01

    A popular mode of shape synthesis involves mixing and matching parts from different objects to form a coherent whole. The key challenge is to efficiently synthesize shape variations that are plausible, both locally and globally. A major obstacle is to assemble the objects with local consistency, i.e., all the connections between parts are valid with no dangling open connections. The combinatorial complexity of this problem limits existing methods in geometric and/or topological variations of the synthesized models. In this work, we introduce replaceable substructures as arrangements of parts that can be interchanged while ensuring boundary consistency. The consistency information is extracted from part labels and connections in the original source models. We present a polynomial time algorithm that discovers such substructures by working on a dual of the original shape graph that encodes inter-part connectivity. We demonstrate the algorithm on a range of test examples producing plausible shape variations, both from a geometric and from a topological viewpoint. © 2015 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Demobilization and social reintegration of Brazilian and American troops of World War II: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cesar Alves Ferraz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to discuss the results of a comparative study of demobilization and social reintegration of Brazilian and American veterans of World War II. . In spite of the obvious difference in scale of the two military experiences, I argue that the study of the two experiences can offer new insights into lights on various common issues to both countries: the relationship between the societies and their armed forces, between the governments and their citizens, social and racial inequalities and, finally, the experiences of building welfare state structures during the war and postwar periods. Based on international studies of demobilization and social integration war veterans, the variables that were decisive for the success or failure of adaptation were: a past experiences in the reintegration of war veterans; b the nature and consequences of recruitment of future veterans; c planning by the State and the Armed Forces of procedures for post-bellum demobilization and reintegration; d the implementation of demobilization and the effects within the military institution and in civil society.

  3. Influence of solidification parameters on the cellular sub-structure of tin and some tin alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosavljevic, Dj.

    1965-01-01

    This paper describes an attempt to obtain qualitative data on sub-structure of samples solidified in contact with the cooler. The objective of experiments was to study micro segregation phenomena by investigating the substructure in the solidified sample obtained under experimental conditions which are similar to real solidification conditions

  4. Ballast and Subgrade requirements study : railroad track substructure - design and performance evaluation practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-30

    Earth materials--i.e., soil and rock--form the substructure (ballast, subballast, and subgrade) of all railroad track. In this report, the most suitable technology and design criteria as related to design of the substructure are identified based on a...

  5. Misoriented dislocation substructures and the fracture of polycrystalline Cu-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneva, N. A.; Trishkina, L. I.; Cherkasova, T. V.; Kozlov, E. V.

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of the dislocation substructure in polycrystalline Cu-Al alloys with various grain sizes is studied during deformation to failure. A relation between the fracture of the alloys and the forming misorientation dislocation substructures is revealed. Microcracks in the alloy are found to form along grain boundaries and the boundaries of misoriented dislocation cells and microtwins.

  6. Exploring a heavy charged Higgs using jet substructure in a fully hadronic channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the type-II Two Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM-II a charged Higgs search strategy is presented for the dominant production mode gb→tH± at the 14 TeV LHC. We consider the decay process which includes t→bW± and H±→AW±, and a fully hadronic final state consisting of bbb¯+jets+X. Dictated by the b→sγ constraints which render MH±>480 GeV we study two scenarios in which the charged Higgs mass is 750 GeV and the pseudoscalar Higgs mass is 200 GeV and 500 GeV. In this mass scheme highly boosted final state objects are expected and handled with jet substructure techniques which also acts to suppress the standard model background. A detailed detector analysis is performed, followed by a multivariate analysis involving many kinematic variables to optimize signal to background significance. Finally the LHC search sensitivities for the two scenarios are presented for various integrated luminosities.

  7. Numerical Hermitian Yang-Mills connections and Kähler cone substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Braun, Volker; Ovrut, Burt A.

    2012-01-01

    We further develop the numerical algorithm for computing the gauge connection of slope-stable holomorphic vector bundles on Calabi-Yau manifolds. In particular, recent work on the generalized Donaldson algorithm is extended to bundles with Kähler cone substructure on manifolds with h 1;1 > 1. Since the computation depends only on a one-dimensional ray in the Kähler moduli space, it can probe slope-stability regardless of the size of h 1;1. Suitably normalized error measures are introduced to quantitatively compare results for different directions in Kähler moduli space. A significantly improved numerical integration procedure based on adaptive refinements is described and implemented. Finally, a rapid computational check is proposed for probing the slope-stable stability properties of a given vector bundle.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Antibacterial Evaluation of Oxazolidinones with Fused Heterocyclic C-Ring Substructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Mahesh S; Jain, Nidhi

    2017-11-09

    A series of novel oxazolidinone antibacterials with diverse fused heteroaryl C-rings bearing hydrogen bond donor and hydrogen bond acceptor functionalities were designed and synthesized. The compound with benzoxazinone C-ring substructure ( 8c ) exhibited superior activity compared to linezolid against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Structural modifications at C5-side chain of 8c resulted in identification of several potent compounds ( 12a , 12b , 12g , and 12h ). Selected compounds 8c and 12a showed very good microsomal stability and no CYP 450 liability, thus clearing preliminary safety hurdles. A docking model of 12a binding to 23S rRNA suggested that the increased potency of 12a is due to additional ligand-receptor interaction.

  9. 2D-Qsar for 450 types of amino acid induction peptides with a novel substructure pair descriptor having wider scope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osoda Tsutomu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR analysis of peptides is helpful for designing various types of drugs such as kinase inhibitor or antigen. Capturing various properties of peptides is essential for analyzing two-dimensional QSAR. A descriptor of peptides is an important element for capturing properties. The atom pair holographic (APH code is designed for the description of peptides and it represents peptides as the combination of thirty-six types of key atoms and their intermediate binding between two key atoms. Results The substructure pair descriptor (SPAD represents peptides as the combination of forty-nine types of key substructures and the sequence of amino acid residues between two substructures. The size of the key substructures is larger and the length of the sequence is longer than traditional descriptors. Similarity searches on C5a inhibitor data set and kinase inhibitor data set showed that order of inhibitors become three times higher by representing peptides with SPAD, respectively. Comparing scope of each descriptor shows that SPAD captures different properties from APH. Conclusion QSAR/QSPR for peptides is helpful for designing various types of drugs such as kinase inhibitor and antigen. SPAD is a novel and powerful descriptor for various types of peptides. Accuracy of QSAR/QSPR becomes higher by describing peptides with SPAD.

  10. Cant of Posterior Occlusal Plane in Class II Division 1 Patients - A Comparative Cephalometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bhat

    2010-01-01

    & angular measurements. Statistical analysis was performed by Pearson product - moment correlation & student′s unpaired t- test. This study led us to the conclusion that while treating skeletalclass II division 1 malocclusion with a steep cant in the posterior occlusal plane,control of the vertical dimension of the posterior teeth is extremely important & it is recommended that class II elastics should be used as sparingly as possible.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A; Purvine, Samuel O; Zink, Erika M; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M; Hansel, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Zeiner

    Full Text Available Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a. We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-07-19

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  14. The LabelHash algorithm for substructure matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Drew H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing number of proteins with known structure but unknown function. Determining their function would have a significant impact on understanding diseases and designing new therapeutics. However, experimental protein function determination is expensive and very time-consuming. Computational methods can facilitate function determination by identifying proteins that have high structural and chemical similarity. Results We present LabelHash, a novel algorithm for matching substructural motifs to large collections of protein structures. The algorithm consists of two phases. In the first phase the proteins are preprocessed in a fashion that allows for instant lookup of partial matches to any motif. In the second phase, partial matches for a given motif are expanded to complete matches. The general applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated with three different case studies. First, we show that we can accurately identify members of the enolase superfamily with a single motif. Next, we demonstrate how LabelHash can complement SOIPPA, an algorithm for motif identification and pairwise substructure alignment. Finally, a large collection of Catalytic Site Atlas motifs is used to benchmark the performance of the algorithm. LabelHash runs very efficiently in parallel; matching a motif against all proteins in the 95% sequence identity filtered non-redundant Protein Data Bank typically takes no more than a few minutes. The LabelHash algorithm is available through a web server and as a suite of standalone programs at http://labelhash.kavrakilab.org. The output of the LabelHash algorithm can be further analyzed with Chimera through a plugin that we developed for this purpose. Conclusions LabelHash is an efficient, versatile algorithm for large-scale substructure matching. When LabelHash is running in parallel, motifs can typically be matched against the entire PDB on the order of minutes. The algorithm is able to identify

  15. Comparative study on the adsorption capacity of raw and modified litchi pericarp for removing Cu(II) from solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhenglei; Li, Xiaochen; Tian, Jiyu; Yang, Jili; Sun, Shujuan

    2014-02-15

    The adsorption of Cu(II) onto raw litchi pericarp (LP) and modified litchi pericarp (MLP) as a function of pH, adsorbent dose and contact time, were investigated. Adsorption equilibrium isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics were studied to characterize the adsorption process. Leaching assays were also conducted to evaluate the potential contamination risk of LP and MLP to aqueous systems. The maximum adsorption of Cu(II) onto MLP was occurred at the pH of 6.0, adsorbent dose of 10.0 g/L, and contact time of 60 min, respectively. The adsorption process of Cu(II) onto LP and MLP were described well by both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and the adsorption kinetics of Cu(II) on MLP was pseudo-second-order. Cu(II) adsorption onto LP and MLP are both exothermic, while it is spontaneous for MLP, and non-spontaneous for LP. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cu(II) onto MLP was 23.70 mg/g, which was about 2.7 times higher than that of LP. Additionally, as compared to LP, the leaching amounts of TOC, TN, and TP from MLP were significantly reduced by a percentage of 27.0%, 90.3%, and 35.3%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spin effects from quark and lepton substructure at future machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckl, R.

    1985-01-01

    If quarks and leptons are composite on a distance scale Λ -1 the physics at energies larger than Λ will provide plenty of evidence for the new level of substructure. However, already at energies below Λ compositeness should become manifest in deviations from the standard model due to form factors, residual interactions and, possibly, new ''light'' states. I discuss the virtue of polarized lepton and hadron beams in searching for new interactions and exemplify the production of excited fermions and bosons focussing on spin properties. The detailed of the contact interactions and the spin of the excited fermions and bosons can give important clues on the basic preon structure and dynamics. Phenomenological studies show that polarization asymmetries and angular distributions of decay products probe most sensitively the chiral properties of contact interactions and the spin of new states. Thus, polarized beams and good angular coverage are of great advantage

  17. An algebraic substructuring using multiple shifts for eigenvalue computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Jin Hwan; Jung, Sung Nam; Byun, Do Young; Bai, Zhaojun

    2008-01-01

    Algebraic substructuring (AS) is a state-of-the-art method in eigenvalue computations, especially for large-sized problems, but originally it was designed to calculate only the smallest eigenvalues. Recently, an updated version of AS has been introduced to calculate the interior eigenvalues over a specified range by using a shift concept that is referred to as the shifted AS. In this work, we propose a combined method of both AS and the shifted AS by using multiple shifts for solving a considerable number of eigensolutions in a large-sized problem, which is an emerging computational issue of noise or vibration analysis in vehicle design. In addition, we investigated the accuracy of the shifted AS by presenting an error criterion. The proposed method has been applied to the FE model of an automobile body. The combined method yielded a higher efficiency without loss of accuracy in comparison to the original AS

  18. Testing and evaluation of MHD materials and substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Stand that can simulate the environment in any of the various substructures of a coal fired baseline MHD power plant. After construction was completed, shakedown tests were performed, and the Test Stand was used in a series of tests to simulate the gas stream composition and temperature conditions in the baseline plant's radiant boiler. The tests were conducted in order to study the effect of stoichiometry and staged combustion on the generation of nitrogen oxide. A computer based monitoring and control system was developed that provides safe Test Stand operation, controls the critical parameters, and accurately measures, displays, and logs the necessary physical data. Several computer programs were developed to determine the thermal performance of the Test Stand, and several models were developed to predict the thermal performance of the Test Stand with bare walls and with slag coated walls, and to determine the gas stream properties as a function of temperature and pressure.

  19. ATLAS Standard Model Measurements Using Jet Grooming and Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Boosted topologies allow to explore Standard Model processes in kinematical regimes never tested before. In such LHC challenging environments, standard reconstruction techniques quickly hit the wall. Targeting hadronic final states means to properly reconstruct energy and multiplicity of the jets in the event. In order to be able to identify the decay product of boosted objects, i.e. W bosons, $t\\bar{t}$ pairs or Higgs produced in association with $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, ATLAS experiment is currently exploiting several algorithms using jet grooming and jet substructure. This contribution will mainly cover the following ATLAS measurements: $t\\bar{t}$ differential cross section production and jet mass using the soft drop procedure. Standard Model measurements offer the perfect field to test the performances of new jet tagging techniques which will become even more important in the search for new physics in highly boosted topologies.”

  20. Decorrelated Jet Substructure Tagging using Adversarial Neural Networks

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    We describe a strategy for constructing a neural network jet substructure tagger which powerfully discriminates boosted decay signals while remaining largely uncorrelated with the jet mass. This reduces the impact of systematic uncertainties in background modeling while enhancing signal purity, resulting in improved discovery significance relative to existing taggers. The network is trained using an adversarial strategy, resulting in a tagger that learns to balance classification accuracy with decorrelation. As a benchmark scenario, we consider the case where large-radius jets originating from a boosted Z' decay are discriminated from a background of nonresonant quark and gluon jets. We show that in the presence of systematic uncertainties on the background rate, our adversarially-trained, decorrelated tagger considerably outperforms a conventionally trained neural network, despite having a slightly worse signal-background separation power. We generalize the adversarial training technique to include a paramet...

  1. E-learning interventions are comparable to user's manual in a randomized trial of training strategies for the AGREE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durocher Lisa D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice guidelines (PGs are systematically developed statements intended to assist in patient and practitioner decisions. The AGREE II is the revised tool for PG development, reporting, and evaluation, comprised of 23 items, two global rating scores, and a new User's Manual. In this study, we sought to develop, execute, and evaluate the impact of two internet interventions designed to accelerate the capacity of stakeholders to use the AGREE II. Methods Participants were randomized to one of three training conditions. 'Tutorial'--participants proceeded through the online tutorial with a virtual coach and reviewed a PDF copy of the AGREE II. 'Tutorial + Practice Exercise'--in addition to the Tutorial, participants also appraised a 'practice' PG. For the practice PG appraisal, participants received feedback on how their scores compared to expert norms and formative feedback if scores fell outside the predefined range. 'AGREE II User's Manual PDF (control condition'--participants reviewed a PDF copy of the AGREE II only. All participants evaluated a test PG using the AGREE II. Outcomes of interest were learners' performance, satisfaction, self-efficacy, mental effort, time-on-task, and perceptions of AGREE II. Results No differences emerged between training conditions on any of the outcome measures. Conclusions We believe these results can be explained by better than anticipated performance of the AGREE II PDF materials (control condition or the participants' level of health methodology and PG experience rather than the failure of the online training interventions. Some data suggest the online tools may be useful for trainees new to this field; however, this requires further study.

  2. Comparative chemical analysis of commercial creosotes and solvent refined coal-II materials by high resolution gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-06-01

    The chemical composition of a commercially available creosote was compared to a direct coal liquefaction product, i.e., solvent refined coal-II fuel oil blend (SRC-II FOB) using high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC). In addition, hydrogenated products of these materials were studied. Samples were fractionated by chemical class on neutral alumina. Those fractions previously shown to be the most mutagenic and tumorigenic in laboratory bioassays of coal-derived materials were analyzed and compared by HRGC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Individual components were tentatively identified and quantitated. Although similar chemical components were present in the creosote and SRC-II FOB fractions studied, the creosotes had higher concentrations of heavy molecular weight materials and a lower ratio of alkylated to parent polycyclic aromatic compounds than the coal liquefaction products. The creosote samples also had a significantly higher concentration of components which eluted in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) chemical class fraction. Amino-substituted PAH were present in both nonhydrogenated coal liquid and creosote materials. The creosote and SRC-II FOB crudes and nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (NPAC) chemical class fractions expressed similar microbial mutagenicity. Based on chemical analysis data, the predicted tumorigenic potency of the creosote in laboratory bioassay systems would be equivalent to or greater than the SRC-II FOB. 16 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Automated measurement of serum thyroxine with the ''AIRA II,'' as compared with competitive protein binding and radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, M.G.; Johnson, L.V.R.

    1978-01-01

    Two conventional serum thyroxine assays, run in separate laboratories, one by competitive protein binding and one by radioimmunoassay, were used to evaluate the automated ARIA II (Becton Dickinson Immunodiagnostics) serum thyroxine assay. Competitive protein binding as compared to ARIA II with 111 clinical serum samples gave a slope of 1.04 and a correlation coefficient of 0.94. The radioimmunoassay comparison to ARIA II with 53 clinical serum samples gave a slope of 1.05 and a correlation coefficient of 0.92. The ARIA II inter-assay coefficient of variation for 10 replicates of low, medium, and high thyroxine serum samples was 6.2, 6.0, and 2.9%, respectively, with an inter-assay coefficient of variation among 15 different assays of 15.5, 10.1, and 7.9%. The automated ARIA II, with a 2.2-min cycle per sample, gives results that compare well with those by manual methodology

  4. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XIX. TOMOGRAPHY OF MILKY WAY SUBSTRUCTURES IN THE NGVS FOOTPRINT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokhorst, Deborah; Starkenburg, Else; Navarro, Julio F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1, Canada (Canada); McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. [National Research Council, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Peng, Eric W. [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [CEA/IRFU/SAP, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Guhathakurta, Puragra, E-mail: dml@uvic.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a deep u*giz survey targeting the Virgo Cluster of galaxies at 16.5 Mpc. This survey provides high-quality photometry over an ∼100 deg{sup 2} region straddling the constellations of Virgo and Coma Berenices. This sightline through the Milky Way is noteworthy in that it intersects two of the most prominent substructures in the Galactic halo: the Virgo overdensity (VOD) and Sagittarius stellar stream (close to its bifurcation point). In this paper, we use deep u*gi imaging from the NGVS to perform tomography of the VOD and Sagittarius stream using main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars as a halo tracer population. The VOD, whose centroid is known to lie at somewhat lower declinations (α ∼ 190°, δ ∼ −5°) than is covered by the NGVS, is nevertheless clearly detected in the NGVS footprint at distances between ∼8 and 25 kpc. By contrast, the Sagittarius stream is found to slice directly across the NGVS field at distances between 25 and 40 kpc, with a density maximum at ≃35 kpc. No evidence is found for new substructures beyond the Sagittarius stream, at least out to a distance of ∼90 kpc—the largest distance to which we can reliably trace the halo using MSTO stars. We find clear evidence for a distance gradient in the Sagittarius stream across the ∼30° of sky covered by the NGVS and its flanking fields. We compare our distance measurements along the stream with those predicted by leading stream models.

  5. Ceramide content is higher in type I compared to type II fibers in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ditte Bech; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Larsen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated fiber-type-specific muscle ceramide content in obese subjects and type 2 diabetes patients. Two substudies, one which compared type 2 diabetes patients to both lean- and obese BMI-matched subjects and the other study which compared lean body-matched post-obese, obese...... index was higher in lean compared to type 2 diabetes patients and obese controls. Also in control and post-obese subjects, a higher insulin sensitivity was observed compared to obese subjects. Ceramide content was consistently higher in type I than in type II muscle fibers and higher in deltoideus than...... vastus lateralis across all groups. No significant differences between groups were observed in ceramide content in either of the two substudies. In human skeletal muscle, ceramide content was higher in type I than in type II fibers in patients with type 2 diabetes and in obese subjects, but overall...

  6. Comparative Study on Biosorption of Zn(II, Cu(II and Cr(VI from Textile Dye Effluent Using Sawdust and Neem Leaves Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gopalakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the low cost adsorbents such as sawdust and neem leaves powder in removing the heavy metals like Zn(II, Cu(II and Cr(VI from textile dye effluent are reported. Adsorbent dosage, pH and contact time were taken as parameters for biosorption study. Removal of heavy metal ions from the textile dye effluent increases with increase in adsorbent dosage. The influence of pH and contact time was maximum for removal of heavy metal ions. The presence of the decreased heavy metal toxicity in the treated textile dye effluent was evaluated through the percentage of seed germination of Vigna mungo L. On comparison, sawdust was found to be good adsorbent compared to neem leaves powder.

  7. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, A.; van Beekveld, M.; Beenakker, W.; Caron, S.; Hendriks, L.

    2015-01-01

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV . We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the

  8. Placental iodothyronine deiodinase III and II ratios, mRNA expression compared to enzyme activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulp, M. R.; de Vijlder, J. J.; Ris-Stalpers, C.

    1998-01-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases III and II (D3 and D2) specific enzyme activities in human placenta both decrease with gestational age. The relation of the enzyme activities with their respective mRNA expression was investigated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR on human placenta mRNA. To investigate if RT-PCR

  9. Dislocation Substructures Formed After Fracture of Deformed Polycrystalline Cu-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneva, N. A.; Trishkina, L. I.; Cherkasova, T. V.

    2017-08-01

    The paper deals with the dislocation substructure of polycrystalline FCC alloys modified by plastic deformation at a distance from the area of the specimen fracture. Observations are performed using the transmission electron microscopy. Cu-Al alloys with grain size ranging from 10 to 240 μm are studied in this paper. The parameters of the dislocation substructure are measured and their variation is determined by the increasing distance from the fracture area. It is shown how the grain size influences these processes. The different dislocation substructures which determine the specimen fracture at a mesocscale level are found herein.

  10. Jet Substructure at the Tevatron and LHC: New results, new tools, new benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    Altheimer, A; Asquith, L; Brooijmans, G; Butterworth, J; Campanelli, M; Chapleau, B; Cholakian, A E; Chou, J P; Dasgupta, M; Davison, A; Dolen, J; Ellis, S D; Essig, R; Fan, J J; Field, R; Fregoso, A; Gallicchio, J; Gershtein, Y; Gomes, A; Haas, A; Halkiadakis, E; Halyo, V; Hoeche, S; Hook, A; Hornig, A; Huang, P; Izaguirre, E; Jankowiak, M; Kribs, G; Krohn, D; Larkoski, A J; Lath, A; Lee, C; Lee, S J; Loch, P; Maksimovic, P; Martinez, M; Miller, D W; Plehn, T; Prokofiev, K; Rahmat, R; Rappoccio, S; Safonov, A; Salam, G P; Schumann, S; Schwartz, M D; Schwartzman, A; Seymour, M; Shao, J; Sinervo, P; Son, M; Soper, D E; Spannowsky, M; Stewart, I W; Strassler, M; Strauss, E; Takeuchi, M; Thaler, J; Thomas, S; Tweedie, B; Vasquez Sierra, R; Vermilion, C K; Villaplana, M; Vos, M; Wacker, J; Walker, D; Walsh, J R; Wang, L-T; Wilbur, S; Yavin, I; Zhu, W

    2012-01-01

    In this report we review recent theoretical progress and the latest experimental results in jet substructure from the Tevatron and the LHC. We review the status of and outlook for calculation and simulation tools for studying jet substructure. Following up on the report of the Boost 2010 workshop, we present a new set of benchmark comparisons of substructure techniques, focusing on the set of variables and grooming methods that are collectively known as "top taggers". To facilitate further exploration, we have attempted to collect, harmonise, and publish software implementations of these techniques.

  11. Prognostic relevance of gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma: gemistocytic component and MR imaging features compared to non-gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin [Inje University, Busan Paik Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Ho Sung; Lee, Ji Ye; Jung, Seung Chai; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Soo Jeong [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    To determine if gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma (GemA) and its MR imaging characteristics are associated with a shorter time-to-progression (TTP) compared with non-gemistocytic grade II astrocytoma (non-GemA). We enrolled 78 patients who were followed up more than 5 years (29 pathologically proven GemA and 49 non-GemA) during a 10-year period. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) and clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and MR imaging features were analyzed as possible prognostic factors of high-grade transformation, and multivariate analysis of TTP was performed using Cox proportional modeling. GemA showed more frequent high-grade features than non-GemA, including diffusion restriction (P <.001), increased choline/creatine (P =.02), and increased choline/NAA ratio (P =.015). Patients with GemA had a significantly shorter median TTP (53.1 vs 68 months; P <.001). A gemistocytic histopathology (hazard ratio = 3.42; P =.015) and low ADC (hazard ratio = 3.61; P =.001) were independently associated with a shorter TTP. GemA can present with MR imaging findings mimicking high-grade glioma at initial diagnosis and transforms to high-grade disease earlier than non-GemA. Low ADC on DWI might be useful in stratifying the risk of progression in patients with grade II astrocytoma. (orig.)

  12. Exploring Milkyway Halo Substructures with Large-Area Sky Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ting [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, our understanding of the Milky Way has been improved thanks to large data sets arising from large-area digital sky surveys. The stellar halo is now known to be inhabited by a variety of spatial and kinematic stellar substructures, including stellar streams and stellar clouds, all of which are predicted by hierarchical Lambda Cold Dark Matter models of galaxy formation. In this dissertation, we first present the analysis of spectroscopic observations of individual stars from the two candidate structures discovered using an M-giant catalog from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The follow-up observations show that one of the candidates is a genuine structure which might be associated with the Galactic Anticenter Stellar Structure, while the other one is a false detection due to the systematic photometric errors in the survey or dust extinction in low Galactic latitudes. We then presented the discovery of an excess of main sequence turn-off stars in the direction of the constellations of Eridanus and Phoenix from the first-year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) – a five-year, 5,000 deg2 optical imaging survey in the Southern Hemisphere. The Eridanus-Phoenix (EriPhe) overdensity is centered around l ~ 285° and b ~ -60° and the Poisson significance of the detection is at least 9σ. The EriPhe overdensity has a cloud-like morphology and the extent is at least ~ 4 kpc by ~ 3 kpc in projection, with a heliocentric distance of about d ~ 16 kpc. The EriPhe overdensity is morphologically similar to the previously-discovered Virgo overdensity and Hercules-Aquila cloud. These three overdensities lie along a polar plane separated by ~ 120° and may share a common origin. In addition to the scientific discoveries, we also present the work to improve the photometric calibration in DES using auxiliary calibration systems, since the photometric errors can cause false detection in first the halo substructure. We present a detailed description of the two

  13. Analysis of the state of the art of precast concrete bridge substructure systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Precasting of bridge substructure components holds potential for accelerating the construction of bridges,reducing : impacts to the traveling public on routes adjacent to construction sites, improving bridge durability and hence service : life, and r...

  14. On the role of interphase barrier and substructural strengthening in deformation processed composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funkenbusch, P.D. (Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Courtney, T.H. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science)

    1989-10-01

    The authors discuss deformation processed composites. They are complex materials, and it is unlikely that any single strengthening mechanism/model can account for all aspects of their behavior. The work hardening model is consistent with some aspects of microstructural evolution and can be used to predict composite strengths as they depend on interphase spacing, phase volume fraction and deformation strain. In addition, the model predicts other important qualitative aspects of DPCM behavior. The work hardening model, however, can not be relied on to provide a detailed picture of dislocation substructure. Recent attempts to model DPCM strengths solely in terms of interphase barrier strengthening appear implausible. This is a consequence of disregarding substructural development and the importance of substructure in determining composite strengths. Nor is such a mechanism able to explain many other aspects of DPCM behavior. The interphase barrier mechanism is most plausible when processing produces a composite without strong substructural obstacles.

  15. Characterization of Chloride thresholds in Florida coastal concrete bridge substructures : final report, February 11, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-11

    Sea water induced reinforcing steel corrosion often results in high maintenance costs and can be service life limiting for concrete bridge substructure elements in marine environments. In the present research, a novel piling type specimen assembly an...

  16. Comparing M31 and Milky Way satellites: The extended star formation histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Vía Láctea s/n., E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bernard, Edouard J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Boylan-Kolchin, Michael [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Cassisi, Santi [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy); Cole, Andrew A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Irwin, Mike [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Universit de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universit, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Mayer, Lucio [Institut für Theoretische Physik, University of Zurich, Zürich (Switzerland); Navarro, Julio F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; M{sub V} = –12.0; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; M{sub V} = –7.5; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ∼5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.

  17. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY X-RAY SUBSTRUCTURES IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Lima Neto, Gastao B.; Lagana, Tatiana F. [Departamento de Astronomia, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-02-20

    We present a new method to quantify substructures in clusters of galaxies, based on the analysis of the intensity of structures. This analysis is done in a residual image that is the result of the subtraction of a surface brightness model, obtained by fitting a two-dimensional analytical model ({beta}-model or Sersic profile) with elliptical symmetry, from the X-ray image. Our method is applied to 34 clusters observed by the Chandra Space Telescope that are in the redshift range z in [0.02, 0.2] and have a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) greater than 100. We present the calibration of the method and the relations between the substructure level with physical quantities, such as the mass, X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cluster redshift. We use our method to separate the clusters in two sub-samples of high- and low-substructure levels. We conclude, using Monte Carlo simulations, that the method recuperates very well the true amount of substructure for small angular core radii clusters (with respect to the whole image size) and good S/N observations. We find no evidence of correlation between the substructure level and physical properties of the clusters such as gas temperature, X-ray luminosity, and redshift; however, analysis suggest a trend between the substructure level and cluster mass. The scaling relations for the two sub-samples (high- and low-substructure level clusters) are different (they present an offset, i.e., given a fixed mass or temperature, low-substructure clusters tend to be more X-ray luminous), which is an important result for cosmological tests using the mass-luminosity relation to obtain the cluster mass function, since they rely on the assumption that clusters do not present different scaling relations according to their dynamical state.

  18. Revealing dark matter substructure with anisotropies in the diffuse gamma-ray background

    OpenAIRE

    Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of gamma-ray emission from Galactic dark matter annihilation is likely to be detected as a contribution to the diffuse gamma-ray background. I show that dark matter substructure in the halo of the Galaxy induces characteristic anisotropies in the diffuse background that could be used to determine the small-scale dark matter distribution. I calculate the angular power spectrum of the emission from dark matter substructure for several models of the subhalo population, and show that...

  19. Statistics of magnification perturbations by substructure in the cold dark matter cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bertone, Gianfranco; /Fermilab; Chen, Jacqueline; /KICP,

    2005-06-01

    We study the statistical properties of magnification perturbations by substructures in strong lensed systems using linear perturbation theory and an analytical substructure model including tidal truncation and a continuous substructure mass spectrum. We demonstrate that magnification perturbations are dominated by perturbers found within a tidal radius of an image, and that sizable magnification perturbations may arise from small, coherent contributions from several substructures within the lens halo. We find that the root-mean-square (rms) fluctuation of the magnification perturbation is {approx}10% to {approx}20% and both the average and rms perturbations are sensitive to the mass spectrum and density profile of the perturbers. Interestingly,we find that relative to a smooth model of the same mass, the average magnification in clumpy models is lower (higher) than that in smooth models for positive (negative) parity images. This is opposite from what is observed if one assumes that the image magnification predicted by the best-fit smooth model of a lens is a good proxy for what the observed magnification would have been if substructures were absent. While it is possible for this discrepancy to be resolved via nonlinear perturbers, we argue that a more likely explanation is that the assumption that the best-fit lens model is a good proxy for the magnification in the absence of substructure is not correct. We conclude that a better theoretical understanding of the predicted statistical properties of magnification perturbations by CDM substructure is needed in order to affirm that CDM substructures have been unambiguously detected.

  20. Application of Resin Transfer Molding to the Manufacture of Wind Turbine Blade Substructures. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedley, C. W.; Ritter, W. J.; Ashwill, T.

    2001-07-26

    The U.S. has generally lacked the capability for an iterative process of detailed structural design, manufacturing, and testing at the full blade level to achieve specific structural performance, cost, and weight targets. This project examined the effects that different composites processing methods had on the performance of representative blade substructures. In addition, the results of the testing of these substructures was used to validate NuMAD, the design tool developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  1. A New Method to Quantify X-Ray Substructures in Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Lima Neto, Gastão B.; Laganá, Tatiana F.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new method to quantify substructures in clusters of galaxies, based on the analysis of the intensity of structures. This analysis is done in a residual image that is the result of the subtraction of a surface brightness model, obtained by fitting a two-dimensional analytical model (β-model or Sérsic profile) with elliptical symmetry, from the X-ray image. Our method is applied to 34 clusters observed by the Chandra Space Telescope that are in the redshift range z in [0.02, 0.2] and have a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) greater than 100. We present the calibration of the method and the relations between the substructure level with physical quantities, such as the mass, X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cluster redshift. We use our method to separate the clusters in two sub-samples of high- and low-substructure levels. We conclude, using Monte Carlo simulations, that the method recuperates very well the true amount of substructure for small angular core radii clusters (with respect to the whole image size) and good S/N observations. We find no evidence of correlation between the substructure level and physical properties of the clusters such as gas temperature, X-ray luminosity, and redshift; however, analysis suggest a trend between the substructure level and cluster mass. The scaling relations for the two sub-samples (high- and low-substructure level clusters) are different (they present an offset, i.e., given a fixed mass or temperature, low-substructure clusters tend to be more X-ray luminous), which is an important result for cosmological tests using the mass-luminosity relation to obtain the cluster mass function, since they rely on the assumption that clusters do not present different scaling relations according to their dynamical state.

  2. Comparative cephalometric study of Class II malocclusion treatment with Pendulum and Jones jig appliances followed by fixed corrective orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayara Paim; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues; Pinzan, Arnaldo; Janson, Guilherme; de Freitas, Marcos Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to cephalometrically compare the skeletal and dentoalveolar effects in the treatment of Class II malocclusion with Pendulum and Jones jig appliances, followed by fixed corrective orthodontics, and to compare such effects to a control group. The sample was divided into three groups. Group 1: 18 patients treated with Pendulum, Group 2: 25 patients treated with Jones jig, and Group 3: 19 young subjects with untreated Class II malocclusions and initial mean age of 12.88 years. The chi-square test was applied to assess severity and gender distribution. Groups 1 and 2 were compared to the control group by means of the one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests in order to differentiate treatment changes from those occurred by craniofacial growth. There were no significant changes among the three groups with regard to the components of the maxilla and the mandible, maxillomandibular relationship, cephalometric and tegumental pattern. Buccal tipping of mandibular incisors was significantly greater in the experimental groups and increased mesial angulation of the maxillary second molars was found in the Jones jig group. In the experimental groups, dental relationship, overbite and overjet were corrected. It can be stated that the distalization achieved its purpose of correcting the Class II.

  3. Pd-nanoparticles cause increased toxicity to kiwifruit pollen compared to soluble Pd(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranza, Anna; Leopold, Kerstin; Maier, Marina; Taddei, Anna Rita; Scoccianti, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, endpoints including in vitro pollen performance (i.e., germination and tube growth) and lethality were used as assessments of nanotoxicity. Pollen was treated with 5-10 nm-sized Pd particles, similar to those released into the environment by catalytic car exhaust converters. Results showed Pd-nanoparticles altered kiwifruit pollen morphology and entered the grains more rapidly and to a greater extent than soluble Pd(II). At particulate Pd concentrations well below those of soluble Pd(II), pollen grains experienced rapid losses in endogenous calcium and pollen plasma membrane damage was induced. This resulted in severe inhibition and subsequent cessation of pollen tube emergence and elongation at particulate Pd concentrations as low as 0.4 mg L -1 . Particulate Pd emissions related to automobile traffic have been increasing and are accumulating in the environment. This could seriously jeopardize in vivo pollen function, with impacts at an ecosystem level. - Nanoparticulate Pd - which resembles emissions from automobile catalysts - affects pollen to a higher extent than soluble Pd.

  4. Pd-nanoparticles cause increased toxicity to kiwifruit pollen compared to soluble Pd(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speranza, Anna, E-mail: anna.speranza@unibo.i [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Bologna, via Irnerio 42, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Leopold, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.leopold@lrz.tu-muenchen.d [Arbeitsgruppe fuer Analytische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Maier, Marina, E-mail: marina.maier@ch.tum.d [Arbeitsgruppe fuer Analytische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Taddei, Anna Rita, E-mail: artaddei@unitus.i [CIME, Universita della Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Scoccianti, Valeria, E-mail: valeria.scoccianti@uniurb.i [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Uomo, dell' Ambiente e della Natura, Universita di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    In the present study, endpoints including in vitro pollen performance (i.e., germination and tube growth) and lethality were used as assessments of nanotoxicity. Pollen was treated with 5-10 nm-sized Pd particles, similar to those released into the environment by catalytic car exhaust converters. Results showed Pd-nanoparticles altered kiwifruit pollen morphology and entered the grains more rapidly and to a greater extent than soluble Pd(II). At particulate Pd concentrations well below those of soluble Pd(II), pollen grains experienced rapid losses in endogenous calcium and pollen plasma membrane damage was induced. This resulted in severe inhibition and subsequent cessation of pollen tube emergence and elongation at particulate Pd concentrations as low as 0.4 mg L{sup -1}. Particulate Pd emissions related to automobile traffic have been increasing and are accumulating in the environment. This could seriously jeopardize in vivo pollen function, with impacts at an ecosystem level. - Nanoparticulate Pd - which resembles emissions from automobile catalysts - affects pollen to a higher extent than soluble Pd.

  5. Differences in attractiveness comparing female profile modifications of Class II Division 1 malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Aylin Gözde; Iskender, Sebahat Yesim; Kuitert, Reinder; Papadopoulou, Alexandra K; Dalci, Kerem; Darendeliler, M Ali; Dalci, Oyku

    2017-10-01

    Our objective was to study the perceptions of laypeople for digital alterations and the amount of nasolabial angle increase that is tolerable and how much chin-neck length increase is needed to achieve a desirable profile in Class II Division 1 women with mandibular retrognathia. The profile image of a white woman with a Class II Division 1 mandibular rethrognatic profile was digitally modified to create 6 images: 3 with stepwise increased nasolabial angles of 113°, 121°, and 129°, and 3 with stepwise increased chin-neck distances of 51, 54, and 57 mm. These images were assessed and ranked by 155 white laypeople. The baseline profile was judged significantly as the least attractive. A nasolabial angle of 129° was judged as unattractive as the baseline profile. Profiles with a chin-neck length of 54 and 57 mm were equally judged as most attractive. The untreated (baseline) profile was found to be least esthetic, as well as the profile with the largest nasolabial angle. Nasolabial angle increases up to 121° seem to be acceptable. Profiles simulating a chin-neck length increase as produced by surgery seem to be most favored. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis and application of European genetic substructure using 300 K SNP information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available European population genetic substructure was examined in a diverse set of >1,000 individuals of European descent, each genotyped with >300 K SNPs. Both STRUCTURE and principal component analyses (PCA showed the largest division/principal component (PC differentiated northern from southern European ancestry. A second PC further separated Italian, Spanish, and Greek individuals from those of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry as well as distinguishing among northern European populations. In separate analyses of northern European participants other substructure relationships were discerned showing a west to east gradient. Application of this substructure information was critical in examining a real dataset in whole genome association (WGA analyses for rheumatoid arthritis in European Americans to reduce false positive signals. In addition, two sets of European substructure ancestry informative markers (ESAIMs were identified that provide substantial substructure information. The results provide further insight into European population genetic substructure and show that this information can be used for improving error rates in association testing of candidate genes and in replication studies of WGA scans.

  7. Improving substructure identification accuracy of shear structures using virtual control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Tingqiang; Li, Hui

    2018-02-01

    Substructure identification is a powerful tool to identify the parameters of a complex structure. Previously, the authors developed an inductive substructure identification method for shear structures. The identification error analysis showed that the identification accuracy of this method is significantly influenced by the magnitudes of two key structural responses near a certain frequency; if these responses are unfavorable, the method cannot provide accurate estimation results. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to improve the substructure identification accuracy by introducing a virtual control system (VCS) into the structure. A virtual control system is a self-balanced system, which consists of some control devices and a set of self-balanced forces. The self-balanced forces counterbalance the forces that the control devices apply on the structure. The control devices are combined with the structure to form a controlled structure used to replace the original structure in the substructure identification; and the self-balance forces are treated as known external excitations to the controlled structure. By optimally tuning the VCS’s parameters, the dynamic characteristics of the controlled structure can be changed such that the original structural responses become more favorable for the substructure identification and, thus, the identification accuracy is improved. A numerical example of 6-story shear structure is utilized to verify the effectiveness of the VCS based controlled substructure identification method. Finally, shake table tests are conducted on a 3-story structural model to verify the efficacy of the VCS to enhance the identification accuracy of the structural parameters.

  8. Systematic benchmark of substructure search in molecular graphs - From Ullmann to VF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrlich Hans-Christian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching for substructures in molecules belongs to the most elementary tasks in cheminformatics and is nowadays part of virtually every cheminformatics software. The underlying algorithms, used over several decades, are designed for the application to general graphs. Applied on molecular graphs, little effort has been spend on characterizing their performance. Therefore, it is not clear how current substructure search algorithms behave on such special graphs. One of the main reasons why such an evaluation was not performed in the past was the absence of appropriate data sets. Results In this paper, we present a systematic evaluation of Ullmann’s and the VF2 subgraph isomorphism algorithms on molecular data. The benchmark set consists of a collection of 1235 SMARTS substructure expressions and selected molecules from the ZINC database. The benchmark evaluates substructures search times for complete database scans as well as individual substructure-molecule pairs. In detail, we focus on the influence of substructure formulation and size, the impact of molecule size, and the ability of both algorithms to be used on multiple cores. Conclusions The results show a clear superiority of the VF2 algorithm in all test scenarios. In general, both algorithms solve most instances in less than one millisecond, which we consider to be acceptable. Still, in direct comparison, the VF2 is most often several folds faster than Ullmann’s algorithm. Additionally, Ullmann’s algorithm shows a surprising number of run time outliers.

  9. An algebraic sub-structuring method for large-scale eigenvalue calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.; Bai, Z.; Li, X.; Lee, L.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.

    2004-01-01

    We examine sub-structuring methods for solving large-scale generalized eigenvalue problems from a purely algebraic point of view. We use the term 'algebraic sub-structuring' to refer to the process of applying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a large sparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectral components are extracted and combined to provide approximate solutions to the original problem. We are interested in the question of which spectral components one should extract from each sub-structure in order to produce an approximate solution to the original problem with a desired level of accuracy. Error estimate for the approximation to the smallest eigenpair is developed. The estimate leads to a simple heuristic for choosing spectral components (modes) from each sub-structure. The effectiveness of such a heuristic is demonstrated with numerical examples. We show that algebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve a generalized eigenvalue problem arising from the simulation of an accelerator structure. One interesting characteristic of this application is that the stiffness matrix produced by a hierarchical vector finite elements scheme contains a null space of large dimension. We present an efficient scheme to deflate this null space in the algebraic sub-structuring process

  10. MetMaxStruct: a Tversky-similarity-based strategy for analysing the (substructural similarities of drugs and endogenous metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve O'Hagan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies compared the molecular similarity of marketed drugs and endogenous human metabolites (endogenites, using a series of fingerprint-type encodings, variously ranked and clustered using the Tanimoto (Jaccard similarity coefficient (TS. Because this gives equal weight to all parts of the encoding (thence to different substructures in the molecule it may not be optimal, since in many cases not all parts of the molecule will bind to their macromolecular targets. Unsupervised methods cannot alone uncover this. We here explore the kinds of differences that may be observed when the TS is replaced – in a manner more equivalent to semi-supervised learning – by variants of the asymmetric Tversky (TV similarity, that includes  and  parameters. Results. Dramatic differences are observed in (i the drug-endogenite similarity heatmaps, (ii the cumulative ‘greatest similarity’ curves, and (iii the fraction of drugs with a Tversky similarity to a metabolite exceeding a given value when the Tversky  and  parameters are varied from their Tanimoto values. The same is true when the sum of the  and  parameters is varied. A clear trend towards increased endogenite-likeness of marketed drugs is observed when  or adopt values nearer the extremes of their range, and when their sum is smaller. The kinds of molecules exhibiting the greatest similarity to two interrogating drug molecules (chlorpromazine and clozapine also vary in both nature and the values of their similarity as  and  are varied. The same is true for the converse, when drugs are interrogated with an endogenite. The fraction of drugs with a Tversky similarity to a molecule in a library exceeding a given value depends on the contents of that library, and  and  may be ‘tuned’ accordingly, in a semi-supervised manner. At some values of  and  drug discovery library candidates or natural products can look much more like (i.e. have

  11. Comparative evaluation of microleakage in class II cavities restored with Ceram X and Filtek P-90: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Bogra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Polymerization shrinkage in composite resins is responsible for microleakage. Methacrylate-based composite resins have linear reactive groups resulting in high polymerization shrinkage. A recently introduced composite resin Filtek P90 is based on siloxanes and oxiranes which polymerize by cationic "ring opening" polymerization resulting in reduced polymerization shrinkage. Objectives: Aim of this study was to compare microleakage in class II cavities restored with a nanoceramic restorative (Ceram X and a silorane composite (Filtek P90. Materials and Methods: Standardized class II box type cavities were prepared on mesial (Groups Ia and IIa and distal (Groups Ib and IIb surfaces of twenty extracted permanent molar teeth with gingival floor ending 1 mm coronal and apical to the cementoenamel junction, respectively. The teeth in Group Ia and Ib were restored with Ceram X and Group IIa and IIb with Filtek P90. The specimens were thermocycled and microleakage evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were statistically analyzed using Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test at the 0.05 level of significance. Results: Mean microleakage score of group la and lb was 1 ± 2.260 and 2.8 ± 1.229, respectively. And that of group Ila and llb was 0.2 ± .869 and 0.3 ± .588, respectively. When groups I and II were compared, results were statistically significant (P<0.05. Conclusion: It was concluded that silorane-based composite may be a better substitute for methacrylate-based composites.

  12. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  13. Study of a 900 MW PWR by a substructuring method - Spectral response to a seismic excitation and comparison with a beam model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, G.; Bianchini-Burlot, B.; Bosselut, D.; Jacquart, G. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Viallet, E. [Electricite de France (EDF), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a three dimensional Finite Element Model (FEM) of a 900 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) which is described at first: its modal behaviour is computed by a sub-structuring method based upon a Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) method. All the substructures taken into account in the model are described. One model with equivalent beams is also described. Then, different approaches to take into account the fluid/structure interaction in the different models are investigated. Results of the modal analysis of each model are compared to each other and with experimental measures. This modal analysis is then used to compute the non linear and linear response of the PWR due to a seismic excitation. (author) 4 refs.

  14. Comparative clinical characteristics of depression in bipolar affective disorders types I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tyuvina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the clinical features of depression within bipolar affective disorders types I and II (BADI and BADII.Patients and methods. An examination was made in 100 depressive patients, including 25 with BADI, 37 with BADII, and 38 with recurrent depressive disorder (RDD (a comparison group. The patients' status was evaluated in accordance with the ICD-10 and DSM-V affective disorder criteria, by using a specially developed questionnaire.Results. BAD-related depression has features distinguishing it from RDD: sexual preference (men; an earlier age of disease onset; a shorter duration, but a higher frequency of exacerbations; a greater tendency for the continuum; a more marked decrease in social and family adaptation; development in people with predominantly hyperthymic premorbid; more frequently a family history of affective disorders, schizophrenia, and alcoholism; high comorbidity with metabolic diseases and psychoactive substance abuse; worse health more commonly in autumn and winter; a predominant anxious affect and an obviously decreasing interest in the structure of depression; a higher incidence of atypical sleep, appetite, and weight disorders; high suicidal activity; higher motor retardation (in BADI; relatively small involvement of somatic complaints in BAD I and frequent panic attacks in BADII.Conclusion. Knowledge of the specific features of BAD-related depression will be able to make a more accurate differential diagnosis and to perform more effective treatment in these patients.

  15. Correlation of substructure with mechanical properties of plastically deformed reactor structural materials. Progress report, January 1, 1974--December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moteff, J.

    1976-01-01

    Ratio of the subgrain boundary dislocations to those contributing to creep deformation was found to be independent of applied stress and creep strain after the steady-state creep stage is reached. The observed cell or subgrain sizes are correlated with flow stress in Type 304 ss, and the deformation rate-stress relation obeys the equation epsilon =β lambda 3 (sigma/sub T//E)/sub n/ exp (-Q/sub c//RT), where lambda = subgrain size, sigma/sub T/ = effective true stress, E = Young modulus, and Q/sub c/ = 85 kcal/mole. Well-developed subgrains were observed in TEM on 304 ss tested in creep at 704 0 C. Role of twin boundary-grain boundary intersections in microcracking behavior of 304 ss deformed in slow tension and creep at 650 0 C was investigated. Grain shape analysis show that intragranular deformation becomes more predominant in the grains with the larger intercept distances, and that grain boundary sliding becomes important as the strain rate decreases. RT mechanical properties of austenitic ss are enhanced by subgrains formed during high-temperature deformation. The substructural development during high-temperature low-cycle fatigue of 304 ss was studied using TEM. Fatigue properties of Incoloy 800 tested in bend and push-pull modes are being compared. Effects of hold time on fatigue substructure and fracture of 304 ss are being studied. 31 figures, 53 references

  16. Virtual interface substructure synthesis method for normal mode analysis of super-large molecular complexes at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuehui; Sun, Yunxiang; An, Xiongbo; Ming, Dengming

    2011-10-14

    Normal mode analysis of large biomolecular complexes at atomic resolution remains challenging in computational structure biology due to the requirement of large amount of memory space and central processing unit time. In this paper, we present a method called virtual interface substructure synthesis method or VISSM to calculate approximate normal modes of large biomolecular complexes at atomic resolution. VISSM introduces the subunit interfaces as independent substructures that join contacting molecules so as to keep the integrity of the system. Compared with other approximate methods, VISSM delivers atomic modes with no need of a coarse-graining-then-projection procedure. The method was examined for 54 protein-complexes with the conventional all-atom normal mode analysis using CHARMM simulation program and the overlap of the first 100 low-frequency modes is greater than 0.7 for 49 complexes, indicating its accuracy and reliability. We then applied VISSM to the satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV, 78,300 atoms) and to F-actin filament structures of up to 39-mer, 228,813 atoms and found that VISSM calculations capture functionally important conformational changes accessible to these structures at atomic resolution. Our results support the idea that the dynamics of a large biomolecular complex might be understood based on the motions of its component subunits and the way in which subunits bind one another. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  17. Discovering Higgs Bosons of the MSSM using Jet Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Roy, Tuhin S.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We present a qualitatively new approach to discover Higgs bosons of the MSSM at the LHC using jet substructure techniques applied to boosted Higgs decays. These techniques are ideally suited to the MSSM, since the lightest Higgs boson overwhelmingly decays to b{bar b} throughout the entire parameter space, while the heavier neutral Higgs bosons, if light enough to be produced in a cascade, also predominantly decay to b{bar b}. The Higgs production we consider arises from superpartner production where superpartners cascade decay into Higgs bosons. We study this mode of Higgs production for several superpartner hierarchies: m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}},{sub {tilde B}} > m{sub h} + {mu}; m{tilde q};m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}},{sub {tilde B}} > m {sub h,H,A} + {mu}; and m{sub {tilde q}},m{sub {tilde g}} > m{sub {tilde W}} > m{sub h} + {mu} with m{sub {tilde B}} {approx} {mu}. In these cascades, the Higgs bosons are boosted, with pT > 200 GeV a large fraction of the time. Since Higgs bosons appear in cascades originating from squarks and/or gluinos, the cross section for events with at least one Higgs boson can be the same order as squark/gluino production. Given 10 fb{sup -1} of 14 TeV LHC data, with m{sub {tilde q}} {approx}< 1 TeV, and one of the above superpartner mass hierarchies, our estimate of S{radical} B of the Higgs signal is sufficiently high that the b{bar b} mode can become the discovery mode of the lightest Higgs boson of the MSSM.

  18. Discovering Higgs bosons of the MSSM using jet substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kribs, Graham D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Spannowsky, Michael; Martin, Adam

    2010-01-01

    We present a qualitatively new approach to discover Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) at the LHC using jet substructure techniques applied to boosted Higgs decays. These techniques are ideally suited to the MSSM, since the lightest Higgs boson overwhelmingly decays to bb throughout the entire parameter space, while the heavier neutral Higgs bosons, if light enough to be produced in a cascade, also predominantly decay to bb. The Higgs production we consider arises from superpartner production where superpartners cascade decay into Higgs bosons. We study this mode of Higgs production for several superpartner hierarchies: m q -tilde, m g -tilde>m W -tilde ,B -tilde>m h +μ; m q -tilde, m g -tilde>m W -tilde ,B -tilde>m h,H,A +μ; and m q -tilde, m g -tilde>m W -tilde>m h +μ with m B -tilde≅μ. In these cascades, the Higgs bosons are boosted, with p T >200 GeV a large fraction of the time. Since Higgses appear in cascades originating from squarks and/or gluinos, the cross section for events with at least one Higgs can be the same order as squark/gluino production. Given 10 fb -1 of 14 TeV LHC data, with m q -tilde < or approx. 1 TeV, and one of the above superpartner mass hierarchies, our estimate of S/√(B) of the Higgs signal is sufficiently high that the bb mode can become the discovery mode of the lightest Higgs boson of the MSSM.

  19. Mass-stiffness substructuring of an elastic metasurface for full transmission beam steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk; Lee, Jun Kyu; Seung, Hong Min; Kim, Yoon Young

    2018-03-01

    The metasurface concept has a significant potential due to its novel wavefront-shaping functionalities that can be critically useful for ultrasonic and solid wave-based applications. To achieve the desired functionalities, elastic metasurfaces should cover full 2π phase shift and also acquire full transmission within subwavelength scale. However, they have not been explored much with respect to the elastic regime, because the intrinsic proportionality of mass-stiffness within the continuum elastic media causes an inevitable trade-off between abrupt phase shift and sufficient transmission. Our goal is to engineer an elastic metasurface that can realize an inverse relation between (amplified) effective mass and (weakened) stiffness in order to satisfy full 2π phase shift as well as full transmission. To achieve this goal, we propose a continuum elastic metasurface unit cell that is decomposed into two substructures, namely a mass-tuning substructure with a local dipolar resonator and a stiffness-tuning substructure composed of non-resonant multiply-perforated slits. We demonstrate analytically, numerically, and experimentally that this unique substructured unit cell can satisfy the required phase shift with high transmission. The substructuring enables independent tuning of the elastic properties over a wide range of values. We use a mass-spring model of the proposed continuum unit cell to investigate the working mechanism of the proposed metasurface. With the designed metasurface consisting of substructured unit cells embedded in an aluminum plate, we demonstrate that our metasurface can successfully realize anomalous steering and focusing of in-plane longitudinal ultrasonic beams. The proposed substructuring concept is expected to provide a new principle for the design of general elastic metasurfaces that can be used to efficiently engineer arbitrary wave profiles.

  20. Usher's Syndrome Type II: A Comparative Study of Genetic Mutations and Vestibular System Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Gagliardi, Silvia; Iozzo, Nicola; Plateroti, Rocco; Mariottini, Alessandro; Torricelli, Francesca

    2017-11-01

    Objective Usher's syndrome type II (USH2) is characterized by moderate to profound congenital hearing loss, later onset of retinitis pigmentosa, and normal vestibular function. Recently, a study investigating the vestibular function of USH2 patients demonstrated a pathologic response to vestibular tests. In this cross-sectional study we performed vestibular tests of a group patients with genetic diagnosis of USH2 syndrome to demonstrate if vestibular damage is present in USH2 patients. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods Mutated genes of 7 patients with a clinical diagnosis of USH2 were evaluated. Vestibular function was investigated by audiometry, Fitzgerald-Hallpike caloric vestibular testing, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (C-VEMPs), ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (O-VEMPs), and video head impulse test (v-HIT). Results Genetic tests confirmed the USH2 diagnosis in 5 of 7 patients examined, with 1 patient reporting a unique mutation on genetic tests. Four (80%) of the 5 patients with a genetic diagnosis of USH2 showed pathological O-VEMPs. Two patients (40%) reported bilateral absent or abnormal values of C-VEMPs. The superior semicircular canal presented a significant deficit in 2 (40%) patients. The same 2 cases showed a pathologic response of the v-HIT of the horizontal semicircular canal. Finally, the posterior semicircular canal presented a significant deficit in 4 (40.0%) patients. Conclusion A vestibular evaluation with vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and v-HIT seems to identify latent damage to the vestibular receptors of USH2 patients.

  1. The angular power spectrum of the diffuse gamma-ray background as a probe of Galactic dark matter substructure

    OpenAIRE

    Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    Dark matter annihilation in Galactic substructure produces diffuse gamma-ray emission of remarkably constant intensity across the sky, and in general this signal dominates over the smooth halo signal at angles greater than a few tens of degrees from the Galactic Center. The large-scale isotropy of the emission from substructure suggests that it may be difficult to extract this Galactic dark matter signal from the extragalactic gamma-ray background. I show that dark matter substructure induces...

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Orthosis Augmented by Either Stretching or Stretching and Strengthening for Stage II Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Jeff; Neville, Christopher; Tome, Josh; Flemister, Adolph

    2015-09-01

    The value of strengthening and stretching exercises combined with orthosis treatment in a home-based program has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of augmenting orthosis treatment with either stretching or a combination of stretching and strengthening in participants with stage II tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction (TPTD). Participants included 39 patients with stage II TPTD who were recruited from a medical center and then randomly assigned to a strengthening or stretching treatment group. Excluding 3 dropouts, there were 19 participants in the strengthening group and 17 in the stretching group. The stretching treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with stretching exercises. The strengthening treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with the stretching and strengthening exercises. The main outcome measures were self-report (ie, Foot Function Index and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment) and isometric deep posterior compartment strength. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test for differences between groups at 6 and 12 weeks after starting the exercise programs. Both groups significantly improved in pain and function over the 12-week trial period. The self-report measures showed minimal differences between the treatment groups. There were no differences in isometric deep posterior compartment strength. A moderate-intensity, home-based exercise program was minimally effective in augmenting orthosis wear alone in participants with stage II TPTD. Level I, prospective randomized study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Comparing the utility of DSM-5 Section II and III antisocial personality disorder diagnostic approaches for capturing psychopathic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Maples, Jessica L; MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    The current study compares the 2 diagnostic approaches (Section II vs. Section III) included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) for diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in terms of their relations with psychopathic traits and externalizing behaviors (EBs). The Section III approach to ASPD, which is more explicitly trait-based than the Section II approach, also includes a psychopathy specifier (PS) that was created with the goal of making the diagnosis of ASPD more congruent with psychopathy. In a community sample of individuals currently receiving mental health treatment (N = 106), ratings of the 2 DSM-5 diagnostic approaches were compared in relation to measures of psychopathy, as well as indices of EBs. Both DSM-5 ASPD approaches were significantly related to the psychopathy scores, although the Section III approach accounted for almost twice the amount of variance when compared with the Section II approach. Relatively little of this predictive advantage, however, was due to the PS, as these traits manifested little evidence of incremental validity in relation to existing psychopathy measures and EBs, with the exception of a measure of fearless dominance. Overall, the DSM-5 Section III diagnostic approach for ASPD is more convergent with the construct of psychopathy, from which ASPD was originally derived. These improvements, however, are due primarily to the new trait-based focus in the Section III ASPD diagnosis rather than the assessment of personality dysfunction or the inclusion of additional "psychopathy-specific" traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Comparative clinical evaluation of removable partial dentures made of two different materials in Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundal, Maninder; Madan, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Cast Chromium Cobalt alloy has been the material of choice for fabricating Removable Partial Dentures (RPDs) but has certain drawbacks. Newer materials like the flexible Nylon based Super Polyamide have been introduced to overcome these drawbacks. The present study has compared the above two materials for nine clinical parameters. The study was carried out on 30 patients presenting with a Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation who were divided into two equal groups and clinically assessed. Statistically significant results were obtained in favor of flexible RPDs, in the parameters of 'aesthetics' and 'overall patient satisfaction'. Both groups showed more or less similar values for 'frequency of fracture of the prosthesis during usage' with the incidence being slightly higher for patients wearing the cast RPDs. The clinical parameters of 'oral soft tissue tolerance', 'gingival health', 'periodontal health' and 'adaptability in areas with undercut' were statistically at par for all the 30 patients thus suggesting the comparable biocompatibility of the two materials. The highlight of this study was the relative ease in fabrication of the flexible RPDs as compared to the cast RPDs. Based on the favorable clinical results of this study, it can be summarized that the flexible RPDs is a viable alternative to cast RPDs in Kennedy Applegate class II partially edentulous situation in the short term.

  5. In vitro microleakage of Biodentine as a dentin substitute compared to Fuji II LC in cervical lining restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Anne; Eschrich, Geoffroy; Dejou, Jacques; About, Imad

    2012-12-01

    1) To evaluate the marginal sealing efficacy of Biodentine at the cervical margins of approximal cavities placed in molars; 2) to evaluate and compare the use of Biodentine in combination with resin-based adhesives and a resin composite, compared with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Fuji II LC). Sixty approximal cavities were prepared on mesial and distal surfaces of 30 extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly assigned into 6 groups of 10 cavities each: (G1) Biodentine, (G2) Fuji II LC as a filling material, (G3) Biodentine as a base + Optibond Solo Plus + silane + Filtek Z250, (G4) as in G3 without silane, (G5) Biodentine as a base + Septobond SE + Filtek Z250, (G6) Fuji II LC as a base + Optibond Solo Plus + Filtek Z250. The materials were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. Biodentine required no dentin or enamel surface conditioning treatment. The teeth were thermocycled 2500x (5°C to 55°C). The specimens were then sealed with a 1-mm window around the marginal interface. Samples were immersed in a 50% w/v silver nitrate solution and exposed to a photo developing solution. The teeth were embedded in resin (Sody 33) and sectioned through the restorations. The silver penetration was directly measured using a light microscope. The results were expressed as ordinal scores from 0 to 3 at cervical, interfacial, and enamel margins. The data were analyzed with the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Games Howell, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests (p Biodentine or Fuji II LC)/resin composite interfaces. Statistically significant differences were observed between G5 (median score = 2.0) and the other groups (median score = 1.0) for the enamel margins. Statistically significant differences were found between enamel and dentin cervical margins in G2 (enamel median score = 1.0; dentin median score = 1.5) and G5 (enamel median score = 2.0; dentin median score = 1.0). Within the limits of this in vitro study, Biodentine as dentin substitute in

  6. Substructure elucidation and chemical shift estimation using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectral database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Osamu; Hayamizu, Kikuko; Yanagisawa, Masaru

    1989-01-01

    A computer system for substructure elucidation and chemical shift estimation by the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra is described. In this system, substructures in a molecule can be elucidated by specifying chemical shift values or ranges, and conversely chemical shift values can be estimated by specifying substructures for both 1 H- and 13 C-NMR data. The retrieval of data can be performed interactively between 1 H- and 13 C-NMR data. It is possible to estimate all chemical shift values for a compound by giving its chemical structure. The search file for these purposes is created for signals (or signal groups) from a large number of 1 H- and 13 C-NMR spectra in our database. The information contained in the search file consists of substructures and the corresponding chemical shift values. A line notation system has been developed to plot chemical structures with spectral assignments of NMR signals and to extract substructures corresponding to particular chemical shift values. (author)

  7. Comparative analyses of postoperative complications and prognosis of different surgical procedures in stage II endometrial carcinoma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin H

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hongmei Yin,1 Ting Gui2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Binzhou Medical University Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the impact of surgical resection extent on the postoperative complications and the prognosis in patients with stage II endometrial cancer. Methods: A total of 54 patients were retrospectively reviewed, 35 patients underwent subradical hysterectomy and 19 patients received radical hysterectomy, both with simultaneous bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy. Results: Comparing the surgical outcomes in subradical hysterectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, there were no significant differences in operative time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay. After surgery, 37.1% vs 36.8% patients received postoperative radiotherapy in the subradical hyster­ectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, without statistically significant difference. As for postoperative complications, the early postoperative complication rate in patients who underwent subradical hysterectomy was 14.3%, significantly lower than that in patients submitted to radical hysterectomy (14.3% vs 42.1%, with P=0.043. However, there was no significant difference in late postoperative complication rate between the two surgical procedures. Regarding the clinical prognosis, patients receiving the subradical hysterectomy showed similar survival to their counterparts undergoing the radical procedures. The relapse rate was 5.71% vs 5.26%, respectively, without significant difference. There were no deaths in both surgical groups. Conclusion: For stage II endometrial carcinoma, subradical hysterectomy presented with less early postoperative complications and similar survival duration and recurrence

  8. Current standards for syphilis treatment: comparing the russian and foreign guidelines (part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Krasnoselskikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of penicillin has been a breakthrough in the treatment of syphilis. For 70 years, penicillin remains the preferred drug for the treatment of all forms of the disease; its effectiveness has been proven by wide experience gained from clinical observations. However, a very limited number of published meta-analyzes, systematic reviews and data from randomized controlled trials on the comparative assessment of the effectiveness of various antibiotics and treatment regimens are currently available. Some aspects of syphilis treatment are insufficiently developed, particularly, the treatment schedules for neurosyphilis, syphilis in pregnancy, syphilis in HIV-infected individuals and persons allergic to penicillin. There are disagreements in the assessment of the clinical significance of serofast state after a course of antibiotic therapy. There is no uniform approach to the management of patients with treatment failures. This article compares the Russian standards for syphilis treatment set out in the «Federal guidelines for the management of patients with syphilis» with the current European recommendations of the International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections (IUSTI and the recommendations of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. The peculiarities of these guidelines, their strengths and shortcomings, as well as controversial issues of syphilis therapy are discussed. The differences between the domestic and foreign recommendations are more significant in the section concerning the treatment of syphilis than in the section of diagnosis.

  9. Comparative Evaluation Study of II2 O2 Mouthrinse in Gingivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghighati F

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria! plaque is an essential factor of gingival and periodontal disease."nThe ability of chemical piaque control agent to prevent plaque formation is well documented compare with"nother mechanical plaque removal methods. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical effects of"nShore choice mouth rinse (H2 O2, 0.1% with a placebo."nFollowing a period of 4 weeks, 20 subjects were allocated to two treatment groups."nDuring this period of time, they rinsed twice a day with either a placebo mouth rinse or the Shor choice."nPlaque Index (PI and bleeding on probing index (BOP were recorded three days after scaling and root"nplanning. These indecies were rechecked 2 and 4 weeks after rinsing the subject's mouth by mouth rinse and"nplacebo. Results indicated that although there were no significant differences between test and control"ngroups, a reduction of PI and BOP were found in different stages of this study."nThe clinical data obtained in this study are thus consistent with the previous data, however, care should be"ntaken to extrapolate these results.

  10. Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy, Part II: Comparing the literature with practice across diverse clinical populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Felicity; Wigram, Tony; Stott, Dave

    2009-01-01

    is occurring in clinical practice. Generally, songs were composed with individual clients in single sessions, with lyrics created prior to the music. Clinicians had a significant role in creating the music with improvised and pre-determined musical structures being equally employed.  Chi-square or comparable....... Responses to a 21-question on-line survey were obtained from 419 professional music therapists practicing in 29 countries which focused on approaches to songwriting within their practice with a single clinical population. Results suggest that in general, the literature provides good representation for what......  Exact tests (Fisher-Freeman-Halton) were applied to the data and significant associations were found according to clinical populations particularly with respect the number of sessions required to complete a song, approaches to composing lyrics and music, the context with which songwriting was employed...

  11. COSA II Further benchmark exercises to compare geomechanical computer codes for salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, M.J.S.; Knowles, N.C.

    1989-01-01

    Project COSA (COmputer COdes COmparison for SAlt) was a benchmarking exercise involving the numerical modelling of the geomechanical behaviour of heated rock salt. Its main objective was to assess the current European capability to predict the geomechanical behaviour of salt, in the context of the disposal of heat-producing radioactive waste in salt formations. Twelve organisations participated in the exercise in which their solutions to a number of benchmark problems were compared. The project was organised in two distinct phases: The first, from 1984-1986, concentrated on the verification of the computer codes. The second, from 1986-1988 progressed to validation, using three in-situ experiments at the Asse research facility in West Germany as a basis for comparison. This document reports the activities of the second phase of the project and presents the results, assessments and conclusions

  12. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biganzoli, Laura, E-mail: laura.biganzoli@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Racanella, Gaia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Marras, Roberto [Unicalce S.p.A., R and D Department, Via Tonio da Belledo 30, 23900 Lecco (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  13. Genetic admixture and population substructure in Guanacaste Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoming Wang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The population of Costa Rica (CR represents an admixture of major continental populations. An investigation of the CR population structure would provide an important foundation for mapping genetic variants underlying common diseases and traits. We conducted an analysis of 1,301 women from the Guanacaste region of CR using 27,904 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs genotyped on a custom Illumina InfiniumII iSelect chip. The program STRUCTURE was used to compare the CR Guanacaste sample with four continental reference samples, including HapMap Europeans (CEU, East Asians (JPT+CHB, West African Yoruba (YRI, as well as Native Americans (NA from the Illumina iControl database. Our results show that the CR Guanacaste sample comprises a three-way admixture estimated to be 43% European, 38% Native American and 15% West African. An estimated 4% residual Asian ancestry may be within the error range. Results from principal components analysis reveal a correlation between genetic and geographic distance. The magnitude of linkage disequilibrium (LD measured by the number of tagging SNPs required to cover the same region in the genome in the CR Guanacaste sample appeared to be weaker than that observed in CEU, JPT+CHB and NA reference samples but stronger than that of the HapMap YRI sample. Based on the clustering pattern observed in both STRUCTURE and principal components analysis, two subpopulations were identified that differ by approximately 20% in LD block size averaged over all LD blocks identified by Haploview. We also show in a simulated association study conducted within the two subpopulations, that the failure to account for population stratification (PS could lead to a noticeable inflation in the false positive rate. However, we further demonstrate that existing PS adjustment approaches can reduce the inflation to an acceptable level for gene discovery.

  14. Design studies for the transmission simulator method of experimental dynamic substructuring.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayes, Randall Lee; Arviso, Michael

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, a successful method for generating experimental dynamic substructures has been developed using an instrumented fixture, the transmission simulator. The transmission simulator method solves many of the problems associated with experimental substructuring. These solutions effectively address: (1) rotation and moment estimation at connection points; (2) providing substructure Ritz vectors that adequately span the connection motion space; and (3) adequately addressing multiple and continuous attachment locations. However, the transmission simulator method may fail if the transmission simulator is poorly designed. Four areas of the design addressed here are: (1) designating response sensor locations; (2) designating force input locations; (3) physical design of the transmission simulator; and (4) modal test design. In addition to the transmission simulator design investigations, a review of the theory with an example problem is presented.

  15. Jets, $E_T^{miss}$, and Jet Substructure and Tagging Performance in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Swiatlowski, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS has implemented and commissioned several new techniques for the analysis and interpretation of hadronic final states at the LHC. These include event-by-event pile-up subtraction algorithms for jets and $E_T^{miss}$, jet substructure, quark-gluon discrimination, and jet tagging tools for the identification of boosted heavy particles. The excellent ATLAS detector capabilities, in particular its high resolution longitudinally segmented calorimeter and inner detector, have enabled the development of complex clustering and calibration algorithms for the reconstruction of jets, $E_T^{miss}$, and jet substructure, and its validation and calibration in data using large datasets collected during 2012. A summary of the most modern jet, $E_T^{miss}$, and jet substructure and tagging tools developed in ATLAS, and their calibrations are presented.

  16. Improving jet substructure performance in ATLAS with unified tracking and calorimeter inputs

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, Roland; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Jet substructure techniques play a critical role in ATLAS in searches for new physics, and are being utilized in the trigger. They become increasingly important in detailed studies of the Standard Model, among them the inclusive search for the Higgs boson produced with high transverse momentum decaying to a bottom-antibottom quark pair. To date, ATLAS has mostly focused on the use of calorimeter-based jet substructure, which works well for jets initiated by particles with low to moderate boost, but which lacks the angular resolution needed to resolve the desired substructure in the highly-boosted regime. We will present a novel approach designed to mitigate the calorimeter angular resolution limitations, thus providing superior performance to prior methods. Similar to previous methods, the superior angular resolution of the tracker is combined with information from the calorimeters. However, the new method is fundamentally different, as it correlates low-level objects as tracks and individual energy deposits ...

  17. Improving jet substructure performance in ATLAS using Track-CaloClusters

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Jet substructure techniques play a critical role in ATLAS in searches for new physics, are increasingly important in measurements of the Standard Model, and are being utilized in the trigger. To date, ATLAS has mostly focused on the use of calorimeter-based jet substructure, which works well for jets initiated by particles with low to moderate boost, but which lacks the angular resolution needed to resolve the desired substructure in the highly-boosted regime. We present a novel approach designed to mitigate the calorimeter angular resolution limitations, thus providing superior performance to prior methods. Similarly to the previously developed combined mass technique, the superior angular resolution of the tracker is combined with information from the calorimeters. However, the new method is fundamentally different, as it correlates low-level objects such as tracks and individual energy deposits in the calorimeter, before running any jet finding algorithms. The resulting objects are used as inputs to jet re...

  18. Improving jet substructure in ATLAS using unified track and calorimeter information

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Jet substructure techniques play a critical role in ATLAS in searches for new physics, are increasingly important in measurements of the Standard Model, and are being utilized in the trigger. To date, ATLAS has mostly focused on the use of calorimeter-based jet substructure, which works well for jets initiated by particles with low to moderate boost, but which lacks the angular resolution needed to resolve the desired substructure in the highly-boosted regime. We will present a novel approach designed to mitigate the calorimeter angular resolution limitations, thus providing superior performance to prior methods. Similar to previous methods, the superior angular resolution of the tracker is combined with information from the calorimeters. However, the new method is fundamentally different, as it correlates low-level objects as tracks and individual energy deposits in the calorimeter, before running any jet finding algorithms. The resulting objects are used as inputs to jet reconstruction, and in turn result i...

  19. Earthquake analysis of structures including structure-soil interaction by a substructure method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, A.K.; Guttierrez, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A general substructure method for analysis of response of nuclear power plant structures to earthquake ground motion, including the effects of structure-soil interaction, is summarized. The method is applicable to complex structures idealized as finite element systems and the soil region treated as either a continuum, for example as a viscoelastic halfspace, or idealized as a finite element system. The halfspace idealization permits reliable analysis for sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no rigid boundary such as soil-rock interface. For sites where layers of soft soil are underlain by rock at shallow depth, finite element idealization of the soil region is appropriate; in this case, the direct and substructure methods would lead to equivalent results but the latter provides the better alternative. Treating the free field motion directly as the earthquake input in the substructure method eliminates the deconvolution calculations and the related assumption -regarding type and direction of earthquake waves- required in the direct method. The substructure method is computationally efficient because the two substructures-the structure and the soil region- are analyzed separately; and, more important, it permits taking advantage of the important feature that response to earthquake ground motion is essentially contained in the lower few natural modes of vibration of the structure on fixed base. For sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no obvious rigid boundary such as a soil-rock interface, numerical results for earthquake response of a nuclear reactor structure are presented to demonstrate that the commonly used finite element method may lead to unacceptable errors; but the substructure method leads to reliable results

  20. Structural optimization of the fibre-reinforced composite substructure in a three-unit dental bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Fok, Alex S L

    2009-06-01

    Failures of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) made of fibre-reinforced composites (FRC) have been reported in many clinical and in vitro studies. The types of failure include debonding at the composite-tooth interface, delamination of the veneering material from the FRC substructure and fracture of the pontic. The design of the FRC substructure, i.e. the position and orientation of the fibres, will affect the fracture resistance of the FPD. The purpose of this study was to find an optimal arrangement of the FRC substructure, by means of structural optimization, which could minimize the failure-initiating stresses in a three-unit FPD. A structural optimization method mimicking biological adaptive growth was developed for orthotropic materials such as FRC and incorporated into the finite element (FE) program ABAQUS. Using the program, optimization of the fibre positions and directions in a three-unit FPD was carried out, the aim being to align the fibre directions with those of the maximum principal stresses. The optimized design was then modeled and analyzed to verify the improvements in mechanical performance of the FPD. Results obtained from the optimization suggested that the fibres should be placed at the bottom of the pontic, forming a U-shape substructure that extended into the connectors linking the teeth and the pontic. FE analyses of the optimized design indicated stress reduction in both the veneering composite and at the interface between the veneer and the FRC substructure. The optimized design obtained using FE-based structural optimization can potentially improve the fracture resistance of FPDs by reducing some of the failure-initiating stresses. Optimization methods can therefore be a useful tool to provide sound scientific guidelines for the design of FRC substructures in FPDs.

  1. Synthesis, structure and photoluminescence of (PLAGH)2[ZnCl4] and comparative analysis of photoluminescence properties with tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radanović, Mirjana M.; Jelić, Miodrag G.; Romčević, Nebojša Ž.; Boukos, Nikos; Vojinović-Ješić, Ljiljana S.; Leovac, Vukadin M.; Hadžić, Branka B.; Bajac, Branimir M.; Nađ, Laslo F.; Chandrinou, Chrysoula; Baloš, Sebastian S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New zinc(II) complex with pyridoxalaminoguanidine was synthesized. • The enhancement of the photoluminescence due to the compound formation was achieved. • Very high photoluminescence of Zn(II) compound was noticed. • Comparative analysis of photoluminescence with tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) was provided. - Abstract: The first compound of zinc(II) containing pyridoxalaminoguanidine has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra, conductometric measurements and X-ray crystallography. Single crystals of the compound were obtained in the reaction of methanolic solution of zinc(II) chloride and pyridoxalaminoguanidine hydrochloride. In this compound the coordination of chelate ligand is absent and tetrachlorido complex of zinc(II) with pyridoxalaminuguanidinium cation as contraion is obtained. Photoluminescence spectra were measured. Lorentzian multipeak technique was used to determine peak wavelengths and their intensities. Photoluminescence spectroscopy upon 325, 488 and 514 nm laser excitation light was used to obtain results. This novel compound of zinc(II) was compared to the well-known organic light emitting diode material—ruthenium(II) complex with bypiridine i.e., tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), under the same circumstances and the identical experimental setup. A scheme of energy levels and transitions is proposed to explain the obtained experimental results

  2. Updating failure probability of a welded joint in offshore wind turbine substructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Quang A.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Rigo, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    . Updating the reliability of a welded joint can theoretically be done using Bayesian updating. However, for tubular joints in offshore wind turbine substructures when considering a two dimensional crack growth and a failure criterion combining brittle fracture and material strength, the updating is quite...... complex due to the wind turbine loading obtained during operation. This paper solves that updating problem by using the Failure Assessment Diagram as a limit state function. It is discussed how application of the updating procedure can be used for inspection planning for offshore wind turbine...... substructures, and thus also for reducing the required safety factors at the design stage....

  3. Performance of Jet Substructure Techniques and Boosted Object Identification in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lacey, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS has implemented and commissioned many new jet substructure techniques to aid in the identification and interpretation of hadronic final states originating from Lorentz-boosted heavy particles produced at the LHC. These techniques include quantum jets, jet charge, jet shapes, quark/gluon, boosted boson and top quark tagging, along with grooming methods such as pruning, trimming, and filtering. These techniques have been validated using the large 2012 ATLAS dataset. Presented here is a summary of the state of the art jet substructure and tagging techniques developed in ATLAS, their performance and recent results.

  4. Comparative analysis of HLA II allele and genotype frequency distribution in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Aleksandrovna Repina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare HLA II allele and genotype frequency distribution in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT with that in isolated T1DM.Materials and Methods. A total of 92 T1DM patients were subdivided into two groups. The first group comprised 54 patients with established AIT comorbidity or elevation of anti-thyroid autoantibodies (ATA. Patients with isolated T1DM (ATA-negative formed the second group. HLA-genotyping was performed by multiprimer PCR set for the three following genes: DRB1, DQA1 and DQВ1.Results. Prevalence of alleles DRB1*01, *03(017, *04, *07, *11 and genotypes 01/03, 01/04, 03/04 tends to be higher among patients with AIT comorbidity. The comorbidity group was also characterized by the trend towards higher prevalence of “marker/marker” and “marker/non-marker” combinations favouring the former variant. Conversely, ATA-negative patients exhibited trend for higher prevalence of “non-marker/non-marker” combination.Conclusion. Statistically insignificant difference between HLA II alleles and genotypes in the two studied groups suggests that primary genetic factors are common in these two diseases. Plausibly, genes other than DRB1, DQA1 and DQВ1 determine the localization of the autoimmune process.

  5. Not-for-profit versus for-profit health care providers--Part II: Comparing and contrasting their records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotarius, Timothy; Trujillo, Antonio J; Liberman, Aaron; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2006-01-01

    The debate over which health care providers are most capably meeting their responsibilities in serving the public's interest continues unabated, and the comparisons of not-for-profit (NFP) versus for-profit (FP) hospitals remain at the epicenter of the discussion. From the perspective of available factual information, which of the two sides to this debate is correct? This article is part II of a 2-part series on comparing and contrasting the performance records of NFP health care providers with their FP counterparts. Although it is demonstrated that both NFP and FP providers perform virtuous and selfless feats on behalf of America's public, it is also shown that both camps have been accused of being involved in potentially willful clinical and administrative missteps. Part I provided the background information (eg, legal differences, perspectives on social responsibility, and types of questionable and fraudulent behavior) required to adequately understand the scope of the comparison issue. Part II offers actual comparisons of the 2 organizational structures using several disparate factors such as specific organizational behaviors, approach to the health care priorities of cost and quality, and business-focused goals of profits, efficiency, and community benefit.

  6. Acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet compares favorably to a step II diet in a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Neal D; Scialli, Anthony R; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Lanou, Amy J

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet, as compared with a more typical fat-modified diet, among overweight and obese adults. Through newspaper advertisements, 64 overweight, postmenopausal women were recruited, 59 of whom completed the study. The participants were assigned randomly to a low-fat vegan diet or, for comparison, to a National Cholesterol Education Program Step II (NCEP) diet. At baseline and 14 weeks later, dietary intake, dietary restraint, disinhibition, and hunger, as well as the acceptability and perceived benefits and adverse effects of each diet were assessed. Dietary restraint increased in the NCEP group (P vegan group. Disinhibition and hunger scores fell in each group (P vegan group participants rated their diet as less easy to prepare than their usual diets (P vegan diet is high and not demonstrably different from that of a more moderate low-fat diet among well-educated, postmenopausal women in a research environment.

  7. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume II. Waste form data, process descriptions, and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Thornhill, R.E.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains supporting information for the comparative assessment of the transuranic waste forms and processes summarized in Volume I. Detailed data on the characterization of the waste forms selected for the assessment, process descriptions, and cost information are provided. The purpose of this volume is to provide additional information that may be useful when using the data in Volume I and to provide greater detail on particular waste forms and processes. Volume II is divided into two sections and two appendixes. The first section provides information on the preparation of the waste form specimens used in this study and additional characterization data in support of that in Volume I. The second section includes detailed process descriptions for the eight processes evaluated. Appendix A lists the results of MCC-1 leach test and Appendix B lists additional cost data. 56 figures, 12 tables

  8. Feedback components of a U20Pu10Zr-fueled compared to a U10Zr-fueled EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Calculated feedback components of the regional contributions of the power reactivity decrements (PRDs) and of the temperature coefficients of reactivity of a U20Pu10Zr-fueled and of a U10Zr-fueled Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are compared. The PRD components are also separated into power-to-flow dependent and solely power dependent parts. The effects of these values upon quantities useful for indicating the comparative potential inherent safety characteristics of these EBR-II loadings are presented

  9. Approach to include load sequence effects in the design of an offshore wind turbine substructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragt, R.C.; Allaix, D.L.; Maljaars, J.; Tuitman, J.T.; Salman, Y.; Otheguy, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the main design drivers for offshore wind substructures. Using Fracture Mechanics methods, load sequence effects such as crack growth retardation due to large load peaks can be included in the fatigue damage estimation. Due to the sequence dependency, a method is required that

  10. Morality as the substructure of social justice: religion in education as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moral issues and principles do not only emerge in cases of conflict among, for instance, religious communities or political parties; indeed they form the moral substructure of notions of social justice. During periods of conflict each opponent claims justice for his/her side and bases the claim on certain principles. In this article ...

  11. Substructure formation during pattern transposition from substrate into polymer blend film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cyganik, P; Budkowski, A; Steiner, U; Rysz, J; Bernasik, A; Walheim, S; Postawa, Z; Raczkowska, J

    A chemical pattern on a substrate is transposed into thin films of a ternary polymer blend during spin-casting from a common solvent. One of the blend components intercalates at interfaces between the other two phases to reduce their interfacial energy. As a result, an extensive substructure is

  12. Revealing dark matter substructure with anisotropies in the diffuse gamma-ray background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M, E-mail: jsg@kicp.uchicago.edu [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The majority of gamma-ray emission from galactic dark matter annihilation is likely to be detected as a contribution to the diffuse gamma-ray background. I show that dark matter substructure in the halo of the Galaxy induces characteristic anisotropies in the diffuse background that could be used to determine the small-scale dark matter distribution. I calculate the angular power spectrum of the emission from dark matter substructure for several models of the subhalo population and show that features in the power spectrum can be used to infer the presence of substructure. The shape of the power spectrum is largely unaffected by the subhalo radial distribution and mass function, and for many scenarios I find that a measurement of the angular power spectrum by Fermi will be able to constrain the abundance of substructure. An anti-biased subhalo radial distribution is shown to produce emission that differs significantly in intensity and large-scale angular dependence from that of a subhalo distribution which traces the smooth dark matter halo, potentially impacting the detectability of the dark matter signal for a variety of targets and methods.

  13. Ring and jet study on the azimuthal substructure of pions at CERN ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structures in the emission of secondary charged hadrons coming from 32S–Ag/Br interactions at 200 A GeV/c. Nuclear photographic emulsion technique has been employed to collect the experimental data. The presence of such substructures, ...

  14. Revealing dark matter substructure with anisotropies in the diffuse gamma-ray background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M

    2008-01-01

    The majority of gamma-ray emission from galactic dark matter annihilation is likely to be detected as a contribution to the diffuse gamma-ray background. I show that dark matter substructure in the halo of the Galaxy induces characteristic anisotropies in the diffuse background that could be used to determine the small-scale dark matter distribution. I calculate the angular power spectrum of the emission from dark matter substructure for several models of the subhalo population and show that features in the power spectrum can be used to infer the presence of substructure. The shape of the power spectrum is largely unaffected by the subhalo radial distribution and mass function, and for many scenarios I find that a measurement of the angular power spectrum by Fermi will be able to constrain the abundance of substructure. An anti-biased subhalo radial distribution is shown to produce emission that differs significantly in intensity and large-scale angular dependence from that of a subhalo distribution which traces the smooth dark matter halo, potentially impacting the detectability of the dark matter signal for a variety of targets and methods

  15. [Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond of zirconia substructure and veneering ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qun; Peng, Yan; Wu, Xue-ying; Weng, Jia-wei

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of zirconia substructure and veneering ceramic. Kavo zirconia specimens were divided into 4 groups (each group contains 8 specimens) according to different surface treatments: Group A was pigmented by dipping presintered blocks in the coloring solution VITA LL5, and not treated with abrasion after firing; Group B was pigmented with the same solution and then dealt with abrasion; Group C was not treated by any methods and Group D was only dealt with abrasion. All the veneering ceramics were fired on the zirconia substructure by slip-casting technique and the shear bond strength of zirconia substructure and veneering ceramic were tested. The data was analyzed statistically with SPSS 10.0 software package. The shear bond strength of the abrasive-treated groups (group B and group D) was significantly higher than the other two groups, but no significant difference was found between pigmented-treated groups (group A and group C) and non-pigmented-treated groups (group B and group D). Abrasion can increase the shear bond between Kavo zirconia substructure and veneering ceramics while pigmentation has no significant effect on the bonding strength.

  16. Morality as the Substructure of Social Justice: Religion in Education as a Case in Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, Ferdinand J.

    2011-01-01

    Moral issues and principles do not only emerge in cases of conflict among, for instance, religious communities or political parties; indeed they form the moral substructure of notions of social justice. During periods of conflict each opponent claims justice for his/her side and bases the claim on certain principles. In this article, reference is…

  17. Substructures in DAFT/FADA survey clusters based on XMM and optical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durret, F.; DAFT/FADA Team

    2014-07-01

    The DAFT/FADA survey was initiated to perform weak lensing tomography on a sample of 90 massive clusters in the redshift range [0.4,0.9] with HST imaging available. The complementary deep multiband imaging constitutes a high quality imaging data base for these clusters. In X-rays, we have analysed the XMM-Newton and/or Chandra data available for 32 clusters, and for 23 clusters we fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to search for substructures in the X-ray gas. This study was coupled with a dynamical analysis for the 18 clusters with at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range, based on a Serna & Gerbal (SG) analysis. We detected ten substructures in eight clusters by both methods (X-rays and SG). The percentage of mass included in substructures is found to be roughly constant with redshift, with values of 5-15%. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are found to be relatively recent infalls, probably at their first cluster pericenter approach.

  18. Disposable diapers decrease the incidence of neonatal infections compared to cloth diapers in a level II neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, M Chowdary; Tandur, Baswaraj; Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas

    2015-08-01

    To study whether disposable diapers decrease the incidence of neonatal infections compared with cloth diapers in a level II neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). All neonates admitted to the NICU and having duration of stay >48 h were enrolled. Those babies with signs and symptoms of infection were screened with septic screen and/or blood culture. The primary outcome of the study was incidence of probable sepsis. Of 253 babies enrolled in the study period, probable sepsis was present in 101 (39.9%) infants in the total study group and was higher in cloth diaper group as compared with disposable diaper group (p = 0.01). For an average NICU stay of 6 days, cloth diapers would cost Rs. 241 vs. Rs. 162 for disposable diaper for any infant. Usage of disposable diapers decrease the incidence of probable sepsis in babies admitted to NICU. It is also cost effective to use disposable diapers in the NICU. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. COMPAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuefner, K.

    1976-01-01

    COMPAR works on FORTRAN arrays with four indices: A = A(i,j,k,l) where, for each fixed k 0 ,l 0 , only the 'plane' [A(i,j,k 0 ,l 0 ), i = 1, isub(max), j = 1, jsub(max)] is held in fast memory. Given two arrays A, B of this type COMPAR has the capability to 1) re-norm A and B ind different ways; 2) calculate the deviations epsilon defined as epsilon(i,j,k,l): =[A(i,j,k,l) - B(i,j,k,l)] / GEW(i,j,k,l) where GEW (i,j,k,l) may be chosen in three different ways; 3) calculate mean, standard deviation and maximum in the array epsilon (by several intermediate stages); 4) determine traverses in the array epsilon; 5) plot these traverses by a printer; 6) simplify plots of these traverses by the PLOTEASY-system by creating input data blocks for this system. The main application of COMPAR is given (so far) by the comparison of two- and three-dimensional multigroup neutron flux-fields. (orig.) [de

  20. THE PERILS OF CLUMPFIND: THE MASS SPECTRUM OF SUBSTRUCTURES IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2009-01-01

    We study the mass spectrum of substructures in the Perseus Molecular Cloud Complex traced by 13 CO(1-0), finding that dN/dM ∝ M -2.4 for the standard Clumpfind parameters. This result does not agree with the classical dN/dM ∝ M -1.6 . To understand this discrepancy, we study the robustness of the mass spectrum derived using the Clumpfind algorithm. Both two- and three-dimensional Clumpfind versions are tested, using 850 μm dust emission and 13 CO spectral-line observations of Perseus, respectively. The effect of varying threshold is not important, but varying stepsize produces a different effect for two- and three-dimensional cases. In the two-dimensional case, where emission is relatively isolated (associated with only the densest peaks in the cloud), the mass spectrum variability is negligible compared to the mass function fit uncertainties. In the three-dimensional case, however, where the 13 CO emission traces the bulk of the molecular cloud (MC), the number of clumps and the derived mass spectrum are highly correlated with the stepsize used. The distinction between 'two dimension' and 'three dimension' here is more importantly also a distinction between 'sparse' and 'crowded' emission. In any 'crowded' case, Clumpfind should not be used blindly to derive mass functions. Clumpfind's output in the 'crowded' case can still offer a statistical description of emission useful in intercomparisons, but the clump-list should not be treated as a robust region decomposition suitable to generate a physically meaningful mass function. We conclude that the 13 CO mass spectrum depends on the observations resolution, due to the hierarchical structure of the MC.

  1. Subspace orthogonalization for substructuring preconditioners for nonsymmetric systems of linear equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starke, G. [Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    For nonselfadjoint elliptic boundary value problems which are preconditioned by a substructuring method, i.e., nonoverlapping domain decomposition, the author introduces and studies the concept of subspace orthogonalization. In subspace orthogonalization variants of Krylov methods the computation of inner products and vector updates, and the storage of basis elements is restricted to a (presumably small) subspace, in this case the edge and vertex unknowns with respect to the partitioning into subdomains. The author investigates subspace orthogonalization for two specific iterative algorithms, GMRES and the full orthogonalization method (FOM). This is intended to eliminate certain drawbacks of the Arnoldi-based Krylov subspace methods mentioned above. Above all, the length of the Arnoldi recurrences grows linearly with the iteration index which is therefore restricted to the number of basis elements that can be held in memory. Restarts become necessary and this often results in much slower convergence. The subspace orthogonalization methods, in contrast, require the storage of only the edge and vertex unknowns of each basis element which means that one can iterate much longer before restarts become necessary. Moreover, the computation of inner products is also restricted to the edge and vertex points which avoids the disturbance of the computational flow associated with the solution of subdomain problems. The author views subspace orthogonalization as an alternative to restarting or truncating Krylov subspace methods for nonsymmetric linear systems of equations. Instead of shortening the recurrences, one restricts them to a subset of the unknowns which has to be carefully chosen in order to be able to extend this partial solution to the entire space. The author discusses the convergence properties of these iteration schemes and its advantages compared to restarted or truncated versions of Krylov methods applied to the full preconditioned system.

  2. Hubble space telescope/advanced camera for surveys confirmation of the dark substructure in A520

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, M. J.; Hoekstra, H.; Mahdavi, A.; Babul, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a weak-lensing study of the cluster A520 based on Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) data. The excellent data quality provides a mean source density of ∼109 arcmin –2 , which improves both resolution and significance of the mass reconstruction compared to a previous study based on Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images. We take care in removing instrumental effects such as the charge trailing due to radiation damage of the detector and the position-dependent point-spread function. This new ACS analysis confirms the previous claims that a substantial amount of dark mass is present between two luminous subclusters where we observe very little light. The centroid of the dark peak in the current ACS analysis is offset to the southwest by ∼1' with respect to the centroid from the WFPC2 analysis. Interestingly, this new centroid is in better agreement with the location where the X-ray emission is strongest, and the mass-to-light ratio estimated with this centroid is much higher (813 ± 78 M ☉ /L R☉ ) than the previous value; the aperture mass with the WFPC2 centroid provides a consistent mass. Although we cannot provide a definite explanation for the dark peak, we discuss a revised scenario, wherein dark matter with a more conventional range (σ DM /m DM < 1 cm 2 g –1 ) of self-interacting cross-section can lead to the detection of this dark substructure. If supported by detailed numerical simulations, this hypothesis opens up the possibility that the A520 system can be used to establish a lower limit of the self-interacting cross-section of dark matter.

  3. The Extended Halo of Centaurus A: Uncovering Satellites, Streams, and Substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the widest-field resolved stellar map to date of the closest (D˜ 3.8 Mpc) massive elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A; Cen A), extending out to a projected galactocentric radius of ˜150 kpc. The data set is part of our ongoing Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) utilizing the Magellan/Megacam imager. We resolve a population of old red giant branch (RGB) stars down to ˜1.5 mag below the tip of the RGB, reaching surface brightness limits as low as {μ }V,0˜ 32 mag arcsec-2. The resulting spatial stellar density map highlights a plethora of previously unknown streams, shells, and satellites, including the first tidally disrupting dwarf around Cen A (CenA-MM-Dw3), which underline its active accretion history. We report 13 previously unknown dwarf satellite candidates, of which 9 are confirmed to be at the distance of Cen A (the remaining 4 are not resolved into stars), with magnitudes in the range {M}V=-7.2 to -13.0, central surface brightness values of {μ }V,0=25.4{--}26.9 mag arcsec-2, and half-light radii of {r}h=0.22{--}2.92 {{kpc}}. These values are in line with Local Group dwarfs but also lie at the faint/diffuse end of their distribution; interestingly, CenA-MM-Dw3 has similar properties to the recently discovered ultradiffuse galaxies in Virgo and Coma. Most of the new dwarfs are fainter than the previously known Cen A satellites. The newly discovered dwarfs and halo substructures are discussed in light of their stellar populations, and they are compared to those discovered by the PAndAS survey of M31. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  4. Removal of cadmium (II) from aqueous solution: A comparative study of raw attapulgite clay and a reusable waste–struvite/attapulgite obtained from nutrient-rich wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Xuejiang, E-mail: wangxj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ma, Jinxing, E-mail: jinxing.ma@unsw.edu.au [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Xia, Peng; Zhao, Jianfu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • Both nutrient recovery and Cd(II) removal were achieved by MAP/APT. • The nutrient recovery process was used as a novel method of modification. • Compared with raw APT, MAP/APT enhanced Cd(II) adsorption capacity. • Cd(II) adsorption mechanisms from aqueous solution were extensively investigated. - Abstract: In this study, raw attapulgite (APT) and a novel adsorbent, struvite/attapulgite (MAP/APT) obtained from nutrient-rich wastewater treated by MgO modified APT, were applied as the absorbent for Cd(II) ion removal from aqueous solution. The two adsorbents were characterized by BET, SEM-EDS, XRD, FT-IR. Raw APT and MAP/APT separately presented the maximum Cd(II) adsorption capacities of 10.38 mg/g and 121.14 mg/g at pH of 5.45. The Cd(II) adsorption on raw APT and MAP/APT could be well fitted by Freundlich isotherm and Langmuir isotherm, respectively. Pseudo-second order equation was able to properly describe the kinetics of Cd(II) adsorption by raw APT and MAP/APT. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that Cd(II) adsorption onto raw APT and MAP/APT were spontaneous and endothermic. An economic evaluation revealed that the treatment costs of the adsorption process by raw APT and MPA/APT were 0.013 $ per 1000 mg Cd and 0.004 $ per 1000 mg Cd, respectively.

  5. Effect of Soil-Structure Interaction on Seismic Performance of Long-Span Bridge Tested by Dynamic Substructuring Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyun Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the limitations of testing facilities and techniques, the seismic performance of soil-structure interaction (SSI system can only be tested in a quite small scale model in laboratory. Especially for long-span bridge, a smaller tested model is required when SSI phenomenon is considered in the physical test. The scale effect resulting from the small scale model is always coupled with the dynamic performance, so that the seismic performance of bridge considering SSI effect cannot be uncovered accurately by the traditional testing method. This paper presented the implementation of real-time dynamic substructuring (RTDS, involving the combined use of shake table array and computational engines for the seismic simulation of SSI. In RTDS system, the bridge with soil-foundation system is divided into physical and numerical substructures, in which the bridge is seen as physical substructures and the remaining part is seen as numerical substructures. The interface response between the physical and numerical substructures is imposed by shake table and resulting reaction force is fed back to the computational engine. The unique aspect of the method is to simulate the SSI systems subjected to multisupport excitation in terms of a larger physical model. The substructuring strategy and the control performance associated with the real-time substructuring testing for SSI were performed. And the influence of SSI on a long-span bridge was tested by this novel testing method.

  6. Family law matters in a European dimension - A comparative perspective between Brussels II bis Regulation and the new Albanian Act on private international law.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniana Qarri

    2014-01-01

    Also the paper will focus in the study of the institute of marriage and parental responsibilities in the cases of marriages with foreign elements, seen in the framework of the new Albanian Act “On private international law” compared to the previous law and compared with the EU regulations Brussels II bis and Roma III.

  7. Boosted objects and jet substructure at the LHC. Report of BOOST2012, held at IFIC Valencia, 23rd-27th of July 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altheimer, A.; Thompson, E.N. [Columbia University, Nevis Laboratory, Irvington, NY (United States); Arce, A.; Bjergaard, D. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Asquith, L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL (United States); Backus Mayes, J.; Hook, A.; Izaguirre, E.; Jankowiak, M.; Larkoski, A.; Nef, P.; Schwartzman, A.; Swiatlowski, M.; Wacker, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kuutmann, E.B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany); Berger, J. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Bryngemark, L. [Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Buckley, A.; Debenedetti, C. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Butterworth, J.; Campanelli, M.; Davison, A. [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Cacciari, M. [CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carli, T.; Roeck, A. de [LPTHE, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 et CNRS UMR, Paris (France); Chala, M. [CAFPE and Univ. of Granada, Granada (Spain); Chapleau, B. [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Chen, C. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Chou, J.P. [Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Cornelissen, T.; Fleischmann, S. [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Curtin, D. [YITP, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Dasgupta, M. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Almeida Dias, F. de [UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil); De Cosa, A. [INFN, Naples (Italy); University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Doglioni, C.; Guescini, F. [University of Geneva, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Ellis, S.D.; Hornig, A.; Scholtz, J. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Fassi, F.; Hoz, S.G. de la; Kaci, M.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Rodrigo, G.; Salt, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Villaplana, M.; Vos, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, IFIC/CSIC-UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Ferrando, J.; Kar, D.; Nordstrom, K. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Freytsis, M. [University of California, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gonzalez Silva, M.L. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Han, Z.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Schwartz, M.D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Juknevich, J. [Weizmann Institute, Rehovot (Israel); Kasieczka, G.; Plehn, T.; Schaetzel, S.; Takeuchi, M. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Kogler, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Loch, P. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Marzani, S.; Spannowsky, M. [IPPP, University of Durham, Durham (United Kingdom); Masetti, L. [Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Mateu, V.; Stewart, I.; Thaler, J. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Miller, D.W. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Mishra, K.; Tran, N.V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Penwell, J. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Pilot, J. [University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Rappoccio, S. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Rizzi, A. [INFN, Pisa (Italy); University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Safonov, A. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Salam, G.P. [CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); LPTHE, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 et CNRS UMR, Paris (France); Schioppa, M. [INFN, Rende (IT); University of Calabria, Rende (IT); Schmidt, A. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (DE); Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (DE); Segala, M. [Brown University, Richmond, RI (US); Son, M. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (US); Soyez, G. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (FR); Strom, D. [University of Illinois, Chicago, IL (US); Vermilion, C. [University of California, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (US); Walsh, J. [University of California, Berkeley, CA (US)

    2014-03-15

    This report of the BOOST2012 workshop presents the results of four working groups that studied key aspects of jet substructure. We discuss the potential of first-principle QCD calculations to yield a precise description of the substructure of jets and study the accuracy of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo tools. Limitations of the experiments' ability to resolve substructure are evaluated, with a focus on the impact of additional (pile-up) proton proton collisions on jet substructure performance in future LHC operating scenarios. A final section summarizes the lessons learnt from jet substructure analyses in searches for new physics in the production of boosted top quarks. (orig.)

  8. Boosted objects and jet substructure at the LHC. Report of BOOST2012, held at IFIC Valencia, 23rd-27th of July 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altheimer, A.; Thompson, E.N.; Arce, A.; Bjergaard, D.; Asquith, L.; Backus Mayes, J.; Hook, A.; Izaguirre, E.; Jankowiak, M.; Larkoski, A.; Nef, P.; Schwartzman, A.; Swiatlowski, M.; Wacker, J.; Kuutmann, E.B.; Berger, J.; Bryngemark, L.; Buckley, A.; Debenedetti, C.; Butterworth, J.; Campanelli, M.; Davison, A.; Cacciari, M.; Carli, T.; Roeck, A. de; Chala, M.; Chapleau, B.; Chen, C.; Chou, J.P.; Cornelissen, T.; Fleischmann, S.; Curtin, D.; Dasgupta, M.; Almeida Dias, F. de; De Cosa, A.; Doglioni, C.; Guescini, F.; Ellis, S.D.; Hornig, A.; Scholtz, J.; Fassi, F.; Hoz, S.G. de la; Kaci, M.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Rodrigo, G.; Salt, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Villaplana, M.; Vos, M.; Ferrando, J.; Kar, D.; Nordstrom, K.; Freytsis, M.; Gonzalez Silva, M.L.; Han, Z.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Schwartz, M.D.; Juknevich, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Plehn, T.; Schaetzel, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Kogler, R.; Loch, P.; Marzani, S.; Spannowsky, M.; Masetti, L.; Mateu, V.; Stewart, I.; Thaler, J.; Miller, D.W.; Mishra, K.; Tran, N.V.; Penwell, J.; Pilot, J.; Rappoccio, S.; Rizzi, A.; Safonov, A.; Salam, G.P.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidt, A.; Segala, M.; Son, M.; Soyez, G.; Strom, D.; Vermilion, C.; Walsh, J.

    2014-01-01

    This report of the BOOST2012 workshop presents the results of four working groups that studied key aspects of jet substructure. We discuss the potential of first-principle QCD calculations to yield a precise description of the substructure of jets and study the accuracy of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo tools. Limitations of the experiments' ability to resolve substructure are evaluated, with a focus on the impact of additional (pile-up) proton proton collisions on jet substructure performance in future LHC operating scenarios. A final section summarizes the lessons learnt from jet substructure analyses in searches for new physics in the production of boosted top quarks. (orig.)

  9. Comparative in vivo analysis of recombinant type II feline coronaviruses with truncated and completed ORF3 region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádám Bálint

    Full Text Available Our previous in vitro comparative study on a feline coronavirus (FCoV pair, differing only in the intactness of their ORF3abc regions, showed that the truncated ORF3abc plays an important role in the efficient macrophage/monocyte tropism of type II feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV. In the present study, we describe a challenge experiment with the same recombinant FCoVs in order to gain data on the in vivo characteristics on these viruses. While parent virus FIPV DF-2 developed feline infectious peritonitis in all the infected cats, its recombinant virus PBFIPV-DF-2, differing only in seven nucleotides, proved to be surprisingly low virulent, although caused an acute febrile episode similarly to the original FIPV DF-2. PBFIPV-DF-2 infection induced significantly lower virus neutralization titers than its parent virus, and lacked the second phase of viremia and development of fatal course of the disease. The recombinant PBFIPV-DF-2-R3i with completed ORF3abc gained biological properties that differentiate between the feline enteric coronavirus (FECV and FIPV biotypes such as intensive replication in the gut, absence of viremia and weak or no serological response. Using reverse genetic approaches our study is the first experimental proof that ORF3abc is indeed responsible for the restriction of FECV replication to the intestine in vivo.

  10. Evaluation of three indirect calorimetry devices in mechanically ventilated patients: which device compares best with the Deltatrac II(®)? A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Séverine; Karsegard, Véronique Laurie; Viatte, Valérie; Heidegger, Claudia Paula; Fleury, Yvan; Pichard, Claude; Genton, Laurence

    2015-02-01

    Indirect calorimetry (IC) is the gold standard to measure energy expenditure (EE) in hospitalized patients. The popular 30 year-old Deltatrac II(®) (Datex) IC is no more commercialized, but other manufacturers have developed new devices. This study aims at comparing for the first time simultaneously, two new IC, the CCM express(®) (Medgraphics) and the Quark RMR(®) (Cosmed) with the Deltatrac II(®) to assess their potential use in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. ICU patients on mechanical ventilation, with positive end-expiratory pressure consumption, VCO2 production, respiratory quotient and EE were recorded. Data were presented as mean (SD) and compared by linear regression, repeated measure one-way ANOVA and Bland & Altman diagrams. Forty patients (23 males, 60(17) yrs, BMI 25.4(7.0) kg/m(2)) were included. For the Deltatrac II(®), VO2 was 227(61) ml/min, VCO2 189(52) ml/min and EE 1562(412) kcal/d. VO2, VCO2, and EE differed significantly between Deltatrac II(®) and CCM express(®) (p II(®) and Quark RMR(®). For EE, diagrams showed a mean difference (2SD) of 25.2(441) kcal between Deltatrac II(®) vs. the Quark RMR(®), and -273 (532) kcal between Deltatrac II(®) vs CCM express(®). Quark RMR(®) compares better with Deltatrac II(®) than CCM express(®), but it suffers an EE variance of 441 kcal, which is not acceptable for clinical practice. New indirect IC should be further improved before recommending their clinical use in ICU. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative study of RetCamRetCam II vs. binocular ophthalmoscopy in a screening program for retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada-Palacios, P; Zarratea, L; Moral, M; de la Cruz-Bértolo, J

    2015-08-01

    To determine the performance of RetCam vs. binocular ophthalmoscopy (BIO) in a screening program for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Observational comparative study with prospective data collection. Examinations with RetCam (n=169) were performed on 83 infants included in a screening program for ROP and stored for analysis at a later stage. An experienced ophthalmologist examined the ocular fundus with binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO). The RetCam images were assessed for the presence of ROP, zone, grade, and presence of plus disease. RetCam and BIO data were compared by visually to estimate sensitivity, specificity, positive (VPP) and negative (VPN) predictive values. ROP disease was detected in 108 eyes with BIO, and in 74 with RetCam. Out of 306 eyes examined with RetCam, false negative results were found in 34 eyes, with no false positives. Sensitivity of RetCam exam vs. BIO was 0.68, and specificity was 0.99. Positive predictive value was 0.93 and negative predictive value was 0.85. All 34 ROP cases not detected with RetCam were in zone III or outer zone II. They were all mild and regressed spontaneously. No threshold ROP was missed with RetCam. Binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy is the reference method for the diagnosis of ROP. RetCam may be used as an alternative for ROP screening. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Global Profiling and Novel Structure Discovery Using Multiple Neutral Loss/Precursor Ion Scanning Combined with Substructure Recognition and Statistical Analysis (MNPSS): Characterization of Terpene-Conjugated Curcuminoids in Curcuma longa as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Lin, Xiong-hao; Ji, Shuai; Zhang, Zheng-xiang; Bo, Tao; Guo, De-an; Ye, Min

    2016-01-05

    To fully understand the chemical diversity of an herbal medicine is challenging. In this work, we describe a new approach to globally profile and discover novel compounds from an herbal extract using multiple neutral loss/precursor ion scanning combined with substructure recognition and statistical analysis. Turmeric (the rhizomes of Curcuma longa L.) was used as an example. This approach consists of three steps: (i) multiple neutral loss/precursor ion scanning to obtain substructure information; (ii) targeted identification of new compounds by extracted ion current and substructure recognition; and (iii) untargeted identification using total ion current and multivariate statistical analysis to discover novel structures. Using this approach, 846 terpecurcumins (terpene-conjugated curcuminoids) were discovered from turmeric, including a number of potentially novel compounds. Furthermore, two unprecedented compounds (terpecurcumins X and Y) were purified, and their structures were identified by NMR spectroscopy. This study extended the application of mass spectrometry to global profiling of natural products in herbal medicines and could help chemists to rapidly discover novel compounds from a complex matrix.

  13. Pretreatment of furfural industrial wastewater by Fenton, electro-Fenton and Fe(II)-activated peroxydisulfate processes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C W; Wang, D; Tang, Q

    2014-01-01

    The Fenton, electro-Fenton and Fe(II)-activated peroxydisulfate (PDS) processes have been applied for the treatment of actual furfural industrial wastewater in this paper. Through the comparative study of the three processes, a suitable pretreatment technology for actual furfural wastewater treatment was obtained, and the mechanism and dynamics process of this technology is discussed. The experimental results show that Fenton technology has a good and stable effect without adjusting pH of furfural wastewater. At optimal conditions, which were 40 mmol/L H₂O₂ initial concentration and 10 mmol/L Fe²⁺ initial concentration, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate can reach 81.2% after 90 min reaction at 80 °C temperature. The PDS process also has a good performance. The COD removal rate could attain 80.3% when Na₂S₂O₈ initial concentration was 4.2 mmol/L, Fe²⁺ initial concentration was 0.1 mol/L, the temperature remained at 70 °C, and pH value remained at 2.0. The electro-Fenton process was not competent to deal with the high-temperature furfural industrial wastewater and only 10.2% COD was degraded at 80 °C temperature in the optimal conditions (2.25 mA/cm² current density, 4 mg/L Na₂SO₄, 0.3 m³/h aeration rate). For the Fenton, electro-Fenton and PDS processes in pretreatment of furfural wastewater, their kinetic processes follow the pseudo first order kinetics law. The pretreatment pathways of furfural wastewater degradation are also investigated in this study. The results show that furfural and furan formic acid in furfural wastewater were preferentially degraded by Fenton technology. Furfural can be degraded into low-toxicity or nontoxic compounds by Fenton pretreatment technology, which could make furfural wastewater harmless and even reusable.

  14. Comparative study of the shear bond strength of various veneering materials on grade II commercially pure titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Young; Jun, Sul-Gi; Wright, Robert F; Park, Eun-Jin

    2015-02-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of various veneering materials to grade II commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). Thirty specimens of CP-Ti disc with 9 mm diameter and 10 mm height were divided into three experimental groups. Each group was bonded to heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Lucitone 199), porcelain (Triceram), and indirect composite (Sinfony) with 7 mm diameter and 2 mm height. For the control group (n=10), Lucitone 199 were applied on type IV gold alloy castings. All samples were thermocycled for 5000 cycles in 5-55℃ water. The maximum shear bond strength (MPa) was measured with a Universal Testing Machine. After the shear bond strength test, the failure mode was assessed with an optic microscope and a scanning electron microscope. Statistical analysis was carried out with a Kruskal-Wallis Test and Mann-Whitney Test. The mean shear bond strength and standard deviations for experimental groups were as follows: Ti-Lucitone 199 (12.11 ± 4.44 MPa); Ti-Triceram (11.09 ± 1.66 MPa); Ti-Sinfony (4.32 ± 0.64 MPa). All of these experimental groups showed lower shear bond strength than the control group (16.14 ± 1.89 MPa). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the Ti-Lucitone 199 group and the control group, and the Ti-Lucitone 199 group and the Ti-Triceram group. Most of the failure patterns in all experimental groups were adhesive failures. The shear bond strength of veneering materials such as heat-polymerized acrylic resin, porcelain, and indirect composite to CP-Ti was compatible to that of heatpolymerized acrylic resin to cast gold alloy.

  15. Fluctuations of the gravitational field generated by a random population of extended substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2018-02-01

    A large population of extended substructures generates a stochastic gravitational field that is fully specified by the function p(F), which defines the probability that a tracer particle experiences a force F within the interval F, F+d{F}. This paper presents a statistical technique for deriving the spectrum of random fluctuations directly from the number density of substructures with known mass and size functions. Application to the subhalo population found in cold dark matter simulations of Milky Way sized haloes shows that, while the combined force distribution is governed by the most massive satellites, the fluctuations of the tidal field are completely dominated by the smallest and most abundant subhaloes. In light of this result, we discuss observational experiments that may be sufficiently sensitive to Galactic tidal fluctuations to probe the `dark' low end of the subhalo mass function and constrain the particle mass of warm and ultralight axion dark matter models.

  16. Seasonal variations of radon concentrations in single-family houses with different sub-structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, B.

    1992-01-01

    Seasonal variations of indoor radon concentrations have been studied in 70 single-family houses selected according to the type of sub-structure and the type of soil underneath the house. Five categories of sub-structure were included - slab-on-grade, crawl space, basement, and combinations...... of basement with slab-on-grade or crawl space. Half of the houses are located on clayey till and the other half on glaciofluvial gravel. In each house radon was measured in a living room and a bedroom, in the basement if present, and in the crawl space if present and accessible. The measurements were made...... with track detectors on a quarterly basis throughout a year. For living rooms and bedrooms the seasonal variations range from being highly significant for the slab-on-grade houses to being insignificant for the crawl space houses. For basements and crawl spaces the geometric mean radon concentrations do...

  17. Performance of large-R jets and jet substructure reconstruction with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the application of techniques to study jet substructure. The performance of modified jet algorithms for a variety of jet types and event topologies is investigated. Properties of jets subjected to the mass-drop filtering, trimming and pruning algorithms are found to have a reduced sensitivity to multiple proton-proton interactions and exhibit improved stability at high luminosity. Monte Carlo studies of the signal-background discrimination with jet grooming in new physics searches based on jet invariant mass and jet substructure properties are also presented. The application of jet trimming is shown to improve the robustness of large-R jet measurements, reduce sensitivity to the superfluous effects due to the intense environment of the high luminosity LHC, and improve the physics potential of searches for heavy boosted objects. The analyses presented in this note use the full 2011 ATLAS dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 \\pm 0.2 fb−1 .

  18. 3D Representative Volume Element Reconstruction of Fiber Composites via Orientation Tensor and Substructure Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Wei; Xu, Hongyi; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    To provide a seamless integration of manufacturing processing simulation and fiber microstructure modeling, two new stochastic 3D microstructure reconstruction methods are proposed for two types of random fiber composites: random short fiber composites, and Sheet Molding Compounds (SMC) chopped fiber composites. A Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) algorithm is first developed to embed statistical orientation information into 3D RVE reconstruction of random short fiber composites. For the SMC composites, an optimized Voronoi diagram based approach is developed for capturing the substructure features of SMC chopped fiber composites. The proposed methods are distinguished from other reconstruction works by providing a way of integrating statistical information (fiber orientation tensor) obtained from material processing simulation, as well as capturing the multiscale substructures of the SMC composites.

  19. Analysis of East Asia genetic substructure using genome-wide SNP arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tian

    Full Text Available Accounting for population genetic substructure is important in reducing type 1 errors in genetic studies of complex disease. As efforts to understand complex genetic disease are expanded to different continental populations the understanding of genetic substructure within these continents will be useful in design and execution of association tests. In this study, population differentiation (Fst and Principal Components Analyses (PCA are examined using >200 K genotypes from multiple populations of East Asian ancestry. The population groups included those from the Human Genome Diversity Panel [Cambodian, Yi, Daur, Mongolian, Lahu, Dai, Hezhen, Miaozu, Naxi, Oroqen, She, Tu, Tujia, Naxi, Xibo, and Yakut], HapMap [ Han Chinese (CHB and Japanese (JPT], and East Asian or East Asian American subjects of Vietnamese, Korean, Filipino and Chinese ancestry. Paired Fst (Wei and Cockerham showed close relationships between CHB and several large East Asian population groups (CHB/Korean, 0.0019; CHB/JPT, 00651; CHB/Vietnamese, 0.0065 with larger separation with Filipino (CHB/Filipino, 0.014. Low levels of differentiation were also observed between Dai and Vietnamese (0.0045 and between Vietnamese and Cambodian (0.0062. Similarly, small Fst's were observed among different presumed Han Chinese populations originating in different regions of mainland of China and Taiwan (Fst's <0.0025 with CHB. For PCA, the first two PC's showed a pattern of relationships that closely followed the geographic distribution of the different East Asian populations. PCA showed substructure both between different East Asian groups and within the Han Chinese population. These studies have also identified a subset of East Asian substructure ancestry informative markers (EASTASAIMS that may be useful for future complex genetic disease association studies in reducing type 1 errors and in identifying homogeneous groups that may increase the power of such studies.

  20. AFM friction and adhesion mapping of the substructures of human hair cuticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, James R.; Tsibouklis, John; Nevell, Thomas G.; Breakspear, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Using atomic force microscopy, values of the microscale friction coefficient, the tip (silicon nitride) - surface adhesion force and the corresponding adhesion energy, for the substructures that constitute the surface of human hair (European brown hair) have been determined from Amonton plots. The values, mapped for comparison with surface topography, corresponded qualitatively with the substructures’ plane surface characteristics. Localised maps and values of the frictional coefficient, extracted avoiding scale edge effects, are likely to inform the formulation of hair-care products and treatments.

  1. AFM friction and adhesion mapping of the substructures of human hair cuticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James R., E-mail: james.smith@port.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Tsibouklis, John; Nevell, Thomas G. [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Breakspear, Steven [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Global R and D–Hair Beauty Laboratory, Kao Corporation, 2-1-3, Bunka Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 131-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Using atomic force microscopy, values of the microscale friction coefficient, the tip (silicon nitride) - surface adhesion force and the corresponding adhesion energy, for the substructures that constitute the surface of human hair (European brown hair) have been determined from Amonton plots. The values, mapped for comparison with surface topography, corresponded qualitatively with the substructures’ plane surface characteristics. Localised maps and values of the frictional coefficient, extracted avoiding scale edge effects, are likely to inform the formulation of hair-care products and treatments.

  2. Pre-Processing and Re-Weighting Jet Images with Different Substructure Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Huynh, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This work is an extension of Monte Carlo simulation based studies in tagging boosted, hadronically decaying W bosons at a center of mass energy of s = 13 TeV. Two pre-processing techniques used with jet images, translation and rotation, are first examined. The generated jet images for W signal jets and QCD background jets are then rescaled and weighted with five different substructure variables for visual comparison.

  3. Comparison of Shade of Ceramic with Three Different Zirconia Substructures using Spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Syed Rashid; Shiddi, Ibraheem F Al

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed how changing the Zirconia (Zr) substructure affected the color samples after they have been overlaid by the same shade of veneering ceramic. Three commercial Zr materials were tested in this study: Prettau(®) Zirconia (ZirKonZahn, Italy), Cercon (Dentsply, Germany) and InCoris ZI (Sirona, Germany). For each system, 15 disk-shaped specimens (10 × 1 mm) were fabricated. Three shades of A1, A2 and A3.5 of porcelain (IPS e.MaxCeram, IvoclarVivadent, USA) were used for layering the specimens. Five specimens from each type of Zr were layered with same shade of ceramic. Color measurements were recorderd by a spectrophotometer Color-Eye(®) 7000A (X-Rite, Grand Rapids, MI). Mean values of L, a, b color coordinates and ΔE were recorded and comparisons were made. Differences in the ΔE were recorded for the same porcelain shade with different Zr substructures and affected the color of the specimens (p < 0.01, ANOVA). The maximum difference between the ΔE values for the A1, A2 and A3.5 shades with three types of Zr substructures was found to be 1.59, 1.69 and 1.45 respectively. Multiple comparisons of the ΔE with PostHoc Tukey test revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between the three types of Zr, except between Type 2 Zr and Type 3 Zr for the Shade A1. The mean values of L, a, b and ΔE for the Prettau(®) Zirconia substructure were found to be the least among the three types. The brand of Zr used influences the final color of the all ceramic Zr based restorations and this has clinical significance.

  4. Morality as the substructure of social justice: religion in education as a case in point

    OpenAIRE

    Potgieter, Ferdinand Jacobus

    2011-01-01

    Moral issues and principles do not only emerge in cases of conflict among, for instance, religious communities or political parties; indeed they form the moral substructure of notions of social justice. During periods of conflict each opponent claims justice for his/her side and bases the claim on certain principles. In this article, reference is made to the differences among South Africans about the extent to which religion and religious differences in the population should be accommodated i...

  5. Substructuring preconditioners for an h-p domain decomposition method with interior penalty mortaring

    KAUST Repository

    Antonietti, P. F.

    2014-05-13

    We propose and study an iterative substructuring method for an h-p Nitsche-type discretization, following the original approach introduced in Bramble et al. Math. Comp. 47(175):103–134, (1986) for conforming methods. We prove quasi-optimality with respect to the mesh size and the polynomial degree for the proposed preconditioner. Numerical experiments assess the performance of the preconditioner and verify the theory. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Italia.

  6. Comparative study of Hg(II) adsorption by thiol- and hydroxyl-containing bifunctional montmorillonite and vermiculite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Lytuong; Wu, Pingxiao; Zhu, Yajie; Liu, Shuai; Zhu, Nengwu

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel adsorbents were prepared by functionalization with BAL to remove Hg(II). • Thiol and hydroxyl groups contributed to the enhancement of Hg(II) removal. • BAL-Vm showed the most adsorption capacity of Hg(II). • The adsorption mechanism was discussed based on the adsorption behaviors. - Abstract: A novel approach to prepare adsorbents for Hg(II) uptake from aqueous media based on the grafting of dimercaprol (BAL), containing thiol and hydroxyl groups, onto the natural montmorillonite and vermiculite was investigated concerning the evaluation of the adsorption capacity. The kinetic study showed that the adsorption process abided by pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption behavior of Hg(II) onto the obtained samples fitted well with Langmuir isotherm model, exhibiting an enhanced maximum adsorption capacity of 8.57 and 3.21 mg g −1 for BAL-Vm and BAL-Mt, respectively. The feasibility of Hg(II) uptake onto the the samples was studied thermodynamically and the calculated coefficients such as ΔH, ΔS and ΔG indicated a physical and spontaneous process. The pH values and coexisting cations had a great influence on Hg(II) removal, confirming the optimal pH value of 4.0–5.0 and the negative correlation between the ionic strength and the adsorption capacity of Hg(II). In general, BAL-Vm possessed a higher efficiency of Hg(II) uptake than BAL-Mt, contrary to that of the pristine clays. The pristine and functionalized materials were investigated by XRD, FTIR, BET, SEM and zeta potential analysis to gain in-depth insight into the structure and surface morphology. The results showed that BAL was successful grafted on montmorillonite and vermiculite surface, providing plentiful adsorption sites as chelating ligands. The mechanisms of Hg(II) adsorption on these samples could be further explained as ion exchange and electrostatic attraction for Vm and Mt, and formation of complexes for BAL-Vm and BAL-Mt.

  7. Calibration of TDR Test Probe for Measuring Moisture in the Body of the Railway Substructure and its Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction of the paper there is characterized a way of monitoring the moisture in the railway substructure in the experimental stand, which is a part of the experimental workplace of the Department of Railway Engineering and Track Management. A substantial part of the paper is devoted to the calibration of TDR test probe for selected rock materials as a basic prerequisite for the determination of the actual moisture in the body of the railway substructure and subgrade.

  8. Comparative electrochemical study of some cobalt(III and cobalt(II complexes with azamacrocycles and b-diketonato ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. BABIC-SAMARDZIJA

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical properties of eight mixed-ligand cobalt(III and cobalt(II complexes of the general formulas [CoIII(Raccyclam](ClO42 (1–(4 and [Co2II(Ractpmc](ClO43 (5–(8 were studied. The substances were investigated in aqueous NaClO4 solution and non-aqueous LiClO4/CH3CN solution by cyclic voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. In aqueous solution, cyclam and Rac ligands being soluble in water undergo anodic oxidation. Coordination to Co(III in complexes 1–4, stabilizes these ligands but reversible peaks in catohodic region indicate the redox reaction CoIII/CoII ion. In the case of the binuclear Co(II complexes 5–8, peaks recorded on the CVs represent oxidation of the bridged Rac ligand. The complexes examined influence the cathodic reaction of hydrogen evolution in aqueous solutions by shifting its potential to more negative values and its current is increased. In non-aqueous solution the CVs of the ligands show irreversible anodic peaks for cyclam, tpmc and for the Rac ligands soluble in acetonitrile. The absence of any peaks in the case of the investigated complexes 1–4 indicates that coordination to Co(III stabilizes both the cyclam and Rac ligands. Cyclic voltammograms of the complexes 5–8 show oxidation processes of the Rac ligand and Co(II ions but the absence of a highly anodic peak of the coordinated macrocycle tpmc shows its stabilization. Contrary to in aqueous solution, the redox reaction Co(III/Co(II does not occur in acetonitrate indicating a higher stability of the complexes 1–4 in this media in comparison with the binuclear cobalt(II-tpmc complexes 5–8.

  9. Earthquake analysis of structures including structure-soil interaction by a substructure method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, A.K.; Guttierrez, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A general substructure method for analysis of response of nuclear power plant structures to earthquake ground motion, including the effects of structure-soil interaction, is summarized. The method is applicable to complex structures idealized as finite element systems and the soil region treated as either a continuum, for example as a viscoelastic halfspace, or idealized as a finite element system. The halfspace idealization permits reliable analysis for sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no rigid boundary such as soil-rock interface. For sites where layers of soft soil are underlain by rock at shallow depth, finite element idealization of the soil region is appropriate; in this case, the direct and substructure methods would lead to equivalent results but the latter provides the better alternative. Treating the free field motion directly as the earthquake input in the substructure eliminates the deconvolution calculations and the related assumption-regarding type and direction of earthquake waves-required in the direct method. (Auth.)

  10. A substructure method to compute the 3D fluid-structure interaction during blowdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, D.; Axisa, F.; Gantenbein, F.; Gibert, R.J.

    1983-08-01

    The waves generated by a sudden rupture of a PWR primary pipe have an important mechanical effect on the internal structures of the vessel. This fluid-structure interaction has a strong 3D aspect. 3D finite element explicit methods can be applied. These methods take into account the non linearities of the problem but the calculation is heavy and expensive. We describe in this paper another type of method based on a substructure procedure: the vessel, internals and contained fluid are axisymmetrically described (AQUAMODE computer code). The pipes and contained fluid are monodimensionaly described (TEDEL-FLUIDE Computer Code). These substructures are characterized by their natural modes. Then, they are connected to another (connection of both structural and fluid nodes) the TRISTANA Computer Code. This method allows to compute correctly and cheaply the 3D fluid-structure effects. The treatment of certain non linearities is difficult because of the modal characterization of the substructures. However variations of contact conditions versus time can be introduced. We present here some validation tests and comparison with experimental results of the litterature

  11. DISCOVERY OF SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE SCATTER-BROADENED IMAGE OF SGR A*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwinn, C. R. [Physics Department, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Kovalev, Y. Y.; Soglasnov, V. A. [Astro Space Center, Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya Str. 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Johnson, M. D., E-mail: cgwinn@physics.ucsb.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We have detected substructure within the smooth scattering disk of the celebrated Galactic center radio source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We observed this structure at 1.3 cm wavelength with the Very Long Baseline Array together with the Green Bank Telescope, on baselines of up to 3000 km, long enough to completely resolve the average scattering disk. Such structure is predicted theoretically as a consequence of refraction by large-scale plasma fluctuations in the interstellar medium. Along with the much-studied θ{sub d}∝λ{sup 2} scaling of angular broadening θ{sub d} with observing wavelength λ, our observations indicate that the spectrum of interstellar turbulence is shallow with an inner scale larger than 300 km. The substructure is consistent with an intrinsic size of about 1 mas at 1.3 cm wavelength, as inferred from deconvolution of the average scattering. Further observations of the substructure can set stronger constraints on the properties of scattering material and on the intrinsic size of Sgr A*. These constraints will guide our understanding of the effects of scatter broadening and the emission physics near the black hole in images with the Event Horizon Telescope at millimeter wavelengths.

  12. A hybrid system identification methodology for wireless structural health monitoring systems based on dynamic substructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragos, Kosmas; Smarsly, Kay

    2016-04-01

    System identification has been employed in numerous structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Traditional system identification methods usually rely on centralized processing of structural response data to extract information on structural parameters. However, in wireless SHM systems the centralized processing of structural response data introduces a significant communication bottleneck. Exploiting the merits of decentralization and on-board processing power of wireless SHM systems, many system identification methods have been successfully implemented in wireless sensor networks. While several system identification approaches for wireless SHM systems have been proposed, little attention has been paid to obtaining information on the physical parameters (e.g. stiffness, damping) of the monitored structure. This paper presents a hybrid system identification methodology suitable for wireless sensor networks based on the principles of component mode synthesis (dynamic substructuring). A numerical model of the monitored structure is embedded into the wireless sensor nodes in a distributed manner, i.e. the entire model is segmented into sub-models, each embedded into one sensor node corresponding to the substructure the sensor node is assigned to. The parameters of each sub-model are estimated by extracting local mode shapes and by applying the equations of the Craig-Bampton method on dynamic substructuring. The proposed methodology is validated in a laboratory test conducted on a four-story frame structure to demonstrate the ability of the methodology to yield accurate estimates of stiffness parameters. Finally, the test results are discussed and an outlook on future research directions is provided.

  13. Factorization for groomed jet substructure beyond the next-to-leading logarithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, Christopher; Larkoski, Andrew J.; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Yan, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Jet grooming algorithms are widely used in experimental analyses at hadron colliders to remove contaminating radiation from within jets. While the algorithms perform a great service to the experiments, their intricate algorithmic structure and multiple parameters has frustrated precision theoretic understanding. In this paper, we demonstrate that one particular groomer called soft drop actually makes precision jet substructure easier. In particular, we derive a factorization formula for a large class of soft drop jet substructure observables, including jet mass. The essential observation that allows for this factorization is that, without the soft wide-angle radiation groomed by soft drop, all singular contributions are collinear. The simplicity and universality of the collinear limit in QCD allows us to show that to all orders, the normalized differential cross section has no contributions from non-global logarithms. It is also independent of process, up to the relative fraction of quark and gluon jets. In fact, soft drop allows us to define this fraction precisely. The factorization theorem also explains why soft drop observables are less sensitive to hadronization than their ungroomed counterparts. Using the factorization theorem, we resum the soft drop jet mass to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. This requires calculating some clustering effects that are closely related to corresponding effects found in jet veto calculations. We match our resummed calculation to fixed order results for both e + e − → dijets and pp→Z+j events, producing the first jet substructure predictions (groomed or ungroomed) to this accuracy for the LHC.

  14. Comparative examinations of serum pepsinogen I, II and gastric area using computed radiography in the atrophic gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsu, Yoshimitsu; Ogura, Yasuharu; Yamazaki, Kouichi [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The relationship between serum PG I, PG II levels and extent of atrophic gastritis was examined. The subjects were 64 patients (male: 32, female: 32, 51.9 years old on average) with established diagnosis of either atrophic gastritis or normal. In the X-ray gastric examination, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) was used to obtain clear-cut images of the gastric area. Concerning the serum PG I level, patients in the group with atrophic gastritis showed lower levels than those of the people in the group with no atrophic change, but the variation was wide, and no definite tendency was seen in the relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG I levels. Concerning the serum PG II level, as the atrophic change progresses, the serum PG II level tended to increase gradually. A significant reduction in the PG I/II ratio was seen in the group with atrophic changes (p<0.01) in comparison with the group with no atrophic changes, and the PG I/II value tended to decrease. In conclusion, as a relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG levels had a wide variation, we considered it to be difficult to understand the presence and extent of the atrophic gastritis by measuring serum PG levels. (author).

  15. Comparative examinations of serum pepsinogen I, II and gastric area using computed radiography in the atrophic gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsu, Yoshimitsu; Ogura, Yasuharu; Yamazaki, Kouichi

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between serum PG I, PG II levels and extent of atrophic gastritis was examined. The subjects were 64 patients (male: 32, female: 32, 51.9 years old on average) with established diagnosis of either atrophic gastritis or normal. In the X-ray gastric examination, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) was used to obtain clear-cut images of the gastric area. Concerning the serum PG I level, patients in the group with atrophic gastritis showed lower levels than those of the people in the group with no atrophic change, but the variation was wide, and no definite tendency was seen in the relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG I levels. Concerning the serum PG II level, as the atrophic change progresses, the serum PG II level tended to increase gradually. A significant reduction in the PG I/II ratio was seen in the group with atrophic changes (p<0.01) in comparison with the group with no atrophic changes, and the PG I/II value tended to decrease. In conclusion, as a relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG levels had a wide variation, we considered it to be difficult to understand the presence and extent of the atrophic gastritis by measuring serum PG levels. (author)

  16. MetMaxStruct: A Tversky-Similarity-Based Strategy for Analysing the (Sub)Structural Similarities of Drugs and Endogenous Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Steve; Kell, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies compared the molecular similarity of marketed drugs and endogenous human metabolites (endogenites), using a series of fingerprint-type encodings, variously ranked and clustered using the Tanimoto (Jaccard) similarity coefficient (TS). Because this gives equal weight to all parts of the encoding (thence to different substructures in the molecule) it may not be optimal, since in many cases not all parts of the molecule will bind to their macromolecular targets. Unsupervised methods cannot alone uncover this. We here explore the kinds of differences that may be observed when the TS is replaced-in a manner more equivalent to semi-supervised learning-by variants of the asymmetric Tversky (TV) similarity, that includes α and β parameters. Dramatic differences are observed in (i) the drug-endogenite similarity heatmaps, (ii) the cumulative "greatest similarity" curves, and (iii) the fraction of drugs with a Tversky similarity to a metabolite exceeding a given value when the Tversky α and β parameters are varied from their Tanimoto values. The same is true when the sum of the α and β parameters is varied. A clear trend toward increased endogenite-likeness of marketed drugs is observed when α or β adopt values nearer the extremes of their range, and when their sum is smaller. The kinds of molecules exhibiting the greatest similarity to two interrogating drug molecules (chlorpromazine and clozapine) also vary in both nature and the values of their similarity as α and β are varied. The same is true for the converse, when drugs are interrogated with an endogenite. The fraction of drugs with a Tversky similarity to a molecule in a library exceeding a given value depends on the contents of that library, and α and β may be "tuned" accordingly, in a semi-supervised manner. At some values of α and β drug discovery library candidates or natural products can "look" much more like (i.e., have a numerical similarity much closer to) drugs than do even

  17. A Multistage Longitudinal Comparative (MLC) Design Stage II: Evaluation of the Changing Lives Program (CLP)--The Possible Selves Questionnaire-Qualitative Extensions (PSQ-QE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsch, Gabrielle; Kurtines, William M.; Montgomery, Marilyn J.

    2008-01-01

    The study reported in this paper, a Multistage Longitudinal Comparative (MLC) Design Stage II evaluation conducted as a planned preliminary efficacy evaluation (psychometric evaluation of measures, short-term controlled outcome studies, etc.) of the Changing Lives Program (CLP), provided evidence for the reliability and validity of qualitative…

  18. Randomized Phase II Trial Comparing Obinutuzumab (GA101) With Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed CD20(+) Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehn, L. H.; Goy, A.; Offner, F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Obinutuzumab (GA101), a novel glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated responses in single-arm studies of patients with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This is the first prospective, randomized study comparing safety and efficacy of obinutuzumab with r...

  19. Measuring the resistance of different substructure materials by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-26

    May 26, 2015 ... Mann–Whitney U‑test was used for comparisons of the groups with two options, and Kruskal–Wallis variance analysis was used to compare ... cementing of prosthetic restorations include derivatives of bisphenol A‑glycidyl ..... future, and the performance of these adhesive systems can be evaluated with ...

  20. In silico prediction of ROCK II inhibitors by different classification approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chuipu; Wu, Qihui; Luo, Yunxia; Ma, Huili; Shen, Jiangang; Zhang, Yongbin; Yang, Lei; Chen, Yunbo; Wen, Zehuai; Wang, Qi

    2017-11-01

    ROCK II is an important pharmacological target linked to central nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this research is to generate ROCK II inhibitor prediction models by machine learning approaches. Firstly, four sets of descriptors were calculated with MOE 2010 and PaDEL-Descriptor, and optimized by F-score and linear forward selection methods. In addition, four classification algorithms were used to initially build 16 classifiers with k-nearest neighbors [Formula: see text], naïve Bayes, Random forest, and support vector machine. Furthermore, three sets of structural fingerprint descriptors were introduced to enhance the predictive capacity of classifiers, which were assessed with fivefold cross-validation, test set validation and external test set validation. The best two models, MFK + MACCS and MLR + SubFP, have both MCC values of 0.925 for external test set. After that, a privileged substructure analysis was performed to reveal common chemical features of ROCK II inhibitors. Finally, binding modes were analyzed to identify relationships between molecular descriptors and activity, while main interactions were revealed by comparing the docking interaction of the most potent and the weakest ROCK II inhibitors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on ROCK II inhibitors utilizing machine learning approaches that provides a new method for discovering novel ROCK II inhibitors.

  1. Measurement of jet substructure observables in $\\mathrm{t \\bar t}$ events from pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A measurement of differential jet substructure observables is presented using $\\mathrm{t \\bar t}$ lepton+jets events from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2016 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}$. Multiple jet substructure variables, such as the particle multiplicity, width, eccentricity, $p_\\mathrm{T}$ dispersion, N-subjettiness ratios, generalized angularities, and energy correlation functions, are measured for inclusive jets, as well as for identified bottom, light-quark, and gluon jets from the $\\mathrm{t \\bar t}$ final state. The results are unfolded to the stable-particle level and compared to predictions from POWHEG interfaced with PYTHIA 8 and HERWIG 7.1, as well as from SHERPA 2 and DIRE. A reasonable agreement between the data and the Monte Carlo predictions is found. From a comparison of the jet width distribution to the prediction, it is shown that a lower value of the effective strong coupling in t...

  2. Application of Probabilistic and Nonprobabilistic Hybrid Reliability Analysis Based on Dynamic Substructural Extremum Response Surface Decoupling Method for a Blisk of the Aeroengine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the nondeterministic factors of an aeroengine blisk, including both factors with sufficient and insufficient statistical data, based on the dynamic substructural method of determinate analysis, the extremum response surface method of probabilistic analysis, and the interval method of nonprobabilistic analysis, a methodology called the probabilistic and nonprobabilistic hybrid reliability analysis based on dynamic substructural extremum response surface decoupling method (P-NP-HRA-DS-ERSDM is proposed. The model includes random variables and interval variables to determine the interval failure probability and the interval reliability index. The extremum response surface function and its flow chart of mixed reliability analysis are given. The interval analysis is embedded in the most likely failure point in the iterative process. The probabilistic analysis and nonprobabilistic analysis are investigated alternately. Tuned and mistuned blisks are studied in a complicated environment, and the results are compared with the Monte Carlo method (MCM and the multilevel nested algorithm (MLNA to verify that the hybrid model can better handle reliability problems concurrently containing random variables and interval variables; meanwhile, it manifests that the computational efficiency of this method is superior and more reasonable for analysing and designing a mistuned blisk. Therefore, this methodology has very important practical significance.

  3. The effect of translucency of Y-TZP based all-ceramic crowns fabricated with difference substructure designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Naota; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Finkelman, Matthew D; Ishikawa-Nagai, Shigemi

    2013-08-01

    To analyse the effect of translucency of Y-TZP based all-ceramic crowns fabricated with different substructure thicknesses and extensions. The effect of restoration shading is also investigated. A maxillary right central incisal typodont tooth was prepared and a die was fabricated with Type IV stone after making impression. Horizontally and vertically reduced substructure extensions were designed at the facial cervical part with 0.3 mm and 0.5mm thick Lava Y-TZP. Each substructure was fabricated with two different shades, FS1 and FS7. A1 shade veneering porcelain was applied on FS1 shade Y-TZP substructures and D3 shade veneering porcelain was applied on FS7 shade Y-TZP substructures with lost wax and press ceramic technique. Ten specimens were fabricated for a total of 8 groups. The cervical and body colour of specimens were analysed with a spectrophotometer, after placing specimens on the two different coloured abutment teeth using translucent try-in cement. The data were obtained in CIELAB colour coordinates L*a*b*, and DE* through the test specimens over ND1 and ND8 shade abutments were calculated. At the cervical area, there was a significant difference on substructure extension (P crown shade could increase DE* at the body area. The translucency of a Y-TZP based all-ceramic crowns may influence its esthetic outcome when it is used on a discoloured abutment tooth. Clinicians should be aware of the effect of substructure design on the translucency of YTZP based all-ceramic crowns. 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative assessment of soft-tissue changes in Class II Division 1 patients following extraction and non-extraction treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Sneh Lata; Sharma, Vijay Prakash; Singh, Gyan Prakash; Sachan, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Background: The extraction of teeth for orthodontic purpose has always been a controversial subject in the speciality. The aesthetics impact of the soft-tissue profile might play a key role in deciding on premolar extraction or non-extraction (NE) treatment, particularly in borderline patients. The purpose of this cephalometric study was to examine the soft-tissue treatment effects of Class II Division 1 malocclusion undergoing extraction of all first premolars in comparison with patients und...

  5. Halo substructure in the SDSS-Gaia catalogue: streams and clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myeong, G. C.; Evans, N. W.; Belokurov, V.; Amorisco, N. C.; Koposov, S. E.

    2018-04-01

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-Gaia Catalogue to identify six new pieces of halo substructure. SDSS-Gaia is an astrometric catalogue that exploits SDSS data release 9 to provide first epoch photometry for objects in the Gaia source catalogue. We use a version of the catalogue containing 245 316 stars with all phase-space coordinates within a heliocentric distance of ˜10 kpc. We devise a method to assess the significance of halo substructures based on their clustering in velocity space. The two most substantial structures are multiple wraps of a stream which has undergone considerable phase mixing (S1, with 94 members) and a kinematically cold stream (S2, with 61 members). The member stars of S1 have a median position of (X, Y, Z) = (8.12, -0.22, 2.75) kpc and a median metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.78. The stars of S2 have median coordinates (X, Y, Z) = (8.66, 0.30, 0.77) kpc and a median metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.91. They lie in velocity space close to some of the stars in the stream reported by Helmi et al. By modelling, we estimate that both structures had progenitors with virial masses ≈1010M⊙ and infall times ≳ 9 Gyr ago. Using abundance matching, these correspond to stellar masses between 106 and 107M⊙. These are somewhat larger than the masses inferred through the mass-metallicity relation by factors of 5 to 15. Additionally, we identify two further substructures (S3 and S4 with 55 and 40 members) and two clusters or moving group (C1 and C2 with 24 and 12) members. In all six cases, clustering in kinematics is found to correspond to clustering in both configuration space and metallicity, adding credence to the reliability of our detections.

  6. Convergence properties of halo merger trees; halo and substructure merger rates across cosmic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Gregory B.; Mutch, Simon J.; Croton, Darren J.; Wyithe, Stuart

    2017-12-01

    We introduce GBPTREES: an algorithm for constructing merger trees from cosmological simulations, designed to identify and correct for pathological cases introduced by errors or ambiguities in the halo finding process. GBPTREES is built upon a halo matching method utilizing pseudo-radial moments constructed from radially sorted particle ID lists (no other information is required) and a scheme for classifying merger tree pathologies from networks of matches made to-and-from haloes across snapshots ranging forward-and-backward in time. Focusing on SUBFIND catalogues for this work, a sweep of parameters influencing our merger tree construction yields the optimal snapshot cadence and scanning range required for converged results. Pathologies proliferate when snapshots are spaced by ≲0.128 dynamical times; conveniently similar to that needed for convergence of semi-analytical modelling, as established by Benson et al. Total merger counts are converged at the level of ∼5 per cent for friends-of-friends (FoF) haloes of size np ≳ 75 across a factor of 512 in mass resolution, but substructure rates converge more slowly with mass resolution, reaching convergence of ∼10 per cent for np ≳ 100 and particle mass mp ≲ 109 M⊙. We present analytic fits to FoF and substructure merger rates across nearly all observed galactic history (z ≤ 8.5). While we find good agreement with the results presented by Fakhouri et al. for FoF haloes, a slightly flatter dependence on merger ratio and increased major merger rates are found, reducing previously reported discrepancies with extended Press-Schechter estimates. When appropriately defined, substructure merger rates show a similar mass ratio dependence as FoF rates, but with stronger mass and redshift dependencies for their normalization.

  7. Factorization for groomed jet substructure beyond the next-to-leading logarithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, Christopher; Larkoski, Andrew J.; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Yan, Kai [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Harvard University,17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Jet grooming algorithms are widely used in experimental analyses at hadron colliders to remove contaminating radiation from within jets. While the algorithms perform a great service to the experiments, their intricate algorithmic structure and multiple parameters has frustrated precision theoretic understanding. In this paper, we demonstrate that one particular groomer called soft drop actually makes precision jet substructure easier. In particular, we derive a factorization formula for a large class of soft drop jet substructure observables, including jet mass. The essential observation that allows for this factorization is that, without the soft wide-angle radiation groomed by soft drop, all singular contributions are collinear. The simplicity and universality of the collinear limit in QCD allows us to show that to all orders, the normalized differential cross section has no contributions from non-global logarithms. It is also independent of process, up to the relative fraction of quark and gluon jets. In fact, soft drop allows us to define this fraction precisely. The factorization theorem also explains why soft drop observables are less sensitive to hadronization than their ungroomed counterparts. Using the factorization theorem, we resum the soft drop jet mass to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. This requires calculating some clustering effects that are closely related to corresponding effects found in jet veto calculations. We match our resummed calculation to fixed order results for both e{sup +}e{sup −}→ dijets and pp→Z+j events, producing the first jet substructure predictions (groomed or ungroomed) to this accuracy for the LHC.

  8. Simulations of Fractal Star Cluster Formation. I. New Insights for Measuring Mass Segregation of Star Clusters with Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jincheng; Puzia, Thomas H. [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Católica, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Lin, Congping; Zhang, Yiwei, E-mail: yujc.astro@gmail.com, E-mail: tpuzia@gmail.com, E-mail: congpinglin@gmail.com, E-mail: yiweizhang831129@gmail.com [Center for Mathematical Science, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 4370074 (China)

    2017-05-10

    We compare the existent methods, including the minimum spanning tree based method and the local stellar density based method, in measuring mass segregation of star clusters. We find that the minimum spanning tree method reflects more the compactness, which represents the global spatial distribution of massive stars, while the local stellar density method reflects more the crowdedness, which provides the local gravitational potential information. It is suggested to measure the local and the global mass segregation simultaneously. We also develop a hybrid method that takes both aspects into account. This hybrid method balances the local and the global mass segregation in the sense that the predominant one is either caused by dynamical evolution or purely accidental, especially when such information is unknown a priori. In addition, we test our prescriptions with numerical models and show the impact of binaries in estimating the mass segregation value. As an application, we use these methods on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) observations and the Taurus cluster. We find that the ONC is significantly mass segregated down to the 20th most massive stars. In contrast, the massive stars of the Taurus cluster are sparsely distributed in many different subclusters, showing a low degree of compactness. The massive stars of Taurus are also found to be distributed in the high-density region of the subclusters, showing significant mass segregation at subcluster scales. Meanwhile, we also apply these methods to discuss the possible mechanisms of the dynamical evolution of the simulated substructured star clusters.

  9. Simulations of Fractal Star Cluster Formation. I. New Insights for Measuring Mass Segregation of Star Clusters with Substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jincheng; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lin, Congping; Zhang, Yiwei

    2017-01-01

    We compare the existent methods, including the minimum spanning tree based method and the local stellar density based method, in measuring mass segregation of star clusters. We find that the minimum spanning tree method reflects more the compactness, which represents the global spatial distribution of massive stars, while the local stellar density method reflects more the crowdedness, which provides the local gravitational potential information. It is suggested to measure the local and the global mass segregation simultaneously. We also develop a hybrid method that takes both aspects into account. This hybrid method balances the local and the global mass segregation in the sense that the predominant one is either caused by dynamical evolution or purely accidental, especially when such information is unknown a priori. In addition, we test our prescriptions with numerical models and show the impact of binaries in estimating the mass segregation value. As an application, we use these methods on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) observations and the Taurus cluster. We find that the ONC is significantly mass segregated down to the 20th most massive stars. In contrast, the massive stars of the Taurus cluster are sparsely distributed in many different subclusters, showing a low degree of compactness. The massive stars of Taurus are also found to be distributed in the high-density region of the subclusters, showing significant mass segregation at subcluster scales. Meanwhile, we also apply these methods to discuss the possible mechanisms of the dynamical evolution of the simulated substructured star clusters.

  10. Numerical Analysis of the Behavior of an IPM Bridge According to Super-Structure and Sub-Structure Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mincheol Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A bridge with an integrated and pile-bent abutment with a mechanically stabilized earth-wall (IPM was developed by separating earth pressure from the abutment to overcome the problems typically faced by integral abutment bridges. Also, the IPM bridge removes expansion joints and bearing by integrating the super-structure and the abutment and does not need many piles because it separates the earth pressure from backfills. Therefore, it is superior in cost, durability, and maintainability to traditional bridges and is sustainable due to using less material. A numerical analysis was conducted to ascertain the behavior of the IPM bridge according to its super-structural and sub-structural characteristics. Based on the analysis results, the behaviors of the IPM bridge are as follows: The bending moments ( M y of the pre-stressed concrete (PSC girder and the steel-plate girder of the bridge were influenced by the presence of the time-dependent loads. The contraction behavior in the PSC girder is largely due to the time-dependent loads, whereas the expansion behavior in the steel-plate girder is large due to its greater thermal expansion coefficient and temperature range compared with those of the PSC girder. In general, the suggested bridge length limit for PSC girders in both the integral abutment bridge and the IPM bridge is larger than that in a steel bridge. This needs to be reviewed again with consideration of the long-term and seasonal behaviors.

  11. Hippocampal substructural vulnerability to sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment in patients with chronic primary insomnia: magnetic resonance imaging morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Kim, Hosung; Suh, Sooyeon; Hong, Seung Bong

    2014-07-01

    Despite compelling evidence from animal studies indicating hippocampal subfield-specific vulnerability to poor sleep quality and related cognitive impairment, there have been no human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies investigating the relationship between hippocampal subfield volume and sleep disturbance. Our aim was to investigate the pattern of volume changes across hippocampal subfields in patients with primary insomnia relative to controls. Pointwise morphometry allowed for volume measurements of hippocampal regions on T1-weighted MRI. University hospital. Twenty-seven unmedicated patients (age: 51.2 ± 9.6 y) and 30 good sleepers as controls (50.4 ± 7.1 y). N/A. We compared hippocampal subfield volumes between patients and controls and correlated volume with clinical and neuropsychological features in patients. Patients exhibited bilateral atrophy across all hippocampal subfields (P sleep quality (higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and higher arousal index of polysomnography) (r 0.45, P sleep fragmentation and related chronic stress condition. Atrophy in the CA3-4-DG region was associated with impaired cognitive functions in patients. These observations may provide insight into pathophysiological mechanisms that make patients with chronic sleep disturbance vulnerable to cognitive impairment. Joo EY, Kim H, Suh S, Hong SB. Hippocampal substructural vulnerability to sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment in patients with chronic primary insomnia: magnetic resonance imaging morphometry.

  12. Prefabricated floor panels composed of fiber reinforced concrete and a steel substructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus H.; Fischer, Gregor; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a study on prefabricated composite and modular floor deck panels composed of relatively thin fiber reinforced concrete slabs connected to steel substructures. The study focuses on the design, manufacturing, structural improvements and behavior of the floor systems during...... loading at the serviceability and ultimate limit states. The composite construction concept offers flexibility in the assembly process, the ability to adapt to various load and boundary requirements, and efficient utilization of material properties that result in a light weight prefabricated structural...

  13. Soil-structure interaction analysis of NPP containments: substructure and frequency domain methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venancio-Filho, F.; Almeida, M.C.F.; Ferreira, W.G.; De Barros, F.C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Substructure and frequency domain methods for soil-structure interaction are addressed in this paper. After a brief description of mathematical models for the soil and of excitation, the equations for dynamic soil-structure interaction are developed for a rigid surface foundation and for an embedded foundation. The equations for the frequency domain analysis of MDOF systems are provided. An example of soil-structure interaction analysis with frequency-dependent soil properties is given and examples of identification of foundation impedance functions and soil properties are presented. (orig.)

  14. Chemical composition of stars in kinematical substructures of the galactic disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbaneva T.I.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Y, Zr, La, Ce, Nd , Sm and Eu abundances were found in LTE approach, and the abundance of Ba was computed in NLTE approximation for 280 FGK dwarfs in the region of metallicity of − 1<[Fe]< + 0.3. The selection of stars belonging to thin and thick disks and the stream Hercules was made on kinematic criteria. The analysis of enrichment of the different substructures of the Galaxy with α-element (Mg, Si, the iron peak (Ni and neutron-capture elements was carried out.

  15. Study of Jet Substructure in the ATLAS Experiment using Distributed Analysis within Spanish Tier-2 Infrastuctures

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver García, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Study of Jet Substructure in the ATLAS experiment using Distributed Analysis within Spanish Tier-2 Infrastructures (Estudio de Subestructura de Jets en el experimento ATLAS usando Análisis Distribuido dentro de las Infraestructuras del Tier-2 Español) Resumen en español 1. Motivación En el Large Hadron Collider (LHC) se producen partículas consideradas objetos ‘boosted’ donde sus productos de desintegración se concentran en una pequeña parte del detector. El estudio de estos ...

  16. Substructures in photo - absoption cross sections of sup(206,208)Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.; Stoyanov, Ch.; Voronov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced E1-transition probabilities and total photoabsorption cross sections σsub(γt) in sup(206, 208)Pb are calculated within the quasiparticle phonon nuclear model. Substructures, caused by the fragmented one-phonon states, are observed in the energy dependence of σsub(γt) in the interval from 5 to 8 MeV in sup(206, 208)Pb. The behaviour of σ(γt) differs from the Lorentz extrapolation of the giant dipole resonance, that is confirmed by the experimental data [ru

  17. X-ray diffraction analysis of substructures in plastically deformed BCC materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimanek, P.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure for line-shape analysis of broadened X-ray (or neutron) diffraction peaks is presented and specified for b.c.c. materials, which takes into account the effect of interfaces, internal stress of the 2nd kind and a dislocation distribution with weak defect correlation. Application of the technique is demonstrated by the estimation of dislocation densities in plastically deformed α-iron and steel. The results confirm that X-ray line-broadening analysis is suitable for integrated substructure characterization, but it becomes also evident that local structural inhomogeneity and the texture of the sample material must carefully included into the interpretation of experimental data. (orig.)

  18. Exclusive processes: Tests of coherent QCD phenomena and nucleon substructure at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1994-07-01

    Measurements of exclusive processes such as electroproduction, photoproduction, and Compton scattering are among the most sensitive probes of proton structure and coherent phenomena in quantum chromodynamics. The continuous electron beam at CEBAF, upgraded in laboratory energy to 10--12 GeV, will allow a systematic study of exclusive, semi-inclusive, and inclusive reactions in a kinematic range well-tuned to the study of fundamental nucleon and nuclear substructure. I also discuss the potential at CEBAF for studying novel QCD phenomena at the charm production threshold, including the possible production of nuclear-bound quarkonium

  19. Comparative acute toxicity of gallium(III), antimony(III), indium(III), cadmium(II), and copper(II) on freshwater swamp shrimp (Macrobrachium nipponense).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jen-Lee

    2014-04-01

    Acute toxicity testing were carried out the freshwater swamp shrimp, Macrobrachium nipponense, as the model animal for the semiconductor applied metals (gallium, antimony, indium, cadmium, and copper) to evaluate if the species is an suitable experimental animal of pollution in aquatic ecosystem. The static renewal test method of acute lethal concentrations determination was used, and water temperature was maintained at 24.0 ± 0.5°C. Data of individual metal obtained from acute toxicity tests were determined using probit analysis method. The median lethal concentration (96-h LC50) of gallium, antimony, indium, cadmium, and copper for M. nipponense were estimated as 2.7742, 1.9626, 6.8938, 0.0539, and 0.0313 mg/L, respectively. Comparing the toxicity tolerance of M. nipponense with other species which exposed to these metals, it is obviously that the M. nipponense is more sensitive than that of various other aquatic animals.

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Neutrophilic Iron(II Oxidizer Genomes for Candidate Genes in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomei He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular electron transfer (EET is recognized as a key biochemical process in circumneutral pH Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB. In this study, we searched for candidate EET genes in 73 neutrophilic FeOB genomes, among which 43 genomes are complete or close-to-complete and the rest have estimated genome completeness ranging from 5 to 91%. These neutrophilic FeOB span members of the microaerophilic, anaerobic phototrophic, and anaerobic nitrate-reducing FeOB groups. We found that many microaerophilic and several anaerobic FeOB possess homologs of Cyc2, an outer membrane cytochrome c originally identified in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The “porin-cytochrome c complex” (PCC gene clusters homologous to MtoAB/PioAB are present in eight FeOB, accounting for 19% of complete and close-to-complete genomes examined, whereas PCC genes homologous to OmbB-OmaB-OmcB in Geobacter sulfurreducens are absent. Further, we discovered gene clusters that may potentially encode two novel PCC types. First, a cluster (tentatively named “PCC3” encodes a porin, an extracellular and a periplasmic cytochrome c with remarkably large numbers of heme-binding motifs. Second, a cluster (tentatively named “PCC4” encodes a porin and three periplasmic multiheme cytochromes c. A conserved inner membrane protein (IMP encoded in PCC3 and PCC4 gene clusters might be responsible for translocating electrons across the inner membrane. Other bacteria possessing PCC3 and PCC4 are mostly Proteobacteria isolated from environments with a potential niche for Fe(II oxidation. In addition to cytochrome c, multicopper oxidase (MCO genes potentially involved in Fe(II oxidation were also identified. Notably, candidate EET genes were not found in some FeOB, especially the anaerobic ones, probably suggesting EET genes or Fe(II oxidation mechanisms are different from the searched models. Overall, based on current EET models, the search extends our understanding of bacterial EET and

  1. The dormant and the fully competent oocyte: comparing the transcriptome of human oocytes from primordial follicles and in metaphase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndahl, Marie Louise; Borup, Rehannah; Vikeså, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Oocytes become enclosed in primordial follicles during fetal life and remain dormant there until activation followed by growth and meiotic resumption. Current knowledge about the molecular pathways involved in oogenesis is incomplete. This study identifies the specific transcriptome of the human...... oocyte in the quiescent state and at the pinnacle of maturity at ovulation. In silico bioinformatic comparisons were made between the transcriptome of human oocytes from dormant primordial follicles and that of human metaphase II (MII) oocytes and granulosa cells and unique gene expression profiles were...

  2. [A comparative analysis of transverse and longitudinal gastrojejunostomies in the late period after a Bilroth-II gastric resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoluzhnyĭ, V I; Sluzhaeva, A P; Churkin, M V; Podoluzhnaia, I V

    1996-01-01

    A dynamic observation of 48 patients with the longitudinal gastrojejunal anastomoses and 41 patients with the transverse ones was performed at the period up to 7 years after the Billroth-II resection for ulcer disease of the duodenum. It was found that the functional value of the gastric stump mucosa was similarly decreased after the operation independent of the type of anastomosis. The difference of the rate of reducing the acidity and changes of proteolysis is not reliable. No substantial difference was found in the development of the disorders after the gastric resection.

  3. Comparative acute toxicity of gallium(III, antimony(III, indium(III, cadmium(II, and copper(II on freshwater swamp shrimp (Macrobrachium nipponense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Lee Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute toxicity testing were carried out the freshwater swamp shrimp, Macrobrachium nipponense, as the model animal for the semiconductor applied metals (gallium, antimony, indium, cadmium, and copper to evaluate if the species is an suitable experimental animal of pollution in aquatic ecosystem. RESULTS: The static renewal test method of acute lethal concentrations determination was used, and water temperature was maintained at 24.0 ± 0.5°C. Data of individual metal obtained from acute toxicity tests were determined using probit analysis method. The median lethal concentration (96-h LC50 of gallium, antimony, indium, cadmium, and copper for M. nipponense were estimated as 2.7742, 1.9626, 6.8938, 0.0539, and 0.0313 mg/L, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Comparing the toxicity tolerance of M. nipponense with other species which exposed to these metals, it is obviously that the M. nipponense is more sensitive than that of various other aquatic animals.

  4. The Comparative Reliability and Feasibility of the Past-Year Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Comparison of the Paper and Web Versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Lo Siou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in technology-enabled dietary assessment include the advent of web-based food frequency questionnaires, which may reduce costs and researcher burden but may introduce new challenges related to internet connectivity and computer literacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intra- and inter-version reliability, feasibility and acceptability of the paper and web Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II (CDHQ-II in a sub-sample of 648 adults (aged 39–81 years recruited from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1 paper, web, paper; or (2 web, paper, web over a six-week period. With few exceptions, no statistically significant differences in mean nutrient intake were found in the intra- and inter-version reliability analyses. The majority of participants indicated future willingness to complete the CDHQ-II online, and 59% indicated a preference for the web over the paper version. Findings indicate that, in this population of adults drawn from an existing cohort, the CDHQ-II may be administered in paper or web modalities (increasing flexibility for questionnaire delivery, and the nutrient estimates obtained with either version are comparable. We recommend that other studies explore the feasibility and reliability of different modes of administration of dietary assessment instruments prior to widespread implementation.

  5. The Comparative Reliability and Feasibility of the Past-Year Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Comparison of the Paper and Web Versions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Siou, Geraldine; Csizmadi, Ilona; Boucher, Beatrice A.; Akawung, Alianu K.; Whelan, Heather K.; Sharma, Michelle; Al Rajabi, Ala; Vena, Jennifer E.; Kirkpatrick, Sharon I.; Koushik, Anita; Massarelli, Isabelle; Rondeau, Isabelle; Robson, Paula J.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in technology-enabled dietary assessment include the advent of web-based food frequency questionnaires, which may reduce costs and researcher burden but may introduce new challenges related to internet connectivity and computer literacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intra- and inter-version reliability, feasibility and acceptability of the paper and web Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II (CDHQ-II) in a sub-sample of 648 adults (aged 39–81 years) recruited from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1) paper, web, paper; or (2) web, paper, web over a six-week period. With few exceptions, no statistically significant differences in mean nutrient intake were found in the intra- and inter-version reliability analyses. The majority of participants indicated future willingness to complete the CDHQ-II online, and 59% indicated a preference for the web over the paper version. Findings indicate that, in this population of adults drawn from an existing cohort, the CDHQ-II may be administered in paper or web modalities (increasing flexibility for questionnaire delivery), and the nutrient estimates obtained with either version are comparable. We recommend that other studies explore the feasibility and reliability of different modes of administration of dietary assessment instruments prior to widespread implementation. PMID:28208819

  6. The Substructure of the Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore calculate how the intensity scales from a low-resolution (AIA) pixels to high-resolution (Hi-C) pixels for both the dynamic events and "background" emission (meaning, the steady emission over the 5 minutes of data acquisition time). We find there is no evidence of substructure in the background corona; the intensity scales smoothly from low-resolution to high-resolution Hi-C pixels. In transient events, however, the intensity observed with Hi-C is, on average, 2.6 times larger than observed with AIA. This increase in intensity suggests that AIA is not resolving these events. This result suggests a finely structured dynamic corona embedded in a smoothly varying background.

  7. Detailed analysis of Japanese population substructure with a focus on the southwest islands of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Takeshi; Kishino, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Sadao; Ando, Ryosuke; Niimura, Hideshi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Horita, Mikako; Ohnaka, Keizo; Kuriyama, Nagato; Mikami, Haruo; Takashima, Naoyuki; Mastuo, Keitaro; Guang, Yin; Wakai, Kenji; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Uncovering population structure is important for properly conducting association studies and for examining the demographic history of a population. Here, we examined the Japanese population substructure using data from the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC), which covers all but the northern region of Japan. Using 222 autosomal loci from 4502 subjects, we investigated population substructure by estimating F(ST) among populations, testing population differentiation, and performing principal component analysis (PCA) and correspondence analysis (CA). All analyses revealed a low but significant differentiation between the Amami Islanders and the mainland Japanese population. Furthermore, we examined the genetic differentiation between the mainland population, Amami Islanders and Okinawa Islanders using six loci included in both the Pan-Asian SNP (PASNP) consortium data and the J-MICC data. This analysis revealed that the Amami and Okinawa Islanders were differentiated from the mainland population. In conclusion, we revealed a low but significant level of genetic differentiation between the mainland population and populations in or to the south of the Amami Islands, although genetic variation between both populations might be clinal. Therefore, the possibility of population stratification must be considered when enrolling the islander population of this area, such as in the J-MICC study.

  8. The Compact Muon Solenoid silicon tracker testing of hybrids, modules and substructures at operating temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Pottgens, M

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of two general purpose detectors which are foreseen to operate at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is presently being built at the European laboratory for particle physics (CERN) in Switzerland. The central tracker of CMS consists of a pixel system, which is located close to the interaction point and a silicon strip tracker (SST) which instruments the intermediate and outer region. The SST is composed of 15148 silicon microstrip detector modules which contain the read-out electronics (hybrids) and sensors. These modules will be assembled into substructures with control electronics and optics for transmitting data. The substructures will be integrated into the subsystems of the SST. The SST will be operated for up to ten years in the harsh radiation environment of the LHC. The lifetime of the SST will be extended by operating the detector at lowered temperature. The sensors, which are very delicate parts in respect to radiation damage, will be operated at a maximum ...

  9. Nuclear sub-structure in 112–122Ba nuclei within relativistic mean field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuyan, M.; Patra, S.K.; Arumugam, P.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2011-01-01

    Working within the framework of relativistic mean field theory, we study for the first time the clustering structure (nuclear sub-structure) of 112–122 Ba nuclei in an axially deformed cylindrical coordinate. We calculate the individual neutrons and protons density distributions for Ba-isotopes. From the analysis of the clustering configurations in total (neutrons-plus-protons) density distributions for various shapes of both the ground and excited states, we find different sub-structures inside the Ba nuclei considered here. The important step, carried out here for the first time, is the counting of number of protons and neutrons present in the clustering region(s). 12 C is shown to constitute the cluster configuration in prolate-deformed ground-states of 112–116 Ba and oblate-deformed first excited states of 118–122 Ba nuclei. Presence of other lighter clusters such as 2 H, 3 H and nuclei in the neighborhood of N = Z, 14 N, 34–36 Cl, 36 Ar and 42 Ca are also indicated in the ground and excited states of these nuclei. Cases with no cluster configuration are shown for 112–116 Ba in their first and second excited states. All these results are of interest for the observed intermediate-mass-fragments and fusion–fission processes, and the so far unobserved evaporation residues from the decaying Ba* compound nuclei formed in heavy ion reactions. (author)

  10. Deformation behavior of a 16-8-2 GTA weld as influenced by its solidification substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.; Moteff, J.; Sikka, V.K.; McEnerney, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Weldment sections from formed and welded type 316 stainless steel pipe are characterized with respect to some time-independent (tensile) and time-dependent (creep) mechanical properties at temperatures between 25 0 C and 649 0 C. The GTA weldment, welded with 16-8-2 filler metal, is sectioned from pipe in the formed + welded + solution annealed + straightened condition, as well as in the same condition with an additional re-solution treatment. Detailed room temperature microhardness measurements on these sections before and after reannealing enable a determination of the different recovery characteristics of weld and base metal. The observed stable weld metal solidification dislocation substructure in comparison with the base metal random dislocation structure, in fact, adequately explains weld/base metal elevated temperature mechanical behavior differences from this recovery characteristic standpoint. The weld metal substructure is the only parameter common to the variety of austenitic stainless steel welds exhibiting the consistent parent/weld metal deformation behavior differences described. As such, it must be considered the key to understanding weldment mechanical behavior

  11. Motion and deformation estimation from medical imagery by modeling sub-structure interaction and constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2012-09-13

    This paper presents a novel medical image registration algorithm that explicitly models the physical constraints imposed by objects or sub-structures of objects that have differing material composition and border each other, which is the case in most medical registration applications. Typical medical image registration algorithms ignore these constraints and therefore are not physically viable, and to incorporate these constraints would require prior segmentation of the image into regions of differing material composition, which is a difficult problem in itself. We present a mathematical model and algorithm for incorporating these physical constraints into registration / motion and deformation estimation that does not require a segmentation of different material regions. Our algorithm is a joint estimation of different material regions and the motion/deformation within these regions. Therefore, the segmentation of different material regions is automatically provided in addition to the image registration satisfying the physical constraints. The algorithm identifies differing material regions (sub-structures or objects) as regions where the deformation has different characteristics. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on the analysis of cardiac MRI which includes the detection of the left ventricle boundary and its deformation. The experimental results indicate the potential of the algorithm as an assistant tool for the quantitative analysis of cardiac functions in the diagnosis of heart disease.

  12. Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer: substructure and similarity searching of molecules from Wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Patiny, Luc; Sander, Thomas; Rufener, Christian; Zasso, Michaël

    2015-01-01

    Wikipedia, the world's largest and most popular encyclopedia is an indispensable source of chemistry information. It contains among others also entries for over 15,000 chemicals including metabolites, drugs, agrochemicals and industrial chemicals. To provide an easy access to this wealth of information we decided to develop a substructure and similarity search tool for chemical structures referenced in Wikipedia. We extracted chemical structures from entries in Wikipedia and implemented a web system allowing structure and similarity searching on these data. The whole search as well as visualization system is written in JavaScript and therefore can run locally within a web page and does not require a central server. The Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer is accessible on-line at www.cheminfo.org/wikipedia and is available also as an open source project from GitHub for local installation. The web-based Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer provides a useful resource for research as well as for chemical education enabling both researchers and students easy and user friendly chemistry searching and identification of relevant information in Wikipedia. The tool can also help to improve quality of chemical entries in Wikipedia by providing potential contributors regularly updated list of entries with problematic structures. And last but not least this search system is a nice example of how the modern web technology can be applied in the field of cheminformatics. Graphical abstractWikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer allows substructure and similarity searches on molecules referenced in Wikipedia.

  13. Molecular query language (MQL)--a context-free grammar for substructure matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proschak, Ewgenij; Wegner, Jörg K; Schüller, Andreas; Schneider, Gisbert; Fechner, Uli

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a Java library for substructure matching that features easy-to-read syntax and extensibility. This molecular query language (MQL) is grounded on a context-free grammar, which allows for straightforward modification and extension. The formal description of MQL is provided in this paper. Molecule primitives are atoms, bonds, properties, branching, and rings. User-defined features can be added via a Java interface. In MQL, molecules are represented as graphs. Substructure matching was implemented using the Ullmann algorithm because of favorable run-time performance. The Ullmann algorithm carries out a fast subgraph isomorphism search by combining backtracking with effective forward checking. MQL software design was driven by the aim to facilitate the use of various cheminformatics toolkits. Two Java interfaces provide a bridge from our MQL package to an external toolkit: the first one provides the matching rules for every feature of a particular toolkit; the second one converts the found match from the internal format of MQL to the format of the external toolkit. We already implemented these interfaces for the Chemistry Development Toolkit.

  14. Substructure hybrid testing of reinforced concrete shear wall structure using a domain overlapping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Pan, Peng; Gong, Runhua; Wang, Tao; Xue, Weichen

    2017-10-01

    An online hybrid test was carried out on a 40-story 120-m high concrete shear wall structure. The structure was divided into two substructures whereby a physical model of the bottom three stories was tested in the laboratory and the upper 37 stories were simulated numerically using ABAQUS. An overlapping domain method was employed for the bottom three stories to ensure the validity of the boundary conditions of the superstructure. Mixed control was adopted in the test. Displacement control was used to apply the horizontal displacement, while two controlled force actuators were applied to simulate the overturning moment, which is very large and cannot be ignored in the substructure hybrid test of high-rise buildings. A series of tests with earthquake sources of sequentially increasing intensities were carried out. The test results indicate that the proposed hybrid test method is a solution to reproduce the seismic response of high-rise concrete shear wall buildings. The seismic performance of the tested precast high-rise building satisfies the requirements of the Chinese seismic design code.

  15. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP2-05: Can Automatic Delineation of Cardiac Substructures On Noncontrast CT Be Used for Cardiac Toxicity Analysis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y; Liao, Z; Jiang, W; Gomez, D; Williamson, R; Court, L; Yang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using an automatic segmentation tool to delineate cardiac substructures from computed tomography (CT) images for cardiac toxicity analysis for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after radiotherapy. Methods: A multi-atlas segmentation tool developed in-house was used to delineate eleven cardiac substructures including the whole heart, four heart chambers, and six greater vessels automatically from the averaged 4DCT planning images for 49 NSCLC patients. The automatic segmented contours were edited appropriately by two experienced radiation oncologists. The modified contours were compared with the auto-segmented contours using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean surface distance (MSD) to evaluate how much modification was needed. In addition, the dose volume histogram (DVH) of the modified contours were compared with that of the auto-segmented contours to evaluate the dosimetric difference between modified and auto-segmented contours. Results: Of the eleven structures, the averaged DSC values ranged from 0.73 ± 0.08 to 0.95 ± 0.04 and the averaged MSD values ranged from 1.3 ± 0.6 mm to 2.9 ± 5.1mm for the 49 patients. Overall, the modification is small. The pulmonary vein (PV) and the inferior vena cava required the most modifications. The V30 (volume receiving 30 Gy or above) for the whole heart and the mean dose to the whole heart and four heart chambers did not show statistically significant difference between modified and auto-segmented contours. The maximum dose to the greater vessels did not show statistically significant difference except for the PV. Conclusion: The automatic segmentation of the cardiac substructures did not require substantial modification. The dosimetric evaluation showed no statistically significant difference between auto-segmented and modified contours except for the PV, which suggests that auto-segmented contours for the cardiac dose response study are feasible in the clinical

  16. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP2-05: Can Automatic Delineation of Cardiac Substructures On Noncontrast CT Be Used for Cardiac Toxicity Analysis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y; Liao, Z; Jiang, W; Gomez, D; Williamson, R; Court, L; Yang, J [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using an automatic segmentation tool to delineate cardiac substructures from computed tomography (CT) images for cardiac toxicity analysis for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after radiotherapy. Methods: A multi-atlas segmentation tool developed in-house was used to delineate eleven cardiac substructures including the whole heart, four heart chambers, and six greater vessels automatically from the averaged 4DCT planning images for 49 NSCLC patients. The automatic segmented contours were edited appropriately by two experienced radiation oncologists. The modified contours were compared with the auto-segmented contours using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean surface distance (MSD) to evaluate how much modification was needed. In addition, the dose volume histogram (DVH) of the modified contours were compared with that of the auto-segmented contours to evaluate the dosimetric difference between modified and auto-segmented contours. Results: Of the eleven structures, the averaged DSC values ranged from 0.73 ± 0.08 to 0.95 ± 0.04 and the averaged MSD values ranged from 1.3 ± 0.6 mm to 2.9 ± 5.1mm for the 49 patients. Overall, the modification is small. The pulmonary vein (PV) and the inferior vena cava required the most modifications. The V30 (volume receiving 30 Gy or above) for the whole heart and the mean dose to the whole heart and four heart chambers did not show statistically significant difference between modified and auto-segmented contours. The maximum dose to the greater vessels did not show statistically significant difference except for the PV. Conclusion: The automatic segmentation of the cardiac substructures did not require substantial modification. The dosimetric evaluation showed no statistically significant difference between auto-segmented and modified contours except for the PV, which suggests that auto-segmented contours for the cardiac dose response study are feasible in the clinical

  17. Older driver estimates of driving exposure compared to in-vehicle data in the Candrive II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michelle M; Smith, Glenys A; Cull, Andrew W; Myers, Anita M; Bédard, Michel; Gélinas, Isabelle; Mazer, Barbara L; Marshall, Shawn C; Naglie, Gary; Rapoport, Mark J; Tuokko, Holly A; Vrkljan, Brenda H

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on older adults' driving practices have relied on self-reported information. With technological advances it is now possible to objectively measure the everyday driving of older adults in their own vehicles over time. The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of older drivers to accurately estimate their kilometers driven over one year relative to objectively measured driving exposure. A subsample (n = 159 of 928; 50.9% male) of Candrive II participants (age ≥ 70 years of age) was used in these analyses based on strict criteria for data collected from questionnaires as well as an OttoView-CD Autonomous Data Logging Device installed in their vehicle, over the first year of the prospective cohort study. Although there was no significant difference overall between the self-reported and objectively measured distance categories, only moderate agreement was found (weighted kappa = 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.67). Almost half (45.3%) chose the wrong distance category, and some people misestimated their distance driven by up to 20,000 km. Those who misjudged in the low mileage group (≤5000 km) consistently underestimated, whereas the reverse was found for those in the high distance categories (≥ 20,000); that is, they always overestimated their driving distance. Although self-reported driving distance categories may be adequate for studies entailing broad group comparisons, caution should be used in interpreting results. Use of self-reported estimates for individual assessments should be discouraged.

  18. Migration and multiple sclerosis in United Kingdom and Ireland immigrants to Australia: a reassessment. II. Characteristics of early (pre-1947) compared to later migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, J G; Hammond, S R; Kurtzke, J F

    2012-04-01

    In our recent reassessment we explored the risk of MS by age at immigration in 258 migrants from United Kingdom and Ireland (UKI) to four states of Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, and Western Australia) in the period 1947-1981 (Group II). In the present report we have compared their characteristics with 44 cases who migrated before 1947 (Group I), divided into two subsets: Group Ia (15 cases) was rather similar to Group II in age at immigration (means of 20 and 23 years), age at onset (39 and 33 years), and duration from immigration to onset (19 and 10 years). Group Ib (29 cases) was significantly different from Group II, with mean ages of 4 years at immigration and 40 years at onset, for a mean interval of some 35 years between immigration and onset. All onsets in Group Ib occurred after 1947. We concluded that the Group Ib cases had most probably acquired their MS in Australia. Immigrants from high MS risk countries, including UKI, were modest in number before 1947, but some 770,000 entered from 1947-1981. They may have been the source of MS for the Group Ib migrants.

  19. One year of adjuvant tamoxifen compared with chemotherapy and tamoxifen in postmenopausal patients with stage II breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Elversang, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    We report the long-term results of a randomised trial comparing tamoxifen with tamoxifen plus cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF) in postmenopausal high-risk breast cancer patients. In addition, we analyse the prognostic and predictive value of centrally assessed subtypes....

  20. Apical Periodontitis and Endodontic Treatment in Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus: Comparative Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Leena

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of apical periodontitis (AP) in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients compared with nondiabetic patients and to examine the effect of glycemic control on the prevalence of AP. Radiographs of a group of DM patients were compared with those of a matched nondiabetic group to identify AP. The diabetic group was subdivided according to the level of glycemic control into two subgroups: A well-controlled DM and a poorly controlled DM. The periapical index score was used to assess the periapical status. All groups were compared in regard to the presence of AP lesions, the number of end-odontically treated teeth (ET), and the percentage of failure of endodontically treated teeth (AP/ET ratio). Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0, Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for all the analyses; p ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The prevalence of AP was higher in diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (13.5 vs 11.9% respectively). Diabetic group had more teeth with endodontic treatment ET compared with nondiabetic group (4.18 vs 1.82% respectively); this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001) along with higher AP/ET ratio (27.7 vs 19.3 respectively). The poorly controlled DM group had a higher prevalence of AP lesions compared with the well-controlled DM group (18.29 vs 9.21 respectively). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001); they also had a higher percentage of ET (5.55 vs 3.13% respectively) and AP/ ET ratio (32.0 vs 21.8% respectively). This survey demonstrates a higher prevalence of AP in DM patients compared with nondiabetic group, with an increased prevalence of persistent chronic AP. Compared with a well-controlled diabetic group, a poor glycemic control may be associated with a higher prevalence of AP and increased rate of endodontic failures. Counseling diabetic patients, particularly those with poor glycemic control, about the risk of

  1. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL TO COMPARE THE EFFECT OF MUSCLE ENERGY TECHNIQUE WITH CONVENTIONAL THERAPY IN STAGE II ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    OpenAIRE

    B. Chakradhar Reddy; Santosh Metgud

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Adhesive capsulitis is a clinical diagnosis made from a history of the gradual onset of severe shoulder pain with the progressive limitation of active and passive glenohumeral movements. Muscle energy technique helps to mobilize restricted joints by stretching hypertonic muscles, capsules, ligaments, and fascia. The aim of the study is to find out and compare the effect of MET and Conventional therapy to reduce pain, improve the shoulder range of motion ...

  2. Passengers Preference and Satisfaction of Public Transport in Malaysia, Part II: A Comparative Analysis of Komuter and LRT Network

    OpenAIRE

    Rozmi Ismail; Mohammad Hesam Hafezi; Rahim Mohd Nor

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a comparative analysis of passengers preference and satisfaction of two kinds of public transportation in Malaysia, namely, train commuter (KTM) and Light Rail Transit (LRT). One of the important issues regarding public transport is the passenger satisfaction. The main objective of this research is to describe traveler’s satisfaction and preference towards public transport with service quality attributes. Parameters in passenger preference and satisfaction on public transp...

  3. Comparative study of As (III) and Zn (II) removal from aqueous solutions using Philippine natural zeolite and alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olegario-Sanchez, Eleanor; Pelicano, Christian Mark

    2017-12-01

    Herein, the heavy metal removal efficiency of Philippine natural zeolite is investigated through a comparative study with commercial alumina (Al2O3). XRD results revealed a high purity crystalline γ-Al2O3 and a natural zeolite having clinoptilolite (Na,K,Ca)2-3Al3(Al,Si)2Si13O36.12H2O and mordenite (Ca, Na2, K2)Al2Si10O24.7H2O as primary component minerals. Micro-pores and plate-like structures were observed on the surface of the natural zeolite. The natural zeolite has shown three times higher removal efficiency for Zn2+ ion than alumina. On the other hand, alumina exhibited comparable but smaller removal efficiency for As3+ as with that of natural zeolite. Alumina showed a higher capability of increasing the pH of both solutions compared with the natural zeolite. Based on removal efficiency and adsorbent costs, Philippine natural zeolite could be used as a low-cost alternative for wastewater treatment.

  4. Reduction of fatigue loads on jacket substructure through blade design optimization for multimegawatt wind turbines at 50 m water depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NJOMO WANDJI, Wilfried; Pavese, Christian; Natarajan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the reduction of the fore-aft damage equivalent moment at the tower base for multi-megawatt offshore wind turbines mounted on jacket type substructures at 50 m water depths. The study investigates blade design optimization of a reference 10 MW wind turbine under standard wind...... on the efficient design of other components such as the constituents of the nacelle....

  5. What (if anything) can few-body strange systems teach us about quark-gluon hadronic substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltman, K. (Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We discuss expectation, relevant to the proposed ({pi},K) program at PILAC, for the effects of hadronic quark-gluon substructure on the physics of few-body strangeness {minus}1 systems, in the context of QCD-inspired models used previously to describe the hadron spectrum and short distance nucleon-nucleon scattering. 50 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. What (if anything) can few-body strange systems teach us about quark-gluon hadronic substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltman, K. (University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1991-04-25

    We discuss expectations, relevant to the proposed ({pi}, {ital K}) program at PILAC, for the effects of hadronic quark-gluon substructure on the physics of few-body strangeness {minus}1 systems, in the context of QCD-inspired models used previously to describe the handron spectrum ad short distance nucleon-nucleon scattering.

  7. What (if anything) can few-body strange systems teach us about quark-gluon hadronic substructure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltman, K.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss expectation, relevant to the proposed (π,K) program at PILAC, for the effects of hadronic quark-gluon substructure on the physics of few-body strangeness -1 systems, in the context of QCD-inspired models used previously to describe the hadron spectrum and short distance nucleon-nucleon scattering. 50 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIVEZEY, BRADLEY C; ZUSI, RICHARD L

    2007-01-01

    . Bootstrapping (based on 10 000 replicates) percentages and ratchet-minimized support (Bremer) indices indicated most nodes to be robust. Several fossil Neornithes (e.g. Dinornithiformes, Aepyornithiformes) were placed within the ingroup a posteriori either through unconstrained, heursitic searches based on the complete matrix augmented by these taxa separately or using backbone-constraints. Analysis confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the Neornithes. Findings included monophyly of the palaeognathous birds, comprising the sister taxa Tinamiformes and ratites, respectively, and the Anseriformes and Galliformes as monophyletic sister-groups, together forming the sister-group to other Neornithes exclusive of the Palaeognathae (Neoaves). Noteworthy inferences include: (i) the sister-group to remaining Neoaves comprises a diversity of marine and wading birds; (ii) Podicipedidae are the sister-group of Gaviidae, and not closely related to the Phoenicopteridae, as recently suggested; (iii) the traditional Pelecaniformes, including the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) as sister-taxon to other members, are monophyletic; (iv) traditional Ciconiiformes are monophyletic; (v) Strigiformes and Falconiformes are sister-groups; (vi) Cathartidae is the sister-group of the remaining Falconiformes; (vii) Ralliformes (Rallidae and Heliornithidae) are the sister-group to the monophyletic Charadriiformes, with the traditionally composed Gruiformes and Turniciformes (Turnicidae and Mesitornithidae) sequentially paraphyletic to the entire foregoing clade; (viii) Opisthocomus hoazin is the sister-taxon to the Cuculiformes (including the Musophagidae); (ix) traditional Caprimulgiformes are monophyletic and the sister-group of the Apodiformes; (x) Trogoniformes are the sister-group of Coliiformes; (xi) Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes are mutually monophyletic and closely related; and (xii) the Galbulae are retained within the

  9. The Genetics of Mexico Recapitulates Native American Substructure and Affects Biomedical Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Zakharia, Fouad; Sikora, Martin; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Sandoval, Karla; Eng, Celeste; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Robles, Victoria; Kenny, Eimear E.; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín-Pérez, Gastón; Granados-Arriola, Julio; Huntsman, Scott; Galanter, Joshua M.; Via, Marc; Ford, Jean G.; Chapela, Rocío; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodríguez-Santana, Jose R.; Romieu, Isabelle; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Navarro, Blanca del Rio; London, Stephanie J.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Garcia-Herrera, Rodrigo; Estrada, Karol; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Carnevale, Alessandra; Soberón, Xavier; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexico harbors great cultural and ethnic diversity, yet fine-scale patterns of human genome-wide variation from this region remain largely uncharacterized. We studied genomic variation within Mexico from over 1,000 individuals representing 20 indigenous and 11 mestizo populations. We found striking genetic stratification among indigenous populations within Mexico at varying degrees of geographic isolation. Some groups were as differentiated as Europeans are from East Asians. Pre-Columbian genetic substructure is recapitulated in the indigenous ancestry of admixed mestizo individuals across the country. Furthermore, two independently phenotyped cohorts of Mexicans and Mexican Americans showed a significant association between sub-continental ancestry and lung function. Thus, accounting for fine-scale ancestry patterns is critical for medical and population genetic studies within Mexico, in Mexican-descent populations, and likely in many other populations worldwide. PMID:24926019

  10. A NASTRAN DMAP alter for the coupling of modal and physical coordinate substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described to derive a generalized coordinate model consisting of flexible cantilever modes and rigid body modes from a physical coordinate model using a direct matrix abstraction procedure alter to rigid format 3. This model can readily be coupled to other substructures using modal synthesis techniques. It allows the use of a reduced size model for structural analyses while maintaining the capability of recovering the accelerations, forces, stresses, etc., from the original, large, complex model. This output recovery is accomplished with the use of a loads transformation matrix which relates the output parameters to the modal coordinate accelerations. In addition, a method is described to synthesize structural models consisting of hybrid coordinates for use in dynamic response analyses where one structure is described using physical coordinates and the other using generalized modal coordinates.

  11. Gamma-ray signatures of annihilation to charged leptons in dark matter substructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, Matthew D.; Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Because of their higher concentrations and small internal velocities, Milky Way subhalos can be at least as important as the smooth halo in accounting for the GeV positron excess via dark matter annihilation. After showing how this can be achieved in various scenarios, including in Sommerfeld models, we demonstrate that, in this case, the diffuse inverse-Compton emission resulting from electrons and positrons produced in substructure leads to a nearly-isotropic signal close to the level of the isotropic GeV gamma-ray background seen by Fermi. Moreover, we show that HESS cosmic-ray electron measurements can be used to constrain multi-TeV internal bremsstrahlung gamma rays arising from annihilation to charged leptons.

  12. Definition of a concrete bio-decontamination process in nuclear substructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jestin, A.

    2005-05-01

    The decontamination of sub-structural materials represents a stake of high-importance because of the high volume generated. It is agreed then to propose efficient and effective processes. The process of bio-decontamination of the hydraulic binders leans on the mechanisms of biodegradation of concretes, phenomenon characterized in the 40's by an indirect attack of the material by acids stem from the microbial metabolism: sulphuric acid (produced by Thiobacillus), nitric acid (produced by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter) and organic acids (produced by fungi). The principle of the bio-decontamination process is to apply those micro-organisms on the surface of the contaminated material, in order to damage its surface and to retrieve the radionuclides. One of the multiple approaches of the process is the use of a bio-gel that makes possible the micro-organisms application. (author)

  13. The Substructure of a Flux Transfer Event Observed by the MMS Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Gershman, D.; Avanov, L.; Paterson, W. R.; Dorelli, J. C.; Ergun, R. E.; Russel, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    On 15 August 2015, MMS (Magnetospheric Multiscale mission), skimming the dusk magnetopause, detected an isolated region of an increased magnetic strength and bipolar Bn, indicating a flux transfer event (FTE). The four spacecraft in a tetrahedron allowed for investigations of the shape and motion of the FTE. In particular, high-resolution particle data facilitated our exploration of FTE substructures and their magnetic connectivity inside and surrounding the FTE. Combined field and plasma observations suggest that the core fields are open, magnetically connected to the northern magnetosphere from which high-energy particles leak; ion "D" distributions characterize the axis of flux ropes that carry old-opened field lines; counter streaming electrons superposed by parallel-heated components populate the periphery surrounding the FTE; and the interface between the core and draped regions contains a separatrix of newlyopened magnetic field lines that emanate from the X line above the FTE.

  14. Performance of boosted object and jet substructure techniques in Run 1 and 2 ATLAS data

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00356617; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Hadronic decays of heavy particles with momenta much larger than their mass result in their decay products being reconstructable as a single large-radius jet. The study of the substructure of these jets allows the separation of these boosted decays with respect to more common jets from light-quarks and gluons. Several techniques have been developed by the phenomenology and experimental community to identify jets coming from hadronic decays of boosted top quarks, W, Z and Higgs bosons. The performance of several such techniques have been studied in ATLAS using fully-simulated Monte Carlo events, and validated on data using pure samples of top quarks, W bosons from top decays and dijet events. Results of these studies will be presented for Run 1 as well as Run 2 of the LHC.

  15. Design and Test Beam Performance of Substructures of the CMS Tracker End Caps

    CERN Document Server

    Brauer, Richard

    2005-01-01

    With its total active silicon area of about 200 squaremetres and more than 15000 silicon modules the silicon strip tracker of the CMS experiment at the LHC will be the largest silicon strip detector ever built. While the performance of single silicon modules has already been tested extensively in various test beam experiments, the performance of larger integrated substructures also had to be studied with a particle beam before launching mass production, in order to ensure the envisaged performance of the overall system. In May/June 2004 the performance of a system of two petals of the tracker end caps (TEC), which represents about 1% of the full TEC and forms an autonomous unit in terms of data acquisition, has been studied in a test beam experiment at CERN. In this document the test beam experiment is described and results are presented.

  16. Structure and substructure analysis of DAFT/FADA galaxy clusters in the [0.4-0.9] redshift range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guennou, L.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Ulmer, M. P.; Clowe, D.; LeBrun, V.; Martinet, N.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Basa, S.; Benoist, C.; Biviano, A.; Cappi, A.; Cypriano, E. S.; Gavazzi, R.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Jullo, E.; Just, D.; Limousin, M.; Márquez, I.; Mazure, A.; Murphy, K. J.; Plana, H.; Rostagni, F.; Russeil, D.; Schirmer, M.; Slezak, E.; Tucker, D.; Zaritsky, D.; Ziegler, B.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The DAFT/FADA survey is based on the study of ~90 rich (masses found in the literature >2 × 1014 M⊙) and moderately distant clusters (redshifts 0.4 clusters and to build a database (deep multi-band imaging allowing photometric redshift estimates, spectroscopic data, X-ray data) of rich distant clusters to study their properties. Aims: We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range are available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. Methods: In X-rays, we analysed the XMM-Newton data available, fit a β-model, and subtracted it to identify residuals. We used Chandra data, when available, to identify point sources. In the optical, we applied a Serna & Gerbal (SG) analysis to clusters with at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts available in the cluster range. We discuss the substructure detection efficiencies of both methods. Results: XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a β-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. The choice of a minimum number of 15 redshifts implies that only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster pericentre approach and are relatively recent infalls. We also find hints of a decreasing X-ray gas density profile core radius with redshift

  17. Comparative analysis of the anterior and posterior length and deflection angle of the cranial base, in individuals with facial Pattern I, II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Thiesen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the variations in the anterior cranial base (S-N, posterior cranial base (S-Ba and deflection of the cranial base (SNBa among three different facial patterns (Pattern I, II and III. METHOD: A sample of 60 lateral cephalometric radiographs of Brazilian Caucasian patients, both genders, between 8 and 17 years of age was selected. The sample was divided into 3 groups (Pattern I, II and III of 20 individuals each. The inclusion criteria for each group were the ANB angle, Wits appraisal and the facial profile angle (G'.Sn.Pg'. To compare the mean values obtained from (SNBa, S-N, S-Ba each group measures, the ANOVA test and Scheffé's Post-Hoc test were applied. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference for the deflection angle of the cranial base among the different facial patterns (Patterns I, II and III. There was no significant difference for the measures of the anterior and posterior cranial base between the facial Patterns I and II. The mean values for S-Ba were lower in facial Pattern III with statistically significant difference. The mean values of S-N in the facial Pattern III were also reduced, but without showing statistically significant difference. This trend of lower values in the cranial base measurements would explain the maxillary deficiency and/or mandibular prognathism features that characterize the facial Pattern III.OBJETIVO: o presente estudo avaliou as variações da base craniana anterior (S-N, base craniana posterior (S-Ba, e ângulo de deflexão da base do crânio (SNBa entre três diferentes padrões faciais (Padrão I, II e III. MÉTODOS: selecionou-se uma amostra de 60 telerradiografias em norma lateral de pacientes brasileiros leucodermas, de ambos os sexos, com idades entre 8 anos e 17 anos. A amostra foi dividida em três grupos (Padrão I, II e III, sendo cada grupo constituído de 20 indivíduos. Os critérios de seleção dos indivíduos para cada grupo

  18. Objectives and methodology of Romanian SEPHAR II Survey. Project for comparing the prevalence and control of cardiovascular risk factors in two East-European countries: Romania and Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorobantu, Maria; Tautu, Oana-Florentina; Darabont, Roxana; Ghiorghe, Silviu; Badila, Elisabeta; Dana, Minca; Dobreanu, Minodora; Baila, Ilarie; Rutkowski, Marcin; Zdrojewski, Tomasz

    2015-08-12

    Comparing results of representative surveys conducted in different East-European countries could contribute to a better understanding and management of cardiovascular risk factors, offering grounds for the development of health policies addressing the special needs of this high cardiovascular risk region of Europe. The aim of this paper was to describe the methodology on which the comparison between the Romanian survey SEPHAR II and the Polish survey NATPOL 2011 results is based. SEPHAR II, like NATPOL 2011, is a cross-sectional survey conducted on a representative sample of the adult Romanian population (18 to 80 years) and encompasses two visits with the following components: completing the study questionnaire, blood pressure and anthropometric measurements, and collection of blood and urine samples. From a total of 2223 subjects found at 2860 visited addresses, 2044 subjects gave written consent but only 1975 subjects had eligible data for the analysis, accounting for a response rate of 69.06%. Additionally we excluded 11 subjects who were 80 years of age (NATPOL 2011 included adult subjects up to 79 years). Therefore, the sample size included in the statistical analysis is 1964. It has similar age groups and gender structure as the Romanian population aged 18-79 years from the last census available at the moment of conducting the survey (weight adjustments for epidemiological analyses range from 0.48 to 8.7). Sharing many similarities, the results of SEPHAR II and NATPOL 2011 surveys can be compared by a proper statistical method offering crucial information regarding cardiovascular risk factors in a high-cardiovascular risk European region.

  19. Adsorption properties of Sr (II) on bentonite Jelsovy potok compared with standard SAz-1 and STx-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnak, A.; Galambos, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of mineralogical composition of bentonite adsorbents of Jelsovy potok bearing and standards of montmorillonite SAz-1 and STx-1 on adsorption behavior of strontium cations. In the experiment, Jelsovy potok bentonite showed good adsorption behavior compared with montmorillonite standards. Based on demonstration of the impact of mineralogical composition of adsorbents on adsorption percentage of strontium cations Jelsovy potok bentonite may be considered to be utilizable for multi-barrier system of a deep geological repository for high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  20. Using computational fluid dynamics to compare shear rate and turbulence in the in vivo-representative TIM automated-gastric-compartment with USP Apparatus II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopgood, Matthew; Reynolds, Gavin; Barker, Richard

    2018-03-30

    We use computational fluid dynamics to compare the shear rate and turbulence in an advanced in vitro gastric model (TIMagc) during its simulation of fasted state Migrating Motor Complex phases I and II, with the United States Pharmacopeia Paddle Dissolution Apparatus II (USPII). A specific focus is placed on how shear rate in these apparatus effects erosion-based solid oral dosage forms. The study finds that tablet surface shear rates in TIMagc are strongly time-dependant and fluctuate between 0.001 and 360 s -1 . In USPII, tablet surface shear rates are approximately constant for a given paddle speed and increase linearly from 9 s -1 to 36 s -1 as the paddle speed is increased from 25 to 100 rpm. A strong linear relationship is observed between tablet surface shear rate and tablet erosion rate in USPII, whereas TIMagc shows highly variable behaviour. The flow regimes present in each apparatus are compared to in vivo predictions using Reynolds number analysis. Reynolds numbers for flow in TIMagc lie predominantly within the predicted in vivo bounds (0.01-30), whereas Reynolds numbers for flow in USPII lie above the predicted upper bound when operating with paddle speeds as low as 25 rpm (33). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Preoperative Quantitative MR Tractography Compared with Visual Tract Evaluation in Patients with Neuropathologically Confirmed Gliomas Grades II and III: A Prospective Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Anna F.; Nilsson, Markus; Latini, Francesco; Mårtensson, Johanna; Zetterling, Maria; Berntsson, Shala G.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Lätt, Jimmy; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Low-grade gliomas show infiltrative growth in white matter tracts. Diffusion tensor tractography can noninvasively assess white matter tracts. The aim was to preoperatively assess tumor growth in white matter tracts using quantitative MR tractography (3T). The hypothesis was that suspected infiltrated tracts would have altered diffusional properties in infiltrated tract segments compared to noninfiltrated tracts. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight patients with suspected low-grade glioma were included after written informed consent and underwent preoperative diffusion tensor imaging in this prospective review-board approved study. Major white matter tracts in both hemispheres were tracked, segmented, and visually assessed for tumor involvement in thirty-four patients with gliomas grade II or III (astrocytomas or oligodendrogliomas) on postoperative neuropathological evaluation. Relative fractional anisotropy (rFA) and mean diffusivity (rMD) in tract segments were calculated and compared with visual evaluation and neuropathological diagnosis. Results. Tract segment infiltration on visual evaluation was associated with a lower rFA and high rMD in a majority of evaluated tract segments (89% and 78%, resp.). Grade II and grade III gliomas had similar infiltrating behavior. Conclusion. Quantitative MR tractography corresponds to visual evaluation of suspected tract infiltration. It may be useful for an objective preoperative evaluation of tract segment involvement

  2. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XXXII. A Search for Globular Cluster Substructures in the Virgo Galaxy Cluster Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Longobardi, Alessia; Peng, Eric W.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Durrell, Patrick; Eigenthaler, Paul; Ferrarese, Laura; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Hudelot, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hongxin

    2018-03-01

    Substructure in globular cluster (GC) populations around large galaxies is expected in galaxy formation scenarios that involve accretion or merger events, and it has been searched for using direct associations between GCs and structure in the diffuse galaxy light, or with GC kinematics. Here, we present a search for candidate substructures in the GC population around the Virgo cD galaxy M87 through the analysis of the spatial distribution of the GC colors. The study is based on a sample of ∼1800 bright GCs with high-quality u, g, r, i, z, K s photometry, selected to ensure a low contamination by foreground stars or background galaxies. The spectral energy distributions of the GCs are associated with formal estimates of age and metallicity, which are representative of its position in a 4D color space relative to standard single stellar population models. Dividing the sample into broad bins based on the relative formal ages, we observe inhomogeneities that reveal signatures of GC substructures. The most significant of these is a spatial overdensity of GCs with relatively young age labels, of diameter ∼0.°1 (∼30 kpc), located to the south of M87. The significance of this detection is larger than about 5σ after accounting for estimates of random and systematic errors. Surprisingly, no large Virgo galaxy is present in this area that could potentially host these GCs. But candidate substructures in the M87 halo with equally elusive hosts have been described based on kinematic studies in the past. The number of GC spectra available around M87 is currently insufficient to clarify the nature of the new candidate substructure.

  3. The substructure of immunoglobulin G resolved to 25 kDa using amplitude modulation AFM in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, Neil H.

    2005-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (or tapping-mode) atomic force microscopy (AM AFM or TM AFM) in air can reveal sub-molecular details of isolated multi-subunit proteins, such as immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, on atomically flat support surfaces such as mica [A. San Paulo, R. Garcia, Biophys. J. 78(3) (2000) 1599]. This is achieved by controlling the microscope imaging parameters (e.g. cantilever drive frequency and set-point amplitude) to keep the AFM tip predominantly in the attractive force regime. Under these conditions, the 50 kDa F c and F ab subunits can be resolved when the molecule has the appropriate orientation on the surface. The presence of a water layer on hydrophilic mica is an important factor affecting imaging contrast, a consequence of capillary neck formation between tip and surface [L. Zitzler, S. Herminghaus, F. Mugele, Phys. Rev. B 66(15) (2002) 155436]. Desiccation of samples to remove surface bound water layers can yield reproducible imaging of the IgG substructure [N.H. Thomson, J. Microsc. (Oxford) 217(3) (2004) 193]. This approach has also given higher resolution than previously achieved, down to about 25 kDa, and these data are detailed here. These subdomains are formed as two immunoglobulin folds from the light and heavy peptide chains of the IgG crossover. This result has been validated by comparing the AFM images with X-ray crystallography data from the protein data bank. These data show that the AFM can obtain 25 kDa resolution on isolated protein molecules with commercially available silicon tips, but, as expected for a local probe technique, resolution is highly dependent on the macromolecular orientation on the support surface

  4. The response to estrogen deprivation on cartilage collagen degradation markers; CTX-II is unique compared to other markers of collagen turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tabassi, Nadine; Sondergaard, Lene

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The urinary level of type II collagen degradation marker CTX-II is increased in postmenopausal women and in ovariectomized rats, suggesting that estrogen deprivation induces cartilage breakdown. Here we investigate whether this response to estrogen holds true for other type...... II collagen turnover markers known to be affected in osteoarthritis, and whether it relates to its presence in specific areas of cartilage tissue. METHODS: The type II collagen degradation markers CTX-II and Helix-II were measured in body fluids of pre- and postmenopausal women and of ovariectomized...... rats receiving estrogen or not. Levels of PIIANP, a marker of type II collagen synthesis, were also measured in rats. Rat knee cartilage was analyzed for immunoreactivity of CTX-II and PIIANP and for type II collagen expression. RESULTS: As expected, urinary levels of CTX-II are significantly increased...

  5. Direction Modulated Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer. II: Comparative Planning Study With Intracavitary and Intracavitary–Interstitial Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dae Yup [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Safigholi, Habib; Soliman, Abraam [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Leung, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Scanderbeg, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Liu, Zhaowei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Owrangi, Amir [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, William Y., E-mail: william.song@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparative planning study evaluating the utility of the proposed direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator against standard applicators, in the setting of image guided adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A detailed conceptual article was published in 2014. The proposed DMBT tandem applicator has 6 peripheral grooves of 1.3-mm width, along a 5.4-mm-thick nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod of density 18.0 g/cm{sup 3}, capable of generating directional dose profiles. We performed a comparative planning study with 45 cervical cancer patients enrolled consecutively in the prospective observational EMBRACE study. In all patients, MRI-based planning was performed while utilizing various tandem-ring (27 patients) and tandem-ring-needles (18 patients) applicators, in accordance with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie–European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology recommendations. For unbiased comparisons, all cases were replanned with an in-house–developed inverse optimization code while enforcing a uniform set of constraints that are reflective of the clinical practice. All plans were normalized to the same high-risk clinical target volume D90 values achieved in the original clinical plans. Results: In general, if the standard tandem was replaced with the DMBT tandem while maintaining all other planning conditions the same, there was consistent improvement in the plan quality. For example, among the 18 tandem-ring-needles cases, the average D2cm{sup 3} reductions achieved were −2.48% ± 11.03%, −4.45% ± 5.24%, and −5.66% ± 6.43% for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, respectively. An opportunity may also exist in avoiding use of needles altogether for when the total number of needles required is small (approximately 2 to 3 needles or less), if DMBT tandem is used. Conclusions: Integrating the novel DMBT tandem onto both intracavitary and intracavitary

  6. Extremotolerance and resistance of lichens: comparative studies on five species used in astrobiological research II. Secondary lichen compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meessen, J; Sánchez, F J; Sadowsky, A; de la Torre, R; Ott, S; de Vera, J-P

    2013-12-01

    Lichens, which are symbioses of a fungus and one or two photoautotrophs, frequently tolerate extreme environmental conditions. This makes them valuable model systems in astrobiological research to fathom the limits and limitations of eukaryotic symbioses. Various studies demonstrated the high resistance of selected extremotolerant lichens towards extreme, non-terrestrial abiotic factors including space exposure, hypervelocity impact simulations as well as space and Martian parameter simulations. This study focusses on the diverse set of secondary lichen compounds (SLCs) that act as photo- and UVR-protective substances. Five lichen species used in present-day astrobiological research were compared: Buellia frigida, Circinaria gyrosa, Rhizocarpon geographicum, Xanthoria elegans, and Pleopsidium chlorophanum. Detailed investigation of secondary substances including photosynthetic pigments was performed for whole lichen thalli but also for axenically cultivated mycobionts and photobionts by methods of UV/VIS-spectrophotometry and two types of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Additionally, a set of chemical tests is presented to confirm the formation of melanic compounds in lichen and mycobiont samples. All investigated lichens reveal various sets of SLCs, except C. gyrosa where only melanin was putatively identified. Such studies will help to assess the contribution of SLCs on lichen extremotolerance, to understand the adaptation of lichens to prevalent abiotic stressors of the respective habitat, and to form a basis for interpreting recent and future astrobiological experiments. As most of the identified SLCs demonstrated a high capacity in absorbing UVR, they may also explain the high resistance of lichens towards non-terrestrial UVR.

  7. Extremotolerance and Resistance of Lichens: Comparative Studies on Five Species Used in Astrobiological Research II. Secondary Lichen Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeßen, J.; Sánchez, F. J.; Sadowsky, A.; de la Torre, R.; Ott, S.; de Vera, J.-P.

    2013-12-01

    Lichens, which are symbioses of a fungus and one or two photoautotrophs, frequently tolerate extreme environmental conditions. This makes them valuable model systems in astrobiological research to fathom the limits and limitations of eukaryotic symbioses. Various studies demonstrated the high resistance of selected extremotolerant lichens towards extreme, non-terrestrial abiotic factors including space exposure, hypervelocity impact simulations as well as space and Martian parameter simulations. This study focusses on the diverse set of secondary lichen compounds (SLCs) that act as photo- and UVR-protective substances. Five lichen species used in present-day astrobiological research were compared: Buellia frigida, Circinaria gyrosa, Rhizocarpon geographicum, Xanthoria elegans, and Pleopsidium chlorophanum. Detailed investigation of secondary substances including photosynthetic pigments was performed for whole lichen thalli but also for axenically cultivated mycobionts and photobionts by methods of UV/VIS-spectrophotometry and two types of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Additionally, a set of chemical tests is presented to confirm the formation of melanic compounds in lichen and mycobiont samples. All investigated lichens reveal various sets of SLCs, except C. gyrosa where only melanin was putatively identified. Such studies will help to assess the contribution of SLCs on lichen extremotolerance, to understand the adaptation of lichens to prevalent abiotic stressors of the respective habitat, and to form a basis for interpreting recent and future astrobiological experiments. As most of the identified SLCs demonstrated a high capacity in absorbing UVR, they may also explain the high resistance of lichens towards non-terrestrial UVR.

  8. Comparing microleakage and the layering methods of silorane-based resin composite in wide Class II MOD cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Yildirim Hakan; Baltacioglu, Ismail Hakki; Kahyaogullari, Savas

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the effects of different layering techniques and different monomer-based composites on microleakage. Thirty-two freshly extracted caries-free human third molars were used. A wide mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity was prepared in each third molar, with the occlusal dimension being approximately two-thirds of the intercuspal dimension, and the cervical limit of one proximal box was stopped 1 mm below and the other 1 mm above the cementoenamel junction. The cavities were filled with a methacrylate-based nanohybrid composite (Grandio, VoCo) and a silorane-based microhybrid composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE). All samples were subjected to 1000 thermal cycles of 5 degrees C/55 degrees C in water with a 30-second dwell time and, after the procedure, the teeth were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin dye at 23 degrees C for 24 hours. Sectioned samples were examined under a stereomicroscope (Leica MZ12, Leica Microsystems), and microleakage scores were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests. No microleakage was observed for silorane-based resin composite restorations. The nanohybrid-based resin composite restorations showed different levels of leakage. Statistical analysis of microleakage scores showed differences only at the enamel margins for nanohybrid material for both layering techniques (p < 0.05). The nanohybrid-based resin composite restorations showed better results with the vertical layering technique for enamel margins.

  9. Comparative study of heat transfer from Nb-Ti and Nb_{3}Sn coils to He II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco La China

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In superconducting magnets, the energy deposited or generated in the coil must be evacuated to prevent temperature rise and consequent transition of the superconductor to the resistive state. The main barrier to heat extraction is represented by the electric insulation wrapped around superconducting cables. In the LHC, insulation improvement is a key point in the development of interaction region magnets and injector chain fast-pulsed magnets for luminosity upgrade; the high heat load of these magnets, in fact, is not compatible with the use of current insulation schemes. We review the standard insulation schemes for Nb-Ti and Nb_{3}Sn technology from the thermal point of view. We implement, in an analytical model, the strongly nonlinear thermal resistances of the different coil components including the permeability to superfluid helium of Nb-Ti insulations, measured during the LHC main dipole development. We use such a model to compare Nb-Ti and Nb_{3}Sn technologies by taking into account their specific operating margin in different working conditions. Finally, we propose an insulation scheme to enhance the heat transfer capability of Nb-Ti coils.

  10. Compressible Kolmogorov flow in strongly coupled dusty plasma using molecular dynamics and computational fluid dynamics. II. A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we perform comparative studies of compressible Kolmogorov flow in the two-dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma by means of atomistic or molecular dynamics (MD) and continuum or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. Recently, using MD simulation, generation of molecular shear heat at the atomistic level is shown to reduce the average coupling strength of the system and destruct the vortical structures. To suppress the molecular heat, a novel method of a thermostat, namely, the configurational thermostat is introduced by which the microscale heat generated by the shear flow has shown to be thermostatted out efficiently without compromising the large scale vortex dynamics. While using a configurational thermostat, it has been found that the growth rate obtained from both the studies is the same with the marginal difference. To make the comparison with the continuum fluid model, we perform the same study using the generalised hydrodynamic model, wherein molecular shear heating phenomena is completely absent, however, viscous dissipation is there at the macroscale level. For this purpose, an Advanced Generalised SPECTral Code has been developed to study the linear and nonlinear aspects of the Kolmogorov flow in the incompressible and compressible limit for viscoelastic fluids. All the phenomenological parameters used in CFD simulations have been calculated from MD simulations. Code is benchmarked against the eigen value solver in the linear regime. Linear growth-rates calculated from the phenomenological fluid model is found to be close to that obtained from MD simulation for the same set of input parameters. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow has been found at a critical value of Reynolds number Rc in both the macroscopic (CFD) and microscopic (MD) simulation. Rc in MD is smaller than the one obtained by CFD simulation. In the nonlinear regime of CFD, the mode becomes unstable and vortex formation happens earlier than in MD. The

  11. Synthesis, structure and photoluminescence of (PLAGH){sub 2}[ZnCl{sub 4}] and comparative analysis of photoluminescence properties with tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radanović, Mirjana M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Jelić, Miodrag G., E-mail: jelicmgm@uns.ac.rs [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Romčević, Nebojša Ž. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia); Boukos, Nikos [National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Institute of Materials Science, Athens (Greece); Vojinović-Ješić, Ljiljana S.; Leovac, Vukadin M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Hadžić, Branka B. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia); Bajac, Branimir M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technology, Novi Sad (Serbia); Nađ, Laslo F. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Chandrinou, Chrysoula [National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Institute of Materials Science, Athens (Greece); Baloš, Sebastian S. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • New zinc(II) complex with pyridoxalaminoguanidine was synthesized. • The enhancement of the photoluminescence due to the compound formation was achieved. • Very high photoluminescence of Zn(II) compound was noticed. • Comparative analysis of photoluminescence with tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) was provided. - Abstract: The first compound of zinc(II) containing pyridoxalaminoguanidine has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra, conductometric measurements and X-ray crystallography. Single crystals of the compound were obtained in the reaction of methanolic solution of zinc(II) chloride and pyridoxalaminoguanidine hydrochloride. In this compound the coordination of chelate ligand is absent and tetrachlorido complex of zinc(II) with pyridoxalaminuguanidinium cation as contraion is obtained. Photoluminescence spectra were measured. Lorentzian multipeak technique was used to determine peak wavelengths and their intensities. Photoluminescence spectroscopy upon 325, 488 and 514 nm laser excitation light was used to obtain results. This novel compound of zinc(II) was compared to the well-known organic light emitting diode material—ruthenium(II) complex with bypiridine i.e., tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), under the same circumstances and the identical experimental setup. A scheme of energy levels and transitions is proposed to explain the obtained experimental results.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of the Lipid Profile in the Serum of Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Healthy Individuals with Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Biju; Prasad, Rajendra B; Shetty, Sucheta; Vishakh, R

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an immuno-inflammatory disease that is initiated by the interaction between microbial plaque and the periodontal tissues. The data available on the association of periodontal diseases with the lipid profile are conflicting. Therefore, a need for a study in this area was felt. To evaluate the lipid profile in the serum of patients with chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and to compare it with healthy controls, to see whether they can serve as potential markers for chronic periodontitis and also to assess whether periodontitis can have systemic effects. This study is a cross-sectional study. This cross-sectional study was conducted involving 300 participants in the age group of 30-60 years from October 2010 to May 2015. Five milliliters of venous blood was collected from each of the study participants, from the antecubital vein. Lipid profile was assessed using the ERBA commercially available kit. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software version 17. Multigroup comparison was carried out using ANOVA. The honest significant difference Tukey's test was used in conjunction with ANOVA to find means which are significantly different from each other. When the lipid profile was estimated, total cholesterol (TC) levels were seen to be significantly higher ( P periodontitis group. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were seen to be significantly higher ( P periodontitis group. The triglyceride (TGL) values were also significantly higher ( P periodontitis group. The HDL and LDL levels were seen to be nonsignificant between chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with diabetic group. The findings of the study showed that the lipid profile was significantly altered in patients with chronic periodontitis as compared to healthy controls. There was a potentiated difference in the values for TC, VLDL cholesterol, and TGL in patients with chronic periodontitis when compared to

  13. Preclinical activity of the type II CD20 antibody GA101 (obinutuzumab) compared with rituximab and ofatumumab in vitro and in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Sylvia; Herting, Frank; Mundigl, Olaf; Waldhauer, Inja; Weinzierl, Tina; Fauti, Tanja; Muth, Gunter; Ziegler-Landesberger, Doris; Van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Lang, Sabine; Duong, Minh Ngoc; Reslan, Lina; Gerdes, Christian A; Friess, Thomas; Baer, Ute; Burtscher, Helmut; Weidner, Michael; Dumontet, Charles; Umana, Pablo; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We report the first preclinical in vitro and in vivo comparison of GA101 (obinutuzumab), a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 monoclonal antibody, with rituximab and ofatumumab, the two currently approved type I CD20 antibodies. The three antibodies were compared in assays measuring direct cell death (AnnexinV/PI staining and time-lapse microscopy), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP), and internalization. The models used for the comparison of their activity in vivo were SU-DHL4 and RL xenografts. GA101 was found to be superior to rituximab and ofatumumab in the induction of direct cell death (independent of mechanical manipulation required for cell aggregate disruption formed by antibody treatment), whereas it was 10 to 1,000 times less potent in mediating CDC. GA101 showed superior activity to rituximab and ofatumumab in ADCC and whole-blood B-cell depletion assays, and was comparable with these two in ADCP. GA101 also showed slower internalization rate upon binding to CD20 than rituximab and ofatumumab. In vivo, GA101 induced a strong antitumor effect, including complete tumor remission in the SU-DHL4 model and overall superior efficacy compared with both rituximab and ofatumumab. When rituximab-pretreated animals were used, second-line treatment with GA101 was still able to control tumor progression, whereas tumors escaped rituximab treatment. Taken together, the preclinical data show that the glyoengineered type II CD20 antibody GA101 is differentiated from the two approved type I CD20 antibodies rituximab and ofatumumab by its overall preclinical activity, further supporting its clinical investigation. ©2013 AACR.

  14. Demographics and Outcomes of Stage I-II Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treated with Mohs Micrographic Surgery Compared with Wide Local Excision in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babu; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Truong, Minh Tam; Sahni, Debjani

    2018-02-03

    The optimal surgical approach (wide local excision (WLE) vs. Mohs micrographic surgery (MOHS)) for treating Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is yet to be determined. To compare survival outcomes in patients with early stage MCC treated with MOHS versus WLE. A retrospective review of all cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of MCC of clinical Stage I-II MCC treated with WLE or MOHS was performed. 1,795 cases of Stage I-II MCC were identified who underwent WLE (N=1,685) or MOHS (N=110). There was no difference in residual tumor on surgical margins between the two treatment groups (p=0.588). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in overall survival between the treatment modalities (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.72-1.45, p=0.897). There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups on propensity score matched analysis. Disease specific survival was not reported as this data in not available in the NCDB. MOHS appears to be as effective as WLE in treating early stage MCC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Development of an expert system for the simulation model for casting metal substructure of a metal-ceramic crown design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, Ivan; Hadzistevic, Miodrag; Vukelic, Djordje; Potran, Michal; Brajlih, Tomaz

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the integrated CAD/CAE systems are favored solutions for the design of simulation models for casting metal substructures of metal-ceramic crowns. The worldwide authors have used different approaches to solve the problems using an expert system. Despite substantial research progress in the design of experts systems for the simulation model design and manufacturing have insufficiently considered the specifics of casting in dentistry, especially the need for further CAD, RE, CAE for the estimation of casting parameters and the control of the casting machine. The novel expert system performs the following: CAD modeling of the simulation model for casting, fast modeling of gate design, CAD eligibility and cast ability check of the model, estimation and running of the program code for the casting machine, as well as manufacturing time reduction of the metal substructure. The authors propose an integration method using common data model approach, blackboard architecture, rule-based reasoning and iterative redesign method. Arithmetic mean roughness values was determinated with constant Gauss low-pass filter (cut-off length of 2.5mm) according to ISO 4287 using Mahr MARSURF PS1. Dimensional deviation between the designed model and manufactured cast was determined using the coordinate measuring machine Zeiss Contura G2 and GOM Inspect software. The ES allows for obtaining the castings derived roughness grade number N7. The dimensional deviation between the simulation model of the metal substructure and the manufactured cast is 0.018mm. The arithmetic mean roughness values measured on the casting substructure are from 1.935µm to 2.778µm. The realized developed expert system with the integrated database is fully applicable for the observed hardware and software. Values of the arithmetic mean roughness and dimensional deviation indicate that casting substructures are surface quality, which is more than enough and useful for direct porcelain veneering. The

  16. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – bis(benzoin)ethylenediiminato have been prepared and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, conductivity measurements and solubility. The potentiometric, and elemental analyses studies of the complexes revealed 1:1 ...

  17. The response to oestrogen deprivation of the cartilage collagen degradation marker, CTX-II, is unique compared with other markers of collagen turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tabassi, Nadine C B; Sondergaard, Lene V

    2009-01-01

    The urinary level of the type II collagen degradation marker CTX-II is increased in postmenopausal women and in ovariectomised rats, suggesting that oestrogen deprivation induces cartilage breakdown. Here we investigate whether this response to oestrogen is also true for other type II collagen tu...

  18. Biosynthesis of micro- and nanocrystals of Pb (II), Hg (II) and Cd (II) sulfides in four Candida species: a comparative study of in vivo and in vitro approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Lucio-Hernández, Daniela; Martínez-Ángeles, Isabel; Demitri, Nicola; Polentarutti, Maurizio; Rosales-Hoz, María J; Moreno, Abel

    2017-03-01

    Nature produces biominerals (biogenic minerals) that are synthesized as complex structures, in terms of their physicochemical properties. These biominerals are composed of minerals and biological macromolecules. They are produced by living organisms and are usually formed through a combination of chemical, biochemical and biophysical processes. Microorganisms like Candida in the presence of heavy metals can biomineralize those metals to form microcrystals (MCs) and nanocrystals (NCs). In this work, MCs and NCs of PbS, HgS or HgCl 2 as well as CdS are synthesized both in vitro (gels) and in vivo by four Candida species. Our in vivo results show that, in the presence of Pb 2+ , Candida cells are able to replicate and form extracellular PbS MCs, whereas in the presence of Hg 2+ and Cd 2+ , they did synthesize intercellular MCs from HgS or HgCl 2 and CdS NCs respectively. The MCs and NCs biologically obtained in Candida were compared with those PbS, HgS and CdS crystals synthetically obtained in vitro through the gel method (grown either in agarose or in sodium metasilicate hydrogels). This is, to our knowledge, the first time that the biosynthesis of the various MCs and NCs (presented in several species of Candida) has been reported. This biosynthesis is differentially regulated in each of these pathogens, which allows them to adapt and survive in different physiological and environmental habitats. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Substructuring of multibody systems for numerical transfer path analysis in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acri, Antonio; Offner, Guenter; Nijman, Eugene; Rejlek, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Noise legislations and the increasing customer demands determine the Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) development of modern commercial vehicles. In order to meet the stringent legislative requirements for the vehicle noise emission, exact knowledge of all vehicle noise sources and their acoustic behavior is required. Transfer path analysis (TPA) is a fairly well established technique for estimating and ranking individual low-frequency noise or vibration contributions via the different transmission paths. Transmission paths from different sources to target points of interest and their contributions can be analyzed by applying TPA. This technique is applied on test measurements, which can only be available on prototypes, at the end of the designing process. In order to overcome the limits of TPA, a numerical transfer path analysis methodology based on the substructuring of a multibody system is proposed in this paper. Being based on numerical simulation, this methodology can be performed starting from the first steps of the designing process. The main target of the proposed methodology is to get information of noise sources contributions of a dynamic system considering the possibility to have multiple forces contemporary acting on the system. The contributions of these forces are investigated with particular focus on distribute or moving forces. In this paper, the mathematical basics of the proposed methodology and its advantages in comparison with TPA will be discussed. Then, a dynamic system is investigated with a combination of two methods. Being based on the dynamic substructuring (DS) of the investigated model, the methodology proposed requires the evaluation of the contact forces at interfaces, which are computed with a flexible multi-body dynamic (FMBD) simulation. Then, the structure-borne noise paths are computed with the wave based method (WBM). As an example application a 4-cylinder engine is investigated and the proposed methodology is applied on the

  20. Effects of membrane lipid composition and antibacterial drugs on the rigidity of Escherichia coli: Different contributions of various bacterial substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Gan, Chaoye; Shao, Wenxiang; Yu, Chuan; Wang, Xingguo; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The rigidity/stiffness is an important biomechanical property of bacteria and potentially correlated with many bacterial activities. While the rigidity or fluidity of the bacterial membrane has been extensively studied, the contributions of different bacterial substructures to the bacterial rigidity are less investigated. Here, we utilized four Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains with different membrane lipid compositions and three antibacterial drugs (EDTA, lysozyme, and streptomycin) to specifically alter bacterial substructures. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that the average height and Young's modulus of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-deficient E. coli strains were larger than those of PE(+) strains and that EDTA, EDTA plus lysozyme instead of lysozyme alone, and streptomycin all caused significant decreases in height and Young's modulus of the four E. coli strains. Our data imply that membrane lipid composition, the integrated outer membrane, the cell wall, and the cytoplasmic content are all responsible for bacterial rigidity but to different extents. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Influence of ausforming on substructures and shape memory behavior in Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Ji, W.; Han, M.; Jia, D.; Liu, W.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of ausforming (deformation of austenite at temperatures above Md) on shape memory effect (SME) and the substructures in Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr (wt.%) alloy were studied, intending to reveal the dominating factor for SME in terms of microstructural characteristics in comparison with the case of thermo-mechanical training. It was found that the SME in the studied alloy could be effectively improved by ausforming at 700 C for 9% tensile strain, in the process of which the oriented stacking faults and dislocations were evolved and regularly distributed in austenite. The improvement of SME by ausforming, as well as thermo-mechanical training, is attributed to the restored substructures in austenite; while there is no closely correspondent relation between SME and the strength of austenite matrix. (orig.)

  2. Distribution of distances between dislocations in different types of dislocation substructures in deformed Cu-Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trishkina, L., E-mail: trishkina.53@mail.ru; Zboykova, N.; Koneva, N., E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru; Kozlov, E. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya St., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, T. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya St., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 50 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the investigation was the determination of the statistic description of dislocation distribution in each dislocation substructures component forming after different deformation degrees in the Cu-Al alloys. The dislocation structures were investigated by the transmission diffraction electron microscopy method. In the work the statistic description of distance distribution between the dislocations, dislocation barriers and dislocation tangles in the deformed Cu-Al alloys with different concentration of Al and test temperature at the grain size of 100 µm was carried out. It was established that the above parameters influence the dislocation distribution in different types of the dislocation substructures (DSS): dislocation chaos, dislocation networks without disorientation, nondisoriented and disoriented cells, in the walls and inside the cells. The distributions of the distances between dislocations in the investigated alloys for each DSS type formed at certain deformation degrees and various test temperatures were plotted.

  3. Distribution of distances between dislocations in different types of dislocation substructures in deformed Cu-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trishkina, L.; Cherkasova, T.; Zboykova, N.; Koneva, N.; Kozlov, E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was the determination of the statistic description of dislocation distribution in each dislocation substructures component forming after different deformation degrees in the Cu-Al alloys. The dislocation structures were investigated by the transmission diffraction electron microscopy method. In the work the statistic description of distance distribution between the dislocations, dislocation barriers and dislocation tangles in the deformed Cu-Al alloys with different concentration of Al and test temperature at the grain size of 100 µm was carried out. It was established that the above parameters influence the dislocation distribution in different types of the dislocation substructures (DSS): dislocation chaos, dislocation networks without disorientation, nondisoriented and disoriented cells, in the walls and inside the cells. The distributions of the distances between dislocations in the investigated alloys for each DSS type formed at certain deformation degrees and various test temperatures were plotted.

  4. Searching for dwarf spheroidal galaxies and other galactic dark matter substructures with the Fermi large area telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-08-01

    Over the past century, it has become clear that about a quarter of the known universe is composed of an invisible, massive component termed ''dark matter''. Some of the most popular theories of physics beyond the Standard Model suggest that dark matter may be a new fundamental particle that could self-annihilate to produce γ rays. Nearby over-densities in the dark matter halo of our Milky Way present some of the most promising targets for detecting the annihilation of dark matter. We used the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for γ rays produced by dark matter annihilation in Galactic dark matter substructures. We searched for γ-ray emission coincident with Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies, which trace the most massive Galactic dark matter substructures. We also sought to identify nearby dark matter substructures that lack all astrophysical tracers and would be detectable only through γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation. We found no conclusive evidence for γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and we set stringent and robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. While γ-ray searches for dark matter substructure are currently the most sensitive and robust probes of dark matter annihilation, they are just beginning to intersect the theoretically preferred region of dark matter parameter space. Thus, we consider future prospects for increasing the sensitivity of γ-ray searches through improvements to the LAT instrument performance and through upcoming wide- field optical surveys.

  5. THE ONGOING ASSEMBLY OF A CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXY: PHASE-SPACE SUBSTRUCTURES IN THE HALO OF M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Arnold, Jacob A. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Strader, Jay [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Spitler, Lee R.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Foster, Caroline [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2012-03-20

    The halos of galaxies preserve unique records of their formation histories. We carry out the first combined observational and theoretical study of phase-space halo substructure in an early-type galaxy: M87, the central galaxy in the Virgo cluster. We analyze an unprecedented wide-field, high-precision photometric and spectroscopic data set for 488 globular clusters (GCs), which includes new, large-radius Subaru/Suprime-Cam and Keck/DEIMOS observations. We find signatures of two substructures in position-velocity phase space. One is a small, cold stream associated with a known stellar filament in the outer halo; the other is a large shell-like pattern in the inner halo that implies a massive, hitherto unrecognized accretion event. We perform extensive statistical tests and independent metallicity analyses to verify the presence and characterize the properties of these features, and to provide more general methodologies for future extragalactic studies of phase-space substructure. The cold outer stream is consistent with a dwarf galaxy accretion event, while for the inner shell there is tension between a low progenitor mass implied by the cold velocity dispersion, and a high mass from the large number of GCs, which might be resolved by a {approx}0.5 L* E/S0 progenitor. We also carry out proof-of-principle numerical simulations of the accretion of smaller galaxies in an M87-like gravitational potential. These produce analogous features to the observed substructures, which should have observable lifetimes of {approx}1 Gyr. The shell and stream GCs together support a scenario where the extended stellar envelope of M87 has been built up by a steady rain of material that continues until the present day. This phase-space method demonstrates unique potential for detailed tests of galaxy formation beyond the Local Group.

  6. A Substructure Combination Strategy To Create Potent and Selective Transthyretin Kinetic Stabilizers That Prevent Amyloidogenesis and Cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sungwook; Reixach, Natlia; Connelly, Stephen; Johnson, Steven M.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W. (Scripps)

    2010-08-13

    Transthyretin aggregation-associated proteotoxicity appears to cause several human amyloid diseases. Rate-limiting tetramer dissociation and monomer misfolding of transthyretin (TTR) occur before its aggregation into cross-{beta}-sheet amyloid fibrils. Small molecule binding to and preferential stabilization of the tetrameric state of TTR over the dissociative transition state raises the kinetic barrier for dissociation, imposing kinetic stabilization on TTR and preventing aggregation. This is an effective strategy to halt neurodegeneration associated with polyneuropathy, according to recent placebo-controlled clinical trial results. In three recent papers, we systematically ranked possibilities for the three substructures composing a typical TTR kinetic stabilizer, using fibril inhibition potency and plasma TTR binding selectivity data. Herein, we have successfully employed a substructure combination strategy to use these data to develop potent and selective TTR kinetic stabilizers that rescue cells from the cytotoxic effects of TTR amyloidogenesis. Of the 92 stilbene and dihydrostilbene analogues synthesized, nearly all potently inhibit TTR fibril formation. Seventeen of these exhibit a binding stoichiometry of >1.5 of a maximum of 2 to plasma TTR, while displaying minimal binding to the thyroid hormone receptor (<20%). Six analogues were definitively categorized as kinetic stabilizers by evaluating dissociation time-courses. High-resolution TTR-(kinetic stabilizer)2 crystal structures (1.31-1.70 {angstrom}) confirmed the anticipated binding orientation of the 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxyphenyl substructure and revealed a strong preference of the isosteric 3,5-dibromo-4-aminophenyl substructure to bind to the inner thyroxine binding pocket of TTR.

  7. Class II treatment in adults: comparing camouflage orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics and orthognathic surgery--a cephalometric study to evaluate various therapeutic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzinger, Gero; Frye, Linda; Diedrich, Peter

    2009-01-01

    It was the aim of this clinical study to compare the skeletal and dentoalveolar effects as well as those on the profile of three different treatment approaches in Class II patients (camouflage orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics, and combined orthodontic and surgical treatment). Our study cohort consisted of 60 young adults presenting a skeletal Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: 20 patients whose overjet was reduced by camouflage following premolar extraction, 20 patients whose occlusions were corrected by placement of a fixed functional orthopedic appliance, and 20 who underwent orthognathic surgery (bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible without genioplasty). We documented the therapeutic progress using cephalometry. Each patient group achieved a reduction in overjet via their respective treatment. While no treatment-related changes in the maxillary area were assessable, the effects on the mandible differed. We observed advancement of the bony chin and an increase in mandibular length in the sagittal-diagonal dimension in the surgical and functional orthopedic groups. However, the extent of the treatment-related changes was significant only in the group of patients that had undergone orthognathic surgery. Only the surgical group presented changes in vertical relationships. Incisor repositioning as an outcome of the respective treatments differed fundamentally, with those in the surgical group revealing significant protrusion of the upper incisors. The maxillary incisors were retruded and mandibular incisors proclined in the functional orthopedic group, whereas the upper and lower incisors both retruded significantly in the extraction group. Soft-tissue remodeling bore no linear relationship to treatment-induced skeletal and dental effects. Still, orthognathic surgery led to the most marked profile changes. Treatment using fixed functional orthopedic appliances reduced the convexity of the soft-tissue profile at least moderately. Camouflage

  8. Puzzle-based versus traditional lecture: comparing the effects of pedagogy on academic performance in an undergraduate human anatomy and physiology II lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetzik, Lucas; Deeter, Anthony; Parker, Jamie; Yukech, Christine

    2015-06-23

    A traditional lecture-based pedagogy conveys information and content while lacking sufficient development of critical thinking skills and problem solving. A puzzle-based pedagogy creates a broader contextual framework, and fosters critical thinking as well as logical reasoning skills that can then be used to improve a student's performance on content specific assessments. This paper describes a pedagogical comparison of traditional lecture-based teaching and puzzle-based teaching in a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. Using a single subject/cross-over design half of the students from seven sections of the course were taught using one type of pedagogy for the first half of the semester, and then taught with a different pedagogy for the second half of the semester. The other half of the students were taught the same material but with the order of the pedagogies reversed. Students' performance on quizzes and exams specific to the course, and in-class assignments specific to this study were assessed for: learning outcomes (the ability to form the correct conclusion or recall specific information), and authentic academic performance as described by (Am J Educ 104:280-312, 1996). Our findings suggest a significant improvement in students' performance on standard course specific assessments using a puzzle-based pedagogy versus a traditional lecture-based teaching style. Quiz and test scores for students improved by 2.1 and 0.4% respectively in the puzzle-based pedagogy, versus the traditional lecture-based teaching. Additionally, the assessments of authentic academic performance may only effectively measure a broader conceptual understanding in a limited set of contexts, and not in the context of a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. In conclusion, a puzzle-based pedagogy, when compared to traditional lecture-based teaching, can effectively enhance the performance of students on standard course specific assessments, even when the assessments only test a limited

  9. Aseismic optimization of nonlinear joint elements in boiler plant structures based on substructure synthesis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, E.; Suzuki, K.; Yasuda, T.; Ohwa, Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with an optimum design method for joint elements in boiler plant structures which are excited by earthquakes. Characteristics of joint elements which connect the boiler and its supporting structure, are supposed to be viscoelastic, elasto-plastic, or a combination of both. Considering the expansion of this study to an active or semi-active aseismic structural control of joint elements, the structures are modeled with the aid of block diagram. In order to improve the efficiency of calculation, substructure synthesis method is introduced. Time-domain optimization is carried out using a nonlinear programming technique. To prevent seismic damage of pipes and ducts, limitations for relative displacements between the boiler and its supporting structure is introduced is inequality constraints. Elasto-plasticity and viscoelasticity of joint elements are simulated by a combination of a spring, a Coulomb friction, and a dashpot. These joint element characteristics are optimized to minimize seismic time-response of the structures. This method is applied to actual boiler plant structures and has proven to be effective and practical for aseismic designs of boiler plant structures

  10. Association of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Clinical Features with European Population Genetic Substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaza, Manuel; Witte, Torsten; Papasteriades, Chryssa; Marchini, Maurizio; Migliaresi, Sergio; Kovacs, Attila; Ordi-Ros, Josep; Bijl, Marc; Santos, Maria Jose; Ruzickova, Sarka; Pullmann, Rudolf; Carreira, Patricia; Skopouli, Fotini N.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Suarez, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J.; Gomez-Reino, Juan J.; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a very varied spectrum of clinical manifestations that could be partly determined by genetic factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between prevalence of 11 clinical features and age of disease onset with European population genetic substructure. Data from 1413 patients of European ancestry recruited in nine countries was tested for association with genotypes of top ancestry informative markers. This analysis was done with logistic regression between phenotypes and genotypes or principal components extracted from them. We used a genetic additive model and adjusted for gender and disease duration. Three clinical features showed association with ancestry informative markers: autoantibody production defined as immunologic disorder (P = 6.8×10−4), oral ulcers (P = 6.9×10−4) and photosensitivity (P = 0.002). Immunologic disorder was associated with genotypes more common in Southern European ancestries, whereas the opposite trend was observed for photosensitivity. Oral ulcers were specifically more common in patients of Spanish and Portuguese self-reported ancestry. These results should be taken into account in future research and suggest new hypotheses and possible underlying mechanisms to be investigated. A first hypothesis linking photosensitivity with variation in skin pigmentation is suggested. PMID:22194982

  11. The genomic distribution of population substructure in four populations using 8,525 autosomal SNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriver Mark D

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Understanding the nature of evolutionary relationships among persons and populations is important for the efficient application of genome science to biomedical research. We have analysed 8,525 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 84 individuals from four populations: African-American, European-American, Chinese and Japanese. Individual relationships were reconstructed using the allele sharing distance and the neighbour-joining tree making method. Trees show clear clustering according to population, with the root branching from the African-American clade. The African-American cluster is much less star-like than European-American and East Asian clusters, primarily because of admixture. Furthermore, on the East Asian branch, all ten Chinese individuals cluster together and all ten Japanese individuals cluster together. Using positional information, we demonstrate strong correlations between inter-marker distance and both locus-specific FST (the proportion of total variation due to differentiation levels and branch lengths. Chromosomal maps of the distribution of locus-specific branch lengths were constructed by combining these data with other published SNP markers (total of 33,704 SNPs. These maps clearly illustrate a non-uniform distribution of human genetic substructure, an instructional and useful paradigm for education and research.

  12. On the sound insulation of acoustic metasurface using a sub-structuring approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Lu, Zhenbo; Cheng, Li; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-08-01

    The feasibility of using an acoustic metasurface (AMS) with acoustic stop-band property to realize sound insulation with ventilation function is investigated. An efficient numerical approach is proposed to evaluate its sound insulation performance. The AMS is excited by a reverberant sound source and the standardized sound reduction index (SRI) is numerically investigated. To facilitate the modeling, the coupling between the AMS and the adjacent acoustic fields is formulated using a sub-structuring approach. A modal based formulation is applied to both the source and receiving room, enabling an efficient calculation in the frequency range from 125 Hz to 2000 Hz. The sound pressures and the velocities at the interface are matched by using a transfer function relation based on ;patches;. For illustration purposes, numerical examples are investigated using the proposed approach. The unit cell constituting the AMS is constructed in the shape of a thin acoustic chamber with tailored inner structures, whose stop-band property is numerically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated. The AMS is shown to provide effective sound insulation of over 30 dB in the stop-band frequencies from 600 to 1600 Hz. It is also shown that the proposed approach has the potential to be applied to a broad range of AMS studies and optimization problems.

  13. Natural Product-Derived Spirooxindole Fragments Serve as Privileged Substructures for Discovery of New Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Zheng, Yi-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Ping-Ping; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The utility of natural products for identifying anticancer agents has been highly pursued in the last decades and over 100 drug molecules in clinic are natural products or natural product-derived compounds. Natural products are believed to be able to cover unexplored chemical space that is normally not occupied by commercially available molecule libraries. However, the low abundance and synthetic intractability of natural products have limited their applications in drug discovery. Recently, the identification of biologically relevant fragments derived from biologically validated natural products has been recognized as a powerful strategy in searching new biological probes and drugs. The spirocyclic oxindoles, as privileged structural scaffolds, have shown their potential in designing new drugs. Several anticancer drug candidates such as SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres are undergoing clinical trials or preclinical studies. To highlight the significant progress, we focus on illustrating the discovery of SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres for cancer therapy using substructure-based strategies and discussing modes of action, binding models and preclinical data.

  14. Dark matter substructure in numerical simulations: a tale of discreteness noise, runaway instabilities, and artificial disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Ogiya, Go

    2018-04-01

    To gain understanding of the complicated, non-linear, and numerical processes associated with the tidal evolution of dark matter subhaloes in numerical simulation, we perform a large suite of idealized simulations that follow individual N-body subhaloes in a fixed, analytical host halo potential. By varying both physical and numerical parameters, we investigate under what conditions the subhaloes undergo disruption. We confirm the conclusions from our more analytical assessment in van den Bosch et al. that most disruption is numerical in origin; as long as a subhalo is resolved with sufficient mass and force resolution, a bound remnant survives. This implies that state-of-the-art cosmological simulations still suffer from significant overmerging. We demonstrate that this is mainly due to inadequate force softening, which causes excessive mass loss and artificial tidal disruption. In addition, we show that subhaloes in N-body simulations are susceptible to a runaway instability triggered by the amplification of discreteness noise in the presence of a tidal field. These two processes conspire to put serious limitations on the reliability of dark matter substructure in state-of-the-art cosmological simulations. We present two criteria that can be used to assess whether individual subhaloes in cosmological simulations are reliable or not, and advocate that subhaloes that satisfy either of these two criteria be discarded from further analysis. We discuss the potential implications of this work for several areas in astrophysics.

  15. The End-Of-Substructure Card for the ATLAS ITk Strip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Goettlicher, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The End-Of-Substructure Card (EoS) is the interface between the building block of the ITk Strip Tracker (staves and petals) and the outside world. In the ITk the modules consisting of the silicon sensor itself and the hybrids with the readout ASICS are placed on a common structure called a stave (in the barrel) and petal (in the end-cap). All module use a common bus-tape co-cured to carbon-fiber based structure to distribute power and signals. The data lines and command lines are then connected from the bus-tape to EoS. The power, both low and high voltage, are also distributed via the bus tape and coonected to the EoS. All these connections will be made using wire-bonds. The card concept is build around using the lpGBT chip set and the VTRx optical link, both common developments for the LHC Upgrades. The command signals will be coming in on a 10 Gbit/s link and will be de-multiplexed by the lpGBt and send to the stave/petal. The incoming data from the sensor, which depending on the type of stave or petal wil...

  16. Determining the Thickness and the Sub-Structure Details of the Magnetopause from MMS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuzzo, R.; Belmont, G.; Rezeau, L.

    2017-12-01

    The magnetopause thickness, like its mean location, is a notion that can have different meanings depending which parameters are considered (magnetic field or plasma properties). In any case, all the determinations have been done, up to now, considering the magnetopause boundary as a structure strictly stationary and 1D (or with a simple curvature). These determinations have shown to be very sensitive to the accuracy of the normal direction, because it affects the projection of the quantities of interest in studying geometrical sensitive phenomena such as the magnetic reconnection. Furthermore, the 1D stationary assumptions are likely to be rarely verified at the real magnetopause. The high quality measurements of MMS and their high time resolution now allow investigating the magnetopause structure in its more delicate features and with an unequal spatio-temporal accuracy. We make use here of the MDD tool developed by [Shi et al., 2005], which gives the dimensionality of the gradients from the four-point measurements of MMS and allows estimating the direction of the local normal when defined. Extending this method to various quantities, we can draw their profiles as functions of a physical abscissa (length instead of time) along a sensible normal. This procedure allows answering quantitatively the questions concerning the locations and the thicknesses of the different sub-structures encountered inside the "global magnetopause" [Rezeau, 2017, paper submitted to JGR-Space Physics].

  17. Jet substructure shedding light on heavy Majorana neutrinos at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arindam; Konar, Partha; Thalapillil, Arun

    2018-02-01

    The existence of tiny neutrino masses and flavor mixings can be explained naturally in various seesaw models, many of which typically having additional Majorana type SM gauge singlet right handed neutrinos ( N). If they are at around the electroweak scale and furnished with sizable mixings with light active neutrinos, they can be produced at high energy colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A characteristic signature would be same sign lepton pairs, violating lepton number, together with light jets — pp → Nℓ ± , N → ℓ ± W ∓ , W ∓ → jj. We propose a new search strategy utilising jet substructure techniques, observing that for a heavy right handed neutrino mass M N much above M W ±, the two jets coming out of the boosted W ± may be interpreted as a single fat-jet ( J). Hence, the distinguishing signal topology will be ℓ ± ℓ ± J . Performing a comprehensive study of the different signal regions along with complete background analysis, in tandem with detector level simulations, we compute statistical significance limits. We find that heavy neutrinos can be explored effectively for mass ranges 300 GeV ≤ M N ≤ 800 GeV and different light-heavy neutrino mixing | V μN |2. At the 13 TeV LHC with 3000 fb-1 integrated luminosity one can competently explore mixing angles much below present LHC limits, and moreover exceed bounds from electroweak precision data.

  18. Association of systemic lupus erythematosus clinical features with European population genetic substructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Alonso-Perez

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with a very varied spectrum of clinical manifestations that could be partly determined by genetic factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between prevalence of 11 clinical features and age of disease onset with European population genetic substructure. Data from 1413 patients of European ancestry recruited in nine countries was tested for association with genotypes of top ancestry informative markers. This analysis was done with logistic regression between phenotypes and genotypes or principal components extracted from them. We used a genetic additive model and adjusted for gender and disease duration. Three clinical features showed association with ancestry informative markers: autoantibody production defined as immunologic disorder (P = 6.8×10(-4, oral ulcers (P = 6.9×10(-4 and photosensitivity (P = 0.002. Immunologic disorder was associated with genotypes more common in Southern European ancestries, whereas the opposite trend was observed for photosensitivity. Oral ulcers were specifically more common in patients of Spanish and Portuguese self-reported ancestry. These results should be taken into account in future research and suggest new hypotheses and possible underlying mechanisms to be investigated. A first hypothesis linking photosensitivity with variation in skin pigmentation is suggested.

  19. Association of systemic lupus erythematosus clinical features with European population genetic substructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Perez, Elisa; Suarez-Gestal, Marian; Calaza, Manuel; Witte, Torsten; Papasteriades, Chryssa; Marchini, Maurizio; Migliaresi, Sergio; Kovacs, Attila; Ordi-Ros, Josep; Bijl, Marc; Santos, Maria Jose; Ruzickova, Sarka; Pullmann, Rudolf; Carreira, Patricia; Skopouli, Fotini N; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Suarez, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a very varied spectrum of clinical manifestations that could be partly determined by genetic factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between prevalence of 11 clinical features and age of disease onset with European population genetic substructure. Data from 1413 patients of European ancestry recruited in nine countries was tested for association with genotypes of top ancestry informative markers. This analysis was done with logistic regression between phenotypes and genotypes or principal components extracted from them. We used a genetic additive model and adjusted for gender and disease duration. Three clinical features showed association with ancestry informative markers: autoantibody production defined as immunologic disorder (P = 6.8×10(-4)), oral ulcers (P = 6.9×10(-4)) and photosensitivity (P = 0.002). Immunologic disorder was associated with genotypes more common in Southern European ancestries, whereas the opposite trend was observed for photosensitivity. Oral ulcers were specifically more common in patients of Spanish and Portuguese self-reported ancestry. These results should be taken into account in future research and suggest new hypotheses and possible underlying mechanisms to be investigated. A first hypothesis linking photosensitivity with variation in skin pigmentation is suggested.

  20. Major substructure in the M31 outer halo: the South-West Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, N. F.; Conn, A. R.; McMonigal, B.; Lewis, G. F.; Martin, N. F.; McConnachie, A. W.; Veljanoski, J.; Mackey, A. D.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Ibata, R. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Fardal, M.; Huxor, A. P.; Babul, A.

    2014-02-01

    We undertake the first detailed analysis of the stellar population and spatial properties of a diffuse substructure in the outer halo of M31. The South-West Cloud lies at a projected distance of ˜100 kpc from the centre of M31 and extends for at least ˜50 kpc in projection. We use Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey photometry of red giant branch stars to determine a distance to the South-West Cloud of 793^{+45}_{-45} kpc. The metallicity of the cloud is found to be [Fe/H] = -1.3 ± 0.1. This is consistent with the coincident globular clusters PAndAS-7 and PAndAS-8, which have metallicities determined using an independent technique of [Fe/H] = -1.35 ± 0.15. We measure a brightness for the Cloud of MV = -12.1 mag; this is ˜75 per cent of the luminosity implied by the luminosity-metallicity relation. Under the assumption that the South-West Cloud is the visible remnant of an accreted dwarf satellite, this suggests that the progenitor object was amongst M31's brightest dwarf galaxies prior to disruption.

  1. Comparing Alterations of Blood Glucose Level in type II Diabetic Patients Taking Metformin and Withhold of Metformin on the Morning of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tarbiat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In the context effect of metformin in patients with acute coronary syndrome, available evidence supports cardiac effect. Yet, there is doubt about continuation or discontinuation of metformin before major surgery. The aim of the present study is to determine the efficacy of continuing metformin in plasma glucose, renal function index, arterial PH in type II diabetic patients after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials & Methods: In this clinical-experimental study, 90 type II diabetic patients with ASA class II admitted for CABG surgery in Hamadan Ekbatan Hospital were enrolled in the study in 2014 and were randomly assigned to two groups , one group treated with insulin and continued metformin and the other group treated with insulin and discontinued metformin.In the beginning indicators such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI were compared which were not significantly different in the two groups. Then, other parameters such as blood glucose, BUN, Cr, arterial blood PH, cardiac arrhythmia and need for inotrope were compared. Used inotropes in this study included dopamine, dobutamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, milrinon to achieve systolic blood presser pressure over 100mmHg. Results: Average plasma BUN after surgery and one day after surgery in the group who discontinued metformin significantly were higher compared with the metformin group, but no differences were observed in average plasma BUN in the 2nd and 3rd days after surgery in the two groups. During 3 days after surgery, average plasma creatinine was significantly lower in metformin group compared to non- metformin group. Although there was no difference between the two groups in pH parameter before surgery but in the metformin group, average pH was lower than non-metformin group after surgery. Before and 3 days after surgery mean blood glucose level was not significantly different between the two groups. During surgery, average need for inotrope in

  2. Comparative evaluation of the lipid profile in the serum of patients with type II diabetes mellitus and healthy individuals with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Periodontal disease is an immuno-inflammatory disease that is initiated by the interaction between microbial plaque and the periodontal tissues. The data available on the association of periodontal diseases with the lipid profile are conflicting. Therefore, a need for a study in this area was felt. Aims: To evaluate the lipid profile in the serum of patients with chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with Type II diabetes mellitus (DM patients and to compare it with healthy controls, to see whether they can serve as potential markers for chronic periodontitis and also to assess whether periodontitis can have systemic effects. Settings and Design: This study is a cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted involving 300 participants in the age group of 30–60 years from October 2010 to May 2015. Five milliliters of venous blood was collected from each of the study participants, from the antecubital vein. Lipid profile was assessed using the ERBA commercially available kit. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software version 17. Multigroup comparison was carried out using ANOVA. The honest significant difference Tukey's test was used in conjunction with ANOVA to find means which are significantly different from each other. Results: When the lipid profile was estimated, total cholesterol (TC levels were seen to be significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the DM with periodontitis group. High-density lipoprotein (HDL levels were seen to be significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the control group. Mean serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL and very LDL (VLDL levels were seen to be significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the DM with periodontitis group. The triglyceride (TGL values were also significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the DM with periodontitis group. The HDL and LDL levels were seen to be nonsignificant between chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with

  3. Long-term effects of conflict-related sexual violence compared with non-sexual war trauma in female World War II survivors: a matched pairs study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwert, Philipp; Glaesmer, Heide; Eichhorn, Svenja; Grundke, Elena; Pietrzak, Robert H; Freyberger, Harald J; Klauer, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the long-term effects of conflict-related sexual violence experienced at the end of World War II (WWII) with non-sexual WWII trauma (e.g., being exposed to shell shock or physical violence). A total of 27 elderly wartime rape survivors were compared to age- and gender-matched control subjects who were drawn from a larger sample of subjects over 70 years of age who had experienced WWII-related trauma. A modified version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale was used to assess trauma characteristics and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 was used to assess current psychopathology. Additionally, measures of posttraumatic growth (Posttraumatic Growth Inventory) and social acknowledgement as a trauma survivor (Social Acknowledgement Questionnaire) were used to assess two mediating variables in post-trauma conditions of rape victims. Women exposed to conflict-related sexual violence reported greater severity of PTSD-related avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms, as well as anxiety, compared with female long-term survivors of non-sexual WWII trauma. The vast majority (80.9 %) of these women also reported severe sexual problems during their lifetimes relative to 19.0 % of women who experienced non-sexual war trauma. Women exposed to conflict-related sexual violence also reported greater posttraumatic growth, but less social acknowledgement as trauma survivors, compared to survivors of non-sexual war trauma. The results were consistent with emerging neurobiological research, which suggests that different traumas may be differentially associated with long-term posttraumatic sequelae in sexual assault survivors than in other survivor groups and highlights the need to treat (or better prevent) deleterious effects of conflict-related sexual violence in current worldwide crisis zones.

  4. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers for major renal outcomes in patients with diabetes: A 15-year cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon-Yen Wu

    Full Text Available Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are considered to have similar renoprotective effects; so far there has been no consensus about their priorities. This study aimed to compare ACEIs and ARBs for major renal outcomes and survival in a 15-year cohort of adults with diabetes.This study utilized Taiwan's medical and pharmacy claims data in the Longitudinal Cohort of Diabetes Patients. The primary outcome was long-term dialysis, and secondary outcomes were hospitalization for acute kidney injury, hospitalization for hyperkalemia, all-cause death, cardiovascular death, and non-cardiovascular death. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for outcomes comparing ACEIs with ARBs. We conducted subgroup analyses and interaction tests among patients with different age and comorbid diseases.A total of 34,043 patients received ACEIs and 23,772 patients received ARBs. No differences were found for primary or secondary outcomes in the main analyses. ACEIs showed significantly lower hazard than ARBs for long-term dialysis among patients with cardiovascular disease (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.97, interaction P = 0.003 or chronic kidney disease (0.81, 0.71-0.93, interaction P = 0.001.Our analyses show similar effects of ACEIs and ARBs in patients with diabetes. However, ACEIs might provide additional renoprotective effects among patients who have cardiovascular disease or chronic kidney disease.

  5. Coadministration of alloxan and nicotinamide in rats produces biochemical changes in blood and pathological alterations comparable to the changes in type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattam, K K; Raghavendran, Hrb; Murali, M R; Savatey, H; Kamarul, T

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, thirty six male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups and were injected with varying doses of alloxan (Ax) and nicotinamide (NA). The serum levels of glucose, insulin, and adiponectin were measured weekly up to 4 weeks. Elevated levels of glucose were observed in all groups on days 7, 14, 21, and 28, except in groups a and f (control). The serum insulin levels were significantly elevated in groups b and c on day 7, when compared with that in group f, whereas a decrease in the serum insulin levels was observed in groups d and e on days 21 and 28. The adiponectin levels showed inconsistencies on days 7 and 14. However, significant decrease in the adiponectin levels was observed on days 21 and 28. Histological section of the pancreas showed mild (group a), moderate (group b) to severe (groups c, d, and e) degenerative changes. Concomitant fatty changes in the liver and inflammatory infiltration of the kidney were markedly observed in all the treated groups, when compared to control. These results suggested that the use of selective combination of Ax120 + NA50 injection demonstrated type II diabetes mellitus in rats. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Comparing the dependability and associations with functioning of the DSM-5 Section III trait model of personality pathology and the DSM-5 Section II personality disorder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Michael; Ruggero, Camilo J; Kotov, Roman; Liu, Keke; Krueger, Robert F

    2017-07-01

    Two competing models of personality psychopathology are included in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ( DSM-5 ; American Psychiatric Association, 2013); the traditional personality disorder (PD) model included in Section II and an alternative trait-based model included in Section III. Numerous studies have examined the validity of the alternative trait model and its official assessment instrument, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger, Derringer, Markon, Watson, & Skodol, 2012). However, few studies have directly compared the trait-based model to the traditional PD model empirically in the same dataset. Moreover, to our knowledge, only a single study (Suzuki, Griffin, & Samuel, 2015) has examined the dependability of the PID-5, which is an essential component of construct validity for traits (Chmielewski & Watson, 2009; McCrae, Kurtz, Yamagata, & Terracciano, 2011). The current study directly compared the dependability of the DSM-5 traits, as assessed by the PID-5, and the traditional PD model, as assessed by the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4 (PDQ-4+), in a large undergraduate sample. In addition, it evaluated and compared their associations with functioning, another essential component of personality pathology. In general, our findings indicate that most DSM-5 traits demonstrate high levels of dependability that are superior to the traditional PD model; however, some of the constructs assessed by the PID-5 may be more state like. The models were roughly equivalent in terms of their associations with functioning. The current results provide additional support for the validity of PID-5 and the DSM-5 Section III personality pathology model. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. A clinical and radiographical evaluation on the treatment of grade II furcation involvement of mandibular molars by demineralized bone matrix (Dynagraft as compared with coronally positioned flap (CPF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorsand A.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the problems associated with the treatment of periodontal diseases is caused through the extension of disease toward furcation area. Several techniques in Conservative, Resective and Regenerative categories have been suggested for the treatment of furcation involvement."nPurpose: The aim of this study was to compare the results of the treatment of grade II furcation involvement in mandibular molars using an allograft material named 'Dynagraft' (a type of demineralized bone matrix and the coronally positioned flap. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial study, twelve patients (9 females and 3 males, aged 25 to 40, suffering from bilaterally grade II furcation involvement of mandibular molars who referred to dental faculty Tehran University of medical Sciences, were investigated. The molars of one side were treated by Dynagraft whereas those of the opposite side underwent the CPF method. Measurements of the probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, keratinized gingiva (KG and horizontal probing depth (HPD were recorded at baseline, 3 and 6 months after surgery. In order to investigate the bone radiographic changes, radiovisiography at the mentioned periods in addition to clinical investigation, were performed. For statistical analysis, Paired West was used."nResults: The mean PPD reduction three months and six months after the operation were 1.75 mm and 2.25mm, respectively in the Dynagraft (test group whereas 1.26mm and 1.27mm in the CPF (control group (P<0.005. The mean attachment gain three months and six months after the operation were 1.1 mm and 1.5mm respectively in the test group, and 0.2mm and 0.3mm in the control group (P<0.005. The mean KG reduction three months and six months after the operation were 0.5mm and 0.6mm respectively in the test group and those of the control group were 1.1mm and 1.1mm. The mean HPD reduction three months and six months

  8. Cost-Utility Analysis of Lipegfilgrastim Compared to Pegfilgrastim for the Prophylaxis of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia in Patients with Stage II-IV Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esse I. H. Akpo

    2017-09-01

    -to-pay thresholds (WTP of €10,000, €30,000 and €50,000 per QALY gained, respectively. At a WTP threshold of €30,000 per QALY gained, lipegfilgrastim was cost-effective up to €1,500 across all age bands and cancer stages, compared to the current price.Conclusions: Lipegfilgrastim is a cost-effective use of health care resources in patients with stage II-IV breast cancer.

  9. Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-07-01

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  10. Multi-Center Randomized Phase II Study Comparing Cediranib plus Gefitinib with Cediranib plus Placebo in Subjects with Recurrent/Progressive Glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Brown

    Full Text Available Cediranib, an oral pan-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, failed to show benefit over lomustine in relapsed glioblastoma. One resistance mechanism for cediranib is up-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. This study aimed to determine if dual therapy with cediranib and the oral EGFR inhibitor gefitinib improved outcome in recurrent glioblastoma.This was a multi-center randomized, two-armed, double-blinded phase II study comparing cediranib plus gefitinib versus cediranib plus placebo in subjects with first relapse/first progression of glioblastoma following surgery and chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was progression free survival (PFS. Secondary outcome measures included overall survival (OS and radiologic response rate. Recruitment was terminated early following suspension of the cediranib program. 38 subjects (112 planned were enrolled with 19 subjects in each treatment arm. Median PFS with cediranib plus gefitinib was 3.6 months compared to 2.8 months for cediranib plus placebo (HR; 0.72, 90% CI; 0.41 to 1.26. Median OS was 7.2 months with cediranib plus gefitinib and 5.5 months with cediranib plus placebo (HR; 0.68, 90% CI; 0.39 to 1.19. Eight subjects (42% had a partial response in the cediranib plus gefitinib arm versus five patients (26% in the cediranib plus placebo arm.Cediranib and gefitinib in combination is tolerated in patients with glioblastoma. Incomplete recruitment led to the study being underpowered. However, a trend towards improved survival and response rates with the addition of gefitinib to cediranib was observed. Further studies of the combination incorporating EGFR and VEGF inhibition are warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01310855.

  11. A Map of the Local Velocity Substructure in the Milky Way Disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearl, Alan N.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Smith, R. Fiona [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Carlin, Jeffrey L. [LSST, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    We confirm, quantify, and provide a table of the coherent velocity substructure of the Milky Way disk within 2 kpc of the Sun toward the Galactic anticenter, with a 0.2 kpc resolution. We use the radial velocities of ∼340,000 F-type stars obtained with the Guoshoujing Telescope (also known as the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope, LAMOST), and proper motions derived from the PPMXL catalog. The PPMXL proper motions have been corrected to remove systematic errors by subtracting the average proper motions of galaxies and QSOs that have been confirmed in the LAMOST spectroscopic survey, and that are within 2.°5 of the star’s position. We provide the resulting table of systematic offsets derived from the PPMXL proper motion measurements of extragalactic objects identified in the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. Using the corrected phase-space stellar sample, we find statistically significant deviations in the bulk disk velocity of 20 km s{sup −1} or more in the three-dimensional velocities of Galactic disk stars. The bulk velocity varies significantly over length scales of half a kiloparsec or less. The rotation velocity of the disk increases by 20 km s{sup −1} from the Sun’s position to 1.5 kpc outside the solar circle. Disk stars in the second quadrant, within 1 kpc of the Sun, are moving radially toward the Galactic center and vertically toward a point a few tenths of a kiloparsec above the Galactic plane; looking down on the disk, the stars appear to move in a circular streaming motion with a radius of the order of 1 kpc.

  12. Probing deformation substructure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and dislocation dynamics modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hofmann, Felix; Song, Xu; Eve, Sophie; Collins, Steve P

    2010-09-01

    Materials characterization at the nano-scale is motivated by the desire to resolve the structural aspects and deformation behavior at length scales relevant to those mechanisms that define the novel and unusual properties of nano-structured materials. A range of novel techniques has recently become accessible with the help of synchrotron X-ray beams that can be focused down to spot sizes of less than a few microns on the sample. The unique combination of tunability (energy selection), parallelism and brightness of synchrotron X-ray beams allows their use for high resolution diffraction (determination of crystal structure and transformations, analysis of dislocation sub-structures, orientation and texture analysis, strain mapping); small angle X-ray scattering (analysis of nano-scale voids and defects; orientation analysis) and imaging (radiography and tomography). After a brief review of the state-of-the-art capabilities for monochromatic and white beam synchrotron diffraction, we consider the usefulness of these techniques for the task of bridging the gap between experiment and modeling. Namely, we discuss how the experiments can be configured to provide information relevant to the validation and improvement of modeling approaches, and also how the results of various simulations can be post-processed to improve the possibility of (more or less) direct comparison with experiments. Using the example of some recent experiments carried out on beamline 116 at Diamond Light Source near Oxford, we discuss how such experimental results can be interpreted in view and in conjunction with numerical deformation models, particularly those incorporating dislocation effects, e.g., finite-element based pseudo-continuum strain gradient formulations, and discrete dislocation simulations. Post-processing of FE and discrete dislocation simulations is described, illustrating the kind of information that can be extracted from comparisons between modeling and experimental data.

  13. A Map of the Local Velocity Substructure in the Milky Way Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Alan N.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Smith, R. Fiona

    2017-10-01

    We confirm, quantify, and provide a table of the coherent velocity substructure of the Milky Way disk within 2 kpc of the Sun toward the Galactic anticenter, with a 0.2 kpc resolution. We use the radial velocities of ˜340,000 F-type stars obtained with the Guoshoujing Telescope (also known as the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope, LAMOST), and proper motions derived from the PPMXL catalog. The PPMXL proper motions have been corrected to remove systematic errors by subtracting the average proper motions of galaxies and QSOs that have been confirmed in the LAMOST spectroscopic survey, and that are within 2.°5 of the star’s position. We provide the resulting table of systematic offsets derived from the PPMXL proper motion measurements of extragalactic objects identified in the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. Using the corrected phase-space stellar sample, we find statistically significant deviations in the bulk disk velocity of 20 km s-1 or more in the three-dimensional velocities of Galactic disk stars. The bulk velocity varies significantly over length scales of half a kiloparsec or less. The rotation velocity of the disk increases by 20 km s-1 from the Sun’s position to 1.5 kpc outside the solar circle. Disk stars in the second quadrant, within 1 kpc of the Sun, are moving radially toward the Galactic center and vertically toward a point a few tenths of a kiloparsec above the Galactic plane; looking down on the disk, the stars appear to move in a circular streaming motion with a radius of the order of 1 kpc.

  14. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF Ly α BLOB 1: HALO SUBSTRUCTURE ILLUMINATED FROM WITHIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geach, J. E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Narayanan, D. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Haverford College, PA 19041 (United States); Matsuda, Y.; Ao, Y.; Kubo, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hayes, M. [Stockholm University, Dept. of Astronomy and Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Mas-Ribas, Ll.; Dijkstra, M. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Steidel, C. C. [California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2 (Canada); Feldmann, R. [Dept. of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Avison, A. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Manchester (United Kingdom); Agertz, O. [Dept. of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); Birkinshaw, M.; Bremer, M. N. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Dannerbauer, H. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Farrah, D. [Dept. of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Harrison, C. M. [Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Dept. of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Michałowski, M. J., E-mail: j.geach@herts.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-11-20

    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) 850 μ m continuum observations of the original Ly α Blob (LAB) in the SSA22 field at z = 3.1 (SSA22-LAB01). The ALMA map resolves the previously identified submillimeter source into three components with a total flux density of S {sub 850} = 1.68 ± 0.06 mJy, corresponding to a star-formation rate of ∼150 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup -1}. The submillimeter sources are associated with several faint ( m ≈ 27 mag) rest-frame ultraviolet sources identified in Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) clear filter imaging ( λ ≈ 5850 Å). One of these companions is spectroscopically confirmed with the Keck Multi-Object Spectrometer For Infra-Red Exploration to lie within 20 projected kpc and 250 km s{sup -1} of one of the ALMA components. We postulate that some of these STIS sources represent a population of low-mass star-forming satellites surrounding the central submillimeter sources, potentially contributing to their growth and activity through accretion. Using a high-resolution cosmological zoom simulation of a 10{sup 13} M {sub ⊙} halo at z = 3, including stellar, dust, and Ly α radiative transfer, we can model the ALMA+STIS observations and demonstrate that Ly α photons escaping from the central submillimeter sources are expected to resonantly scatter in neutral hydrogen, the majority of which is predicted to be associated with halo substructure. We show how this process gives rise to extended Ly α emission with similar surface brightness and morphology to observed giant LABs.

  15. Revealing the sub-structures of the magnetic reconnection separatrix via particle-in-cell simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, M.; Deng, X. H.; Pang, Y.; Xu, X. J.; Yao, M.; Huang, S. Y.; Yuan, Z. G.; Li, H. M.; Wang, D. D.; Wang, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic separatrix is an important boundary layer separating the inflow and outflow regions in magnetic reconnection. In this article, we investigate the sub-structures of the separatrix region by using two-and-half dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The separatrix region can be divided into two sub-regions in terms of the ion and electron frozen-in conditions. Far from the neutral sheet, ions and electrons are magnetized in magnetic fields. Approaching the neutral sheet, ion frozen-in condition is broken in a narrow region (∼c/ω pi ) at the edge of a density cavity, while electrons are frozen-in to magnetic fields. In this region, electric field E z is around zero, and the convective term –(v i × B) is balanced by the Hall term in the generalized Ohm’s law because ions carry the perpendicular current. Inside the density cavity, both ion and electron frozen-in conditions are broken. The region consists of two sub-ion or electron-scale layers, which contain intense electric fields. Formation of the two sub-layers is due to the complex electron flow pattern around the separatrix region. In the layer, E z is balanced by a combination of Hall term and the divergence of electron pressure tensor, with the Hall term being dominant. Our preliminary simulation result shows that the separatrix region in guide field reconnection also contains two sub-regions: the inner region and the outer region. However, the inner region contains only one current layer in contrast with the case without guide field.

  16. Examining Coherency Scales, Substructure, and Propagation of Whistler Mode Chorus Elements With Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; Lee, J. H.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Jaynes, A. N.; Leonard, T.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Baker, D. N.; Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Strangeway, R. J.; Hartley, D. P.; Kletzing, C. A.; Breuillard, H.; Le Contel, O.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Torbert, R. B.; Allen, R. C.; Burch, J. L.; Santolik, O.

    2017-11-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves are a naturally occurring electromagnetic emission observed in Earth's magnetosphere. Here, for the first time, data from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission were used to analyze chorus waves in detail, including the calculation of chorus wave normal vectors, fi>k. A case study was examined from a period of substorm activity around the time of a conjunction between the MMS constellation and NASA's Van Allen Probes mission on 07 April 2016. Chorus wave activity was simultaneously observed by all six spacecraft over a broad range of L shells (5.5 flat or falling frequency following the peak, and all the elements exhibited complex and well-organized substructure observed consistently at all four MMS spacecraft at separations up to 70 km (60 km perpendicular and 38 km parallel to the background magnetic field). The waveforms in field-aligned coordinates also demonstrated that these waves were all phase coherent, allowing for the direct calculation of fi>k. Error estimates on calculated fi>k revealed that the plane wave approximation was valid for six of the eight elements and most of the subelements. The wave normal vectors were within 20-30° from the direction antiparallel to the background field for all elements and changed from subelement to subelement through at least two of the eight elements. The azimuthal angle of fi>k in the perpendicular plane was oriented earthward and was oblique to that of the Poynting vector, which has implications for the validity of cold plasma theory.

  17. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenwirth, C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Drexler, S.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); Girst, S.; Reindl, J. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Walsh, D.W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Friedl, A.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); and others

    2015-04-01

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future.

  18. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebenwirth, C.; Greubel, C.; Drexler, S.E.; Girst, S.; Reindl, J.; Walsh, D.W.M.; Dollinger, G.; Friedl, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future

  19. Advanced pulse oximeter signal processing technology compared to simple averaging. II. Effect on frequency of alarms in the postanesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheineck-Leyssius, A T; Kalkman, C J

    1999-05-01

    To determine the effect of a new pulse oximeter (Nellcor Symphony N-3000, Pleasanton, CA) with signal processing technique (Oxismart) on the incidence of false alarms in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Prospective study. Nonuniversity hospital. 603 consecutive ASA physical status I, II, and III patients recovering from general or regional anesthesia in the PACU. We compared the number of alarms produced by a recently developed "third"-generation pulse oximeter (Nellcor Symphony N-3000) with Oxismart signal processing technique and a conventional pulse oximeter (Criticare 504, Waukesha, WI). Patients were randomly assigned to either a Nellcor pulse oximeter or a Criticare with the signal averaging time set at either 12 or 21 seconds. For each patient the number of false (artifact) alarms was counted. The Nellcor generated one false alarm in 199 patients and 36 (in 31 patients) "loss of pulse" alarms. The conventional pulse oximeter with the averaging time set at 12 seconds generated a total of 32 false alarms in 17 of 197 patients [compared with the Nellcor, relative risk (RR) 0.06, confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.25] and a total of 172 "loss of pulse" alarms in 79 patients (RR 0.39, CI 0.28 to 0.55). The conventional pulse oximeter with the averaging time set at 21 seconds generated 12 false alarms in 11 of 207 patients (compared with the Nellcor, RR 0.09, CI 0.02 to 0.48) and a total of 204 "loss of pulse" alarms in 81 patients (RR 0.40, CI 0.28 to 0.56). The lower incidence of false alarms of the conventional pulse oximeter with the longest averaging time compared with the shorter averaging time did not reach statistical significance (false alarms RR 0.62, CI 0.3 to 1.27; "loss of pulse" alarms RR 0.98, CI 0.77 to 1.3). To date, this is the first report of a pulse oximeter that produced almost no false alarms in the PACU.

  20. Estudo Comparativo dos Resultados Maternos e Perinatais entre Pacientes com Diabetes Pré-gestacional Tipo I e Tipo II Comparative Study of Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes among Patients with Pregestational Type I and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheline Monte de Carvalho

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: avaliar a evolução da gestação, controle metabólico e resultados perinatais de pacientes diabéticas pré-gestacionais e fazer um estudo comparativo entre os resultados de pacientes com diabetes insulino-dependente e não-insulino-dependente. Métodos: análise retrospectiva de prontuários de 57 pacientes com diagnóstico de diabetes pré-gestacional que iniciaram pré-natal no Serviço de Medicina Materno-Fetal da Maternidade-Escola Assis Chateaubriand da Universidade Federal do Ceará, no período de janeiro 1995 a dezembro de 1998. As 57 grávidas incluídas no estudo foram divididas em dois grupos: grupo I, composto de 28 pacientes portadoras de diabetes insulino-dependente (tipo I, e grupo II, com 29 gestantes com diabetes não-insulino-dependente (tipo II controladas com dieta ou com hipoglicemiante oral antes da gestação. Resultados: não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os dois grupos em relação à necessidade de internamento para controle glicêmico (39,2% x 27,5% e complicações maternas, tais como: hipertensão arterial crônica (14,2% x 27,5%, doença hipertensiva específica da gravidez (14,2% x 17,2%, amniorrexe prematura (3,5% x 10,3%, infecção do trato urinário (10,7% x 6,8% e trabalho de parto prematuro (3,5% x 6,8%. Foi observado, porém, maior número de episódios de hipoglicemia materna entre as pacientes insulino-dependentes (35,7% x 3,4%. Os resultados perinatais foram semelhantes. Observamos elevados índices de malformações e morbimortalidade perinatal. Conclusão: não houve diferença na incidência de intercorrências clínicas e obstétricas entre as pacientes insulino-dependentes e não-insulino-dependentes, excluindo-se hipoglicemia materna.Purpose: to evaluate the evolution of gestation, metabolic control and perinatal outcome of pregestational diabetic patients and to perform a comparative study of the results of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes (type I and

  1. A phase II prospective, non-comparative assessment of a new silver sodium carboxymethylcellulose (AQUACEL(®) Ag BURN) glove in the management of partial thickness hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duteille, Franck; Jeffery, Steven L A

    2012-11-01

    Nylon-reinforced silver sodium carboxymethylcellulose (AQUACEL(®) Ag BURN) dressings were developed to be pliable and conforming for the management of partial-thickness burns. This study evaluated the AQUACEL(®) Ag BURN glove for the management of hand burns. This 21-day, phase II, prospective, non-comparative study included 23 patients with partial-thickness hand burn of at least two fingers. The AQUACEL(®) Ag BURN glove was applied to one hand and could remain in place up to 21 days until clinically indicated to change the glove. Dressings were evaluated 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 14, and 21 days after initial application. Safety was the primary study endpoint. Sixteen (70%) hand burns re-epithelialized fully over a mean of 15.6 days. Initial application was easy/very easy for 20 (87%) patients. Mean time for initial dressing application was 5.4 min. At final evaluation, most patients gave ratings of excellent/good for conformability (91%), overall glove performance (74%), and appropriateness of sizes (83%). Mean pain score from 0 (none) to 10 (worst imaginable) was 3.43 at baseline; during the study, mean scores were 1.15 at rest and 2.29 during movement. Of 61 glove removals, most (72%) were easy/very easy, and 12% had fallen off. Adverse events (wound site or elsewhere) occurred in 15 (65%) patients. Treatment-related adverse events were wound pain (17%), maceration (9%), and stiff fingers (4%). The AQUACEL(®) Ag BURN glove was well tolerated in the management of partial-thickness hand burn. Many patients used only one glove. When glove changes were required, they were usually quick and easy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Copper(II) 12-metallacrown-4 complexes of alpha-, beta- and gamma-aminohydroxamic acids: a comparative thermodynamic study in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegoni, Matteo; Remelli, Maurizio; Bacco, Dimitri; Marchiò, Luciano; Dallavalle, Francesco

    2008-05-28

    A complete thermodynamic study of the protonation and Cu(II) complex formation equilibria of a series of alpha- and beta-aminohydroxamic acids in aqueous solution was performed. The thermodynamic parameters obtained for the protonation of glycine-, (S)-alpha-alanine-, (R,S)-valine-, (S)-leucine-, beta-alanine- and (R)-aspartic-beta-hydroxamic acids were compared with those previously reported for gamma-amino- and (S)-glutamic-gamma-hydroxamic acids. The enthalpy/entropy parameters calculated for the protonation microequilibria of these three types of ligands are in very good agreement with the literature values for simple amines and hydroxamic acids. The pentanuclear complexes [Cu5L4H(-4)]2+ contain the ligands acting as (NH2,N-)-(O,O-) bridging bis-chelating and correspond to 12-metallacrown-4 (12-MC-4) which are formed by self-assembly between pH 4 and 6 with alpha-aminohydroxamates (HL), while those with beta- and gamma-derivatives exist in a wider pH range (4-11). The stability order of these metallomacrocycles is beta- > alpha- > gamma-aminohydroxamates. The formation of 12-MC-4 with alpha-aminohydroxamates is entropy-driven, and that with beta-derivatives is enthalpy-driven, while with gamma-GABAhydroxamate both effects occur. These results are interpreted on the basis of specific enthalpies or entropy contributions related to chelate ring dimensions, charge neutralization and solvation-desolvation effects. The enthalpy/entropy parameters of 12-MC-4 with alpha-aminohydroxamic acids considered are also dependent on the optical purity of the ligands. Actually, that with (R,S)-valinehydroxamic acid presents an higher entropy and a lower enthalpy value than those of enantiopure ligands, although the corresponding stabilities are almost equivalent. Moreover, DFT calculations are in agreement with a more exothermic enthalpy found for metallacrowns with enantiomerically pure ligands.

  3. Influence of substructure design, veneer application technique, and firing regime on the in vitro performance of molar zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Verena; Letsch, Christoph; Handel, Gerhard; Behr, Michael; Schneider-Feyrer, Sibylle; Rosentritt, Martin

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of substructure design, veneer application technique, and firing regime on the failure and fracture resistance of molar zirconia crowns. Six groups (n=8/group) of zirconia crowns were fabricated in simple core (SC) or anatomically reduced (AR) design, veneered with different feldspathic or glass ceramic materials, and defined according to the application technique and firing regime (LT: layering technique; LT_L: LT with long-term cooling; PT: press technique; DV: digital veneering technique). The following groups were investigated: SCLT, ARLT, SCLT_L, SCPT, ARPT, ARDV. Crowns were adhesively bonded to polymethylmethacrylate abutment teeth and subjected to thermal cycling (TC: 2×3000×5°/55°) and mechanical loading (ML: 1.2×10(6); 50N; 1.6Hz) in a chewing simulator with metal-ceramic molar crowns as antagonists. Failures were monitored and fracture resistance determined after aging. Data were statistically analyzed (one-way analysis of variance, ANOVA; post hoc Bonferroni, α=0.05). Crowns were subjected to scanning electron microscopy for fractographic failure analysis. Failures (chipping, cracks) during TCML were observed in groups SCLT (2×), ARDV (2×) and SCLT_L (1×). Defect sizes varied between 3.5mm (SCLT: crack) and 30.0mm(2) (SCLT_L: chipping). Mean (SD) fracture forces ranged between 1529.0 (405.2)N for SCPT and 2372.3 (351.8)N for ARDV. The failure frequency of veneered zirconia crowns could be reduced by using anatomically reduced substructures, the press veneering technique, and an adapted cooling protocol. Fracture resistance increased with use of anatomically reduced substructures and the digital veneering technique. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and application of the added fluid mass and substructure techniques for integrated pressurized water reactor assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Sung; Oh, Kyoung-Hoon; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Jhung, Myung-Jo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dynamic and seismic analysis was performed about the SMART reactor assembly. ► Use of the fluid element is realistic and rational on dynamic fluid behavior. ► Substructure technique using super-elements reduces analysis time and storage volume. ► By using two methods, natural frequency reduces and is equal to the normal element. ► The assembly was designed with sufficient safety margin by the elementary techniques. - Abstract: The SMART (system-integrated advanced modular reactor), one of iPWRs (integrated pressurized water reactors), has been on the process of design in Republic of Korea. For the structural integrity of the 330MWt SMART reactor assembly against earthquake, this paper presents FE (finite element) models, and dynamic and seismic analysis results. Prior to the dynamic and seismic analysis for the iPWR assembly, elementary techniques such as added fluid mass and substructure techniques were developed for simplified models used in this work. For the added fluid mass techniques, it is found that the use of the fluid element is more realistic and rational for the fluid effect on dynamic behavior than the addition of the lumped mass. For the substructure techniques using super-elements, it is found that these techniques can avoid a long calculation time and reduce the data storage volume. The dynamic analysis was implemented for the iPWR assembly using the aforementioned elementary techniques. As a result of the dynamic analysis, natural frequency at each mode is reduced with the consideration of the fluid mass and the super-element generates the very same natural frequencies as the normal element model generates. The response spectrum and time history-based seismic analyses were performed for the iPWR assembly using the elementary techniques. It is concluded that the iPWR assembly was designed with sufficient seismic safety margins.

  5. Effect of the shades of background substructures on the overall color of zirconia-based all-ceramic crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Tulapornchai, Chantana; Mamani, Jatuphol; Kamchatphai, Wannaporn; Thongpun, Noparat

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the color of a background substructure on the overall color of a zirconia-based all-ceramic crown. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty one posterior zirconia crowns were made for twenty subjects. Seven premolar crowns and six molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with metal post and core in the first and second group. In the third group, eight molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with a prefabricated post and composite core ...

  6. Development of new methodologies to assess the structural integrity of the grouted joint of a 10MW wind turbine substructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Benjamin; Gintautas, Tomas; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2018-01-01

    Monopiles are currently the most commonly used substructure in the offshore wind market due to their ease of installation in shallow to medium waters. The monopile and the transition piece are connected by a grouted joint. Fatigue and corrosion are two of the most important degradation mechanisms...... been developed considering the effect of corrosion on the steel parts of the grouted joints, along with the consideration of stiffness degradation of the concrete structure and the reliability of the joint under fatigue. One type of grouted joint connection is considered: the conventional cylindrical...

  7. Aspects of dislocation substructures associated with the deformation stages of stainless steel AISI 304 at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, J.L.L.; Reis Filho, J.A.B.S.; Almeida, L.H. de; Monteiro, S.N.

    1978-07-01

    The development of dislocation substrutures in type 304 austenitic stainless steel at high temperatures has been associated with the deformation stages through log dσ/d epsilon x log epsilon plots, which show the transition point independently. The mechanisms responsible for the Dynamic Strain Aging particulary the Portevin-LeChatelier effect were related to the appearence of the stages. The results indicate that the deformation stages can be divided into two distinct regions. Each one of these region show particular characteristics with respect to the stress level, transition point, developed substructure and type of crystalline defects interaction with dislocations. (Author) [pt

  8. Estimation of the displacement of cardiac substructures and the motion of the coronary arteries using electrocardiographic gating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wenyong Tan,1,* Liying Xu,2,* Xiaohong Wang,1 Dasheng Qiu,3 Guang Han,1 Desheng Hu1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 3PET-CT Center, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors have contributed equally to this paper Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify the displacement of cardiac substructures, including the anterior myocardial territory (AMT, left ventricle, and coronary arteries during a normal cardiac cycle. Materials and methods: Computed tomography (CT images with retrospective electrocardiographic gating of 17 eligible patients were obtained. All images were reconstructed automatically for the end-diastolic and end-systolic phases. CT scanning without contrast at a random phase and a selected vertebral body were used as references to measure three-dimensionaldisplacements of the cardiac substructures. Results: The displacement between the end-diastolic and end-systolic phases (Dd-s was greater than that between the end-systolic and random phases and between the end-diastolic and random cardiac phases. The largest displacements for the heart were in the left, posterior, and inferior directions with an average Dd-s of approximately 4–6 mm. The average Dd-s for the AMT and left ventricle was 1.2–2.7 mm in the anterior and right directions, 4.3–7.8 mm in left and posterior directions, and 4.9–6.3 mm in superior and inferior directions. For the coronary arteries, the average Dd-s was 2.8–5.9 mm in the anterior-posterior direction, 3.5–6.6 mm in left-right direction, and 3.8–5.3 mm in the superior-inferior direction. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for the heart, AMT, and left ventricle (kappa coefficient, >0.75 for all and good for most coronary arteries in three dimensions (kappa coefficient, 0.511–0.687. The Dd-s did not

  9. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter Phase II study comparing the efficacy and safety of oral nemonoxacin with oral levofloxacin in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: To compare the clinical efficacy and safety of nemonoxacin with levofloxacin in treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in a Phase II clinical trial. Methods: One hundred ninety-two patients with CAP were randomized to receive oral nemonoxacin (500 mg or 750 mg or levofloxacin (500 mg once daily for 7–10 days. Clinical and bacteriological responses were determined at the test of cure (TOC visit in the full analysis set (FAS. Results: The clinical cure rate of nemonoxacin (500 mg, nemonoxacin (750 mg, and levofloxacin (500 mg was 93.3%, 87.3%, and 88.5%, respectively, in the FAS (n = 168, and 93.0%, 93.9%, and 88.9%, respectively in the per protocol set (n = 152. At the TOC visit, nemonoxacin at 500 mg and 750 mg was proven to be noninferior to levofloxacin at 500 mg in the FAS in terms of clinical efficacy. The overall bacteriological success rate was 83.3% in both nemonoxacin groups and 80.0% in the levofloxacin 500 mg group in the bacteriological FAS. The comprehensive efficacy rate was comparable among the three groups (87.5% for the nemonoxacin 500 mg group, 93.8% for the nemonoxacin 750 mg group, and 81.3% for the levofloxacin 500 mg group. Most drug-related adverse events were mild and transient, mainly gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, transient neutropenia, and elevated liver enzymes. No drug-related serious adverse events occurred. Conclusion: Either 500 mg or 750 mg of oral nemonoxacin taken once daily for 7–10 days demonstrated high clinical and bacteriological success rates in Chinese adult patients with CAP. Nemonoxacin at 500 mg once daily for 7–10 days is recommended for future Phase III clinical trials.ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01537250. Keywords: clinical trial, community-acquired pneumonia, efficacy, nenomoxacin, safety

  10. A randomized multi-center phase II trial of the angiogenesis inhibitor Cilengitide (EMD 121974 and gemcitabine compared with gemcitabine alone in advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Frieder

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-angiogenic treatment is believed to have at least cystostatic effects in highly vascularized tumours like pancreatic cancer. In this study, the treatment effects of the angiogenesis inhibitor Cilengitide and gemcitabine were compared with gemcitabine alone in patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods A multi-national, open-label, controlled, randomized, parallel-group, phase II pilot study was conducted in 20 centers in 7 countries. Cilengitide was administered at 600 mg/m2 twice weekly for 4 weeks per cycle and gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m2 for 3 weeks followed by a week of rest per cycle. The planned treatment period was 6 four-week cycles. The primary endpoint of the study was overall survival and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS, response rate, quality of life (QoL, effects on biological markers of disease (CA 19.9 and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor, and safety. An ancillary study investigated the pharmacokinetics of both drugs in a subset of patients. Results Eighty-nine patients were randomized. The median overall survival was 6.7 months for Cilengitide and gemcitabine and 7.7 months for gemcitabine alone. The median PFS times were 3.6 months and 3.8 months, respectively. The overall response rates were 17% and 14%, and the tumor growth control rates were 54% and 56%, respectively. Changes in the levels of CA 19.9 went in line with the clinical course of the disease, but no apparent relationships were seen with the biological markers of angiogenesis. QoL and safety evaluations were comparable between treatment groups. Pharmacokinetic studies showed no influence of gemcitabine on the pharmacokinetic parameters of Cilengitide and vice versa. Conclusion There were no clinically important differences observed regarding efficacy, safety and QoL between the groups. The observations lay in the range of other clinical studies

  11. Resonant substructure in K. pi. pi. pi. decays of D mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffman, D.; DeJongh, F.; Dubois, G.P.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.G.; Matthews, C.G.; Mincer, A.; Richman, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wisniewski, W.J.; Zhu, Y. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)); Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.O.; Cassell, R.E.; Coward, D.H.; Kim, P.C.; Labs, J.; Odian, A.; Pitman, D.; Schindler, R.H.; Toki, W.; Wasserbaech, S. (Stanford Linear Acclerator Center, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)); Drinkard, J.J.; Gatto, C.; Heusch, C.A.; Lockman, W.S.; Scarlatella, M.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Schalk, T.L.; Seiden, A.; Weseler, S. (University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)); Eisenstein, B.I.; Freese, T.; Gladding, G.; Izen, J.M.; Stockdale, I.E.; Tripsas, B. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)); Mallik, U.; Wang, M.Z. (University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)); Brown, J.; Burnett, T.H.; Li, A.D.; Mir, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Nemat; fP(Mark III Collaboration)fP

    1992-04-01

    We determine the resonant substructure of {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}}{pi}{pi}{pi} decays, extracting the relative fractions and phases of the amplitudes contributing to the {ital K}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}, {ital {bar K}} {sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}, {ital K}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, and {ital {bar K}} {sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} final states. We find that two-body decay modes account for at least 75% of these decays. We obtain branching ratios for {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}a}{sub 1}(1260), {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}} {sup *}{rho}, {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}}{sub 1}(1270){pi}, {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}}{sub 1}(1400){pi}, and {ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}} {sup 0}{omega} decay modes, as well as for several three- and four-body decay modes. In the case of {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}a}{sub 1}(1260) and {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}} {sup *}{rho}, we obtain the branching ratios for all three possible isospin combinations, enabling us to extract the isospin-1/2 and -3/2 amplitudes, and their relative phases. We find that the isospin-3/2 amplitudes are suppressed relative to the isospin-1/2 amplitudes. This implies that the widths of the {ital D}{sup +} modes are suppressed relative to those of the {ital D}{sup 0}, confirming that an understanding of the lifetime difference of the {ital D}{sup 0} and {ital D}{sup +} depends on an understanding of two-body hadronic decays. For the {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}} {sup *}{rho} decay modes, we obtain detailed information on the polarization of the {ital {bar K}} {sup *} and {rho}. This enables us to place constraints on the form factors for {ital D}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}} {sup *} and {ital D}{r arrow}{rho} transitions.

  12. California Verbal Learning Test-II performance in schizophrenia as a function of ascertainment strategy: comparing the first and second phases of the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia (COGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William S; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Braff, David L; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Greenwood, Tiffany A; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Sprock, Joyce; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Seidman, Larry J

    2015-04-01

    The first phase of the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia (COGS-1) showed performance deficits in learning and memory on the California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition (CVLT-II) in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), compared to healthy comparison subjects (HCS). A question is whether the COGS-1 study, which used a family study design (i.e. studying relatively intact families), yielded "milder" SZ phenotypes than those acquired subsequently in the COGS-2 case-control design that did not recruit unaffected family members. CVLT-II performance was compared for the COGS-1 and COGS-2 samples. Analyses focused on learning, recall and recognition variables, with age, gender and education as covariates. Analyses of COGS-2 data explored effects of additional covariates and moderating factors in CVLT-II performance. 324 SZ subjects and 510 HCS had complete CVLT-II and covariate data in COGS-1, while 1356 SZ and 1036 HCS had complete data in COGS-2. Except for recognition memory, analysis of covariance showed significantly worse performance in COGS-2 on all CVLT-II variables for SZ and HCS, and remained significant in the presence of the covariates. Performance in each of the 5 learning trials differed significantly. However, effect sizes comparing cases and controls were comparable across the two studies. COGS-2 analyses confirmed SZ performance deficits despite effects of multiple significant covariates and moderating factors. CVLT-II performance was worse in COGS-2 than in COGS-1 for both the SZ and the HCS in this large cohort, likely due to cohort effects. Demographically corrected data yield a consistent pattern of performance across the two studies in SZ. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Comparative cost-effectiveness of the HeartWare versus HeartMate II left ventricular assist devices used in the United Kingdom National Health Service bridge-to-transplant program for patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikottil-Jacob, Ruth; Suri, Gaurav; Connock, Martin; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Sutcliffe, Paul; Maheswaran, Hendramoorthy; Banner, Nicholas R; Clarke, Aileen

    2014-04-01

    Patients with advanced heart failure may receive a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) as part of a bridge-to-transplant (BTT) strategy. The United Kingdom National Health Service (UK NHS) has financed a BTT program in which the predominant LVADs used have been the HeartMate II (HM II; Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA) and HeartWare (HW; HeartWare International, Inc. Framingham, MA). We aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness of the use of these within the NHS program. Individual patient data from the UK NHS Blood and Transplant Data Base were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier and competing outcomes methodologies. Outcomes were time to death, time to heart transplant (HT), and cumulative incidences of HT, death on LVAD support, and LVAD explantation. A semi-Markov multistate economic model was built to assess cost-effectiveness. The perspective was from the NHS, discount rates were 3.5%. Outcomes were quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and incremental cost (2011 prices in GB£) per QALY (ICER) for HW vs HM II. Survival was better with HW support than with HM II. Cumulative incidence of HT was low for both groups (11% at ~2 years). HW patients accrued 4.99 lifetime QALYs costing £258,913 ($410,970), HM II patients accrued 3.84 QALYs costing £231,871 ($368,048); deterministic and probabilistic ICERs for HW vs HM II were £23,530 ($37,349) and £20,799 ($33,014), respectively. Patients In the UK BTT program who received the HW LVAD had a better clinical outcome than those who received the HM II, and the HW was more cost-effective. This result needs to be reassessed in a randomized controlled trial comparing the 2 devices. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Studies of jet shapes and jet substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Loch, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Jet substructure reconstruction techniques are applied in the context of the reconstruction of heavy boosted particles, with a particular emphasis on searches for new physics, and in other analyses sensitive to the origin of the jets. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC conducts extensive performance evaluations for a series of substructure techniques using proton-proton collision data taken in 2011 at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. Selected results for various observables and their sensitivity to experimental conditions like pile-up are presented, together with comparisons to Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that most of the considered jet substructure related mass, distance and splitting scale measures can be understood with precisions of better than 10%.

  15. Comparing the life cycle costs of using harvest residue as feedstock for small- and large-scale bioenergy systems (part II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, Julian; Wolf, Derek P.; Caspersen, John P.

    2015-01-01

    In part II of our two-part study, we estimate the nominal electricity generation and GHG (greenhouse gas) mitigation costs of using harvest residue from a hardwood forest in Ontario, Canada to fuel (1) a small-scale (250 kW e ) combined heat and power wood chip gasification unit and (2) a large-scale (211 MW e ) coal-fired generating station retrofitted to combust wood pellets. Under favorable operational and regulatory conditions, generation costs are similar: 14.1 and 14.9 cents per kWh (c/kWh) for the small- and large-scale facilities, respectively. However, GHG mitigation costs are considerably higher for the large-scale system: $159/tonne of CO 2 eq., compared to $111 for the small-scale counterpart. Generation costs increase substantially under existing conditions, reaching: (1) 25.5 c/kWh for the small-scale system, due to a regulation mandating the continual presence of an operating engineer; and (2) 22.5 c/kWh for the large-scale system due to insufficient biomass supply, which reduces plant capacity factor from 34% to 8%. Limited inflation adjustment (50%) of feed-in tariff rates boosts these costs by 7% to 11%. Results indicate that policy generalizations based on scale require careful consideration of the range of operational/regulatory conditions in the jurisdiction of interest. Further, if GHG mitigation is prioritized, small-scale systems may be more cost-effective. - Highlights: • Generation costs for two forest bioenergy systems of different scales are estimated. • Nominal electricity costs are 14.1–28.3 cents/kWh for the small-scale plant. • Nominal electricity costs are 14.9–24.2 cents/kWh for the large-scale plant. • GHG mitigation costs from displacing coal and LPG are $111-$281/tonne of CO 2 eq. • High sensitivity to cap. factor (large-scale) and labor requirements (small-scale)

  16. In silico prediction of Tetrahymena pyriformis toxicity for diverse industrial chemicals with substructure pattern recognition and machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feixiong; Shen, Jie; Yu, Yue; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Lee, Philip W; Tang, Yun

    2011-03-01

    There is an increasing need for the rapid safety assessment of chemicals by both industries and regulatory agencies throughout the world. In silico techniques are practical alternatives in the environmental hazard assessment. It is especially true to address the persistence, bioaccumulative and toxicity potentials of organic chemicals. Tetrahymena pyriformis toxicity is often used as a toxic endpoint. In this study, 1571 diverse unique chemicals were collected from the literature and composed of the largest diverse data set for T. pyriformis toxicity. Classification predictive models of T. pyriformis toxicity were developed by substructure pattern recognition and different machine learning methods, including support vector machine (SVM), C4.5 decision tree, k-nearest neighbors and random forest. The results of a 5-fold cross-validation showed that the SVM method performed better than other algorithms. The overall predictive accuracies of the SVM classification model with radial basis functions kernel was 92.2% for the 5-fold cross-validation and 92.6% for the external validation set, respectively. Furthermore, several representative substructure patterns for characterizing T. pyriformis toxicity were also identified via the information gain analysis methods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. European Population Genetic Substructure: Further Definition of Ancestry Informative Markers for Distinguishing Among Diverse European Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Kosoy, Roman; Nassir, Rami; Lee, Annette; Villoslada, Pablo; Klareskog, Lars; Hammarström, Lennart; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Pulver, Ann E.; Ransom, Michael; Gregersen, Peter K.; Seldin, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    The definition of European population genetic substructure and its application to understanding complex phenotypes is becoming increasingly important. In the current study using over 4000 subjects genotyped for 300 thousand SNPs we provide further insight into relationships among European population groups and identify sets of SNP ancestry informative markers (AIMs) for application in genetic studies. In general, the graphical description of these principal components analyses (PCA) of diverse European subjects showed a strong correspondence to the geographical relationships of specific countries or regions of origin. Clearer separation of different ethnic and regional populations was observed when northern and southern European groups were considered separately and the PCA results were influenced by the inclusion or exclusion of different self-identified population groups including Ashkenazi Jewish, Sardinian and Orcadian ethnic groups. SNP AIM sets were identified that could distinguish the regional and ethnic population groups. Moreover, the studies demonstrated that most allele frequency differences between different European groups could be effectively controlled in analyses using these AIM sets. The European substructure AIMs should be widely applicable to ongoing studies to confirm and delineate specific disease susceptibility candidate regions without the necessity to perform additional genome-wide SNP studies in additional subject sets. PMID:19707526

  18. New Structural-Dynamics Module for Offshore Multimember Substructures within the Wind Turbine Computer-Aided Engineering Tool FAST: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, H.; Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-08-01

    FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is a computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool for aero-hydro-servo-elastic analysis of land-based and offshore wind turbines. This paper discusses recent upgrades made to FAST to enable loads simulations of offshore wind turbines with fixed-bottom, multimember support structures (e.g., jackets and tripods, which are commonly used in transitional-depth waters). The main theory and strategies for the implementation of the multimember substructure dynamics module (SubDyn) within the new FAST modularization framework are introduced. SubDyn relies on two main engineering schematizations: 1) a linear frame finite-element beam (LFEB) model and 2) a dynamics system reduction via Craig-Bampton's method. A jacket support structure and an offshore system consisting of a turbine atop a jacket substructure were simulated to test the SubDyn module and to preliminarily assess results against results from a commercial finite-element code.

  19. Development and design of a semi-floater substructure for multi-megawatt wind turbines at 50+ m water depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NJOMO WANDJI, Wilfried; Natarajan, Anand; Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov

    2016-01-01

    A semi-floater concept as a substructure for multi-megawatt wind turbines is developed herein for installation at 50þ m water depths. The semi-floater concept is a hybrid between a fixed monopile type support structure and a floating spar buoy. The configuration of the substructure is composed of...... turbine components, and to exhibit low platform displacement at the mean sea level. Finally, the overall performance of the structure related to energy production is similar to that of a reference wind turbine situated on land....... of a floating system, a mooring system, and an articulated joint. A case study is carried out under specific design conditions and constraints. The detailed designs of the mooring system and of the articulated joint are iteratively carried out using a hydro-servo-elastic analysis tool for structure response......, HAWC2, coupled with dedicated in-house software packages for structural design analysis, and Abaqus. A reliability analysis and fatigue load calculations are made to ensure a desired life expectancy of the structure. The semi-floater concept is shown to maintain acceptable fatigue load levels for all...

  20. Comparative study cephalometric-radiographic of the cephalo-facio-dental patterns in patients who presented normal occlusion and class II, division 1 malocclusions, considering variations of the FMA angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.M.N.

    1986-01-01

    The proposal of this job was to study cephalo-facio-dental patterns comparatively in patients who presented normal occlusion and Class II, division 1 malocclusions, considering variations of the FMA angle. The sample was composed of seventy-five telerradiographies on lateral pattern, obtained from Brazilian teenagers students of the ABC area (Santo Andre, Sao Bernardo do Campo and Sao Caetano do Sul), 'whites', who presented normal occlusion and Class II, division 1 malocclusions, without previous orthodontic treatment: their parents were Brazilian. (author) [pt

  1. 40 CFR Table C-5 to Subpart C of... - Summary of Comparability Field Testing Campaign Site and Seasonal Requirements for Class II and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Campaign Site and Seasonal Requirements for Class II and III FEMs for PM10â2.5 and PM2.5 C Table C-5 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Between Candidate Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-5 Table C-5 to Subpart C of Part...

  2. A randomized clinical multicentre trial comparing enamel matrix derivative and membrane treatment of buccal class II furcation involvement in mandibular molars. Part III: patient factors and treatment outcome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, T.; Richter, S; Meyle, J.; Gonzales, J.R.; Heinz, B.; Arjomand, M.; Sculean, A.; Reich, E.; Jepsen, K.J.; Jepsen, S.; Boedeker, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of effects of patient factors on the outcome of regenerative treatment of buccal mandibular class II furcation defects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-one patients were recruited. In the intention-to-treat population 21 patients were allocated into the sequence left treatment with

  3. A prospective randomized trial comparing the sequence of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy following curative resection of stage II, III rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Ju; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Je Hwan; Kim, Jin Cheon; Yu, Chang Sik [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the side effects, pattern of failure, and survival rate according to the sequence of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, patients with stages II and III rectal cancer who had undergone curative resection were randomized to early radiotherapy group(am II), then we intend to determine the most effective sequence of the radiotherapy and chemotherapy. From January 1996 to March 1999, 313 patients with curatively resected stages II and III rectal cancer have been randomized to 'early' or 'late' radiation therapy group and received combined chemotherapy (5-FU 375 mg/m{sup 2}, IV bolus daily D1-5, 8 cycles) and radiation therapy (whole pelvis with 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks). Arm I received radiation therapy from day 1 with first cycle of chemotherapy and arm II received radiation therapy from day 57 with third cycle of chemotherapy after completion of first two cycles. Preliminary analysis was performed with 228 patients registered up to Jun 1998. Two out of the 228 patients were excluded because of double primary cancer. Median follow-up period was 23 months. Local recurrence occurred in 11 patients (9.7%) for arm l and 9 patients (8%) for arm II. There was no significant difference between both groups (p=0.64). However, distant metastasis was found in 22 patients (19.5%) for arm l and 35 patients (31.0%) for arm II and which showed statistically significant difference between the two groups (p=0.046). And neither 3-year disease-free survival (70.2% vs 59.2%, p=0.2) nor overall survival (89.4% vs 88.0%, p=0.47) showed significant differences. The incidence of leukopenia during radiation therapy and chemotherapy was 78.3% and 79.9% respectively but leukopenia more than RTOG grade 3 was only 2.1% and 6.0% respectively. The incidence of diarrhea more than 10 times per day was significantly higher in the patients for arm k than for arm II (71.2% vs 41.6%, p=0.02) but this complication was controlled with supportive cares

  4. Local heat application for the treatment of Buruli ulcer : results of a phase II open label single center non comparative clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bratschi, Martin W.; Bolz, Miriam; Um Boock, Alphonse; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pluschke, Gerd; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease most prevalent among West African children. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is sensitive to temperatures above 37°C. We investigated the safety and efficacy of a local heat application device based on phase change material. METHODS In a phase II open label single center noncomparative clinical trial (ISRCTN 72102977) under GCP standards in Cameroon, laboratory confirmed BU patients received up to 8 weeks of...

  5. Investigating the Role of Coherence Effects on Jet Quenching in Pb-Pb Collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV using Jet Substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardoshti, Nima; Alice Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    We report measurements of two jet shapes, the ratio of 2-Subjettiness to 1-Subjettiness (τ2 /τ1) and the opening angle between the two axes of the 2-Subjettiness jet shape, which is obtained by reclustering the jet with the exclusive-kT algorithm [S.D.Ellis and D.E.Soper, Phys.Rev.B 48, 3160] and undoing the final clustering step. The aim of this measurement is to explore a possible change in the rate of 2-pronged objects in Pb-Pb compared to pp due to colour coherence. Coherence effects [Y.Mehtar-Tani, C.A.Salgado and K.Tywoniuk Phys. Rev. Lett. 106:122002, 2011] relate to the ability of the medium to resolve a jet's substructure, which has an impact on the energy loss magnitude and mechanism of the traversing jet. In both collision systems charged jets are found with the anti-kT algorithm [M.Cacciari, G.P.Salam and G.Soyez JHEP 0804:063, 2008], a resolution parameter of R = 0.4 and a constituent cut off of 0.15 GeV. This analysis uses hadron-jet coincidence techniques in Pb-Pb collisions to reject the combinatorial background and corrects further for background effects by employing various jet shape subtraction techniques and two dimensional unfolding. Measurements of the Nsubjettiness for jet momenta of 40-60 GeV/c in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV and pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV will be presented and compared to PYTHIA simulations.

  6. Small-Scale Systems of Galaxies. II. Properties of the NGC 4756 Group of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützbauch, R.; Kelm, B.; Focardi, P.; Trinchieri, G.; Rampazzo, R.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2005-04-01

    This paper is part of a series that focuses on investigating galaxy formation and evolution in small-scale systems of galaxies in low-density environments. We present results from a study of the NGC 4756 group, which is dominated by the elliptical galaxy NGC 4756. The characteristics of the group are investigated through (1) the detailed investigation of the morphological, photometric, and spectroscopic properties of nine galaxies among the dominant members of the group; (2) the determination of the photometric parameters of the faint galaxy population in an area of 34'×34' centered on NGC 4756 and (3) an analysis of the X-ray emission in the area based on archival data. The nine member galaxies are located in the core part of the NGC 4756 group (a strip ~300 kpc in diameter, H0=70 km s-1 Mpc-1), which has a very loose configuration. The central part of the NGC 4756 group contains a significant fraction of early-type galaxies. Three new group members with previously unknown systemic velocities are identified, one of which is type dE. At about 7.5 arcmin southwest of NGC 4756 a substructure of the group is detected, including IC 829, MCG -2-33-35, MCG -2-33-36, and MCG -2-33-38, that meets the Hickson criteria for being a compact group. Most of the galaxies in this substructure show interaction signatures. We do not detect apparent fine structure and signatures of recent interaction events in the early-type galaxy population, with the exception of a strong dust lane in the elliptical galaxy MCG -2-33-38. However, this galaxy displays signatures of nuclear activity. Strong [O III], [N II], and [S II] line emission, combined with comparatively weak but broad Hα emission, suggests an intermediate Seyfert type classification. Although the area is heavily contaminated by the background cluster A1631, X-ray data suggest the presence of a hot intergalactic medium related to the detected X-ray emission of the group. The present results are discussed in the context of

  7. Performance of jet substructure techniques for large-R jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aad, G.; et al., [Unknown; Aben, R.; Beemster, L.J.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berglund, E.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bos, K.; Boterenbrood, H.; Castelli, A.; Colijn, A.P.; de Jong, P.; de Nooij, L.; Deluca, C.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dhaliwal, S.; Ferrari, P.; Gadatsch, S.; Geerts, D.A.A.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.P.; Hod, N.; Igonkina, O.; Kluit, P.; Koffeman, E.; Lee, H.; Lenz, T.; Linde, F.; Mahlstedt, J.; Mechnich, J.; Mussche, I.; Ottersbach, J.P.; Pani, P.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Ta, D.; Tsiakiris, M.; Valencic, N.; van der Deijl, P.C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van Vulpen, I.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vreeswijk, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a variety of techniques to study jet substructure. The performance of various modified jet algorithms, or jet grooming techniques, for several jet types and event topologies is investigated for jets with transverse momentum larger than 300 GeV. Properties of

  8. A multi-center, randomized, clinical trial comparing adhesive polyurethane foam dressing and adhesive hydrocolloid dressing in patients with grade II pressure ulcers in primary care and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén-Solà, Mireia; Soler Mieras, Aina; Tomàs-Vidal, Antònia M

    2013-12-21

    Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are ischemic wounds in the skin and underlying tissues caused by long-standing pressure force over an external bone or cartilaginous surface. PrUs are an important challenge for the overall health system because can prolong patient hospitalization and reduce quality of life. Moreover, 95% of PrUs are avoidable, suggesting they are caused by poor quality care assistance. PrUs are also costly, increasing national costs. For example, they represent about 5% of overall annual health expenses in Spain. Stages I and II PrUs have a combined prevalence of 65%. According main clinical guidelines, stage II PrUs (PrU-IIs) are usually treated by applying special dressings (polyurethane or hydrocolloid). However, little scientific evidence regarding their efficacy has been identified in scientific literature. Our aim is to assess the comparative efficacy of adhesive polyurethane foam and hydrocolloid dressings in the treatment of PrU-IIs in terms of healed ulcer after 8 weeks of follow-up. This paper describes the development and evaluation protocol of a randomized clinical trial of two parallel treatment arms. A total of 820 patients with at least 1 PrU-II will be recruited from primary health care and home care centers. All patients will receive standardized healing procedures and preventive measures (e.g. positional changes and pressure-relieving support surfaces), following standardized procedures. The main outcome will be the percentage of wounds healed after 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes will include cost-effectiveness, as evaluated by cost per healed ulcer and cost per treated patient and safety evaluated by adverse events. This trial will address the hypothesis that hydrocolloid dressings will heal at least 10% more stage II PrUs and be more cost-effective than polyurethane foam dressings after 8 weeks. This trial has been registered with controlled-trials number ISCRCTN57842461 and EudraCT 2012-003945-14.

  9. Definition of a concrete bio-decontamination process in nuclear substructures; Biodegradation de matrices cimentaires en vue de leur decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jestin, A

    2005-05-15

    The decontamination of sub-structural materials represents a stake of high-importance because of the high volume generated. It is agreed then to propose efficient and effective processes. The process of bio-decontamination of the hydraulic binders leans on the mechanisms of biodegradation of concretes, phenomenon characterized in the 40's by an indirect attack of the material by acids stem from the microbial metabolism: sulphuric acid (produced by Thiobacillus), nitric acid (produced by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter) and organic acids (produced by fungi). The principle of the bio-decontamination process is to apply those micro-organisms on the surface of the contaminated material, in order to damage its surface and to retrieve the radionuclides. One of the multiple approaches of the process is the use of a bio-gel that makes possible the micro-organisms application. (author)

  10. Impact of Intragranular Substructure Parameters on the Forming Limit Diagrams of Single-Phase B.C.C. Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald Franz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An advanced elastic-plastic self-consistent polycrystalline model, accounting for intragranular microstructure development and evolution, is coupled with a bifurcation-based localization criterion and applied to the numerical investigation of the impact of microstructural patterns on ductility of single-phase steels. The proposed multiscale model, taking into account essential microstructural aspects, such as initial and induced textures, dislocation densities, and softening mechanisms, allows us to emphasize the relationship between intragranular microstructure of B.C.C. steels and their ductility. A qualitative study in terms of forming limit diagrams for various dislocation networks, during monotonic loading tests, is conducted in order to analyze the impact of intragranular substructure parameters on the formability of single-phase B.C.C. steels.

  11. Rehabilitation of Nose following Chemical Burn Using CAD/CAM Made Substructure for Implant Retained Nasal Prosthesis: A Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Chaturvedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient knowledge of medical chemicals and their improper use have destructive effects. Accidental exposure to chemicals on facial tissue may result in large facial defect. For ages the tradition of piercing nose is common but improper use of unknown chemical for piercing has deleterious effect. Mostly rhinectomy defects are acquired caused by trauma or malignant diseases. Prosthetic rehabilitation is the preferred treatment of choice for any large rhinectomy defects as medical and surgical interventions are ineffective in developing esthetics. Main concern with the prosthesis for such defects is retention. This article describes rehabilitation of a patient with large size nasal defect created by chemical burn in childhood during piercing. Implant retained customized silicone nasal prosthesis was fabricated using simple O-ring attachments and innovative modified polyamide acrylic resin substructure acting as skeleton.

  12. Phase II Results of RTOG 0537: A Phase II/III Study Comparing Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Versus Pilocarpine in Treating Early Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Raimond K. W.; James, Jennifer L.; Sagar, Stephen; Wyatt, Gwen; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; Singh, Anurag K.; Lukaszczyk, Barbara; Cardinale, Francis; Yeh, Alexander M.; Berk, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II component of a multi-institutional phase II/III randomized trial assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) in reducing radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods Head and neck cancer patients who were 3–24 months from completing radiotherapy ± chemotherapy (RT±C) and experiencing xerostomia symptoms with basal whole saliva production ≥0.1 ml/min and without recurrence were eligible. Patients received twice weekly ALTENS sessions (24 over 12 weeks) using a Codetron™ unit. The primary objective assessed the feasibility of ALTENS treatment. A patient was considered compliant if 19/24 ALTENS were delivered, with a targeted 85% compliance rate. Secondary objectives measured treatment-related toxicities and ALTENS effect on overall radiation-induced xerostomia burden using the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS). Results Of 48 accrued patients, 47 were evaluable. Median age was 60 years; 84% were male, 70% completed RT±C for > 12 months and 21% had received prior pilocarpine. All ALTENS sessions were completed in 34 patients, but 9 and 1 completed 20–23 and 19 sessions respectively, representing a 94% total compliance rate. 6-month XeQOLS scores were available for 35 patients; 30 (86%) achieved a positive treatment response with a mean reduction of 35.9% (SD 36.1). Five patients developed grade 1–2 gastrointestinal toxicity and one had grade 1 pain event. Conclusions ALTENS treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia can be uniformly delivered in a cooperative multicenter setting and has possible beneficial treatment response. Given these results, the phase III component of this study was initiated. PMID:22252927

  13. Jet-substructure tools and boosted hadronic boson identification in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvetsov, Ivan; Mozer, Matthias; Mueller, Thomas [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), KIT (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    At the double central-mass energy in Run II boosted hadronic vector boson decays will be of greater importance than in Run I. One of the main challenges for the reconstruction of such hadronic decays in the coming LHC run will be increase of instantaneous luminosity which will result in a large number of additional proton-proton interactions (pileup). In particular the high pileup environment degrades the reconstruction of jet properties. In this talk the performance of several pileup mitigation tools such as charge hadron subtraction, pileup per particle identification (PUPPI) and grooming techniques is presented. Improvements of techniques for the identification of hadronically decaying vector bosons under the challenging conditions of Run II are also discussed.

  14. Effect of the shades of background substructures on the overall color of zirconia-based all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Tulapornchai, Chantana; Mamani, Jatuphol; Kamchatphai, Wannaporn; Thongpun, Noparat

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the color of a background substructure on the overall color of a zirconia-based all-ceramic crown. Twenty one posterior zirconia crowns were made for twenty subjects. Seven premolar crowns and six molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with metal post and core in the first and second group. In the third group, eight molar crowns were cemented onto abutments with a prefabricated post and composite core build-up. The color measurements of all-ceramic crowns were made before try-in, before and after cementation. A repeated measure ANOVA was used for a statistical analysis of a color change of all-ceramic crowns at α=.05. Twenty four zirconia specimens, with different core thicknesses (0.4-1 mm) were also prepared to obtain the contrast ratio of zirconia materials after veneering. L(*) , a(*) , and b(*) values of all-ceramic crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or on a prefabricated post did not show significant changes (P>.05). However, the slight color changes of zirconia crowns were detected and represented by ΔE(*) ab values, ranging from 1.2 to 3.1. The contrast ratios of zirconia specimens were 0.92-0.95 after veneering. No significant differences were observed between the L(*) , a(*) , and b(*) values of zirconia crowns cemented either on a metal cast post and core or a prefabricated post and composite core. However, the color of a background substructure could affect the overall color of posterior zirconia restorations with clinically recommended core thickness according to ΔE(*) ab values.

  15. Novel platinum(II) complexes of long chain aliphatic diamine ligands with oxalato as the leaving group: Comparative cytotoxic activity relative to chloride precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Heveline; Barra, Carolina V.; Rocha, Fillipe V.; Fontes, Ana Paula S. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Lopes, Miriam T.P. [Universidade Federal deMinas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacologia; Frezard, Frederic, E-mail: frezard@icb.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia e Biofisica

    2010-07-01

    Platinum complexes play an important role in the development of anticancer drugs. Their cytotoxicity can be influenced by the nature of the leaving ligands, due to the hydrolysis reaction that occurs prior to the binding of the platinum complex to DNA. Also, non-leaving groups such as lipophilic diamines may affect cellular uptake. In this work, we describe the synthesis of platinum(II) complexes having oxalato and long chain aliphatic N-alkyl ethylenediamines as ligands. The products were characterized by elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy. Biological activity was assessed against tumor cell lines (A{sub 549}, B16-F1, B16-F10, MDA-MB-231) and non-tumor cell lines (BHK-21 and CHO). The length of the carbon chain affects the cytotoxicity and the oxalato complexes were less cytotoxic than the respective chloride-containing analogues. (author)

  16. Comparative study of the anchorage and the catalytic properties of nanoporous TiO2 films modified with ruthenium (II) and rhenium (I) carbonyl complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Diego P.; Chardon-Noblat, Sylvie; Linarez Pérez, Omar E.; López Teijelo, Manuel; Zúñiga, César; Zarate, Ximena; Shott, Eduardo; Carreño, Alexander; Arratia-Perez, Ramiro

    2018-02-01

    In this article we study the anchoring of cis-[Ru(bpyC4pyr)(CO)2(CH3CN)2]2+, cis-[Ru(bpy)2(CO)2]2+ and cis-[Ru(bpyac)(CO)2Cl2], onto nanoporous TiO2 employing electropolymerization, electrostatic interaction and chemical bonding. Also, the [Re(bpyac)(CO)3Cl] rhenium(I) complex for chemical anchorage was analyzed. The characterization of TiO2/Ru(II) and TiO2/Re(I) nanocomposite films was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, for the more stable nanocomposites obtained, the catalytic properties (solar energy conversion and CO2 reduction) were evaluated. The efficiency improvement in redox process derived from the (photo)electrochemical evidence indicates that modified nanoporous TiO2 structures enhance the rate of charge transfer reactions.

  17. Comparative study of two typing methods, hsp65 PRA and ITS sequencing, revealed a possible evolutionary link between Mycobacterium kansasii type I and II isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Tomotada; Saito, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    One hundred and ninety-eight clinical isolates of Mycobacterium kansasii collected between 2003 and 2004 in Japan were genotyped by PCR and restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. The results demonstrated that clinical isolates of M. kansasii in Japan are almost exclusively of the type I PRA genotype, as is the case in other countries. Although the results of subtyping using the 16S-23S ITS sequence were generally consistent with subtyping using hsp65 PRA, four strains showed a discrepancy between the two methods. Sequence analysis of the hsp65, gyrB and 16S rRNA genes and the ITS sequence of the four strains suggests that they branched from type II and could be considered an ancestral strain of the type I strain. The newly recognized strains were designated as intermediate type I.

  18. Local Heat Application for the Treatment of Buruli Ulcer: Results of a Phase II Open Label Single Center Non Comparative Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bratschi, Martin W; Bolz, Miriam; Um Boock, Alphonse; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pluschke, Gerd; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease most prevalent among West African children. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is sensitive to temperatures above 37°C. We investigated the safety and efficacy of a local heat application device based on phase change material. In a phase II open label single center noncomparative clinical trial (ISRCTN 72102977) under GCP standards in Cameroon, laboratory confirmed BU patients received up to 8 weeks of heat treatment. We assessed efficacy based on the endpoints 'absence of clinical BU specific features' or 'wound closure' within 6 months ("primary cure"), and 'absence of clinical recurrence within 24 month' ("definite cure"). Of 53 patients 51 (96%) had ulcerative disease. 62% were classified as World Health Organization category II, 19% each as category I and III. The average lesion size was 45 cm(2). Within 6 months after completion of heat treatment 92.4% (49 of 53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 81.8% to 98.0%) achieved cure of their primary lesion. At 24 months follow-up 83.7% (41 of 49, 95% CI, 70.3% to 92.7%) of patients with primary cure remained free of recurrence. Heat treatment was well tolerated; adverse effects were occasional mild local skin reactions. Local thermotherapy is a highly effective, simple, cheap and safe treatment for M. ulcerans disease. It has in particular potential as home-based remedy for BU suspicious lesions at community level where laboratory confirmation is not available. ISRCT 72102977. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  19. Comparing the Suitability of Autodock, Gold and Glide for the Docking and Predicting the Possible Targets of Ru(II-Based Complexes as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo A. Adeniyi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In cancer chemotherapy, metal-based complexes have been recognized as the most promising means of inhibiting cancer growth due to the successful application of cis-platin and its derivatives above many of the existing organic anticancer agents. The limitations in their rational design can be traced to the complexity of the mechanism of their operations, lack of proper knowledge of their targets and lack of force fields in docking packages to appropriately define the metal centre of the organometallic complexes. In this paper, some of the promising anticancer complexes of Ru(II such as the rapta-based complexes formulated as [Ru(η6-p-cymeneL2(pta] and those with unusual ligands are considered. CatB and kinases which have been experimentally confirmed as possible targets of the complexes are also predicted by the three methods as one of the most targeted receptors while TopII and HDAC7 are predicted by two and one of the methods as best targets. The interesting features of the binding of the complexes show that some of the complexes preferentially target specific macromolecules than the others, which is an indication of their specificity and possibility of their therapeutic combination without severe side effects that may come from competition for the same target. Also, introduction of unusual ligands is found to significantly improve the activities of most of the complexes studied. Strong correlations are observed for the predicted binding sites and the orientation of the complexes within the binding site by the three methods of docking. However there are disparities in the ranking of the complexes by the three method of docking, especially that of Glide.

  20. Comparative genomic analysis reveals independent expansion of a lineage-specific gene family in vertebrates: The class II cytokine receptors and their ligands in mammals and fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogensen Knud

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high degree of sequence conservation between coding regions in fish and mammals can be exploited to identify genes in mammalian genomes by comparison with the sequence of similar genes in fish. Conversely, experimentally characterized mammalian genes may be used to annotate fish genomes. However, gene families that escape this principle include the rapidly diverging cytokines that regulate the immune system, and their receptors. A classic example is the class II helical cytokines (HCII including type I, type II and lambda interferons, IL10 related cytokines (IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24 and IL26 and their receptors (HCRII. Despite the report of a near complete pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes genome sequence, these genes remain undescribed in fish. Results We have used an original strategy based both on conserved amino acid sequence and gene structure to identify HCII and HCRII in the genome of another pufferfish, Tetraodon nigroviridis that is amenable to laboratory experiments. The 15 genes that were identified are highly divergent and include a single interferon molecule, three IL10 related cytokines and their potential receptors together with two Tissue Factor (TF. Some of these genes form tandem clusters on the Tetraodon genome. Their expression pattern was determined in different tissues. Most importantly, Tetraodon interferon was identified and we show that the recombinant protein can induce antiviral MX gene expression in Tetraodon primary kidney cells. Similar results were obtained in Zebrafish which has 7 MX genes. Conclusion We propose a scheme for the evolution of HCII and their receptors during the radiation of bony vertebrates and suggest that the diversification that played an important role in the fine-tuning of the ancestral mechanism for host defense against infections probably followed different pathways in amniotes and fish.

  1. Effect of fiber reinforcement on microleakage of class II cavities restored with a novel G-aenial posterior composite, silorane composite, and nanohybrid composite: an in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineet; Kapoor, Sonali

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare G-aenial, silorane, and nanoceramic composites and the effect of polyethylene fiber inserts in reducing gingival microleakage in class II composite restorations placed apical to the cementoenamel junction. Standardized class II cavities were prepared on extracted molars and randomly divided into six groups (n = 20 each): group 1, Ceram X mono; group 2, Ceram X mono + Ribbond; group 3, Filtek P90; group 4, Filtek P90 + Ribbond; group 5, G-aenial posterior; and group 6, G-aenial posterior + Ribbond. All specimens were subjected to a thermocycling regime, immersed in 2% methylene blue dye for 24 h, sectioned longitudinally, and examined under a stereomicroscope to assess dye penetration on a six-point scale. The score data were subjected to statistical analysis, whereby the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance was used for multiple group comparisons and the Mann-Whitney test for groupwise comparisons at a significance level of P ≤ 0.05. A statistically-significant decrease in microleakage was found when Ribbond fiber was used: group 2 vs group 1 (P composites when compared to the nanoceramic composite (P composite, and G-aenial posterior composite reduces microleakage in class II composite restorations with gingival margins below the cementoenamel junction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. The structure of personality disorders: comparing the DSM-IV-TR Axis II classification with the five-factor model framework using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaansen, Leen; Rossi, Gina; Schotte, Christiaan; De Fruyt, Filip

    2011-06-01

    Earlier factor analytical studies on the empirical validity of the DSM-IV-TR (American Psychological Association, 2000) Axis II classification have offered little support for the current three-cluster structure. In his large-scale meta-analysis of previously published personality disorder correlation matrices, O'Connor (2005) found four factors, corresponding to the neuroticism, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness domains of the five-factor model of personality. In the present study, this dimensional four-factor model and the categorical DSM three-cluster structure were fitted to the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders questionnaire (ADP-IV; Schotte & De Doncker, 1994) scale scores using structural equation modelling. The results strongly favored the dimensional model, which also resembled other well-founded four-factor proposals (Livesley, Jang, & Vernon, 1998; Widiger & Simonsen, 2005). Moreover, a multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that this model was highly invariant and thus generalizable across two large clinical (n = 1,029) and general population (n = 659) samples.

  3. Comparative biological evaluation between {sup 99m}Tc tricarbonyl and {sup 99m}Tc-Sn(II) levosalbutamol as a β{sub 2}-adrenoceptor agonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanad, Mahmoud H. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Labeled Compounds Dept.; Borai, Emad H. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Analytical Chemistry Dept.

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the comparison between {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl and {sup 99m}Tc-Sn (II) levosalbutamol as a β{sub 2}-adrenoceptors radiopharmaceutical and evaluation of their different biological characteristics using experimental animals. Levosalbutamol was labeled firstly with {sup 99m}Tc in the presence of SnCl{sub 2} . 2H{sub 2}O as a reducing agent under the optimum conditions: pH 8, 50 μg SnCl{sub 2} . 2H{sub 2}O, room temperature, 40 μg levosalbutamol and 30 min reaction time to give a maximum radiochemical yield of 98 ± 0.1%. The obtained {sup 99m}Tc-levosalbutamol was stable for a time up to 8 h. Secondly, {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl ([{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sup +}) levosalbutamol was prepare under 30 min heating at 100 C. Labeling yield and stability were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (labeling yield >99% and stability for 8 h). Biodistribution investigation showed that, the maximum uptake ratio of the {sup 99m}Tc-levosalbutamol ({sup 99m}Tc-Lev) between lung and heart was 2.34 ± 0.62 % of the injected activity/g tissue organ, at 30 min post-injection. But in case of {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl levosalbutamol ({sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl Lev) the maximum uptake ratio was 3.6 ± 0.11 of the injected activity/g tissue organ, at 30 min post-injection. This indicates that {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl levosalbutamol was more selective for lung β{sub 2}-adrenoceptors than {sup 99m}Tc-levosalbutamol. These results introduce {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl levosalbutamol as a novel potential radiopharmaceutical for lung imaging.

  4. Comparing equivalent thermal, high pressure and pulsed electric field processes for mild pasteurization of orange juice: Part II: Impact on specific chemical and biochemical quality parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, L.; Plancken, van der I.; Grauwet, T.; Timmermans, R.A.H.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.E.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of thermal, high pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing for mild pasteurization of orange juice was compared on a fair basis, using processing conditions leading to an equivalent degree of microbial inactivation. Examining the effect on specific chemical and biochemical

  5. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    ., 2009) biomaterials. However, the ..... reported for various microorganisms by various researchers (Gong et al., 2005). At biomass ... the increase in initial Pb (II) was also observed for removal of Pb (II) by loofa sponge immobilized Aspergillus.

  6. Analysis of Polymorphisms in the Merozoite Surface Protein-3a Gene and Two Microsatellite Loci in Sri Lankan Plasmodium vivax: Evidence of Population Substructure in Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Mette L; Rajakaruna, Rupika S; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. The geographical distribution of genetic variation in Plasmodium vivax samples (N = 386) from nine districts across Sri Lanka is described using three markers; the P. vivax merozoite surface protein-3a (Pvmsp-3a) gene, and the two microsatellites m1501 and m3502. At Pvmsp-3a, 11 alleles....... The results show evidence of high genetic diversity and possible population substructure of P. vivax populations in Sri Lanka....

  7. Comparative study of trusses to determine the influence of the geometry in the structural efficiency, according to the directions of the principal stresses : Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Señís, Roger; Brufau, Robert; Sastre, Ramón; Carbajal, Eusebio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Congreso celebrado en la Escuela de Arquitectura de la Universidad de Sevilla desde el 24 hasta el 26 de junio de 2015. This study compares flat lattice girders mounted on two supports, based on various design parameters, to determine which have better structural performance and what geometries are more efficient. The fundamental goal is to determine the relationship of performance and structural behaviour of each type of framework structure, with respect to the principle of optimization a...

  8. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Xin, E-mail: Xin.Liang@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); College of Stomatology, Dalian Medical University (China); Lambrichts, Ivo, E-mail: Ivo.Lambrichts@uhasselt.b [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Histology and Electron Microscopy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasselt, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Sun Yi, E-mail: Sunyihello@hotmail.co [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Denis, Kathleen, E-mail: kathleen.denis@groept.b [Department of Industrial Sciences and Techology-Engineering (IWT), XIOS Hogeschool Limburg, Hasselt (Belgium); Hassan, Bassam, E-mail: b.hassan@acta.n [Department of Oral Radiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Li Limin, E-mail: Limin.Li@uz.kuleuven.b [Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Special Dental Care, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, Ruben, E-mail: Ruben.Pauwels@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Jacobs, Reinhilde, E-mail: Reinhilde.Jacobs@uz.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  9. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xin; Lambrichts, Ivo; Sun Yi; Denis, Kathleen; Hassan, Bassam; Li Limin; Pauwels, Ruben; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  10. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  11. In vivo STED microscopy visualizes PSD95 sub-structures and morphological changes over several hours in the mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Waja; Mott, Alexander C; Grant, Seth G N; Steffens, Heinz; Willig, Katrin I

    2018-01-09

    The post-synaptic density (PSD) is an electron dense region consisting of ~1000 proteins, found at the postsynaptic membrane of excitatory synapses, which varies in size depending upon synaptic strength. PSD95 is an abundant scaffolding protein in the PSD and assembles a family of supercomplexes comprised of neurotransmitter receptors, ion channels, as well as signalling and structural proteins. We use superresolution STED (STimulated Emission Depletion) nanoscopy to determine the size and shape of PSD95 in the anaesthetised mouse visual cortex. Adult knock-in mice expressing eGFP fused to the endogenous PSD95 protein were imaged at time points from 1 min to 6 h. Superresolved large assemblies of PSD95 show different sub-structures; most large assemblies were ring-like, some horse-shoe or figure-8 shaped, and shapes were continuous or made up of nanoclusters. The sub-structure appeared stable during the shorter (minute) time points, but after 1 h, more than 50% of the large assemblies showed a change in sub-structure. Overall, these data showed a sub-morphology of large PSD95 assemblies which undergo changes within the 6 hours of observation in the anaesthetised mouse.

  12. Resonant substructure in K sup minus. pi. sup +. pi. sup +. pi. sup minus decays of D sup 0 mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, J.; Bai, Z.; Blaylock, G.T.; Bolton, T.; Brient, J.; Browder, T.E.; Brown, J.S.; Bunnell, K.O.; Burchell, M.; Burnett, T.H.; Cassell, R.E.; Coffman, D.; Cook, V.; Coward, D.H.; DeJongh, F.; Dorfan, D.E.; Drinkard, J.; Dubois, G.P.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.F.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Freese, T.; Gatto, C.; Gladding, G.; Grab, C.; Hauser, J.; Heusch, C.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Izen, J.M.; Kim, P.C.; Koepke, L.; Labs, J.; Li, A.; Lockman, W.S.; Mallik, U.; Matthews, C.G.; Mincer, A.I.; Mir, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Nemati, B.; Odian, A.; Parrish, L.; Partridge, R.; Pitman, D.; Plaetzer, S.A.; Richman, J.D.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Scarlatella, M.; Schalk, T.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Seiden, A.; Simopoulos, C.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stockdale, I.E.; Stockhausen, W.; Toki, W.; Tripsas, B.; Villa, F.; Wang, M.Z.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wattenberg, A.; Weinstein, A.J.; Weseler, S.; Willutzki, H.J.; Wisinski, D.; Wisniewski, W.J.; Xu, R.; Zhu, Y. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (USA) Univer; (Mark III Collaboration)

    1990-05-28

    We determine the resonant substructure of {ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} decays using a five-dimensional maximum-likelihood technique to extract the relative fractions and phases of the amplitudes contributing to this final state. We find that two-body decay modes account for at least 76% of all decays. We obtain branching ratios for several decay modes including {ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital a}{sub 1}{sup +}) =(9.0{plus minus}0.9{plus minus}1.7)%, {ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}} {sup *0}{rho}{sup 0})=(1.9{plus minus}0.3{plus minus}0.7)%, and {ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital K}{sub 1}(1270){sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}) =(1.8{plus minus}0.5 {plus minus}0.8)%. For the decay mode {ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}} {sup *0}{rho}{sup 0}, the {ital {bar K}} {sup *0} and {rho}{sup 0} are found to be polarized with their spins oriented in the direction of their motion as seen from the {ital D}{sup 0} frame.

  13. Quantum Numbers of Eigenstates of Generalized de Broglie-Bargmann- Wigner Equations for Fermions with Partonic Substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, H.

    2003-01-01

    Generalized de Broglie-Bargmann-Wigner (BBW) equations are relativistically invariant quantum mechanical many body equations with nontrivial interaction, selfregularization and probability interpretation. Owing to these properties these equations are a suitable means for describing relativistic bound states of fermions. In accordance with de Broglie's fusion theory and modern assumptions about the partonic substructure of elementary fermions, i.e., leptons and quarks, the three-body generalized BBW-equations are investigated. The transformation properties and quantum numbers of the three-parton equations under the relevant group actions are elaborated in detail. Section 3 deals with the action of the isospin group SU(2), a U(1) global gauge group for the fermion number, the hypercharge and charge generators. The resulting quantum numbers of the composite partonic systems can be adapted to those of the phenomenological particles to be described. The space-time transformations and in particular rotations generated by angular momentum operators are considered in Section 4. Based on the compatibility of the BBW-equations and the group theoretical constraints, in Sect. 5 integral equations are formulated in a representation with diagonal energy and total angular momentum variables. The paper provides new insight into the solution space and quantum labels of resulting integral equations for three parton states and prepares the ground for representing leptons and quarks as composite systems.

  14. The Chemistry Development Kit (CDK) v2.0: atom typing, depiction, molecular formulas, and substructure searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willighagen, Egon L; Mayfield, John W; Alvarsson, Jonathan; Berg, Arvid; Carlsson, Lars; Jeliazkova, Nina; Kuhn, Stefan; Pluskal, Tomáš; Rojas-Chertó, Miquel; Spjuth, Ola; Torrance, Gilleain; Evelo, Chris T; Guha, Rajarshi; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2017-06-06

    The Chemistry Development Kit (CDK) is a widely used open source cheminformatics toolkit, providing data structures to represent chemical concepts along with methods to manipulate such structures and perform computations on them. The library implements a wide variety of cheminformatics algorithms ranging from chemical structure canonicalization to molecular descriptor calculations and pharmacophore perception. It is used in drug discovery, metabolomics, and toxicology. Over the last 10 years, the code base has grown significantly, however, resulting in many complex interdependencies among components and poor performance of many algorithms. We report improvements to the CDK v2.0 since the v1.2 release series, specifically addressing the increased functional complexity and poor performance. We first summarize the addition of new functionality, such atom typing and molecular formula handling, and improvement to existing functionality that has led to significantly better performance for substructure searching, molecular fingerprints, and rendering of molecules. Second, we outline how the CDK has evolved with respect to quality control and the approaches we have adopted to ensure stability, including a code review mechanism. This paper highlights our continued efforts to provide a community driven, open source cheminformatics library, and shows that such collaborative projects can thrive over extended periods of time, resulting in a high-quality and performant library. By taking advantage of community support and contributions, we show that an open source cheminformatics project can act as a peer reviewed publishing platform for scientific computing software. Graphical abstract CDK 2.0 provides new features and improved performance.

  15. Search for vector-like T' quarks using tools for the analysis of jet substructure with the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Haller, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    A search for pairs of vector-like T' quark produced in proton-proton collisions recorded with the CMS experiment at p s = 8 TeV is presented. The search is optimized for decays of T' quarks to top quarks and Higgs bosons, where the top quarks and Higgs bosons decay hadronically. The T'-quark mass range between 500 and 1000 GeV is investigated. The top quarks and Higgs bosons produced in decays of the heavy T' quarks acquire large Lorentz boosts. The signatures of these particles in the detector can overlap and are therefore dicult to resolve using classical jet reconstruction methods. Large-radius jets are reconstructed and subjets formed from their constituents. The decay products of particles with large Lorentz boosts are highly collimated and can all be found within a single one of these large-radius jets. Top jets containing hadronic top-quark decays are identied with a top-tagging algorithm that analyzes the jet substructure. A b-tagging algorithm is applied to the reconstructed subjets in order to nd bo...

  16. A multicenter study of levonorgestrel-estradiol contraceptive vaginal rings. II-Subjective and objective measures of effects. An international comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivin, I; Mishell, D R; Victor, A; Diaz, S; Alvarez-Sanchez, F; Nielsen, N C; Akinla, O; Pyorala, T; Coutinho, E; Faundes, A; Roy, S; Brenner, P F; Ahren, T; Pavez, M; Brache, V; Giwa-Osagie, O F; Fasan, M O; Zausner-Guelman, B; Darze, E; Gama daSilva, J C; Diaz, J; Jackanicz, T M; Stern, J; Nash, H A

    1981-10-01

    Comparative clinical trials of 2 sizes of contraceptive vaginal rings and of an oral contraceptive were undertaken at 8 investigational sites (9 clinics). More than 500 women enrolled on each of the 3 study regimens. Side effects of the rings and of Nordette, the oral contraceptive, were evaluated by noting spontaneous complaints, by recording medications taken and by physical examination. Inquiries about changes in the frequency of specific conditions were made at the end of the subjects participation in the first year of the study. The incidence of spontaneous complaints was similar among users of the 2 different-sized rings and of the pill.

  17. Substructure and in vitro assembly of the outer, structured layer of Spirillum serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmire, F L; Murray, R G

    1976-01-01

    Electron micrographs of disintegrating units of the outer, structured (HP) layer of Spirillum serpens and of the isolated protein obtained from the HP layer revealed V- and Y-shaped and linear profiles. Interpretation of these forms, influenced by the seemingly trimeric form of the isolated protein and by biochemical data, suggested that the protein subunits were identical and Y shaped. A model is proposed for the assembly of the Y-shaped subunits to form a hexagon composed of two triads (three Y-shaped subunits each). The isolated protein adsorbed to a template of wall fragments (basal layer) to the same degree (over 90%) in high concentrations of Na+, K+ (5 X 10(-2) M), Ca2+, Sr2+, and Mg2+ (10(-2) M). At a lower concentration (4 x 10(-5) M) of the cations there was differential adsorption of the protein. Adsorption to the template in the presence of each cation, followed by dilution, also led to differential release of the protein. The adsorption of the protein to the basal layer was correlated with reassembly of the HP layer on the template. The mechanisms seem to be: (i) an ionic strength-dependent reassembly, which results in an HP layer loosely attached to the template (this layer is easily dissociated by decreasing the ionic strength); and (ii) a cation-specific (Ca2+ or Sr2+, but not Mg2+, Na+, or K+) mechanism independent of ionic strength. In this latter case, the specific cations presumably form strong noncovalent "salt" linkages between triads and the basal layer, enabling stable hexagons and the HP layer to be formed.

  18. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES : II. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF BLOOD FROM NORMAL INDIVIDUALS AND PATIENTS WITH INCREASED LEUCOCYTE COUNTS (SEPSIS; CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUCEMIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daland, G A; Isaacs, R

    1927-06-30

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells.

  19. Application of mechanosynthesized azine-decorated zinc(II) metal-organic frameworks for highly efficient removal and extraction of some heavy-metal ions from aqueous samples: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Elham; Masoomi, Mohammad Yaser; Yamini, Yadollah; Morsali, Ali

    2015-01-20

    The three zinc(II) metal-organic frameworks [Zn2(oba)2(4-bpdb)]·(DMF)x (TMU-4), [Zn(oba)(4-bpdh)0.5]n·(DMF)y (TMU-5), and [Zn(oba)(4-bpmb)0.5]n·(DMF)z (TMU-6) [DMF = dimethylformamide, H2oba = 4,4'-oxybisbenzoic acid, 4-bpdb = 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene, 4-bpdh = 2,5-bis(4-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene, and 4-bpmb = N(1),N(4)-bis((pyridin-4-yl)methylene)benzene-1,4-diamine], which contain azine-functionalized pores, have been successfully synthesized by mechanosynthesis as a convenient, rapid, low-cost, solventless, and green process. These MOFs were studied for the removal and extraction of some heavy-metal ions from aqueous samples, and the effects of the basicity and void space of these MOFs on adsorption efficiency were evaluated. The results showed that, for trace amounts of metal ions, the basicity of the N-donor ligands in the MOFs determines the adsorption efficiency of the MOFs for the metal ions. In contrast, at high concentrations of metal ions, the void space of the MOFs plays a main role in the adsorption process. The studies conducted revealed that, among the three MOFs, TMU-6 had a lower adsorption efficiency for metal ions than the other two MOFs. This result can be attributed to the greater basicity of the azine groups on the TMU-4 and TMU-5 pore walls as compared to the imine groups on the N-donor ligands on the TMU-6 pore walls. Subsequently, TMU-5 was chosen as an efficient sorbent for the extraction and preconcentration of trace amounts of some heavy-metal ions including Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), and Pb(II), followed by their determination by flow injection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Several variables affecting the extraction efficiency of the analytes were investigated and optimized. The optimized methodology exhibits a good linearity between 0.05 and 100 μg L(-1) (R(2) > 0.9935) and detection limits in the range of 0.01-1.0 μg L(-1). The method has enhancement factors between 42

  20. Ring and jet study on the azimuthal substructure of pions at CERN ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Ring-like and jet-like events; pseudorapidity; Monte-Carlo simulations; Cherenkov gluons radiation. ... The experimental results have also been compared with the results simulated by Monte-Carlo method. The analysis strongly indicates the presence of ring- and jet-like structures in the experimental distributions ...

  1. Comparative study of open and arthroscopic coracoid transfer for shoulder anterior instability (Latarjet)-computed tomography evaluation at a short term follow-up. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordasiewicz, Bartłomiej; Kicinski, Maciej; Małachowski, Konrad; Wieczorek, Janusz; Chaberek, Sławomir; Pomianowski, Stanisław

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and to compare the radiological parameters after arthroscopic and open Latarjet technique via evaluation of computed tomography (CT) scans. Our hypothesis was that the radiological results after arthroscopic stabilisation remained in the proximity of those results achieved after open stabilisation. CT scan evaluation results of patients after primary Latarjet procedure were analysed. Patients operated on between 2006 and 2011 using an open technique composed the OPEN group and patients operated on arthroscopically between 2011 and 2013 composed the ARTHRO group. Forty-three out of 55 shoulders (78.2%) in OPEN and 62 out of 64 shoulders (95.3%) in ARTHRO were available for CT scan evaluation. The average age at surgery was 28 years in OPEN and 26 years in ARTHRO. The mean follow-up was 54.2 months in OPEN and 23.4 months in ARTHRO. CT scan evaluation was used to assess graft fusion and osteolysis. Bone block position and screw orientation were assessed in the axial and the sagittal views. The subscapularis muscle fatty infiltration was evaluated according to Goutallier classification. The non-union rate was significantly higher in OPEN than in ARTHRO: 5 (11.9%) versus 1 (1.7%) (p  0.05). These results should be evaluated very carefully due to significant difference in the follow-up of both groups. A significantly higher rate of partial graft osteolysis at the level of the superior screw was reported in ARTHRO with 32 patients (53.3%) versus 10 (23.8%) in OPEN (p  0.05). However, in the position between 3 and 5 o'clock there were 56.7% of the grafts in ARTHRO versus 87.8% in OPEN (p Latarjet stabilisation showed satisfactory radiographic results, comparable to the open procedure, however the short-term follow-up can bias this evaluation. Graft healing rate was very high in the arthroscopic technique, but yet osteolysis of the superior part of the graft and more superior graft position in the sagittal view were

  2. Comparative study of the effects of PM1-induced oxidative stress on autophagy and surfactant protein B and C expressions in lung alveolar type II epithelial MLE-12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ru; Guan, Longfei; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jinxia; Rui, Wei; Zhang, Fang; Ding, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    There is a strong link between smaller air pollution particles and a range of serious health conditions. Thus, there is a need for understanding the impacts of airborne fine particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter of PM1) on lung alveolar epithelial cells. In the present study, mouse lung epithelial type II cell MLE-12 cells were used to examine the intracellular oxidative responses and the surfactant protein expressions after exposure to various concentrations of PM1 collected from an urban site and a steel-factory site (referred as uPM1 and sPM1 hereafter, respectively). Physicochemical characterization of PM1 was performed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity and autophagy induced by PM1 were assessed by using comprehensive approaches after MLE-12 cells were exposed to different concentrations of PM1 for various times. Expression of surfactant proteins B and C in MLE-12 cells was determined by Western blotting. All of the tested PM1 induced cytotoxicity evidenced by significant decrease of cell viability and increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in the exposed cells compared with the unexposed cells. A similar pattern of increase of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities was also observed. PM1-induced autophagy was evidenced by an increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain-3 (LC3) puncta, accumulation of LC3II, and increased levels of beclin1. Data from Western blotting showed significant decrease of surfactant protein B and C expressions. Relatively high concentrations of transition metals, including Fe, Cu and Mn, may be responsible for the higher toxicity of sPM1 compared with uPM1. Moreover, pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or Chelex (a metal chelating agent, which removes a large suite of metals from PM1) prevented the increase of

  3. Comparative Study of C-Arms for Intraoperative 3-dimensional Imaging and Navigation in Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Part II: Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Jan-Helge; Sircar, Ronen; Scheiwe, Christian; Kogias, Evangelos; Krüger, Marie T; Scholz, Christoph; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    A radiation exposure study in vitro. This study aimed to compare the radiation exposure of 2 different 3-dimensional (3D) C-arm devices on an anthropomorphic phantom. Minimally invasive pedicle screw placement requires intraoperative imaging techniques for visualization of the unexposed spine. Mobile 3D C-arms compose a 3D image data set out of multiple successive fluoroscopic images. We compared the 3D C-arm devices Siremobil Iso-C 3D (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and Vision FD Vario 3D (Ziehm Imaging, Nuremberg, Germany) regarding their radiation exposure. For this purpose, dosimeters were attached on an anthropomorphic phantom at various sites (eye lenses, thyroid gland, female, and male gonads). With each C-arm, 10 automated 3D scans as well as 400 fluoroscopic images were performed on the cervical and lumbar spine, respectively. The Vision FD Vario 3D generally causes higher radiation exposures than the Siremobil Iso-C 3D. Significantly higher radiation exposures were assessed at the eye lenses performing cervical (294.1 vs. 84.6 μSv) and lumbar 3D scans (22.5 vs. 11.2 μSv) as well as at the thyroid gland performing cervical 3D scans (4405.2 vs. 2761.9 μSv). Moreover, the Vision FD Vario 3D caused significantly higher radiation exposure at the eye lenses for standard cervical fluoroscopic images (3.2 vs. 0.4 μSv). 3D C-arms facilitate minimally invasive and accurate pedicle screw placement by providing 3D image datasets for intraoperative 3D imaging and navigation. However, the hereby potentially increased radiation exposure has to be considered. In particular, the Vision FD Vario 3D appears to generally evoke higher radiation exposures than the Siremobil Iso-C 3D. Well-indicated application of ionizing radiation and compliance with radiation protection principles remain mandatory to keep radiation exposure to patient and staff as low as reasonably achievable.

  4. THE AFTERGLOWS OF SWIFT-ERA GAMMA-RAY BURSTS. I. COMPARING PRE-SWIFT AND SWIFT-ERA LONG/SOFT (TYPE II) GRB OPTICAL AFTERGLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Schulze, S.; Zhang, B.; Malesani, D.; Castro Ceron, J. M.; Nakar, E.; Pozanenko, A.; Burenin, R. A.; Wilson, A. C.; Butler, N. R.; Jakobsson, P.; Andreev, M.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Biryukov, V.; Boettcher, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chincarini, G.; Cobb, B. E.

    2010-01-01

    We have gathered optical photometry data from the literature on a large sample of Swift-era gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows including GRBs up to 2009 September, for a total of 76 GRBs, and present an additional three pre-Swift GRBs not included in an earlier sample. Furthermore, we publish 840 additional new photometry data points on a total of 42 GRB afterglows, including large data sets for GRBs 050319, 050408, 050802, 050820A, 050922C, 060418, 080413A, and 080810. We analyzed the light curves of all GRBs in the sample and derived spectral energy distributions for the sample with the best data quality, allowing us to estimate the host-galaxy extinction. We transformed the afterglow light curves into an extinction-corrected z = 1 system and compared their luminosities with a sample of pre-Swift afterglows. The results of a former study, which showed that GRB afterglows clustered and exhibited a bimodal distribution in luminosity space, are weakened by the larger sample. We found that the luminosity distribution of the two afterglow samples (Swift-era and pre-Swift) is very similar, and that a subsample for which we were not able to estimate the extinction, which is fainter than the main sample, can be explained by assuming a moderate amount of line-of-sight host extinction. We derived bolometric isotropic energies for all GRBs in our sample, and found only a tentative correlation between the prompt energy release and the optical afterglow luminosity at 1 day after the GRB in the z = 1 system. A comparative study of the optical luminosities of GRB afterglows with echelle spectra (which show a high number of foreground absorbing systems) and those without, reveals no indication that the former are statistically significantly more luminous. Furthermore, we propose the existence of an upper ceiling on afterglow luminosities and study the luminosity distribution at early times, which was not accessible before the advent of the Swift satellite. Most GRBs feature

  5. Comparative factor analysis models for an empirical study of EEG data, II: A data-guided resolution of the rotation indeterminacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L J; Douglas, R R

    1984-02-01

    In this paper (the second in a series), we consider a (generic) pair of datasets, which have been analyzed by the techniques of the previous paper. Thus, their "stable subspaces" have been established by comparative factor analysis. The pair of datasets must satisfy two confirmable conditions. The first is the "Inclusion Condition," which requires that the stable subspace of one of the datasets is nearly identical to a subspace of the other dataset's stable subspace. On the basis of that, we have assumed the pair to have similar generating signals, with stochastically independent generators. The second verifiable condition is that the (presumed same) generating signals have distinct ratios of variances for the two datasets. Under these conditions a small elaboration of some elementary linear algebra reduces the rotation problem to several eigenvalue-eigenvector problems. Finally, we emphasize that an analysis of each dataset by the method of Douglas and Rogers (1983) is an essential prerequisite for the useful application of the techniques in this paper. Nonempirical methods of estimating the number of factors simply will not suffice, as confirmed by simulations reported in the previous paper.

  6. Split-time artificial insemination in beef cattle: II. Comparing pregnancy rates among nonestrous heifers based on administration of GnRH at AI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, B E; Thomas, J M; Abel, J M; Poock, S E; Ellersieck, M R; Smith, M F; Patterson, D J

    2017-01-01

    This experiment was designed to evaluate split-time artificial insemination (AI) in beef heifers following administration of the 14-day controlled internal drug release (CIDR)-prostaglandin F 2α (PG) protocol and to compare pregnancy rates among nonestrous heifers based on administration of GnRH at AI. Estrus was synchronized for 1138 heifers across six locations. Heifers received a CIDR insert (1.38 g progesterone) on Day 0 with removal on Day 14. Estrus detection aids (Estrotect) were applied at PG (25 mg), 16 days after CIDR removal on Day 30. Heifers were assigned to balanced treatments based on reproductive tract score and weight, and treatments were represented within each location. Split-time AI was performed at 66 and 90 hours after PG, and estrus was recorded at these times. Heifers in both treatments that exhibited estrus by 66 hours were inseminated and did not receive GnRH, whereas AI was delayed 24 hours until 90 hours after PG for heifers that failed to exhibit estrus by 66 hours. For heifers in treatment 1 that were inseminated at 90 hours, GnRH (100 μg) was administered concurrent with AI at 90 hours. Heifers in treatment 2 that were inseminated at 90 hours did not receive GnRH. Estrous response did not differ between treatments at 66 hours after PG (treatment 1 = 70%; treatment 2 = 71%; P = 0.58) or during the 24-hour delay period (treatment 1 = 59%; treatment 2 = 52%; P = 0.21). There was no effect of treatment on pregnancy rates resulting from AI for heifers inseminated at 66 hours (treatment 1 = 58%; treatment 2 = 62%; P = 0.86) or 90 hours (treatment 1 = 44%; treatment 2 = 39%; P = 0.47) after PG; and there was no difference between treatments when considering total AI pregnancy rate (treatment 1 = 54%; treatment 2 = 56%; P = 0.60). Ovulation was confirmed via ultrasonography for a subset of heifers that failed to exhibit estrus prior to 90 hours after PG. For heifers that failed to exhibit estrus by 90

  7. Randomized phase II study of gefitinib compared with placebo in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and poor performance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Glenwood; Ferry, David; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Laurie, Scott A; Thompson, Joyce; Biesma, Bonne; Hirsch, Fred R; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Duffield, Emma; Ataman, Ozlem U; Zarenda, Marc; Armour, Alison A

    2009-05-01

    To compare gefitinib with placebo in chemotherapy naïve patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status. NSCLC patients (chemotherapy naïve, WHO performance status 2 or 3; unfit for chemotherapy; stage IIIB/IV) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d) plus best supportive care (BSC; n = 100) or placebo plus BSC (n = 101). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and safety. Correlation of gefitinib efficacy with EGFR gene copy number (fluorescent in situ hybridization [FISH]) was explored. Hazard ratios (HRs; gefitinib:placebo) were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.60 to 1.12; P = .217) for PFS and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.15; P = .272) for OS. As expected for this patient population, OS for both arms was poor, at about 3 months. ORRs were 6.0% (gefitinib) and 1.0% (placebo). QOL and PSI rates were 21.1% and 28.3% (gefitinib) and 20.0% and 28.3% (placebo), respectively. In EGFR FISH-positive patients (n = 32), HRs were 0.29 (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.73) for PFS and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.17 to 1.12) for OS. No unexpected adverse events occurred. There was no statistically significant difference in PFS, OS, and ORRs after treatment with gefitinib or placebo, in the overall population; improvements in QOL and symptoms were similar in both groups. Tolerability profile of gefitinib was consistent with previous studies. PFS was statistically significantly improved for gefitinib-treated patients with EGFR FISH-positive tumors.

  8. Randomized Phase II Study of Gefitinib Compared With Placebo in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Poor Performance Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Glenwood; Ferry, David; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Laurie, Scott A.; Thompson, Joyce; Biesma, Bonne; Hirsch, Fred R.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Duffield, Emma; Ataman, Ozlem U.; Zarenda, Marc; Armour, Alison A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare gefitinib with placebo in chemotherapy naïve patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status. Patients and Methods NSCLC patients (chemotherapy naïve, WHO performance status 2 or 3; unfit for chemotherapy; stage IIIB/IV) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d) plus best supportive care (BSC; n = 100) or placebo plus BSC (n = 101). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and safety. Correlation of gefitinib efficacy with EGFR gene copy number (fluorescent in situ hybridization [FISH]) was explored. Results Hazard ratios (HRs; gefitinib:placebo) were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.60 to 1.12; P = .217) for PFS and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.15; P = .272) for OS. As expected for this patient population, OS for both arms was poor, at about 3 months. ORRs were 6.0% (gefitinib) and 1.0% (placebo). QOL and PSI rates were 21.1% and 28.3% (gefitinib) and 20.0% and 28.3% (placebo), respectively. In EGFR FISH-positive patients (n = 32), HRs were 0.29 (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.73) for PFS and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.17 to 1.12) for OS. No unexpected adverse events occurred. Conclusion There was no statistically significant difference in PFS, OS, and ORRs after treatment with gefitinib or placebo, in the overall population; improvements in QOL and symptoms were similar in both groups. Tolerability profile of gefitinib was consistent with previous studies. PFS was statistically significantly improved for gefitinib-treated patients with EGFR FISH-positive tumors. PMID:19289623

  9. Individual fluorouracil dose adjustment in FOLFOX based on pharmacokinetic follow-up compared with conventional body-area-surface dosing: a phase II, proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitain, Olivier; Asevoaia, Andreaa; Boisdron-Celle, Michele; Poirier, Anne-Lise; Morel, Alain; Gamelin, Erick

    2012-12-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of pharmacokinetically (PK) guided fluorouracil (5-FU) dose adjustment vs. standard body-surface-area (BSA) dosing in a FOLFOX (folinic acid, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) regimen in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). A total of 118 patients with mCRC were administered individually determined PK-adjusted 5-FU in first-line FOLFOX chemotherapy. The comparison arm consisted of 39 patients, and these patients were also treated with FOLFOX with 5-FU by BSA. For the PK-adjusted arm 5-FU was monitored during infusion, and the dose for the next cycle was based on a dose-adjustment chart to achieve a therapeutic area under curve range (5-FU(ODPM Protocol)). The objective response rate was 69.7% in the PK-adjusted arm, and median overall survival and median progression-free survival were 28 and 16 months, respectively. In the traditional patients who received BSA dosage, objective response rate was 46%, and overall survival and progression-free survival were 22 and 10 months, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicity was 1.7% for diarrhea, 0.8% for mucositis, and 18% for neutropenia in the dose-monitored group; they were 12%, 15%, and 25%, respectively, in the BSA group. Efficacy and tolerability of PK-adjusted FOLFOX dosing was much higher than traditional BSA dosing in agreement with previous reports for 5-FU monotherapy PK-adjusted dosing. Analysis of these results suggests that PK-guided 5-FU therapy offers added value to combination therapy for mCRC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative effects of combination drug therapy regimens commencing with either losartan potassium, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, or enalapril maleate for the treatment of severe hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, D; Gazdick, L P; Berman, R; Goldberg, A I; Sweet, C S

    1996-02-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of a regimen of losartan potassium (losartan) and a regimen of enalapril maleate (enalapril) in a randomized trial of patients with severe hypertension in which the initial treatments were blinded. Seventy-five patients, 23-74 years of age, with sitting diastolic blood pressure of 115-130mmHg, were enrolled in a 12-site multicenter study. The primary efficacy parameters were the change in trough systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as response to treatment in terms of categories of hypertensive response. A gradual reduction in mean sitting diastolic blood pressure was observed in all patients treated from week 1 to 12 (10-29mmHg for the losartan regimen and 14-32 mmHg for the enalapril regimen). At week 4, a substantial number of patients remained on monotherapy at either the initial dose or double the dose of losartan (52%) or enalapril (72%). The blood pressure curves for each treatment were parallel over time. The enalapril-based regimen elicited a statistically significantly greater reduction in blood pressure than the losartan-based regimen, although the mean differences in the blood pressure response between the two treatment groups was small. Based on sitting diastolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a reduction in blood pressure of at least 10 mmHg, 98% of the patients assigned to the losartan regimen and 100% of the patients assigned to the enalapril regimen had a satisfactory response with a regimen of one to three antihypertensive drugs. Headache was the most common adverse experience in both treatment groups (occurring in 22% of patients assigned to the losartan regimen and 20% of patients assigned to the enalapril regimen). In this study, the losartan-based regimen effectively lowered blood pressure, was generally well tolerated, and was generally similar to the enalapril-based regimen in the treatment of patients with severe hypertension.

  11. Comparing docetaxel with gemcitabine as second-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: A single institute randomized phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the backbone of treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC however second-line treatment options are controversial particularly in patients with borderline performance status (PS of 2. The aim of this study was to compare efficacy and toxicity of weekly docetaxel versus gemcitabine in this clinical setting. Patients and methods: A total of 70 patients with advanced (stage IIIB, IV NSCLC entered this single institute study. Cases of this study had experienced disease progression after the first-line platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, with PS 0- 2 in “Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group” scale. They were randomly assigned by stratified blocks to receive docetaxel 35 mg/m2 (Arm A, n=34 or gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 (Arm B, n=36 days 1, 8 and 15, every three weeks, for up to six cycles. Primary end point was progression free survival (PFS and secondary end points were objective response rate, disease control rate, median overall survival (OS and toxicity. Dose modification was permitted upon clinician’s discretion for each individual patient. Results: Median of PFS was 2.02 months in arm A and 2.63 months in arm B (HR= 1.279; 95% CI: 0.710-2.304, P= 0.551. Although median OS for arm A was numerically greater (9.2 months than arm B (8.3 months it was statistically non-significant (HR= 1.384; 95% CI: 0.632 to 2.809, P= 0.59. Objective response was higher in Arm B than that in Arm A (P= 0.20 but disease control rates were statistically different in both arms (P= 0.034. Statistically significant differences in term of leukopenia was seen in arm B (P= 0.013. Conclusion: This study, with limited number of cases, indicates that in advanced NSCLC, weekly docetaxel and gemcitabine are reasonable second-line treatment options with statistically similar effectiveness in terms of PFS and median OS with manageable toxicities in patients with PS 0-2.

  12. A comparative study on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of low cost adsorbents for mitigation of toxic ions is one of the most important areas of research and development. Iron oxides especially in nano form have the potential for removing cations due to their structural properties. In the present work additive assisted nano structured goethite was synthesized at pH ...

  13. Comparative effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers on the risk of pneumonia and severe exacerbations in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai CC

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Cheng Lai,1 Ya-Hui Wang,2 Cheng-Yi Wang,3 Hao-Chien Wang,4 Chong-Jen Yu,4 Likwang Chen5 On behalf of the Taiwan Clinical Trial Consortium for Respiratory Diseases (TCORE 1Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Taiwan; 2Medical Research Center, Cardinal Tien Hospital and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Cardinal Tien Hospital and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Institute of Population Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan Objectives: This study aimed to compare the effects of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEis and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs on the risk of pneumonia and severe exacerbations in patients with COPD.Patients and methods: All patients with COPD who used ACEis and ARBs for >90 days between 2000 and 2005 were recruited. Pairwise matching (1:1 of the ACEi and ARB groups resulted in two similar subgroups, with 6,226 patients in each. The primary outcomes were pneumonia and COPD exacerbations, and the secondary outcome was death.Results: During the follow-up period, the incidence of pneumonia was 7.20 per 100 person-years in the ACEi group and 5.89 per 100 person-years in the ARB group. The ACEi group had a higher risk of pneumonia (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.22; 95% CI, 1.15–1.29 than the ARB group. The incidence of severe exacerbations was 0.65 per person-year for the patients receiving ACEis and 0.52 per person-year for those receiving ARBs. The patients receiving ACEis had a higher risk of severe exacerbations (aHR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.16–1.21 than those receiving ARBs. Similar trends were noted in terms of severe exacerbations requiring

  14. Ancestry inference using principal component analysis and spatial analysis: a distance-based analysis to account for population substructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jinyoung; Han, Younghun; Gorlov, Ivan P; Busam, Jonathan A; Seldin, Michael F; Amos, Christopher I

    2017-10-16

    Accurate inference of genetic ancestry is of fundamental interest to many biomedical, forensic, and anthropological research areas. Genetic ancestry memberships may relate to genetic disease risks. In a genome association study, failing to account for differences in genetic ancestry between cases and controls may also lead to false-positive results. Although a number of strategies for inferring and taking into account the confounding effects of genetic ancestry are available, applying them to large studies (tens thousands samples) is challenging. The goal of this study is to develop an approach for inferring genetic ancestry of samples with unknown ancestry among closely related populations and to provide accurate estimates of ancestry for application to large-scale studies. In this study we developed a novel distance-based approach, Ancestry Inference using Principal component analysis and Spatial analysis (AIPS) that incorporates an Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method from spatial analysis to assign individuals to population memberships. We demonstrate the benefits of AIPS in analyzing population substructure, specifically related to the four most commonly used tools EIGENSTRAT, STRUCTURE, fastSTRUCTURE, and ADMIXTURE using genotype data from various intra-European panels and European-Americans. While the aforementioned commonly used tools performed poorly in inferring ancestry from a large number of subpopulations, AIPS accurately distinguished variations between and within subpopulations. Our results show that AIPS can be applied to large-scale data sets to discriminate the modest variability among intra-continental populations as well as for characterizing inter-continental variation. The method we developed will protect against spurious associations when mapping the genetic basis of a disease. Our approach is more accurate and computationally efficient method for inferring genetic ancestry in the large-scale genetic studies.

  15. Superposed epoch study of ICME sub-structures near Earth and their effects on Galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Rodriguez, L.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the interplanetary manifestations of solar eruptions. The overtaken solar wind forms a sheath of compressed plasma at the front of ICMEs. Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of ICMEs with specific properties (e.g. the presence of a flux rope). When ICMEs pass near Earth, ground observations indicate that the flux of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) decreases. Aims: The main aims of this paper are to find common plasma and magnetic properties of different ICME sub-structures and which ICME properties affect the flux of GCRs near Earth. Methods: We used a superposed epoch method applied to a large set of ICMEs observed in situ by the spacecraft ACE, between 1998 and 2006. We also applied a superposed epoch analysis on GCRs time series observed with the McMurdo neutron monitors. Results: We find that slow MCs at 1 AU have on average more massive sheaths. We conclude that this is because they are more effectively slowed down by drag during their travel from the Sun. Slow MCs also have a more symmetric magnetic field and sheaths expanding similarly as their following MC, while in contrast, fast MCs have an asymmetric magnetic profile and a sheath in compression. In all types of MCs, we find that the proton density and the temperature and the magnetic fluctuations can diffuse within the front of the MC due to 3D reconnection. Finally, we derive a quantitative model that describes the decrease in cosmic rays as a function of the amount of magnetic fluctuations and field strength. Conclusions: The obtained typical profiles of sheath, MC and GCR properties corresponding to slow, middle, and fast ICMEs, can be used for forecasting or modelling these events, and to better understand the transport of energetic particles in ICMEs. They are also useful for improving future operative space weather activities.

  16. Validity of the ages and stages questionnaires in Korean compared to Bayley Scales of infant development-II for screening preterm infants at corrected age of 18-24 months for neurodevelopmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwun, Yoojin; Park, Hye Won; Kim, Min-Ju; Lee, Byong Sop; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validity of the ages and stages questionnaire in Korean (ASQ 1st edition, Korean Questionnaires, Seoul Community Rehabilitation Center, 2000) for premature infants. The study population consisted of 90 premature infants born between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, who were tested using the ASQ (Korean) and Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) (II) at a corrected age of 18-24 months. The validity of the ASQ (Korean) using cut-off values set at < -2 SD was examined by comparing it to the BSID (II) components, namely, the mental developmental index (MDI) or psychomotor developmental index (PDI), which were both set at < 85. The calculation of the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values of the ASQ (Korean) components revealed that they detected infants with neurodevelopmental delay with low sensitivity and positive predictive values, however, the communication domain showed moderate correlations with MDI. The failure in more than one domain of the ASQ (Korean) was significantly correlated with the failure in MDI. The ASQ (Korean) showed low validity for screening neurodevelopmentally delayed premature infants.

  17. Dark matter substructure modelling and sensitivity of the Cherenkov Telescope Array to Galactic dark halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huetten, M.; Combet, C.; Maurin, D.

    2016-07-01

    Hierarchical structure formation leads to a clumpy distribution of dark matter in the Milky Way. These clumps are possible targets to search for dark matter annihilation with present and future γ-ray instruments. Many uncertainties exist on the clump distribution, leading to disputed conclusions about the expected number of detectable clumps and the ensuing limits that can be obtained from non-detection. In this paper, we use the CLUMPY code to simulate thousands of skymaps for several clump distributions. This allows us to statistically assess the typical properties (mass, distance, angular size, luminosity) of the detectable clumps. Varying parameters of the clump distributions allows us to identify the key quantities to which the number of detectable clumps is the most sensitive. Focusing our analysis on two extreme clump configurations, yet consistent with results from numerical simulations, we revisit and compare various calculations made for the Fermi-LAT instrument, in terms of number of dark clumps expected and the angular power spectrum for the Galactic signal. We then focus on the prospects of detecting dark clumps with the future CTA instrument, for which we make a detailed sensitivity analysis using open-source CTA software. Based on a realistic scenario for the foreseen CTA extragalactic survey, and accounting for a post-trial sensitivity in the survey, we show that we obtain competitive and complementary limits to those based on long observation of a single bright dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  18. Quarkonium polarization and the long distance matrix elements hierarchies using jet substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lin; Shrivastava, Prashant

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms in jets at the LHC, using the fragmenting jet functions (FJF) approach. Specifically, we discuss the jet energy dependence of the J /ψ production cross section at the LHC. By comparing the cross sections for the different NRQCD production channels (1S0[8], 3S1[8], 3PJ[8], and 3cripts>S1[1]), we find that at fixed values of energy fraction z carried by the J /ψ , if the normalized cross section is a decreasing function of the jet energy, in particular for z >0.5 , then the depolarizing 1S0[8] must be the dominant channel. This makes the prediction made in [Baumgart et al., J. High Energy Phys. 11 (2014) 003, 10.1007/JHEP11(2014)003] for the FJF's also true for the cross section. We also make comparisons between the long distance matrix elements extracted by various groups. This analysis could potentially shed light on the polarization properties of the J /ψ production in high pT region.

  19. Stellar substructures in the solar neighbourhood. I. Kinematic group 3 in the Geneva-Copenhagen survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonkutė, E.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Nordström, B.; Ženovienė, R.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Galactic archeology is a powerful tool for investigating the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. We use this technique to study kinematic groups of F- and G-stars in the solar neighbourhood. From correlations between orbital parameters, three new coherent groups of stars were recently identified and suggested to correspond to remnants of disrupted satellites. Aims: We determine detailed elemental abundances in stars belonging to one of these groups and compare their chemical composition with Galactic disc stars. The aim is to look for possible chemical signatures that might give information about the history of this kinematic group of stars. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope, La Palma, and analysed with a differential model atmosphere method. Comparison stars were observed and analysed with the same method. Results: The average value of [Fe/H] for the 20 stars investigated in this study is -0.69 ± 0.05 dex. Elemental abundances of oxygen and α-elements are overabundant in comparison with Galactic thin-disc dwarfs and thin-disc chemical evolution models. This abundance pattern has similar characteristics as the Galactic thick-disc. Conclusions: The homogeneous chemical composition together with the kinematic properties and ages of stars in the investigated Group 3 of the Geneva-Copenhagen survey provides evidence of their common origin and possible relation to an ancient merging event. The similar chemical composition of stars in the investigated group and the thick-disc stars might suggest that their formation histories are linked. Table 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Analysis of population substructure in two sympatric populations of Gran Chaco, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Sevini

    Full Text Available Sub-population structure and intricate kinship dynamics might introduce biases in molecular anthropology studies and could invalidate the efforts to understand diseases in highly admixed populations. In order to clarify the previously observed distribution pattern and morbidity of Chagas disease in Gran Chaco, Argentina, we studied two populations (Wichí and Criollos recruited following an innovative bio-cultural model considering their complex cultural interactions. By reconstructing the genetic background and the structure of these two culturally different populations, the pattern of admixture, the correspondence between genealogical and genetic relationships, this integrated perspective had the power to validate data and to link the gap usually relying on a singular discipline. Although Wichí and Criollos share the same area, these sympatric populations are differentiated from the genetic point of view as revealed by Non Recombinant Y Chromosome genotyping resulting in significantly high Fst values and in a lower genetic variability in the Wichí population. Surprisingly, the Amerindian and the European components emerged with comparable amounts (20% among Criollos and Wichí respectively. The detailed analysis of mitochondrial DNA showed that the two populations have as much as 87% of private haplotypes. Moreover, from the maternal perspective, despite a common Amerindian origin, an Andean and an Amazonian component emerged in Criollos and in Wichí respectively. Our approach allowed us to highlight that quite frequently there is a discrepancy between self-reported and genetic kinship. Indeed, if self-reported identity and kinship are usually utilized in population genetics as a reliable proxy for genetic identity and parental relationship, in our model populations appear to be the result not only and not simply of the genetic background but also of complex cultural determinants. This integrated approach paves the way to a rigorous

  1. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of Bio-Gen with biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of class II furcation defects: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Jenabian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Treatment of furcation defects are thought to be challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic parameters of Bio-Gen with Biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of Class II furcation defects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this clinical trial, 24 patients with Class II furcation defect on a buccal or lingual mandibular molar were recruited. After oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing and achievement of acceptable plaque control, the patients were randomly chosen to receive either connective tissue and Bio-Gen (case group or Biocollagen and Bio-Gen (control group. The following parameters were recorded before the first and re-entry surgery (six months later: vertical clinical attachment level (VCAL, gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, horizontal probing depth (HPD, vertical probing depth (VPD, gingival recession (GR, furcation vertical component (FVC, furcation to alveolar crest (FAC, fornix to base of defect (FBD, and furcation horizontal component (FHC were calculated at the time of first surgery and during re-entry. A digital periapical radiograph was taken in parallel before first surgery and re-entry. The radiographs were then analyzed by digital subtraction. The differences with p value <0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: Only the mean changes of FAC, FHC, mean of FHC, FBD in re-entry revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups. HPD, VPD, FBD, FAC, and FHC showed statistically significant differences after 6 months in the case group. However, in the control group, statistically significant differences were found in GR and HPD. We did not observe any significant difference in radiographic changes among the two groups. CONCLUSION: The results of this trial indicate that better clinical outcomes can be obtained with connective tissue grafts in combination with bone material compared with a resorbable barrier with bone

  2. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: A Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of 2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid and 2, 4 - pentanedione. The reaction of the prepared Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride formed diaquo bis( N – 2 – amino – 3 - methylbutyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) complex. The Schiff base is ...

  3. A Randomized Phase I/II Trial to Compare Weekly Usage with Triple Weekly Usage of Paclitaxel in Concurrent Radiochemotherapy for Patients with Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anhui SHI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Although the guidelines of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network of USA recommend that the standard therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LANSCLC is concurrent chemoradiotherapy. There is ongoing controversy about the treatment regimen which combines chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. The aim of this study is to compare weekly usage with triple weekly usage of paclitaxel in concurrent radiochemotherapy for patients with LANSCLC, and to obtain the best paclitaxel regimen in the concurrent radiochemotherapy. Methods From April 2006 to April 2009, some LANSCLC patients in multicenter were randomly divided into weekly usage (45 mg/m2, 1 times/week, a total of 270 mg/m2 in six weeks and triple weekly usage (15 mg/m2, 3 times/week, a total of 270 mg/m2 in six weeks group of paclitaxel by a random number table. All patients were treated with 3D radiotherapy, and 95% planning target volume (PTV received a prescription dose of (60-70 Gy/(30-35times/(6-7weeks, (1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction. Then the side effects, response and overall survival rate were compared between two groups of patients. Results Thirty-eight LANSCLC patients were enrolled. Weekly usage and triple weekly usage group were 20 and 18 patients, respectively. In the triple weekly usage group, the side effects were 12 patients had radiation esophagitis of I-II degree, 1 patient had radiation esophagitis of III degree, 2 patients had radiation pneumonitis of I degree, 1 patient had radiation pneumonitis of II degree, 1 patient had radiation pneumonitis of III degree and died of respiratory failure, 2 patients developed weight loss of I degree. In the weekly usage group, the side effects were 11 patients had radiation esophagitis of I-III degree, 6 patients had radiation pneumonitis of II-III degree, 2 patients developed weight loss of I degree, 6 patients developed leucopenia of III-IV degree. The response rate of two groups was 88.8% and 50

  4. Stellar substructures in the solar neighbourhood. III. Kinematic group 2 in the Geneva-Copenhagen survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ženovienė, R.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Nordström, B.; Stonkutė, E.

    2014-03-01

    Context. From correlations between orbital parameters, several new coherent groups of stars were recently identified in the Galactic disc and suggested to correspond to remnants of disrupted satellites. To reconstruct their origin at least three main observational parameters - kinematics, chemical composition and age - must be known. Aims: We determine detailed elemental abundances in stars belonging to the so-called Group 2 of the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey and compare the chemical composition with Galactic thin- and thick-disc stars, as well as with the Arcturus and AF06 streams (Arifyanto & Fuchs 2006, A&A, 449, 533). The aim is to search for chemical signatures that might give information about the formation history of this kinematic group of stars. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope, La Palma, and were analysed with a differential model atmosphere method. Comparison stars were observed and analysed with the same method. Results: The average value of [Fe/H] for the 32 stars of Group 2 is - 0.42 ± 0.10 dex. The investigated group consists mainly of two 8- and 12-Gyr-old stellar populations. Abundances of oxygen, α-elements, and r-process-dominated elements are higher than in Galactic thin-disc dwarfs. This elemental abundance pattern has similar characteristics as that of the Galactic thick-disc. Conclusions: The similarity in chemical composition of stars in Group 2 with that in stars of the thick-disc might suggest that their formation histories are linked. The chemical composition together with the kinematic properties and ages of stars in the stars investigated provides evidence of their common origin and possible relation to an ancient merging event. A gas-rich satellite merger scenario is proposed as the most likely origin. Groups 2 and 3 of the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey might have originated in the same merging event. Tables 4 and 5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. A complex network approach reveals a pivotal substructure of genes linked to schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Monaco

    Full Text Available Research on brain disorders with a strong genetic component and complex heritability, such as schizophrenia, has led to the development of brain transcriptomics. This field seeks to gain a deeper understanding of gene expression, a key factor in exploring further research issues. Our study focused on how genes are associated amongst each other. In this perspective, we have developed a novel data-driven strategy for characterizing genetic modules, i.e., clusters of strongly interacting genes. The aim was to uncover a pivotal community of genes linked to a target gene for schizophrenia. Our approach combined network topological properties with information theory to highlight the presence of a pivotal community, for a specific gene, and to simultaneously assess the information content of partitions with the Shannon's entropy based on betweenness. We analyzed the publicly available BrainCloud dataset containing post-mortem gene expression data and focused on the Dopamine D2 receptor, encoded by the DRD2 gene. We used four different community detection algorithms to evaluate the consistence of our approach. A pivotal DRD2 community emerged for all the procedures applied, with a considerable reduction in size, compared to the initial network. The stability of the results was confirmed by a Dice index ≥80% within a range of tested parameters. The detected community was also the most informative, as it represented an optimization of the Shannon entropy. Lastly, we verified the strength of connection of the DRD2 community, which was stronger than any other randomly selected community and even more so than the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis module, commonly considered the standard approach for such studies. This finding substantiates the conclusion that the detected community represents a more connected and informative cluster of genes for the DRD2 community, and therefore better elucidates the behavior of this module of strongly related

  6. Measurement of the cross-section of high transverse momentum vector bosons reconstructed as single jets and studies of jet substructure in $pp$ collisions at ${\\sqrt{s}}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Av