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Sample records for ii comparing substructure

  1. SHARP - II: Revealing a bias in observational measurements of dark matter substructure with gravitational lens flux ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Hsueh, J - W; Vegetti, S; McKean, J P; Spingola, C; Auger, M W; Koopmans, L V E; Lagattuta, D J

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational lens flux-ratio anomalies provide a powerful technique for measuring dark matter substructure in distant galaxies. However, before using these flux-ratio anomalies to test galaxy formation models, it is imperative to ascertain that the given anomalies are indeed due to the presence of dark matter substructure and not due to some other component of the lensing galaxy halo or to propagation effects. Here we present the case of CLASS~B1555+375, which has a strong radio-wavelength flux-ratio anomaly. Our high-resolution near-infrared Keck~II adaptive optics imaging and archival Hubble Space Telescope data reveal the lensing galaxy in this system to have a clear edge-on disc component that crosses directly over the pair of images that exhibit the flux-ratio anomaly. We find simple models that include the disc can reproduce the cm-wavelength flux-ratio anomaly without requiring additional dark matter substructure. Although further studies are required, our results suggest the assumption that all flux-...

  2. Exploring the Variable Sky with LINEAR. II. Halo Structure and Substructure Traced by RR Lyrae Stars to 30 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J Scott; Morgan, Dylan M; Becker, Andrew C; Sharma, Sanjib; Palaversa, Lovro; Jurić, Mario; Wozniak, Przemyslaw; Oluseyi, Hakeem

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample of ~5,000 RR Lyrae stars selected from the recalibrated LINEAR dataset and detected at heliocentric distances between 5 kpc and 30 kpc over ~8,000 deg^2 of sky. The coordinates and light curve properties, such as period and Oosterhoff type, are made publicly available. We find evidence for the Oosterhoff dichotomy among field RR Lyrae stars, with the ratio of the type II and I subsamples of about 1:4. The number density distribution of halo RRab stars as a function of galactocentric distance can be described as an oblate ellipsoid with the axis ratio q=0.63 and with either a single or a double power law with a power-law index in the range -2 to -3. Using a group-finding algorithm EnLink, we detected seven candidate halo groups, only one of which is statistically spurious. Three of these groups are near globular clusters (M53/NGC 5053, M3, M13), and one is near a known halo substructure (Virgo Stellar Stream); the remaining three groups do not seem to be near any known halo substructures or...

  3. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. II. HALO STRUCTURE AND SUBSTRUCTURE TRACED BY RR LYRAE STARS TO 30 kpc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ivezic, Zeljko; Morgan, Dylan M.; Becker, Andrew C. [University of Washington, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Stuart, J. Scott [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States); Sharma, Sanjib [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Palaversa, Lovro [Observatoire astronomique de l' Universite de Geneve, 51 chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Juric, Mario [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85121 (United States); Wozniak, Przemyslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory, 30 Bikini Atoll Rd., Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Oluseyi, Hakeem [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    We present a sample of {approx}5000 RR Lyrae stars selected from the recalibrated LINEAR data set and detected at heliocentric distances between 5 kpc and 30 kpc over {approx}8000 deg{sup 2} of sky. The coordinates and light curve properties, such as period and Oosterhoff type, are made publicly available. We analyze in detail the light curve properties and Galactic distribution of the subset of {approx}4000 type ab RR Lyrae (RRab) stars, including a search for new halo substructures and the number density distribution as a function of Oosterhoff type. We find evidence for the Oosterhoff dichotomy among field RR Lyrae stars, with the ratio of the type II and I subsamples of about 1:4, but with a weaker separation than for globular cluster stars. The wide sky coverage and depth of this sample allow unique constraints for the number density distribution of halo RRab stars as a function of galactocentric distance: it can be described as an oblate ellipsoid with an axis ratio q = 0.63 and with either a single or a double power law with a power-law index in the range -2 to -3. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the Oosterhoff type II subsample has a steeper number density profile than the Oosterhoff type I subsample. Using the group-finding algorithm EnLink, we detected seven candidate halo groups, only one of which is statistically spurious. Three of these groups are near globular clusters (M53/NGC 5053, M3, M13), and one is near a known halo substructure (Virgo Stellar Stream); the remaining three groups do not seem to be near any known halo substructures or globular clusters and seem to have a higher ratio of Oosterhoff type II to Oosterhoff type I RRab stars than what is found in the halo. The extended morphology and the position (outside the tidal radius) of some of the groups near globular clusters are suggestive of tidal streams possibly originating from globular clusters. Spectroscopic follow-up of detected halo groups is encouraged.

  4. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  5. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  6. SHARP - II. Mass structure in strong lenses is not necessarily dark matter substructure: a flux ratio anomaly from an edge-on disc in B1555+375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, J.-W.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Vegetti, S.; McKean, J. P.; Spingola, C.; Auger, M. W.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Lagattuta, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational lens flux-ratio anomalies provide a powerful technique for measuring dark matter substructure in distant galaxies. However, before using these flux-ratio anomalies to test galaxy formation models, it is imperative to ascertain that the given anomalies are indeed due to the presence of dark matter substructure and not due to some other component of the lensing galaxy halo or to propagation effects. Here we present the case of CLASS~B1555+375, which has a strong radio-wavelength flux-ratio anomaly. Our high-resolution near-infrared Keck~II adaptive optics imaging and archival Hubble Space Telescope data reveal the lensing galaxy in this system to have a clear edge-on disc component that crosses directly over the pair of images that exhibit the flux-ratio anomaly. We find that simple models that include the disc can reproduce the cm-wavelength flux-ratio anomaly without requiring additional dark matter substructure. Although further studies are required, our results suggest the assumption that all flux-ratio anomalies are due to a population of dark matter sub-haloes may be incorrect, and analyses that do not account for the full complexity of the lens macro-model may overestimate the substructure mass fraction in massive lensing galaxies.

  7. Statistics of dark matter substructure - II. Comparison of model with simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Jiang, Fangzhou

    2016-05-01

    We compare subhalo mass and velocity functions obtained from different simulations with different subhalo finders among each other, and with predictions from the new semi-analytical model presented in Paper I. We find that subhalo mass functions (SHMFs) obtained using different subhalo finders agree with each other at the level of ˜20 per cent, but only at the low-mass end. At the massive end, subhalo finders that identify subhaloes based purely on density in configuration space dramatically underpredict the subhalo abundances by more than an order of magnitude. These problems are much less severe for subhalo velocity functions (SHVFs), indicating that they arise from issues related to assigning masses to the subhaloes, rather than from detecting them. Overall the predictions from the semi-analytical model are in excellent agreement with simulation results obtained using the more advanced subhalo finders that use information in six-dimensional phase-space. In particular, the model accurately reproduces the slope and host-mass-dependent normalization of both the subhalo mass and velocity functions. We find that the SHMFs and SHVFs have power-law slopes of 0.86 and 2.77, respectively, significantly shallower than what has been claimed in several studies in the literature.

  8. Jet substructure measurements at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Aparajita; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A review is given of recent Run II measurements of jet substructure at CMS and ATLAS, as well of the most relevant measurements from Run I. Quark and gluon discrimination, jet mass and other substructure observable are discussed together with prospects for future measurements with new insight from theory.

  9. Thermal substructure of hot deformed austenite substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernshtejn, M.L.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Nikishov, N.A. (Moskovskij Inst. Stali i Splavov (USSR))

    1982-01-01

    Effect of hot working different regimes on formation of austenite structure and substructure of the 60N20 and 60Kh5G6 steels and kinetics of softening processes at postdeformation isothermal (at deformation temperature) heating, is investigated. It is shown, that variation of hot working regimes permits to obtain a wide range of structural and substructural austenite conditions. Rate decrease and temperature increase promotes obtaining after hot working and conservation under cooling conditions of developed polygonized substructure. Similar polygonized isotropic substructure with a rather low density of dislocations inside of subgrains promotes decelerating of initial stages of recrystallization development under conditions of hot working and regulated post-deformation heatings. Alloying by carbide-forming elements (chromium and manganese) delays development of recrystallization (in comparison with alloying with nickel), even if the steel is in the condition of single-phase solid solution.

  10. Tracing Galaxy Formation with Stellar Halos. II. Relating Substructure in Phase and Abundance Space to Accretion Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kathryn V.; Bullock, James S.; Sharma, Sanjib; Font, Andreea; Robertson, Brant E.; Leitner, Samuel N.

    2008-12-01

    This paper explores the mapping between the observable properties of a stellar halo in phase and abundance space and the parent galaxy's accretion history in terms of the characteristic epoch of accretion and mass and orbits of progenitor objects. The study utilizes a suite of 11 stellar halo models constructed within the context of a standard ΛCDM cosmology. The results demonstrate that coordinate-space studies are sensitive to the recent (0-8 Gyr ago) merger histories of galaxies (this timescale corresponds to the last few percent to tens of percent of mass accretion for a Milky Way-type galaxy). Specifically, the frequency, sky coverage, and fraction of stars in substructures in the stellar halo as a function of surface brightness are indicators of the importance of recent merging and of the luminosity function of infalling dwarfs. The morphology of features serves as a guide to the orbital distribution of those dwarfs. Constraints on the earlier merger history (>8 Gyr ago) can be gleaned from the abundance patterns in halo stars: within our models, dramatic differences in the dominant epoch of accretion or luminosity function of progenitor objects leave clear signatures in the [α/Fe] and [Fe/H] distributions of the stellar halo; halos dominated by very early accretion have higher average [α/Fe], while those dominated by high-luminosity satellites have higher [Fe/H]. This insight can be applied to reconstruct much about the merger histories of nearby galaxies from current and future data sets.

  11. Substructure of Highly Boosted Massive Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alon, Raz [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2012-10-01

    Modern particle accelerators enable researchers to study new high energy frontiers which have never been explored before. This realm opens possibilities to further examine known fields such as Quantum Chromodynamics. In addition, it allows searching for new physics and setting new limits on the existence of such. This study examined the substructure of highly boosted massive jets measured by the CDF II detector. Events from 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider were collected out of a total integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb$^{-1}$. They were selected to have at least one jet with transverse momentum above 400 GeV/c. The jet mass, angularity, and planar flow were measured and compared with predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics, and were found to be consistent with the theory. A search for boosted top quarks was conducted and resulted in an upper limit on the production cross section of such top quarks.

  12. Jet Substructure by Accident

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Timothy; Lisanti, Mariangela; Lou, Hou Keong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new search strategy for high-multiplicity hadronic final states. When new particles are produced at threshold, the distribution of their decay products is approximately isotropic. If there are many partons in the final state, it is likely that several will be clustered into the same large-radius jet. The resulting jet exhibits substructure, even though the parent states are not boosted. This "accidental" substructure is a powerful discriminant against background because it is more pronounced for high-multiplicity signals than for QCD multijets. We demonstrate how to take advantage of accidental substructure to reduce backgrounds without relying on the presence of missing energy. As an example, we present the expected limits for several R-parity violating gluino decay topologies. This approach allows for the determination of QCD backgrounds using data-driven methods, which is crucial for the feasibility of any search that targets signatures with many jets and suppressed missing energy.

  13. Free-Interface Modal Synthesis Based Substructural Damage Detection Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanghong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Free-interface modal synthesis method is applied to civil structure, and a substructure method is proposed by introducing the method into global sensitivity method. The substructure expression of the derivatives of eigenvalues and eigenvectors with respect to elemental parameters is obtained. The accuracy of the application of free-interface modal synthesis method is evaluated with different retained modes in substructure, and then the effectiveness of the proposed substructure sensitivity method is illustrated through an 11-storey building under both single- and multidamage cases. Both the damage locations and the extent can be effectively identified. By comparing it with the identical results of global sensitivity method, the proposed method can be faster in detecting the damage location and more stable under multidamage cases. Since this substructure sensitivity method only needs to update sensitivity matrix in the substructure with relative small number of DOFs, it may save much computation effort and become more efficient.

  14. Spectroscopy of clusters in the ESO distant cluster survey (EDisCS). II.. Redshifts, velocity dispersions, and substructure for clusters in the last 15 fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milvang-Jensen, B.; Noll, S.; Halliday, C.; Poggianti, B. M.; Jablonka, P.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Saglia, R. P.; Nowak, N.; von der Linden, A.; De Lucia, G.; Pelló, R.; Moustakas, J.; Poirier, S.; Bamford, S. P.; Clowe, D. I.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Rudnick, G. H.; Simard, L.; White, S. D. M.; Zaritsky, D.

    2008-05-01

    Aims: We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in 15 survey fields as part of the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We determine the redshifts and velocity dispersions of the galaxy clusters located in these fields, and we test for possible substructure in the clusters. Methods: We obtained multi-object mask spectroscopy using the FORS2 instrument at the VLT. We reduced the data with particular attention to the sky subtraction. We implemented the method of Kelson for performing sky subtraction prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data. From the measured galaxy redshifts, we determine cluster velocity dispersions using the biweight estimator and test for possible substructure in the clusters using the Dressler-Shectman test. Results: The method of subtracting the sky prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data delivers photon-noise-limited results, whereas the traditional method of subtracting the sky after the data have been rebinned/interpolated results in substantially larger noise for spectra from tilted slits. Redshifts for individual galaxies are presented and redshifts and velocity dispersions are presented for 21 galaxy clusters. For the 9 clusters with at least 20 spectroscopically confirmed members, we present the statistical significance of the presence of substructure obtained from the Dressler-Shectman test, and substructure is detected in two of the clusters. Conclusions: Together with data from our previous paper, spectroscopy and spectroscopic velocity dispersions are now available for 26 EDisCS clusters with redshifts in the range 0.40-0.96 and velocity dispersions in the range 166 km s-1-1080 km s-1. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, as part of large programme 166.A-0162 (the ESO Distant Cluster Survey). Full Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/482/419

  15. Spectroscopy of clusters in the ESO distant cluster survey (EDisCS).II. Redshifts, velocity dispersions, and substructure for clusters in the last 15 fields

    CERN Document Server

    Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Halliday, Claire; Poggianti, Bianca M; Jablonka, Pascale; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Saglia, Roberto P; Nowak, Nina; von der Linden, Anja; De Lucia, Gabriella; Pello, Roser; Moustakas, John; Poirier, Sebastien; Bamford, Steven P; Clowe, Douglas I; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Rudnick, Gregory H; Simard, Luc; White, Simon D M; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    AIMS. We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in 15 survey fields as part of the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We determine the redshifts and velocity dispersions of the galaxy clusters located in these fields, and we test for possible substructure in the clusters. METHODS. We obtained multi-object mask spectroscopy using the FORS2 instrument at the VLT. We reduced the data with particular attention to the sky subtraction. We implemented the method of Kelson for performing sky subtraction prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data. From the measured galaxy redshifts, we determine cluster velocity dispersions using the biweight estimator and test for possible substructure in the clusters using the Dressler-Shectman test. RESULTS. The method of subtracting the sky prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data delivers photon-noise-limited results, whereas the traditional method of subtracting the sky after the data have been rebinned/interpolated results in substantially larger noise f...

  16. Can galactic dark matter substructure contribute to the cosmic gamma-ray anisotropy?

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, J U

    2014-01-01

    The annihilation of dark matter (DM) particles in the Milky Way can contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray background (DGRB). Due to the presence of substructures, this emission will appear anisotropic in a predictable way. We generate full-sky maps of the gamma-ray emission in galactic substructures from results of the high-resolution Via Lactea II N-body simulation of the Milky Way DM halo. We calculate the anisotropy pattern, taking into account different radial profiles of the DM distribution in substructures, cosmic variance, and the detection threshold, and compare it to the anisotropy in the DGRB observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). By comparing the upper limits on the DM self-annihilation cross-section, , implied by the anisotropy to the intensity of the DGRB and detected sources in the LAT 2-yr Point Source Catalog, we find that galactic substructure cannot contribute to the anisotropies in the DGRB without strongly violating these observations. Our results challenge the perception that sma...

  17. Characterising the Decays of High-pt Top Quarks and Addressing Naturalness with Jet Substructure in ATLAS Runs I and II

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, Matt

    The coupling of the Standard Model top quark to the Higgs boson is O(1), which leads to large quantum corrections in the perturbative expansion of the Higgs boson mass. Possible solutions to this so-called naturalness problem include supersymmetric models with gluinos and stop squarks whose masses are at the electroweak scale, O(1 TeV). If supersymmetry is realised in nature at this scale, these particles are expected to be accessible with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A search for gluino pair production with decays mediated by stop- and sbottom-squark loops in the initial 14.8 ifb of the ATLAS run 2 dataset is presented in terms of a pair of simplified models, which targets extreme regions of phase space using jet substructure techniques. No excess is observed and limits are set which greatly extend the previous exclusion region of this search, up to 1.9 TeV (1.95 TeV) for gluinos decaying through light stop (sbottom) squarks to the lightest neutralinos. A performance study of top tagging algorithms in ...

  18. THE SEGUE K GIANT SURVEY. III. QUANTIFYING GALACTIC HALO SUBSTRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janesh, William; Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Rockosi, Constance [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Starkenburg, Else [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700, STN CSC, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Xue, Xiang Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Johnson, Jennifer [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lee, Young Sun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5–125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration project. Using a position–velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (∼33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity.

  19. Comparing Binaural Pre-processing Strategies II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Baumgärtel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several binaural audio signal enhancement algorithms were evaluated with respect to their potential to improve speech intelligibility in noise for users of bilateral cochlear implants (CIs. 50% speech reception thresholds (SRT50 were assessed using an adaptive procedure in three distinct, realistic noise scenarios. All scenarios were highly nonstationary, complex, and included a significant amount of reverberation. Other aspects, such as the perfectly frontal target position, were idealized laboratory settings, allowing the algorithms to perform better than in corresponding real-world conditions. Eight bilaterally implanted CI users, wearing devices from three manufacturers, participated in the study. In all noise conditions, a substantial improvement in SRT50 compared to the unprocessed signal was observed for most of the algorithms tested, with the largest improvements generally provided by binaural minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR beamforming algorithms. The largest overall improvement in speech intelligibility was achieved by an adaptive binaural MVDR in a spatially separated, single competing talker noise scenario. A no-pre-processing condition and adaptive differential microphones without a binaural link served as the two baseline conditions. SRT50 improvements provided by the binaural MVDR beamformers surpassed the performance of the adaptive differential microphones in most cases. Speech intelligibility improvements predicted by instrumental measures were shown to account for some but not all aspects of the perceptually obtained SRT50 improvements measured in bilaterally implanted CI users.

  20. A comparative study on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Co(II) while it decreased in the presence of Cu(II) in the studied range of concentration variation. Maximum Pb(II) .... size variation in the range of 2 to 10 nm. ...... Zinc-bromine Battery, Lead-acid and Lithium Batteries, Arsenic Remediation from.

  1. The Cluster Substructure - Alignment Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Plionis, Manolis

    2001-01-01

    Using the APM cluster data we investigate whether the dynamical status of clusters is related to the large-scale structure of the Universe. We find that cluster substructure is strongly correlated with the tendency of clusters to be aligned with their nearest neighbour and in general with the nearby clusters that belong to the same supercluster. Furthermore, dynamically young clusters are more clustered than the overall cluster population. These are strong indications that cluster develop in ...

  2. Substructure mining using elaborate chemical representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazius, Jeroen; Nijssen, Siegfried; Kok, Joost; Bäck, Thomas; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2006-01-01

    Substructure mining algorithms are important drug discovery tools since they can find substructures that affect physicochemical and biological properties. Current methods, however, only consider a part of all chemical information that is present within a data set of compounds. Therefore, the overall aim of our study was to enable more exhaustive data mining by designing methods that detect all substructures of any size, shape, and level of chemical detail. A means of chemical representation was developed that uses atomic hierarchies, thus enabling substructure mining to consider general and/or highly specific features. As a proof-of-concept, the efficient, multipurpose graph mining system Gaston learned substructures of any size and shape from a mutagenicity data set that was represented in this manner. From these substructures, we extracted a set of only six nonredundant, discriminative substructures that represent relevant biochemical knowledge. Our results demonstrate the individual and synergistic importance of elaborate chemical representation and mining for nonlinear substructures. We conclude that the combination of elaborate chemical representation and Gaston provides an excellent method for 2D substructure mining as this recipe systematically explores all substructures in different levels of chemical detail.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Effects of Laser Modalities on Shear Bond Strengths of Veneering Porcelains to Laser Sintered Substructures: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorler, Oguzhan; Saygin, Aysegul Goze

    2017-06-01

    Laser modalities and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) have a potential to enhance micromechanical bonding between dental super- and infrastructures. However, the effect of different manufacturing methods on the metal-ceramic bond strength needs further evaluation. We investigated the effect of surface treatment with Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and Ho:YAG lasers on the shear bond strength (SBS) of high-fusion dental porcelains (Vita and G-Ceram) to infrastructures prepared with DMLS in vitro settings. Study specimens (n = 128) were randomly divided into study subsets (n = 8), considering treatment types applied on the surface of infrastructures, including sandblasting and selected laser modalities; infrastructure types as direct laser sintered (DLS) and Ni-Cr based; and superstructure porcelains as Vita and G-Ceram. The SBS test was performed to assess the effectiveness of surface modifications that were also examined with a stereo microscope. Considering laser procedure types, the highest SBS values were obtained by Er:YAG laser, followed by, with a decreasing efficiency, Ho:YAG laser and sandblasting procedures, and Nd:YAG laser procedure (p laser decreases the bonding of Vita and G-Ceram in all the infrastructures compared with sandblasting. Considering porcelains, the highest SBS values were obtained by Vita (p laser procedures caused surface irregularities as revealed by the stereo microscopic examination. In current experimental settings, Er:YAG laser applied to DLS infrastructure veneered with Vita porcelain increases bonding strength more distinctly, and Nd:YAG laser applied to Ni-Cr-based infrastructure veneered with G-Ceram porcelain alters bonding strength unfavorably.

  4. Substructure of fuzzy dark matter halos

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Xiaolong; Niemeyer, Jens C

    2016-01-01

    We derive the halo mass function (HMF) for fuzzy dark matter (FDM) by solving the excursion set problem explicitly with a mass-dependent barrier function, which has not been done before. We find that compared to the naive approach of the Sheth-Tormen HMF for FDM the one we obtain has a higher cut off mass and the cut off mass change less strongly with redshifts. Using merger trees constructed with a modified version of the Lacey & Cole formalism that accounts for suppressed small scale power and the scale-dependent growth of FDM halos and the semi-analytic Galacticus code, we study the statistics of halo substructure including the effects from dynamical friction and tidal stripping. We find that if the dark matter is a mixture of cold dark matter (CDM) and FDM, there will be a suppression on the halo substructure on small scales which may be able to solve the Missing Satellites Problem faced by the pure CDM model. The suppression becomes stronger with increasing FDM fraction or decreasing FDM mass. Thus i...

  5. Substructure of fuzzy dark matter haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaolong; Behrens, Christoph; Niemeyer, Jens C.

    2017-02-01

    We derive the halo mass function (HMF) for fuzzy dark matter (FDM) by solving the excursion set problem explicitly with a mass-dependent barrier function, which has not been done before. We find that compared to the naive approach of the Sheth-Tormen HMF for FDM, our approach has a higher cutoff mass and the cutoff mass changes less strongly with redshifts. Using merger trees constructed with a modified version of the Lacey & Cole formalism that accounts for suppressed small-scale power and the scale-dependent growth of FDM haloes and the semi-analytic GALACTICUS code, we study the statistics of halo substructure including the effects from dynamical friction and tidal stripping. We find that if the dark matter is a mixture of cold dark matter (CDM) and FDM, there will be a suppression on the halo substructure on small scales which may be able to solve the missing satellites problem faced by the pure CDM model. The suppression becomes stronger with increasing FDM fraction or decreasing FDM mass. Thus, it may be used to constrain the FDM model.

  6. Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauchamp, R.O. Jr. [Center for Information on Toxicology and Environment, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  7. A Comparison of Reduced Order Modeling Techniques Used in Dynamic Substructuring [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roettgen, Dan [Wisc; Seeger, Benjamin [Stuttgart; Tai, Wei Che [Washington; Baek, Seunghun [Michigan; Dossogne, Tilan [Liege; Allen, Matthew S [Wisc; Kuether, Robert J.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Mayes, Randall L.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental dynamic substructuring is a means whereby a mathematical model for a substructure can be obtained experimentally and then coupled to a model for the rest of the assembly to predict the response. Recently, various methods have been proposed that use a transmission simulator to overcome sensitivity to measurement errors and to exercise the interface between the substructures; including the Craig-Bampton, Dual Craig-Bampton, and Craig-Mayes methods. This work compares the advantages and disadvantages of these reduced order modeling strategies for two dynamic substructuring problems. The methods are first used on an analytical beam model to validate the methodologies. Then they are used to obtain an experimental model for structure consisting of a cylinder with several components inside connected to the outside case by foam with uncertain properties. This represents an exceedingly difficult structure to model and so experimental substructuring could be an attractive way to obtain a model of the system.

  8. A Comparison of Reduced Order Modeling Techniques Used in Dynamic Substructuring.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roettgen, Dan; Seegar, Ben; Tai, Wei Che; Baek, Seunghun; Dossogne, Tilan; Allen, Matthew; Kuether, Robert J.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-10-01

    Experimental dynamic substructuring is a means whereby a mathematical model for a substructure can be obtained experimentally and then coupled to a model for the rest of the assembly to predict the response. Recently, various methods have been proposed that use a transmission simulator to overcome sensitivity to measurement errors and to exercise the interface between the substructures; including the Craig-Bampton, Dual Craig-Bampton, and Craig-Mayes methods. This work compares the advantages and disadvantages of these reduced order modeling strategies for two dynamic substructuring problems. The methods are first used on an analytical beam model to validate the methodologies. Then they are used to obtain an experimental model for structure consisting of a cylinder with several components inside connected to the outside case by foam with uncertain properties. This represents an exceedingly difficult structure to model and so experimental substructuring could be an attractive way to obtain a model of the system.

  9. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, J.; dell'Antonio, I.; Huwe, P.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  10. MASS SUBSTRUCTURE IN ABELL 3128

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCleary, J.; Dell’Antonio, I.; Huwe, P., E-mail: Jacqueline_McCleary@brown.edu [Department of Physics, Brown University, Box 1843, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2015-05-20

    We perform a detailed two-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the point-spread function that enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak-lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak-lensing shear profile of a Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW) halo and also perform NFW fits to substructures detected in the 2D mass maps of the cluster. This study yields one of the highest resolution mass maps of a low-z cluster to date and is the first step in a larger effort to characterize the redshift evolution of mass substructures in clusters.

  11. Optical Substructures in 48 Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Fadda, D; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the presence of substructures in a set of 48 galaxy clusters, by using galaxy positions and redshifts. We use a multi-scale analysis which couples kinematical estimators with the wavelet transform. 14% of our clusters are strongly substructured (i.e. they are bimodal or complex) and 24% of the remaining unimodal clusters contain substructures at small scales. Thus, in substantial agreement with previous studies, about one third of clusters show substructures. In unimodal clusters the presence of substructures does not affect the estimates of both virial masses and velocity dispersions, which are generally in good agreement with the X-ray temperatures. Thus, unimodal clusters are not too far from a status of dynamical equilibrium. On the contrary, velocity dispersions and masses for some bimodal or complex clusters strongly depend on whether they are treated as single systems or as sums of different clumps and X-ray temperatures and velocity dispersions may be very different.

  12. Evolution variable dependence of jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaki, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Studies on jet substructure have evolved significantly in recent years. Jet substructure is essentially determined by QCD radiations and non-perturbative effects. Predictions of jet substructure are usually different among Monte Carlo event generators, and are governed by the parton shower algorithm implemented. For leading logarithmic parton shower, even though one of the core variables is the evolution variable, its choice is not unique. We examine evolution variable dependence of the jet substructure by developing a parton shower generator that interpolates between different evolution variables using a parameter $\\alpha$. Jet shape variables and associated jet rates for quark and gluon jets are used to demonstrate the $\\alpha$-dependence of the jet substructure. We find angular ordered shower predicts wider jets, while relative transverse momentum ($p_{\\bot}$) ordered shower predicts narrower jets. This is qualitatively in agreement with the missing phase space of $p_{\\bot}$ ordered showers. Such differenc...

  13. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XI. TEMPERATURES AND SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALACTIC CLUMPS BASED ON 350 μM OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merello, Manuel; Evans II, Neal J. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Astronomy, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, 4-181 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Ginsburg, Adam [European Southern Observatory, ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-95748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Bally, John [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Battersby, Cara; Dunham, Michael M., E-mail: manuel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present 107 maps of continuum emission at 350 μm from Galactic molecular clumps. Observed sources were mainly selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, with three additional maps covering star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy. The higher resolution of the SHARC-II images (8.″5 beam) compared with the 1.1 mm images from BGPS (33″ beam) allowed us to identify a large population of smaller substructures within the clumps. A catalog is presented for the 1386 sources extracted from the 350 μm maps. The color temperature distribution of clumps based on the two wavelengths has a median of 13.3 K and mean of 16.3 ± 0.4 K, assuming an opacity law index of 1.7. For the structures with good determination of color temperatures, the mean ratio of gas temperature, determined from NH{sub 3} observations, to dust color temperature is 0.88 and the median ratio is 0.76. About half the clumps have more than 2 substructures and 22 clumps have more than 10. The fraction of the mass in dense substructures seen at 350 μm compared to the mass of their parental clump is ∼0.19, and the surface densities of these substructures are, on average, 2.2 times those seen in the clumps identified at 1.1 mm. For a well-characterized sample, 88 structures (31%) exceed a surface density of 0.2 g cm{sup −2}, and 18 (6%) exceed 1.0 g cm{sup −2}, thresholds for massive star formation suggested by theorists.

  14. Type Classes for Lightweight Substructural Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Linear and substructural types are powerful tools, but adding them to standard functional programming languages often means introducing extra annotations and typing machinery. We propose a lightweight substructural type system design that recasts the structural rules of weakening and contraction as type classes; we demonstrate this design in a prototype language, Clamp. Clamp supports polymorphic substructural types as well as an expressive system of mutable references. At the same time, it adds little additional overhead to a standard Damas-Hindley-Milner type system enriched with type classes. We have established type safety for the core model and implemented a type checker with type inference in Haskell.

  15. Chemical substructure search in SQL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Adel; Henrick, Kim

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel technique for a fast chemical substructure search on a relational database by use of a standard SQL query. The symmetry of a query graph is analyzed to give additional constraints. Our method is based on breadth-first search (BFS) algorithms implementation using Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS). In addition to the chemical search we apply our technique to the field of intermolecular interactions which involves nonplanar graphs and describe how to achieve linear time performance along with the suggestion on how to sufficiently reduce the linear coefficient. From the algorithms theory perspective these results mean that subgraph isomorphism is a polynomial time problem, hence equal problems have the same complexity. The application to subgraph isomorphism in chemical search is available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd-srv/chemsearch and http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd-srv/msdmotif/chem . The application to the network of molecule interactions is available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd-srv/msdmotif .

  16. Algebraic sub-structuring for electromagnetic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chao; Gao, Weiguo; Bai, Zhaojun; Li, Xiaoye; Lee, Lie-Quan; Husbands, Parry; Ng, Esmond G.

    2004-09-14

    Algebraic sub-structuring refers to the process of applying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a large sparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectral components are extracted and combined to form approximate solutions to the original problem. In this paper, we show that algebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve generalized eigenvalue problems arising from the finite element analysis of an accelerator structure.

  17. Algebraic Sub-Structuring for Electromagnetic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.G.; Bai, Z.J.; Li, X.Y.S.; Lee, L.Q.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Davis /SLAC

    2006-06-30

    Algebraic sub-structuring refers to the process of applying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a large sparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectral components are extracted and combined to form approximate solutions to the original problem. In this paper, they show that algebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve generalized eigenvalue problems arising from the finite element analysis of an accelerator structure.

  18. A structural design decomposition method utilizing substructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    A new method of design decomposition for structural analysis and optimization is described. For this method, the structure is divided into substructures where each substructure has its structural response described by a structural-response subproblem, and its structural sizing determined from a structural-sizing subproblem. The structural responses of substructures that have rigid body modes when separated from the remainder of the structure are further decomposed into displacements that have no rigid body components, and a set of rigid body modes. The structural-response subproblems are linked together through forces determined within a structural-sizing coordination subproblem which also determines the magnitude of any rigid body displacements. Structural-sizing subproblems having constraints local to the substructures are linked together through penalty terms that are determined by a structural-sizing coordination subproblem. All the substructure structural-response subproblems are totally decoupled from each other, as are all the substructure structural-sizing subproblems, thus there is significant potential for use of parallel solution methods for these subproblems.

  19. Lateral cephalometric diagnosis of asymmetry in Angle Class II subdivision compared to Class I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida Fernanda Meloti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Lateral cephalometric radiographs are traditionally required for orthodontic treatment, yet rarely used to assess asymmetries. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to use lateral cephalometric radiographs to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in Class II subdivision and to compare them with the existing morphology in Class I and II relationship. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety initial lateral cephalometric radiographs of male and female Brazilian children aged between 12 to 15 years old were randomly and proportionally divided into three groups: Group 1 (Class I, Group 2 (Class II and Group 3 (Class II subdivision. Analysis of lateral cephalometric radiographs included angular measurements, horizontal linear measurements and two indexes of asymmetry that were prepared for this study. RESULTS: In accordance with an Index of Dental Asymmetry (IDA, greater mandibular dental asymmetry was identified in Group 3. An Index of Mandibular Asymmetry (IMA revealed less skeletal and dental mandibular asymmetry in Group 2, greater skeletal mandibular asymmetry in Group 1, and greater mandibular dental asymmetry in Group 3. CONCLUSION: Both IDA and IMA revealed greater mandibular dental asymmetry for Group 3 in comparison to Groups 1 and 2. These results are in accordance with those found by other diagnostic methods, showing that lateral cephalometric radiography is an acceptable method to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in malocclusions.

  20. Inspection of Asian Lacquer Substructures by Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Fukunaga, Kaori; Kohzuma, Yoshei; Kiriyama, Kyoko; Matsuda, Kazutaka; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2017-04-01

    Lacquering is considered one of the most representative Asian artistic techniques. While the decorative part of lacquerwares is the lacquer itself, their substructures serve as the backbone of the object itself. Very little is known about these hidden substructures. Since lacquerwares are mostly composed of organic materials, such as urushi, wood, carbon black, and fabrics which are very X-ray transparent, standard X-ray radiography has some problems in achieving clear X-ray radiographic images. Therefore, we wanted to contribute to the understanding of the lacquer manufacturing technique by inspecting the substructures of Asian lacquerwares by means of THz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Three different kinds of Asian lacquerwares were examined by THz-TDI, and the outcomes have been compared with those obtained by standard X-radiography. THz-TDI provides unique information on lacquerwares substructures, aiding in the comprehension of the manufacturing technology yielding to these precious artefacts.

  1. Abell 2744: Too much substructure for Lambda CDM?

    CERN Document Server

    Schwinn, J; Baugh, C M; Bartelmann, M; Eckert, D; Harvey, D; Natarajan, P; Massey, R

    2016-01-01

    The massive substructures found in Abell 2744 by Jauzac et al. (2016) present a challenge to the cold dark matter paradigm due to their number and proximity to the cluster centre. We use one of the biggest N-body simulations, the Millennium XXL, to investigate the substructure in a large sample of massive dark matter haloes. A range of effects which influence the comparison with the observations is considered, extending the preliminary evaluation carried out by Jauzac et al. (2016). There are many tens of haloes in the simulation with a total mass comparable with or larger than that of Abell 2744. However, we find no haloes with a number and distribution of massive substructures (> 5 10^13 Msun) that is close to that inferred from the observations of Abell 2744. The application of extreme value statistics suggests that we would need a simulation of at least ten times the volume of the Millennium XXL to find a single dark matter halo with a similar internal structure to Abell 2744. Explaining the distribution ...

  2. The Singular Behavior of Jet Substructure Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Jet substructure observables play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider for identifying the boosted hadronic decay products of electroweak scale resonances. The complete description of these observables requires understanding both the limit in which hard substructure is resolved, as well as the limit of a jet with a single hard core. In this paper we study in detail the perturbative structure of two prominent jet substructure observables, $N$-subjettiness and the energy correlation functions, as measured on background QCD jets. In particular, we focus on the distinction between the limits in which two-prong structure is resolved or unresolved. Depending on the choice of subjet axes, we demonstrate that at fixed order, $N$-subjettiness can manifest myriad behaviors in the unresolved region: smooth tails, end-point singularities, or singularities in the physical region. The energy correlation functions, by contrast, only have non-singular perturbative tails extending to the end point. We discuss the effec...

  3. THE UNORTHODOX ORBITS OF SUBSTRUCTURE HALOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludlow, Aaron D.; Navarro, Julio F.; Springel, Volker; Jenkins, Adrian; Frenk, Carlos S.; Helmi, Amina

    2009-01-01

    We use a suite of cosmological N-body simulations to study the properties of substructure halos (subhalos) in galaxy-sized cold dark matter halos. We extend prior work on the subject by considering the whole population of subhalos physically associated with the main system. These are defined as subh

  4. Halo Substructure Towards the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, Paul Martin; Martin, Charles; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Shelton, Siddartha; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Willett, Benjamin A.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the velocity substructure of blue horizontal branch stars in Data Release 10 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, particularly in the regions of the Hermus Stream, the Hyllus Stream, and the Hercules-Aquila Cloud. These stars are concentrated at lower latitudes (b Research.

  5. MAPPING THE GALACTIC HALO. VIII. QUANTIFYING SUBSTRUCTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Morrison, Heather L.; Harding, Paul; van Woerden, Hugo; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Frey, Lucy; Oravetz, Dan

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the amount of kinematic substructure in the Galactic halo using the final data set from the Spaghetti project, a pencil-beam high-latitude sky survey. Our sample contains 101 photometrically selected and spectroscopically confirmed giants with accurate distance, radial velocity, and

  6. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fofanov Viacheslav Y

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. Results This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs. SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. Conclusions FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated

  7. Boosted objects and jet substructure at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Altheimer, A.; Asquith, L.; Backus Mayes, J.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, J.; Bjergaard, D.; Bryngemark, L.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.; Cacciari, M.; Campanelli, M.; Carli, T.; Chala, M.; Chen, C.; Chou, J.P.; Cornelissen, Th.; Curtin, D.; Dasgupta, M.; Davison, A.; De Almeida Dias, F.; De Cosa, A.; De Roeck, A.; Debenedetti, C.; Doglioni, C.; Ellis, S.D.; Fassi, F.; Ferrando, J.; Fleischmann, S.; Freytsis, M.; Gonzalez Silva, M.L.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Guescini, F.; Han, Z.; Hook, A.; Hornig, A.; Izaguirre, E.; Jankowiak, M.; Juknevich, J.; Kaci, M.; Kar, D.; Kasieczka, G.; Kogler, R.; Larkoski, A.; Loch, P.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Marzani, S.; Masetti, L.; Mateu, V.; Miller, D.W.; Mishra, K.; Nef, P.; Nordstrom, K.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Penwell, J.; Pilot, J.; Plehn, T.; Rappoccio, S.; Rizzi, A.; Rodrigo, G.; Safonov, A.; Salam, G.P.; Salt, J.; Schaetzel, S.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidt, A.; Scholtz, J.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwartz, M.; Segala, M.; Son, M.; Soyez, G.; Spannowsky, M.; Stewart, I.; Strom, D.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Takeuchi, M.; Thaler, J.; Thompson, E.; Tran, N.V.; Vermilion, C.; Villaplana, M.; Vos, M.; Wacker, J.; Walsh, J.

    2014-01-01

    This report of the BOOST2012 workshop presents the results of four working groups that studied key aspects of jet substructure. We discuss the potential of the description of jet substructure in first-principle QCD calculations and study the accuracy of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo tools. Experimental limitations of the ability to resolve substructure are evaluated, with a focus on the impact of additional proton proton collisions on jet substructure performance in future LHC operating scenarios. A final section summarizes the lessons learnt during the deployment of substructure analyses in searches for new physics in the production of boosted top quarks.

  8. THE ORIGIN OF THE VIRGO STELLAR SUBSTRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yam, William; Willett, Benjamin A.; Newberg, Heidi J. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Majewski, Steven R., E-mail: carlij@rpi.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2012-07-10

    We present three-dimensional space velocities of stars selected to be consistent with membership in the Virgo stellar substructure. Candidates were selected from SA 103, a single 40' Multiplication-Sign 40' field from our proper-motion (PM) survey in Kapteyn's Selected Areas (SAs), based on the PMs, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry, and follow-up spectroscopy of 215 stars. The signature of the Virgo substructure is clear in the SDSS color-magnitude diagram (CMD) centered on SA 103, and 16 stars are identified that have high Galactocentric-frame radial velocities (V{sub GSR} > 50 km s{sup -1}) and lie near the CMD locus of Virgo. The implied distance to the Virgo substructure from the candidates is 14 {+-} 3 kpc. We derive mean kinematics from these 16 stars, finding a radial velocity V{sub GSR} = 153 {+-} 22 km s{sup -1} and proper motions ({mu}{sub {alpha}}cos {delta}, {mu}{sub {delta}}) = (- 5.24, -0.91) {+-} (0.43, 0.46) mas yr{sup -1}. From the mean kinematics of these members, we determine that the Virgo progenitor was on an eccentric (e {approx} 0.8) orbit that recently passed near the Galactic center (pericentric distance R{sub p} {approx} 6 kpc). This destructive orbit is consistent with the idea that the substructure(s) in Virgo originated in the tidal disruption of a Milky Way satellite. N-body simulations suggest that the entire cloud-like Virgo substructure (encompassing the 'Virgo Overdensity' and the 'Virgo Stellar Stream') is likely the tidal debris remnant from a recently disrupted massive ({approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) dwarf galaxy. The model also suggests that some other known stellar overdensities in the Milky Way halo (e.g., the Pisces Overdensity and debris near NGC 2419 and SEGUE 1) are explained by the disruption of the Virgo progenitor.

  9. Removal of Pb(II) and Zn(II) from Aqueous Solutions by Raw Crab Shell: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuanqiang; Gong, Xiangxiang; Han, Jie; Guo, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Removals of Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions from water using crab (Clistocoeloma sinensis) shell particles as biosorbent have been compared in this study. Uptake equilibriums for two ions well described by Langmuir isotherm revealed that crab shell possessed higher uptake capacity for Pb(II) (709 mg/g) than that for Zn(II) (117 mg/g). Kinetics data for the uptake of the two metals were successfully modeled using the pseudo-second-order model, where the initial uptake rate of Pb(II) was much faster than that of Zn(II). Dubinin-Radushkevick modeling and thermodynamic parameters hinted at different uptake mechanisms of Pb(II) and Zn(II) removal by crab shell, attested by FTIR, XRD, FESEM analysis. Pb(II) ion was removed mainly through the chemical reaction, while the uptake of Zn(II) ion onto crab shell was attributed to the chelation and coordination interactions. The polluted river water and laboratory wastewater both satisfied the standards for drinking and irrigation/fishery water, respectively, after being treated with crab shell particles.

  10. An online substructure identification method for local structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jilin; Jankowski, Łukasz; Ou, Jinping

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a substructure isolation method, which uses time series of measured local response for online monitoring of substructures. The proposed monitoring process consists of two key steps: construction of the isolated substructure, and its identification. The isolated substructure is an independent virtual structure, which is numerically isolated from the global structure by placing virtual supports on the interface. First, the isolated substructure is constructed by a specific linear combination of time series of its measured local responses. Then, the isolated substructure is identified using its local natural frequencies extracted from the combined responses. The substructure is assumed to be linear; the outside part of the global structure can have any characteristics. The method has no requirements on the initial state of the structure, and so the process can be carried out repetitively for online monitoring. Online isolation and monitoring is illustrated in a numerical example with a frame model, and then verified in a cantilever beam experiment.

  11. Biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions using mushrooms: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimala, R., E-mail: vimararagu@yahoo.co.in [School of Biotechnology, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Das, Nilanjana [School of Biotechnology, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2009-08-30

    Sorption capacity of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus platypus), button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and milky mushroom (Calocybe indica) were evaluated on biosorption of heavy metals, viz. cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions. The optimum sorption conditions were studied for each metal separately. The desired pH of the aqueous solution was found to be 6.0 for the removal of cadmium (II) and 5.0 for removal of lead (II) for all the mushrooms. The percent removal of both the metals was found to increase with the increase in biosorbent dosage and contact time. The fitness of the biosorption data for Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models was investigated. It was found that biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions onto the biomass of the three mushrooms were better suitable to Langmuir than Freundlich adsorption model. P. platypus showed the highest metal uptake potential for cadmium (q{sub max} 34.96 mg/g) whereas A. bisporus exhibited maximum potential for lead (q{sub max} 33.78 mg/g). Milky mushroom showed the lowest metal uptake capacity for both the metals. The present data confirms that mushrooms may be used as efficient biosorbent for the removal of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions from aqueous solution.

  12. Biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions using mushrooms: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimala, R; Das, Nilanjana

    2009-08-30

    Sorption capacity of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus platypus), button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and milky mushroom (Calocybe indica) were evaluated on biosorption of heavy metals, viz. cadmium (II) and lead (II) from aqueous solutions. The optimum sorption conditions were studied for each metal separately. The desired pH of the aqueous solution was found to be 6.0 for the removal of cadmium (II) and 5.0 for removal of lead (II) for all the mushrooms. The percent removal of both the metals was found to increase with the increase in biosorbent dosage and contact time. The fitness of the biosorption data for Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models was investigated. It was found that biosorption of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions onto the biomass of the three mushrooms were better suitable to Langmuir than Freundlich adsorption model. P. platypus showed the highest metal uptake potential for cadmium (q(max) 34.96 mg/g) whereas A. bisporus exhibited maximum potential for lead (q(max) 33.78 mg/g). Milky mushroom showed the lowest metal uptake capacity for both the metals. The present data confirms that mushrooms may be used as efficient biosorbent for the removal of cadmium (II) and lead (II) ions from aqueous solution.

  13. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. XI. Temperatures and Substructure of Galactic Clumps Based on 350 micron Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Merello, Manuel; Shirley, Yancy L; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Dunham, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    We present 107 maps of continuum emission at 350 microns from Galactic molecular clumps. Observed sources were mainly selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, with 3 additional maps covering star forming regions in the outer Galaxy. The higher resolution of the SHARC-II images (8.5'' beam) compared with the 1.1 mm images from BGPS (33'' beam) allowed us to identify a large population of smaller substructures within the clumps. A catalog is presented for the 1386 sources extracted from the 350 micron maps. The color temperature distribution of clumps based on the two wavelengths has a median of 13.3 K and mean of 16.3 +- 0.4 K, assuming an opacity law index of 1.7. For the structures with the best determined color temperatures, the mean ratio of gas temperature, determined from NH3 observations, to dust color temperature is 0.88 and the median ratio is 0.76. About half the clumps have more than two substructures and 22 clumps have more than 10. The fraction of the mass in dense substruct...

  14. Tagging Partially Reconstructed Objects with Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Freytsis, Marat; Walsh, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    We present a new tagger which aims at identifying partially reconstructed objects, in which only some of the constituents are collected in a single jet. As an example, we focus on top decays in which either part of the hadronically decaying W or the b jet is soft or falls outside of the top jet cone. We construct an observable to identify remnant substructure from the decay and employ aggressive jet grooming to reject QCD backgrounds. The tagger is complementary to existing ones and works well in the intermediate boost regime where jet substructure techniques usually fail. It is anticipated that a similar tagger can be used to identify non-QCD hadronic jets, such as those expected from hidden valleys.

  15. Preservation under Substructures modulo Bounded Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Sankaran, Abhisekh; Madan, Vivek; Kamath, Pritish; Chakraborty, Supratik

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a model-theoretic property that generalizes the classical notion of "preservation under substructures". We call this property \\emph{preservation under substructures modulo bounded cores}, and present a syntactic characterization via $\\Sigma_2^0$ sentences for properties of arbitrary structures definable by FO sentences. Towards a sharper characterization, we conjecture that the count of existential quantifiers in the $\\Sigma_2^0$ sentence equals the size of the smallest bounded core. While we do not have a proof of the conjecture yet, we show that it holds for special fragments of FO and also over special classes of structures. We present a (not FO-definable) class of finite structures for which the conjecture fails, but for which the classical {\\L}o\\'s-Tarski preservation theorem holds. As a fallout of our studies, we have obtained combinatorial proofs of the {\\L}o\\'s-Tarski theorem for some of the aforementioned cases.

  16. Towards an understanding of jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Marzani, Simone; Salam, Gavin P

    2013-01-01

    We present first analytic, resummed calculations of the rates at which widespread jet substructure tools tag QCD jets. As well as considering trimming, pruning and the mass-drop tagger, we introduce modified tools with improved analytical and phenomenological behaviours. Most taggers have double logarithmic resummed structures. The modified mass-drop tagger is special in that it involves only single logarithms, and is free from a complex class of terms known as non-global logarithms. The modification of pruning brings an improved ability to discriminate between the different colour structures that characterise signal and background. As we outline in an extensive phenomenological discussion, these results provide valuable insight into the performance of existing tools and help lay robust foundations for future substructure studies.

  17. Jacket Substructure Fatigue Mitigation through Active Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanis, Tomas; Natarajan, Anand

    2014-01-01

    As offshore wind farms are being installed farther and in deeper waters offshore, new, and more sophisticated marine substructures such as jackets need to be used. Herein, a 10MW wind turbine mounted on a jacket sub structure at a mean water depth of 50 meters is investigated with regards...... to the fatigue design loads on the braces of the jacket. Since large wind turbines of 10MW rating have low rotor speeds (p), the modal frequencies of the sub structures approach 3p at low wind speeds, which leads to a modal coupling and resonance. Therefore an active control system is developed which provides...... sufficient structural damping and consequently a fatigue reduction at the substructure. The resulting reduction in fatigue design loads on the jacket structure based on the active control system is presented....

  18. Smart variations: Functional substructures for part compatibility

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Youyi

    2013-05-01

    As collections of 3D models continue to grow, reusing model parts allows generation of novel model variations. Naïvely swapping parts across models, however, leads to implausible results, especially when mixing parts across different model families. Hence, the user has to manually ensure that the final model remains functionally valid. We claim that certain symmetric functional arrangements (sFarr-s), which are special arrangements among symmetrically related substructures, bear close relation to object functions. Hence, we propose a purely geometric approach based on such substructures to match, replace, and position triplets of parts to create non-trivial, yet functionally plausible, model variations. We demonstrate that starting even from a small set of models such a simple geometric approach can produce a diverse set of non-trivial and plausible model variations. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Extreme Brightness Temperatures and Refractive Substructure in 3C273 with RadioAstron

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael D; Gwinn, Carl R; Gurvits, Leonid I; Narayan, Ramesh; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Jauncey, David L; Voitsik, Peter A; Anderson, James M; Sokolovsky, Kirill V; Lisakov, Mikhail M

    2016-01-01

    Earth-space interferometry with RadioAstron provides the highest direct angular resolution ever achieved in astronomy at any wavelength. RadioAstron detections of the classic quasar 3C273 on interferometric baselines up to 171,000 km suggest brightness temperatures exceeding expected limits from the "inverse-Compton catastrophe" by two orders of magnitude. We show that at 18 cm, these estimates most probably arise from refractive substructure introduced by scattering in the interstellar medium. We use the scattering properties to estimate an intrinsic brightness temperature of 7*10^12 K, which is consistent with expected theoretical limits, but which is ~15 times lower than estimates that neglect substructure. At 6 cm, the substructure influences the measured values appreciably but gives an estimated brightness temperature that is comparable to models that do not account for the substructure. At 1.3 cm, the substructure does not affect the extremely high inferred brightness temperatures, in excess of 10^13 K....

  20. Identifying a new particle with jet substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Sung Hak; Kim, Doojin; Kim, Minho; Kong, Kyoungchul; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a potential of measuring properties of a heavy resonance X, exploiting jet substructure techniques. Motivated by heavy higgs boson searches, we focus on the decays of X into a pair of (massive) electroweak gauge bosons. More specifically, we consider a hadronic Z boson, which makes it possible to determine properties of X at an earlier stage. For $m_X$ of O(1) TeV, two quarks from a Z boson would be captured as a "merged jet" in a significant fraction of events. The use of the merged jet enables us to consider a Z-induced jet as a reconstructed object without any combinatorial ambiguity. We apply a conventional jet substructure method to extract four-momenta of subjets from a merged jet. We find that jet substructure procedures may enhance features in some kinematic observables formed with subjets. Subjet momenta are fed into the matrix element associated with a given hypothesis on the nature of X, which is further processed to construct a matrix element method (MEM)-based observable. For both ...

  1. Identifying a new particle with jet substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Sung Hak; Kim, Doojin; Kim, Minho; Kong, Kyoungchul; Park, Myeonghun

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a potential of measuring properties of a heavy resonance X, exploiting jet substructure techniques. Motivated by heavy higgs boson searches, we focus on the decays of X into a pair of (massive) electroweak gauge bosons. More specifically, we consider a hadronic Z boson, which makes it possible to determine properties of X at an earlier stage. For $m_X$ of O(1) TeV, two quarks from a Z boson would be captured as a "merged jet" in a significant fraction of events. The use of the merged jet enables us to consider a Z-induced jet as a reconstructed object without any combinatorial ambiguity. We apply a conventional jet substructure method to extract four-momenta of subjets from a merged jet. We find that jet substructure procedures may enhance features in some kinematic observables formed with subjets. Subjet momenta are fed into the matrix element associated with a given hypothesis on the nature of X, which is further processed to construct a matrix element method (MEM)-based observable. For both ...

  2. Identifying a new particle with jet substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Sung Hak; Kim, Doojin; Kim, Minho; Kong, Kyoungchul; Park, Myeonghun

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a potential of measuring properties of a heavy resonance X, exploiting jet substructure techniques. Motivated by heavy higgs boson searches, we focus on the decays of X into a pair of (massive) electroweak gauge bosons. More specifically, we consider a hadronic Z boson, which makes it possible to determine properties of X at an earlier stage. For $m_X$ of O(1) TeV, two quarks from a Z boson would be captured as a "merged jet" in a significant fraction of events. The use of the merged jet enables us to consider a Z-induced jet as a reconstructed object without any combinatorial ambiguity. We apply a conventional jet substructure method to extract four-momenta of subjets from a merged jet. We find that jet substructure procedures may enhance features in some kinematic observables formed with subjets. Subjet momenta are fed into the matrix element associated with a given hypothesis on the nature of X, which is further processed to construct a matrix element method (MEM)-based observable. For both ...

  3. Simulations of Strong Gravitational Lensing with Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Amara, A; Cox, T J; Ostriker, J P; Amara, Adam; Cox, Thomas J.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2004-01-01

    Galactic sized gravitational lenses are simulated by combining a cosmological N-body simulation and models for the baryonic component of the galaxy. The lens caustics, critical curves, image locations and magnification ratios are calculated by ray-shooting on an adaptive grid. It is found that the simulations do not cause the observed number of violations of the cusp caustic magnification relation. A part of this may be due to an insufficient amount of substructure but even for unsmoothed simulations (with maximal substructure) the factor of three increase in the number of violations still did not match the data. This suggests that other factors play an important role. These may include lensing by structure outside the halo, selection bias and the possibility that a randomly selected galaxy halo may be more irregular, for example due to recent mergers, than the isolated halo used in this study. It is also shown that, with the computed level of substructure, the image magnifications of the Einstein cross type ...

  4. The Origin of the Virgo Stellar Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Carlin, Jeffrey L; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I; Willett, Benjamin A; Newberg, Heidi J; Majewski, Steven R; Girard, Terrence M

    2012-01-01

    We present three-dimensional space velocities of stars selected to be consistent with membership in the Virgo stellar substructure. Candidates were selected from SA 103, a single 40x40 arcmin field from our proper motion (PM) survey in Kapteyn's Selected Areas (SAs), based on the PMs, SDSS photometry, and follow-up spectroscopy of 215 stars. The signature of the Virgo substructure is clear in the SDSS color-magnitude diagram (CMD) centered on SA 103, and 16 stars are identified that have high Galactocentric-frame radial velocities (V_GSR > 50 km/s) and lie near the CMD locus of Virgo. The implied distance to the Virgo substructure from the candidates is 14+/-3 kpc. We derive mean kinematics from these 16 stars, finding a radial velocity V_GSR = 153+/-22 km/s and proper motions (mu_alpha*cos(delta), mu_delta) = (-5.24, -0.91)+/-(0.43, 0.46) mas/yr. From the mean kinematics of these members, we determine that the Virgo progenitor was on an eccentric (e ~ 0.8) orbit that recently passed near the Galactic center ...

  5. Composite Octet Searches with Jet Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yang; /SLAC; Shelton, Jessie; /Yale U.

    2012-02-14

    Many new physics models with strongly interacting sectors predict a mass hierarchy between the lightest vector meson and the lightest pseudoscalar mesons. We examine the power of jet substructure tools to extend the 7 TeV LHC sensitivity to these new states for the case of QCD octet mesons, considering both two gluon and two b-jet decay modes for the pseudoscalar mesons. We develop both a simple dijet search using only the jet mass and a more sophisticated jet substructure analysis, both of which can discover the composite octets in a dijet-like signature. The reach depends on the mass hierarchy between the vector and pseudoscalar mesons. We find that for the pseudoscalar-to-vector meson mass ratio below approximately 0.2 the simple jet mass analysis provides the best discovery limit; for a ratio between 0.2 and the QCD-like value of 0.3, the sophisticated jet substructure analysis has the best discovery potential; for a ratio above approximately 0.3, the standard four-jet analysis is more suitable.

  6. Four methods compared for measuring des-carboxy-prothrombin (PIVKA-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdershoven, J; van Munster, P; De Abreu, R; Bosman, H; van Lith, T; van der Putten-van Meyel, M; Motohara, K; Matsuda, I

    1987-11-01

    PIVKA-II (Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence) is abnormal des-carboxylated prothrombin, which is present in vitamin K deficiency or in patients using warfarin. With a sensitive method for PIVKA-II, biochemical vitamin K deficiency can be established before clinical symptoms occur. We give an overview of methods used to detect PIVKA-II, and four selected methods are inter-compared: (a) measuring total factor II including PIVKA-II by using Echis carinatus snake venom as an activator of prothrombin; (b) measuring PIVKA-II by using snake venom as an activator of factor II after adsorption of functional factor II onto barium sulfate; (c) electrophoresis-immunofixation method; and (d) enzyme immunoassay. We found d to be the most sensitive and reliable method for PIVKA-II.

  7. Exploring triad-rich substructures by graph-theoretic characterizations in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Songwei; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong; Nastos, James; Wen, Xiao; Zhang, Xindong; Wang, Haiyang

    2017-02-01

    One of the most important problems in complex networks is how to detect communities accurately. The main challenge lies in the fact that traditional definition about communities does not always capture the intrinsic features of communities. Motivated by the observation that communities in PPI networks tend to consist of an abundance of interacting triad motifs, we define a 2-club substructure with diameter 2 possessing triad-rich property to describe a community. Based on the triad-rich substructure, we design a DIVision Algorithm using our proposed edge Niche Centrality DIVANC to detect communities effectively in complex networks. We also extend DIVANC to detect overlapping communities by proposing a simple 2-hop overlapping strategy. To verify the effectiveness of triad-rich substructures, we compare DIVANC with existing algorithms on PPI networks, LFR synthetic networks and football networks. The experimental results show that DIVANC outperforms most other algorithms significantly and, in particular, can detect sparse communities.

  8. Exploring triad-rich substructures by graph-theoretic characterizations in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Songwei; Gao, Yong; Nastos, James; Wen, Xiao; Zhang, Xindong; Wang, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important problems in complex networks is how to detect metadata groups accurately. The main challenge lies in the fact that traditional structural communities do not always capture the intrinsic features of metadata groups. Motivated by the observation that metadata groups in PPI networks tend to consist of an abundance of interacting triad motifs, we define a 2-club substructure with diameter 2 which possessing triad-rich property to describe a metadata group. Based on the triad-rich substructure, we design a DIVision Algorithm using our proposed edge Niche Centrality DIVANC to detect metadata groups effectively in complex networks. We also extend DIVANC to detect overlapping metadata groups by proposing a simple 2-hop overlapping strategy. To verify the effectiveness of triad-rich substructures, we compare DIVANC with existing algorithms on PPI networks, LFR synthetic networks and football networks. The experimental results show that DIVANC outperforms most other algorithms significantly an...

  9. Shaken and stirred: the Milky Way's dark substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawala, Till; Pihajoki, Pauli; Johansson, Peter H.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Navarro, Julio F.; Oman, Kyle A.; White, Simon D. M.

    2017-06-01

    The predicted abundance and properties of the low-mass substructures embedded inside larger dark matter haloes differ sharply among alternative dark matter models. Too small to host galaxies themselves, these subhaloes may still be detected via gravitational lensing or via perturbations of the Milky Way's globular cluster streams and its stellar disc. Here, we use the Apostle cosmological simulations to predict the abundance and the spatial and velocity distributions of subhaloes in the range 106.5-108.5 M⊙ inside haloes of mass ˜1012 M⊙ in Λ cold dark matter. Although these subhaloes are themselves devoid of baryons, we find that baryonic effects are important. Compared to corresponding dark matter only simulations, the loss of baryons from subhaloes and stronger tidal disruption due to the presence of baryons near the centre of the main halo reduce the number of subhaloes by ˜1/4 to 1/2, independently of subhalo mass, but increasingly towards the host halo centre. We also find that subhaloes have non-Maxwellian orbital velocity distributions, with centrally rising velocity anisotropy and positive velocity bias that reduces the number of low-velocity subhaloes, particularly near the halo centre. We parametrize the predicted population of subhaloes in terms of mass, galactocentric distance and velocities. We discuss implications of our results for the prospects of detecting dark matter substructures and for possible inferences about the nature of dark matter.

  10. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement of Aerospace Carbon Fiber Composites: Substructural Strength Evaluation for Aerostructure Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Ydrefors, L.; Hallander, P.; Ishiguro, Kyoko; Nordin, P.; Wardle, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are placed between all plies in an aerospace carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminate (unidirectional plies, [(0/90/±45)2]s) to reinforce the interlaminar region in the z-direction. Significant improvement in Mode I and II interlaminar toughness have been observed previously. In this work, several substructural in-plane strength tests relevant to aerostructures were undertaken: bolt/tension-bearing, open hole compression, and L-shape laminate be...

  11. Structural integrity of Offshore Wind Power Substructures

    OpenAIRE

    Imafidon, Oliver Osazee

    2010-01-01

    Offshore wind turbine structures are now being developed in relatively deep waters with the purpose of capturing and utilizing the strong winds at sea. The structures must be robust in order to resist extreme loads. To be competitive, a cost reduction in fabrication and installation of wind substructures is necessary and the use of high strength steel has been suggested as one way of achieving this through the design of light-weight structures.The thesis gives an overview of offshore wind tur...

  12. Comparative studies in Chelicerata II. Epimerata (Palpigradi and Actinotrichida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der L.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study is made of two groups of Chelicerata (Palpigradi and Actinotrichid mites, together constituting the Epimerata, a chelicerate class), and models of the evolution of epimerate characters are prepared. The study is based on the same methods and principles as the first part of the pr

  13. Substructurability: the effect of interface location on a real-time dynamic substructuring test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkovics, N.; Neild, S. A.; Lowenberg, M.; Szalai, R.; Krauskopf, B.

    2016-08-01

    A full-scale experimental test for large and complex structures is not always achievable. This can be due to many reasons, the most prominent one being the size limitations of the test. Real-time dynamic substructuring is a hybrid testing method where part of the system is modelled numerically and the rest of the system is kept as the physical test specimen. The numerical-physical parts are connected via actuators and sensors and the interface is controlled by advanced algorithms to ensure that the tested structure replicates the emulated system with sufficient accuracy. The main challenge in such a test is to overcome the dynamic effects of the actuator and associated controller, that inevitably introduce delay into the substructured system which, in turn, can destabilize the experiment. To date, most research concentrates on developing control strategies for stable recreation of the full system when the interface location is given a priori. Therefore, substructurability is mostly studied in terms of control. Here, we consider the interface location as a parameter and study its effect on the stability of the system in the presence of delay due to actuator dynamics and define substructurability as the system's tolerance to delay in terms of the different interface locations. It is shown that the interface location has a major effect on the tolerable delays in an experiment and, therefore, careful selection of it is necessary.

  14. Property Graph vs RDF Triple Store: A Comparison on Glycan Substructure Search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Alocci

    Full Text Available Resource description framework (RDF and Property Graph databases are emerging technologies that are used for storing graph-structured data. We compare these technologies through a molecular biology use case: glycan substructure search. Glycans are branched tree-like molecules composed of building blocks linked together by chemical bonds. The molecular structure of a glycan can be encoded into a direct acyclic graph where each node represents a building block and each edge serves as a chemical linkage between two building blocks. In this context, Graph databases are possible software solutions for storing glycan structures and Graph query languages, such as SPARQL and Cypher, can be used to perform a substructure search. Glycan substructure searching is an important feature for querying structure and experimental glycan databases and retrieving biologically meaningful data. This applies for example to identifying a region of the glycan recognised by a glycan binding protein (GBP. In this study, 19,404 glycan structures were selected from GlycomeDB (www.glycome-db.org and modelled for being stored into a RDF triple store and a Property Graph. We then performed two different sets of searches and compared the query response times and the results from both technologies to assess performance and accuracy. The two implementations produced the same results, but interestingly we noted a difference in the query response times. Qualitative measures such as portability were also used to define further criteria for choosing the technology adapted to solving glycan substructure search and other comparable issues.

  15. Property Graph vs RDF Triple Store: A Comparison on Glycan Substructure Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alocci, Davide; Mariethoz, Julien; Horlacher, Oliver; Bolleman, Jerven T; Campbell, Matthew P; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Resource description framework (RDF) and Property Graph databases are emerging technologies that are used for storing graph-structured data. We compare these technologies through a molecular biology use case: glycan substructure search. Glycans are branched tree-like molecules composed of building blocks linked together by chemical bonds. The molecular structure of a glycan can be encoded into a direct acyclic graph where each node represents a building block and each edge serves as a chemical linkage between two building blocks. In this context, Graph databases are possible software solutions for storing glycan structures and Graph query languages, such as SPARQL and Cypher, can be used to perform a substructure search. Glycan substructure searching is an important feature for querying structure and experimental glycan databases and retrieving biologically meaningful data. This applies for example to identifying a region of the glycan recognised by a glycan binding protein (GBP). In this study, 19,404 glycan structures were selected from GlycomeDB (www.glycome-db.org) and modelled for being stored into a RDF triple store and a Property Graph. We then performed two different sets of searches and compared the query response times and the results from both technologies to assess performance and accuracy. The two implementations produced the same results, but interestingly we noted a difference in the query response times. Qualitative measures such as portability were also used to define further criteria for choosing the technology adapted to solving glycan substructure search and other comparable issues.

  16. NVU dynamics. II. Comparing to four other dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S; Toxvaerd, Søren; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2011-09-14

    In the companion paper [T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, O. J. Heilmann, T. B. Schrøder, and J. C. Dyre, "NVU dynamics. I. Geodesic motion on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface," J. Chem. Phys. (in press)] an algorithm was developed for tracing out a geodesic curve on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface. Here, simulations of NVU dynamics are compared to results for four other dynamics, both deterministic and stochastic. First, NVU dynamics is compared to the standard energy-conserving Newtonian NVE dynamics by simulations of the Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones liquid, its WCA version (i.e., with cut-off's at the pair potential minima), and the Lennard-Jones Gaussian liquid. We find identical results for all quantities probed: radial distribution functions, incoherent intermediate scattering functions, and mean-square displacement as function of time. Arguments are presented for the equivalence of NVU and NVE dynamics in the thermodynamic limit; in particular, to leading order in 1∕N these two dynamics give identical time-autocorrelation functions. In the final part of the paper, NVU dynamics is compared to Monte Carlo dynamics, to a diffusive dynamics of small-step random walks on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface, and to Nosé-Hoover NVT dynamics. If time is scaled for the two stochastic dynamics to make single-particle diffusion constants identical to that of NVE dynamics, the simulations show that all five dynamics are equivalent at low temperatures except at short times.

  17. Early dynamical evolution of young substructured clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure, inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system. The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth and velocity inheritance. We introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a ''Hubble expansion'' which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. In depth analysis of the resulting clumps shows consistency with hydrodynamical simulations of young star clusters. We use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters. We find the collapse to be soft, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. The subsequent evolution is less pronounced than the equilibrium achieved from a cold collapse formation scenario.

  18. Identifying a New Particle with Jet Substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Chengcheng; Kim, Minho; Kong, Kyoungchul; Lim, Sung Hak; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a potential of determining properties of a new heavy resonance of mass $\\mathcal{O}(1)$ TeV which decays to collimated jets via heavy Standard Model intermediary states, exploiting jet substructure techniques. Employing the $Z$ gauge boson as a concrete example for the intermediary state, we utilize a ``merged jet'' defined by a large jet size to capture the two quarks from its decay. The use of the merged jet benefits the identification of a $Z$-induced jet as a single, reconstructed object without any combinatorial ambiguity. We find that jet substructure procedures may enhance features in some kinematic observables formed with subjet four-momenta extracted from a merged jet. This observation motivates us to feed subjet momenta into the matrix elements associated with plausible hypotheses on the nature of the heavy resonance, which are further processed to construct a matrix element method (MEM)-based observable. For both moderately and highly boosted $Z$ bosons, we demonstrate that the ME...

  19. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S

    2008-01-01

    We perform a set of high-resolution, dissipationless N-body simulations to investigate the influence of cold dark matter (CDM) substructure on the dynamical evolution of thin galactic disks. Our method combines cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized CDM halos to derive the properties of substructure populations and controlled numerical experiments of consecutive subhalo impacts onto initially-thin, fully-formed disk galaxies. We demonstrate that close encounters between massive subhalos and galactic disks since z~1 should be common occurrences in LCDM models. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. One typical host halo merger history is used to seed controlled N-body experiments of subhalo-disk encounters. As a result of these accretion events, the disk thickens considerably at all radii with the disk scale height increasing in excess of a factor of 2 in the solar neighborhood. We show that interactions with the subhalo p...

  20. Rape in World War II film: comparing narrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzadevych, Tetyana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to show how the filmmaker’s genre of choice shapes the main discourse of the film. The author compares Helke Sander’s documentary Liberators Take Liberties (1991-1992 and Max Farberbock’s narrative feature A Woman in Berlin (2008 both dealing with the dramatic effect of the end of WWII, in particular with the instances of German women having been raped by the Allied troops, a theme first publicized in the anonymous diary A Woman in Berlin (1953. There is a clear connection between the book and the two films, but if Sander focuses on the rape itself and on the extraordinary female experience of war, Farberbock is more concerned with cross-national revenge. The author looks closer at the genre elements, particularly at the genres of the diary, the (feminist documentary, and the narrative film. Then, the author draws some parallels between the Helke Sander film and the diary A Woman of Berlin and discusses the documentaries within the feminist framework inspired by Sander’s accomplishments.

  1. Comparative study of Passiflora taxa leaves: II. A chromatographic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luma Wosch

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Popularly known as passion fruit, some species of the genus Passiflora are widely used in folk medicines, such as sedatives and tranquilizers in many countries. Although these plants are employed for the same purposes, research with different species of Passiflora has indicated their heterogeneous chemical compositions. Since different chemical compositions can result in varying degrees of therapeutic efficiency, quality control based on the chemical constituents of each species is essential. To that end, the aim of this study was to compare pharmacognostically species of Passiflora in order to establish a chromatographic profile for the quality control of drugs in herbal medicines containing passion fruit. The study was conducted by collecting samples of leaves from twelve Passiflora taxa (i.e., ten species and two forms of P. edulis – P. actinia, P. alata, P. amethystina, P. capsularis, P. cincinnata, P. edulis f. flavicarpa, P. edulis f. edulis, P. incarnata, P. morifolia, P. urnifolia, P. coccinea, and P. setacea – from different locations and obtaining their chromatographic profiles via thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Both methods used the flavonoid C-glycosides isoorientin, orientin, vitexin, and isovitexin as reference compounds and could ultimately establish specific profiles for each species. The chromatographic analyses discussed here can be used to assist in determining the quality and authenticity of herbal drugs derived from Passiflora species.

  2. Safety Evaluation of a Hybrid Substructure for Offshore Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Su Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Towers and rotor-nacelles are being enlarged to respond to the need for higher gross generation of the wind turbines. However, the accompanying enlargement of the substructure supporting these larger offshore wind turbines makes it strongly influenced by the effect of wave forces. In the present study, the hybrid substructure is suggested to reduce the wave forces by composing a multicylinder having different radii near free surface and a gravity substructure at the bottom of the multicylinder. In addition, the reaction forces acting on the substructure due to the very large dead load of the offshore wind turbine require very firm foundations. This implies that the dynamic pile-soil interaction has to be fully considered. Therefore, ENSOFT Group V7.0 is used to calculate the stiffness matrices on the pile-soil interaction conditions. These matrices are then used together with the loads at TP (Transition Piece obtained from GH-Bladed for the structural analysis of the hybrid substructure by ANSYS ASAS. The structural strength and deformation are evaluated to derive an ultimate structural safety of the hybrid substructure for various soil conditions and show that the first few natural frequencies of the substructure are heavily influenced by the wind turbine. Therefore, modal analysis is carried out through GH-Bladed to examine the resonance between the wind turbine and the hybrid substructure.

  3. Lens Mapping of Dark Matter Substructure with VSOP-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, S.; Chiba, M.; Inoue, K. T.

    2009-08-01

    Hierarchical clustering models of cold dark matter (CDM) predict that about 5% - 10% of a galaxy-sized halo with mass ˜ 1012 solar masses (M⊙ ) resides in substructures (CDM subhalos) with masses ⪉ 108 M⊙. To directly identify such substructures, we propose to observe radio continuum emission from multiply imaged QSOs using VSOP-2 with a high angular resolution.

  4. A Consensus Tree Approach for Reconstructing Human Evolutionary History and Detecting Population Substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Chi; Blelloch, Guy; Ravi, R.; Schwartz, Russell

    The random accumulation of variations in the human genome over time implicitly encodes a history of how human populations have arisen, dispersed, and intermixed since we emerged as a species. Reconstructing that history is a challenging computational and statistical problem but has important applications both to basic research and to the discovery of genotype-phenotype correlations. In this study, we present a novel approach to inferring human evolutionary history from genetic variation data. Our approach uses the idea of consensus trees, a technique generally used to reconcile species trees from divergent gene trees, adapting it to the problem of finding the robust relationships within a set of intraspecies phylogenies derived from local regions of the genome. We assess the quality of the method on two large-scale genetic variation data sets: the HapMap Phase II and the Human Genome Diversity Project. Qualitative comparison to a consensus model of the evolution of modern human population groups shows that our inferences closely match our best current understanding of human evolutionary history. A further comparison with results of a leading method for the simpler problem of population substructure assignment verifies that our method provides comparable accuracy in identifying meaningful population subgroups in addition to inferring the relationships among them.

  5. Free-Interface Dual-Compatibility Modal Synthesis Substructure Method in Large-Scale Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Guihan彭桂瀚; Lin Wei林伟; Chen Shanghong陈尚鸿; Yu Jiexin余洁歆

    2015-01-01

    Free-interface dual-compatibility modal synthesis method(compatibility of both force and displacement on interfaces)is introduced to large-scale civil engineering structure to enhance computation efficiency. The basic equations of the method are first set up, and then the mode cut-off principle and the dividing principle are proposed. MATLAB is used for simulation in different frame structures. The simulation results demonstrate the applicability of this substructure method to civil engineering structures and the correctness of the proposed mode cut-off princi-ple. Studies are also conducted on how to divide the whole structure for better computation efficiency while main-taining better precision. It is observed that the geometry and material properties should be considered, and the syn-thesis results would be more precise when the inflection points of the mode shapes are taken into consideration. Furthermore, the simulation performed on a large-scale high-rise connected structure further proves the feasibility and efficiency of this modal synthesis method compared with the traditional global method. It is also concluded from the simulation results that the fewer number of DOFs in each substructure will result in better computation efficiency, but too many substructures will be time-consuming due to the tedious synthesis procedures. Moreover, the substructures with free interface will introduce errors and reduce the precision dramatically, which should be avoided.

  6. Factorization for substructures of boosted Higgs jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Joshua; Li, Hsiang-nan; Li, Zhao; Yuan, C.-P.

    2017-08-01

    We present a perturbative QCD factorization formula for substructures of an energetic Higgs jet, taking the energy profile resulting from the H → b b bar decay as an example. The formula is written as a convolution of a hard Higgs decay kernel with two b-quark jet functions and a soft function that links the colors of the two b quarks. We derive an analytical expression to approximate the energy profile within a boosted Higgs jet, which significantly differs from those of ordinary QCD jets. This formalism also extends to boosted W and Z bosons in their hadronic decay modes, allowing an easy and efficient discrimination of fat jets produced from different processes.

  7. The Unorthodox Orbits of Substructure Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Ludlow, Aaron D; Springel, Volker; Jenkins, Adrian; Frenk, Carlos S; Helmi, Amina

    2008-01-01

    We use numerical simulations to study the properties of substructure within galaxy-sized dark matter halos. Our study extends previous work by considering the whole population of subhalos physically associated with the main system; these are subhalos that have at some time been within the virial radius of the main progenitor and have survived as self-bound entities to z=0. We find that this population extends beyond three times the virial radius and contains objects on extreme orbits. We trace the origin of these unorthodox orbits to multiple-body interactions acting during the tidal dissociation of bound groups. Multiple-body interactions affect primarily low-mass subhalos and push them onto higher energy orbits, resulting in a strong mass-dependent bias in the spatial distribution and kinematics of associated subhalos: the lower the subhalo mass at accretion time, the less concentrated and kinematically hotter their descendant population. Our findings imply that subhalos identified within the virial radius ...

  8. Factorization for substructures of boosted Higgs jets

    CERN Document Server

    Isaacson, Joshua; Li, Zhao; Yuan, C -P

    2015-01-01

    We present a perturbative QCD factorization formula for substructures of an energetic Higgs jet, taking the energy profile resulting from the $H\\to b\\bar b$ decay as an example. The formula is written as a convolution of a hard Higgs decay kernel with two $b$-quark jet functions and a soft function that links the colors of the two $b$ quarks. We derive an analytical expression to approximate the energy profile within a boosted Higgs jet, which significantly differs from those of ordinary QCD jets. This formalism also extends to boosted $W$ and $Z$ bosons in their hadronic decay modes, allowing an easy and efficient discrimination of fat jets produced from different processes.

  9. Dynamics of 10 clusters of galaxies with substructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhchaura, Kiran; Singh, K. P., E-mail: kiran_astro@tifr.res.in [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2014-06-01

    We present a detailed Chandra study of a sample of 10 clusters of galaxies selected based on the presence of substructures in their optical images. The X-ray surface brightness maps of most of these clusters show anisotropic morphologies, especially in the central regions. A total of 22 well resolved significantly bright X-ray peaks (corresponding with high-density regions) are seen in the central parts (within r{sub c} /2) of the clusters. Multiple peaks are seen in central parts of six clusters. We found 11 peaks to have optical counterparts (10 coinciding with the brightest cluster galaxies of the 10 clusters and 1 coinciding with the second brightest galaxy in A539). For most of the clusters, the optical substructures detected in the previous studies are found to be outside the field of view of Chandra. In the spectroscopically produced two-dimensional temperature maps, significantly lower temperatures are seen at the locations of three peaks (two in A539 and one in A376). The centers of five clusters in our sample also host regions of higher temperature compared to the ambient medium, indicating the presence of galaxy scale mergers. The X-ray luminosity, gas mass, and central cooling time estimates for all the clusters are presented. The radial X-ray surface-brightness profiles of all but one of the clusters are found to be best-fitted with a double-β model, pointing toward the presence of double-phased central gas due to cool cores. The cooling time estimates of all the clusters, however, indicate that none of them hosts a strong cool core, although the possibility of weak cool cores cannot be ruled out.

  10. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  11. Cluster X-Ray Substructure and Radio Galaxy Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledlow, M. J.; Burns, J. O.

    1994-12-01

    Current wisdom suggests that X-ray substructure in the intracluster medium (ICM) is fairly common in galaxy clusters. This substructure takes the form of elongations, isophotal twisting, asymmetries, and sub-clumping. Substructure is also frequently present in kinematical analysis of the galaxy velocity and spatial distributions. These features include bimodality, kurtosis or skewness, and non-Gaussian velocity distributions. Consistent with the observations, Hydro/N-Body simulations suggest that cluster-subcluster mergers may be the culprit to explain these features in the ICM gas distribution, and would indicate that many clusters, even at the present epoch, are still undergoing significant dynamical evolution. From a sample of X-ray images from the Einstein satellite and, more recently, the ROSAT mission, Burns et al. (1994) found a significant correlation between the positions of radio galaxies and subclumps within the cluster-scale X-ray emission. Burns et al. have suggested that radio galaxies reside in the residue of cluster/sub-cluster merging sites, and may therefore act as pointers to clusters with ongoing and intersting dynamical activity. We are following up these ideas with a detailed substructure analysis, and a comparison to a sample of clusters without radio galaxies. In order to determine the signficance of substructure, we have reanalyzed the X-ray images using a Bootstrap-Resampling Monte-Carlo technique. In this method, asymmetries, elongations, and other forms of substructure are evaluated using a moment-analysis similar to M{o}hr et al. (1994), with the advantage that we need not assume apriori any specific substructure-free model for the source (\\ie\\ a Beta-model). The significance of individual features is determined solely from a comparison to statistical fluctuations (including noise) of the actual data. Using this technique, we place limits on the fraction of clusters with significant substructure and test the radio galaxy/substructure

  12. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  13. Substructuring by Lagrange multipliers for solids and plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandel, J.; Tezaur, R. [Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Farhat, C. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present principles and theoreretical foundation of a substructuring method for large structural problems. The algorithm is preconditioned conjugate gradients on a subspace for the dual problem. The preconditioning is proved asymptotically optimal and the method is shown to be parallel scalable, i.e., the condition number is bounded independently of the number of substructures. For plate problems, a special modification is needed that retains continuity of the displacement solution at substructure crosspoints, resulting in an asymptically optimal method. The results are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  14. Measuring the resistance of different substructure materials by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measuring the resistance of different substructure materials by sticking them to dentine with ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search ... Materials and Methods: In an in vitro study, 72 central upper front teeth were ...

  15. Measuring the resistance of different substructure materials by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-26

    May 26, 2015 ... cement (Panavia F 2.0 Light) and a self‑adhesive resin cement ... Resistance of substructure materials with two cements. 731 ..... is known to have several disadvantages like the increase .... There are no conflicts of interest.

  16. Substructures formation induced by gravitational tides?

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, F; Naab, T; Boily, C M

    2009-01-01

    Physics lectures always refer to the tides as a disruptive effect. However, tides can also be compressive. When the potential of two galaxies overlap, as happens during a merger, fully compressive tides can develop and have a strong impact on the dynamics of substructures such as star clusters or tidal dwarf galaxies. Using N-body simulations of a large set of mergers, we noticed the importance of these tidal modes at cluster scale. With a model of the Antennae galaxies, we conclude that the positions and timescales of these tidal modes match the actual distribution of young clusters. A detailed study of the statistics of the compressive tides shows a stunning correlation between this purely gravitational effect and the observed properties of the star clusters. In this contribution, we introduce the concept of compressive tide and show its relevance in the special case of the Antennae galaxies. We extend our conclusions to a broad range of parameters and discuss their implications on several critical points s...

  17. Signatures of LCDM substructure in tidal debris

    CERN Document Server

    Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, surveys of the stellar component of the Galaxy such as SDSS and 2MASS have revealed a number of stellar streams. Current and future observations are rapidly increasing the precision and quantity of data available, raising the possibility of using tidal streams to constrain the distribution of dark matter in the halo. Simulations of hierarchical structure formation in LCDM cosmologies predict that the dark matter halo of a galaxy like the Milky Way contains a smooth component as well as hundreds of subhalos with masses of ~10^8 solar masses and greater, and it has been suggested that the existence of coherent tidal streams is incompatible with the expected abundance of substructure. We investigate the properties of tidal streams arising from the disruption of satellites in a variety of dark matter halo models. In general, we find that the halo shape and the specific orbital path more strongly determine the degree of disruption of the satellite than does the presence or absence of substructu...

  18. Using Network Methodology to Infer Population Substructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Prokopenko

    Full Text Available One of the main caveats of association studies is the possible affection by bias due to population stratification. Existing methods rely on model-based approaches like structure and ADMIXTURE or on principal component analysis like EIGENSTRAT. Here we provide a novel visualization technique and describe the problem of population substructure from a graph-theoretical point of view. We group the sequenced individuals into triads, which depict the relational structure, on the basis of a predefined pairwise similarity measure. We then merge the triads into a network and apply community detection algorithms in order to identify homogeneous subgroups or communities, which can further be incorporated as covariates into logistic regression. We apply our method to populations from different continents in the 1000 Genomes Project and evaluate the type 1 error based on the empirical p-values. The application to 1000 Genomes data suggests that the network approach provides a very fine resolution of the underlying ancestral population structure. Besides we show in simulations, that in the presence of discrete population structures, our developed approach maintains the type 1 error more precisely than existing approaches.

  19. A new interface element for connecting independently modeled substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1993-01-01

    A new interface element based on the hybrid variational formulation is presented and demonstrated. The element provides a means of connecting independently modeled substructures whose nodes along the common boundary need not be coincident. The interface element extends previous work to include connecting an arbitrary number of substructures, the use of closed and generally curved interfaces, and the use of multiple, possibly nested, interfaces. Several applications of the element are presented and aspects of the implementation are discussed.

  20. Searches for new physics using jet grooming and substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Models predicting the production and decay of supersymmetric (SUSY) particles often have promising search channels involving decays through heavy intermediate states such as top quarks and heavy bosons. However, unlike in most exotics scenarios these heavy states are only moderately boosted which can make traditional substructure techniques less useful and motivates the development of alternative techniques. The results of several SUSY analyses using substructure techniques are presented.

  1. How well can cold-dark-matter substructures account for the observed radio flux-ratio anomalies?

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Dandan; Gao, Liang; Wang, Jie; Frenk, Carlos; Mao, Shude; Schneider, Peter; Springel, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Discrepancies between the observed and model-predicted radio flux ratios are seen in a number of quadruply-lensed quasars. The most favored interpretation of these anomalies is that CDM substructures present in lensing galaxies perturb the lens potentials and alter image magnifications and thus flux ratios. So far no consensus has emerged regarding whether or not the predicted CDM substructure abundance fully accounts for the lensing flux anomaly observations. Accurate modeling relies on a realistic lens sample in terms of both the lens environment and internal structures and substructures. In this paper we construct samples of generalised and specific lens potentials, to which we add (rescaled) subhalo populations from the galaxy-scale Aquarius and the cluster-scale Phoenix simulation suites. We further investigate the lensing effects from subhalos of masses several orders of magnitude below the simulation resolution limit. The resulting flux ratio distributions are compared to the currently best available s...

  2. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, H J; Zanichelli, A; Caballero, T; Bouillet, L; Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Fain, O; Fabien, V; Andresen, I

    2017-04-01

    Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1-INH-HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1-INH-AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1-INH-HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6-month intervals during patient follow-up visits. In the icatibant-treated population, 16 patients with C1-INH-AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33-64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70-15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1-INH-AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II versus C1-INH-AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P types I/II, respectively. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Development and Demonstration of a Magnesium-Intensive Vehicle Front-End Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Stephen D. [United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC, Southfield, MI (United States); Forsmark, Joy H. [United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC, Southfield, MI (United States); Osborne, Richard [United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC, Southfield, MI (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This project is the final phase (designated Phase III) of an extensive, nine-year effort with the objectives of developing a knowledge base and enabling technologies for the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of magnesium-intensive automotive front-end substructures intended to partially or completely replace all-steel comparators, providing a weight savings approaching 50% of the baseline. Benefits of extensive vehicle weight reduction in terms of fuel economy increase, extended vehicle range, vehicle performance and commensurate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are well known. An exemplary vehicle substructure considered by the project is illustrated in Figure 1, along with the exterior vehicle appearance. This unibody front-end “substructure” is one physical objective of the ultimate design and engineering aspects established at the outset of the larger collective effort.

  4. Fast and accurate protein substructure searching with simulated annealing and GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stivala Alex D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching a database of protein structures for matches to a query structure, or occurrences of a structural motif, is an important task in structural biology and bioinformatics. While there are many existing methods for structural similarity searching, faster and more accurate approaches are still required, and few current methods are capable of substructure (motif searching. Results We developed an improved heuristic for tableau-based protein structure and substructure searching using simulated annealing, that is as fast or faster and comparable in accuracy, with some widely used existing methods. Furthermore, we created a parallel implementation on a modern graphics processing unit (GPU. Conclusions The GPU implementation achieves up to 34 times speedup over the CPU implementation of tableau-based structure search with simulated annealing, making it one of the fastest available methods. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of a GPU to the protein structural search problem.

  5. New Constraints on the Complex Mass Substructure in Abell 1689 from Gravitational Flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Adrienne; Goldberg, David M

    2010-01-01

    In a recent publication, the flexion aperture mass statistic was found to provide a robust and effective method by which substructure in galaxy clusters might be mapped. Moreover, we suggested that constraints on the masses and mass profile of structures might be constrained using this method. In this paper, we apply the flexion aperture mass technique to HST ACS images of Abell 1689. We compare this measure to the weak lensing shear aperture mass statistic, and demonstrate that the flexion aperture mass statistic is more sensitive to structures on the scales considered, dramatically outperforming the shear aperture mass statistic on this dataset, which suffers from persistent systematic noise. While the central potential is not constrained by our method, due largely to missing data in the central 0.5$^\\prime$ of the cluster, we are able to place constraints on the masses and mass profiles of prominent substructures. Considering 16 flexion aperture mass reconstructions, we identify 4 separate mass peaks, and ...

  6. Ring and jet study on the azimuthal substructure of pions at CERN SPS energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabir Kumar Haldar; Sanjib Kumar Manna; Prosenjit Saha; Dipak Ghosh

    2013-04-01

    We have presented an investigation on the ring- and jet-like azimuthal angle sub-structures in the emission of secondary charged hadrons coming from 32S–Ag/Br interactions at 200 A GeV/c. Nuclear photographic emulsion technique has been employed to collect the experimental data. The presence of such substructures, their average behaviour, their size, and their position of occurrence have been examined. The experimental results have also been compared with the results simulated by Monte-Carlo method. The analysis strongly indicates the presence of ring- and jet-like structures in the experimental distributions of particles beyond statistical noise. The experimental results are in good agreement with I M Dremin idea, that the phenomenon is similar to the emission of Cherenkov electromagnetic radiation.

  7. Shaken and Stirred: The Milky Way's Dark Substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sawala, Till; Johansson, Peter H; Frenk, Carlos S; Navarro, Julio F; Oman, Kyle A; White, Simon D M

    2016-01-01

    The predicted abundance and properties of the low-mass substructures embedded inside larger dark matter haloes differ sharply among alternative dark matter models. Too small to host galaxies themselves, these subhaloes may still be detected via gravitational lensing, or via perturbations of the Milky Way's globular cluster streams and its stellar disk. Here we use the Apostle cosmological simulations to predict the abundance and the spatial and velocity distributions of subhaloes in the range 10^6.5-10^8.5 solar masses inside haloes of mass ~ 10^12 solar masses in LCDM. Although these subhaloes are themselves devoid of baryons, we find that baryonic effects are important. Compared to corresponding dark matter only simulations, the loss of baryons from subhaloes and stronger tidal disruption due to the presence of baryons near the centre of the main halo, reduce the number of subhaloes by ~ 1/4 to 1/2, independently of subhalo mass, but increasingly towards the host halo centre. We also find that subhaloes hav...

  8. The SEGUE K Giant Survey. III. Quantifying Galactic Halo Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Janesh, William; Ma, Zhibo; Harding, Paul; Rockosi, Constance; Starkenburg, Else; Xue, Xiang Xiang; Rix, Hans-Walter; Beers, Timothy C; Johnson, Jennifer; Lee, Young Sun; Schneider, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's SEGUE project. We use a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a smooth stellar halo model to quantify the amount of substructure in the halo. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured, and confirm earlier work using BHB stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius. In addition, we find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity, and that the K giant sample shows significantly stronger substructure than the BHB stars, which only sample the most metal poor stars. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify groups, we find that a large fraction ($\\sim 33\\%$) of the st...

  9. Quantifying the Significance of Substructure in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeough, K. B. D.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2014-12-01

    A method to infer the presence of small-scale substructure in SDO/AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory) images of coronal loops is developed. We can classify visible loop structure based on this propensity to show substructure which puts constraints on contemporary solutions to the coronal heating problem. The method uses the Bayesian algorithm Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) to infer the multi-scale component of the loops which describes deviations from a smooth model. The increase in contrast of features in this multi-scale component is determined using a statistic that estimates the sharpness across the image. Regions with significant substructure are determined using p-value upper bounds. We are able to locate substructure visible in Hi-C (High-Resolution Coronal Imager) data that are not salient features in the corresponding AIA image. Looking at coronal loops at different regions of the Sun (e.g., low-lying structure and loops in the upper corona) we are able to map where detectable substructure exists and thus the influence of the nanoflare heating process. We acknowledge support from AIA under contract SP02H1701R from Lockheed-Martin to SAO.

  10. Functional defecation disorders in children: comparing the Rome II with the Rome III criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Rosa; Levin, Alon D; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Benninga, Marc A

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of pediatric functional defecation disorders (FDD) using the Rome III criteria and to compare these data with those obtained using Rome II criteria. A chart review was performed in patients referred to a tertiary outpatient clinic with symptoms of constipation and/or fecal incontinence. All patients received a standardized bowel questionnaire and physical examination, including rectal examination. The prevalence of pediatric FDD according to both Rome criteria sets was assessed. Patients with FDD (n = 336; 61% boys, mean age 6.3 ± 3.5 SD) were studied: 39% had a defecation frequency ≤ 2/wk, 75% had fecal incontinence, 75% displayed retentive posturing, 60% had pain during defecation, 49% passed large diameter stools, and 49% had a palpable rectal fecal mass. According to the Rome III criteria, 87% had functional constipation (FC) compared with only 34% fulfilling criteria for either FC or functional fecal retention based on the Rome II definitions (P criteria for functional nonretentive fecal incontinence according to both the Rome II and Rome III criteria. The pediatric Rome III criteria for FC are less restrictive than the Rome II criteria. The Rome III criteria are an important step forward in the definition and recognition of FDD in children. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RISK FACTORS OF TYPE-II DIABETES IN RURAL AND URBAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Kiranmai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available : A study of effect of various risk factors on Type–II diabetes in Urban and rural population. Generally Indians seems to have great tendency to develop diabetes mellitus. In addition to this, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism are the other causes for diabetes mellitus. AIM: To analyze the impact of different risk factors on Type – II diabetes in urban and rural population. METHODS: Total 160 subjects of urban and rural population were included in this study and their detailed histories were taken by the questionnaire. In this study we compared the blood glucose levels, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism in urban and rural population. RESULT: The study showed that the blood glucose levels, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism were found higher in urban than in rural population. CONCLUSION: The results showed that the fond of Type – II diabetes is very less in rural population when compared to urban population. This is because of, the rural population had more physical activity, intake of moderate calorie food, less diabetic family history and less obese. So, these factors help to overcome the increased effect of age, smoking and alcoholism on Type – II diabetes in rural population.

  12. Substructures developed during creep and cyclic tests of type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Bhargava, R.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Moteff, J.

    1977-09-01

    Substructures developed in tested specimens of a reference heat of type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796) are examined. Data include dislocation densities, cell and subgrain sizes, and carbide precipitate sizes. Testing conditions range for temperatures from 482 to 649/sup 0/C, for stresses from 28 to 241 MPa, and for times from 4 to 15,000 hr. As expected, it is observed that temperature, stress, and time have strong influences on substructure. The change in the dislocation density is too small to measure for conditions which produce less than 1 percent monotonic strain. No cells form, and the major alteration of substructure is the precipitation of M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ carbides on grain boundaries, on twin boundaries, and on some dislocations. At stresses ranging from 69 to 172 MPa and at temperatures ranging from 482 to 593/sup 0/C, the dislocation density increases with increasing stress and is generally higher than expected from studies made at higher temperatures. Dislocations are arranged in fine networks stabilized by carbides. At stresses above 172 MPa and temperatures to 649/sup 0/C, the dislocation density is too great to measure. Cells develop which are finer in size than cells developed at similar stresses but at higher temperatures. Dislocation densities and cell sizes for cyclic specimens are comparable to data for creep-tested specimens. On the basis of the observed substructures, recommendations are made regarding further studies which would assist in the development of constitutive equations for high-temperature inelastic analysis of reactor components.

  13. Detection of Lensing Substructure Using ALMA Observations of the Dusty Galaxy SDP.81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Dalal, Neal; Marrone, Daniel P.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren; Wen, Di; Blandford, Roger D.; Carlstrom, John E.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Kemball, Athol; Marshall, Philip J.; Murray, Norman; Perreault Levasseur, Laurence; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-05-01

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 108.96±0.12 M ⊙ subhalo near one of the images, with a significance of 6.9σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ˜ 2 × 107 M ⊙, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.

  14. Indirect Inverse Substructuring Method for Multibody Product Transport System with Rigid and Flexible Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to develop a new frequency response function- (FRF- based indirect inverse substructuring method without measuring system-level FRFs in the coupling DOFs for the analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a three-substructure coupled product transport system with rigid and flexible coupling. By enforcing the dynamic equilibrium conditions at the coupling coordinates and the displacement compatibility conditions, a closed-form analytical solution to inverse substructuring analysis of multisubstructure coupled product transport system is derived based on the relationship of easy-to-monitor component-level FRFs and the system-level FRFs at the coupling coordinates. The proposed method is validated by a lumped mass-spring-damper model, and the predicted coupling dynamic stiffness is compared with the direct computation, showing exact agreement. The method developed offers an approach to predict the unknown coupling dynamic stiffness from measured FRFs purely. The suggested method may help to obtain the main controlling factors and contributions from the various structure-borne paths for product transport system.

  15. Functional group and substructure searching as a tool in metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kotera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A direct link between the names and structures of compounds and the functional groups contained within them is important, not only because biochemists frequently rely on literature that uses a free-text format to describe functional groups, but also because metabolic models depend upon the connections between enzymes and substrates being known and appropriately stored in databases. METHODOLOGY: We have developed a database named "Biochemical Substructure Search Catalogue" (BiSSCat, which contains 489 functional groups, >200,000 compounds and >1,000,000 different computationally constructed substructures, to allow identification of chemical compounds of biological interest. CONCLUSIONS: This database and its associated web-based search program (http://bisscat.org/ can be used to find compounds containing selected combinations of substructures and functional groups. It can be used to determine possible additional substrates for known enzymes and for putative enzymes found in genome projects. Its applications to enzyme inhibitor design are also discussed.

  16. Study of Substructure of High Transverse Momentum Jets Produced in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.

    2012-01-01

    A study of the substructure of jets with transverse momentum greater than 400 GeV/c produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and recorded by the CDF II detector is presented. The distributions of the jet mass, angularity, and planar flow are measured for the first time in a sample with an integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb^-1. The observed substructure for high mass jets is consistent with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  17. Comparative and competitive adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) using tetraethylenepentamine modified chitosan/CoFe2O4 particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chunzhen; Li, Kan; Li, Juexiu; Ying, Diwen; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2017-03-15

    In this paper, tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) modified chitosan/CoFe2O4 particles were prepared for comparative and competitive adsorption of Cu(II) and Pb(II) in single and bi-component aqueous solutions. The characteristics results of SEM, FTIR and XRD indicated that the adsorbent was successfully fabricated. The magnetic property results manifested that the particles with saturation magnetization value of 63.83emug(-1) would have a fast magnetic response. The effects of experimental parameters including contact time, pH value, initial metal ions concentration and coexisting ions on single and bi-component adsorption were investigated. The results revealed that the adsorption kinetic was followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating that chemical adsorption was the rate-limiting step. Sorption isotherms were also determined in single and bi-component solutions with different mass ratio of Cu(II) to Pb(II) (Cu(II)/Pb(II)) and fitted using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. A better fit for Cu(II) and Pb(II) adsorption were obtained with Langmuir model, with a maximum sorption capacity of 168.067 and 228.311mgg(-1) for Cu(II) and Pb(II) in single component solution, 139.860 and 160.256mgg(-1) in bi-component solution (Cu(II)/Pb(II)=1:1), respectively. The present results suggest that TEPA modified chitosan/CoFe2O4 particles are feasible and satisfactory adsorbent for efficient removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions.

  18. A Comparative Study on the Sorption Characteristics of Pb(II and Hg(II onto Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Muthulakshmi Andal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption equilibrium and kinetics of Pb(II and Hg(II on coconut shell carbon (CSC were investigated by batch equilibration method. The effects of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, temperature and initial concentration of Pb(II and Hg(II on the activated carbon of coconut shell wastes were studied. Maximum adsorption of Pb(II occurred at pH 4.5 and Hg(II at pH 6. The sorptive mechanism followed the pseudo second order kinetics. The equilibrium data were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The equilibration data fitted well with both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm model. The Langmuir adsorption capacity for Pb(II was greater than Hg(II. The mean free energy of adsorption calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R isotherm model indicated that the adsorption of metal ions was found to be by chemical ion exchange. Thermodynamic parameter showed that the sorption process of Pb(II onto SDC was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic under studied conditions. A comparison was evaluated for the two metals.

  19. Novel SHM method to locate damages in substructures based on VARX models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, U.; Anduaga, J.; Martínez, F.; Iturrospe, A.

    2015-07-01

    A novel damage localization method is proposed, which is based on a substructuring approach and makes use of Vector Auto-Regressive with eXogenous input (VARX) models. The substructuring approach aims to divide the monitored structure into several multi-DOF isolated substructures. Later, each individual substructure is modelled as a VARX model, and the health of each substructure is determined analyzing the variation of the VARX model. The method allows to detect whether the isolated substructure is damaged, and besides allows to locate and quantify the damage within the substructure. It is not necessary to have a theoretical model of the structure and only the measured displacement data is required to estimate the isolated substructure's VARX model. The proposed method is validated by simulations of a two-dimensional lattice structure.

  20. The structure and early evolution of massive star forming regions - Substructure in the infrared dark cloud SDC13

    CERN Document Server

    McGuire, Catherine; Peretto, Nicolas; Zhang, Qizhou; Traficante, Alessio; Avison, Adam; Jimenez-Serra, Izaskun

    2016-01-01

    Investigations into the substructure of massive star forming regions are essential for understanding the observed relationships between core mass distributions and mass distributions in stellar clusters, differentiating between proposed mechanisms of massive star formation. We study the substructure in the two largest fragments (i.e. cores) MM1 and MM2, in the infrared dark cloud complex SDC13. As MM1 appears to be in a later stage of evolution than MM2, comparing their substructure provides an insight in to the early evolution of massive clumps. We report the results of high resolution SMA dust continuum observations towards MM1 and MM2. Combining these data with Herschel observations, we carry out RADMC-3D radiative transfer modelling to characterise the observed substructure. SMA continuum data indicates 4 sub-fragments in the SDC13 region. The nature of the second brightest sub-fragment (B) is uncertain as it does not appear as prominent at the lower MAMBO resolution or at radio wavelengths. Statistical a...

  1. Constraining the Milky Way potential using the dynamical kinematic substructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monari, G.; Antoja Castelltort, Teresa; Helmi, A.; Reyle, C; Robin, A; Schultheis, M

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to constrain the potential of the non-axisymmetric components of the Galaxy using the kinematics of stars in the solar neighborhood. The basic premise is that dynamical substructures in phase-space (i.e. due to the bar and/or spiral arms) are associated with families of periodic

  2. Small scale substructure, collapse time and dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Gambera, M

    1996-01-01

    We solve numerically the equations of motion for the collapse of a shell of baryonic matter, made of galaxies and substructure of $ 10^{6} M_{\\odot} \\div 10^{9} M_{\\odot}$, taking into account the dynamical friction and the parameters on which it depends: the peaks' height $\

  3. Substructural Identification of Flexural Rigidity for Beam-Like Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Young Koo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a novel substructural identification method based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory with a single variable optimization scheme to estimate the flexural rigidity of a beam-like structure such as a bridge deck, which is one of the major structural integrity indices of a structure. In ordinary bridges, the boundary condition of a superstructure can be significantly altered by aging and environmental variations, and the actual boundary conditions are generally unknown or difficult to be estimated correctly. To efficiently bypass the problems related to boundary conditions, a substructural identification method is proposed to evaluate the flexural rigidity regardless of the actual boundary conditions by isolating an identification region within the internal substructure. The proposed method is very simple and effective as it utilizes the single variable optimization based on the transfer function formulated utilizing Bernoulli Euler beam theory for the inverse analysis to obtain the flexural rigidity. This novel method is also rigorously investigated by applying it for estimating the flexural rigidity of a simply supported beam model with different boundary conditions, a concrete plate-girder bridge model with different length of an internal substructure, a cantilever-type wind turbine tower structure with different type of excitation, and a steel box-girder bridge model with internal structural damages.

  4. New Developments for Jet Substructure Reconstruction in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo based studies showcasing several developments for jet substructure reconstruction in CMS. This include Quark/Gluon tagging algorithms using Boosted Decision Trees and Deep Neural Networks, the XCone jet clustering algorithm and the Boosted Event Shape Tagger (BEST).

  5. Substructure in the Stellar Halos of the Aquarius Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmi, Amina; Cooper, A. P.; White, S. D. M.; Cole, S.; Frenk, C. S.; Navarro, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    We characterize the substructure in the simulated stellar halos of Cooper et al. which were formed by the disruption of satellite galaxies within the cosmological N-body simulations of galactic halos of the Aquarius project. These stellar halos exhibit a wealth of tidal features: broad overdensities

  6. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  7. A Comparative Study of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Machinery in Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nimisha; Mehta, Surbhi

    The control of gene expression, predominantly at the level of transcription, plays a fundamental role in biological processes determining the phenotypic changes in cells and organisms. The eukaryotes have evolved a complex and sophisticated transcription machinery to transcribe DNA into RNA. RNA polymerase II enzyme lies at the centre of the transcription apparatus that comprises nearly 60 polypeptides and is responsible for the expression and regulation of proteinencoding genes. Much of our present understanding and knowledge of the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus in eukaryotes has been derived from studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. More recently, Schizosaccharomyces pombe has emerged as a better model system to study transcription because the transcription mechanism in this yeast is closer to that in higher eukaryotes. Also, studies on components of the basal transcription machinery have revealed a number of properties that are common with other eukaryotes, but have also highlighted some features unique to S. pombe. In fact, the fungal transcription associated protein families show greater species specificity and only 15% of these proteins contain homologues shared between both S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. In this chapter, we compare the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus in different yeasts.

  8. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of lineages I, II, and III strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that causes infections with a high-mortality rate and has served as an invaluable model for intracellular parasitism. Here, we report complete genome sequences for two L. monocytogenes strains belonging to serotype 4a (L99) and 4b (CLIP80459), and transcriptomes of representative strains from lineages I, II, and III, thereby permitting in-depth comparison of genome- and transcriptome -based data from three lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lineage III, represented by the 4a L99 genome is known to contain strains less virulent for humans. Results The genome analysis of the weakly pathogenic L99 serotype 4a provides extensive evidence of virulence gene decay, including loss of several important surface proteins. The 4b CLIP80459 genome, unlike the previously sequenced 4b F2365 genome harbours an intact inlB invasion gene. These lineage I strains are characterized by the lack of prophage genes, as they share only a single prophage locus with other L. monocytogenes genomes 1/2a EGD-e and 4a L99. Comparative transcriptome analysis during intracellular growth uncovered adaptive expression level differences in lineages I, II and III of Listeria, notable amongst which was a strong intracellular induction of flagellar genes in strain 4a L99 compared to the other lineages. Furthermore, extensive differences between strains are manifest at levels of metabolic flux control and phosphorylated sugar uptake. Intriguingly, prophage gene expression was found to be a hallmark of intracellular gene expression. Deletion mutants in the single shared prophage locus of lineage II strain EGD-e 1/2a, the lma operon, revealed severe attenuation of virulence in a murine infection model. Conclusion Comparative genomics and transcriptome analysis of L. monocytogenes strains from three lineages implicate prophage genes in intracellular adaptation and indicate that gene loss and decay may have led to the emergence of attenuated lineages

  9. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of lineages I, II, and III strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hain Torsten

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that causes infections with a high-mortality rate and has served as an invaluable model for intracellular parasitism. Here, we report complete genome sequences for two L. monocytogenes strains belonging to serotype 4a (L99 and 4b (CLIP80459, and transcriptomes of representative strains from lineages I, II, and III, thereby permitting in-depth comparison of genome- and transcriptome -based data from three lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lineage III, represented by the 4a L99 genome is known to contain strains less virulent for humans. Results The genome analysis of the weakly pathogenic L99 serotype 4a provides extensive evidence of virulence gene decay, including loss of several important surface proteins. The 4b CLIP80459 genome, unlike the previously sequenced 4b F2365 genome harbours an intact inlB invasion gene. These lineage I strains are characterized by the lack of prophage genes, as they share only a single prophage locus with other L. monocytogenes genomes 1/2a EGD-e and 4a L99. Comparative transcriptome analysis during intracellular growth uncovered adaptive expression level differences in lineages I, II and III of Listeria, notable amongst which was a strong intracellular induction of flagellar genes in strain 4a L99 compared to the other lineages. Furthermore, extensive differences between strains are manifest at levels of metabolic flux control and phosphorylated sugar uptake. Intriguingly, prophage gene expression was found to be a hallmark of intracellular gene expression. Deletion mutants in the single shared prophage locus of lineage II strain EGD-e 1/2a, the lma operon, revealed severe attenuation of virulence in a murine infection model. Conclusion Comparative genomics and transcriptome analysis of L. monocytogenes strains from three lineages implicate prophage genes in intracellular adaptation and indicate that gene loss and decay may have led to the emergence

  10. Common substructure in otoacoustic emission spectra of land vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Geoffrey A.; Köppl, Christine; Bergevin, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In humans, a similar spectral periodicity is found in all otoacoustic emission types and in threshold fine structure. This may reflect travelling wave phase and reflectance from "structural roughness" in the organ of Corti, or entrainment and suppressive interactions between emissions. To further understand these phenomena, we have examined spontaneous otoacoustic emission (SOAE) spectra in 9 lizard species and the barn owl and find a comparable periodicity. Importantly, the frequency spacing between SOAE peaks was independent of the physical spacing and of the frequency space constants in hearing organs. In 9 lizard species, median spectral gaps lay between 219 and 461 Hz, with no correlation to papillar length (0.3 to 2.1 mm). Similarly in much longer organs: In humans (35 mm), SOAE spectral gaps vary up to 220 Hz at 4 kHz; in the barn owl (11 mm), the median SOAE peak spacing was 395Hz. In the barn owl, a very large space constant between 5 and 10 kHz (5 mm/octave) contrasts with stable SOAE spacing between 1 and 11 kHz. Similar SOAE spectral gaps across all species suggests they represent a basic frequency grating revealing local phase-dependent interactions between active hair cells, a feature not determined by macro-structural anatomy. Emission spectral spacing is independent of cochlear length, of the frequency space constant, of the existence of travelling waves or of a tectorial membrane. Our data suggest that there are greater similarities between frequency selectivity reflected at the level of the hair cells' spontaneous mechanical output (OAEs) than there are at the level of the auditory nerve, where macro-structural anatomy links hair-cell activity differentially to the neural output. Apparently, all hair-cell arrays show a similar frequency substructure not directly replicated in neural tuning.

  11. Evolutionarily conserved substrate substructures for automated annotation of enzyme superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranyee A Chiang

    Full Text Available The evolution of enzymes affects how well a species can adapt to new environmental conditions. During enzyme evolution, certain aspects of molecular function are conserved while other aspects can vary. Aspects of function that are more difficult to change or that need to be reused in multiple contexts are often conserved, while those that vary may indicate functions that are more easily changed or that are no longer required. In analogy to the study of conservation patterns in enzyme sequences and structures, we have examined the patterns of conservation and variation in enzyme function by analyzing graph isomorphisms among enzyme substrates of a large number of enzyme superfamilies. This systematic analysis of substrate substructures establishes the conservation patterns that typify individual superfamilies. Specifically, we determined the chemical substructures that are conserved among all known substrates of a superfamily and the substructures that are reacting in these substrates and then examined the relationship between the two. Across the 42 superfamilies that were analyzed, substantial variation was found in how much of the conserved substructure is reacting, suggesting that superfamilies may not be easily grouped into discrete and separable categories. Instead, our results suggest that many superfamilies may need to be treated individually for analyses of evolution, function prediction, and guiding enzyme engineering strategies. Annotating superfamilies with these conserved and reacting substructure patterns provides information that is orthogonal to information provided by studies of conservation in superfamily sequences and structures, thereby improving the precision with which we can predict the functions of enzymes of unknown function and direct studies in enzyme engineering. Because the method is automated, it is suitable for large-scale characterization and comparison of fundamental functional capabilities of both characterized

  12. Health effects of war stress on Norwegian World War II resistance groups: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Ellinor F

    2003-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which adverse long-term health effects of World War II stress exposure were present in 3 groups of resistance veterans. The groups had been exposed to different types of war stressors: concentration camp incarceration, resistance participation within the illegal press, and a secret military organization. With the differences in war stressors as a basis, we assumed that those incarcerated in a concentration camp would display more adverse health effect compared to the resistance veterans. The findings point to a relationship between the severity of war stressors and postwar health in all 3 groups.

  13. [Comparative characteristic of the formation of stereotype of aging in participants of current war conflicts and World War II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakymets', V M

    2006-01-01

    The study was carried out to examine participants of current war conflicts and World War II in order to compare the development of the formation of stereotype of old age. It was established that participants of World War II have higher level of the formation of pessimistic stereotype of old age than participants of current war conflicts have.

  14. Within-population genetic structure in beech (Fagus sylvatica L. stands characterized by different disturbance histories: does forest management simplify population substructure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Piotti

    Full Text Available The fine-scale assessment of both spatially and non-spatially distributed genetic variation is crucial to preserve forest genetic resources through appropriate forest management. Cryptic within-population genetic structure may be more common than previously thought in forest tree populations, which has strong implications for the potential of forests to adapt to environmental change. The present study was aimed at comparing within-population genetic structure in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. plots experiencing different disturbance levels. Five plot pairs made up by disturbed and undisturbed plots having the same biogeographic history were sampled throughout Europe. Overall, 1298 individuals were analyzed using four highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (SSRs. Bayesian clustering within plots identified 3 to 11 genetic clusters (within-plot θ ST ranged from 0.025 to 0.124. The proportion of within-population genetic variation due to genetic substructuring (F CluPlot = 0.067 was higher than the differentiation among the 10 plots (F PlotTot = 0.045. Focusing on the comparison between managed and unmanaged plots, disturbance mostly explains differences in the complexity of within-population genetic structure, determining a reduction of the number of genetic clusters present in a standardized area. Our results show that: i genetic substructuring needs to be investigated when studying the within-population genetic structure in forest tree populations, and ii indices describing subtle characteristics of the within-population genetic structure are good candidates for providing early signals of the consequences of forest management, and of disturbance events in general.

  15. Within-population genetic structure in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stands characterized by different disturbance histories: does forest management simplify population substructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Andrea; Leonardi, Stefano; Heuertz, Myriam; Buiteveld, Joukje; Geburek, Thomas; Gerber, Sophie; Kramer, Koen; Vettori, Cristina; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The fine-scale assessment of both spatially and non-spatially distributed genetic variation is crucial to preserve forest genetic resources through appropriate forest management. Cryptic within-population genetic structure may be more common than previously thought in forest tree populations, which has strong implications for the potential of forests to adapt to environmental change. The present study was aimed at comparing within-population genetic structure in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) plots experiencing different disturbance levels. Five plot pairs made up by disturbed and undisturbed plots having the same biogeographic history were sampled throughout Europe. Overall, 1298 individuals were analyzed using four highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (SSRs). Bayesian clustering within plots identified 3 to 11 genetic clusters (within-plot θ ST ranged from 0.025 to 0.124). The proportion of within-population genetic variation due to genetic substructuring (F CluPlot = 0.067) was higher than the differentiation among the 10 plots (F PlotTot = 0.045). Focusing on the comparison between managed and unmanaged plots, disturbance mostly explains differences in the complexity of within-population genetic structure, determining a reduction of the number of genetic clusters present in a standardized area. Our results show that: i) genetic substructuring needs to be investigated when studying the within-population genetic structure in forest tree populations, and ii) indices describing subtle characteristics of the within-population genetic structure are good candidates for providing early signals of the consequences of forest management, and of disturbance events in general.

  16. Floating substructure flexibility of large-volume 10MW offshore wind turbine platforms in dynamic calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Michael; Melchior Hansen, Anders; Bredmose, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Designing floating substructures for the next generation of 10MW and larger wind turbines has introduced new challenges in capturing relevant physical effects in dynamic simulation tools. In achieving technically and economically optimal floating substructures, structural flexibility may increase to the extent that it becomes relevant to include in addition to the standard rigid body substructure modes which are typically described through linear radiation-diffraction theory. This paper describes a method for the inclusion of substructural flexibility in aero-hydro-servo-elastic dynamic simulations for large-volume substructures, including wave-structure interactions, to form the basis of deriving sectional loads and stresses within the substructure. The method is applied to a case study to illustrate the implementation and relevance. It is found that the flexible mode is significantly excited in an extreme event, indicating an increase in predicted substructure internal loads.

  17. Towards an understanding of the correlations in jet substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Arce, A. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Asquith, L. [University of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom); Backovic, M. [CP3, Universite catholique du Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Barillari, T.; Menke, S. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Berta, P. [Charles University in Prague, FMP, Prague (Czech Republic); Bertolini, D. [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Buckley, A.; Ferrando, J.; Pollard, C. [University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Butterworth, J.; Cooper, B. [University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Camacho Toro, R.C.; Picazio, A. [University of Geneva, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Caudron, J.; El Hedri, S.; Masetti, L. [Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Chien, Y.T.; Hornig, A.; Lee, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cogan, J.; Nachman, B.; Nef, P.; Schwartzman, A.; Strauss, E.; Swiatlowski, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Curtin, D. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Debenedetti, C. [University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Dolen, J.; Rappoccio, S. [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Eklund, M.; Embry, T.; Johns, K.; Lampl, W.; Leone, R.; Loch, P.; O' Grady, F.T.; Rutherfoord, J.; Veatch, J. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Ellis, S.D. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ferencek, D. [Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Fleischmann, S. [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Freytsis, M.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Schwartz, M.D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Giulini, M.; Sosa Corral, D.E. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Han, Z.; Soper, D. [University of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Hare, D.; Mishra, K.; Tran, N.V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Harris, P.; Potter-Landua, B.; Potter, C.; Thomas, C.; Young, C. [CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hinzmann, A. [Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Hoing, R.; Kogler, R.; Marchesini, I.; Usai, E. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Jankowiak, M. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Kasieczka, G. [ETH Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Larkoski, A.J.; Marzani, S.; Thaler, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Lou, H.K. [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Low, M.; Miller, D.W. [University of Chicago, Zurich, IL (United States); Maksimovic, P. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); McCarthy, R. [YITP, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ovcharova, A. [University of California, Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Rojo, J.; Tseng, J. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Salam, G.P. [CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); LPTHE, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 and CNRS UMR, Paris (France); Schabinger, R.M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Shuve, B. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, ON (Canada); Sinervo, P. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Spannowsky, M. [University of Durham, IPPP, Durham (United Kingdom); Thompson, E. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Valery, L. [LPC Clermont-Ferrand, Aubiere Cedex (France); Vos, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, IFIC/CSIC-UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Waalewijn, W. [University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wacker, J. [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. This is explored in the context of quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W boson tagging and boosted top quark tagging. (orig.)

  18. Towards an Understanding of the Correlations in Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Asquith, L.; Backovic, M.; Barillari, T.; Berta, P.; Bertolini, D.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.; Camacho Toro, R.C.; Caudron, J.; Chien, Y.T.; Cogan, J.; Cooper, B.; Curtin, D.; Debenedetti, C.; Dolen, J.; Eklund, M.; El Hedri, S.; Ellis, S.D.; Embry, T.; Ferencek, D.; Ferrando, J.; Fleischmann, S.; Freytsis, M.; Giulini, M.; Han, Z.; Hare, D.; Harris, P.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoing, R.; Hornig, A.; Jankowiak, M.; Johns, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kogler, R.; Lampl, W.; Larkoski, A.J.; Lee, C.; Leone, R.; Loch, P.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lou, H.K.; Low, M.; Maksimovic, P.; Marchesini, I.; Marzani, S.; Masetti, L.; McCarthy, R.; Menke, S.; Miller, D.W.; Mishra, K.; Nachman, B.; Nef, P.; O'Grady, F.T.; Ovcharova, A.; Picazio, A.; Pollard, C.; Potter-Landua, B.; Potter, C.; Rappoccio, S.; Rojo, J.; Rutherfoord, J.; Salam, G.P.; Schabinger, R.M.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwartz, M.D.; Shuve, B.; Sinervo, P.; Soper, D.; Sosa Corral, D.E.; Spannowsky, M.; Strauss, E.; Swiatlowski, M.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, C.; Thompson, E.; Tran, N.V.; Tseng, J.; Usai, E.; Valery, L.; Veatch, J.; Vos, M.; Waalewijn, W.; Wacker, J.; Young, C.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. This is explored in the context of quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W boson tagging and boosted top quark tagging.

  19. Constraining the Milky Way potential using the dynamical kinematic substructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoja T.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to constrain the potential of the non-axisymmetric components of the Galaxy using the kinematics of stars in the solar neighborhood. The basic premise is that dynamical substructures in phase-space (i.e. due to the bar and/or spiral arms are associated with families of periodic or irregular orbits, which may be easily identified in orbital frequency space. We use the “observed” positions and velocities of stars as initial conditions for orbital integrations in a variety of gravitational potentials. We then compute their characteristic frequencies, and study the structure present in the frequency maps. We find that the distribution of dynamical substructures in velocity- and frequency-space is best preserved when the integrations are performed in the “true” gravitational potential.

  20. Searches for Exotic Physics in ATLAS using Substructure Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, Janna Katharina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The significant increase of the centre-of-mass energy of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from 8 to 13 TeV has allowed the LHC experiments to explore previously inaccessible kinematic regimes in their search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The sensitivity of these searches depends crucially on the efficient reconstruction and identification of hadronic decays of highly energetic (boosted) objects, the decay products of which are typically collimated into a single large jet with a characteristic substructure. In this contribution, the searches conducted by the ATLAS experiment on data recorded during 2015 and 2016 that rely on jet substructure techniques to identify signatures of interest are reviewed. A particular emphasis is placed on recent developments in the rapidly evolving field of boosted object tagging.

  1. Tracing the Cosmic Web substructure with Lagrangian submanifold

    CERN Document Server

    Shandarin, Sergei F

    2014-01-01

    A new computational paradigm for the analysis of substructure of the Cosmic Web in cosmological cold dark matter simulations is proposed. We introduce a new data-field --- the flip-flop field ---which carries wealth of information about the history and dynamics of the structure formation in the universe. The flip-flop field is an ordered data set in Lagrangian space representing the number of turns inside out sign reversals of an elementary volume of each collisionless fluid element represented by a computational particle in a N-body simulation. This field is computed using the Lagrangian submanifold, i.e. the three-dimensional dark matter sheet in the six-dimensional space formed by three Lagrangian and three Eulerian coordinates of the simulation particles. It is demonstrated that the very rich substructure of dark matter haloes and the void regions can be reliably and unambiguously recovered from the flip-flop field.

  2. A Unified Approach to Substructuring and Structural Modification Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter D’Ambrogio

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Substructures coupling is still an important tool in several applications of modal analysis, especially structural modification and structures assembling. The subject is particularly relevant in virtual prototyping of complex systems and responds to actual industrial needs. This paper analyzes the possibility of assembling together different substructures' models. The important role of rotational DoFs is highlighted, underlying the difficulty of assembling theoretical and experimental models, for which, usually, the rotational DoFs are not available. Expansion techniques can be used to provide this information as well as appropriate modelling of joints. With this information FRF models, modal models and FE models can be appropriately combined together and solutions for several cases of practical interest are presented. The analyzed procedures are tested on purpose-built benchmarks, showing limits and capabilities of each of them.

  3. Searches for Exotic Physics in ATLAS using substructure techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, Janna Katharina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase of the centre-of-mass energy of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from 8 to 13 TeV has allowed the experiments at the LHC to explore previously inaccessible kinematic regimes in their search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics. The sensitivity of these searches depends crucially on the efficient reconstruction and identification of hadronic decays of highly energetic (boosted) objects, the decay products of which are typically collimated into a single large jet with a characteristic substructure. In this contribution, I review the searches conducted by the ATLAS experiment on data recorded during 2015 and 2016 that rely on substructure techniques to identify signatures of interest. A particular emphasis is placed on recent developments in the rapidly evolving field of boosted object tagging.

  4. Particle Reconstruction at the LHC using Jet Substructure Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Rathjens, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The LHC-era with √ s = 7 TeV allows for a new energy-regime to be accessed. Heavy mass-resonances up to 3.5 TeV/c 2 are in reach. If such heavy particles decay hadronically to much lighter Standard Model particles such as top, Z or W, the jets of the decay products have a sizeable probability to be merged into a single jet. The result is a boosted jet with substructure. This diploma thesis deals with the phenomena of boosted jets, algorithms to distinguish substructure in these jets from normal hadronization and methods to further improve searches with boosted jets. The impact of such methods is demonstrated in an example analysis of a Z’→ tt¯-scenario on 2 fb −1 of data.

  5. Stick-slip substructure in rapid tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2010-10-15

    The peeling of adhesive tape is known to proceed with a stick-slip mechanism and produces a characteristic ripping sound. The peeling also produces light and when peeled in a vacuum, even X-rays have been observed, whose emissions are correlated with the slip events. Here we present direct imaging of the detachment zone when Scotch tape is peeled off at high speed from a solid surface, revealing a highly regular substructure, during the slip phase. The typical 4-mm-long slip region has a regular substructure of transverse 220 μm wide slip bands, which fracture sideways at speeds over 300 m/s. The fracture tip emits waves into the detached section of the tape at ∼100 m/s, which promotes the sound, so characteristic of this phenomenon.

  6. The SLUGGS Survey: Globular cluster system kinematics and substructure in NGC 4365

    CERN Document Server

    Blom, Christina; Brodie, Jean P; Foster, Caroline; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Spitler, Lee R; Strader, Jay

    2012-01-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the globular cluster (GC) system of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4365 and find several distinct kinematic substructures. This analysis is carried out using radial velocities for 269 GCs, obtained with the DEIMOS instrument on the Keck II telescope as part of the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and Galaxies Survey (SLUGGS). We find that each of the three (formerly identified) GC colour subpopulations reveal distinct rotation properties. The rotation of the green GC subpopulation is consistent with the bulk of NGC 4365's stellar light, which `rolls' about the photometric major axis. The blue and red GC subpopulations show `normal' rotation about the minor axis. We also find that the red GC subpopulation is rotationally dominated beyond 2.5 arcmin (~17 kpc) and that the root mean squared velocity of the green subpopulation declines sharply with radius suggesting a possible bias towards radial orbits relative to the other GC subpopulations. Additionally, we find a population ...

  7. Comparative binding energy COMBINE analysis for understanding the binding determinants of type II dehydroquinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peón, Antonio; Coderch, Claire; Gago, Federico; González-Bello, Concepción

    2013-05-01

    Herein we report comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analyses to derive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models that help rationalize the determinants of binding affinity for inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase (DHQ2), the third enzyme of the shikimic acid pathway. Independent COMBINE models were derived for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DHQ2, which is an essential enzyme in both these pathogenic bacteria that has no counterpart in human cells. These studies quantify the importance of the hydrogen bonding interactions between the ligands and the water molecule involved in the DHQ2 reaction mechanism. They also highlight important differences in the ligand interactions with the interface pocket close to the active site that could provide guides for future inhibitor design.

  8. Trans-Dimensional Bayesian Inference for Gravitational Lens Substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Brewer, Brendon J; Lewis, Geraint F

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a Bayesian solution to the problem of inferring the density profile of strong gravitational lenses when the lens galaxy may contain multiple dark or faint substructures. The source and lens models are based on a superposition of an unknown number of non-negative basis functions (or "blobs") whose form was chosen with speed as a primary criterion. The prior distribution for the blobs' properties is specified hierarchically, so the mass function of substructures is a natural output of the method. We use reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) within Diffusive Nested Sampling (DNS) to sample the posterior distribution and evaluate the marginal likelihood of the model, including the summation over the unknown number of blobs in the source and the lens. We demonstrate the method on a simulated data set with a single substructure, which is recovered well with moderate uncertainties. We also apply the method to the g-band image of the "Cosmic Horseshoe" system, and find some hints of potential s...

  9. Stellar Substructures Around the Hercules Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Mackey, A. D.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2015-05-01

    We present deep g and i band Dark Energy Camera stellar photometry of the Hercules Milky Way satellite galaxy, and its surrounding field, out to a radial distance of 5.4 times the tidal radius. We have identified nine extended stellar substructures associated with the dwarf; preferentially distributed along the major axis of the galaxy. Two significant over-densities lie outside the 95% confidence band for the likely orbital path of the galaxy and appear to be free-floating tidal debris. We estimate the luminosity of the new stellar substructures, and find that approximately the same amount of stellar flux is lying in these extended structures as inside the main body of Hercules. We also analyze the distribution of candidate blue-horizontal-branch stars and find agreement with the alignment of the substructures at a confidence level greater than 98%. Our analysis provides a quantitative demonstration that Hercules is a strongly tidally disrupted system, with noticeable stellar features at least 1.9 kpc away from the galaxy.

  10. Periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai, India: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontitis is referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, thereby compromising a patient's ability to maintain a proper diet and affecting the quality of life. Aim: To assess the periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai city. Materials and Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted among diabetics and nondiabetic population attending a government hospital in Chennai city. The WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997 was used to assess the periodontal status. The final sample size of the study was 1000 which included 500 diabetics and 500 nondiabetics. Results: This study showed a significant association between the diabetic status and periodontal disease. The severity of periodontal disease was high among diabetics when compared to nondiabetics. The mean number of sextants with shallow pockets was 0.76 ± 1.20 among diabetics and 0.49 ± 0.86 among nondiabetics (P < 0.0001. The mean number of sextants with Loss of Attachment score of 1 (4–5 mm was 0.67 ± 1.05 among diabetics and 0.32 ± 0.70 among nondiabetics. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more frequent and severe in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetics although there are a number of questions need to be answered in future research.

  11. [The clinical significance of PIVKA-II determination in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparative study with alpha-fetoprotein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakon, M; Monden, M; Goto, M; Kanai, T; Umeshita, K; Endo, W; Mori, T

    1990-05-01

    The changes in the plasma level of PIVKA-II (Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II) following the treatment or progress of the disease was studied in 60 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The positivity rate determined by the changes in PIVKA-II was 58.4 percent (35/60 cases) and was about the same as those reported so far, all of which were obtained by a single determination of PIVKA-II. Plasma PIVKA-II was elevated in 61.9 percent (13/21 cases) of alpha-fetoprotein negative patients and it was almost identical with the overall positivity rate. In parallel with serum alpha-fetoprotein, the plasma level of PIVKA-II was decreased after the surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization and was increased when the recurrence or progress of the disease was observed. Furthermore, the nonspecific elevation of PIVKA-II due to the associated liver cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis was infrequent compared with that of alpha-fetoprotein. In 18 cases positive with both PIVKA-II and alpha-fetoprotein, a close correlation (R = 0.91) was observed between the changes of these markers during the progress or treatment of the disease. Thus, it was suggested that determination of PIVKA-II in blood might be useful not only in the diagnosis but in monitoring the progress or the effectiveness of treatments in hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. A comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernova rise times as exemplified by the case of LSQ13cuw

    CERN Document Server

    Gall, E E E; Kotak, R; Jerkstrand, A; Leibundgut, B; Rabinowitz, D; Sollerman, J; Sullivan, M; Smartt, S J; Anderson, J P; Benetti, S; Baltay, C; Feindt, U; Fraser, M; González-Gaitán, S; Inserra, C; Maguire, K; McKinnon, R; Valenti, S; Young, D

    2015-01-01

    We report on our findings based on the analysis of observations of the Type II-L supernova LSQ13cuw within the framework of currently-accepted physical predictions of core-collapse supernova explosions. LSQ13cuw was discovered within a day of explosion, which is hitherto unprecedented for Type II-L supernovae. This motivated a comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernovae with relatively well-constrained explosion epochs and rise times to maximium (optical) light. From our sample of 19 such events, we find evidence of a positive correlation between the duration of the rise and the peak brightness. On average, SNe II-L tend to have brighter peak magnitudes and longer rise times than SNe II-P. However, this difference is clearest only at the extreme ends of the rise-time versus peak brightness relation. Using two different analytical models, we performed a parameter study to investigate the physical parameters that control the rise-time behaviour. In general, the models qualitatively reproduce aspects of t...

  13. Correlation between the sub-structure parameters and the manufacturing technologies of metal threads in historical textiles using X-ray line profile analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csiszar, Gabor; Ungar, Tamas [Eoetvoes University Budapest, Department of Materials Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Jaro, Marta [Hungarian National Museum, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-06-15

    Micro-structure can talk when documentation is missing. In ancient Roman or medieval periods, kings, queens, or just rich people decorated their clothes or even their horse covers richly with miniature jewels or metal threads. The origin or the fabrication techniques of these ancient threads is often unknown. Thirteen thread samples made of gold or gilt silver manufactured during the last sixteen hundred years are investigated for the micro-structure in terms of dislocation density, crystallite size, and planar defects. In a few cases, these features are compared with sub-structure of similar metallic threads prepared in modern, twentieth century workshops. The sub-structure is determined by X-ray line profile analysis, using high resolution diffractograms with negligible instrumental broadening. On the basis of the sub-structure parameters, we attempt to assess the metal-threads manufacturing procedures on samples stemming from the fourth century A.D. until now. (orig.)

  14. Correlation between the sub-structure parameters and the manufacturing technologies of metal threads in historical textiles using X-ray line profile analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszár, Gábor; Ungár, Tamás; Járó, Márta

    2013-06-01

    Micro-structure can talk when documentation is missing. In ancient Roman or medieval periods, kings, queens, or just rich people decorated their clothes or even their horse covers richly with miniature jewels or metal threads. The origin or the fabrication techniques of these ancient threads is often unknown. Thirteen thread samples made of gold or gilt silver manufactured during the last sixteen hundred years are investigated for the micro-structure in terms of dislocation density, crystallite size, and planar defects. In a few cases, these features are compared with sub-structure of similar metallic threads prepared in modern, twentieth century workshops. The sub-structure is determined by X-ray line profile analysis, using high resolution diffractograms with negligible instrumental broadening. On the basis of the sub-structure parameters, we attempt to assess the metal-threads manufacturing procedures on samples stemming from the fourth century A.D. until now.

  15. A comparative study of reaction times between type II diabetics and non-diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shum Judy

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging has been shown to slow reflexes and increase reaction time to varied stimuli. However, the effect of Type II diabetes on these same reaction times has not been reported. Diabetes affects peripheral nerves in the somatosensory and auditory system, slows psychomotor responses, and has cognitive effects on those individuals without proper metabolic control, all of which may affect reaction times. The additional slowing of reaction times may affect every-day tasks such as balance, increasing the probability of a slip or fall. Methods Reaction times to a plantar touch, a pure tone auditory stimulus, and rightward whole-body lateral movement of 4 mm at 100 mm/s2 on a platform upon which a subject stood, were measured in 37 adults over 50 yrs old. Thirteen (mean age = 60.6 ± 6.5 years had a clinical diagnosis of type II diabetes and 24 (mean age = 59.4 ± 8.0 years did not. Group averages were compared to averages obtained from nine healthy younger adult group (mean age = 22.7 ± 1.2 years. Results Average reaction times for plantar touch were significantly longer in diabetic adults than the other two groups, while auditory reaction times were not significantly different among groups. Whole body reaction times were significantly different among all three groups with diabetic adults having the longest reaction times, followed by age-matched adults, and then younger adults. Conclusion Whole body reaction time has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of differences between young adults, healthy mature adults, and mature diabetic adults. Additionally, the increased reaction time seen in this modality for subjects with diabetes may be one cause of increased slips and falls in this group.

  16. A comparative study of Cu(II)-assisted vs Cu(II)-free chalcogenation on benzyl and 2°/3°-cycloalkyl moieties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santosh K Sahoo

    2015-12-01

    A relative synthetic strategy toward intermolecular oxidative C−Chalcogen bond formation of alkanes has been illustrated using both Cu(II) assisted Cu(II) free conditions. This led to construction of a comparative study of hydrocarbon benzylic and 2°/3°-cycloalkyl moieties bond sulfenylation and selenation protocol by the chalcogen sources, particularly sulfur and selenium, respectively. In addition, this protocol disclosed the auspicious formation of sp3C−S coupling products over leading the sp3C−N coupling products by using 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) substrates.

  17. Statistics of Dark Matter Substructure: III. Halo-to-Halo Variance

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Fangzhou

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of unprecedented statistical power regarding the halo-to-halo variance of dark matter substructure. Using a combination of N-body simulations and a semi-analytical model, we investigate the variance in subhalo mass fractions and subhalo occupation numbers, with an emphasis on how these statistics scale with halo formation time. We demonstrate that the subhalo mass fraction, f_sub, is mainly a function of halo formation time, with earlier forming haloes having less substructure. At fixed formation redshift, the average f_sub is virtually independent of halo mass, and the mass dependence of f_sub is therefore mainly a manifestation of more massive haloes assembling later. We compare observational constraints on f_sub from gravitational lensing to our model predictions and simulation results. Although the inferred f_sub are substantially higher than the median LCDM predictions, they fall within the 95th percentile due to halo-to-halo variance. We show that while the halo occupation distributio...

  18. The investigation of dynamic behaviour of a structure using wave-based substructuring method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Basri Ahmad Burhani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for accurate, efficient and economical methods for the investigation of the dynamic behaviour of large complex structures within the engineering community. The component mode synthesis (CMS has been perceived by the community to be an attractive efficient method for the investigation. However, the method has substantial shortcomings, particularly in analysing a structure having a large number of interface degrees of freedom (DOFs between substructures. This paper puts forward a method, based upon the wave-based substructuring (WBS for the investigation of the dynamic behaviour of a structure with a large number of interface DOFs. The finite element method is used to construct the full finite element model of the structure and NASTRAN 103 is used for the normal modes analysis. A new finite element model of the structure with reduced interface DOFs is constructed based on the WBS. The measurement of the dynamic behaviour of the structure is carried out using free-free boundary conditions and an impact hammer test. The predicted results of the proposed method are then compared with those from the full finite element model and experimental counterparts. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method are discussed and illustrated with two different case studies.

  19. Statistics and implications of substructure detected in a representative sample of X-ray clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Gayoung; Smith, Graham

    2012-01-01

    We present a morphological study of 35 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15Substructure Survey (LoCuSS), for which deep XMM-Newton observations are available. We characterise the structure of the X-ray surface brightness distribution of each cluster by measuring both their power ratios and centroid shift, and thus rank the clusters by the degree of substructure. These complementary probes give a consistent description of the cluster morphologies with some well understood exceptions. We find a remarkably tight correlation of regular morphology with the occurrence of cool cores in clusters. We also compare our measurements of X-ray morphology with measurements of the luminosity gap statistics and ellipticity of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We check how our new X-ray morphological analysis maps onto cluster scaling relations, finding that (i) clusters with relatively undisturbed X-ray morphologies are on average more luminous at fixed X-ray...

  20. Probing the evolution of the substructure frequency in galaxy clusters up to z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Weißmann, A; Chon, G

    2013-01-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters are the last and largest objects to form in the standard hierarchical structure formation scenario through merging of smaller systems. The substructure frequency in the past and present epoch provides excellent means for studying the underlying cosmological model. Aims. Using X-ray observations, we study the substructure frequency as a function of redshift by quantifying and comparing the fraction of dynamically young clusters at different redshifts up to z=1.08. We are especially interested in possible biases due to the inconsistent data quality of the low-z and high-z samples. Methods. Two well-studied morphology estimators, power ratio P3/P0 and center shift w, were used to quantify the dynamical state of 129 galaxy clusters, taking into account the different observational depth and noise levels of the observations. Results. Owing to the sensitivity of P3/P0 to Poisson noise, it is essential to use datasets with similar photon statistics when studying the P3/P0-z relation. We degra...

  1. Demobilization and social reintegration of Brazilian and American troops of World War II: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cesar Alves Ferraz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to discuss the results of a comparative study of demobilization and social reintegration of Brazilian and American veterans of World War II. . In spite of the obvious difference in scale of the two military experiences, I argue that the study of the two experiences can offer new insights into lights on various common issues to both countries: the relationship between the societies and their armed forces, between the governments and their citizens, social and racial inequalities and, finally, the experiences of building welfare state structures during the war and postwar periods. Based on international studies of demobilization and social integration war veterans, the variables that were decisive for the success or failure of adaptation were: a past experiences in the reintegration of war veterans; b the nature and consequences of recruitment of future veterans; c planning by the State and the Armed Forces of procedures for post-bellum demobilization and reintegration; d the implementation of demobilization and the effects within the military institution and in civil society.

  2. GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlen, Michael; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Diemand, Jurg; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys.; Madau, Piero; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. /Garching, Max Planck Inst.

    2011-11-29

    We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos. One of the most exciting discoveries that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) could make, is the detection of gamma-rays from the annihilation of dark matter (DM). Such a measurement would directly address one of the major physics problems of our time: the nature of the DM particle. Whether or not GLAST will actually detect a DM annihilation signal depends on both unknown particle physics and unknown astrophysics theory. Particle physics uncertainties include the type of particle (axion, neutralino, Kaluza-Klein particle, etc.), its mass, and its interaction cross section. From the astrophysical side it appears that DM is not smoothly distributed throughout the Galaxy halo, but instead exhibits abundant clumpy substructure, in the form of thousands of so-called subhalos. The observability of DM annihilation radiation originating in Galactic DM subhalos depends on their abundance, distribution, and internal properties. Numerical simulations have been used in the past to estimate the annihilation flux from DM substructure, but since the subhalo properties, especially their central density profile, which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical resolution, it makes sense to re-examine their contribution with higher resolution simulations.

  3. Floating substructure flexibility of large-volume 10MW offshore wind turbine platforms in dynamic calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Michael; Hansen, Anders Melchior; Bredmose, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    to the extent that it becomes relevant to include in addition to the standard rigid body substructure modes which are typically described through linear radiation-diffraction theory. This paper describes a method for the inclusion of substructural flexibility in aero-hydro-servo-elastic dynamic simulations......Designing floating substructures for the next generation of 10MW and larger wind turbines has introduced new challenges in capturing relevant physical effects in dynamic simulation tools. In achieving technically and economically optimal floating substructures, structural flexibility may increase...

  4. Unexpected relationships of substructured populations in Chinese Locusta migratoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ya-Jie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly migratory species are usually expected to have minimal population substructure because strong gene flow has the effect of homogenizing genetic variation over geographical populations, counteracting random drift, selection and mutation. The migratory locust Locusta migratoria belongs to a monotypic genus, and is an infamous pest insect with exceptional migratory ability – with dispersal documented over a thousand kilometers. Its distributional area is greater than that of any other locust or grasshopper, occurring in practically all the temperate and tropical regions of the eastern hemisphere. Consequently, minimal population substructuring is expected. However, in marked contrast to its high dispersal ability, three geographical subspecies have been distinguished in China, with more than nine being biologically and morphologically identified in the world. Such subspecies status has been under considerable debate. Results By multilocus microsatellite genotyping analysis, we provide ample genetic evidence for strong population substructure in this highly migratory insect that conforms to geography. More importantly, our genetic data identified an unexpected cryptic subdivision and demonstrated a strong affiliation of the East China locusts to those in Northwest/Northern China. The migratory locusts in China formed three distinct groups, viz. (1 the Tibetan group, comprising locusts from Tibet and nearby West China high mountain regions; this is congruent with the previously recognized Tibetan subspecies, L. m. tibetensis; (2 the South China group, containing locusts from the Hainan islands; this corresponds to the Southeast Asia oriental tropical subspecies L. m. manilensis; (3 the North China group, including locusts from the Northwest and Northern China (the Asiatic subspecies L. m. migratoria, Central China and Eastern China regions. Therefore, the traditional concept on Locusta subspecies status established from

  5. Fatigue reassessment for lifetime extension of offshore wind monopile substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Lisa; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue reassessment is required to decide about lifetime extension of aging offshore wind farms. This paper presents a methodology to identify important parameters to monitor during the operational phase of offshore wind turbines. An elementary effects method is applied to analyze the global sensitivity of residual fatigue lifetimes to environmental, structural and operational parameters. Therefore, renewed lifetime simulations are performed for a case study which consists of a 5 MW turbine with monopile substructure in 20 m water depth. Results show that corrosion, turbine availability, and turbulence intensity are the most influential parameters. This can vary strongly for other settings (water depth, turbine size, etc.) making case-specific assessments necessary.

  6. Validation of metabolic pathway databases based on chemical substructure search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Liliana; Valiente, Gabriel

    2007-09-01

    Metabolic pathway databases such as KEGG contain information on thousands of biochemical reactions drawn from the biomedical literature. Ensuring consistency of such large metabolic pathways is essential to their proper use. In this paper, we present a new method to determine consistency of an important class of biochemical reactions. Our method exploits the knowledge of the atomic rearrangement pattern in biochemical reactions, to reduce the automatic atom mapping problem to a series of chemical substructure searches between the substrate and the product of a biochemical reaction. As an illustrative application, we describe the exhaustive validation of a substantial portion from the latest release of the KEGG LIGAND database.

  7. A phase II randomized trial comparing radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin or weekly paclitaxel in patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charafeddine Maya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose/Objective This is a prospective comparison of weekly cisplatin to weekly paclitaxel as concurrent chemotherapy with standard radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Materials/Methods Between May 2000 and May 2004, 31 women with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer or with postsurgical pelvic recurrence were enrolled into this phase II study and randomized to receive on a weekly basis either 40 mg/m2 Cisplatin (group I; 16 patients or 50 mg/m2 paclitaxel (group II; 15 patients concurrently with radiotherapy. Median total dose to point A was 74 Gy (range: 66-92 Gy for group I and 66 Gy (range: 40-98 Gy for group II. Median follow-up time was 46 months. Results Patient and tumor characteristics were similar in both groups. The mean number of chemotherapy cycles was also comparable with 87% and 80% of patients receiving at least 4 doses in groups I and II, respectively. Seven patients (44% of group I and 8 patients (53% of group II developed tumor recurrence. The Median Survival time was not reached for Group I and 53 months for group II. The proportion of patients surviving at 2 and 5 years was 78% and 54% for group I and 73% and 43% for group II respectively. Conclusions This small prospective study shows that weekly paclitaxel does not provide any clinical advantage over weekly cisplatin for concurrent chemoradiation for advanced carcinoma of the cervix.

  8. Comparative equilibrium studies of sorption of Pb(II) ions by sodium and calcium alginate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KHOTIMCHENKO Maxim; KOVALEV Valeri; KHOTIMCHENKO Yuri

    2008-01-01

    The absorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by different alginate compounds was studied in a batch sorption system. Water soluble sodium alginate and insoluble calcium alginate beads were investigated. The lead-binding capacity of both alginate compounds was highest within the pH range 6-8. The binding capacities and rates of Pb(II) ions by alginate compounds were evaluated. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Bruneaur, Emmet and Teller (BET) sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and isotherm constants. Sorption isothermal data could be well interpreted by the Langmuir model. The results obtained through the study suggest that alginate compounds are favorable sorbents. The largest amount of Pb(II) ions were bound by sodium alginate although the difference between two compounds was slight. Therefore, alginate substances may be considered as alternative for sorption and removal of Pb(II) ions from wastewaters.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Chaput, Dominique L.; Haridas, Sajeet; Wu, Si; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Henrissat, Bernard; Santelli, Cara M.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-07-19

    Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Secretome Profiles of Manganese(II-Oxidizing Ascomycete Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Zeiner

    Full Text Available Fungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a. We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RISK FACTORS OF TYPE-II DIABETES IN RURAL AND URBAN POPULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ch. Kiranmai; Sukhes; Rama Krishna; Preethi; Aruna

    2014-01-01

    : A study of effect of various risk factors on Type–II diabetes in Urban and rural population. Generally Indians seems to have great tendency to develop diabetes mellitus. In addition to this, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism are the other causes for diabetes mellitus. AIM: To analyze the impact of different risk factors on Type – II diabetes in urban and rural population. METHODS: Total 160 subjects ...

  12. Design and Analysis of Jacket Substructures for Offshore Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Wen Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on investigating various existing types of offshore jacket substructures along with a proposed twisted-tripod jacket type (modified jacket (MJ-structures. The architectures of the three-leg structure, as well as the patented twisted jacket structure motivated the design of the proposed MJ-structures. The dimensions of the structures were designed iteratively using static stress analysis to ensure that all structures had a similar level of load-carrying capability. The numerical global buckling analyses were performed for all structures after the validation by the scaled-down experiments. The local buckling strength of all compressive members was analyzed using the NORSOK standard. The results showed that the proposed MJ-structures possess excellent structural behavior and few structural nodes and components competitive with the patented twisted jacket structures, while still maintaining the advantages of low material usage similar to the three-leg jacket structures. This study provides alternatives for the initial selection and design of offshore wind turbine substructures for green energy applications.

  13. Replaceable Substructures for Efficient Part-Based Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Han

    2015-05-01

    A popular mode of shape synthesis involves mixing and matching parts from different objects to form a coherent whole. The key challenge is to efficiently synthesize shape variations that are plausible, both locally and globally. A major obstacle is to assemble the objects with local consistency, i.e., all the connections between parts are valid with no dangling open connections. The combinatorial complexity of this problem limits existing methods in geometric and/or topological variations of the synthesized models. In this work, we introduce replaceable substructures as arrangements of parts that can be interchanged while ensuring boundary consistency. The consistency information is extracted from part labels and connections in the original source models. We present a polynomial time algorithm that discovers such substructures by working on a dual of the original shape graph that encodes inter-part connectivity. We demonstrate the algorithm on a range of test examples producing plausible shape variations, both from a geometric and from a topological viewpoint. © 2015 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Residuated lattices an algebraic glimpse at substructural logics

    CERN Document Server

    Galatos, Nikolaos; Kowalski, Tomasz; Ono, Hiroakira

    2007-01-01

    The book is meant to serve two purposes. The first and more obvious one is to present state of the art results in algebraic research into residuated structures related to substructural logics. The second, less obvious but equally important, is to provide a reasonably gentle introduction to algebraic logic. At the beginning, the second objective is predominant. Thus, in the first few chapters the reader will find a primer of universal algebra for logicians, a crash course in nonclassical logics for algebraists, an introduction to residuated structures, an outline of Gentzen-style calculi as well as some titbits of proof theory - the celebrated Hauptsatz, or cut elimination theorem, among them. These lead naturally to a discussion of interconnections between logic and algebra, where we try to demonstrate how they form two sides of the same coin. We envisage that the initial chapters could be used as a textbook for a graduate course, perhaps entitled Algebra and Substructural Logics. As the book progresses the f...

  15. Cold Dark Matter Substructures in Early-Type Galaxy Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Fiacconi, Davide; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We present initial results from the "Ponos" zoom-in numerical simulations of dark matter substructures in massive ellipticals. Two very highly resolved dark matter halos with $M_{\\rm vir}=1.2\\times 10^{13}$ $M_{\\odot}$ and $M_{\\rm vir}=6.5\\times 10^{12}$ $M_{\\odot}$ and different ("violent" vs. "quiescent") assembly histories have been simulated down to $z=0$ in a $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology with a total of 921,651,914 and 408,377,544 particles, respectively. Within the virial radius, the total mass fraction in self-bound $M_{\\rm sub}>10^6$ $M_{\\odot}$ subhalos at the present epoch is 15% for the violent host and 16.5% for the quiescent one. At $z=0.7$, these fractions increase to 19 and 33%, respectively, as more recently accreted satellites are less prone to tidal destruction. In projection, the average fraction of surface mass density in substructure at a distance of $R/R_{\\rm vir}=0.02$ ($\\sim 5-10$ kpc) from the two halo centers ranges from 0.6% to $\\gtrsim 2$%, significantly higher than measured in simulatio...

  16. Fossil Group Origins VII. Galaxy substructures in fossil systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zarattini, S; Aguerri, J A L; Boschin, W; Barrena, R; del Burgo, C; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Corsini, E M; D'Onghia, E; Kundert, A; Méndez-Abreu, J; Sánchez-Janssen, R

    2016-01-01

    Fossil groups are expected to be the final product of galaxy merging within galaxy groups. In simulations, they are predicted to assemble their mass at high redshift. This early formation allows for the innermost $M^\\ast$ galaxies to merge into a massive central galaxy. Then, they are expected to maintain their fossil status because of the few interactions with the large-scale structure. In this context, the magnitude gap between the two brightest galaxies of the system is considered a good indicator of its dynamical status. As a consequence, the systems with the largest gaps should be dynamically relaxed. In order to examine the dynamical status of these systems, we systematically analyze, for the first time, the presence of galaxy substructures in a sample of 12 spectroscopically-confirmed fossil systems with redshift $z \\le 0.25$. We apply a number of tests in order to investigate the substructure in fossil systems in the two-dimensional space of projected positions out to $R_{200}$. Moreover, for a subsam...

  17. Detection of a Dark Substructure through Gravitational Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Vegetti, S; Bolton, A; Treu, T; Gavazzi, R

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of a dark substructure through direct gravitational imaging - undetected in the HST-WFPC2 F606W image - in the gravitational lens galaxy of SLACS SDSSJ0946+1006 (the "Double Einstein Ring"). The detection is based on a Bayesian grid reconstruction of the two-dimensional surface density of the galaxy inside an annulus around its Einstein radius (few kpc). The detection of a small mass concentration in the surface density maps has a strong statistical significance. We confirm this detection by modeling the system including a parametric mass model with a tidally truncated pseudo-Jaffe density profile; in that case the substructure mass is M_sub=(3.51+-0.15)x10^9 Msun, located at (-0.651+-0.038,1.040+-0.034)'', precisely where also the surface density map shows a strong convergence peak (Bayes factor dlog(E)=-128.0; equivalent to a ~16-sigma detection). The result is robust under substantial changes in the model and the data-set (e.g. PSF, pixel number and scale, source and potential regul...

  18. E-learning interventions are comparable to user's manual in a randomized trial of training strategies for the AGREE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durocher Lisa D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice guidelines (PGs are systematically developed statements intended to assist in patient and practitioner decisions. The AGREE II is the revised tool for PG development, reporting, and evaluation, comprised of 23 items, two global rating scores, and a new User's Manual. In this study, we sought to develop, execute, and evaluate the impact of two internet interventions designed to accelerate the capacity of stakeholders to use the AGREE II. Methods Participants were randomized to one of three training conditions. 'Tutorial'--participants proceeded through the online tutorial with a virtual coach and reviewed a PDF copy of the AGREE II. 'Tutorial + Practice Exercise'--in addition to the Tutorial, participants also appraised a 'practice' PG. For the practice PG appraisal, participants received feedback on how their scores compared to expert norms and formative feedback if scores fell outside the predefined range. 'AGREE II User's Manual PDF (control condition'--participants reviewed a PDF copy of the AGREE II only. All participants evaluated a test PG using the AGREE II. Outcomes of interest were learners' performance, satisfaction, self-efficacy, mental effort, time-on-task, and perceptions of AGREE II. Results No differences emerged between training conditions on any of the outcome measures. Conclusions We believe these results can be explained by better than anticipated performance of the AGREE II PDF materials (control condition or the participants' level of health methodology and PG experience rather than the failure of the online training interventions. Some data suggest the online tools may be useful for trainees new to this field; however, this requires further study.

  19. A Comparative Study of the Current Situation on Teaching about World War II in Japanese and American Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, James L.

    1992-01-01

    Compares questionnaire results sent to elementary and secondary school teachers in Indiana and Japan. Surveys how and what is taught about World War II. Reports teachers in the United States concentrate more on Europe, Pearl Harbor, and fascism, whereas Japanese teachers are more concerned with Pacific theater. Concludes Japanese teach peace…

  20. Boosting the charged Higgs search prospects using jet substructure at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinmian; Patrick, Riley; Sharma, Pankaj; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-11-01

    Charged Higgs bosons are predicted in variety of theoretically well-motivated new physics models with extended Higgs sectors. In this study, we focus on a type-II two Higgs doublet model (2HDM-II) and consider a heavy charged Higgs with its mass ranging from 500 GeV to 1 TeV as dictated by the b → sγ constraints which render M H ± > 480 GeV. We study the dominant production mode H ± t associated production with H ± → W ± A being the dominant decay channel when the pseudoscalar A is considerably lighter. For such a heavy charged Higgs, both the decay products W ± and A are relatively boosted. In such a scenario, we apply the jet substructure analysis of tagging the fat pseudoscalar and W jets in order to eliminate the standard model background efficiently. We perform a detailed detector simulation for the signal and background processes at the 14 TeV LHC. We introduce various kinematical cuts to determine the signal significance for a number of benchmark points with charged Higgs boson mass from 500 GeV to 1 TeV in the W ± A decay channel. Finally we perform a multivariate analysis utilizing a boosted decision tree algorithm to optimize these significances.

  1. Exploring a heavy charged Higgs using jet substructure in a fully hadronic channel

    CERN Document Server

    Patrick, Riley; Williams, Anthony G

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the type-II Two Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM-II) a charged Higgs search strategy is presented for the dominant production mode $gb \\rightarrow tH^\\pm$ at the 14 TeV LHC. We consider the decay process which includes $t \\rightarrow bW^\\pm$ and $H^\\pm \\rightarrow AW^\\pm$, and a fully hadronic final state consisting of $bb\\bar{b}+\\mbox{jets}+X$. Dictated by the $b \\rightarrow s\\gamma$ constraints which render $M_{H^\\pm} > 480$ GeV we study two scenarios in which the charged Higgs mass is 750 GeV and the pseudoscalar Higgs mass is 200 GeV and 500 GeV. In this mass scheme highly boosted final state objects are expected and handled with jet substructure techniques which also acts to suppress the standard model background. A detailed detector analysis is performed, followed by a multivariate analysis involving many kinematic variables to optimize signal to background significance. Finally the LHC search sensitivities for the two scenarios are presented for various integrated luminosities.

  2. Boosting the charged Higgs search prospects using jet substructure at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jinmian; Sharma, Pankaj; Williams, Anthony G

    2016-01-01

    Charged Higgs bosons are predicted in variety of theoretically well-motivated new physics models with extended Higgs sectors. In this study, we focus on a type-II two Higgs doublet model (2HDM-II) and consider a heavy charged Higgs with its mass ranging from 500 GeV to 1 TeV as dictated by the $b\\to s\\gamma$ constraints which render $M_{H^\\pm}>480$ GeV. We study the dominant production mode $H^\\pm t$ associated production with $H^\\pm \\to W^\\pm A$ being the dominant decay channel when the pseudoscalar $A$ is considerably lighter. For such a heavy charged Higgs, both the decay products $W^\\pm$ and $A$ are relatively boosted. In such a scenario, we apply the jet substructure analysis of tagging the fat pseudoscalar and $W$ jets in order to eliminate the standard model background efficiently. We perform a detailed detector simulation for the signal and background processes at the 14 TeV LHC. We introduce various kinematical cuts to determine the signal significance for a number of benchmark points with charged Hi...

  3. Boosting the charged Higgs search prospects using jet substructure at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jinmian [Center of Excellence for Particle Physics at Terascale, University of Adelaide,Adelaide, 5005 South (Australia); School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul, 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Patrick, Riley; Sharma, Pankaj; Williams, Anthony G. [Center of Excellence for Particle Physics at Terascale, University of Adelaide,Adelaide, 5005 South (Australia)

    2016-11-28

    Charged Higgs bosons are predicted in variety of theoretically well-motivated new physics models with extended Higgs sectors. In this study, we focus on a type-II two Higgs doublet model (2HDM-II) and consider a heavy charged Higgs with its mass ranging from 500 GeV to 1 TeV as dictated by the b→sγ constraints which render M{sub H{sup ±}}>480 GeV. We study the dominant production mode H{sup ±}t associated production with H{sup ±}→W{sup ±}A being the dominant decay channel when the pseudoscalar A is considerably lighter. For such a heavy charged Higgs, both the decay products W{sup ±} and A are relatively boosted. In such a scenario, we apply the jet substructure analysis of tagging the fat pseudoscalar and W jets in order to eliminate the standard model background efficiently. We perform a detailed detector simulation for the signal and background processes at the 14 TeV LHC. We introduce various kinematical cuts to determine the signal significance for a number of benchmark points with charged Higgs boson mass from 500 GeV to 1 TeV in the W{sup ±}A decay channel. Finally we perform a multivariate analysis utilizing a boosted decision tree algorithm to optimize these significances.

  4. Ceramide content is higher in type I compared to type II fibers in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ditte Bech; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Ara, Ignacio;

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated fiber-type-specific muscle ceramide content in obese subjects and type 2 diabetes patients. Two substudies, one which compared type 2 diabetes patients to both lean- and obese BMI-matched subjects and the other study which compared lean body-matched post-obese, obese...... index was higher in lean compared to type 2 diabetes patients and obese controls. Also in control and post-obese subjects, a higher insulin sensitivity was observed compared to obese subjects. Ceramide content was consistently higher in type I than in type II muscle fibers and higher in deltoideus than...... vastus lateralis across all groups. No significant differences between groups were observed in ceramide content in either of the two substudies. In human skeletal muscle, ceramide content was higher in type I than in type II fibers in patients with type 2 diabetes and in obese subjects, but overall...

  5. Inspection of Asian Lacquer Substructures by Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Fukunaga, Kaori; Kohzuma, Yoshei;

    2016-01-01

    Lacquering is considered one of the most representative Asian artistic techniques. While the decorative part of lacquerwares is the lacquer itself, their substructures serve as the backbone of the object itself. Very little is known about these hidden substructures. Since lacquerwares are mostly ...

  6. Formation of deformation substructures in FCC crystals under the influence of point defect fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Matveev, M. V.; Selivanikova, Olga Valerievna; Cherepanov, Dmitry Nikolaevich

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with sub-structural transformations in FCC crystals under the influence of point defect fluxes. Different relationships between accumulation of point defects in crystal and substructure transformations, in particular during the process of fragmented dislocation structure formation have been received.

  7. Exploring jet substructure with jet shapes in ALICE arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00249565

    The characterization of the jet substructure can give insight into the microscopic nature of the modification induced on high-momentum partons by the Quark-Gluon Plasma that is formed in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Jet shapes allow us to study the modification of parton to jet fragmentation and virtuality, probing jet energy redistribution, intra-jet broadening or collimation and possible flavour hierarchy. Results of a selected set of jet shapes will be presented for $\\mbox{p--Pb}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\scriptscriptstyle \\rm NN}}= 5.02~\\mathrm{TeV}$ and for $\\mbox{Pb--Pb}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\scriptscriptstyle \\rm NN}} = 2.76~\\mathrm{TeV}$. Results are also compared with PYTHIA calculations and models that include in-medium energy loss.

  8. The LabelHash algorithm for substructure matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Drew H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing number of proteins with known structure but unknown function. Determining their function would have a significant impact on understanding diseases and designing new therapeutics. However, experimental protein function determination is expensive and very time-consuming. Computational methods can facilitate function determination by identifying proteins that have high structural and chemical similarity. Results We present LabelHash, a novel algorithm for matching substructural motifs to large collections of protein structures. The algorithm consists of two phases. In the first phase the proteins are preprocessed in a fashion that allows for instant lookup of partial matches to any motif. In the second phase, partial matches for a given motif are expanded to complete matches. The general applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated with three different case studies. First, we show that we can accurately identify members of the enolase superfamily with a single motif. Next, we demonstrate how LabelHash can complement SOIPPA, an algorithm for motif identification and pairwise substructure alignment. Finally, a large collection of Catalytic Site Atlas motifs is used to benchmark the performance of the algorithm. LabelHash runs very efficiently in parallel; matching a motif against all proteins in the 95% sequence identity filtered non-redundant Protein Data Bank typically takes no more than a few minutes. The LabelHash algorithm is available through a web server and as a suite of standalone programs at http://labelhash.kavrakilab.org. The output of the LabelHash algorithm can be further analyzed with Chimera through a plugin that we developed for this purpose. Conclusions LabelHash is an efficient, versatile algorithm for large-scale substructure matching. When LabelHash is running in parallel, motifs can typically be matched against the entire PDB on the order of minutes. The algorithm is able to identify

  9. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, A.; van Beekveld, M.; Beenakker, W.; Caron, S.; Hendriks, L.

    2015-01-01

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV . We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the pheno

  10. Discoloration and mineralization of Orange II using different heterogeneous catalysts containing Fe: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiyun; Hu, Xijun; Yue, Po Lock

    2004-11-01

    Four heterogeneous catalysts containing Fe including a bentonite-clay-based Fe nanocomposite (Fe-B), hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), amorphous FeOOH, and calcined FeOOH (denoted as FeOOH-M) were employed for the photo-Fenton discoloration and mineralization of 0.2 mM Orange II in the presence of 10 mM H2O2 and 8 W UVC at two different initial solution pH values (3.0 and 6.6). It was found that, at an initial solution pH of 3.0, their photocatalytic activities follow the order Fe-B > FeOOH, FeOOH-M > alpha-Fe2O3. When the Fe-B nanocomposite, FeOOH, and FeOOH-M were used as heterogeneous catalysts, both heterogeneous and homogeneous photo-Fenton reactions were responsible for the discoloration and mineralization of 0.2 mM Orange II because homogeneous photo-Fenton reaction occurred due to the presence of Fe ions leached from the catalysts. At an initial solution pH of 6.6, their photocatalytic activities still follow the order Fe-B > FeOOH, FeOOH-M > alpha-Fe2O3. However, only heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction accounted for the discoloration and mineralization of 0.2 mM Orange II because Fe leaching from the catalysts was significantly depressed. In the case of alpha-Fe2O3 as a catalyst, whether at an initial solution pH of 3.0 or 6.6, only heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction happened for the discoloration and mineralization of 0.2 mM Orange II because Fe leaching from the catalyst is negligible. The apparent discoloration kinetics of Orange II with the four catalysts at two different initial solution pH values was also investigated.

  11. Exposing the dead cone effect with jet substructure techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Fabio; Selvaggi, Michele; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-09-01

    The dead cone is a well-known effect in gauge theories, where radiation from a charged particle of mass m and energy E is suppressed within an angular size of m /E . This effect is universal as it does not depend on the spin of the particle nor on the nature of the gauge interaction. It is challenging to directly measure the dead cone at colliders, however, since the region of suppressed radiation either is too small to be resolved or is filled by the decay products of the massive particle. In this paper, we propose to use jet substructure techniques to expose the dead cone effect in the strong-force radiation pattern around boosted top quarks at the Large Hadron Collider. Our study shows that with 300 /fb of 13-14 TeV collision data, ATLAS and CMS could obtain the first direct evidence of the dead cone effect and test its basic features.

  12. Performance of boosted object and jet substructure techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Hadronic decays of heavy particles with momenta much larger than their mass result in their decay products being reconstructable as a single large ­radius jet. The study of the substructure of these jets allows the separation of these boosted decays with respect to more common jets from light­ quarks and gluons. Several techniques have been developed by the phenomenology and experimental community to identify jets coming from hadronic decays of boosted top quarks, W, Z and Higgs bosons. The performance of several such techniques have been studied in ATLAS using fully­ simulated Monte Carlo events, and validated on data using pure samples of top quarks, W bosons from top decays and dijet events. Results of these studies will be presented for Run 1 as well as Run 2 of the LHC.

  13. Substructure effects on the collapse of density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Popolo, A D

    1996-01-01

    We solve numerically the equations of motion for the collapse of a shell of baryonic matter, made of galaxies and substructure of $ 10^{6} M_{\\odot}- 10^{9} M_{\\odot}$, falling into the central regions of a cluster of galaxies taking account of dynamical friction. We calculate the evolution of the expansion parameter, a(t), of the perturbation using a coefficient of dynamical friction, $ \\eta_{0}$, calculated for a perturbation in which clustering is absent and a coefficient $ \\eta_{cl}$ obtained from a clustered one. The effect of the dynamical friction is to slow down the collapse (V. Antonuccio-Delogu \\& S. Colafrancesco 1994, hereafter AC) producing an observable variation of the parameter of expansion of the shell. The effect increases with increasing $ time depends on $ \\eta_{0}$ and $ \\eta_{cl}$. keywords: {cosmology: theory- galaxies: formation}

  14. Decorrelated Jet Substructure Tagging using Adversarial Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    We describe a strategy for constructing a neural network jet substructure tagger which powerfully discriminates boosted decay signals while remaining largely uncorrelated with the jet mass. This reduces the impact of systematic uncertainties in background modeling while enhancing signal purity, resulting in improved discovery significance relative to existing taggers. The network is trained using an adversarial strategy, resulting in a tagger that learns to balance classification accuracy with decorrelation. As a benchmark scenario, we consider the case where large-radius jets originating from a boosted Z' decay are discriminated from a background of nonresonant quark and gluon jets. We show that in the presence of systematic uncertainties on the background rate, our adversarially-trained, decorrelated tagger considerably outperforms a conventionally trained neural network, despite having a slightly worse signal-background separation power. We generalize the adversarial training technique to include a paramet...

  15. ATLAS Standard Model Measurements Using Jet Grooming and Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Boosted topologies allow to explore Standard Model processes in kinematical regimes never tested before. In such LHC challenging environments, standard reconstruction techniques quickly hit the wall. Targeting hadronic final states means to properly reconstruct energy and multiplicity of the jets in the event. In order to be able to identify the decay product of boosted objects, i.e. W bosons, $t\\bar{t}$ pairs or Higgs produced in association with $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, ATLAS experiment is currently exploiting several algorithms using jet grooming and jet substructure. This contribution will mainly cover the following ATLAS measurements: $t\\bar{t}$ differential cross section production and jet mass using the soft drop procedure. Standard Model measurements offer the perfect field to test the performances of new jet tagging techniques which will become even more important in the search for new physics in highly boosted topologies.”

  16. Resonance Related Spiral Substructure in a Galactic Gaseous Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Yáñez, Miguel A; Martos, Marco A; Hayes, John C

    2007-01-01

    We use high resolution 2D hydrodynamic simulations to study the formation of spiral substructure in the gaseous disk of a galaxy. The obtained gaseous response is driven by a self-consistent non-axisymmetric potential obtained from an imposed spiral mass distribution. We highlight the importance of ultraharmonic resonances in generating these features. The temporal evolution of the system is followed with the parallel ZEUS-MP code, and we follow the steepening of perturbations induced by the spiral potential until large-scale shocks emerge. These shocks exhibit bifurcations that protrude from the gaseous arms and continue to steepen until new shocks are formed. When the contribution from the spiral potential relative to the axisymmetric background is increased from our default value, spurs protrude from the main arms after several revolutions of the gaseous disk. Such spurs overlap on top of the aforementioned shocks. These results support the hypothesis that a complicated gaseous response can coexist with an...

  17. Substructure drag effects and recrystallization textures in aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, R. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering Materials; Bate, P. [Doncasters plc, Melbourne (United Kingdom)

    1999-03-10

    Many important recrystallization texture components in metals such as aluminium originate from nuclei in which the mobile high-angle boundary exists prior to, or is formed in the early stages of, annealing. Nucleation can then occur by a process known as strain-induced boundary migration (SIBM). It is possible that this process will involve several growing subgrains, and the drag from that substructure can then have a significant effect. A simple model is used to demonstrate how changes in the overall driving force for recrystallization and Zener drag can affect recrystallization textures when SIBM is involved. This is discussed in relation to experimental observations and the evidence for this process is reviewed.

  18. Functional gastrointestinal disorders in eating disorder patients: altered distribution and predictors using ROME III compared to ROME II criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Luscombe, Georgina M; Boyd, Catherine; Kellow, John; Abraham, Suzanne

    2014-11-21

    To compare the prevalence of Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) using ROME III and ROME II and to describe predictors of FGIDs among eating disorder (ED) patients. Two similar cohorts of female ED inpatients, aged 17-50 years, with no organic gastrointestinal or systemic disorders, completed either the ROME III (n = 100) or the ROME II (n = 160) questionnaire on admission for ED treatment. The two ROME cohorts were compared on continuous demographic variables (e.g., age, BMI) using Student's t-tests, and on categorical variables (e.g., ED diagnosis) using χ(2)-tests. The relationship between ED diagnostic subtypes and FGID categories was explored using χ(2)-tests. Age, BMI, and psychological and behavioural predictors of the common (prevalence greater than 20%) ROME III FGIDs were tested using logistic regression analyses. The criteria for at least one FGID were fulfilled by 83% of the ROME III cohort, and 94% of the ROME II cohort. There were no significant differences in age, BMI, lowest ever BMI, ED diagnostic subtypes or ED-related quality of life (QOL) scores between ROME II and ROME III cohorts. The most prevalent FGIDs using ROME III were postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) (45%) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (41%), followed by unspecified functional bowel disorders (U-FBD) (24%), and functional heartburn (FH) (22%). There was a 29% or 46% increase (depending on presence or absence of cyclic vomiting) in functional gastroduodenal disorders because of the introduction of PDS in ROME III compared to ROME II. There was a 35% decrease in functional bowel disorders (FBD) in Rome III (excluding U-FBD) compared to ROME II. The most significant predictor of PDS was starvation (P = 0.008). The predictor of FH (P = 0.021) and U-FBD (P = 0.007) was somatisation, and of IBS laxative use (P = 0.025). Age and BMI were not significant predictors. The addition of the 6-mo duration of symptoms requirement for a diagnosis in ROME III added precision to many

  19. A comparative study of reaction times between type II diabetics and non-diabetics

    OpenAIRE

    Shum Judy; Robinson Charles J; Richerson Samantha J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Aging has been shown to slow reflexes and increase reaction time to varied stimuli. However, the effect of Type II diabetes on these same reaction times has not been reported. Diabetes affects peripheral nerves in the somatosensory and auditory system, slows psychomotor responses, and has cognitive effects on those individuals without proper metabolic control, all of which may affect reaction times. The additional slowing of reaction times may affect every-day tasks such a...

  20. A comparative study of reaction times between type II diabetics and non-diabetics

    OpenAIRE

    Richerson, Samantha J; Robinson, Charles J; Shum, Judy

    2005-01-01

    Background Aging has been shown to slow reflexes and increase reaction time to varied stimuli. However, the effect of Type II diabetes on these same reaction times has not been reported. Diabetes affects peripheral nerves in the somatosensory and auditory system, slows psychomotor responses, and has cognitive effects on those individuals without proper metabolic control, all of which may affect reaction times. The additional slowing of reaction times may affect every-day tasks such as balance...

  1. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XIX. TOMOGRAPHY OF MILKY WAY SUBSTRUCTURES IN THE NGVS FOOTPRINT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokhorst, Deborah; Starkenburg, Else; Navarro, Julio F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1, Canada (Canada); McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. [National Research Council, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Peng, Eric W. [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [CEA/IRFU/SAP, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Guhathakurta, Puragra, E-mail: dml@uvic.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a deep u*giz survey targeting the Virgo Cluster of galaxies at 16.5 Mpc. This survey provides high-quality photometry over an ∼100 deg{sup 2} region straddling the constellations of Virgo and Coma Berenices. This sightline through the Milky Way is noteworthy in that it intersects two of the most prominent substructures in the Galactic halo: the Virgo overdensity (VOD) and Sagittarius stellar stream (close to its bifurcation point). In this paper, we use deep u*gi imaging from the NGVS to perform tomography of the VOD and Sagittarius stream using main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars as a halo tracer population. The VOD, whose centroid is known to lie at somewhat lower declinations (α ∼ 190°, δ ∼ −5°) than is covered by the NGVS, is nevertheless clearly detected in the NGVS footprint at distances between ∼8 and 25 kpc. By contrast, the Sagittarius stream is found to slice directly across the NGVS field at distances between 25 and 40 kpc, with a density maximum at ≃35 kpc. No evidence is found for new substructures beyond the Sagittarius stream, at least out to a distance of ∼90 kpc—the largest distance to which we can reliably trace the halo using MSTO stars. We find clear evidence for a distance gradient in the Sagittarius stream across the ∼30° of sky covered by the NGVS and its flanking fields. We compare our distance measurements along the stream with those predicted by leading stream models.

  2. Association between Y haplogroups and autosomal AIMs reveals intra-population substructure in Bolivian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Carlos; Gomes, Verónica; Romanini, Carola; Oliveira, Andréa M; Rocabado, Omar; Aquino, Juliana; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor

    2015-07-01

    For the correct evaluation of the weight of genetic evidence in a forensic context, databases must reflect the structure of the population, with all possible groups being represented. Countries with a recent history of admixture between strongly differentiated populations are usually highly heterogeneous and sub-structured. Bolivia is one of these countries, with a high diversity of ethnic groups and different levels of admixture (among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans) across the territory. For a better characterization of the male lineages in Bolivia, 17 Y-STR and 42 Y-SNP loci were genotyped in samples from La Paz and Chuquisaca. Only European and Native American Y-haplogroups were detected, and no sub-Saharan African chromosomes were found. Significant differences were observed between the two samples, with a higher frequency of European lineages in Chuquisaca than in La Paz. A sample belonging to haplogroup Q1a3a1a1-M19 was detected in La Paz, in a haplotype background different from those previously found in Argentina. This result supports an old M19 North-south dispersion in South America, possibly via two routes. When comparing the ancestry of each individual assessed through his Y chromosome with the one estimated using autosomal AIMs, (a) increased European ancestry in individuals with European Y chromosomes and (b) higher Native American ancestry in the carriers of Native American Y-haplogroups were observed, revealing an association between autosomal and Y-chromosomal markers. The results of this study demonstrate that a sub-structure does exist in Bolivia at both inter- and intrapopulation levels, a fact which must be taken into account in the evaluation of forensic genetic evidence.

  3. Two-body wear of dental porcelain and substructure oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Kolbeck, Carola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the two-body wear of different ceramics. Two-body wear tests were performed in a chewing simulator with steatite and enamel antagonists, respectively. Specimens were loaded in a pin-on-block design with a vertical load of 50 N for 1.2 × 10(5) cycles; (f = 1.6 Hz; lateral movement, 1 mm; mouth opening: 2 mm). Human enamel was used as a reference. Three zirconia ceramics, three veneering porcelains, two glass-infiltrated and one lithium disilicate ceramic were investigated. Veneering and lithium disilicate ceramics were glazed before testing. Surface roughness Ra (SP6, Perthen-Feinprüf, G) and wear depth were determined using a 3D scanner (Laserscan 3D, Willytec, G). SEM (Quanta FEG 400, FEI, USA) pictures of the worn specimens and antagonists were made for evaluating wear performance. Veneering porcelain provided wear traces between 71.2 and 124.1 μm (enamel antagonist) and 117.4 and 274.1 μm (steatite). Wear of the steatite antagonists varied between 0.618 and 2.85 mm². No wear was found for zirconia and glass-infiltrated substructure ceramics. Also, no wear was found for the corresponding antagonists. Wear of specimens and antagonists was strongly material dependent. No visible wear was found on zirconia and glass-infiltrated ceramics. Porcelain and lithium disilicate ceramic showed a comparable or lower wear than the enamel reference. Antagonist wear was found to be lower when specimens were made of substructure oxide ceramics instead of veneering porcelain. From the point of wear testing, zirconia may be used for the fabrication of fixed dental prosthesis without veneering.

  4. Nonlinear signal-based control with an error feedback action for nonlinear substructuring control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokida, Ryuta; Kajiwara, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    A nonlinear signal-based control (NSBC) method utilises the 'nonlinear signal' that is obtained from the outputs of a controlled system and its linear model under the same input signal. Although this method has been examined in numerical simulations of nonlinear systems, its application in physical experiments has not been studied. In this paper, we study an application of NSBC in physical experiments and incorporate an error feedback action into the method to minimise the error and enhance the feasibility in practice. Focusing on NSBC in substructure testing methods, we propose nonlinear substructuring control (NLSC), that is a more general form of linear substructuring control (LSC) developed for dynamical substructured systems. In this study, we experimentally and numerically verified the proposed NLSC via substructuring tests on a rubber bearing used in base-isolated structures. In the examinations, NLSC succeeded in gaining accurate results despite significant nonlinear hysteresis and unknown parameters in the substructures. The nonlinear signal feedback action in NLSC was found to be notably effective in minimising the error caused by nonlinearity or unknown properties in the controlled system. In addition, the error feedback action in NLSC was found to be essential for maintaining stability. A stability analysis based on the Nyquist criterion, which is used particularly for linear systems, was also found to be efficient for predicting the instability conditions of substructuring tests with NLSC and useful for the error feedback controller design.

  5. Analytical methods to determine the comparative DNA binding studies of curcumin-Cu(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban; Rajasekaran, Marichamy; Rajagopal, Gurusamy; Athappan, Periakaruppan

    2012-11-01

    DNA interaction studies of two mononuclear [1:1(1); 1:2(2)] copper(II) complexes of curcumin have been studied. The interaction of these complexes with CT-DNA has been explored by physical methods to propose modes of DNA binding of the complexes. Absorption spectral titrations of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 3 nm with the DNA binding affinity of K(b), 5.21×10(4)M(-1) that are higher than that obtained for 2 (red-shift, 2 nm; K(b), 1.73×10(4)M(-1)) reveal that the binding occurs in grooves as a result of the interaction is via exterior phosphates. The CD spectra of these Cu(II) complexes show a red shift of 3-10nm in the positive band with increase in intensities. This spectral change of induced CD due to the hydrophobic interaction of copper complexes with DNA is the characteristic of B to A conformational change. The EB displacement assay also reveals the same trend as observed in UV-Vis spectral titration. The addition of complexes 1 and 2 to the DNA bound ethidium bromide (EB) solutions causes an obvious reduction in emission intensities indicating that these complexes competitively bind to DNA with EB. The positive shift of both the E(pc) and E(0)' accompanied by reduction of peak currents in differential pulse voltammogram (DPV), upon adding different concentrations of DNA to the metal complexes, are obviously in favor of strong binding to DNA. The super coiled plasmid pUC18 DNA cleavage ability of Cu(II) complexes in the presence of reducing agent reveals the single strand DNA cleavage (ssDNA) is observed. The hydroxyl radical (HO()) and the singlet oxygen are believed to be the reactive species responsible for the cleavage.

  6. Comparative modeling of the three-dimensional structure of type II antifreeze protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Sönnichsen, F D; Sykes, B D; Davies, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Type II antifreeze proteins (AFP), which inhibit the growth of seed ice crystals in the blood of certain fishes (sea raven, herring, and smelt), are the largest known fish AFPs and the only class for which detailed structural information is not yet available. However, a sequence homology has been recognized between these proteins and the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectins. The structure of this domain from rat mannose-binding protein (MBP-A) has been solved by X-ray crystallogr...

  7. Comparing M31 and Milky Way satellites: The extended star formation histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Vía Láctea s/n., E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bernard, Edouard J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Boylan-Kolchin, Michael [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Cassisi, Santi [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy); Cole, Andrew A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Irwin, Mike [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Universit de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universit, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Mayer, Lucio [Institut für Theoretische Physik, University of Zurich, Zürich (Switzerland); Navarro, Julio F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; M{sub V} = –12.0; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; M{sub V} = –7.5; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ∼5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.

  8. Reduction of fatigue loads on jacket substructure through blade design optimization for multimegawatt wind turbines at 50 m water depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NJOMO WANDJI, Wilfried; Pavese, Christian; Natarajan, Anand;

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the reduction of the fore-aft damage equivalent moment at the tower base for multi-megawatt offshore wind turbines mounted on jacket type substructures at 50 m water depths. The study investigates blade design optimization of a reference 10 MW wind turbine under standard wind...... conditions of onshore sites. The blade geometry and structure is optimized to yield a design that minimizes tower base fatigue loads without significant loss of power production compared to that of the reference setup. The resulting blade design is then mounted on a turbine supported by a jacket and placed...

  9. Comparing the utility of DSM-5 Section II and III antisocial personality disorder diagnostic approaches for capturing psychopathic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Lauren R; Lynam, Donald R; Maples, Jessica L; MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    The current study compares the 2 diagnostic approaches (Section II vs. Section III) included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) for diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in terms of their relations with psychopathic traits and externalizing behaviors (EBs). The Section III approach to ASPD, which is more explicitly trait-based than the Section II approach, also includes a psychopathy specifier (PS) that was created with the goal of making the diagnosis of ASPD more congruent with psychopathy. In a community sample of individuals currently receiving mental health treatment (N = 106), ratings of the 2 DSM-5 diagnostic approaches were compared in relation to measures of psychopathy, as well as indices of EBs. Both DSM-5 ASPD approaches were significantly related to the psychopathy scores, although the Section III approach accounted for almost twice the amount of variance when compared with the Section II approach. Relatively little of this predictive advantage, however, was due to the PS, as these traits manifested little evidence of incremental validity in relation to existing psychopathy measures and EBs, with the exception of a measure of fearless dominance. Overall, the DSM-5 Section III diagnostic approach for ASPD is more convergent with the construct of psychopathy, from which ASPD was originally derived. These improvements, however, are due primarily to the new trait-based focus in the Section III ASPD diagnosis rather than the assessment of personality dysfunction or the inclusion of additional "psychopathy-specific" traits.

  10. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Achterbeg, Abraham; Beenakker, Wim; Caron, Sascha; Hendriks, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV. We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM) framework as a possible source for these photons. We find that the same parameter ranges in pMSSM as reported by an earlier paper to be consistent with the Galactic center excess, is also consistent with the excess observed in Reticulum II, resulting in a J-factor of $\\log_{10}(J(\\alpha_{int}=0.5 deg)) \\simeq (20.3-20.5)^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$. This J-factor is consistent with $\\log_{10}(J(\\alpha_{int}=0.5 deg)) = 19.5^{+1.0}_{-0.6}$ GeV$^2$cm$^{-5}$, which is derived using an optimized spherical Jeans analysis of kinematic data obtained from the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS).

  11. Pd-nanoparticles cause increased toxicity to kiwifruit pollen compared to soluble Pd(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speranza, Anna, E-mail: anna.speranza@unibo.i [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Bologna, via Irnerio 42, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Leopold, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.leopold@lrz.tu-muenchen.d [Arbeitsgruppe fuer Analytische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Maier, Marina, E-mail: marina.maier@ch.tum.d [Arbeitsgruppe fuer Analytische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Taddei, Anna Rita, E-mail: artaddei@unitus.i [CIME, Universita della Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Scoccianti, Valeria, E-mail: valeria.scoccianti@uniurb.i [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Uomo, dell' Ambiente e della Natura, Universita di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    In the present study, endpoints including in vitro pollen performance (i.e., germination and tube growth) and lethality were used as assessments of nanotoxicity. Pollen was treated with 5-10 nm-sized Pd particles, similar to those released into the environment by catalytic car exhaust converters. Results showed Pd-nanoparticles altered kiwifruit pollen morphology and entered the grains more rapidly and to a greater extent than soluble Pd(II). At particulate Pd concentrations well below those of soluble Pd(II), pollen grains experienced rapid losses in endogenous calcium and pollen plasma membrane damage was induced. This resulted in severe inhibition and subsequent cessation of pollen tube emergence and elongation at particulate Pd concentrations as low as 0.4 mg L{sup -1}. Particulate Pd emissions related to automobile traffic have been increasing and are accumulating in the environment. This could seriously jeopardize in vivo pollen function, with impacts at an ecosystem level. - Nanoparticulate Pd - which resembles emissions from automobile catalysts - affects pollen to a higher extent than soluble Pd.

  12. Comparing Galactic Center MSSM dark matter solutions to the Reticulum II gamma-ray data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achterberg, Abraham; Beekveld, Melissa van [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Beenakker, Wim [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Institute of Physics, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Caron, Sascha [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park,Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hendriks, Luc [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics,Faculty of Science, Mailbox 79, Radboud University Nijmegen,P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-12-04

    Observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) indicate a possible small photon signal originating from the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II that exceeds the expected background between 2 GeV and 10 GeV. We have investigated two specific scenarios for annihilating WIMP dark matter within the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM) framework as a possible source for these photons. We find that the same parameter ranges in pMSSM as reported by an earlier paper to be consistent with the Galactic Center excess, are also consistent with the excess observed in Reticulum II, resulting in a J-factor of log{sub 10} (J(α{sub int}=0.5{sup ∘}))≃(20.3−20.5){sub −0.3}{sup +0.2} GeV{sup 2}cm{sup −5}. This J-factor is consistent with log{sub 10} (J(α{sub int}=0.5{sup ∘}))=19.6{sub −0.7}{sup +1.0} GeV{sup 2}cm{sup −5}, which was derived using an optimized spherical Jeans analysis of kinematic data obtained from the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS)

  13. Jet Substructure: Boosting the Search for New Physics at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Jesse

    2016-03-01

    Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are dominated by jets, collimated sprays of particles that are proxies for underlying quarks and gluons. With the remarkable performance of the ATLAS and CMS detectors, jets can now be characterized not just by their overall direction and energy but also by their substructure. In this talk, I highlight the ways that jet substructure has enhanced the search for new physics at the LHC, including recent excitement over a possible diboson excess. I also explain how theoretical studies of jet substructure have taught us surprising lessons about the nature of the strong force.

  14. Jet Substructure at the Tevatron and LHC: New results, new tools, new benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    Altheimer, A; Asquith, L; Brooijmans, G; Butterworth, J; Campanelli, M; Chapleau, B; Cholakian, A E; Chou, J P; Dasgupta, M; Davison, A; Dolen, J; Ellis, S D; Essig, R; Fan, J J; Field, R; Fregoso, A; Gallicchio, J; Gershtein, Y; Gomes, A; Haas, A; Halkiadakis, E; Halyo, V; Hoeche, S; Hook, A; Hornig, A; Huang, P; Izaguirre, E; Jankowiak, M; Kribs, G; Krohn, D; Larkoski, A J; Lath, A; Lee, C; Lee, S J; Loch, P; Maksimovic, P; Martinez, M; Miller, D W; Plehn, T; Prokofiev, K; Rahmat, R; Rappoccio, S; Safonov, A; Salam, G P; Schumann, S; Schwartz, M D; Schwartzman, A; Seymour, M; Shao, J; Sinervo, P; Son, M; Soper, D E; Spannowsky, M; Stewart, I W; Strassler, M; Strauss, E; Takeuchi, M; Thaler, J; Thomas, S; Tweedie, B; Vasquez Sierra, R; Vermilion, C K; Villaplana, M; Vos, M; Wacker, J; Walker, D; Walsh, J R; Wang, L-T; Wilbur, S; Yavin, I; Zhu, W

    2012-01-01

    In this report we review recent theoretical progress and the latest experimental results in jet substructure from the Tevatron and the LHC. We review the status of and outlook for calculation and simulation tools for studying jet substructure. Following up on the report of the Boost 2010 workshop, we present a new set of benchmark comparisons of substructure techniques, focusing on the set of variables and grooming methods that are collectively known as "top taggers". To facilitate further exploration, we have attempted to collect, harmonise, and publish software implementations of these techniques.

  15. GESP: A computer program for modeling genetic effective population size, inbreeding, and divergence in substructured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Fredrik; Laikre, Linda; Hössjer, Ola; Ryman, Nils

    2017-03-24

    The genetically effective population size (Ne) is of key importance for quantifying rates of inbreeding and genetic drift, and is often used in conservation management to set targets for genetic viability. The concept was developed for single, isolated populations and the mathematical means for analyzing the expected Ne in complex, subdivided populations have previously not been available. We recently developed such analytical theory and central parts of that work have now been incorporated into a freely available software tool presented here. GESP (Genetic Effective population size, inbreeding, and divergence in Substructured Populations) is R-based and designed to model short and long term patterns of genetic differentiation and effective population size of subdivided populations. The algorithms performed by GESP allow exact computation of global and local inbreeding and eigenvalue effective population size, predictions of genetic divergence among populations (GST) as well as departures from random mating (FIS, FIT) while varying i) subpopulation census and effective size, separately or including trend of the global population size, ii) rate and direction of migration between all pairs of subpopulations, iii) degree of relatedness and divergence among subpopulations, iv) ploidy (haploid or diploid), and v) degree of selfing. Here, we describe GESP and exemplify its use in conservation genetics modeling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. More pieces of the puzzle: chemistry and substructures in the galactic thick disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmi, Amina [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Williams, Mary [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Germany (Germany); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics The Australian National University, Cotter Road Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); De Silva, G., E-mail: ahelmi@astro.rug.nl, E-mail: mary@aip.de [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2014-08-20

    We present a study of the chemical abundances of solar neighborhood stars associated with dynamical structures in the Milky Way's (thick) disk. These stars were identified as an overdensity in the eccentricity range 0.3 < ε < 0.5 in the Copenhagen-Geneva Survey by Helmi et al. We find that stars with these dynamical characteristics do not constitute a homogeneous population. A relatively sharp transition in dynamical and chemical properties appears to occur at a metallicity of [Fe/H] ∼ –0.4. Stars with [Fe/H] > –0.4 have mostly lower eccentricities, smaller vertical velocity dispersions, are α-enhanced, and define a rather narrow sequence in [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H], clearly distinct from that of the thin disk. Stars with [Fe/H] < –0.4 have a range of eccentricities, are hotter vertically, and depict a larger spread in [α/Fe]. We also found tentative evidence of a substructure possibly associated with the disruption of a metal-rich star cluster. The differences between these populations of stars is also present in, e.g., [Zn/Fe], [Ni/Fe], and [SmII/Fe], suggesting a real physical distinction.

  17. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer has been proven efficacious but morbidity and oncological outcome need to be investigated in a randomized clinical trial. Trial design: Non-inferiority randomized clinical trial. METHODS: The COLOR II trial is an ongoing international randomized...... clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...... analysis. RESULTS: By July 2008, 27 hospitals from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Denmark, South Korea and Canada had included 739 patients. The intra-operative conversion rate in the laparoscopic group was 17%. Distribution of age, location of the tumor and radiotherapy were equal...

  18. Exploring Milkyway Halo Substructures with Large-Area Sky Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ting [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, our understanding of the Milky Way has been improved thanks to large data sets arising from large-area digital sky surveys. The stellar halo is now known to be inhabited by a variety of spatial and kinematic stellar substructures, including stellar streams and stellar clouds, all of which are predicted by hierarchical Lambda Cold Dark Matter models of galaxy formation. In this dissertation, we first present the analysis of spectroscopic observations of individual stars from the two candidate structures discovered using an M-giant catalog from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The follow-up observations show that one of the candidates is a genuine structure which might be associated with the Galactic Anticenter Stellar Structure, while the other one is a false detection due to the systematic photometric errors in the survey or dust extinction in low Galactic latitudes. We then presented the discovery of an excess of main sequence turn-off stars in the direction of the constellations of Eridanus and Phoenix from the first-year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) – a five-year, 5,000 deg2 optical imaging survey in the Southern Hemisphere. The Eridanus-Phoenix (EriPhe) overdensity is centered around l ~ 285° and b ~ -60° and the Poisson significance of the detection is at least 9σ. The EriPhe overdensity has a cloud-like morphology and the extent is at least ~ 4 kpc by ~ 3 kpc in projection, with a heliocentric distance of about d ~ 16 kpc. The EriPhe overdensity is morphologically similar to the previously-discovered Virgo overdensity and Hercules-Aquila cloud. These three overdensities lie along a polar plane separated by ~ 120° and may share a common origin. In addition to the scientific discoveries, we also present the work to improve the photometric calibration in DES using auxiliary calibration systems, since the photometric errors can cause false detection in first the halo substructure. We present a detailed description of the two

  19. Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis compared with repair of isolated type II SLAP lesions in patients older than 35 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denard, Patrick J; Lädermann, Alexandre; Parsley, B K; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2014-03-01

    This study compared arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with biceps repair for isolated type II superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions in patients older than 35 years. The authors identified isolated type II SLAP lesions that were surgically managed over a 5-year period. Minimum 2-year follow-up data were available for 22 patients who underwent biceps repair (repair group) and for 15 patients who underwent a primary biceps tenodesis (tenodesis group). Mean age at surgery was 45.2±5.5 years in the repair group and 52.0±8.0 years in the tenodesis group. In the repair group, functional outcome improved from baseline to final follow-up using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) (47.5 to 87.4, respectively; PSLAP lesion had a shorter postoperative recovery, a more predictable functional outcome, and a higher rate of satisfaction and return to activity with a biceps tenodesis compared with a biceps repair. Based on these observations, biceps tenodesis is preferable to biceps repair for isolated type II SLAP lesions in nonoverhead athletes older than 35 years.

  20. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II: a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Venrooij Janine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU. From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II. This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS. Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care.

  1. Red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteomics--Part II: Comparative proteomics and RBC patho-physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Erica M; Lutz, Hans U; Mann, Matthias; Thomas, Alan W

    2010-01-03

    Membrane proteomics offers unprecedented possibilities to compare protein expression in health and disease leading potentially to the identification of markers, of targets for therapeutics and to a better understanding of disease mechanisms. From transfusion medicine to infectious diseases, from cardiovascular affections to diabetes, comparative proteomics has made a contribution to the identification of proteins unique to RBCs of patients with specific illnesses shedding light on possible RBC markers for systemic diseases. In this review we will provide a short overview of some of the main achievements obtained by comparative proteomics in the field of RBC-related local and systemic diseases and suggest some additional areas of RBCs research to which comparative proteomics approaches could be fruitfully applied or extended in combination with biochemical techniques.

  2. Pseudoscalar searches with dileptonic tops and jet substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Dorival; López-Val, David

    2016-11-01

    The quest for new heavy states is a critical component of the LHC physics program. In this paper, we study the search for pseudoscalar bosons produced in association with a t t ¯ pair. We consider the final state t t ¯A →t t ¯b b ¯ with a dileptonic top-pair signature, and reconstruct the boosted A →b b ¯ candidate with jet substructure techniques, achieving a remarkable sensitivity over a broad range of pseudoscalar masses and Yukawa couplings. We apply this strategy to a type-I two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM), demonstrating its ability to probe a realistic, UV-complete extended Higgs sector. In particular, we find that the 13 TeV LHC with 300 fb-1 of data can constrain the region tan β >1.5 at 95% C.L. for a light pseudoscalar with mA=50 GeV . Moreover, the whole mass range 20 GeV

  3. Jet substructure and probes of CP violation in Vh production

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M; Mohan, Kirtimaan A; White, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the hVV (V = W, Z) vertex in a model independent way using Vh production. To that end , we consider possible corrections to the Standard Model Higgs Lagrangian, in the form of higher dimensional operators which parametrise the effects of new physics. In our analysis, we pay special attention to linear observables that can be used to probe CP violation in the same. By considering the associated production of a Higgs boson with a vector boson (W or Z), we use jet substructure methods to define angular observables which are sensitive to new physics effects, including an asymmetry which is linearly sensitive to the presence of CP odd effects. We demonstrate how to use these observables to place bounds on the presence of higher dimensional operators, and quantify these statements using a log likelihood analysis. Our approach allows one to probe separately the hZZ and hWW vertices, involving arbitrary combinations of BSM operators, at the Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions within SCET

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements based upon semi-inclusive jet functions within the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). In this work we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron $h$ is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet as a first example. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function ${\\mathcal G}^h_i(z= \\omega_J/\\omega,z_h=\\omega_h/\\omega_J,\\omega_J, R,\\mu)$ which depends on the jet radius $R$ and the large light-cone momenta of the parton '$i$' initiating the jet ($\\omega$), the jet ($\\omega_J$), and the hadron $h$ ($\\omega_h$). We are then able to express the jet fragmentation function as a semi-inclusive jet observable rather than as an exclusive one, which is closer to the actual experimental measurements. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading order (NLO). We further derive the renormalization gro...

  5. Probing the substructure of $f_0(1370)$

    CERN Document Server

    Fariborz, Amir H; Asrar, Abdorreza

    2015-01-01

    Within an effective nonlinear chiral Lagrangian framework the substructure of $f_0(1370)$ is studied. The investigation is conducted in the context of a global picture of scalar mesons in which the importance of the underlying connections among scalar mesons below and above 1 GeV is recognized and implemented. These connections are due to the mixings among various quark-antiquarks, four-quarks and glue components and play a central role in understanding the properties of scalar mesons. Iterative Monte Carlo simulations are first performed on the 14-dimensional parameter space of the model and sets of points in this parameter space (the global sets) that give an overall agreement with all experimental data on mass spectrum, various decay widths and decay ratios of all isosinglet scalar states below 2 GeV are determined. Then within each global set, subsets that give closest agreement for the properties of $f_0(1370)$ are studied. Unlike the properties of other isosinglet states that show a range of variation w...

  6. Substructural influence in the hot rolling of Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, H. J.

    1998-06-01

    The industrial rolling of aluminum alloys is generally conducted in multistage schedules of 10-15 passes partly on reversing mills and partly on continuous mills with temperature declining from 500°C to between 300°C and 250°C. Static recrystallization may take place in long intervals after passes with higher temperature and strain. During lower temperature intervals, only static recovery takes place so that in the following passes the flow curves exhibit higher initial stresses. Dynamic recovery decreases gradually through the hot-, warm-, and cold-working ranges but is reduced as the concentration of solutes and particles increase. Recrystallization is much more sensitive to temperature and alloying and is retarded by increased dynamic recovery. The texture of sheet depends on lattice-dependent Taylor rotations during dislocation slip, enhanced recovery of certain deformation band orientations, and preferred nucleation and growth during interpass pauses or annealing. Schedule optimization can be guided by physical simulation or modeling based on recrystallization kinetics to attain selected strengthening substructure, recrystallized grain size, and texture for product earing control.

  7. Virtual sensing of structural vibrations using dynamic substructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullaa, Jyrki

    2016-10-01

    Virtual sensing techniques use information available from a limited set of physical sensors together with the finite element model to calculate an estimate of the quantity of interest. In structural dynamics applications, analytical mode shapes from the finite element model are typically used as a basis to estimate the response at unmeasured locations by an expansion algorithm. An alternative is to model only the interesting part of the structure using substructuring techniques, in which the natural modes are replaced by component modes consisting of a selected number of fixed interface modes plus the interface constraint modes. They are mutually independent and compose a valid subspace for estimating the unmeasured response. If the number of interface degrees of freedom is large, interface reduction is applied. The main advantage of the proposed approach is that the modelling effort can be substantially decreased, because only part of the structure is modelled and the modelling uncertainties, non-linearities, or changes in the omitted structure can be ignored. The method is validated by numerical simulations of three different structures under unknown excitation. Different types and locations of virtual sensors are studied. Also, the effects of noise and model errors are investigated. The most accurate estimation is obtained if the virtual sensor is located away from the interface and close to a physical sensor.

  8. Comparative clinical characteristics of depression in bipolar affective disorders types I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tyuvina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the clinical features of depression within bipolar affective disorders types I and II (BADI and BADII.Patients and methods. An examination was made in 100 depressive patients, including 25 with BADI, 37 with BADII, and 38 with recurrent depressive disorder (RDD (a comparison group. The patients' status was evaluated in accordance with the ICD-10 and DSM-V affective disorder criteria, by using a specially developed questionnaire.Results. BAD-related depression has features distinguishing it from RDD: sexual preference (men; an earlier age of disease onset; a shorter duration, but a higher frequency of exacerbations; a greater tendency for the continuum; a more marked decrease in social and family adaptation; development in people with predominantly hyperthymic premorbid; more frequently a family history of affective disorders, schizophrenia, and alcoholism; high comorbidity with metabolic diseases and psychoactive substance abuse; worse health more commonly in autumn and winter; a predominant anxious affect and an obviously decreasing interest in the structure of depression; a higher incidence of atypical sleep, appetite, and weight disorders; high suicidal activity; higher motor retardation (in BADI; relatively small involvement of somatic complaints in BAD I and frequent panic attacks in BADII.Conclusion. Knowledge of the specific features of BAD-related depression will be able to make a more accurate differential diagnosis and to perform more effective treatment in these patients.

  9. Sub-structures in the inner halo of the Milky Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffau S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a spectroscopic study of a sample of 238 RR Lyrae stars, from the QUEST survey, located in the Galactic halo at distances between 4 and 20 kpc from the Sun. Combining their spatial position and kinematics we were able to identify sub-structures in this part of the halo. Some of those sub-structures may be associated with known halo features like the Virgo Overdensity, the Hercules-Aquila Cloud, and the Anticenter Stream.

  10. Contribution to Structural Elucidation: Behaviours of Substructures Partially Defined from 2D NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EPOUHE, Celine; FAN, Bo-Tao; YUAN, Shen-Gang; PANAYE, A.; DOUCET, J. P

    2003-01-01

    Structural elucidation (automatic determination of the structure of a molecule from its spectra) is frequently hampered by combinatorial explosion when trying to assemble the identified substructures. We devised a new method which can avoid this pitfall by a systematic examination of allowed 13C chemical shifts ranges for all substructures chemically possible and combined with a progressive pruning thanks to neighbouring relationships appearing from 2D NMR. This method is explained by a detailed example.

  11. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY X-RAY SUBSTRUCTURES IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Lima Neto, Gastao B.; Lagana, Tatiana F. [Departamento de Astronomia, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-02-20

    We present a new method to quantify substructures in clusters of galaxies, based on the analysis of the intensity of structures. This analysis is done in a residual image that is the result of the subtraction of a surface brightness model, obtained by fitting a two-dimensional analytical model ({beta}-model or Sersic profile) with elliptical symmetry, from the X-ray image. Our method is applied to 34 clusters observed by the Chandra Space Telescope that are in the redshift range z in [0.02, 0.2] and have a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) greater than 100. We present the calibration of the method and the relations between the substructure level with physical quantities, such as the mass, X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cluster redshift. We use our method to separate the clusters in two sub-samples of high- and low-substructure levels. We conclude, using Monte Carlo simulations, that the method recuperates very well the true amount of substructure for small angular core radii clusters (with respect to the whole image size) and good S/N observations. We find no evidence of correlation between the substructure level and physical properties of the clusters such as gas temperature, X-ray luminosity, and redshift; however, analysis suggest a trend between the substructure level and cluster mass. The scaling relations for the two sub-samples (high- and low-substructure level clusters) are different (they present an offset, i.e., given a fixed mass or temperature, low-substructure clusters tend to be more X-ray luminous), which is an important result for cosmological tests using the mass-luminosity relation to obtain the cluster mass function, since they rely on the assumption that clusters do not present different scaling relations according to their dynamical state.

  12. Analysis and application of European genetic substructure using 300 K SNP information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available European population genetic substructure was examined in a diverse set of >1,000 individuals of European descent, each genotyped with >300 K SNPs. Both STRUCTURE and principal component analyses (PCA showed the largest division/principal component (PC differentiated northern from southern European ancestry. A second PC further separated Italian, Spanish, and Greek individuals from those of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry as well as distinguishing among northern European populations. In separate analyses of northern European participants other substructure relationships were discerned showing a west to east gradient. Application of this substructure information was critical in examining a real dataset in whole genome association (WGA analyses for rheumatoid arthritis in European Americans to reduce false positive signals. In addition, two sets of European substructure ancestry informative markers (ESAIMs were identified that provide substantial substructure information. The results provide further insight into European population genetic substructure and show that this information can be used for improving error rates in association testing of candidate genes and in replication studies of WGA scans.

  13. Substructure in the Most Massive GEEC Groups: Field-like Populations in Dynamically Active Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Annie; Wilman, David J; McGee, Sean L; Harris, William E; Connelly, Jennifer L; Balogh, Michael L; Mulchaey, John S; Bower, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    The presence of substructure in galaxy groups and clusters is believed to be a sign of recent galaxy accretion and can be used not only to probe the assembly history of these structures, but also the evolution of their member galaxies. Using the Dressler-Shectman (DS) Test, we study substructure in a sample of intermediate redshift (z ~ 0.4) galaxy groups from the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) group catalog. We find that 4 of the 15 rich GEEC groups, with an average velocity dispersion of ~525 km s-1, are identified as having significant substructure. The identified regions of localized substructure lie on the group outskirts and in some cases appear to be infalling. In a comparison of galaxy properties for the members of groups with and without substructure, we find that the groups with substructure have a significantly higher fraction of blue and star-forming galaxies and a parent colour distribution that resembles that of the field population rather than the overall group population....

  14. Systematic benchmark of substructure search in molecular graphs - From Ullmann to VF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrlich Hans-Christian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching for substructures in molecules belongs to the most elementary tasks in cheminformatics and is nowadays part of virtually every cheminformatics software. The underlying algorithms, used over several decades, are designed for the application to general graphs. Applied on molecular graphs, little effort has been spend on characterizing their performance. Therefore, it is not clear how current substructure search algorithms behave on such special graphs. One of the main reasons why such an evaluation was not performed in the past was the absence of appropriate data sets. Results In this paper, we present a systematic evaluation of Ullmann’s and the VF2 subgraph isomorphism algorithms on molecular data. The benchmark set consists of a collection of 1235 SMARTS substructure expressions and selected molecules from the ZINC database. The benchmark evaluates substructures search times for complete database scans as well as individual substructure-molecule pairs. In detail, we focus on the influence of substructure formulation and size, the impact of molecule size, and the ability of both algorithms to be used on multiple cores. Conclusions The results show a clear superiority of the VF2 algorithm in all test scenarios. In general, both algorithms solve most instances in less than one millisecond, which we consider to be acceptable. Still, in direct comparison, the VF2 is most often several folds faster than Ullmann’s algorithm. Additionally, Ullmann’s algorithm shows a surprising number of run time outliers.

  15. MetMaxStruct: a Tversky-similarity-based strategy for analysing the (substructural similarities of drugs and endogenous metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve O'Hagan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies compared the molecular similarity of marketed drugs and endogenous human metabolites (endogenites, using a series of fingerprint-type encodings, variously ranked and clustered using the Tanimoto (Jaccard similarity coefficient (TS. Because this gives equal weight to all parts of the encoding (thence to different substructures in the molecule it may not be optimal, since in many cases not all parts of the molecule will bind to their macromolecular targets. Unsupervised methods cannot alone uncover this. We here explore the kinds of differences that may be observed when the TS is replaced – in a manner more equivalent to semi-supervised learning – by variants of the asymmetric Tversky (TV similarity, that includes  and  parameters. Results. Dramatic differences are observed in (i the drug-endogenite similarity heatmaps, (ii the cumulative ‘greatest similarity’ curves, and (iii the fraction of drugs with a Tversky similarity to a metabolite exceeding a given value when the Tversky  and  parameters are varied from their Tanimoto values. The same is true when the sum of the  and  parameters is varied. A clear trend towards increased endogenite-likeness of marketed drugs is observed when  or adopt values nearer the extremes of their range, and when their sum is smaller. The kinds of molecules exhibiting the greatest similarity to two interrogating drug molecules (chlorpromazine and clozapine also vary in both nature and the values of their similarity as  and  are varied. The same is true for the converse, when drugs are interrogated with an endogenite. The fraction of drugs with a Tversky similarity to a molecule in a library exceeding a given value depends on the contents of that library, and  and  may be ‘tuned’ accordingly, in a semi-supervised manner. At some values of  and  drug discovery library candidates or natural products can look much more like (i.e. have

  16. Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Orthosis Augmented by Either Stretching or Stretching and Strengthening for Stage II Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Jeff; Neville, Christopher; Tome, Josh; Flemister, Adolph

    2015-09-01

    The value of strengthening and stretching exercises combined with orthosis treatment in a home-based program has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of augmenting orthosis treatment with either stretching or a combination of stretching and strengthening in participants with stage II tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction (TPTD). Participants included 39 patients with stage II TPTD who were recruited from a medical center and then randomly assigned to a strengthening or stretching treatment group. Excluding 3 dropouts, there were 19 participants in the strengthening group and 17 in the stretching group. The stretching treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with stretching exercises. The strengthening treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with the stretching and strengthening exercises. The main outcome measures were self-report (ie, Foot Function Index and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment) and isometric deep posterior compartment strength. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test for differences between groups at 6 and 12 weeks after starting the exercise programs. Both groups significantly improved in pain and function over the 12-week trial period. The self-report measures showed minimal differences between the treatment groups. There were no differences in isometric deep posterior compartment strength. A moderate-intensity, home-based exercise program was minimally effective in augmenting orthosis wear alone in participants with stage II TPTD. Level I, prospective randomized study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Comparing the Predictions of two Mixed Neutralino Dark Matter Models with the Recent CDMS II Candidate Events

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, D P

    2010-01-01

    We consider two optimally mixed neutralino dark matter models, based on nonuniversal gaugino masses, which were recently proposed by us to achieve WMAP compatible relic density over a large part of the MSSM parameter space. We compare the resulting predictions for the spin-independent DM scattering cross-section with the recent CDMS II data, assuming the possibility of the two reported candidate events being signal events. For one model the predicted cross-section agrees with the putative signal over a small part of the parameter space, while for the other the agreement holds over the entire WMAP compatible parameter space of the model.

  18. In vitro microleakage of Biodentine as a dentin substitute compared to Fuji II LC in cervical lining restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Anne; Eschrich, Geoffroy; Dejou, Jacques; About, Imad

    2012-12-01

    1) To evaluate the marginal sealing efficacy of Biodentine at the cervical margins of approximal cavities placed in molars; 2) to evaluate and compare the use of Biodentine in combination with resin-based adhesives and a resin composite, compared with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Fuji II LC). Sixty approximal cavities were prepared on mesial and distal surfaces of 30 extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly assigned into 6 groups of 10 cavities each: (G1) Biodentine, (G2) Fuji II LC as a filling material, (G3) Biodentine as a base + Optibond Solo Plus + silane + Filtek Z250, (G4) as in G3 without silane, (G5) Biodentine as a base + Septobond SE + Filtek Z250, (G6) Fuji II LC as a base + Optibond Solo Plus + Filtek Z250. The materials were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. Biodentine required no dentin or enamel surface conditioning treatment. The teeth were thermocycled 2500x (5°C to 55°C). The specimens were then sealed with a 1-mm window around the marginal interface. Samples were immersed in a 50% w/v silver nitrate solution and exposed to a photo developing solution. The teeth were embedded in resin (Sody 33) and sectioned through the restorations. The silver penetration was directly measured using a light microscope. The results were expressed as ordinal scores from 0 to 3 at cervical, interfacial, and enamel margins. The data were analyzed with the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Games Howell, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests (p Biodentine or Fuji II LC)/resin composite interfaces. Statistically significant differences were observed between G5 (median score = 2.0) and the other groups (median score = 1.0) for the enamel margins. Statistically significant differences were found between enamel and dentin cervical margins in G2 (enamel median score = 1.0; dentin median score = 1.5) and G5 (enamel median score = 2.0; dentin median score = 1.0). Within the limits of this in vitro study, Biodentine as dentin substitute in

  19. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  20. Comparative analyses of postoperative complications and prognosis of different surgical procedures in stage II endometrial carcinoma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin H

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hongmei Yin,1 Ting Gui2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Binzhou Medical University Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the impact of surgical resection extent on the postoperative complications and the prognosis in patients with stage II endometrial cancer. Methods: A total of 54 patients were retrospectively reviewed, 35 patients underwent subradical hysterectomy and 19 patients received radical hysterectomy, both with simultaneous bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy. Results: Comparing the surgical outcomes in subradical hysterectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, there were no significant differences in operative time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay. After surgery, 37.1% vs 36.8% patients received postoperative radiotherapy in the subradical hyster­ectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, without statistically significant difference. As for postoperative complications, the early postoperative complication rate in patients who underwent subradical hysterectomy was 14.3%, significantly lower than that in patients submitted to radical hysterectomy (14.3% vs 42.1%, with P=0.043. However, there was no significant difference in late postoperative complication rate between the two surgical procedures. Regarding the clinical prognosis, patients receiving the subradical hysterectomy showed similar survival to their counterparts undergoing the radical procedures. The relapse rate was 5.71% vs 5.26%, respectively, without significant difference. There were no deaths in both surgical groups. Conclusion: For stage II endometrial carcinoma, subradical hysterectomy presented with less early postoperative complications and similar survival duration and recurrence

  1. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions in SCET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ringer, Felix; Vitev, Ivan [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-25

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements, based upon semi-inclusive jet functions in the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). As a first example, we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron h is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G{sub i}{sup h}(z=ω{sub J}/ω,z{sub h}=ω{sub h}/ω{sub J},ω{sub J},R,μ), which depends on the jet radius R and the large light-cone momenta of the parton ‘i’ initiating the jet (ω), the jet (ω{sub J}), and the hadron h (ω{sub h}). The jet fragmentation function can then be expressed as a semi-inclusive observable, in the spirit of actual experimental measurements, rather than as an exclusive one. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations of this observable at next-to-leading order (NLO). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G{sub i}{sup h}(z,z{sub h},ω{sub J},R,μ) are also derived and shown to follow exactly the usual timelike DGLAP evolution equations for fragmentation functions. The newly obtained RG equations can be used to perform the resummation of single logarithms of the jet radius parameter R up to next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL{sub R}) accuracy. In combination with the fixed NLO calculation, we obtain NLO+NLL{sub R} results for the hadron distribution inside the jet. We present numerical results for pp→(jet h)X in the new framework, and find excellent agreement with existing LHC experimental data.

  2. Substructure method in high-speed monorail dynamic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanchenko, I. I.

    2008-12-01

    combined schemes modeling a strained elastic compound moving structure and a monorail elevated track. The problems of development of methods for dynamic analysis of monorails are very topical, especially because of increasing speeds of the rolling stock motion. These structures are studied in [16-18]. In the present paper, the above problem is solved by using the method for the moving load analysis and a step procedure of integration with respect to time, which were proposed in [9, 19], respectively. Further, these components are used to enlarge the possibilities of the substructure method in problems of dynamics. In the approach proposed for moving load analysis of structures, for a substructure (having the shape of a boundary element or a superelement) we choose an object moving at a constant speed (a monorail rolling stock); in this case, we use rod boundary elements of large length, which are gathered in a system modeling these objects. In particular, sets of such elements form a model of a monorail rolling stock, namely, carriage hulls, wheeled carts, elements of the wheel spring suspension, models of continuous beams of monorail ways and piers with foundations admitting emergency subsidence and unilateral links. These specialized rigid finite elements with linear and nonlinear links, included into the set of earlier proposed finite elements [14, 19], permit studying unsteady vibrations in the "monorail train-elevated track" (MTET) system taking into account various irregularities on the beam-rail, the pier emergency subsidence, and their elastic support by the basement. In this case, a high degree of the structure spatial digitization is obtained by using rods with distributed parameters in the analysis. The displacements are approximated by linear functions and trigonometric Fourier series, which, as was already noted, permits increasing the number of degrees of freedom of the system under study simultaneously preserving the order of the resolving system of

  3. Comparative Analysis of LEON 3 and NIOS II Processor Development Environment: Case Study Rijindael’s Encryption Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghana Hasamnis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Embedded system design is becoming complex day by day, combined with reduced time-to-market deadlines. Due to the constraints and complexity in the design of embedded systems, it incorporates hardware / software co-design methodology. An embedded system is a combination of hardware and software parts integrated together on a common platform. A soft-core processor which is a hardware description language (HDL model of a specific processor (CPU can be customized for any application and can be synthesized for FPGA target. This paper gives a comparative analysis of the development environment for embedded systems using LEON 3 and NIOS II Processor, both soft core processors. LEON3 is an open source processor and NIOS II is a commercial processor. Case study under consideration is Rijindael’s Encryption Algorithm (AES. It is a standard encryption algorithm used to encrypt huge bulk of data and for security. Using the co-design methodology the algorithm is implemented on two different platforms. One using the open source and other using the commercial processor and the comparative results of the two different platforms is stated in terms of its performance parameters. The algorithm is partitioned in hardware and software parts and integrated on a common platform.

  4. A comparative reappraisal of the Rome II and Rome III diagnostic criteria: are we getting closer to the 'true' prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Ami D; Shvartzman, Pesach; Friger, Michael; Fich, Alex

    2007-06-01

    Revisions of the diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome have led to varying prevalence estimates. The Rome III criteria require a lower symptom frequency than Rome II (at least 10% of the time for Rome III, compared with at least 25% of the time for Rome II). In an epidemiological survey of a representative sample of Israeli adults using Rome II, we reported the prevalence for irritable bowel syndrome as 2.9%. The official Rome II integrative questionnaire, used for that study, enables a close approximation of Rome III rates, facilitating a retrospective comparison of these criteria. A representative sample of 1000 adults was interviewed with a validated Hebrew version of the official Rome II integrative questionnaire. The data were re-evaluated retrospectively to compare the Rome II results with a close approximation of the new Rome III criteria. The prevalence rates for irritable bowel syndrome were 2.9 and 11.4%, respectively, for Rome II and Rome III. The corresponding consultation rates were 57.1 and 41.7%, indicating that the more strict Rome II criteria may select out a group of patients with more severe disease or greater psychosocial problems. Women made up 71.4% of irritable bowel syndrome by Rome II and 62.5% by Rome III. In the present retrospective study, the prevalence rate for irritable bowel syndrome in our population is significantly higher by Rome III compared with Rome II. Rome III may more closely reflect the socioeconomic burden of irritable bowel syndrome compared with the overly strict Rome II. Prospective comparative studies should be conducted to confirm these results.

  5. REAL CONVERGENCE IN ROMANIA - A COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO NON-ERM II COUNTRIES FROM CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADELA SOCOL

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to survey the issue of real convergence in Central and Eastern Europe, based our approach on the literature review in the field and intended to develop a comparative approach of the main criteria of real convergence. We comparatively study Romania’s situation face to European Union Member States that did not adhere until now to ERM Exchange Rate Mechanism II and that do not benefit of special opt-outs stipulations - Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Bulgaria. The challenges of the paper consisted in identification and choose of the criteria which properly characterize the real convergence issue of the national economies. This approach is imposed by the widespread concept of real convergence and its different meanings or measurement manners.

  6. Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy, Part II: Comparing the literature with practice across diverse clinical populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Felicity; Wigram, Tony; Stott, Dave

    2009-01-01

    . Responses to a 21-question on-line survey were obtained from 419 professional music therapists practicing in 29 countries which focused on approaches to songwriting within their practice with a single clinical population. Results suggest that in general, the literature provides good representation for what...... is occurring in clinical practice. Generally, songs were composed with individual clients in single sessions, with lyrics created prior to the music. Clinicians had a significant role in creating the music with improvised and pre-determined musical structures being equally employed.  Chi-square or comparable......  Exact tests (Fisher-Freeman-Halton) were applied to the data and significant associations were found according to clinical populations particularly with respect the number of sessions required to complete a song, approaches to composing lyrics and music, the context with which songwriting was employed...

  7. ICT in Universities of the Western Himalayan Region of India II: A Comparative SWOT Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Dhirendra

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a comparative SWOT analysis to comprehend the pattern of development of ICT within six universities of western Himalayan region of India. With the objective of achieving quality and excellence in higher education system in the region, this study provides a basis to decision makers to exploit opportunities and minimize the external threats. The SWOT analysis of different universities, placed under three categories, has been undertaken within the four-tier framework used earlier by the authors. Guided by the initiatives of National Mission on Education through ICT (NMEICT) for SWOT analysis, findings of this paper reveal, relative consistency of these three categories of universities, with the earlier study. A few suggestions, as opportunities, with an emphasis on problem solving orientation in higher education, have been made to strengthen the leadership of universities in the field of ICT.

  8. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biganzoli, Laura, E-mail: laura.biganzoli@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Racanella, Gaia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Marras, Roberto [Unicalce S.p.A., R and D Department, Via Tonio da Belledo 30, 23900 Lecco (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  9. A Comparative Study on Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Resident Gut Bacteria (ii) Effect of Arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to use facultative gut bacteria as an alternate to animals for the initial gastrointestinal toxicity screening of heavy metals, a comparative study on rat intestinal epithelial cells and resident gut bacteria was undertaken.Methods in vitro growth rate of four gut bacteria, dehydrogenase (DHA) and esterase (EA) activity test, intestinal epithelial and bacterial cell membrane enzymes and in situ effect of arsenite were analysed. Results Growth profile of mixed resident population of gut bacteria and pure isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Staphylococcus sp.revealed an arsenite (2-20 ppm) concentration-dependent inhibition. The viability pattern of epithelial cells also showed similar changes. DHA and EA tests revealed significant inhibition (40%-72%) with arsenite exposure of 5 and 10 ppm in isolated gut bacteria and epithelial cells. Decrease in membrane alkaline phosphatase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase activities was in the range of 33%-55% in four bacteria at the arsenite exposure of 10 ppm, whereas it was 60%-65% in intestinal epithelial villus cells. in situ incubation of arsenite using intestinal loops also showed more or less similar changes in membrane enzymes of resident gut bacterial population and epithelial cells. Conclusion The results indicate that facultative gut bacteria can be used as suitable in vitro model for the preliminary screening of arsenical gastrointestinal cytotoxic effects.

  10. Comparative study of adsorption of Pb(II) on native garlic peel and mercerized garlic peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Yifeng; Tao, Yaqi; Yu, Youjie; Jiang, Hongmei; Lian, Hongzhen

    2014-02-01

    A comparative study using native garlic peel and mercerized garlic peel as adsorbents for the removal of Pb(2+) has been proposed. Under the optimized pH, contact time, and adsorbent dosage, the adsorption capacity of garlic peel after mercerization was increased 2.1 times and up to 109.05 mg g(-1). The equilibrium sorption data for both garlic peels fitted well with Langmuir adsorption isotherm, and the adsorbent-adsorbate kinetics followed pseudo-second-order model. These both garlic peels were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy, and the results indicated that mercerized garlic peel offers more little pores acted as adsorption sites than native garlic peel and has lower polymerization and crystalline and more accessible functional hydroxyl groups, which resulted in higher adsorption capacity than native garlic peel. The FT-IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of both garlic peels before and after loaded with Pb(2+) further illustrated that lead was adsorbed on the through chelation between Pb(2+) and O atom existed on the surface of garlic peels. These results described above showed that garlic peel after mercerization can be a more attractive adsorbent due to its faster sorption uptake and higher capacity.

  11. Comparable flow cytometry data can be obtained with two types of instruments, Canto II, and Navios. A GEIL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solly, Françoise; Rigollet, Lauren; Baseggio, Lucille; Guy, Julien; Borgeot, Jessica; Guérin, Estelle; Debliquis, Agathe; Drenou, Bernard; Campos, Lydia; Lacombe, Francis; Béné, Marie C

    2013-12-01

    Flow cytometry (FC) instruments settings classically rely on local establishment of photomultipliers (PMT) voltages adapted to the measurements expected to be performed. In the era of multiparameter FC (MFC), it appears more and more desirable that comparable patterns of fluorescence are obtained in different settings. This relies on a harmonization of settings between instruments. Although this has been shown to be feasible within a given brand of flow cytometers, little information is available about broader comparisons in a given center or in a multicenter fashion. Here, we report a two-phase series of experiments first performed between a Canto II (BD Biosciences) and a Navios (Beckman Coulter) instruments in the same center. PMT values adjusted on the reference instrument (RI) Canto II were used to establish target values for PMT settings on the paired Navios practice instrument (PI). This allowed to show the good correlation of all but peaks 1 and 2 of Rainbow(®) beads between RI and PI. Using 4- or 8-color stained leukocytes, the similitude of the settings was further confirmed. A complex set of matrices was then established between five centers all equipped with both instruments. Using Bland & Altman difference comparisons for median fluorescence values, it was shown that using either Rainbow beads or CD16 stained polymorphonuclears to set-up target values on the RI CantoII, highly superimposable results could be obtained on all 9 PI. The latter were obtained using Rainbow beads or Compbeads(®) for comparisons. In summary, this two-phase study demonstrates the feasibility of different methods allowing for a robust harmonization of settings for MFC.

  12. Comparing marginal microleakage of three Bulk Fill composites in Class II cavities using confocal microscope: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manne Udaya Swapna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to evaluate and compare microleakage at the occlusal wall and cervical wall in Class II cavities restored with one SonicFill Bulk Fill composite and two conventional Bulk Fill composites. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted teeth were divided into three groups of 10 teeth each. Standardized Class II cavities were made on the mesial and distal surfaces of each tooth and restored using SonicFill Bulk Fill composite and two conventional Bulk Fill composites, Tetric Evo Ceram, and X-tra fil. After storage, thermocycling and immersion in 0.6% rhodamine dye solution specimens were sectioned and evaluated for microleakage at the occlusal and cervical walls using confocal microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: The results demonstrated that in the occlusal wall and cervical wall, SonicFill Bulk Fill composite, showed significantly less marginal microleakage than the other groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, SonicFill Bulk Fill composite showed less microleakage than the other conventional Bulk Fill composites.

  13. Novel antennal lobe substructures revealed in the small hive beetle Aethina tumida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, Martin; Rupenthal, Anna Lena; Neumann, Peter; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, is an emerging pest of social bee colonies. A. tumida shows a specialized life style for which olfaction seems to play a crucial role. To better understand the olfactory system of the beetle, we used immunohistochemistry and 3-D reconstruction to analyze brain structures, especially the paired antennal lobes (AL), which represent the first integration centers for odor information in the insect brain. The basic neuroarchitecture of the A. tumida brain compares well to the typical beetle and insect brain. In comparison to other insects, the AL are relatively large in relationship to other brain areas, suggesting that olfaction is of major importance for the beetle. The AL of both sexes contain about 70 olfactory glomeruli with no obvious size differences of the glomeruli between sexes. Similar to all other insects including beetles, immunostaining with an antiserum against serotonin revealed a large cell that projects from one AL to the contralateral AL to densely innervate all glomeruli. Immunostaining with an antiserum against tachykinin-related peptides (TKRP) revealed hitherto unknown structures in the AL. Small TKRP-immunoreactive spherical substructures are in both sexes evenly distributed within all glomeruli. The source for these immunoreactive islets is very likely a group of about 80 local AL interneurons. We offer two hypotheses on the function of such structures.

  14. Corrosion processes and field performance of epoxy-coated reinforcing steel in marine substructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saguees, A.A. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Mechanics; Powers, R.G.; Kessler, R. [Florida Department of Transportation, Gainesville, FL (United States). Materials Office

    1994-12-31

    Severe corrosion of epoxy coated rebar in the substructure of marine bridges in the Florida Keys has prompted an investigation of the condition of other bridges in the State. Over thirty bridges were subject to field examination, which included determination of rebar condition, determination of extent of electric continuity between rebars, extraction of concrete cores, determination of chloride diffusivity, concrete resistivity measurements, and related electrochemical measurements. The results indicate that the time for development of external corrosion symptoms in the Florida Keys was dominated by the corrosion propagation stage, which in that case was comparable to that expected for plain rebar. Structures outside the Florida Keys were found to be generally corrosion-free. Extensive metal-coating disbandment was observed in virtually all structures whether or not significant chloride contamination existed at the rebar level. Chloride penetration was very slow in bridges with modem concrete formulations, suggesting that long corrosion-free service times are likely for those structures. It is expected that the corrosion-free service life in those structures will be primarily the result of concrete quality and thick cover, and not necessarily due to the use of epoxy-coated rebar.

  15. An algebraic sub-structuring method for large-scale eigenvaluecalculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Gao, W.; Bai, Z.; Li, X.; Lee, L.; Husbands, P.; Ng, E.

    2004-05-26

    We examine sub-structuring methods for solving large-scalegeneralized eigenvalue problems from a purely algebraic point of view. Weuse the term "algebraic sub-structuring" to refer to the process ofapplying matrix reordering and partitioning algorithms to divide a largesparse matrix into smaller submatrices from which a subset of spectralcomponents are extracted and combined to provide approximate solutions tothe original problem. We are interested in the question of which spectralcomponentsone should extract from each sub-structure in order to producean approximate solution to the original problem with a desired level ofaccuracy. Error estimate for the approximation to the small esteigen pairis developed. The estimate leads to a simple heuristic for choosingspectral components (modes) from each sub-structure. The effectiveness ofsuch a heuristic is demonstrated with numerical examples. We show thatalgebraic sub-structuring can be effectively used to solve a generalizedeigenvalue problem arising from the simulation of an acceleratorstructure. One interesting characteristic of this application is that thestiffness matrix produced by a hierarchical vector finite elements schemecontains a null space of large dimension. We present an efficient schemeto deflate this null space in the algebraic sub-structuringprocess.

  16. New constraints on the complex mass substructure in Abell 1689 from gravitational flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Adrienne; King, Lindsay J.; Goldberg, David M.

    2011-05-01

    In a recent publication, the flexion aperture mass statistic was found to provide a robust and effective method by which substructure in galaxy clusters might be mapped. Moreover, we suggested that the masses and mass profile of structures might be constrained using this method. In this paper, we apply the flexion aperture mass technique to HST ACS images of Abell 1689. We demonstrate that the flexion aperture mass statistic is sensitive to small-scale structures in the central region of the cluster. While the central potential is not constrained by our method, due largely to missing data in the central 0.5 arcmin of the cluster, we are able to place constraints on the masses and mass profiles of prominent substructures. We identify four separate mass peaks, and use the peak aperture mass signal and zero signal radius in each case to constrain the masses and mass profiles of these substructures. The three most massive peaks exhibit complex small-scale structure, and the masses indicated by the flexion aperture mass statistic suggest that these three peaks represent the dominant substructure component of the cluster (˜7 × 1014 h-1 M⊙). Their complex structure indicates that the cluster - far from being relaxed - may have recently undergone a merger. The smaller, subsidiary peak is located coincident with a group of galaxies within the cluster, with mass ˜1 × 1014 h-1 M⊙. These results are in excellent agreement with previous substructure studies of this cluster.

  17. Efficient substructure searching of large chemical libraries: the ABCD chemical cartridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafiotis, Dimitris K; Lobanov, Victor S; Shemanarev, Maxim; Rassokhin, Dmitrii N; Izrailev, Sergei; Jaeger, Edward P; Alex, Simson; Farnum, Michael

    2011-12-27

    Efficient substructure searching is a key requirement for any chemical information management system. In this paper, we describe the substructure search capabilities of ABCD, an integrated drug discovery informatics platform developed at Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C. The solution consists of several algorithmic components: 1) a pattern mapping algorithm for solving the subgraph isomorphism problem, 2) an indexing scheme that enables very fast substructure searches on large structure files, 3) the incorporation of that indexing scheme into an Oracle cartridge to enable querying large relational databases through SQL, and 4) a cost estimation scheme that allows the Oracle cost-based optimizer to generate a good execution plan when a substructure search is combined with additional constraints in a single SQL query. The algorithm was tested on a public database comprising nearly 1 million molecules using 4,629 substructure queries, the vast majority of which were submitted by discovery scientists over the last 2.5 years of user acceptance testing of ABCD. 80.7% of these queries were completed in less than a second and 96.8% in less than ten seconds on a single CPU, while on eight processing cores these numbers increased to 93.2% and 99.7%, respectively. The slower queries involved extremely generic patterns that returned the entire database as screening hits and required extensive atom-by-atom verification.

  18. Formulation of an experimental substructure model using a Craig-Bampton based transmission simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammer, Daniel C.; Allen, Mathew S.; Mayes, Randy L.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental-analytical substructuring is attractive when there is motivation to replace one or more system subcomponents with an experimental model. This experimentally derived substructure can then be coupled to finite element models of the rest of the structure to predict the system response. The transmission simulator method couples a fixture to the component of interest during a vibration test in order to improve the experimental model for the component. The transmission simulator is then subtracted from the tested system to produce the experimental component. The method reduces ill-conditioning by imposing a least squares fit of constraints between substructure modal coordinates to connect substructures, instead of directly connecting physical interface degrees of freedom. This paper presents an alternative means of deriving the experimental substructure model, in which a Craig-Bampton representation of the transmission simulator is created and subtracted from the experimental measurements. The corresponding modal basis of the transmission simulator is described by the fixed-interface modes, rather than free modes that were used in the original approach. These modes do a better job of representing the shape of the transmission simulator as it responds within the experimental system, leading to more accurate results using fewer modes. The new approach is demonstrated using a simple finite element model based example with a redundant interface.

  19. Strong population substructure is correlated with morphology and ecology in a migratory bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Butterworth, Cassandra M; Jacobs, David S; Harley, Eric H

    2003-07-10

    Examining patterns of inter-population genetic diversity can provide valuable information about both historical and current evolutionary processes affecting a species. Population genetic studies of flying and migratory species such as bats and birds have traditionally shown minimal population substructure, characterized by high levels of gene flow between populations. In general, strongly substructured mammalian populations either are separated by non-traversable barriers or belong to terrestrial species with low dispersal abilities. Species with female philopatry (the tendency to remain in or consistently return to the natal territory) might show strong substructure when examined with maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, but this substructure generally disappears when biparentally inherited markers are used, owing to male-mediated gene flow. Male-biased dispersal is considered typical for mammals, and philopatry in both sexes is rare. Here we show strong population substructure in a migratory bat species, and philopatry in both sexes, as indicated by concordance of nuclear and mtDNA findings. Furthermore, the genetic structure correlates with local biomes and differentiation in wing morphology. There is therefore a close correlation of genetic and morphological differentiation in sympatric subspecific populations of this mammalian species.

  20. Acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet compares favorably to a step II diet in a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Neal D; Scialli, Anthony R; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Lanou, Amy J

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet, as compared with a more typical fat-modified diet, among overweight and obese adults. Through newspaper advertisements, 64 overweight, postmenopausal women were recruited, 59 of whom completed the study. The participants were assigned randomly to a low-fat vegan diet or, for comparison, to a National Cholesterol Education Program Step II (NCEP) diet. At baseline and 14 weeks later, dietary intake, dietary restraint, disinhibition, and hunger, as well as the acceptability and perceived benefits and adverse effects of each diet were assessed. Dietary restraint increased in the NCEP group (P vegan group. Disinhibition and hunger scores fell in each group (P vegan group participants rated their diet as less easy to prepare than their usual diets (P vegan diet is high and not demonstrably different from that of a more moderate low-fat diet among well-educated, postmenopausal women in a research environment.

  1. Exploring the reality of density substructures in the Palomar 5 stellar stream

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Guillaume F; Famaey, Benoit; Martin, Nicolas F; Lewis, Geraint F

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the presence of substructures in the stellar stream of the Palomar 5 globular cluster, as derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. Using a matched filter technique, we recover the positions and sizes of overdensities reported in previous studies. To explore the reality of these structures, we also create an artificial model of the stream, in which we construct a realistic background on top of which we add a perfectly smooth stream structure, taking into account the effects of photometric completeness and interstellar extinction. We find that the smooth artificial stream then shows similarly-pronounced substructures as the real structure. Interestingly, our best-fit N-body simulation does display real projected density variations linked to stellar epicyclic motions, but these become less significant when taking into account the SDSS star-count constraints. The substructures found when applying our matched filter technique to the N-body particles converted into observable stars are ...

  2. Theory and Simulations of Refractive Substructure in Resolved Scatter-Broadened Images

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    At radio wavelengths, scattering in the interstellar medium distorts the appearance of astronomical sources. Averaged over a scattering ensemble, the result is a blurred image of the source. However, Narayan & Goodman (1989) and Goodman & Narayan (1989) showed that for an incomplete average, scattering introduces refractive substructure in the image of a point source that is both persistent and wideband. We show that this substructure is not smoothed by an extended source and that the scattering can therefore introduce spurious compact features into images that would be resolved in the absence of scattering. In addition, we derive efficient strategies to numerically compute realistic scattered images, and we present characteristic examples from simulations. Our results show that refractive substructure is an important consideration for ongoing missions at the highest angular resolutions, and we discuss specific implications for RadioAstron and the Event Horizon Telescope.

  3. Reconstruction of small-scale galaxy cluster substructure with lensing flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Benjamin; Bradač, Maruša; Levinson, Rebecca

    2016-09-01

    We present reconstructions of galaxy-cluster-scale mass distributions from simulated gravitational lensing data sets including strong lensing, weak lensing shear, and measurements of quadratic image distortions - flexion. The lensing data is constructed to make a direct comparison between mass reconstructions with and without flexion. We show that in the absence of flexion measurements, significant galaxy-group scale substructure can remain undetected in the reconstructed mass profiles, and that the resulting profiles underestimate the aperture mass in the substructure regions by ˜25 - 40%. When flexion is included, subhaloes down to a mass of ˜3 × 1012 M⊙ can be detected at an angular resolution smaller than 10″. Aperture masses from profiles reconstructed with flexion match the input distribution values to within an error of ˜13%, including both statistical error and scatter. This demonstrates the important constraint that flexion measurements place on substructure in galaxy clusters and its utility for producing high-fidelity mass reconstructions.

  4. Improving jet substructure in ATLAS using unified track and calorimeter information

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Jet substructure techniques play a critical role in ATLAS in searches for new physics, are increasingly important in measurements of the Standard Model, and are being utilized in the trigger. To date, ATLAS has mostly focused on the use of calorimeter-based jet substructure, which works well for jets initiated by particles with low to moderate boost, but which lacks the angular resolution needed to resolve the desired substructure in the highly-boosted regime. We will present a novel approach designed to mitigate the calorimeter angular resolution limitations, thus providing superior performance to prior methods. Similar to previous methods, the superior angular resolution of the tracker is combined with information from the calorimeters. However, the new method is fundamentally different, as it correlates low-level objects as tracks and individual energy deposits in the calorimeter, before running any jet finding algorithms. The resulting objects are used as inputs to jet reconstruction, and in turn result i...

  5. Improving jet substructure performance in ATLAS using Track-CaloClusters

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Jet substructure techniques play a critical role in ATLAS in searches for new physics, are increasingly important in measurements of the Standard Model, and are being utilized in the trigger. To date, ATLAS has mostly focused on the use of calorimeter-based jet substructure, which works well for jets initiated by particles with low to moderate boost, but which lacks the angular resolution needed to resolve the desired substructure in the highly-boosted regime. We present a novel approach designed to mitigate the calorimeter angular resolution limitations, thus providing superior performance to prior methods. Similarly to the previously developed combined mass technique, the superior angular resolution of the tracker is combined with information from the calorimeters. However, the new method is fundamentally different, as it correlates low-level objects such as tracks and individual energy deposits in the calorimeter, before running any jet finding algorithms. The resulting objects are used as inputs to jet re...

  6. Jet Substructure Templates: Data-driven QCD Backgrounds for Fat Jet Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Timothy; Lisanti, Mariangela; Lou, Hou Keong; Wacker, Jay G

    2014-01-01

    QCD is often the dominant background to new physics searches for which jet substructure provides a useful handle. Due to the challenges associated with modeling this background, data-driven approaches are necessary. This paper presents a novel method for determining QCD predictions using templates -- probability distribution functions for jet substructure properties as a function of kinematic inputs. Templates can be extracted from a control region and then used to compute background distributions in the signal region. Using Monte Carlo, we illustrate the procedure with two case studies and show that the template approach effectively models the relevant QCD background. This work strongly motivates the application of these techniques to LHC data.

  7. Jet substructure templates: data-driven QCD backgrounds for fat jet searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Timothy [Theory Group, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jankowiak, Martin [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lisanti, Mariangela; Lou, Hou Keong [Physics Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wacker, Jay G. [Theory Group, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2014-05-05

    QCD is often the dominant background to new physics searches for which jet substructure provides a useful handle. Due to the challenges associated with modeling this background, data-driven approaches are necessary. This paper presents a novel method for determining QCD predictions using templates — probability distribution functions for jet substructure properties as a function of kinematic inputs. Templates can be extracted from a control region and then used to compute background distributions in the signal region. Using Monte Carlo, we illustrate the procedure with two case studies and show that the template approach effectively models the relevant QCD background. This work strongly motivates the application of these techniques to LHC data.

  8. OPTIMAL SUBSTRUCTURE OF SET-VALUED SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL-FORM GAMES AND COORDINATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norimasa KOBAYASHI; Kyoichi KIJIMA

    2009-01-01

    A number of solution concepts of normal-form games have been proposed in the literature on subspaces of action profiles that have Nash type stability. While the literature mainly focuses on the minimal of such stable subspaces, this paper argues that non-minimal stable subspaces represent well the multi-agent situations to which neither Nash equilibrium nor rationalizability may be applied with satisfaction. As a theoretical support, the authors prove the optimal substructure of stable subspaces regarding the restriction of a game. It is further argued that the optimal substructure characterizes hierarchical diversity of coordination and interim phases in learning.

  9. Performance of Jet Substructure Techniques and Boosted Object Identification in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lacey, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS has implemented and commissioned many new jet substructure techniques to aid in the identification and interpretation of hadronic final states originating from Lorentz-boosted heavy particles produced at the LHC. These techniques include quantum jets, jet charge, jet shapes, quark/gluon, boosted boson and top quark tagging, along with grooming methods such as pruning, trimming, and filtering. These techniques have been validated using the large 2012 ATLAS dataset. Presented here is a summary of the state of the art jet substructure and tagging techniques developed in ATLAS, their performance and recent results.

  10. Substructure evolution of Zircaloy-4 during creep and implications for the Modified Jogged-Screw model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, B.M., E-mail: morrow@lanl.gov [The Ohio State University, 2041 College Rd., 477 Watts Hall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS G755, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kozar, R.W.; Anderson, K.R. [Bettis Laboratory, Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corp., West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States); Mills, M.J., E-mail: millsmj@mse.osu.edu [The Ohio State University, 2041 College Rd., 477 Watts Hall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Several specimens of Zircaloy-4 were creep tested at a single stress-temperature condition, and interrupted at different accumulated strain levels. Substructural observations were performed using bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF STEM). The dislocation substructure was characterized to ascertain how creep strain evolution impacts the Modified Jogged-Screw (MJS) model, which has previously been utilized to predict steady-state strain rates in Zircaloy-4. Special attention was paid to the evolution of individual model parameters with increasing strain. Results of model parameter measurements are reported and discussed, along with possible extensions to the MJS model.

  11. VARIATION OF SUBSTRUCTURES OF PEARLITIC HEAT RESISTANT STEEL AFTER HIGH TEMPERATURE AGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.C.Yang; K.Chen; H.X.Feng; H.Wang

    2004-01-01

    The observations of dislocations, substructures and other microstructural details were conducted mainly by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for 12Cr1Mo V pearlitic heat-resistant steel. It is shown that during the high temperature long-term aging, the disordered and jumbled phasetransformed dislocations caused by normalized cooling are recovered and rearranged into cell substructures, and then the dislocation density is reduced gradually. Finally a low density linear dislocation configuration and a stabler dislocation network are formed and ferritic grains grow considerably.

  12. Comparative evaluation of platelet-rich fibrin versus beta-tri-calcium phosphate in the treatment of Grade II mandibular furcation defects using cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Zeba Rahman; Jhingran, Rajesh; Bains, Vivek Kumar; Srivastava, Ruchi; Madan, Rohit; Rizvi, Iram

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate clinically and radiographically the efficacy of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus β-tri-calcium phosphate (β-TCP) in the treatment of Grade II mandibular furcation defects. Materials and Methods: Forty-five Grade II furcation defect in mandibular molars which were assigned to open flap debridement (OFD) with PRF Group I (n = 15), to OFD with β-TCP Group II (n = 15), and to OFD alone Group III (n = 15) were analyzed for clinical parameters (probing pocket depth [PPD], vertical clinical attachment level [VCAL], horizontal clinical attachment level [HCAL], gingival recession, relative vertical height of furcation [r-VHF], and relative horizontal depth of furcation [r-HDF]) and radiographical parameters (horizontal depth of furcation [H-DOF], vertical height of furcation [V-HOF]) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) at 6 months interval. Results: For clinical parameters, reduction in PPD and gain in VCAL and HCAL were higher in Group II as compared to Group I. Change in r-VHF and r-HDF was greater in Group II as compared to Group I. Mean percentage clinical vertical defect fill was higher in Group II as compared to Group I (58.52% ± 11.68% vs. 53.24% ± 13.22%, respectively). On CBCT, mean change at 6 months for all parameters showed nonsignificant difference between the two experimental groups. Mean change in V-HOF was higher in Group I as compared to Group II, but mean change in H-DOF and furcation width was more in Group II as compared to Group I. Conclusion: For both experimental and control groups, there was statistically significant improvement at 6 months follow-up from baseline values. PMID:28042265

  13. A Substructural Damage Identification Approach for Shear Structure Based on Changes in the First AR Model Coefficient Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A substructural damage identification approach based on changes in the first AR model coefficient matrix is proposed in this paper to identify structural damage including its location and severity. Firstly, a substructure approach is adopted in the procedure to divide a complete structure into several substructures in order to significantly reduce the number of unknown parameters for each substructure so that damage identification processes can be independently conducted on each substructure. To establish a relation between changes in AR model coefficients and structural damage for each substructure, a theoretical derivation is presented. Thus the accelerations are fed into ARMAX models to determine the AR model coefficients for each substructure under undamaged and various damaged conditions, based on which changes in the first AR model coefficient matrix (CFAR is obtained and adopted as the damage indicator for the proposed substructure damage identification approach. To better assess the performance of the proposed procedure, a numerical simulation and an experimental verification of the proposed approach are then carried out and the results show that the proposed procedure can successfully locate and quantify the damage in both simulation and laboratory experiment.

  14. Removal of cadmium (II) from aqueous solution: A comparative study of raw attapulgite clay and a reusable waste–struvite/attapulgite obtained from nutrient-rich wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Xuejiang, E-mail: wangxj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ma, Jinxing, E-mail: jinxing.ma@unsw.edu.au [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Xia, Peng; Zhao, Jianfu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • Both nutrient recovery and Cd(II) removal were achieved by MAP/APT. • The nutrient recovery process was used as a novel method of modification. • Compared with raw APT, MAP/APT enhanced Cd(II) adsorption capacity. • Cd(II) adsorption mechanisms from aqueous solution were extensively investigated. - Abstract: In this study, raw attapulgite (APT) and a novel adsorbent, struvite/attapulgite (MAP/APT) obtained from nutrient-rich wastewater treated by MgO modified APT, were applied as the absorbent for Cd(II) ion removal from aqueous solution. The two adsorbents were characterized by BET, SEM-EDS, XRD, FT-IR. Raw APT and MAP/APT separately presented the maximum Cd(II) adsorption capacities of 10.38 mg/g and 121.14 mg/g at pH of 5.45. The Cd(II) adsorption on raw APT and MAP/APT could be well fitted by Freundlich isotherm and Langmuir isotherm, respectively. Pseudo-second order equation was able to properly describe the kinetics of Cd(II) adsorption by raw APT and MAP/APT. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that Cd(II) adsorption onto raw APT and MAP/APT were spontaneous and endothermic. An economic evaluation revealed that the treatment costs of the adsorption process by raw APT and MPA/APT were 0.013 $ per 1000 mg Cd and 0.004 $ per 1000 mg Cd, respectively.

  15. Three-dimensional study of dislocation substructures in punch-stretched, AK, DQ, low-carbon steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledezma, M.

    1986-05-01

    Dislocation substructures developed in Aluminum Killed (AK), Drawing Quality (DQ), Low Carbon steel sheets during the Limiting Dome Height (LDH) test are investigated. Thin foils parallel to the sheet plane, longitudinal and transverse sections for different strain ratios have been observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Analysis of the cellular structure in three-dimensions allows the determination of the orientations of the cell wall planes inside individual ferrite grains. The observed cell wall planes for different strain ratios and grain orientations are compared with active slip planes calculated by using the Sach's model for polycrystal deformation. Cell walls are found to be roughly parallel to calculated slip planes for the range of strain ratios considered. Discrepancies observed in negative strain ratio samples are explained in terms of the validity of the Sach's model free-grain assumption.

  16. Comparative in vivo analysis of recombinant type II feline coronaviruses with truncated and completed ORF3 region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádám Bálint

    Full Text Available Our previous in vitro comparative study on a feline coronavirus (FCoV pair, differing only in the intactness of their ORF3abc regions, showed that the truncated ORF3abc plays an important role in the efficient macrophage/monocyte tropism of type II feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV. In the present study, we describe a challenge experiment with the same recombinant FCoVs in order to gain data on the in vivo characteristics on these viruses. While parent virus FIPV DF-2 developed feline infectious peritonitis in all the infected cats, its recombinant virus PBFIPV-DF-2, differing only in seven nucleotides, proved to be surprisingly low virulent, although caused an acute febrile episode similarly to the original FIPV DF-2. PBFIPV-DF-2 infection induced significantly lower virus neutralization titers than its parent virus, and lacked the second phase of viremia and development of fatal course of the disease. The recombinant PBFIPV-DF-2-R3i with completed ORF3abc gained biological properties that differentiate between the feline enteric coronavirus (FECV and FIPV biotypes such as intensive replication in the gut, absence of viremia and weak or no serological response. Using reverse genetic approaches our study is the first experimental proof that ORF3abc is indeed responsible for the restriction of FECV replication to the intestine in vivo.

  17. The development of microtextures and dislocation substructures in naturally deformed olivines from various geological environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buiskool Toxopeus, J.M.A.

    1978-01-01

    High voltage electron microscopy and petrofabric analysis techniques are used to distinguish dislocation substructures and preferred orientation patterns of the mineral olivine in naturally deformed peridotites. In order to obtain information over a wide field in which different types of deformation

  18. Updating failure probability of a welded joint in offshore wind turbine substructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Quang A.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Rigo, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The operation and maintenance cost of offshore wind turbine substructures contributes significantly in the cost of a kWh. That cost may be lowered by application of reliability- and risk based maintenance strategies and reliability updating based on inspections performed during the design lifetim...

  19. A model for Quick Load Analysis for monopile-type offshore wind turbine substructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schløer, Signe; Castillo, Laura Garcia; Fejerskov, Morten

    2016-01-01

    A model for Quick Load Analysis, QuLA, of an offshore wind turbine substructure is presented. The aerodynamic rotor loads and damping are precomputed for a load-based configuration. The dynamic structural response is represented by the first global fore-aft mode only and is computed in the freque...

  20. Loop substructure identification for shear structures of unknown structural mass using synthesized references

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyu; Li, Hui

    2017-08-01

    Shear structure is widely adopted to model the dynamics for building structures. Thus, developing accurate and efficient parameter identification methods for a shear structure plays a crucial role in structural health monitoring for building structures. In the authors’ previous studies, a loop substructure identification (LSI) method was proposed for shear structures, in which the dynamic equation of a two-story substructure is utilized to establish a loop identification sequence, directly estimating the substructure’s parameters. To ensure the convergence of the loop identification sequence, some structural control (SC) systems are needed to change the critical structural responses in a favorable way. However, the limited availability of SC systems in general buildings restrains the wide application of this controlled loop substructure identification (CLSI) method. In this paper, the original LSI method is first reformed, which can perform the LSI even if the structural mass is unknown. Then, a new reference selection method is proposed to make the LSI method converge without the help of SC systems. Different synthesized reference responses, formed by a weighted linear combination of measured structural responses, are used to formulate the LSI sequence. Next, an optimization strategy is proposed to determine the optimal weighting factors of the synthesized reference responses, which makes the LSI converged. Finally, the LSI is carried out for a 20-story shear structure, the identification results of which show that the proposed LSI method, combined with the proposed reference selection method, can very accurately estimate the substructure parameters of the shear structure.

  1. Placing Limits on Extragalactic Substructure with Gravitational Lenses and Adaptive Optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagattuta, David J.; Vegetti, S.; Auger, M. W.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; McKean, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results from a systematic search for extragalactic substructure, using high resolution Adaptive Optics (AO) images of known strong gravitational lenses. In particular we focus on two lens systems, B0128+437 and B1939+666, placing limits on both luminous and dark matter substruct

  2. A New Method to Quantify X-ray Substructures in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Laganá, Tatiana Ferraz

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method to quantify substructures in clusters of galaxies, based on the analysis of the intensity of structures. This analysis is done in a residual image that is the result of the subtraction of a surface brightness model, obtained by fitting a two-dimensional analytical model (beta-model or S\\'ersic profile) with elliptical symmetry, from the X-ray image. Our method is applied to 34 clusters observed by the Chandra Space Telescope that are in the redshift range 0.02substructure level with physical quantities, such as the mass, X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cluster redshift. We use our method to separate the clusters in two sub-samples of high and low substructure levels. We conclude, using Monte Carlo simulations, that the method recuperates very well the true amount of substructure for small angular core radii clusters (with respect to the whole image s...

  3. Substructure method of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H. G.; Joe, Y. H. [Industrial Development Research Center, Univ. of Incheon, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-15

    Substructure method has been preferably adopted for soil-structure interaction analysis because of its simplicity and economy in practical application. However, substructure method has some limitation in application and does not always give reliable results especially for embedded structures or layered soil conditions. The objective of this study to validate the reliability of the soil-structure interaction analysis results by the proposed substructure method using lumped-parameter model and suggest a method of seismic design of nuclear power plant structures with specific design conditions. In this study, theoretic background and modeling technique of soil-structure interaction phenomenon have been reviewed and an analysis technique based on substructure method using lumped-parameter model has been suggested. The practicality and reliability of the proposed method have been validated through the application of the method to the seismic analysis of the large-scale seismic test models. A technical guide for practical application and evaluation of the proposed method have been also provided through the various type parametric.

  4. Substructure formation during pattern transposition from substrate into polymer blend film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cyganik, P; Budkowski, A; Steiner, U; Rysz, J; Bernasik, A; Walheim, S; Postawa, Z; Raczkowska, J

    2003-01-01

    A chemical pattern on a substrate is transposed into thin films of a ternary polymer blend during spin-casting from a common solvent. One of the blend components intercalates at interfaces between the other two phases to reduce their interfacial energy. As a result, an extensive substructure is form

  5. Structure and substructure of austenite formed during heating of quenched and thermomechanically strengthened steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernshtejn, M.L.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Prokoshkin, S.D.; Lyuttsau, A.V.; Prokoshkina, V.G. (Moskovskij Inst. Stali i Splavov (USSR))

    1982-06-01

    Mechanism of ..cap alpha.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformation in chromium and chromium-nickel steels, peculiarities of substructure formation of austenite formed at repeated heating after quenching and high-temperature thermomechanical treatment and its stability to recrystallization in steels with different martensite morphology and temperature of the initial stage of austenite formation are investigated.

  6. The tension between organisational sub-structures in secondary schools and educational reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imants, J.G.M.; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Witziers, B.

    2001-01-01

    In Dutch secondary schools the recent trend has been to replace the two existing sub-structures of subject departments and student guidance units by one system of integrated and decentralised teams. The aim of this article is to gain more insight into how secondary schools can provide supportive wor

  7. Quantifying Substructure Measures In X-ray Images of Galaxy Cluster Mergers With SLAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikos, Marios; Sarazin, C. L.; O'Shea, B. W.

    2014-01-01

    I use the Simulation Library of Astrophysical galaxy cluster Mergers (SLAM) database to quantify the effects of mergers on X-ray observables. SLAM consists of a set of 156 adiabatic simulations of binary galaxy cluster mergers, that covers 2 orders of magnitude in the mass of the primary cluster, four values for the mass contrast, and four values for the angular momentum of the collision. In this talk I describe results on substructure measures obtained for various viewing angles. I have quantified the substructure in X-ray images using both center shifts and power ratios. Mergers of intermediate mass contrasts produce substructure signals that can persist in X-ray images for at least 1-2 sound crossing times. The amplitude of both measures depends strongly on the initial mass contrast. The measures for major mergers (mass contrast less than 3) appear to depend on the system mass, while for minor mergers (mass contrast between 3 and 10) they are generally independent of the system mass. Neither measure reflects the true dynamical state of the system closely, although the center shifts appear to be a better proxy. Comparisons with the virial and hydrostatic disequilibrium parameters reveal that there is no value of either substructure measure that unambiguously distinguishes merging from relaxing systems. Implications for SZE observations will also be discussed.

  8. Substructure formation during pattern transposition from substrate into polymer blend film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cyganik, P; Budkowski, A; Steiner, U; Rysz, J; Bernasik, A; Walheim, S; Postawa, Z; Raczkowska, J

    2003-01-01

    A chemical pattern on a substrate is transposed into thin films of a ternary polymer blend during spin-casting from a common solvent. One of the blend components intercalates at interfaces between the other two phases to reduce their interfacial energy. As a result, an extensive substructure is form

  9. Higher fluorescence in platinum(iv) orthometallated complexes of perylene imine compared with their platinum(ii) or palladium(ii) analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito, J Emilio; Álvarez-Paíno, Marta; Aullón, Gabriel; Miguel, Jesús A; Espinet, Pablo

    2015-09-28

    The reaction of 3-perylenylmethylen-4'-ethylaniline () with [Pt2Me4(μ-SMe2)2] (and subsequent addition of PPh3) or with [Pt2(η(3)-C4H7)2(μ-Cl)2] produced cyclometallated Pt(II) complexes [Pt(C^N)Me(PPh3)] () and, respectively, [Pt2(C^N)2(μ-Cl)2] () (HC^N = 3-C20H11CH[double bond, length as m-dash]NC6H4-p-C2H5), with Pt bound to the ortho site of the perylenyl fragment. From the mononuclear complexes [Pt(C^N)L2] (L2 = acac (); S2COMe (); S2CNEt2 () are easily formed. Oxidative addition of methyl iodide to the square-planar Pt(II) complexes , , and gave the corresponding cyclometallated Pt(IV) compounds [Pt(C^N)L2MeI] , and . The X-ray structures of , , and show that the perylenyl fragment remains essentially flat in and and slightly twisted in . Comparison of the optical properties of these Pt(II) complexes with those reported for similar Pd(II) derivatives reveals that the change of metal exerts a notable influence on the UV-vis spectra. In solution at room temperature, all the Pt complexes exhibit fluorescence associated with the perylene fragment with low emission quantum yields for the Pt(II) complexes (IV) complexes: up to 29%, with emission lifetimes of 1-5 ns. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations were performed on the perylene imine and on representative complexes [M(C^N)(acac)] (M = Pd, Pt) and [Pt(C^N)(acac)MeI] to analyse the absorption spectra. These calculations support a perylene-dominated intraligand π-π*emissive state based on the HOMO and LUMO orbitals of the perylene chromophore, and a ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer (more intense for the Pt(II) complex) that explains the observed influence of the metal on the absorption properties.

  10. Comparative study of RetCamRetCam II vs. binocular ophthalmoscopy in a screening program for retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada-Palacios, P; Zarratea, L; Moral, M; de la Cruz-Bértolo, J

    2015-08-01

    To determine the performance of RetCam vs. binocular ophthalmoscopy (BIO) in a screening program for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Observational comparative study with prospective data collection. Examinations with RetCam (n=169) were performed on 83 infants included in a screening program for ROP and stored for analysis at a later stage. An experienced ophthalmologist examined the ocular fundus with binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO). The RetCam images were assessed for the presence of ROP, zone, grade, and presence of plus disease. RetCam and BIO data were compared by visually to estimate sensitivity, specificity, positive (VPP) and negative (VPN) predictive values. ROP disease was detected in 108 eyes with BIO, and in 74 with RetCam. Out of 306 eyes examined with RetCam, false negative results were found in 34 eyes, with no false positives. Sensitivity of RetCam exam vs. BIO was 0.68, and specificity was 0.99. Positive predictive value was 0.93 and negative predictive value was 0.85. All 34 ROP cases not detected with RetCam were in zone III or outer zone II. They were all mild and regressed spontaneously. No threshold ROP was missed with RetCam. Binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy is the reference method for the diagnosis of ROP. RetCam may be used as an alternative for ROP screening. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidative addition of halogens to homoleptic perfluoromethyl or perfluorophenyl derivatives of platinum(II): a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menjón, Babil; Martínez-Salvador, Sonia; Gómez-Saso, Miguel A; Forniés, Juan; Falvello, Larry R; Martín, Antonio; Tsipis, Athanassios

    2009-06-22

    Chlorocarbon solvents (solv=CH(2)Cl(2), CHCl(3)) are suggested to play an active role in the oxidative addition of halogens, X(2) (X=Cl, Br, I), to homoleptic d(8) perfluoromethyl and -phenyl platinum(II) species [Pt(R(F))(4)](2-) (R(F)=CF(3), C(6)F(5)). The perfluoromethyl group, CF(3), has been found to be considerably less prone to undergo reductive elimination processes, and is, therefore, more suitable for stabilizing organoplatinum(IV) derivatives (see scheme).The equilibrium geometries of the homoleptic perfluorinated organoplatinate(II) anions [Pt(CF(3))(4)](2-) and [Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)](2-) have been computed at the B3P86/LANL2DZ level of theory. Remarkably good agreement with the experimentally determined structures has been obtained by X-ray diffraction methods. The reactivity of [NBu(4)](2)[Pt(CF(3))(4)] (1) towards halogens (Cl(2), Br(2), and I(2)) has been investigated by using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. The perfluoromethyl derivative 1 has been found to undergo clean oxidative addition of the three halogens under investigation, giving rise to [NBu(4)](2)[trans-Pt(CF(3))(4)X(2)] (X=Cl (7), Br (10), I (13)) in a quantitative and stereoselective way. In the low-temperature reaction of the perfluorophenyl derivative [NBu(4)](2)[Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)] (3) with Cl(2) or Br(2), the corresponding oxidative-addition products [NBu(4)](2)[trans-Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)X(2)] (X=Cl (14), Br (15)) can also be obtained. In the case in which X=Br and working in CHCl(3) at -55 degrees C, it has been possible to detect the formation of an intermediate species to which we assign the formula [trans-Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)Br(ClCHCl(2))](-) (16). The solvento complex 16 is thermally unstable and prone to undergo reductive elimination of C(6)F(5)--C(6)F(5). In the presence of PhCN, complex [NBu(4)][trans-Pt(C(6)F(5))(4)Br(NCPh)] (17) was isolated and structurally characterized. The reaction of 3 with I(2) gave no organoplatinum(IV) compound. Our comparative study reveals that

  12. The Extended Halo of Centaurus A: Uncovering Satellites, Streams, and Substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the widest-field resolved stellar map to date of the closest (D˜ 3.8 Mpc) massive elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A; Cen A), extending out to a projected galactocentric radius of ˜150 kpc. The data set is part of our ongoing Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) utilizing the Magellan/Megacam imager. We resolve a population of old red giant branch (RGB) stars down to ˜1.5 mag below the tip of the RGB, reaching surface brightness limits as low as {μ }V,0˜ 32 mag arcsec-2. The resulting spatial stellar density map highlights a plethora of previously unknown streams, shells, and satellites, including the first tidally disrupting dwarf around Cen A (CenA-MM-Dw3), which underline its active accretion history. We report 13 previously unknown dwarf satellite candidates, of which 9 are confirmed to be at the distance of Cen A (the remaining 4 are not resolved into stars), with magnitudes in the range {M}V=-7.2 to -13.0, central surface brightness values of {μ }V,0=25.4{--}26.9 mag arcsec-2, and half-light radii of {r}h=0.22{--}2.92 {{kpc}}. These values are in line with Local Group dwarfs but also lie at the faint/diffuse end of their distribution; interestingly, CenA-MM-Dw3 has similar properties to the recently discovered ultradiffuse galaxies in Virgo and Coma. Most of the new dwarfs are fainter than the previously known Cen A satellites. The newly discovered dwarfs and halo substructures are discussed in light of their stellar populations, and they are compared to those discovered by the PAndAS survey of M31. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. Assessment of First- and Second-Order Wave-Excitation Load Models for Cylindrical Substructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, Brandon; Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason

    2016-07-01

    The hydrodynamic loads on an offshore wind turbine's support structure present unique engineering challenges for offshore wind. Two typical approaches used for modeling these hydrodynamic loads are potential flow (PF) and strip theory (ST), the latter via Morison's equation. This study examines the first- and second-order wave-excitation surge forces on a fixed cylinder in regular waves computed by the PF and ST approaches to (1) verify their numerical implementations in HydroDyn and (2) understand when the ST approach breaks down. The numerical implementation of PF and ST in HydroDyn, a hydrodynamic time-domain solver implemented as a module in the FAST wind turbine engineering tool, was verified by showing the consistency in the first- and second-order force output between the two methods across a range of wave frequencies. ST is known to be invalid at high frequencies, and this study investigates where the ST solution diverges from the PF solution. Regular waves across a range of frequencies were run in HydroDyn for a monopile substructure. As expected, the solutions for the first-order (linear) wave-excitation loads resulting from these regular waves are similar for PF and ST when the diameter of the cylinder is small compared to the length of the waves (generally when the diameter-to-wavelength ratio is less than 0.2). The same finding applies to the solutions for second-order wave-excitation loads, but for much smaller diameter-to-wavelength ratios (based on wavelengths of first-order waves).

  14. Subspace orthogonalization for substructuring preconditioners for nonsymmetric systems of linear equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starke, G. [Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    For nonselfadjoint elliptic boundary value problems which are preconditioned by a substructuring method, i.e., nonoverlapping domain decomposition, the author introduces and studies the concept of subspace orthogonalization. In subspace orthogonalization variants of Krylov methods the computation of inner products and vector updates, and the storage of basis elements is restricted to a (presumably small) subspace, in this case the edge and vertex unknowns with respect to the partitioning into subdomains. The author investigates subspace orthogonalization for two specific iterative algorithms, GMRES and the full orthogonalization method (FOM). This is intended to eliminate certain drawbacks of the Arnoldi-based Krylov subspace methods mentioned above. Above all, the length of the Arnoldi recurrences grows linearly with the iteration index which is therefore restricted to the number of basis elements that can be held in memory. Restarts become necessary and this often results in much slower convergence. The subspace orthogonalization methods, in contrast, require the storage of only the edge and vertex unknowns of each basis element which means that one can iterate much longer before restarts become necessary. Moreover, the computation of inner products is also restricted to the edge and vertex points which avoids the disturbance of the computational flow associated with the solution of subdomain problems. The author views subspace orthogonalization as an alternative to restarting or truncating Krylov subspace methods for nonsymmetric linear systems of equations. Instead of shortening the recurrences, one restricts them to a subset of the unknowns which has to be carefully chosen in order to be able to extend this partial solution to the entire space. The author discusses the convergence properties of these iteration schemes and its advantages compared to restarted or truncated versions of Krylov methods applied to the full preconditioned system.

  15. Assessment of First- and Second-Order Wave-Excitation Load Models for Cylindrical Substructures: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, Brandon; Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason

    2017-03-09

    The hydrodynamic loads on an offshore wind turbine's support structure present unique engineering challenges for offshore wind. Two typical approaches used for modeling these hydrodynamic loads are potential flow (PF) and strip theory (ST), the latter via Morison's equation. This study examines the first- and second-order wave-excitation surge forces on a fixed cylinder in regular waves computed by the PF and ST approaches to (1) verify their numerical implementations in HydroDyn and (2) understand when the ST approach breaks down. The numerical implementation of PF and ST in HydroDyn, a hydrodynamic time-domain solver implemented as a module in the FAST wind turbine engineering tool, was verified by showing the consistency in the first- and second-order force output between the two methods across a range of wave frequencies. ST is known to be invalid at high frequencies, and this study investigates where the ST solution diverges from the PF solution. Regular waves across a range of frequencies were run in HydroDyn for a monopile substructure. As expected, the solutions for the first-order (linear) wave-excitation loads resulting from these regular waves are similar for PF and ST when the diameter of the cylinder is small compared to the length of the waves (generally when the diameter-to-wavelength ratio is less than 0.2). The same finding applies to the solutions for second-order wave-excitation loads, but for much smaller diameter-to-wavelength ratios (based on wavelengths of first-order waves).

  16. Application of improved hybrid interface substructural component modal synthesis method in vibration characteristics of mistuned blisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bin; Bai, Guangchen; Li, Chao

    2014-11-01

    The large and complex structures are divided into hundreds of thousands or millions degrees of freedom(DOF) when they are calculated which will spend a lot of time and the efficiency will be extremely low. The classical component modal synthesis method (CMSM) are used extensively, but for many structures in the engineering of high-rise buildings, aerospace systemic engineerings, marine oil platforms etc, a large amount of calculation is still needed. An improved hybrid interface substructural component modal synthesis method(HISCMSM) is proposed. The parametric model of the mistuned blisk is built by the improved HISCMSM. The double coordinating conditions of the displacement and the force are introduced to ensure the computational accuracy. Compared with the overall structure finite element model method(FEMM), the computational time is shortened by 23.86%-31.56% and the modal deviation is 0.002%-0.157% which meets the requirement of the computational accuracy. It is faster 4.46%-10.57% than the classical HISCMSM. So the improved HISCMSM is better than the classical HISCMSM and the overall structure FEMM. Meanwhile, the frequency and the modal shape are researched, considering the factors including rotational speed, gas temperature and geometry size. The strong localization phenomenon of the modal shape's the maximum displacement and the maximum stress is observed in the second frequency band and it is the most sensitive in the frequency veering. But the localization phenomenon is relatively weak in 1st and the 3d frequency band. The localization of the modal shape is more serious under the condition of the geometric dimensioning mistuned. An improved HISCMSM is proposed, the computational efficiency of the mistuned blisk can be increased observably by this method.

  17. Comparing prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) with the oncofetal proteins glypican-3, Alpha feto protein and carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma among Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Gawad, Iman A; Mossallam, Ghada I; Radwan, Noha H; Elzawahry, Heba M; Elhifnawy, Niveen M

    2014-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually asymptomatic in the early stage and does not show elevated alpha-feto protein (AFP). AFP shows 60-80% sensitivity in diagnosing HCC. Glypican3 (GPC-3) is an oncofetal protein that is only detected in HCC cells but not in benign liver tissues, while Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in various neoplasms including HCC. Although, it is not specific for HCC. Prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) is an abnormal prothrombin protein that is increased in the serum of HCC patients. It has higher sensitivity and specificity compared to AFP. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical utility of PIVKA-II with GPC-3, AFP and CEA in diagnosing HCC. This study included 40 patients with HCC, 10 patients with cirrhosis as a benign control group, and 10 apparently healthy volunteers as normal controls. Serum samples were subjected to routine laboratory investigations, measurement of CEA, AFP using MEIA technique (Axsym), glypican3, and PIVKA-II using ELISA technique in the sera of all patients and controls. All markers showed the highest results in the HCC group. Higher concentrations of PIVKA-II were detected in patients with splenomegaly, and in tumors with size (>3cm). Combination of Glypican-3 and PIVKA-II showed the highest sensitivity, while GPC-3 alone and combination of GPC-3 and AFP showed the highest specificity to differentiate HCC from liver cirrhosis and normal controls. GPC-3, PIVKAII, and combination of both showed the highest sensitivity, while GPC-3 alone showed the highest specificity to differentiate HCC from liver cirrhosis. Glypican-3 is the only oncofetal antigen that showed comparable high diagnostic accuracy as PIVKA-II in diagnosing HCC among Egyptian patients. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Identification of population substructure among Jews using STR markers and dependence on reference populations included

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutirangura Apiwat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting population substructure is a critical issue for association studies of health behaviors and other traits. Whether inherent in the population or an artifact of marker choice, determining aspects of a population's genetic history as potential sources of substructure can aid in design of future genetic studies. Jewish populations, among which association studies are often conducted, have a known history of migrations. As a necessary step in understanding population structure to conduct valid association studies of health behaviors among Israeli Jews, we investigated genetic signatures of this history and quantified substructure to facilitate future investigations of these phenotypes in this population. Results Using 32 autosomal STR markers and the program STRUCTURE, we differentiated between Ashkenazi (AJ, N = 135 and non-Ashkenazi (NAJ, N = 226 Jewish populations in the form of Northern and Southern geographic genetic components (AJ north 73%, south 23%, NAJ north 33%, south 60%. The ability to detect substructure within these closely related populations using a small STR panel was contingent on including additional samples representing major continental populations in the analyses. Conclusions Although clustering programs such as STRUCTURE are designed to assign proportions of ancestry to individuals without reference population information, when Jewish samples were analyzed in the absence of proxy parental populations, substructure within Jews was not detected. Generally, for samples with a given grandparental country of birth, STRUCTURE assignment values to Northern, Southern, African and Asian clusters agreed with mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal data from previous studies as well as historical records of migration and intermarriage.

  19. 3-Pyridylmethanol vs. N,N‧-diethylnicotinamide in copper(II) complex formation - A comparative EPR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husáriková, L.; Repická, Z.; Valigura, D.; Valko, M.; Mazúr, M.

    2013-10-01

    Copper(II) complexes, formed from 4-chlorosalicylic acid anion A (A = 4-Clsal-), different copper(II) salts (Cu(ac)2 or CuSO4) and different N-donor ligands B (B = 3-pyridylmethanol (ron) or N,N'-diethylnicotinamide (denia)) with varying N-donor ligand-to-metal ratio (x), were studied by EPR spectroscopy in the frozen water/methanol (1:3 v/v) solutions. The number of ligand B molecules coordinated to Cu(II) central ion was determined from the nitrogen perpendicular and parallel superhyperfine splitting multiplets of Cu(II) EPR spectra. It was found for both N-donor ligands: (i) At lower ligand B concentrations (x = 1, 2), [CuB] and/or [CuB2] species having one and/or two molecules of ligands B in equatorial position were dominant. The dominant ternary complex particles were [CuA2B2] species. (ii) At higher ligand B concentrations (x ⩾ 4) the formation of [CuB3] and/or [CuB4] species having three and/or four molecules of ligands B in equatorial position was confirmed. Such information is not possible to get from Cu(II) EPR spectra of powdered samples of given copper(II) complexes.

  20. Pretreatment of furfural industrial wastewater by Fenton, electro-Fenton and Fe(II)-activated peroxydisulfate processes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C W; Wang, D; Tang, Q

    2014-01-01

    The Fenton, electro-Fenton and Fe(II)-activated peroxydisulfate (PDS) processes have been applied for the treatment of actual furfural industrial wastewater in this paper. Through the comparative study of the three processes, a suitable pretreatment technology for actual furfural wastewater treatment was obtained, and the mechanism and dynamics process of this technology is discussed. The experimental results show that Fenton technology has a good and stable effect without adjusting pH of furfural wastewater. At optimal conditions, which were 40 mmol/L H₂O₂ initial concentration and 10 mmol/L Fe²⁺ initial concentration, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate can reach 81.2% after 90 min reaction at 80 °C temperature. The PDS process also has a good performance. The COD removal rate could attain 80.3% when Na₂S₂O₈ initial concentration was 4.2 mmol/L, Fe²⁺ initial concentration was 0.1 mol/L, the temperature remained at 70 °C, and pH value remained at 2.0. The electro-Fenton process was not competent to deal with the high-temperature furfural industrial wastewater and only 10.2% COD was degraded at 80 °C temperature in the optimal conditions (2.25 mA/cm² current density, 4 mg/L Na₂SO₄, 0.3 m³/h aeration rate). For the Fenton, electro-Fenton and PDS processes in pretreatment of furfural wastewater, their kinetic processes follow the pseudo first order kinetics law. The pretreatment pathways of furfural wastewater degradation are also investigated in this study. The results show that furfural and furan formic acid in furfural wastewater were preferentially degraded by Fenton technology. Furfural can be degraded into low-toxicity or nontoxic compounds by Fenton pretreatment technology, which could make furfural wastewater harmless and even reusable.

  1. Effect of Soil-Structure Interaction on Seismic Performance of Long-Span Bridge Tested by Dynamic Substructuring Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyun Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the limitations of testing facilities and techniques, the seismic performance of soil-structure interaction (SSI system can only be tested in a quite small scale model in laboratory. Especially for long-span bridge, a smaller tested model is required when SSI phenomenon is considered in the physical test. The scale effect resulting from the small scale model is always coupled with the dynamic performance, so that the seismic performance of bridge considering SSI effect cannot be uncovered accurately by the traditional testing method. This paper presented the implementation of real-time dynamic substructuring (RTDS, involving the combined use of shake table array and computational engines for the seismic simulation of SSI. In RTDS system, the bridge with soil-foundation system is divided into physical and numerical substructures, in which the bridge is seen as physical substructures and the remaining part is seen as numerical substructures. The interface response between the physical and numerical substructures is imposed by shake table and resulting reaction force is fed back to the computational engine. The unique aspect of the method is to simulate the SSI systems subjected to multisupport excitation in terms of a larger physical model. The substructuring strategy and the control performance associated with the real-time substructuring testing for SSI were performed. And the influence of SSI on a long-span bridge was tested by this novel testing method.

  2. Ni(II) and Cu(II) N(4)-ethylmorpholine citronellalthiosemicarbazonate: a comparative analysis of cytotoxic effects in malignant human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisceglie, Franco; Alinovi, Rossella; Pinelli, Silvana; Goldoni, Matteo; Buschini, Annamaria; Franzoni, Susanna; Mutti, Antonio; Tarasconi, Pieralberto; Pelosi, Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we report a study conducted with two analogous complexes, bis(N(4)-ethylmorpholine citronellalthiosemicarbazonate) nickel(II) and -copper(II) on four tumour cell lines (U937, HL60, SK-N-MC and HT29). All cell lines appear to be sensitive to both metal complexes, but while in U937, HL60 and SK-N-MC, apoptosis is the main mode through which cell death occurs, HT29 cells undergo necrosis. Among the cell lines which undergo apoptosis, SK-N-MC response is characterized by the intrinsic pathway, whereas U937 and HL60 involve both the intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways. The redox activity of the two complexes provides experimental evidence that they can modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as a function of both the metal and the cell line used. Among the four cell lines, HL60 does not seem to give a significant response to exposure to both compounds. In the case of the nickel derivative, ROS generation is a relatively early event, and ROS could be the mediator leading to cellular damage. HT29 shows a remarkable and rapid ROS increase and a significant induction of membrane peroxidation that could be correlated to the onset of necrosis.

  3. Boosted objects and jet substructure at the LHC. Report of BOOST2012, held at IFIC Valencia, 23rd-27th of July 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altheimer, A.; Thompson, E.N. [Columbia University, Nevis Laboratory, Irvington, NY (United States); Arce, A.; Bjergaard, D. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Asquith, L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL (United States); Backus Mayes, J.; Hook, A.; Izaguirre, E.; Jankowiak, M.; Larkoski, A.; Nef, P.; Schwartzman, A.; Swiatlowski, M.; Wacker, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kuutmann, E.B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany); Berger, J. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Bryngemark, L. [Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Buckley, A.; Debenedetti, C. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Butterworth, J.; Campanelli, M.; Davison, A. [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Cacciari, M. [CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carli, T.; Roeck, A. de [LPTHE, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 et CNRS UMR, Paris (France); Chala, M. [CAFPE and Univ. of Granada, Granada (Spain); Chapleau, B. [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Chen, C. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Chou, J.P. [Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Cornelissen, T.; Fleischmann, S. [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Curtin, D. [YITP, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Dasgupta, M. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Almeida Dias, F. de [UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil); De Cosa, A. [INFN, Naples (Italy); University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Doglioni, C.; Guescini, F. [University of Geneva, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Ellis, S.D.; Hornig, A.; Scholtz, J. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Fassi, F.; Hoz, S.G. de la; Kaci, M.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Rodrigo, G.; Salt, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Villaplana, M.; Vos, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, IFIC/CSIC-UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Ferrando, J.; Kar, D.; Nordstrom, K. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Freytsis, M. [University of California, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gonzalez Silva, M.L. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Han, Z.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Schwartz, M.D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Juknevich, J. [Weizmann Institute, Rehovot (Israel); Kasieczka, G.; Plehn, T.; Schaetzel, S.; Takeuchi, M. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Kogler, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Loch, P. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Marzani, S.; Spannowsky, M. [IPPP, University of Durham, Durham (United Kingdom); Masetti, L. [Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Mateu, V.; Stewart, I.; Thaler, J. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Miller, D.W. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Mishra, K.; Tran, N.V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Penwell, J. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Pilot, J. [University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Rappoccio, S. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Rizzi, A. [INFN, Pisa (Italy); University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Safonov, A. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Salam, G.P. [CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); LPTHE, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 et CNRS UMR, Paris (France); Schioppa, M. [INFN, Rende (IT); University of Calabria, Rende (IT); Schmidt, A. [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (DE); Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (DE); Segala, M. [Brown University, Richmond, RI (US); Son, M. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (US); Soyez, G. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (FR); Strom, D. [University of Illinois, Chicago, IL (US); Vermilion, C. [University of California, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (US); Walsh, J. [University of California, Berkeley, CA (US)

    2014-03-15

    This report of the BOOST2012 workshop presents the results of four working groups that studied key aspects of jet substructure. We discuss the potential of first-principle QCD calculations to yield a precise description of the substructure of jets and study the accuracy of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo tools. Limitations of the experiments' ability to resolve substructure are evaluated, with a focus on the impact of additional (pile-up) proton proton collisions on jet substructure performance in future LHC operating scenarios. A final section summarizes the lessons learnt from jet substructure analyses in searches for new physics in the production of boosted top quarks. (orig.)

  4. Comparative electrochemical study of some cobalt(III and cobalt(II complexes with azamacrocycles and b-diketonato ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. BABIC-SAMARDZIJA

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical properties of eight mixed-ligand cobalt(III and cobalt(II complexes of the general formulas [CoIII(Raccyclam](ClO42 (1–(4 and [Co2II(Ractpmc](ClO43 (5–(8 were studied. The substances were investigated in aqueous NaClO4 solution and non-aqueous LiClO4/CH3CN solution by cyclic voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. In aqueous solution, cyclam and Rac ligands being soluble in water undergo anodic oxidation. Coordination to Co(III in complexes 1–4, stabilizes these ligands but reversible peaks in catohodic region indicate the redox reaction CoIII/CoII ion. In the case of the binuclear Co(II complexes 5–8, peaks recorded on the CVs represent oxidation of the bridged Rac ligand. The complexes examined influence the cathodic reaction of hydrogen evolution in aqueous solutions by shifting its potential to more negative values and its current is increased. In non-aqueous solution the CVs of the ligands show irreversible anodic peaks for cyclam, tpmc and for the Rac ligands soluble in acetonitrile. The absence of any peaks in the case of the investigated complexes 1–4 indicates that coordination to Co(III stabilizes both the cyclam and Rac ligands. Cyclic voltammograms of the complexes 5–8 show oxidation processes of the Rac ligand and Co(II ions but the absence of a highly anodic peak of the coordinated macrocycle tpmc shows its stabilization. Contrary to in aqueous solution, the redox reaction Co(III/Co(II does not occur in acetonitrate indicating a higher stability of the complexes 1–4 in this media in comparison with the binuclear cobalt(II-tpmc complexes 5–8.

  5. An evaluation of the accuracy of the ORange® (Gen II) by comparing it to the IOLMaster® in the prediction of postoperative refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of ORange® Gen II (WaveTec Vision, Aliso Viejo, CA). Setting The Surgical Suites, Honolulu, HI. Methods The prospective 28 consecutive cataract surgical cases were selected from 85 cataract surgical cases between December 16, 2010 and February 24, 2011. With the same intraocular lens implantation, the predicted spherical equivalent refraction from IOLMaster® (Carl Zeiss AG, Oberkochen, Germany) and ORange Gen II were statistically compared and verified with 1-month postoperative manifest refraction. The data were put into IBM SPSS 19 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL) for analysis of variance. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was also calculated to evaluate the correlation between the IOLMaster, ORange Gen II, and 1-month postoperative manifest refraction. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the mean spherical equivalent refraction from the IOLMaster, ORange Gen II, and 1-month postoperative manifest refraction (IOLMaster −0.40 diopters, P = 0.07; ORange Gen II −0.43 diopters, P = 0.16; 1-month refraction −0.41 diopters, P = 0.07). Pearson’s correlation study demonstrated that all three were positively correlated (P refraction (r = +0.6, P < 0.01). Conclusion The ORange Gen II can be considered as an alternative method for intraocular lens selection for cataract patients. PMID:22457590

  6. An evaluation of the accuracy of the ORange (Gen II) by comparing it to the IOLMaster in the prediction of postoperative refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of ORange(®) Gen II (WaveTec Vision, Aliso Viejo, CA). The Surgical Suites, Honolulu, HI. The prospective 28 consecutive cataract surgical cases were selected from 85 cataract surgical cases between December 16, 2010 and February 24, 2011. With the same intraocular lens implantation, the predicted spherical equivalent refraction from IOLMaster(®) (Carl Zeiss AG, Oberkochen, Germany) and ORange Gen II were statistically compared and verified with 1-month postoperative manifest refraction. The data were put into IBM SPSS 19 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL) for analysis of variance. Pearson's correlation coefficient was also calculated to evaluate the correlation between the IOLMaster, ORange Gen II, and 1-month postoperative manifest refraction. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean spherical equivalent refraction from the IOLMaster, ORange Gen II, and 1-month postoperative manifest refraction (IOLMaster -0.40 diopters, P = 0.07; ORange Gen II -0.43 diopters, P = 0.16; 1-month refraction -0.41 diopters, P = 0.07). Pearson's correlation study demonstrated that all three were positively correlated (P refraction (r = +0.6, P < 0.01). The ORange Gen II can be considered as an alternative method for intraocular lens selection for cataract patients.

  7. Randomized Phase II Trial Comparing Obinutuzumab (GA101) With Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed CD20(+) Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehn, L. H.; Goy, A.; Offner, F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Obinutuzumab (GA101), a novel glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated responses in single-arm studies of patients with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This is the first prospective, randomized study comparing safety and efficacy of obinutuzumab with r...

  8. A Multistage Longitudinal Comparative (MLC) Design Stage II: Evaluation of the Changing Lives Program (CLP)--The Possible Selves Questionnaire-Qualitative Extensions (PSQ-QE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsch, Gabrielle; Kurtines, William M.; Montgomery, Marilyn J.

    2008-01-01

    The study reported in this paper, a Multistage Longitudinal Comparative (MLC) Design Stage II evaluation conducted as a planned preliminary efficacy evaluation (psychometric evaluation of measures, short-term controlled outcome studies, etc.) of the Changing Lives Program (CLP), provided evidence for the reliability and validity of qualitative…

  9. A Multi-Stage Longitudinal Comparative Design Stage II Evaluation of the Changing Lives Program: The Life Course Interview (RDA-LCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Lisa Lewis; Kurtines, William M.; Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Ritchie, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    The study reported in this article, a Multi-Stage Longitudinal Comparative Design Stage II evaluation conducted as a planned preliminary efficacy evaluation (psychometric evaluation of measures, short-term controlled outcome studies, etc.) of the Changing Lives Program (CLP), provided evidence for the reliability and validity of the qualitative…

  10. Randomized Phase II and Pharmacogenetic Study of Pemetrexed Compared With Pemetrexed Plus Carboplatin in Pretreated Patients With Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Egbert F.; Burgers, Sjaak A.; Biesma, Bonne; Eppinga, Pier; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Joerger, Markus; Schellens, Jan H.; Vincent, Andrew; van Zandwijk, Nico; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We performed a randomized phase II trial comparing pemetrexed with pemetrexed plus carboplatin (PC) in patients experiencing relapse after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Main eligibility criteria were histologic or cytologic proof of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NS

  11. Global Profiling and Novel Structure Discovery Using Multiple Neutral Loss/Precursor Ion Scanning Combined with Substructure Recognition and Statistical Analysis (MNPSS): Characterization of Terpene-Conjugated Curcuminoids in Curcuma longa as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Lin, Xiong-hao; Ji, Shuai; Zhang, Zheng-xiang; Bo, Tao; Guo, De-an; Ye, Min

    2016-01-05

    To fully understand the chemical diversity of an herbal medicine is challenging. In this work, we describe a new approach to globally profile and discover novel compounds from an herbal extract using multiple neutral loss/precursor ion scanning combined with substructure recognition and statistical analysis. Turmeric (the rhizomes of Curcuma longa L.) was used as an example. This approach consists of three steps: (i) multiple neutral loss/precursor ion scanning to obtain substructure information; (ii) targeted identification of new compounds by extracted ion current and substructure recognition; and (iii) untargeted identification using total ion current and multivariate statistical analysis to discover novel structures. Using this approach, 846 terpecurcumins (terpene-conjugated curcuminoids) were discovered from turmeric, including a number of potentially novel compounds. Furthermore, two unprecedented compounds (terpecurcumins X and Y) were purified, and their structures were identified by NMR spectroscopy. This study extended the application of mass spectrometry to global profiling of natural products in herbal medicines and could help chemists to rapidly discover novel compounds from a complex matrix.

  12. Comparative pathogenicity in Swiss mice of Trypanosoma cruzi IV from northern Brazil and Trypanosoma cruzi II from southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Sheila Karina Lüders; Kaneshima, Edilson Nobuyoshi; Silva, Sueli de Oliveira; Gabriel, Maristela; de Araújo, Silvana Marques; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Barbosa, Maria das Graças Vale; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas

    2014-11-01

    The geographical heterogeneity of Chagas disease (ChD) is mainly caused by genetic variability of the etiological agent Trypanosoma cruzi. Our hypothesis was that the pathogenicity for mice may vary with the genetic lineage (or Discrete Typing Unit - DTU) of the parasite. To test this hypothesis, parasitological and histopathological evaluations were performed in mice inoculated with strains belonging to the DTU T. cruzi IV (TcIV) from the State of Amazonas (northern Brazil), or the DTU T. cruzi II (TcII) from the State of Paraná (southern Brazil). Groups of 10 Swiss mice were inoculated with eight strains of TcIV obtained from acute cases (7) from two outbreaks of orally acquired ChD, and from the triatomine Rhodnius robustus (1) from Amazonas; and three strains of TcII obtained from chronic patients in Paraná. We evaluated the pre-patent period, patent period, maximum peak of parasitemia, day of maximum peak of parasitemia, area under the parasitemia curve, inflammatory process, and tissue parasitism in the acute phase. TcIV was less virulent than TcII, and showed significantly (p < 0.005) lower parasitemia levels. Although the levels of tissue parasitism did not differ statistically, mice infected with TcIV displayed significantly (p < 0.001) fewer inflammatory processes than mice infected with TcII. This supported the working hypothesis, since TcIV from Amazonas was less pathogenic than TcII from Paraná; and agreed with the lower severity of human cases of ChD in the Amazon region.

  13. Comparative overview of RNA polymerase II and III transcription cycles, with focus on RNA polymerase III termination and reinitiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (RNAP) III transcribes hundreds of genes for tRNAs and 5S rRNA, among others, which share similar promoters and stable transcription initiation complexes (TIC), which support rapid RNAP III recycling. In contrast, RNAP II transcribes a large number of genes with highly variable promoters and interacting factors, which exert fine regulatory control over TIC lability and modifications of RNAP II at different transitional points in the transcription cycle. We review data that illustrate a relatively smooth continuity of RNAP III initiation-elongation-termination and reinitiation toward its function to produce high levels of tRNAs and other RNAs that support growth and development.

  14. Photosensitization and the photocurrent switching effect in nanocrystalline titanium dioxide functionalized with iron(II) complexes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macyk, Wojciech; Stochel, Grazyna; Szaciłowski, Konrad

    2007-01-01

    Selected iron(II) complexes (ferrocene, ferrocenylboronic acid, hexacyanoferrate(II)) have been used as photosensitizers of titanium dioxide. Various types of electronic interactions between the surface complex and the semiconducting support are reflected in different yields of photocurrent generated upon visible-light irradiation and different efficiencies of the photosensitization effect. The studied systems, showing the photocurrent switching upon changes of electrode potential and energy of photons (the PEPS effect), are good models of simple photoelectrochemical logic devices. The mechanism of photosensitization and photocurrent switching is discussed with respect to the type of surface-complex-support interaction. Quantum-mechanical calculations support the proposed mechanisms.

  15. Factorization for groomed jet substructure beyond the next-to-leading logarithm

    CERN Document Server

    Frye, Christopher; Schwartz, Matthew D; Yan, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Jet grooming algorithms are widely used in experimental analyses at hadron colliders to remove contaminating radiation from within jets. While the algorithms perform a great service to the experiments, their intricate algorithmic structure and multiple parameters has frustrated precision theoretic understanding. In this paper, we demonstrate that one particular groomer called soft drop actually makes precision jet substructure easier. In particular, we derive a factorization formula for a large class of soft drop jet substructure observables, including jet mass. The essential observation that allows for this factorization is that, without the soft wide-angle radiation groomed by soft drop, all singular contributions are collinear. The simplicity and universality of the collinear limit in QCD allows us to show that to all orders, the normalized differential cross section has no contributions from non-global logarithms. It is also independent of process, up to the relative fraction of quark and gluon jets. In f...

  16. Prefabricated floor panels composed of fiber reinforced concrete and a steel substructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus H.; Fischer, Gregor; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    loading at the serviceability and ultimate limit states. The composite construction concept offers flexibility in the assembly process, the ability to adapt to various load and boundary requirements, and efficient utilization of material properties that result in a light weight prefabricated structural......This paper reports on a study on prefabricated composite and modular floor deck panels composed of relatively thin fiber reinforced concrete slabs connected to steel substructures. The study focuses on the design, manufacturing, structural improvements and behavior of the floor systems during...... detailing of these integrally cast deck panels and to modify them by providing individually cast anchor points in the precast ECC slab, which are subsequently used to attach a steel truss substructure.Full-scale experiments were carried out to verify the structural behavior of the integrally cast panels...

  17. Performance of large-R jets and jet substructure reconstruction with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the application of techniques to study jet substructure. The performance of modified jet algorithms for a variety of jet types and event topologies is investigated. Properties of jets subjected to the mass-drop filtering, trimming and pruning algorithms are found to have a reduced sensitivity to multiple proton-proton interactions and exhibit improved stability at high luminosity. Monte Carlo studies of the signal-background discrimination with jet grooming in new physics searches based on jet invariant mass and jet substructure properties are also presented. The application of jet trimming is shown to improve the robustness of large-R jet measurements, reduce sensitivity to the superfluous effects due to the intense environment of the high luminosity LHC, and improve the physics potential of searches for heavy boosted objects. The analyses presented in this note use the full 2011 ATLAS dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 \\pm 0.2 fb−1 .

  18. Damage detection test of a substructure model of the National Swimming Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to detect the damage locations of complex spatial structures, a sensor region-based damage detection approach was developed based on the damage locating vectors method. A normalized damage locating index was introduced to identify the damage regions. An experiment on damage detection of a substructure model of the National Swimming Center ’Water Cube’ was carried out. Two damage patterns were involved in the experiment. The test model was excited by using hammer impacts. Acceleration responses of the undamaged and damaged structure model were measured. Modal parameters were identified from the acceleration responses by utilizing the eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA). By using the developed sensor region-based method, the damage regions of the substructure model were located. The results show that the proposed method is able to effec- tively locate the damage regions.

  19. The Aspen Framework for Dark Matter Substructure Inference from Strong Gravitational Lensing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Keeton, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the dark matter particle or particles lead to different small scale halo populations, distributions, and evolution over cosmic time. We introduce a new method for characterizing the properties of substructure within galaxies through the power spectrum of potential fluctuations, and demonstrate how complete sets of multiwavelength imaging and time domain observations can be processed directly to infer all facets of the strong gravitational lensing components and source properties, including the dark matter substructure power spectrum constraints. We are able to take advantage of analysis parallels with cosmic background radiation techniques, and furthermore demonstrate how this technique, dubbed The Aspen Framework, reduces to the long-standing approach of working with reduced or derived observable quantities in lensing.

  20. Twisting phonons in complex crystals with quasi-one-dimensional substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Weathers, Annie; Carrete, Jesús; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Delaire, Olivier; Stewart, Derek A; Mingo, Natalio; Girard, Steven N; Ma, Jie; Abernathy, Douglas L; Yan, Jiaqiang; Sheshka, Raman; Sellan, Daniel P; Meng, Fei; Jin, Song; Zhou, Jianshi; Shi, Li

    2015-04-15

    A variety of crystals contain quasi-one-dimensional substructures, which yield distinctive electronic, spintronic, optical and thermoelectric properties. There is a lack of understanding of the lattice dynamics that influences the properties of such complex crystals. Here we employ inelastic neutron scatting measurements and density functional theory calculations to show that numerous low-energy optical vibrational modes exist in higher manganese silicides, an example of such crystals. These optical modes, including unusually low-frequency twisting motions of the Si ladders inside the Mn chimneys, provide a large phase space for scattering acoustic phonons. A hybrid phonon and diffuson model is proposed to explain the low and anisotropic thermal conductivity of higher manganese silicides and to evaluate nanostructuring as an approach to further suppress the thermal conductivity and enhance the thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency. This discovery offers new insights into the structure-property relationships of a broad class of materials with quasi-one-dimensional substructures for various applications.

  1. Characterization Method for 3D Substructure of Nuclear Cell Based on Orthogonal Phase Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of optical models associated with blood cells are introduced in this paper. All of these models are made up of different parts possessing symmetries. The wrapped phase images as well as the unwrapped ones from two orthogonal directions related to some of these models are obtained by simulation technique. Because the phase mutation occurs on the boundary between nucleus and cytoplasm as well as on the boundary between cytoplasm and environment medium, the equation of inflexion curve is introduced to describe the size, morphology, and substructure of the nuclear cell based on the analysis of the phase features of the model. Furthermore, a mononuclear cell model is discussed as an example to verify this method. The simulation result shows that characterization with inflexion curve based on orthogonal phase images could describe the substructure of the cells availably, which may provide a new way to identify the typical biological cells quickly without scanning.

  2. A substructure inside spiral arms, and a mirror image across the Galactic Meridian

    CERN Document Server

    Vallee, Jacques P

    2016-01-01

    While the galactic density wave theory is over 50 years old and well known in science, whether it fits our own Milky Way disk has been difficult to say. Here we show a substructure inside the spiral arms. This substructure is reversing with respect to the Galactic Meridian (longitude zero), and crosscuts of the arms at negative longitudes appear as mirror images of crosscuts of the arms at positive longitudes. Four lanes are delineated: mid-arm (extended 12CO gas at mid arm, HI atoms), in-between offset by about 100 pc (synchrotron, radio recombination lines), in between offset by about 200 pc (masers, colder dust), and inner edge (hotter dust seen in Mid-IR and Near-IR).

  3. Seasonal variations of radon concentrations in single-family houses with different sub-structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, B.

    1992-01-01

    Seasonal variations of indoor radon concentrations have been studied in 70 single-family houses selected according to the type of sub-structure and the type of soil underneath the house. Five categories of sub-structure were included - slab-on-grade, crawl space, basement, and combinations...... of basement with slab-on-grade or crawl space. Half of the houses are located on clayey till and the other half on glaciofluvial gravel. In each house radon was measured in a living room and a bedroom, in the basement if present, and in the crawl space if present and accessible. The measurements were made...... with track detectors on a quarterly basis throughout a year. For living rooms and bedrooms the seasonal variations range from being highly significant for the slab-on-grade houses to being insignificant for the crawl space houses. For basements and crawl spaces the geometric mean radon concentrations do...

  4. Damage detection test of a substructure model of the National Swimming Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN JiaRu; JI XiaoDong; ZHANG WeiJing; XU LongHe; FU XueYi; GU Lei

    2008-01-01

    In order to detect the damage locations of complex spatial structures,a sensor region-based damage detection approach was developed based on the damage locating vectors method.A normalized damage locating index was introduced to identify the damage regions.An experiment on damage detection of a substructure model of the National Swimming Center 'Water Cube' was carried out.Two damage patterns were involved in the experiment.The test model was excited by using hammer impacts.Acceleration responses of the undamaged and damaged struc-ture model were measured.Modal parameters were identified from the acceleration responses by utilizing the eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA).By using the developed sensor region-based method,the damage regions of the substructure model were located.The results show that the proposed method is able to effec-tively locate the damage regions.

  5. Caregiving burden and psychological distress among spouses of bipolar patients – comparative analysis of subtype I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Izabela Arciszewska

    2015-12-01

    The specific types of bipolar disorder (I and II have the different impact on partners, which affects their subjective and objective burden and relationship with patients, indicating a real need to offer them an adequate help, depending on subtype of patient’s bipolar disorder, as well as the spouse sex.

  6. A comparative study for the ion exchange of Fe(III) and Zn(II) on zeolite NaY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroski, Indianara C; Barros, Maria A S D; Silva, Edson A; Dantas, João H; Arroyo, Pedro A; Lima, Oswaldo C M

    2009-01-30

    The uptake capacity of Fe(III) and Zn(II) ions in NaY zeolite was investigated. Experiments were carried out in a fixed bed column at 30 degrees C, pH 3.5 and 4.5 for Fe(III) and Zn(II), respectively, and an average particle size of 0.180 mm. In order to minimize the diffusional resistances the influence of flow rate on the breakthrough curves at feed concentrations of 1.56 meq/L for Fe(III) and 0.844 meq/L for Zn(II) was investigated. Flow rate of the minimal resistance in the bed according to mass transfer parameter were 2.0 mL/min for iron and 8.0 mL/min for zinc ions. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models have been used to represent the column equilibrium data. The iron dynamic isotherm was successfully modeled by the Langmuir equation and this mathematical model described well the experimental breakthrough curves for feed concentrations from 0.1 up to 3.5 meq/L. The zinc dynamic isotherm was successfully modeled by the Freundlich equation. This equilibrium model was applied to mathematical model. Experimental breakthrough curves could be predicted. Experiments were also carried out in a batch reactor to investigate the kinetics adsorption of the ions Fe(III) and Zn(II). Langmuir kinetic model fit well both experimental data.

  7. Manual Indexes versus Computer-Aided Indexes: Comparing the Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature to InfoTrac II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Carol

    1988-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of the CD-ROM information retrieval system, InfoTrac II, and the manual "Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature," was studied. Seventeen community college students were divided into two groups which researched the same questions either on CD-ROM or in the printed index. Results showed the "Readers'…

  8. Comparing addition of ZrO II particles in micron and nano scale on microstructure and mechanical behavior of aluminum-matrix composites produced by vortex route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghchesara, M. A.; Karimi, M.; Abdizadeh, H.; Baharvandi, H. R.

    2007-07-01

    Aluminum matrix composites are important engineering materials in automotive, aerospace and other applications because of their low weight, high specific strength and better physical and mechanical properties compared to pure aluminum. ZrO II particles as reinforcement were selected to add aluminum with micron and nano size. Al/ZrO II composites were produced by direct incorporation (vortex method) in different temperatures and 5 volume percents of ZrO II particles. Microstructure of the samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition of the phases was studied by XRD. Hardness, and density of these composites were also measured. The microstructure and mechanical properties tests of composites and study the effect of particle size, resulted the better properties compared to matrix aluminum. Homogeneous dispersion of the reinforcement particles in the matrix aluminum was observed. The results show enhancing the composites properties for all samples compared to the monolithic alloy. However there are some differences in results because of particle size of ceramics and therefore differences between particles surface area. Maximum volume percent that can be added to A356 aluminum alloy is 5 vol.%, for nano ZrO II particles, but it seems that is more than 5 vol.% for micron particles. Increasing of viscosity, porosities and much more defects are caused by increasing volume percents and using smaller particles. The casting processing is difficult in these conditions. Furthermore, optimum temperatures of casting for micron and nano zirconia particles are not the same.

  9. Substructure of Crystalline Peroxisomes in Methanol-Grown Hansenula polymorpha : Evidence for an In Vivo Crystal of Alcohol Oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, Marten; Harder, Wim; Dijken, Johannes P. van; Mayer, Frank

    1981-01-01

    The substructural organization of completely crystalline peroxisomes present in Hansenula polymorpha cells grown under methanol limitation in a chemostat was investigated by different cytochemical and ultrastructural techniques. Time-dependent cytochemical staining experiments indicated that activit

  10. AFM friction and adhesion mapping of the substructures of human hair cuticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James R., E-mail: james.smith@port.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Tsibouklis, John; Nevell, Thomas G. [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Breakspear, Steven [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Global R and D–Hair Beauty Laboratory, Kao Corporation, 2-1-3, Bunka Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 131-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Using atomic force microscopy, values of the microscale friction coefficient, the tip (silicon nitride) - surface adhesion force and the corresponding adhesion energy, for the substructures that constitute the surface of human hair (European brown hair) have been determined from Amonton plots. The values, mapped for comparison with surface topography, corresponded qualitatively with the substructures’ plane surface characteristics. Localised maps and values of the frictional coefficient, extracted avoiding scale edge effects, are likely to inform the formulation of hair-care products and treatments.

  11. Substructuring preconditioners for an h-p domain decomposition method with interior penalty mortaring

    KAUST Repository

    Antonietti, P. F.

    2014-05-13

    We propose and study an iterative substructuring method for an h-p Nitsche-type discretization, following the original approach introduced in Bramble et al. Math. Comp. 47(175):103–134, (1986) for conforming methods. We prove quasi-optimality with respect to the mesh size and the polynomial degree for the proposed preconditioner. Numerical experiments assess the performance of the preconditioner and verify the theory. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Italia.

  12. Pre-Processing and Re-Weighting Jet Images with Different Substructure Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Huynh, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This work is an extension of Monte Carlo simulation based studies in tagging boosted, hadronically decaying W bosons at a center of mass energy of s = 13 TeV. Two pre-processing techniques used with jet images, translation and rotation, are first examined. The generated jet images for W signal jets and QCD background jets are then rescaled and weighted with five different substructure variables for visual comparison.

  13. A dynamic model with substructures for contact-impact analysis of flexible multibody systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Anping(郭安萍); HONG; Jiazhen(洪嘉振); YANG; Hui(杨辉)

    2003-01-01

    Using a substructure synthesis method this paper studies the longitudinal compressive impact of a flexible bar with a rigid body. The crucial variable affecting the validity of the method is derived theoretically. By computational simulation tests, excellent agreement has been found between the solution of this model and the exact solution when the variable is chosen suitably. Considering both the computational efficiency and the accuracy of solutions obtained on the model in different engineering problems, several optimum values of the variable are suggested.

  14. Thinking outside the ROCs: Designing Decorrelated Taggers (DDT) for jet substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolen, James; Harris, Philip; Marzani, Simone; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Tran, Nhan

    2016-05-01

    We explore the scale-dependence and correlations of jet substructure observables to improve upon existing techniques in the identification of highly Lorentz-boosted objects. Modified observables are designed to remove correlations from existing theoretically well-understood observables, providing practical advantages for experimental measurements and searches for new phenomena. We study such observables in W jet tagging and provide recommendations for observables based on considerations beyond signal and background efficiencies.

  15. Thinking outside the ROCs: Designing Decorrelated Taggers (DDT) for jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Dolen, James; Marzani, Simone; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Tran, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    We explore the scale-dependence and correlations of jet substructure observables to improve upon existing techniques in the identification of highly Lorentz-boosted objects. Modified observables are designed to remove correlations from existing theoretically well-understood observables, providing practical advantages for experimental measurements and searches for new phenomena. We study such observables in $W$ jet tagging and provide recommendations for observables based on considerations beyond signal and background efficiencies.

  16. Analysis of East Asia genetic substructure using genome-wide SNP arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tian

    Full Text Available Accounting for population genetic substructure is important in reducing type 1 errors in genetic studies of complex disease. As efforts to understand complex genetic disease are expanded to different continental populations the understanding of genetic substructure within these continents will be useful in design and execution of association tests. In this study, population differentiation (Fst and Principal Components Analyses (PCA are examined using >200 K genotypes from multiple populations of East Asian ancestry. The population groups included those from the Human Genome Diversity Panel [Cambodian, Yi, Daur, Mongolian, Lahu, Dai, Hezhen, Miaozu, Naxi, Oroqen, She, Tu, Tujia, Naxi, Xibo, and Yakut], HapMap [ Han Chinese (CHB and Japanese (JPT], and East Asian or East Asian American subjects of Vietnamese, Korean, Filipino and Chinese ancestry. Paired Fst (Wei and Cockerham showed close relationships between CHB and several large East Asian population groups (CHB/Korean, 0.0019; CHB/JPT, 00651; CHB/Vietnamese, 0.0065 with larger separation with Filipino (CHB/Filipino, 0.014. Low levels of differentiation were also observed between Dai and Vietnamese (0.0045 and between Vietnamese and Cambodian (0.0062. Similarly, small Fst's were observed among different presumed Han Chinese populations originating in different regions of mainland of China and Taiwan (Fst's <0.0025 with CHB. For PCA, the first two PC's showed a pattern of relationships that closely followed the geographic distribution of the different East Asian populations. PCA showed substructure both between different East Asian groups and within the Han Chinese population. These studies have also identified a subset of East Asian substructure ancestry informative markers (EASTASAIMS that may be useful for future complex genetic disease association studies in reducing type 1 errors and in identifying homogeneous groups that may increase the power of such studies.

  17. Substructure Analysis of Selected Low Richness 2dFGRS Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Burgett, W S; Davis, D S; Colless, M; De Propris, R; Baldry, I K; Baugh, C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bridges, T J; Cannon, R; Cole, S; Collins, C; Couch, W; Cross, N; Dalton, G B; Driver, S; Efstathiou, G P; Ellis, R; Frenk, C; Glazebrook, K; Hawkins, E; Jackson, C; Lahav, O; Lewis, I; Lumsden, S; Maddox, S; Madgwick, D; Norberg, P; Peacock, J A; Percival, W; Peterson, B; Sutherland, W; Taylor, K; Burgett, William S.; Vick, Michael M.; Davis, David S.; Colless, Matthew; Propris, Roberto De; Baldry, Ivan; Baugh, Carlton; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Cross, Nicholas; Dalton, Gavin; Driver, Simon; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard; Frenk, Carlos; Glazebrook, Karl; Hawkins, Edward; Jackson, Carole; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve; Madgwick, Darren; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A.; Percival, Will; Peterson, Bruce; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Complementary one-, two-, and three-dimensional tests for detecting the presence of substructure in clusters of galaxies are applied to recently obtained data from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. The sample of 25 clusters used in this study includes 16 clusters not previously investigated for substructure. Substructure is detected at or greater than the 99% CL level in at least one test for 21 of the 25 clusters studied here. From the results, it appears that low richness clusters commonly contain subclusters participating in mergers. About half of the clusters have two or more components within 0.5 h^{-1} Mpc of the cluster centroid, and at least three clusters (Abell 1139, Abell 1663, and Abell S333) exhibit velocity-position characteristics consistent with the presence of possible cluster rotation, shear, or infall dynamics. The geometry of certain features is consistent with influence by the host supercluster environments. In general, our results support the hypothesis that low richness clusters relax to ...

  18. Dynamic substructure model for multiple impact responses of micro/nano piezoelectric precision drive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN YuNian; YIN XiaoChun

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic substructure technique which considers the electromechanlcal coupling effect of the PZT and the inertial effect of flexible components is presented to study the multiple impact dynamic be-havior of micro/nano piezoelectric impact drive systems. It can investigate the step-like motion of ob-ject body and the multiple impacts behaviors reasonably by the comparison of the experimental data and the numerical solution of the spring-mass model. It is expected to have higher accuracy in the numerical simulations of the motion and the responses, especially to high frequency pulse voltage excitations. The present dynamic substructure technique has firstly studied reasonably the propaga-tions of piezoelectric-induced transient waves and impact-induced transient waves. It is helpful to the failure analysis and the design of piezoelectric stack and flexible components. The present dynamic substructure technique can be applied to the transient dynamics optimization design and the precision control of the micro/nano piezoelectric impact drive systems.

  19. Automatic identification of mobile and rigid substructures in molecular dynamics simulations and fractional structural fluctuation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Martínez

    Full Text Available The analysis of structural mobility in molecular dynamics plays a key role in data interpretation, particularly in the simulation of biomolecules. The most common mobility measures computed from simulations are the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD and Root Mean Square Fluctuations (RMSF of the structures. These are computed after the alignment of atomic coordinates in each trajectory step to a reference structure. This rigid-body alignment is not robust, in the sense that if a small portion of the structure is highly mobile, the RMSD and RMSF increase for all atoms, resulting possibly in poor quantification of the structural fluctuations and, often, to overlooking important fluctuations associated to biological function. The motivation of this work is to provide a robust measure of structural mobility that is practical, and easy to interpret. We propose a Low-Order-Value-Optimization (LOVO strategy for the robust alignment of the least mobile substructures in a simulation. These substructures are automatically identified by the method. The algorithm consists of the iterative superposition of the fraction of structure displaying the smallest displacements. Therefore, the least mobile substructures are identified, providing a clearer picture of the overall structural fluctuations. Examples are given to illustrate the interpretative advantages of this strategy. The software for performing the alignments was named MDLovoFit and it is available as free-software at: http://leandro.iqm.unicamp.br/mdlovofit.

  20. Major Substructure in the M31 Outer Halo: the East Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    McMonigal, B; Conn, A R; Mackey, A D; Lewis, G F; Irwin, M J; Martin, N F; McConnachie, A W; Ferguson, A M N; Ibata, R A; Huxor, A P

    2015-01-01

    We present the first detailed analysis of the East Cloud, a highly disrupted diffuse stellar substructure in the outer halo of M31. The core of the substructure lies at a projected distance of $\\sim100$ kpc from the centre of M31 in the outer halo, with possible extensions reaching right into the inner halo. Using Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey photometry of red giant branch stars, we measure the distance, metallicity and brightness of the cloud. Using Hubble Space Telescope data, we independently measure the distance and metallicity to the two globular clusters coincident with the East Cloud core, PA-57 and PA-58, and find their distances to be consistent with the cloud. Four further globular clusters coincident with the substructure extensions are identified as potentially associated. Combining the analyses, we determine a distance to the cloud of $814^{+20}_{-9}$ kpc, a metallicity of $[Fe/H] = -1.2\\pm0.1$, and a brightness of $M_V = -10.7\\pm0.4$ mag. Even allowing for the inclusion of the potential e...

  1. Dynamic substructure model for multiple impact responses of micro/nano piezoelectric precision drive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic substructure technique which considers the electromechanical coupling effect of the PZT and the inertial effect of flexible components is presented to study the multiple impact dynamic be- havior of micro/nano piezoelectric impact drive systems. It can investigate the step-like motion of ob- ject body and the multiple impacts behaviors reasonably by the comparison of the experimental data and the numerical solution of the spring-mass model. It is expected to have higher accuracy in the numerical simulations of the motion and the responses, especially to high frequency pulse voltage excitations. The present dynamic substructure technique has firstly studied reasonably the propaga- tions of piezoelectric-induced transient waves and impact-induced transient waves. It is helpful to the failure analysis and the design of piezoelectric stack and flexible components. The present dynamic substructure technique can be applied to the transient dynamics optimization design and the precision control of the micro/nano piezoelectric impact drive systems.

  2. A hybrid system identification methodology for wireless structural health monitoring systems based on dynamic substructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragos, Kosmas; Smarsly, Kay

    2016-04-01

    System identification has been employed in numerous structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Traditional system identification methods usually rely on centralized processing of structural response data to extract information on structural parameters. However, in wireless SHM systems the centralized processing of structural response data introduces a significant communication bottleneck. Exploiting the merits of decentralization and on-board processing power of wireless SHM systems, many system identification methods have been successfully implemented in wireless sensor networks. While several system identification approaches for wireless SHM systems have been proposed, little attention has been paid to obtaining information on the physical parameters (e.g. stiffness, damping) of the monitored structure. This paper presents a hybrid system identification methodology suitable for wireless sensor networks based on the principles of component mode synthesis (dynamic substructuring). A numerical model of the monitored structure is embedded into the wireless sensor nodes in a distributed manner, i.e. the entire model is segmented into sub-models, each embedded into one sensor node corresponding to the substructure the sensor node is assigned to. The parameters of each sub-model are estimated by extracting local mode shapes and by applying the equations of the Craig-Bampton method on dynamic substructuring. The proposed methodology is validated in a laboratory test conducted on a four-story frame structure to demonstrate the ability of the methodology to yield accurate estimates of stiffness parameters. Finally, the test results are discussed and an outlook on future research directions is provided.

  3. Spectroscopy of Bright QUEST RR Lyrae Stars: Velocity Substructures toward Virgo

    CERN Document Server

    Vivas, A Katherina; Zinn, Robert; Winnick, Rebeccah; Duffau, Sonia; Mateu, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Using a sample of 43 bright (V<16.1, distance <13 kpc) RR Lyrae stars (RRLS) from the QUEST survey with spectroscopic radial velocities and metallicities, we find that several separate halo substructures contribute to the Virgo overdensity (VOD). While there is little evidence for halo substructure in the spatial distribution of these stars, their distribution in radial velocity reveals two moving groups. These results are reinforced when the sample is combined with a sample of blue horizontal branch stars that were identified in the SDSS, and the combined sample provides evidence for one additional moving group. These groups correspond to peaks in the radial velocity distribution of a sample of F type main-sequence stars that was recently observed in the same directon by SEGUE, although in one case the RRLS and F star groups may not lie at the same distance. One of the new substructures has a very narrow range in metallicity, which is more consistent with it being the debris from a destroyed globular c...

  4. Atomic force microscopic observation on substructure of pollen exine in Cedrus deodara and Metasequoia glyptostroboides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The substructure of pollen exine in Cedrus deodara (Roxb.) Loud. and Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng has been examined with an atomic force microscope (AFM). The results indicate that the exine substructure units containing sporopollenin in two species are similar in shape, which are granular, but slightly different in size. In Cedrus the substructure unit of pollen exine appears to be 56-99 nm long and 42-74 nm wide, while in Metasequoia it appears to be 81-118 nm long and 43-98 nm wide. It has been observed that the subunits of pollen exine in Cedrus arranged tightly to form short-rod-like or spheroidal pollen exine units, several or more than ten of which formed an island-like structure. There are various spaces among these island-like structures which are interconnected to occupy the entire pollen exine. In Metasequoia, the subunits of pollen exine also arranged tightly with a distribution tendency of cluster of 3-10, however, no obvious boundary exists among these clusters. From our results, it is concluded that there is no tendency of helical arrangement for the subunits of pollen exine in Cedrus and Metasequoia, and the results support Southworth' view that subunits of pollen exine are granular shape in lattice structure.

  5. Calibration of TDR Test Probe for Measuring Moisture in the Body of the Railway Substructure and its Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction of the paper there is characterized a way of monitoring the moisture in the railway substructure in the experimental stand, which is a part of the experimental workplace of the Department of Railway Engineering and Track Management. A substantial part of the paper is devoted to the calibration of TDR test probe for selected rock materials as a basic prerequisite for the determination of the actual moisture in the body of the railway substructure and subgrade.

  6. Comparative NH 3-sensing characteristic studies of PANI/TiO II nanocomposite thin films doped with different acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Huiling; Jiang, Yadong; Xie, Guangzhong; Yu, Junsheng; Ying, Zhihua; Chen, Xuan

    2008-02-01

    Polyaniline/titanium dioxide (PANI/TiO II) nanocomposite thin films were synthesized by in-situ self-assembly method, which were doped with p-toluene sulphonic acid (p-TSA) and hydrochloric acid (HCl), respectively. The thin films were characterized by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the NH 3 gas sensitive properties of the thin films were investigated at room temperature. The results showed that the PANI/TiO II thin film doped with HCl was superior to that doped with p-TSA in terms of response-recovery characteristics. The surface morphology characterization of the thin films were performed to explain the different gas-sensing properties.

  7. Initial performances of first undulator-based hard x-ray beamlines of NSLS-II compared to simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg, E-mail: chubar@bnl.gov; Chu, Yong S.; Huang, Xiaojing; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Yan, Hanfei; Shaftan, Timur; Wang, Guimei; Cai, Yong Q.; Suvorov, Alexey; Fluerasu, Andrei; Wiegart, Lutz; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Thieme, Juergen; Williams, Garth; Idir, Mourad; Tanabe, Toshiya; Zschack, Paul; Shen, Qun [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Commissioning of the first X-ray beamlines of NSLS-II included detailed measurements of spectral and spatial distributions of the radiation at different locations of the beamlines, from front-ends to sample positions. Comparison of some of these measurement results with high-accuracy calculations of synchrotron (undulator) emission and wavefront propagation through X-ray transport optics, performed using SRW code, is presented.

  8. Comparative adsorption of Fe(III) and Cd(II) ions on glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan–coated cristobalite

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi; Fathurrahmi; Irwansyah; Arie Purnaratrie

    2015-01-01

    In this study, chitosan was crosslinked with glutaraldehyde and coated on the surface of cristobalite through a dip and phase inversion process. The adsorbent was used in batch experiments to evaluate the adsorption of Fe(III) and Cd(II) ions. A maximum adsorption capacity was observed at a glutaraldehyde concentration in sorbent preparation of 1% (w/w). The equilibrium adsorption quantity was determined to be a function of the solution pH, initial concentration and agitation period. Langmuir...

  9. Comparing M31 and Milky Way Satellites: The Extended Star Formation Histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, Daniel R; Hidalgo, Sebastian L; Monelli, Matteo; Dolphin, Andrew E; McConnachie, Alan; Bernard, Edouard J; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A; Ferguson, Henry C; Irwin, Mike; Martin, Nicolas F; Mayer, Lucio; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Navarro, Julio F; Stetson, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (M$_{V} = -$12.0; log(M$_{\\star}$/M$_{\\odot}$) $\\sim$ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (M$_{V} = -$7.5; log(M$_{\\star}$/M$_{\\odot}$) $\\sim$ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 magnitude below the oldest main sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z$\\sim$5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched $\\sim$ 5 Gyr ago (z$\\sim$0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of si...

  10. Immunohistochemical findings type I and type II collagen in prenatal mouse mandibular condylar cartilage compared with the tibial anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M; Suda, N; Tengan, T; Suzuki, S; Kuroda, T

    1998-07-01

    In growing animals the mandibular condylar cartilage serves not only as an articular but also as a growth cartilage, yet, condylar cartilage has some characteristic features that are not found in growth cartilage. For example, some reports suggest that type I collagen, which is not seen in the growth plate cartilage of long bones, is present in the extracellular matrix of condylar cartilage postnatally. Here, the condylar and limb bud cartilage of fetal mice was examined. The distribution of type I and type II collagen in condylar cartilage was already different from that in the limb bud at the first appearance of the cartilage. Type I collagen was demonstrated in the extracellular matrix of the condylar cartilage that first appeared on day 15 of gestation. However, the reaction for type II collagen was much weaker than that for type I collagen. On day 18 of gestation, type I collagen was still found throughout the cell layers but became gradually weaker with depth. Type II collagen was limited exclusively to the deeper layers at this stage. These findings are different from those in the limb bud cartilage, indicating a characteristic feature of the cells in the condylar cartilage present from the prenatal period.

  11. In silico prediction of ROCK II inhibitors by different classification approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chuipu; Wu, Qihui; Luo, Yunxia; Ma, Huili; Shen, Jiangang; Zhang, Yongbin; Yang, Lei; Chen, Yunbo; Wen, Zehuai; Wang, Qi

    2017-08-02

    ROCK II is an important pharmacological target linked to central nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this research is to generate ROCK II inhibitor prediction models by machine learning approaches. Firstly, four sets of descriptors were calculated with MOE 2010 and PaDEL-Descriptor, and optimized by F-score and linear forward selection methods. In addition, four classification algorithms were used to initially build 16 classifiers with k-nearest neighbors [Formula: see text], naïve Bayes, Random forest, and support vector machine. Furthermore, three sets of structural fingerprint descriptors were introduced to enhance the predictive capacity of classifiers, which were assessed with fivefold cross-validation, test set validation and external test set validation. The best two models, MFK + MACCS and MLR + SubFP, have both MCC values of 0.925 for external test set. After that, a privileged substructure analysis was performed to reveal common chemical features of ROCK II inhibitors. Finally, binding modes were analyzed to identify relationships between molecular descriptors and activity, while main interactions were revealed by comparing the docking interaction of the most potent and the weakest ROCK II inhibitors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on ROCK II inhibitors utilizing machine learning approaches that provides a new method for discovering novel ROCK II inhibitors.

  12. COMPARING METAL AND TRANSPARENT MATRICES IN PREVENTING GINGIVAL OVERHANG WITH DIFFERENT RESIN MATERIAL IN CLASS II RESTORATIONS – AN SEM STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Dinesh Shetty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Transparent matrices and reflective wedges are difficult to adapt, thus their ability to prevent gingival overhang was compared in this study with metal matrices and wooden wedges.Class II MOD cavitieswere prepared and randomly divided into six groups. Group I microhybrid composite, Group II flowable composite liner and Group III compomer. In above 3 groups metal matrices and wooden wedges were used. Group IV microhybrid composite, Group V flowable composite liner and GroupVI compomer. In above 3 groups transparent matrices and light reflecting wedges were used.Specimens were filled with respective resin composite material, using corresponding matrix andwedge.Percentage of gingival overhang was determined under SEM.The result showed greateroverhang formation in transparent matrix group compared to metal matrix group as transparentmatrices are difficult to adapt to the teeth

  13. 40 CFR Table C-5 to Subpart C of... - Summary of Comparability Field Testing Campaign Site and Seasonal Requirements for Class II and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Summary of Comparability Field Testing Campaign Site and Seasonal Requirements for Class II and III FEMs for PM10â2.5 and PM2.5 C Table C-5 to... III FEMs for PM10−2.5 and PM2.5 Candidate method Test site A B C D PM2.5 Test site location area Los...

  14. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Neutrophilic Iron(II Oxidizer Genomes for Candidate Genes in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaomei He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular electron transfer (EET is recognized as a key biochemical process in circumneutral pH Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB. In this study, we searched for candidate EET genes in 73 neutrophilic FeOB genomes, among which 43 genomes are complete or close-to-complete and the rest have estimated genome completeness ranging from 5 to 91%. These neutrophilic FeOB span members of the microaerophilic, anaerobic phototrophic, and anaerobic nitrate-reducing FeOB groups. We found that many microaerophilic and several anaerobic FeOB possess homologs of Cyc2, an outer membrane cytochrome c originally identified in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The “porin-cytochrome c complex” (PCC gene clusters homologous to MtoAB/PioAB are present in eight FeOB, accounting for 19% of complete and close-to-complete genomes examined, whereas PCC genes homologous to OmbB-OmaB-OmcB in Geobacter sulfurreducens are absent. Further, we discovered gene clusters that may potentially encode two novel PCC types. First, a cluster (tentatively named “PCC3” encodes a porin, an extracellular and a periplasmic cytochrome c with remarkably large numbers of heme-binding motifs. Second, a cluster (tentatively named “PCC4” encodes a porin and three periplasmic multiheme cytochromes c. A conserved inner membrane protein (IMP encoded in PCC3 and PCC4 gene clusters might be responsible for translocating electrons across the inner membrane. Other bacteria possessing PCC3 and PCC4 are mostly Proteobacteria isolated from environments with a potential niche for Fe(II oxidation. In addition to cytochrome c, multicopper oxidase (MCO genes potentially involved in Fe(II oxidation were also identified. Notably, candidate EET genes were not found in some FeOB, especially the anaerobic ones, probably suggesting EET genes or Fe(II oxidation mechanisms are different from the searched models. Overall, based on current EET models, the search extends our understanding of bacterial EET and

  15. The dormant and the fully competent oocyte: comparing the transcriptome of human oocytes from primordial follicles and in metaphase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndahl, Marie Louise; Borup, Rehannah; Vikeså, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Oocytes become enclosed in primordial follicles during fetal life and remain dormant there until activation followed by growth and meiotic resumption. Current knowledge about the molecular pathways involved in oogenesis is incomplete. This study identifies the specific transcriptome of the human...... oocyte in the quiescent state and at the pinnacle of maturity at ovulation. In silico bioinformatic comparisons were made between the transcriptome of human oocytes from dormant primordial follicles and that of human metaphase II (MII) oocytes and granulosa cells and unique gene expression profiles were...

  16. Techniques for Profile Binning and Analysis of Eigenvector Composite Spectra: Comparing Hbeta and MgII 2800 as Virial Estimators

    OpenAIRE

    Sulentic, Jack W.; Marziani, Paola; del Olmo, Ascension; Plauchu-Frayn, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    We review the basic techniques for extracting information about quasar structure and kinematics from the broad emission lines in quasars. We consider which lines can most effectively serve as virial estimators of black hole mass. At low redshift the Balmer lines,particularly broad H beta, are the lines of choice. For redshifts greater than 0.7 - 0.8 one can follow H beta into the IR windows or find an H beta surrogate. We explain why UV CIV 1549 is not a safe virial estimator and how MgII 280...

  17. Comparative adsorption of Fe(III and Cd(II ions on glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan–coated cristobalite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, chitosan was crosslinked with glutaraldehyde and coated on the surface of cristobalite through a dip and phase inversion process. The adsorbent was used in batch experiments to evaluate the adsorption of Fe(III and Cd(II ions. A maximum adsorption capacity was observed at a glutaraldehyde concentration in sorbent preparation of 1% (w/w. The equilibrium adsorption quantity was determined to be a function of the solution pH, initial concentration and agitation period. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used to describe adsorption isotherms.

  18. Crystallographic control on the substructure of nacre tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Antonio G; Mutvei, Harry; Osuna-Mascaró, Antonio J; Bonarski, Jan T; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Pina, Carlos M; Rousseau, Marthe; Macías-Sánchez, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Nacre tablets of mollusks develop two kinds of features when either the calcium carbonate or the organic portions are removed: (1) parallel lineations (vermiculations) formed by elongated carbonate rods, and (2) hourglass patterns, which appear in high relief when etched or in low relief if bleached. In untreated tablets, SEM and AFM data show that vermiculations correspond to aligned and fused aragonite nanogloblules, which are partly surrounded by thin organic pellicles. EBSD mapping of the surfaces of tablets indicates that the vermiculations are invariably parallel to the crystallographic a-axis of aragonite and that the triangles are aligned with the b-axis and correspond to the advance of the {010} faces during the growth of the tablet. According to our interpretation, the vermiculations appear because organic molecules during growth are expelled from the a-axis, where the Ca-CO3 bonds are the shortest. In this way, the subunits forming nacre merge uninterruptedly, forming chains parallel to the a-axis, whereas the organic molecules are expelled to the sides of these chains. Hourglass patterns would be produced by preferential adsorption of organic molecules along the {010}, as compared to the {100} faces. A model is presented for the nanostructure of nacre tablets. SEM and EBSD data also show the existence within the tablets of nanocrystalline units, which are twinned on {110} with the rest of the tablet. Our study shows that the growth dynamics of nacre tablets (and bioaragonite in general) results from the interaction at two different and mutually related levels: tablets and nanogranules.

  19. The Comparative Reliability and Feasibility of the Past-Year Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Comparison of the Paper and Web Versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Lo Siou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in technology-enabled dietary assessment include the advent of web-based food frequency questionnaires, which may reduce costs and researcher burden but may introduce new challenges related to internet connectivity and computer literacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intra- and inter-version reliability, feasibility and acceptability of the paper and web Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II (CDHQ-II in a sub-sample of 648 adults (aged 39–81 years recruited from Alberta’s Tomorrow Project. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1 paper, web, paper; or (2 web, paper, web over a six-week period. With few exceptions, no statistically significant differences in mean nutrient intake were found in the intra- and inter-version reliability analyses. The majority of participants indicated future willingness to complete the CDHQ-II online, and 59% indicated a preference for the web over the paper version. Findings indicate that, in this population of adults drawn from an existing cohort, the CDHQ-II may be administered in paper or web modalities (increasing flexibility for questionnaire delivery, and the nutrient estimates obtained with either version are comparable. We recommend that other studies explore the feasibility and reliability of different modes of administration of dietary assessment instruments prior to widespread implementation.

  20. Fractionally distilled SRC-I, SRC-II, EDS, H-Coal and ITSL direct coal liquefaction process materials: a comparative summary of chemical analysis and biological testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Dauble, D.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-07-01

    This document reports and compares the results compiled from chemical analyses and biological testing of coal liquefaction process materials which were fractionally distilled, after production, into various comparable boiling-point range cuts. Comparative analyses were performed on solvent refined coal (SRC)-I, SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) distillate materials. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative, chemical and biological assessments. Where possible, results obtained from the distillate cuts are compared to those from coal liquefaction materials with limited boiling ranges. Work reported here was conducted by investigators in the Biology and Chemistry Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA. 38 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Comparative analysis of 10 small molecules binding to carbonic anhydrase II by different investigators using Biacore technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Giuseppe A; Leavitt, Stephanie; Bynum, Maggie A; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Wilton, Rosemarie; Qiu, Huawei; Steukers, Mieke; Wang, Siming; Bindu, Lakshman; Phogat, Sanjay; Giannetti, Anthony M; Ryan, Thomas E; Pudlak, Victoria A; Matusiewicz, Katarzyna; Michelson, Klaus M; Nowakowski, Agnes; Pham-Baginski, Anh; Brooks, Jonathan; Tieman, Bryan C; Bruce, Barry D; Vaughn, Michael; Baksh, Michael; Cho, Yun Hee; Wit, Mieke De; Smets, Alexandra; Vandersmissen, Johan; Michiels, Lieve; Myszka, David G

    2006-12-01

    In this benchmark study, 26 investigators were asked to characterize the kinetics and affinities of 10 sulfonamide inhibitors binding to the enzyme carbonic anhydrase II using Biacore optical biosensors. A majority of the participants collected data that could be fit to a 1:1 interaction model, but a subset of the data sets obtained from some instruments were of poor quality. The experimental errors in the k(a), k(d), and K(D) parameters determined for each of the compounds averaged 34, 24, and 37%, respectively. As expected, the greatest variation in the reported constants was observed for compounds with exceptionally weak affinity and/or fast association rates. The binding constants determined using the biosensor correlated well with solution-based titration calorimetry measurements. The results of this study provide insight into the challenges, as well as the level of experimental variation, that one would expect to observe when using Biacore technology for small molecule analyses.

  2. Regulatory perspectives of Type II prodrug development and time-dependent toxicity management: nonclinical Pharm/Tox analysis and the role of comparative toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuei-Meng; Farrelly, James G

    2007-07-01

    Many therapeutic agents are prepared in prodrug forms, which are classified into Type I, II and subtypes A, B based on their sites of conversion. Recently, an increasing number of INDs have appeared as Type II prodrugs that often contain dual tracks of toxicity profile exploration, one on the prodrug and another on the active drug. A comparative toxicology analysis is introduced here to assist reviewers to evaluate the dual toxicity profiles effectively. The analysis helps determine which toxicity is contributed by the prodrug itself, its intermediates, or the active drug itself. As prodrug INDs, or any other new molecular entity (NME) INDs progress into advanced phases of toxicology development, analysis of time-dependent component of toxicity expression, regarding the emergence of new target organs over time, becomes more significant. A strategy is developed to address Pharm/Tox issues such as what duration is required for a toxicity to emerge at the exposure level achieved or dose studied, how many animals in the group are affected, whether the toxicity is a cross-species phenomenon, and whether it is reversible, etc. In conclusion, dual-track comparative toxicology can be useful in the understanding of Type II prodrug's mechanism of toxicity, and that time-dependent toxicology analysis offers means to detecting new toxicity emergence over time. Both approaches could significantly facilitate secondary and tertiary review processes during IND development of a prodrug or NME.

  3. A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE ACCURACIES OF RAYPEX 5, RAYPEX 6, IPEX AND IPEX II ELECTRONIC APEX LOCATORS: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mügem Aslı GÜREL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aims of this study were to examine the accuracy of iPex II and to compare it with those of Raypex 5, Raypex 6 and iPex electronic apex locators (EALs. Materials and Methods: Thirty fresh human mandibular premolar teeth were used in this study. Crown segments were cut and root canals were coronally flared. A #10 K-file was inserted until its tip can be seen within apical foramen to determine actual working length (AWL. Teeth were embedded in alginate and each multi-frequency EALs were randomly tested to determine the electronic working length (EWL. Differences between AWLs and EWLs were statistically compared. Results: No significant differences were found between four EALs. EWL measurements by Raypex 5 were accurate in 64.29%, Raypex 6 in 53.58%, iPex in 64.29% and iPex II in 50% of the specimens, within the range of ±0.5 mm from the AWL. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro experiment, our findings indicate that the accuracy of working length measurements calculated with iPex II was similar to those of other multi-frequency EALs used in this study.

  4. Comparative evaluation of microleakage in Class II restorations using open vs. closed centripetal build-up techniques with different lining materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shefali Sawani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluation of microleakage is important for assessing the success of new restorative materials and methods. Aim and Objectives: Comparative evaluation of microleakage in Class II restorations using open vs. closed centripetal build-up techniques with different lining materials. Materials and Methods: Standardized mesi-occlusal (MO and distoocclusal (DO Class II tooth preparations were preparedon 53 molars and samples were randomly divided into six experimental groups and one control group for restorations. Group 1: Open-Sandwich technique (OST with flowable composite at the gingival seat. Group 2: OST with resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC at the gingival seat. Group 3: Closed-Sandwich technique (CST with flowable composite at the pulpal floor and axial wall. Group 4: CST with RMGIC at the pulpal floor and axial wall. Group 5: OST with flowable composite at the pulpal floor, axial wall, and gingival seat. Group 6: OST with RMGIC at the pulpal floor, axial wall, and gingival seat. Group 7: Control - no lining material, centripetal technique only. After restorations and thermocycling, apices were sealed and samples were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye. Sectioning was followed by stereomicroscopic evaluation. Results: Results were analyzed using Post Hoc Bonferroni test (statistics is not a form of tabulation. Cervical scores of control were more than the exprimental groups (P 0.05. Conclusion: Class II composite restorations with centripetal build-up alone or when placed with CST reduces the cervical microleakage when compared to OST.

  5. Comparative evaluation of microleakage between bulk esthetic materials versus resin-modified glass ionomer to restore Class II cavities in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Vellore Kannan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the microleakage of one high-viscosity conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) and a bulk-fill composite resin, in comparison to a resin-modified GIC in Class II restorations in primary molars. Standardized Class II slot cavity preparations were prepared in exfoliating primary molars. Teeth were restored using one of the three materials tested (n = 10): SonicFill bulk-fill composite resin (SF), EQUIA Fil conventional reinforced GIC (EQF), and Vitremer resin-reinforced GIC (VT). The restorations were then subjected to thermocycling procedure (×2000 5°C-55°C 10 s/min) and soaked in 1% neutralized fuchsin solution (pH: 7.4) for 24 h at 37°C. Teeth were sectioned longitudinally in a mesiodistal direction under continuous cooling into three slabs of 1 mm thickness and studied under a stereomicroscope for dye penetration. Data were evaluated by one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey's multiple comparison test employing 95% (α = 0.05). EQF and SF showed significantly lower microleakage scores and percentage of dye penetration (%RL) when compared to VT resin-reinforced GIC (P < 0.001). SF and EQF produced the minimum microleakage when compared to VT in Class II restorations on primary molars. Fewer application procedures and reduction in treatment time in SF and EQF systems proved advantageous in pediatric dentistry.

  6. Comparative evaluation of microleakage between bulk esthetic materials versus resin-modified glass ionomer to restore Class II cavities in primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vellore Kannan Gopinath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the microleakage of one high-viscosity conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC and a bulk-fill composite resin, in comparison to a resin-modified GIC in Class II restorations in primary molars. Materials and Method: Standardized Class II slot cavity preparations were prepared in exfoliating primary molars. Teeth were restored using one of the three materials tested (n = 10: SonicFill bulk-fill composite resin (SF, EQUIA Fil conventional reinforced GIC (EQF, and Vitremer resin-reinforced GIC (VT. The restorations were then subjected to thermocycling procedure (×2000 5°C–55°C 10 s/min and soaked in 1% neutralized fuchsin solution (pH: 7.4 for 24 h at 37°C. Teeth were sectioned longitudinally in a mesiodistal direction under continuous cooling into three slabs of 1 mm thickness and studied under a stereomicroscope for dye penetration. Statistical Analysis: Data were evaluated by one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey's multiple comparison test employing 95% (α = 0.05. Results: EQF and SF showed significantly lower microleakage scores and percentage of dye penetration (%RL when compared to VT resin-reinforced GIC (P < 0.001. Conclusion: SF and EQF produced the minimum microleakage when compared to VT in Class II restorations on primary molars. Fewer application procedures and reduction in treatment time in SF and EQF systems proved advantageous in pediatric dentistry.

  7. The prevalence of skeletal Class II patients found in a consecutive population presenting for TMD treatment compared to the national average.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, H Clifton; Oxford, D Eric; Hill, Matthew D

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-six consecutive patients in a referral-based practice seeking treatment for a complex chronic painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were enrolled in a retrospective study to evaluate the skeletal relationship of patients with TMD compared to the distribution of skeletal patterns found in the average population. During the standard clinical workup, lateral cephalometric radiographs were performed. Using Wits appraisal all of the fifty-six (56) cephalometric radiographs were analyzed. Based on the results of the Wits analysis, 34.6 percent of the patients were skeletal Class I, 63.6 percent were skeletal Class II, and 1.8 percent were skeletal Class III. These results were compared with the data published by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in Proffit's text Contemporary Orthodontics. This study states that in the general population occlusal diversity is eighty to eighty-five percent (80-85%) skeletal Class I, fifteen percent (15%) are skeletal Class II, and one percent (1%) are skeletal Class III. The conclusion can be drawn that the patient sampling analyzed shows that TMD patients have a higher prevalence for skeletal Class II than the general population.

  8. Chemical composition of stars in kinematical substructures of the galactic disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbaneva T.I.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Y, Zr, La, Ce, Nd , Sm and Eu abundances were found in LTE approach, and the abundance of Ba was computed in NLTE approximation for 280 FGK dwarfs in the region of metallicity of − 1<[Fe]< + 0.3. The selection of stars belonging to thin and thick disks and the stream Hercules was made on kinematic criteria. The analysis of enrichment of the different substructures of the Galaxy with α-element (Mg, Si, the iron peak (Ni and neutron-capture elements was carried out.

  9. Study of Jet Substructure in the ATLAS Experiment using Distributed Analysis within Spanish Tier-2 infrastructures

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver García, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Study of Jet Substructure in the ATLAS experiment using Distributed Analysis within Spanish Tier-2 Infrastructures (Estudio de Subestructura de Jets en el experimento ATLAS usando Análisis Distribuido dentro de las Infraestructuras del Tier-2 Español) Resumen en español 1. Motivación En el Large Hadron Collider (LHC) se producen partículas consideradas objetos ‘boosted’ donde sus productos de desintegración se concentran en una pequeña parte del detector. El estudio de estos ...

  10. An early neutrino experiment: how we missed quark substructure in 1963

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D. H.

    2013-12-01

    Some 50 years after the event seems to be an appropriate time at which to take a long look back at one of the early neutrino experiments at CERN. This report is principally about a failure in a 1963 bubble chamber experiment to detect substructure in the nucleon, a year before the quark concept was invented by Gell-Mann and Zweig, and some five years before the existence of quarks as real dynamical objects was definitely established in deep inelastic electron scattering experiments at Stanford.

  11. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks I: Morphological Signatures of Hierarchical SatelliteAccretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2007-12-03

    We conduct a series of high-resolution, fully self-consistent dissipation less N-body simulations to investigate the cumulative effect of substructure mergers onto thin disk galaxies in the context of the {Lambda}CDM paradigm of structure formation. Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. Substructure mass functions, orbital distributions, internal structures, and accretion times are culled directly from cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized cold dark matter (CDM) halos. We demonstrate that accretions of massive subhalos onto the central regions of host halos, where the galactic disk resides, since z {approx} 1 should be common occurrences. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. This is due to the fact that massive subhalos with small orbital pericenters that are most capable of strongly perturbing the disk become either tidally disrupted or suffer substantial mass loss prior to z = 0. One host halo merger history is subsequently used to seed controlled N-body experiments of repeated satellite impacts on an initially-thin Milky Way-type disk galaxy. These simulations track the effects of six dark matter substructures, with initial masses in the range {approx} (0.7-2) x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 20-60% of the disk mass), crossing the disk in the past {approx} 8 Gyr. We show that these accretion events produce several distinctive observational signatures in the stellar disk including: a long-lived, low-surface brightness, ring-like feature in the outskirts; a significant flare; a central bar; and faint filamentary structures that (spuriously) resemble tidal streams in configuration space. The final distribution of disk stars exhibits a complex vertical structure that is well-described by a standard 'thin-thick' disk decomposition, where the 'thick' disk

  12. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks I: Morphological Signatures of Hierarchical SatelliteAccretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2007-12-03

    We conduct a series of high-resolution, fully self-consistent dissipation less N-body simulations to investigate the cumulative effect of substructure mergers onto thin disk galaxies in the context of the {Lambda}CDM paradigm of structure formation. Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. Substructure mass functions, orbital distributions, internal structures, and accretion times are culled directly from cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized cold dark matter (CDM) halos. We demonstrate that accretions of massive subhalos onto the central regions of host halos, where the galactic disk resides, since z {approx} 1 should be common occurrences. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. This is due to the fact that massive subhalos with small orbital pericenters that are most capable of strongly perturbing the disk become either tidally disrupted or suffer substantial mass loss prior to z = 0. One host halo merger history is subsequently used to seed controlled N-body experiments of repeated satellite impacts on an initially-thin Milky Way-type disk galaxy. These simulations track the effects of six dark matter substructures, with initial masses in the range {approx} (0.7-2) x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 20-60% of the disk mass), crossing the disk in the past {approx} 8 Gyr. We show that these accretion events produce several distinctive observational signatures in the stellar disk including: a long-lived, low-surface brightness, ring-like feature in the outskirts; a significant flare; a central bar; and faint filamentary structures that (spuriously) resemble tidal streams in configuration space. The final distribution of disk stars exhibits a complex vertical structure that is well-described by a standard 'thin-thick' disk decomposition, where the 'thick' disk

  13. Ancient Substructure in Early mtDNA Lineages of Southern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Rocha, Jorge; Mpoloka, Sununguko W.; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Among the deepest-rooting clades in the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogeny are the haplogroups defined as L0d and L0k, which are found primarily in southern Africa. These lineages are typically present at high frequency in the so-called Khoisan populations of hunter-gatherers and herders who speak non-Bantu languages, and the early divergence of these lineages led to the hypothesis of ancient genetic substructure in Africa. Here we update the phylogeny of the basal haplogroups L0d and ...

  14. Structure and substructure analysis of DAFT/FADA galaxy clusters in the [0.4-0.9] redshift range

    CERN Document Server

    Guennou, L; Durret, F; Neto, G B Lima; Ulmer, M P; Clowe, D; LeBrun, V; Martinet, N; Allam, S; Annis, J; Basa, S; Benoist, C; Biviano, A; Cappi, A; Cypriano, E S; Gavazzi, R; Halliday, C; Ilbert, O; Jullo, E; Just, D; Limousin, M; Márquez, I; Mazure, A; Murphy, K J; Plana, H; Rostagni, F; Russeil, D; Schirmer, M; Slezak, E; Tucker, D; Zaritsky, D; Ziegler, B

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster per...

  15. Comparative studies of gastrointestinal tolerance and acceptability of milk chocolate containing either sucrose, isomalt or sorbitol in healthy consumers and type II diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbé, A; Brinkworth, R A

    1992-03-01

    The objective was to compare reaction of adult consumers of confectionery to milk chocolate made with either isomalt, sucrose or sorbitol. Test chocolate was eaten by subjects at home during 7 days in amounts chosen by them up to a maximum of 100 g per day. In a double-blind crossover trial isomalt chocolate was associated in healthy consumers (n = 58) with increased motion frequency, wind and flatulence compared with sucrose chocolate. However, the intensity of these gastrointestinal effects was predominantly slight and insufficient to affect acceptability. In separate crossover trials, reactions of Type II diabetic consumers to eating isomalt chocolate (n = 53) or sorbitol chocolate (n = 51) were compared to reactions when eating no chocolate. Both isomalt and sorbitol chocolate were associated with higher incidence of wind and flatulence than for no chocolate, but only sorbitol chocolate increased motion frequency. Again intensity of gastrointestinal effects was slight. It is concluded that isomalt has potential use in both regular and diabetic chocolate.

  16. A comparative analysis of the results from 4 trials of beta-blocker therapy for heart failure: BEST, CIBIS-II, MERIT-HF, and COPERNICUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Michael J; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Massie, Barry M; Deedwania, Prakash; Follmann, Dean; Kovar, David; Murray, David; Oren, Ron; Rosenberg, Yves; Young, James; Zile, Michael; Eichhorn, Eric

    2003-10-01

    Recent large randomized, controlled trials (BEST [Beta-blocker Evaluation of Survival Trial], CIBIS-II [Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Trial II], COPERNICUS [Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival Study], and MERIT-HF [Metoprolol Randomized Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure]) have addressed the usefulness of beta-blockade in the treatment of advanced heart failure. CIBIS-II, COPERNICUS, and MERIT-HF have shown that beta-blocker treatment with bisoprolol, carvedilol, and metoprolol XL, respectively, reduce mortality in advanced heart failure patients, whereas BEST found a statistically nonsignificant trend toward reduced mortality with bucindolol. We conducted a post hoc analysis to determine whether the response to beta-blockade in BEST could be related to differences in the clinical and demographic characteristics of the study populations. We generated a sample from BEST to resemble the patient cohorts studied in CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF to find out whether the response to beta-blocker therapy was similar to that reported in the other trials. These findings are further compared with COPERNICUS, which entered patients with more severe heart failure. To achieve conformity with the entry criteria for CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF, the BEST study population was adjusted to exclude patients with systolic blood pressure 80 years (exclusion criteria employed in those trials). The BEST comparison subgroup (BCG) was further modified to more closely reflect the racial demographics reported for patients enrolled in CIBIS-II and MERIT-HF. The association of beta-blocker therapy with overall survival and survival free of cardiac death, sudden cardiac death, and progressive pump failure in the BCG was assessed. In the BCG subgroup, bucindolol treatment was associated with significantly lower risk of death from all causes (hazard ratio (HR)=0.77 [95% CI=0.65, 0.92]), cardiovascular death (HR=0.71 [0.58, 0.86]), sudden death (HR=0.77 [0.59, 0.999]), and pump

  17. A comparative evaluation of microleakage of restorations using silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavities: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jambai Sampath Kumar Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the microleakage of restorations using low shrinkage silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavity at the occlusal and gingival margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular molars were collected and divided into three experimental groups and one negative control group. Class II slot cavity was prepared on the mesial surface. Experimental groups were restored with Group I: silorane-based microhybrid composite, Group II: methacrylate-based nanohybrid composite, and Group III: Methacrylate-based microhybrid composite, respectively. Group IV: negative control. The samples were thermocycled, root apices were sealed with sticky wax and coated with nail varnish except 1 mm around the restoration. This was followed by immersion in 2% Rhodamine-B dye solution under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h. Then, the samples were sectioned longitudinally in the mesiodistal direction and evaluated under stereomicroscope ×40 magnification. Scoring was done according to the depth of dye penetration in to the cavity. Statistical analysis of the data was done. Results: The results were that no statistically significant difference in the microleakage at the occlusal margin for all the restorative materials, whereas at the gingival margin, silorane-based microhybrid composite showed less microleakage than the methacrylate-based nano- and micro-hybrid composites. Conclusion: In general, silorane-based microhybrid composite had less microleakage among the other materials used in this in vitro study.

  18. Development of a High-fidelity Experimental Substructure Test Rig for Grid-scored Sandwich Panels in Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Steffen; Lund, Erik; Kühlmeier, L.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines high-fidelity experimental substructure testing of sandwich panels which constitute the aerodynamic outer shell of modern wind turbine blades. A full-scale structural experimental and numerical characterisation of a composite wind turbine blade has been conducted. The developm...... of substructure tests for composite wind turbine blades. Furthermore, recommendations on the use of grid-scored sandwich structures in wind turbine blades are presented, which outline the sensitivity in terms of quasi-static strength to the established loading conditions.......This paper outlines high-fidelity experimental substructure testing of sandwich panels which constitute the aerodynamic outer shell of modern wind turbine blades. A full-scale structural experimental and numerical characterisation of a composite wind turbine blade has been conducted...

  19. Relationship among wear-resistance of three-body abrasion,substructure and property in martensite steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of subsurface hardness on wear-resistance of martensitic steel 20Cr, 40CrSi, 60Mn, T8 and T10 in three-body abrasion under static load was investigated. It shows that the characteristic ofthe subsurface hardness distribution and the abrasive wear resistanceis related to the substructure near the worn surface. The substructure of the tested martensite steel has an apparent relationship with thecarbon content and steels with moderate carbon content and hardness exhibit good resistance to abrasive wear. The competition of the work-hardening effect and the temper softening effect, which resulted from deformation and friction heat generating during abrasive wear is considered to be a main reason for the relation among wear-resistance, hardness and substructure. At the test conditions, the wear-resistance of 40CrSi is the best.

  20. One year of adjuvant tamoxifen compared with chemotherapy and tamoxifen in postmenopausal patients with stage II breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Elversang, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    We report the long-term results of a randomised trial comparing tamoxifen with tamoxifen plus cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF) in postmenopausal high-risk breast cancer patients. In addition, we analyse the prognostic and predictive value of centrally assessed subtypes....

  1. Apical Periodontitis and Endodontic Treatment in Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus: Comparative Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Leena

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of apical periodontitis (AP) in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients compared with nondiabetic patients and to examine the effect of glycemic control on the prevalence of AP. Radiographs of a group of DM patients were compared with those of a matched nondiabetic group to identify AP. The diabetic group was subdivided according to the level of glycemic control into two subgroups: A well-controlled DM and a poorly controlled DM. The periapical index score was used to assess the periapical status. All groups were compared in regard to the presence of AP lesions, the number of end-odontically treated teeth (ET), and the percentage of failure of endodontically treated teeth (AP/ET ratio). Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0, Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for all the analyses; p ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The prevalence of AP was higher in diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (13.5 vs 11.9% respectively). Diabetic group had more teeth with endodontic treatment ET compared with nondiabetic group (4.18 vs 1.82% respectively); this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001) along with higher AP/ET ratio (27.7 vs 19.3 respectively). The poorly controlled DM group had a higher prevalence of AP lesions compared with the well-controlled DM group (18.29 vs 9.21 respectively). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.001); they also had a higher percentage of ET (5.55 vs 3.13% respectively) and AP/ ET ratio (32.0 vs 21.8% respectively). This survey demonstrates a higher prevalence of AP in DM patients compared with nondiabetic group, with an increased prevalence of persistent chronic AP. Compared with a well-controlled diabetic group, a poor glycemic control may be associated with a higher prevalence of AP and increased rate of endodontic failures. Counseling diabetic patients, particularly those with poor glycemic control, about the risk of

  2. Motion and deformation estimation from medical imagery by modeling sub-structure interaction and constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2012-09-13

    This paper presents a novel medical image registration algorithm that explicitly models the physical constraints imposed by objects or sub-structures of objects that have differing material composition and border each other, which is the case in most medical registration applications. Typical medical image registration algorithms ignore these constraints and therefore are not physically viable, and to incorporate these constraints would require prior segmentation of the image into regions of differing material composition, which is a difficult problem in itself. We present a mathematical model and algorithm for incorporating these physical constraints into registration / motion and deformation estimation that does not require a segmentation of different material regions. Our algorithm is a joint estimation of different material regions and the motion/deformation within these regions. Therefore, the segmentation of different material regions is automatically provided in addition to the image registration satisfying the physical constraints. The algorithm identifies differing material regions (sub-structures or objects) as regions where the deformation has different characteristics. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on the analysis of cardiac MRI which includes the detection of the left ventricle boundary and its deformation. The experimental results indicate the potential of the algorithm as an assistant tool for the quantitative analysis of cardiac functions in the diagnosis of heart disease.

  3. Dynamic Analysis of Jacket Substructure for Offshore Wind Turbine Generators under Extreme Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jeng Lai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop dynamic analysis technologies regarding the design of offshore wind turbine generators (OWTGs, a special project called Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4 was conducted by IEA (International Energy Agency in 2010. A similar project named INER-OC4 has been performed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER to develop the OWTG technologies of Taiwan. Since the jacket substructure will be applied to Taiwan OWTGs before 2020, the INER-OC4 project has been devoted to the design and analysis of jacket support structure. In this work, the preliminary result of INER-OC4 is presented. A simplified analysis procedure for jacket support structure has been proposed. Both of the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory 5 MW OWTG FAST model and OC4 jacket substructure model have been built and analyzed under severe design load cases (DLCs of IEC (International Electrotechnical commission 61400-3. Simulation results of six severe DLCs are performed in this work and the results are in agreement with the requirements of API (American Petroleum Institute and NORSOK (Norwegian Petroleum Industry standards.

  4. Identification of genetic outliers due to sub-structure and cryptic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlauch, Daniel; Fier, Heide; Lange, Christoph

    2017-02-22

    In order to minimize the effects of genetic confounding on the analysis of high-throughput genetic association studies, e.g. (whole-genome) sequencing (WGS) studies, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), etc., we propose a general framework to assess and to test formally for genetic heterogeneity among study subjects. As the approach fully utilizes the recent ancestor information captured by rare variants, it is especially powerful in WGS studies. Even for relatively moderate sample sizes, the proposed testing framework is able to identify study subjects that are genetically too similar, e.g cryptic relationships, or that are genetically too different, e.g. population substructure. The approach is computationally fast, enabling the application to whole-genome sequencing data, and straightforward to implement. Simulation studies illustrate the overall performance of our approach. In an application to the 1000 Genomes Project, we outline an analysis/cleaning pipeline that utilizes our approach to formally assess whether study subjects are related and whether population substructure is present. In the analysis of the 1000 Genomes Project data, our approach revealed subjects that are most likely related, but had previously passed standard qc-filters. An implementation of our method, Similarity Test for Estimating Genetic Outliers (STEGO), is available in the R package stego from Github at https://github.com/dschlauch/stego . dschlauch@fas.harvard.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Constraining dark matter sub-structure with the dynamics of astrophysical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X; Aguilar, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of the measurements of some astrophysical dynamical systems allows to constrain the existence of incredibly small gravitational perturbations. In particular, the internal Solar System dynamics (planets, Earth-Moon) opens up the possibility, for the first time, to prove the abundance, mass and size, of dark sub-structures at the Earth vicinity. We find that adopting the standard dark matter density, its local distribution can be composed by sub-solar mass halos with no currently measurable dynamical consequences, regardless of the mini-halo fraction. On the other hand, it is possible to exclude the presence of dark streams with linear mass densities higher than $\\lambda_{\\rm st}> 10^{-10} \\Msun/\\AU$ (about the Earth mass spread along the diameter of the SS up to the Kuiper belt). In addition, we review the dynamics of wide binaries inside the dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the MW. The dynamics of such kind of binaries seem to be compatible with the presence of a huge fraction of dark sub-structure, ...

  6. deconSTRUCT: general purpose protein database search on the substructure level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zong Hong; Bharatham, Kavitha; Sherman, Westley A; Mihalek, Ivana

    2010-07-01

    deconSTRUCT webserver offers an interface to a protein database search engine, usable for a general purpose detection of similar protein (sub)structures. Initially, it deconstructs the query structure into its secondary structure elements (SSEs) and reassembles the match to the target by requiring a (tunable) degree of similarity in the direction and sequential order of SSEs. Hierarchical organization and judicious use of the information about protein structure enables deconSTRUCT to achieve the sensitivity and specificity of the established search engines at orders of magnitude increased speed, without tying up irretrievably the substructure information in the form of a hash. In a post-processing step, a match on the level of the backbone atoms is constructed. The results presented to the user consist of the list of the matched SSEs, the transformation matrix for rigid superposition of the structures and several ways of visualization, both downloadable and implemented as a web-browser plug-in. The server is available at http://epsf.bmad.bii.a-star.edu.sg/struct_server.html.

  7. Effects of Dark Matter Substructures on Gravitational Lensing: Results from the Aquarius Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, D D; Wang, J; Springel, V; Gao, L; White, S D M; Frenk, C S; Jenkins, A; Li, G; Navarro, J F

    2009-01-01

    We use high-resolution Aquarius simulations of Milky Way-sized haloes in the LCDM cosmology to study the effects of dark matter substructures on gravitational lensing. Each halo is resolved with ~ 10^8 particles (at a mass resolution ~ 10^3-4 M_sun/h) within its virial radius. Subhaloes with masses larger than 10^5 M_sun/h are well resolved, an improvement of at least two orders of magnitude over previous lensing studies. We incorporate a baryonic component modelled as a Hernquist profile and account for the response of the dark matter via adiabatic contraction. We focus on the "anomalous" flux ratio problem, in particular on the violation of the cusp-caustic relation due to substructures. We find that subhaloes with masses less than ~ 10^8 M_sun/h play an important role in causing flux anomalies; such low mass subhaloes have been unresolved in previous studies. There is large scatter in the predicted flux ratios between different haloes and between different projections of the same halo. In some cases, the f...

  8. The Extraordinary Amount of Substructure in the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    CERN Document Server

    Jauzac, M; Schwinn, J; Harvey, D; Baugh, C M; Robertson, A; Bose, S; Massey, R; Owers, M; Ebeling, H; Shan, H Y; Jullo, E; Kneib, J -P; Richard, J; Atek, H; Clément, B; Egami, E; Israel, H; Knowles, K; Limousin, M; Natarajan, P; Rexroth, M; Taylor, P; Tchernin, C

    2016-01-01

    We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R<1Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, reveals eight substructures, including the main core. All of these dark-matter halos are detected with a significance of at least 5sigma and feature masses ranging from 0.5 to 1.4x10^{14}Msun within R<150kpc. Merten et al. (2011) and Medezinski et al. (2016) substructures are also detected by us. We measure a slightly higher mass for the main core component than reported previously and attribute the discrepancy to the inclusion of our tightly constrained strong-lensing mass model built on Hubble Frontier Fields data. X-ray data obtained by XMM-Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yie...

  9. The Substructure of the Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore calculate how the intensity scales from a low-resolution (AIA) pixels to high-resolution (Hi-C) pixels for both the dynamic events and "background" emission (meaning, the steady emission over the 5 minutes of data acquisition time). We find there is no evidence of substructure in the background corona; the intensity scales smoothly from low-resolution to high-resolution Hi-C pixels. In transient events, however, the intensity observed with Hi-C is, on average, 2.6 times larger than observed with AIA. This increase in intensity suggests that AIA is not resolving these events. This result suggests a finely structured dynamic corona embedded in a smoothly varying background.

  10. CLUMPY: Jeans analysis, $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino fluxes from dark matter (sub-)structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnivard, Vincent; Nezri, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Aldée; Combet, Céline; Maurin, David

    2015-01-01

    We present an update of the CLUMPY code for the calculation of the astrophysical J-factors (from dark matter annihilation/decay) for any Galactic or extragalactic dark matter halo including substructures: the concentration-mass relationship may now be drawn from a distribution, boost factors can include several levels of substructures, and triaxiality is a new option for dark matter haloes. This new version takes advantage of the cfitsio and HEALPix libraries to propose FITS output maps using the HEALPix pixelisation scheme. Skymaps for $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino signals from generic annihilation/decay spectra are now direct outputs of CLUMPY. Smoothing by a user-defined instrumental Gaussian beam is also possible. In addition to these improvements, the main novelty is the implementation of a Jeans analysis module, to obtain dark matter density profiles from kinematic data in relaxed spherical systems (e.g., dwarf spheroidal galaxies). The code is also interfaced with the GreAT toolkit designed for Markov Chai...

  11. Mexican mestizo population sub-structure: effects on genetic and forensic statistical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noris, Gino; Santana, Carla; Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio; de Lourdes Munoz, María; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Magaña, Jonathan J; Granados, Julio; Quezada, Rosa; Revilla, María Cristina; Martínez-Salas, Sergio; Xihuitl, Salvador; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S; Gómez, Rocío

    2012-12-01

    Since Mexican mestizos are an admixed population, it is necessary to determine the effects that the substructure of the population has on genetic and forensic parameters. With this aim, a study was performed with 15 STR loci (CODIS plus D2S1338 and D19S433) on 1,640 unrelated Mexican mestizos. We determine allele and genotypic frequencies observing departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectation (12 out of 15 loci, with an excess of homozygotes, Fis > 0), as well as pairs of loci in an apparent linkage disequilibrium (13 of 92 loci). We conducted a test for genetic population stratification, the results show that the Mexican mestizo population is substructured into three subgroups, which are in HW and linkage equilibrium. The combination of the 15 loci in the whole population has high forensic efficiency with the capacity to genetically discriminate one individual in one quintillion (1/10(18)). Our data potentially validates the use of these 15 STR loci to establish forensic identity and parentage testing for legal purposes, and offers a powerful tool for genetic variation analysis. However, given that the population is stratified, we highly recommend applying a correction with the inbreeding coefficient in calculations of paternity and forensic studies to avoid erroneous assumptions.

  12. RINGED SUBSTRUCTURE AND A GAP AT 1 au IN THE NEAREST PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Bai, Xue-Ning; Öberg, Karin I.; Ricci, Luca [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Zhu, Zhaohuan [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Birnstiel, Tilman [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Carpenter, John M. [Joint ALMA Observatory (JAO), Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura-Santiago de Chile (Chile); Pérez, Laura M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hughes, A. Meredith [Department of Astronomy, Wesleyan University, Van Vleck Observatory, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06457 (United States); Isella, Andrea, E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We present long baseline Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the 870 μm continuum emission from the nearest gas-rich protoplanetary disk, around TW Hya, that trace millimeter-sized particles down to spatial scales as small as 1 au (20 mas). These data reveal a series of concentric ring-shaped substructures in the form of bright zones and narrow dark annuli (1–6 au) with modest contrasts (5%–30%). We associate these features with concentrations of solids that have had their inward radial drift slowed or stopped, presumably at local gas pressure maxima. No significant non-axisymmetric structures are detected. Some of the observed features occur near temperatures that may be associated with the condensation fronts of major volatile species, but the relatively small brightness contrasts may also be a consequence of magnetized disk evolution (the so-called zonal flows). Other features, particularly a narrow dark annulus located only 1 au from the star, could indicate interactions between the disk and young planets. These data signal that ordered substructures on ∼au scales can be common, fundamental factors in disk evolution and that high-resolution microwave imaging can help characterize them during the epoch of planet formation.

  13. Substructure dependence of jet cross sections at HERA and determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Abt, I; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bellagamba, L; Bellan, P M; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Büttner, C; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Everett, A; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Goers, S; Goncalo, R; González, O; Gosau, T; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grigorescu, G; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Horn, C; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Karshon, M; Karstens, F; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Keramidas, A; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Ma, K J; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Miglioranzi, S; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio, A E; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, Usan; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Rinaldi, L; Riveline, U; Robins, S; Rosin, M; Ruspa, M; Ryan, P; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Stösslein, U; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutiak, J; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Targett-Adams, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zambrana, M; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Favereau, J; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J

    2004-01-01

    Jet substructure and differential cross sections for jets produced in the photoproduction and deep inelastic ep scattering regimes have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82.2 pb-1. The substructure of jets has been studied in terms of the jet shape and subjet multiplicity for jets with transverse energies Et(jet) > 17 GeV. The data are well described by the QCD calculations. The jet shape and subjet multiplicity are used to tag gluon- and quark-initiated jets. Jet cross sections as functions of Et(jet), jet pseudorapidity, the jet-jet scattering angle, dijet invariant mass and the fraction of the photon energy carried by the dijet system are presented for gluon- and quark-tagged jets. The data exhibit the behaviour expected from the underlying parton dynamics. A value of alphas(Mz) of alphas(Mz) = 0.1176 +-0.0009(stat.) -0.0026 +0.0009 (exp.) -0.0072 +0.0091 (th.) was extracted from the measurements of jet shapes in deep inelastic scattering.

  14. A Synoptic Map of Halo Substructures from the Pan-STARRS1 3π Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Goldman, Bertrand; Martínez-Delgado, David; Sesar, Branimir; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Draper, Peter W.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We present a panoramic map of the entire Milky Way halo north of δ ˜ -30° (˜ 30,000 deg2), constructed by applying the matched-filter technique to the Pan-STARRS1 3π Survey dataset. Using single-epoch photometry reaching to g ˜22, we are sensitive to stellar substructures with heliocentric distances between 3.5 and ˜35 kpc. We recover almost all previously-reported streams in this volume and demonstrate that several of these are significantly more extended than earlier datasets have indicated. In addition, we also report five new candidate stellar streams. One of these features appears significantly broader and more luminous than the others and is likely the remnant of a dwarf galaxy. The other four streams are consistent with a globular cluster origin, and three of these are rather short in projection (≲ 10°), suggesting that streams like Ophiuchus may not be that rare. Finally, a significant number of more marginal substructures are also revealed by our analysis; many of these features can also be discerned in matched-filter maps produced by other authors from SDSS data, and hence they are very likely to be genuine. However, the extant 3π data is currently too shallow to determine their properties or produce convincing CMDs. The global view of the Milky Way provided by Pan-STARRS1 provides further evidence for the important role of both globular cluster disruption and dwarf galaxy accretion in building the Milky Way's stellar halo.

  15. Gamma-rays from dark matter annihilations strongly constrain the substructure in halos

    CERN Document Server

    Pinzke, Anders; Bergstrom, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that electrons and positrons from dark matter (DM) annihilations provide an excellent fit to the Fermi, PAMELA, and HESS data. Using this DM model, which requires an enhancement of the annihilation cross section over its standard value to match the observations, we show that it immediately implies an observable level of gamma-ray emission for the Fermi telescope from nearby galaxy clusters such as Virgo and Fornax. We show that this DM model implies a peculiar feature from final state radiation that is a distinctive signature of DM. Using the EGRET upper limit on the gamma-ray emission from Virgo, we constrain the minimum mass of substructures within DM halos to be > 0.1 M_sol - five orders of magnitudes larger than the expectation for cold dark matter. This limits the cutoff scale in the linear matter power spectrum to k 10^4 M_sol: if the true substructure cutoff is much smaller than this, the DM interpretation of the Fermi/PAMELA/HESS data must be wrong. To address the problem ...

  16. Disk Evolution and Bar Triggering Driven by Interactions with Dark Matter Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Heller, Clayton; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2008-01-01

    We study formation and evolution of bar-disk systems in fully self-consistent cosmological simulations of galaxy formation in the LCDM WMAP3 Universe. In a representative model we find that the first generation of bars form in response to the asymmetric dark matter (DM) distribution (i.e., DM filament) and quickly decay. Subsequent bar generations form and are destroyed during the major merger epoch permeated by interactions with a DM substructure (subhalos). A long-lived bar is triggered by a tide from a subhalo and survives for ~10 Gyr. The evolution of this bar is followed during the subsequent numerous minor mergers and interactions with the substructure. Together with intrinsic factors, these interactions largely determine the stellar bar evolution. The bar strength and its pattern speed anticorrelate, except during interactions and when the secondary (nuclear) bar is present. For about 5 Gyr bar pattern speed increases substantially despite the loss of angular momentum to stars and cuspy DM halo. We ana...

  17. A Synoptic Map of Halo Substructures from the Pan-STARRS1 3\\pi\\ Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Edouard J; Schlafly, Edward F; Martin, Nicolas F; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Goldman, Bertrand; Martinez-Delgado, David; Sesar, Branimir; Wyse, Rosemary F G; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth C; Draper, Peter W; Hodapp, Klaus W; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A; Metcalfe, Nigel; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    We present a panoramic map of the entire Milky Way halo north of dec~-30 degrees (~30,000 deg^2), constructed by applying the matched-filter technique to the Pan-STARRS1 3Pi Survey dataset. Using single-epoch photometry reaching to g~22, we are sensitive to stellar substructures with heliocentric distances between 3.5 and ~35 kpc. We recover almost all previously-reported streams in this volume and demonstrate that several of these are significantly more extended than earlier datasets have indicated. In addition, we also report five new candidate stellar streams. One of these features appears significantly broader and more luminous than the others and is likely the remnant of a dwarf galaxy. The other four streams are consistent with a globular cluster origin, and three of these are rather short in projection (<10 degrees), suggesting that streams like Ophiuchus may not be that rare. Finally, a significant number of more marginal substructures are also revealed by our analysis; many of these features can a...

  18. Comparative immunolocalisation of perlecan with collagen II and aggrecan in human foetal, newborn and adult ovine joint tissues demonstrates perlecan as an early developmental chondrogenic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Shu, Cindy; Melrose, James

    2010-09-01

    We undertook a comparative immunolocalisation study on type II collagen, aggrecan and perlecan in a number of 12- to 14-week-old human foetal and postnatal (7-19 months) ovine joints including finger, toe, knee, elbow, hip and shoulder. This demonstrated that perlecan followed a virtually identical immunolocalisation pattern to that of type II collagen in the foetal tissues, but a slightly divergent localisation pattern in adult tissues. Aggrecan was also localised in the cartilaginous joint tissues, which were clearly delineated by toluidine blue staining and the type II collagen immunolocalisations. It was also present in the capsular joint tissues and in ligaments and tendons in the joint, which stained poorly or not at all with toluidine blue. In higher power microscopic views, antibodies to perlecan also stained small blood vessels in the synovial lining tissues of the joint capsule; however, this was not discernable in low power macroscopic views where the immunolocalisation of perlecan to pericellular regions of cells within the cartilaginous rudiments was a predominant feature. Perlecan was also evident in small blood vessels in stromal connective tissues associated with the cartilage rudiments and with occasional nerves in the vicinity of the joint tissues. Perlecan was expressed by rounded cells in the enthesis attachment points of tendons to bone and in rounded cells in the inner third of the meniscus, which stained prominently with type II collagen and aggrecan identifying the chondrogenic background of these cells and local compressive loads. Flattened cells within the tendon and in the surface laminas of articular cartilages and the meniscus did not express perlecan. Collected evidence presented herein, therefore, indicates that besides being a basement membrane component, perlecan is also a marker of chondrogenic cells in prenatal cartilages. In postnatal cartilages, perlecan displayed a pericellular localisation pattern rather than the territorial

  19. ISO 12189 standard for the preclinical evaluation of posterior spinal stabilization devices--II: A parametric comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Barbera, Luigi; Costa, Francesco; Villa, Tomaso

    2016-02-01

    The International Standardization Organization (ISO) 12189 standard was recently introduced to preclinically evaluate and compare the mechanical properties of posterior stabilization devices. This scenario presents some new significant steps ahead over the vertebrectomy model recommended by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F1717 standard: the modular anterior support allows for describing a closer scenario to the effective clinical use as well as to test very flexible and dynamic posterior stabilization devices. Despite these significant advantages, ISO 12189 received little attention in the literature. Anatomical parameters depending on the spinal level were compared to the published data or original measurements on biplanar stereoradiography on 13 patients. Other mechanical variables, describing the test set-up design, were considered and all parameters were investigated using a numerical parametric finite element model. Stress values were calculated by also considering their worst-case combination. The standard set-up represents quite well the anatomy of an instrumented average thoracolumbar segment. The parametric comparative analysis demonstrates a significant (even beyond +350%) maximum increase in the stress on the device, compared to the standard currently in use. The anterior support stiffness plays the most detrimental effect (maximum stress increases up to 396%). The initial precompression step has an important role in determining the final stress values achieved at peak load (up to +76%). Moreover, when combining these two contributions, an even higher stress increase may be achieved (up to 473%). Despite the other anatomical parameters playing a secondary role, their worst-case combination demonstrates that a device could potentially undergo higher stresses than those reached according to standard suggestions (maximum increase of 22.4% at L1). Any user/designer should be aware of these effects when using ISO 12189 standard for the

  20. Passengers Preference and Satisfaction of Public Transport in Malaysia, Part II: A Comparative Analysis of Komuter and LRT Network

    OpenAIRE

    Rozmi Ismail; Mohammad Hesam Hafezi; Rahim Mohd Nor

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a comparative analysis of passengers preference and satisfaction of two kinds of public transportation in Malaysia, namely, train commuter (KTM) and Light Rail Transit (LRT). One of the important issues regarding public transport is the passenger satisfaction. The main objective of this research is to describe traveler’s satisfaction and preference towards public transport with service quality attributes. Parameters in passenger preference and satisfaction on public transp...

  1. Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livezey, Bradley C; Zusi, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    . Bootstrapping (based on 10 000 replicates) percentages and ratchet-minimized support (Bremer) indices indicated most nodes to be robust. Several fossil Neornithes (e.g. Dinornithiformes, Aepyornithiformes) were placed within the ingroup a posteriori either through unconstrained, heursitic searches based on the complete matrix augmented by these taxa separately or using backbone-constraints. Analysis confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the Neornithes. Findings included monophyly of the palaeognathous birds, comprising the sister taxa Tinamiformes and ratites, respectively, and the Anseriformes and Galliformes as monophyletic sister-groups, together forming the sister-group to other Neornithes exclusive of the Palaeognathae (Neoaves). Noteworthy inferences include: (i) the sister-group to remaining Neoaves comprises a diversity of marine and wading birds; (ii) Podicipedidae are the sister-group of Gaviidae, and not closely related to the Phoenicopteridae, as recently suggested; (iii) the traditional Pelecaniformes, including the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) as sister-taxon to other members, are monophyletic; (iv) traditional Ciconiiformes are monophyletic; (v) Strigiformes and Falconiformes are sister-groups; (vi) Cathartidae is the sister-group of the remaining Falconiformes; (vii) Ralliformes (Rallidae and Heliornithidae) are the sister-group to the monophyletic Charadriiformes, with the traditionally composed Gruiformes and Turniciformes (Turnicidae and Mesitornithidae) sequentially paraphyletic to the entire foregoing clade; (viii) Opisthocomus hoazin is the sister-taxon to the Cuculiformes (including the Musophagidae); (ix) traditional Caprimulgiformes are monophyletic and the sister-group of the Apodiformes; (x) Trogoniformes are the sister-group of Coliiformes; (xi) Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes are mutually monophyletic and closely related; and (xii) the Galbulae are retained within the

  2. Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIVEZEY, BRADLEY C; ZUSI, RICHARD L

    2007-01-01

    . Bootstrapping (based on 10 000 replicates) percentages and ratchet-minimized support (Bremer) indices indicated most nodes to be robust. Several fossil Neornithes (e.g. Dinornithiformes, Aepyornithiformes) were placed within the ingroup a posteriori either through unconstrained, heursitic searches based on the complete matrix augmented by these taxa separately or using backbone-constraints. Analysis confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the Neornithes. Findings included monophyly of the palaeognathous birds, comprising the sister taxa Tinamiformes and ratites, respectively, and the Anseriformes and Galliformes as monophyletic sister-groups, together forming the sister-group to other Neornithes exclusive of the Palaeognathae (Neoaves). Noteworthy inferences include: (i) the sister-group to remaining Neoaves comprises a diversity of marine and wading birds; (ii) Podicipedidae are the sister-group of Gaviidae, and not closely related to the Phoenicopteridae, as recently suggested; (iii) the traditional Pelecaniformes, including the shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) as sister-taxon to other members, are monophyletic; (iv) traditional Ciconiiformes are monophyletic; (v) Strigiformes and Falconiformes are sister-groups; (vi) Cathartidae is the sister-group of the remaining Falconiformes; (vii) Ralliformes (Rallidae and Heliornithidae) are the sister-group to the monophyletic Charadriiformes, with the traditionally composed Gruiformes and Turniciformes (Turnicidae and Mesitornithidae) sequentially paraphyletic to the entire foregoing clade; (viii) Opisthocomus hoazin is the sister-taxon to the Cuculiformes (including the Musophagidae); (ix) traditional Caprimulgiformes are monophyletic and the sister-group of the Apodiformes; (x) Trogoniformes are the sister-group of Coliiformes; (xi) Coraciiformes, Piciformes and Passeriformes are mutually monophyletic and closely related; and (xii) the Galbulae are retained within the

  3. Objectives and methodology of Romanian SEPHAR II Survey. Project for comparing the prevalence and control of cardiovascular risk factors in two East-European countries: Romania and Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorobantu, Maria; Tautu, Oana-Florentina; Ghiorghe, Silviu; Badila, Elisabeta; Dana, Minca; Dobreanu, Minodora; Baila, Ilarie; Rutkowski, Marcin; Zdrojewski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Comparing results of representative surveys conducted in different East-European countries could contribute to a better understanding and management of cardiovascular risk factors, offering grounds for the development of health policies addressing the special needs of this high cardiovascular risk region of Europe. The aim of this paper was to describe the methodology on which the comparison between the Romanian survey SEPHAR II and the Polish survey NATPOL 2011 results is based. Material and methods SEPHAR II, like NATPOL 2011, is a cross-sectional survey conducted on a representative sample of the adult Romanian population (18 to 80 years) and encompasses two visits with the following components: completing the study questionnaire, blood pressure and anthropometric measurements, and collection of blood and urine samples. Results From a total of 2223 subjects found at 2860 visited addresses, 2044 subjects gave written consent but only 1975 subjects had eligible data for the analysis, accounting for a response rate of 69.06%. Additionally we excluded 11 subjects who were 80 years of age (NATPOL 2011 included adult subjects up to 79 years). Therefore, the sample size included in the statistical analysis is 1964. It has similar age groups and gender structure as the Romanian population aged 18–79 years from the last census available at the moment of conducting the survey (weight adjustments for epidemiological analyses range from 0.48 to 8.7). Conclusions Sharing many similarities, the results of SEPHAR II and NATPOL 2011 surveys can be compared by a proper statistical method offering crucial information regarding cardiovascular risk factors in a high-cardiovascular risk European region. PMID:26322082

  4. Comparative analysis of the anterior and posterior length and deflection angle of the cranial base, in individuals with facial Pattern I, II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Thiesen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the variations in the anterior cranial base (S-N, posterior cranial base (S-Ba and deflection of the cranial base (SNBa among three different facial patterns (Pattern I, II and III. METHOD: A sample of 60 lateral cephalometric radiographs of Brazilian Caucasian patients, both genders, between 8 and 17 years of age was selected. The sample was divided into 3 groups (Pattern I, II and III of 20 individuals each. The inclusion criteria for each group were the ANB angle, Wits appraisal and the facial profile angle (G'.Sn.Pg'. To compare the mean values obtained from (SNBa, S-N, S-Ba each group measures, the ANOVA test and Scheffé's Post-Hoc test were applied. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference for the deflection angle of the cranial base among the different facial patterns (Patterns I, II and III. There was no significant difference for the measures of the anterior and posterior cranial base between the facial Patterns I and II. The mean values for S-Ba were lower in facial Pattern III with statistically significant difference. The mean values of S-N in the facial Pattern III were also reduced, but without showing statistically significant difference. This trend of lower values in the cranial base measurements would explain the maxillary deficiency and/or mandibular prognathism features that characterize the facial Pattern III.OBJETIVO: o presente estudo avaliou as variações da base craniana anterior (S-N, base craniana posterior (S-Ba, e ângulo de deflexão da base do crânio (SNBa entre três diferentes padrões faciais (Padrão I, II e III. MÉTODOS: selecionou-se uma amostra de 60 telerradiografias em norma lateral de pacientes brasileiros leucodermas, de ambos os sexos, com idades entre 8 anos e 17 anos. A amostra foi dividida em três grupos (Padrão I, II e III, sendo cada grupo constituído de 20 indivíduos. Os critérios de seleção dos indivíduos para cada grupo

  5. Preoperative Quantitative MR Tractography Compared with Visual Tract Evaluation in Patients with Neuropathologically Confirmed Gliomas Grades II and III: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Anna F.; Nilsson, Markus; Latini, Francesco; Mårtensson, Johanna; Zetterling, Maria; Berntsson, Shala G.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Lätt, Jimmy; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Low-grade gliomas show infiltrative growth in white matter tracts. Diffusion tensor tractography can noninvasively assess white matter tracts. The aim was to preoperatively assess tumor growth in white matter tracts using quantitative MR tractography (3T). The hypothesis was that suspected infiltrated tracts would have altered diffusional properties in infiltrated tract segments compared to noninfiltrated tracts. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight patients with suspected low-grade glioma were included after written informed consent and underwent preoperative diffusion tensor imaging in this prospective review-board approved study. Major white matter tracts in both hemispheres were tracked, segmented, and visually assessed for tumor involvement in thirty-four patients with gliomas grade II or III (astrocytomas or oligodendrogliomas) on postoperative neuropathological evaluation. Relative fractional anisotropy (rFA) and mean diffusivity (rMD) in tract segments were calculated and compared with visual evaluation and neuropathological diagnosis. Results. Tract segment infiltration on visual evaluation was associated with a lower rFA and high rMD in a majority of evaluated tract segments (89% and 78%, resp.). Grade II and grade III gliomas had similar infiltrating behavior. Conclusion. Quantitative MR tractography corresponds to visual evaluation of suspected tract infiltration. It may be useful for an objective preoperative evaluation of tract segment involvement. PMID:27190647

  6. Preoperative Quantitative MR Tractography Compared with Visual Tract Evaluation in Patients with Neuropathologically Confirmed Gliomas Grades II and III: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna F. Delgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Low-grade gliomas show infiltrative growth in white matter tracts. Diffusion tensor tractography can noninvasively assess white matter tracts. The aim was to preoperatively assess tumor growth in white matter tracts using quantitative MR tractography (3T. The hypothesis was that suspected infiltrated tracts would have altered diffusional properties in infiltrated tract segments compared to noninfiltrated tracts. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight patients with suspected low-grade glioma were included after written informed consent and underwent preoperative diffusion tensor imaging in this prospective review-board approved study. Major white matter tracts in both hemispheres were tracked, segmented, and visually assessed for tumor involvement in thirty-four patients with gliomas grade II or III (astrocytomas or oligodendrogliomas on postoperative neuropathological evaluation. Relative fractional anisotropy (rFA and mean diffusivity (rMD in tract segments were calculated and compared with visual evaluation and neuropathological diagnosis. Results. Tract segment infiltration on visual evaluation was associated with a lower rFA and high rMD in a majority of evaluated tract segments (89% and 78%, resp.. Grade II and grade III gliomas had similar infiltrating behavior. Conclusion. Quantitative MR tractography corresponds to visual evaluation of suspected tract infiltration. It may be useful for an objective preoperative evaluation of tract segment involvement.

  7. Study comparing human papillomavirus (HPV) real-time multiplex PCR and Hybrid Capture II INNO-LiPA v2 HPV genotyping PCR assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftner, Thomas; Germ, Liesje; Swoyer, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genotyping is an essential test to establish efficacy in HPV vaccine clinical trials and HPV prevalence in natural history studies. A number of HPV DNA genotyping methods have been cited in the literature, but the comparability of the outcomes from the different...... methods has not been well characterized. Clinically, cytology is used to establish possible HPV infection. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of HPV multiplex PCR assays compared to those of the testing scheme of the Hybrid Capture II (HCII) assay followed by an HPV PCR/line hybridization assay...... (HCII-LiPA v2). SurePath residual samples were split into two aliquots. One aliquot was subjected to HCII testing followed by DNA extraction and LiPA v2 genotyping. The second aliquot was shipped to a second laboratory, where DNA was extracted and HPV multiplex PCR testing was performed. Comparisons...

  8. Passengers Preference and Satisfaction of Public Transport in Malaysia, Part II: A Comparative Analysis of Komuter and LRT Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozmi Ismail

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a comparative analysis of passengers preference and satisfaction of two kinds of public transportation in Malaysia, namely, train commuter (KTM and Light Rail Transit (LRT. One of the important issues regarding public transport is the passenger satisfaction. The main objective of this research is to describe traveler’s satisfaction and preference towards public transport with service quality attributes. Parameters in passenger preference and satisfaction on public transportation network are facilities, comfortness and quality of services. A survey was conducted public transportation network in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia through a self questionnaire. They were 312 respondents voluntarily participated in this study. Result showed that passenger’s preference and satisfaction in the LRT services are better than Komuter. The application of this study suggested Komuter service need to improve their quality of service to attract more passengers.

  9. The response to estrogen deprivation on cartilage collagen degradation markers; CTX-II is unique compared to other markers of collagen turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tabassi, Nadine; Sondergaard, Lene;

    2009-01-01

    rats receiving estrogen or not. Levels of PIIANP, a marker of type II collagen synthesis, were also measured in rats. Rat knee cartilage was analyzed for immunoreactivity of CTX-II and PIIANP and for type II collagen expression. RESULTS: As expected, urinary levels of CTX-II are significantly increased......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The urinary level of type II collagen degradation marker CTX-II is increased in postmenopausal women and in ovariectomized rats, suggesting that estrogen deprivation induces cartilage breakdown. Here we investigate whether this response to estrogen holds true for other type...... II collagen turnover markers known to be affected in osteoarthritis, and whether it relates to its presence in specific areas of cartilage tissue. METHODS: The type II collagen degradation markers CTX-II and Helix-II were measured in body fluids of pre- and postmenopausal women and of ovariectomized...

  10. Studies of high-transverse momentum jet substructure and top quarks produced in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alon, R.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Duchovni, E.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Perez, G.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    Results of a study of the substructure of the highest transverse momentum (pT) jets observed by the CDF Collaboration are presented. Events containing at least one jet with pT>400 GeV /c in a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb-1 , collected in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, are selected. A study of the jet mass, angularity, and planar-flow distributions is presented, and the measurements are compared with predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics. A search for boosted top-quark production is also described, leading to a 95% confidence level upper limit of 38 fb on the production cross section of top quarks with pT>400 GeV /c .

  11. Reduction of fatigue loads on jacket substructure through blade design optimization for multi-megawatt wind turbines at 50 m water depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njomo Wandji, W.; Pavese, C.; Natarajan, A.; Zahle, F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses the reduction of the fore-aft damage equivalent moment at the tower base for multi-megawatt offshore wind turbines mounted on jacket type substructures at 50 m water depths. The study investigates blade design optimization of a reference 10 MW wind turbine under standard wind conditions of onshore sites. The blade geometry and structure is optimized to yield a design that minimizes tower base fatigue loads without significant loss of power production compared to that of the reference setup. The resulting blade design is then mounted on a turbine supported by a jacket and placed under specific offshore site conditions. The new design achieves alleviate fatigue damage equivalent loads also in the jacket members, showing the possibility to prolong its design lifetime or to save material in comparison to the reference jacket. Finally, the results suggest additional benefit on the efficient design of other components such as the constituents of the nacelle.

  12. Studies of high-transverse momentum jet substructure and top quarks produced in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; D'Errico, Maria; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Duchovni, Ehud; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Marchese, Luigi; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Perez, Gilad; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sinervo, Pekka; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Song, Hao; Sorin, Maria Veronica; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-02-19

    Results of a study of the substructure of the highest transverse momentum (pT) jets observed by the CDF collaboration are presented. Events containing at least one jet with pT > 400 GeV/c in a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.95 inverse fb, collected in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, are selected. A study of the jet mass, angularity, and planar-flow distributions is presented, and the measurements are compared with predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics. A search for boosted top-quark production is also described, leading to a 95% confidence level upper limit of 38 fb on the production cross section of top quarks with pT > 400 GeV/c.

  13. Studies of high-transverse momentum jet substructure and top quarks produced in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; D'Errico, Maria; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Duchovni, Ehud; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Marchese, Luigi Marchese; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Perez, Gilad; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sinervo, Pekka; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Song, Hao; Sorin, Maria Veronica; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Results of a study of the substructure of the highest transverse momentum (pT) jets observed by the CDF collaboration are presented. Events containing at least one jet with pT > 400 GeV/c in a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.95 inverse fb, collected in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, are selected. A study of the jet mass, angularity, and planar-flow distributions is presented, and the measurements are compared with predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics. A search for boosted top-quark production is also described, leading to a 95% confidence level upper limit of 38 fb on the production cross section of top quarks with pT > 400 GeV/c.

  14. Comparative study of heat transfer from Nb-Ti and Nb_{3}Sn coils to He II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco La China

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In superconducting magnets, the energy deposited or generated in the coil must be evacuated to prevent temperature rise and consequent transition of the superconductor to the resistive state. The main barrier to heat extraction is represented by the electric insulation wrapped around superconducting cables. In the LHC, insulation improvement is a key point in the development of interaction region magnets and injector chain fast-pulsed magnets for luminosity upgrade; the high heat load of these magnets, in fact, is not compatible with the use of current insulation schemes. We review the standard insulation schemes for Nb-Ti and Nb_{3}Sn technology from the thermal point of view. We implement, in an analytical model, the strongly nonlinear thermal resistances of the different coil components including the permeability to superfluid helium of Nb-Ti insulations, measured during the LHC main dipole development. We use such a model to compare Nb-Ti and Nb_{3}Sn technologies by taking into account their specific operating margin in different working conditions. Finally, we propose an insulation scheme to enhance the heat transfer capability of Nb-Ti coils.

  15. Extremotolerance and resistance of lichens: comparative studies on five species used in astrobiological research II. Secondary lichen compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meessen, J; Sánchez, F J; Sadowsky, A; de la Torre, R; Ott, S; de Vera, J-P

    2013-12-01

    Lichens, which are symbioses of a fungus and one or two photoautotrophs, frequently tolerate extreme environmental conditions. This makes them valuable model systems in astrobiological research to fathom the limits and limitations of eukaryotic symbioses. Various studies demonstrated the high resistance of selected extremotolerant lichens towards extreme, non-terrestrial abiotic factors including space exposure, hypervelocity impact simulations as well as space and Martian parameter simulations. This study focusses on the diverse set of secondary lichen compounds (SLCs) that act as photo- and UVR-protective substances. Five lichen species used in present-day astrobiological research were compared: Buellia frigida, Circinaria gyrosa, Rhizocarpon geographicum, Xanthoria elegans, and Pleopsidium chlorophanum. Detailed investigation of secondary substances including photosynthetic pigments was performed for whole lichen thalli but also for axenically cultivated mycobionts and photobionts by methods of UV/VIS-spectrophotometry and two types of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Additionally, a set of chemical tests is presented to confirm the formation of melanic compounds in lichen and mycobiont samples. All investigated lichens reveal various sets of SLCs, except C. gyrosa where only melanin was putatively identified. Such studies will help to assess the contribution of SLCs on lichen extremotolerance, to understand the adaptation of lichens to prevalent abiotic stressors of the respective habitat, and to form a basis for interpreting recent and future astrobiological experiments. As most of the identified SLCs demonstrated a high capacity in absorbing UVR, they may also explain the high resistance of lichens towards non-terrestrial UVR.

  16. Comparative Study of Heat Transfer from Nb-Ti and Nb$_3$Sn coils to He II

    CERN Document Server

    La China, M

    2008-01-01

    In superconducting magnets, the energy deposited or generated in the coil must be evacuated to prevent temperature rise and consequent transition of the superconductor to the resistive state. The main barrier to heat extraction is represented by the electric insulation wrapped around superconducting cables. In the LHC, insulation improvement is a key point in the development of interaction region magnets and injector chain fast-pulsed magnets for luminosity upgrade; the high heat load of these magnets, in fact, is not compatible with the use of current insulation schemes. We review the standard insulation schemes for Nb-Ti and Nb3Sn technology from the thermal point of view. We implement, in an analytical model, the strongly nonlinear thermal resistances of the different coil components including the permeability to superfluid helium of Nb-Ti insulations, measured during the LHC main dipole development. We use such a model to compare Nb-Ti and Nb3Sn technologies by taking into account their specific operating...

  17. A comparative study for the sorption of Cd(II) by K-feldspar and sepiolite as soil components, and the recovery of Cd(II) using rhamnolipid biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşçi, Y; Nurbaş, M; Açikel, Y Sağ

    2008-08-01

    This study investigated the sorption characteristics and recovery of selected heavy metal Cd(II) from K-feldspar and sepiolite, representative soil components, using rhamnolipid biosurfactant. Although the proposed technique was classified as a soil bioremediation process, it can also be applied to treatment of waste waters containing Cd(II) ions with minor modifications. The effect of initial Cd(II) concentration on sorption capacity was characterized by determining the sorption isotherms. Of the four models examined, the Freundlich model showed the best fit for the sorption of Cd(II) on K-feldspar, whereas the Langmuir-model was used successfully to characterize the sorption of Cd(II) on sepiolite. Although a high Cd(II) uptake of 7.49 mmol/kg by K-feldspar was obtained, sepiolite was a superior Cd(II) accumulater, with a maximum Cd(II) uptake of 24.66 mmol Cd(II)/kg. The presence of Cd(II) in the sepiolite or K-feldspar prior to addition of the rhamnolipid generally resulted in less rhamnolipid sorption to sepiolite or K-feldspar. The maximum Cd(II) desorption efficiency by rhamnolipid from K-feldspar was substantially higher than that of sepiolite and determined to be 96% of the sorbed Cd(II), whereas only 10.1% of the sorbed Cd(II) from sepiolite was recovered by rhamnolipid solution.

  18. Jet reconstruction and substructure measurements in ATLAS and CMS with first Run-2 data [CMS speaker

    CERN Document Server

    Mozer, Matthias U

    2016-01-01

    Jets play an important role in LHC physics but jet reconstruction and calibration in the high pile-up environment of the 2015 and 2016 data-taking periods pose unique challenges. The ATLAS and CMS experiments have improved their jet reconstruction and correction methods compared to Run I in order to better clean jets of the additional particles generated in pile-up interactions. Beyond jets formed from the hadronization of quarks and gluons, hadronic decays of highly boosted heavy particles, such as top quarks or Z, W or H bosons, in a single fat jet is gaining importance in the search for new physics at the highest possible energies. The LHC experiments have used the time between the LHC Run I and Run II to refine the methods used to identify such boosted decays and make them more robust in the presence of the high pile-up encountered in Run II. The application of this work to early Run II data are presented.

  19. Comparative Study on the Efficiency of the Photodynamic Inactivation of Candida albicans Using CdTe Quantum Dots, Zn(II Porphyrin and Their Conjugates as Photosensitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osnir S. Viana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluorescent II-VI semiconductor quantum dots (QDs as active photosensitizers in photodymanic inactivation (PDI is still being evaluated. In the present study, we prepared 3 nm size CdTe QDs coated with mercaptosuccinic acid and conjugated them electrostatically with Zn(II meso-tetrakis (N-ethyl-2-pyridinium-2-yl porphyrin (ZnTE-2-PyP or ZnP, thus producing QDs-ZnP conjugates. We evaluated the capability of the systems, bare QDs and conjugates, to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and applied them in photodynamic inactivation in cultures of Candida albicans by irradiating the QDs and testing the hypothesis of a possible combined contribution of the PDI action. Tests of in vitro cytotoxicity and phototoxicity in fibroblasts were also performed in the presence and absence of light irradiation. The overall results showed an efficient ROS production for all tested systems and a low cytotoxicity (cell viability >90% in the absence of radiation. Fibroblasts incubated with the QDs-ZnP and subjected to irradiation showed a higher cytotoxicity (cell viability <90% depending on QD concentration compared to the bare groups. The PDI effects of bare CdTe QD on Candida albicans demonstrated a lower reduction of the cell viability (~1 log10 compared to bare ZnP which showed a high microbicidal activity (~3 log10 when photoactivated. The QD-ZnP conjugates also showed reduced photodynamic activity against C. albicans compared to bare ZnP and we suggest that the conjugation with QDs prevents the transmembrane cellular uptake of the ZnP molecules, reducing their photoactivity.

  20. Preclinical activity of the type II CD20 antibody GA101 (obinutuzumab) compared with rituximab and ofatumumab in vitro and in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Sylvia; Herting, Frank; Mundigl, Olaf; Waldhauer, Inja; Weinzierl, Tina; Fauti, Tanja; Muth, Gunter; Ziegler-Landesberger, Doris; Van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Lang, Sabine; Duong, Minh Ngoc; Reslan, Lina; Gerdes, Christian A; Friess, Thomas; Baer, Ute; Burtscher, Helmut; Weidner, Michael; Dumontet, Charles; Umana, Pablo; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We report the first preclinical in vitro and in vivo comparison of GA101 (obinutuzumab), a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 monoclonal antibody, with rituximab and ofatumumab, the two currently approved type I CD20 antibodies. The three antibodies were compared in assays measuring direct cell death (AnnexinV/PI staining and time-lapse microscopy), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP), and internalization. The models used for the comparison of their activity in vivo were SU-DHL4 and RL xenografts. GA101 was found to be superior to rituximab and ofatumumab in the induction of direct cell death (independent of mechanical manipulation required for cell aggregate disruption formed by antibody treatment), whereas it was 10 to 1,000 times less potent in mediating CDC. GA101 showed superior activity to rituximab and ofatumumab in ADCC and whole-blood B-cell depletion assays, and was comparable with these two in ADCP. GA101 also showed slower internalization rate upon binding to CD20 than rituximab and ofatumumab. In vivo, GA101 induced a strong antitumor effect, including complete tumor remission in the SU-DHL4 model and overall superior efficacy compared with both rituximab and ofatumumab. When rituximab-pretreated animals were used, second-line treatment with GA101 was still able to control tumor progression, whereas tumors escaped rituximab treatment. Taken together, the preclinical data show that the glyoengineered type II CD20 antibody GA101 is differentiated from the two approved type I CD20 antibodies rituximab and ofatumumab by its overall preclinical activity, further supporting its clinical investigation.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of the Lipid Profile in the Serum of Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Healthy Individuals with Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Biju; Prasad, Rajendra B; Shetty, Sucheta; Vishakh, R

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an immuno-inflammatory disease that is initiated by the interaction between microbial plaque and the periodontal tissues. The data available on the association of periodontal diseases with the lipid profile are conflicting. Therefore, a need for a study in this area was felt. To evaluate the lipid profile in the serum of patients with chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and to compare it with healthy controls, to see whether they can serve as potential markers for chronic periodontitis and also to assess whether periodontitis can have systemic effects. This study is a cross-sectional study. This cross-sectional study was conducted involving 300 participants in the age group of 30-60 years from October 2010 to May 2015. Five milliliters of venous blood was collected from each of the study participants, from the antecubital vein. Lipid profile was assessed using the ERBA commercially available kit. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software version 17. Multigroup comparison was carried out using ANOVA. The honest significant difference Tukey's test was used in conjunction with ANOVA to find means which are significantly different from each other. When the lipid profile was estimated, total cholesterol (TC) levels were seen to be significantly higher (P periodontitis group. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were seen to be significantly higher (P periodontitis group. The triglyceride (TGL) values were also significantly higher (P periodontitis group. The HDL and LDL levels were seen to be nonsignificant between chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with diabetic group. The findings of the study showed that the lipid profile was significantly altered in patients with chronic periodontitis as compared to healthy controls. There was a potentiated difference in the values for TC, VLDL cholesterol, and TGL in patients with chronic periodontitis when compared to

  2. GAGA: A New Algorithm for Genomic Inference of Geographic Ancestry Reveals Fine Level Population Substructure in Europeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); F. Liu (Fan); A. Wollstein (Andreas); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAttempts to detect genetic population substructure in humans are troubled by the fact that the vast majority of the total amount of observed genetic variation is present within populations rather than between populations. Here we introduce a new algorithm for transforming a genetic dista

  3. Synthesis, structure and photoluminescence of (PLAGH){sub 2}[ZnCl{sub 4}] and comparative analysis of photoluminescence properties with tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radanović, Mirjana M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Jelić, Miodrag G., E-mail: jelicmgm@uns.ac.rs [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Romčević, Nebojša Ž. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia); Boukos, Nikos [National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Institute of Materials Science, Athens (Greece); Vojinović-Ješić, Ljiljana S.; Leovac, Vukadin M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Hadžić, Branka B. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia); Bajac, Branimir M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technology, Novi Sad (Serbia); Nađ, Laslo F. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Chandrinou, Chrysoula [National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Institute of Materials Science, Athens (Greece); Baloš, Sebastian S. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • New zinc(II) complex with pyridoxalaminoguanidine was synthesized. • The enhancement of the photoluminescence due to the compound formation was achieved. • Very high photoluminescence of Zn(II) compound was noticed. • Comparative analysis of photoluminescence with tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) was provided. - Abstract: The first compound of zinc(II) containing pyridoxalaminoguanidine has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra, conductometric measurements and X-ray crystallography. Single crystals of the compound were obtained in the reaction of methanolic solution of zinc(II) chloride and pyridoxalaminoguanidine hydrochloride. In this compound the coordination of chelate ligand is absent and tetrachlorido complex of zinc(II) with pyridoxalaminuguanidinium cation as contraion is obtained. Photoluminescence spectra were measured. Lorentzian multipeak technique was used to determine peak wavelengths and their intensities. Photoluminescence spectroscopy upon 325, 488 and 514 nm laser excitation light was used to obtain results. This novel compound of zinc(II) was compared to the well-known organic light emitting diode material—ruthenium(II) complex with bypiridine i.e., tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), under the same circumstances and the identical experimental setup. A scheme of energy levels and transitions is proposed to explain the obtained experimental results.

  4. Performance of boosted object and jet substructure techniques in Run 1 and 2 ATLAS data

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Hadronic decays of heavy particles with momenta much larger than their mass result in their decay products being reconstructable as a single large-radius jet. The study of the substructure of these jets allows the separation of these boosted decays with respect to more common jets from light-quarks and gluons. Several techniques have been developed by the phenomenology and experimental community to identify jets coming from hadronic decays of boosted top quarks, W, Z and Higgs bosons. The performance of several such techniques have been studied in ATLAS using fully-simulated Monte Carlo events, and validated on data using pure samples of top quarks, W bosons from top decays and dijet events. Results of these studies will be presented for Run 1 as well as Run 2 of the LHC.

  5. Hints of Thermal Fragmentation in the Primordial Substructure of NGC2264

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, P. S.; Lada, C. J.; Young, E. T.; Marengo, M.; Muench, A.; Muzerolle, J.; Siegler, N.; Rieke, G.; Hartmann, L.; Megeath, T.; Fazio, G.

    2005-12-01

    We present Spitzer observations of a young star forming region within NGC2264. These observations reveal new 24 micron sources in curious linear alignments, extending radially like spokes on a wheel from a previously known luminous young protostar. These 24 micron sources are found to be mostly ( ˜60%) Class I protostars that are highly embedded within dense filamentary molecular material. The protostars still retain the primordial substructuring of the parental cloud. We find the protostars to be separated by regular intervals that are consistent with the Jeans length for the average density of the associated molecular material, suggesting that thermal fragmentation played an important role during the star forming process in this region. The figure shows a false color image of this young region built from MIPS 24 micron (red), IRAC 8 micron (green), and IRAC 3.6 micron (blue) data. PT acknowledges support from the scholarship SFRH/BD/13984/2003 FCT, Portugal.

  6. Improving LHC searches for dark photons using lepton-jet substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barello, G.; Chang, Spencer; Newby, Christopher A.; Ostdiek, Bryan

    2017-03-01

    Collider signals of dark photons are an exciting probe for new gauge forces and are characterized by events with boosted lepton jets. Existing techniques are efficient in searching for muonic lepton jets but due to substantial backgrounds have difficulty constraining lepton jets containing only electrons. This is unfortunate since upcoming intensity frontier experiments are sensitive to dark photon masses which only allow electron decays. Analyzing a recently proposed model of kinetic mixing, with new scalar particles decaying into dark photons, we find that existing techniques for electron jets can be substantially improved. We show that using lepton-jet-substructure variables, in association with a boosted decision tree, improves background rejection, significantly increasing the LHC's reach for dark photons in this region of parameter space.

  7. Measuring the power spectrum of dark matter substructure using strong gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Holder, Gilbert; Kisner, Theodore; Kuhlen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become possible to detect individual dark matter subhalos near strong gravitational lenses. Typically, only the most massive subhalos in the strong lensing region may be detected this way. In this work, we show that strong lenses may also be used to constrain the much more numerous population of lower mass subhalos that are too small to be detected individually. In particular, we show that the power spectrum of projected density fluctuations in galaxy halos can be measured using strong gravitational lensing. We develop the mathematical framework of power spectrum estimation, and test our method on mock observations. We use our results to determine the types of observations required to measure the substructure power spectrum with high significance. We predict that deep observations with current facilities (in particular ALMA) can measure this power spectrum, placing strong constraints on the abundance of dark matter subhalos and the underlying particle nature of dark matter.

  8. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, T. A.; Mackey, A. D.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g- and i-band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct overdensity encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Boötes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Boötes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  9. Reheating Effects in the Matter Power Spectrum and Implications for Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Erickcek, Adrienne L

    2011-01-01

    The thermal and expansion history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis is unknown. We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations through the transition from an early matter era to radiation domination. We treat reheating as the perturbative decay of an oscillating scalar field into relativistic plasma and cold dark matter. After reheating, we find that subhorizon perturbations in the decay-produced dark matter density are significantly enhanced, while subhorizon radiation perturbations are instead suppressed. If dark matter originates in the radiation bath after reheating, this suppression may be the primary cut-off in the matter power spectrum. Conversely, for dark matter produced non-thermally from scalar decay, enhanced perturbations can drive structure formation during the cosmic dark ages and dramatically increase the abundance of compact substructures. For low reheat temperatures, we find that as much as 50% of all dark matter is in microhalos with M > 0.1 Earth masses at z=100, ...

  10. Accounting for ancestry: population substructure and genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Gregersen, Peter K; Seldin, Michael F

    2008-10-15

    Accounting for the genetic substructure of human populations has become a major practical issue for studying complex genetic disorders. Allele frequency differences among ethnic groups and subgroups and admixture between different ethnic groups can result in frequent false-positive results or reduced power in genetic studies. Here, we review the problems and progress in defining population differences and the application of statistical methods to improve association studies. It is now possible to take into account the confounding effects of population stratification using thousands of unselected genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms or, alternatively, selected panels of ancestry informative markers. These methods do not require any demographic information and therefore can be widely applied to genotypes available from multiple sources. We further suggest that it will be important to explore results in homogeneous population subsets as we seek to define the extent to which genomic variation influences complex phenotypes.

  11. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Roderick, T A; Jerjen, H; Da Costa, G S

    2016-01-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g and i band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct over-density encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Bo\\"otes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Bo\\"otes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Bo\\"otes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  12. The Genetics of Mexico Recapitulates Native American Substructure and Affects Biomedical Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Zakharia, Fouad; Sikora, Martin; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Sandoval, Karla; Eng, Celeste; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Robles, Victoria; Kenny, Eimear E.; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín-Pérez, Gastón; Granados-Arriola, Julio; Huntsman, Scott; Galanter, Joshua M.; Via, Marc; Ford, Jean G.; Chapela, Rocío; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodríguez-Santana, Jose R.; Romieu, Isabelle; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Navarro, Blanca del Rio; London, Stephanie J.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Garcia-Herrera, Rodrigo; Estrada, Karol; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Carnevale, Alessandra; Soberón, Xavier; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexico harbors great cultural and ethnic diversity, yet fine-scale patterns of human genome-wide variation from this region remain largely uncharacterized. We studied genomic variation within Mexico from over 1,000 individuals representing 20 indigenous and 11 mestizo populations. We found striking genetic stratification among indigenous populations within Mexico at varying degrees of geographic isolation. Some groups were as differentiated as Europeans are from East Asians. Pre-Columbian genetic substructure is recapitulated in the indigenous ancestry of admixed mestizo individuals across the country. Furthermore, two independently phenotyped cohorts of Mexicans and Mexican Americans showed a significant association between sub-continental ancestry and lung function. Thus, accounting for fine-scale ancestry patterns is critical for medical and population genetic studies within Mexico, in Mexican-descent populations, and likely in many other populations worldwide. PMID:24926019

  13. Development of a Probabilistic Component Mode Synthesis Method for the Analysis of Non-Deterministic Substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ferri, Aldo A.

    1995-01-01

    Standard methods of structural dynamic analysis assume that the structural characteristics are deterministic. Recognizing that these characteristics are actually statistical in nature, researchers have recently developed a variety of methods that use this information to determine probabilities of a desired response characteristic, such as natural frequency, without using expensive Monte Carlo simulations. One of the problems in these methods is correctly identifying the statistical properties of primitive variables such as geometry, stiffness, and mass. This paper presents a method where the measured dynamic properties of substructures are used instead as the random variables. The residual flexibility method of component mode synthesis is combined with the probabilistic methods to determine the cumulative distribution function of the system eigenvalues. A simple cantilever beam test problem is presented that illustrates the theory.

  14. On the Recombination Rate Estimation in the Presence of Population Substructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Hecker

    Full Text Available As recombination events are not uniformly distributed along the human genome, the estimation of fine-scale recombination maps, e.g. HapMap Project, has been one of the major research endeavors over the last couple of years. For simulation studies, these estimates provide realistic reference scenarios to design future study and to develop novel methodology. To achieve a feasible framework for the estimation of such recombination maps, existing methodology uses sample probabilities for a two-locus model with recombination, with recent advances allowing for computationally fast implementations. In this work, we extend the existing theoretical framework for the recombination rate estimation to the presence of population substructure. We show under which assumptions the existing methodology can still be applied. We illustrate our extension of the methodology by an extensive simulation study.

  15. The substructure of a flux transfer event observed by the MMS spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Gershman, D.; Avanov, L.; Paterson, W. R.; Dorelli, J. C.; Ergun, R. E.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Mauk, B.; Cohen, I. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    On 15 August 2015, MMS (Magnetospheric Multiscale mission), skimming the dusk magnetopause, detected an isolated region of an increased magnetic strength and bipolar Bn, indicating a flux transfer event (FTE). The four spacecraft in a tetrahedron allowed for investigations of the shape and motion of the FTE. In particular, high-resolution particle data facilitated our exploration of FTE substructures and their magnetic connectivity inside and surrounding the FTE. Combined field and plasma observations suggest that the core fields are open, magnetically connected to the northern magnetosphere from which high-energy particles leak; ion "D" distributions characterize the axis of flux ropes that carry old-opened field lines; counterstreaming electrons superposed by parallel-heated components populate the periphery surrounding the FTE; and the interface between the core and draped regions contains a separatrix of newly opened magnetic field lines that emanate from the X line above the FTE.

  16. Ancient substructure in early mtDNA lineages of southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Rocha, Jorge; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2013-02-07

    Among the deepest-rooting clades in the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogeny are the haplogroups defined as L0d and L0k, which are found primarily in southern Africa. These lineages are typically present at high frequency in the so-called Khoisan populations of hunter-gatherers and herders who speak non-Bantu languages, and the early divergence of these lineages led to the hypothesis of ancient genetic substructure in Africa. Here we update the phylogeny of the basal haplogroups L0d and L0k with 500 full mtDNA genome sequences from 45 southern African Khoisan and Bantu-speaking populations. We find previously unreported subhaplogroups and greatly extend the amount of variation and time-depth of most of the known subhaplogroups. Our major finding is the definition of two ancient sublineages of L0k (L0k1b and L0k2) that are present almost exclusively in Bantu-speaking populations from Zambia; the presence of such relic haplogroups in Bantu speakers is most probably due to contact with ancestral pre-Bantu populations that harbored different lineages than those found in extant Khoisan. We suggest that although these populations went extinct after the immigration of the Bantu-speaking populations, some traces of their haplogroup composition survived through incorporation into the gene pool of the immigrants. Our findings thus provide evidence for deep genetic substructure in southern Africa prior to the Bantu expansion that is not represented in extant Khoisan populations. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Aesthetic repercussions of the class II treatment on the profile: comparative study Distal Activ Concept (DAC)/Extra-Oral Force (EOF)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dénarié, Sophia; Gebeile-Chauty, Sarah; Aknin, Jean-Jacques

    2010-09-01

    In the past orthodontists frequently used extra-oral force to slow down skeletal growth in their treatment of Class II malocclusions; more modern practice relies less on applying distal force to the maxilla than on stimulating forward growth of the mandible. Does this change in therapeutic design have any repercussions in facial esthetics? To evaluate the impact of treatment on the appearance of the profile, we conducted a study with 64 patients in the adolescent dentition stage with a Class II, division 1 malocclusions. None had teeth extracted or preliminary orthodontic treatment. We divided them into two sections; we treated the first group of 33 patients with the Distal Active Concept (DAC), which encourages forward movement and growth of the mandible, and we treated the second group of 31 patients with Extra-Oral Force (EOF) in combination with a full-banded appliance. Comparing the results with cephalometric profile analyses, we found that the soft tissue contour of the lower part of the face showed considerably more sagittal development in the children treated by DAC than those treated by EOF.

  18. Application of Improved Hybrid Interface Substructural Component Modal Synthesis Method inVibration Characteristics of Mistuned Blisk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Bin,BAI Guangchen,; LI Chao

    2014-01-01

    The large and complex structures are divided into hundreds of thousands or millions degrees of freedom(DOF) when they are calculated which will spend a lot of time and the efficiency will be extremely low. The classical component modal synthesis method (CMSM) are used extensively, but for many structures in the engineering of high-rise buildings, aerospace systemic engineerings, marine oil platforms etc, a large amount of calculation is still needed. An improved hybrid interface substructural component modal synthesis method(HISCMSM) is proposed. The parametric model of the mistuned blisk is built by the improved HISCMSM. The double coordinating conditions of the displacement and the force are introduced to ensure the computational accuracy. Compared with the overall structure finite element model method(FEMM), the computational time is shortened by23.86%–31.56%and the modal deviation is 0.002%–0.157% which meets the requirement of the computational accuracy. It is faster 4.46%–10.57% than the classical HISCMSM. So the improved HISCMSM is better than the classical HISCMSM and the overall structure FEMM. Meanwhile, the frequency and the modal shape are researched, considering the factors including rotational speed, gas temperature and geometry size. The strong localization phenomenon of the modal shape’s the maximum displacement and the maximum stress is observed in the second frequency band and it is the most sensitive in the frequency veering. But the localization phenomenon is relatively weak in 1st and the 3d frequency band. The localization of the modal shape is more serious under the condition of the geometric dimensioning mistuned. An improved HISCMSM is proposed, the computational efficiency of the mistuned blisk can be increased observably by this method.

  19. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – ... temperature and coordinated water were determined ... indicating fairly stable complex compounds (Table 1). The complex compounds are insoluble [Table 2] in water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in ...

  20. Long-term effects of conflict-related sexual violence compared with non-sexual war trauma in female World War II survivors: a matched pairs study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwert, Philipp; Glaesmer, Heide; Eichhorn, Svenja; Grundke, Elena; Pietrzak, Robert H; Freyberger, Harald J; Klauer, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the long-term effects of conflict-related sexual violence experienced at the end of World War II (WWII) with non-sexual WWII trauma (e.g., being exposed to shell shock or physical violence). A total of 27 elderly wartime rape survivors were compared to age- and gender-matched control subjects who were drawn from a larger sample of subjects over 70 years of age who had experienced WWII-related trauma. A modified version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale was used to assess trauma characteristics and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 was used to assess current psychopathology. Additionally, measures of posttraumatic growth (Posttraumatic Growth Inventory) and social acknowledgement as a trauma survivor (Social Acknowledgement Questionnaire) were used to assess two mediating variables in post-trauma conditions of rape victims. Women exposed to conflict-related sexual violence reported greater severity of PTSD-related avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms, as well as anxiety, compared with female long-term survivors of non-sexual WWII trauma. The vast majority (80.9 %) of these women also reported severe sexual problems during their lifetimes relative to 19.0 % of women who experienced non-sexual war trauma. Women exposed to conflict-related sexual violence also reported greater posttraumatic growth, but less social acknowledgement as trauma survivors, compared to survivors of non-sexual war trauma. The results were consistent with emerging neurobiological research, which suggests that different traumas may be differentially associated with long-term posttraumatic sequelae in sexual assault survivors than in other survivor groups and highlights the need to treat (or better prevent) deleterious effects of conflict-related sexual violence in current worldwide crisis zones.

  1. Study comparing human papillomavirus (HPV) real-time multiplex PCR and Hybrid Capture II INNO-LiPA v2 HPV genotyping PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftner, Thomas; Germ, Liesje; Swoyer, Ryan; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Breugelmans, J Gabrielle; Munk, Christian; Stubenrauch, Frank; Antonello, Joseph; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2009-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genotyping is an essential test to establish efficacy in HPV vaccine clinical trials and HPV prevalence in natural history studies. A number of HPV DNA genotyping methods have been cited in the literature, but the comparability of the outcomes from the different methods has not been well characterized. Clinically, cytology is used to establish possible HPV infection. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of HPV multiplex PCR assays compared to those of the testing scheme of the Hybrid Capture II (HCII) assay followed by an HPV PCR/line hybridization assay (HCII-LiPA v2). SurePath residual samples were split into two aliquots. One aliquot was subjected to HCII testing followed by DNA extraction and LiPA v2 genotyping. The second aliquot was shipped to a second laboratory, where DNA was extracted and HPV multiplex PCR testing was performed. Comparisons were evaluated for 15 HPV types common in both assays. A slightly higher proportion of samples tested positive by the HPV multiplex PCR than by the HCII-LiPA v2 assay. The sensitivities of the multiplex PCR assay relative to those of the HCII-LiPA v2 assay for HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, for example, were 0.806, 0.646, 0.920, and 0.860, respectively; the specificities were 0.986, 0.998, 0.960, and 0.986, respectively. The overall comparability of detection of the 15 HPV types was quite high. Analyses of DNA genotype testing compared to cytology results demonstrated a significant discordance between cytology-negative (normal) and HPV DNA-positive results. This demonstrates the challenges of cytological diagnosis and the possibility that a significant number of HPV-infected cells may appear cytologically normal.

  2. Comparing Alterations of Blood Glucose Level in type II Diabetic Patients Taking Metformin and Withhold of Metformin on the Morning of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tarbiat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In the context effect of metformin in patients with acute coronary syndrome, available evidence supports cardiac effect. Yet, there is doubt about continuation or discontinuation of metformin before major surgery. The aim of the present study is to determine the efficacy of continuing metformin in plasma glucose, renal function index, arterial PH in type II diabetic patients after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Materials & Methods: In this clinical-experimental study, 90 type II diabetic patients with ASA class II admitted for CABG surgery in Hamadan Ekbatan Hospital were enrolled in the study in 2014 and were randomly assigned to two groups , one group treated with insulin and continued metformin and the other group treated with insulin and discontinued metformin.In the beginning indicators such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI were compared which were not significantly different in the two groups. Then, other parameters such as blood glucose, BUN, Cr, arterial blood PH, cardiac arrhythmia and need for inotrope were compared. Used inotropes in this study included dopamine, dobutamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, milrinon to achieve systolic blood presser pressure over 100mmHg. Results: Average plasma BUN after surgery and one day after surgery in the group who discontinued metformin significantly were higher compared with the metformin group, but no differences were observed in average plasma BUN in the 2nd and 3rd days after surgery in the two groups. During 3 days after surgery, average plasma creatinine was significantly lower in metformin group compared to non- metformin group. Although there was no difference between the two groups in pH parameter before surgery but in the metformin group, average pH was lower than non-metformin group after surgery. Before and 3 days after surgery mean blood glucose level was not significantly different between the two groups. During surgery, average need for inotrope in

  3. Puzzle-based versus traditional lecture: comparing the effects of pedagogy on academic performance in an undergraduate human anatomy and physiology II lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetzik, Lucas; Deeter, Anthony; Parker, Jamie; Yukech, Christine

    2015-06-23

    A traditional lecture-based pedagogy conveys information and content while lacking sufficient development of critical thinking skills and problem solving. A puzzle-based pedagogy creates a broader contextual framework, and fosters critical thinking as well as logical reasoning skills that can then be used to improve a student's performance on content specific assessments. This paper describes a pedagogical comparison of traditional lecture-based teaching and puzzle-based teaching in a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. Using a single subject/cross-over design half of the students from seven sections of the course were taught using one type of pedagogy for the first half of the semester, and then taught with a different pedagogy for the second half of the semester. The other half of the students were taught the same material but with the order of the pedagogies reversed. Students' performance on quizzes and exams specific to the course, and in-class assignments specific to this study were assessed for: learning outcomes (the ability to form the correct conclusion or recall specific information), and authentic academic performance as described by (Am J Educ 104:280-312, 1996). Our findings suggest a significant improvement in students' performance on standard course specific assessments using a puzzle-based pedagogy versus a traditional lecture-based teaching style. Quiz and test scores for students improved by 2.1 and 0.4% respectively in the puzzle-based pedagogy, versus the traditional lecture-based teaching. Additionally, the assessments of authentic academic performance may only effectively measure a broader conceptual understanding in a limited set of contexts, and not in the context of a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. In conclusion, a puzzle-based pedagogy, when compared to traditional lecture-based teaching, can effectively enhance the performance of students on standard course specific assessments, even when the assessments only test a limited

  4. Safety and immunogenicity of Bio Pox™, a live varicella vaccine (Oka strain) in Indian children: A comparative multicentric, randomized phase II/III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Anand Prakash; Faridi, Mohammad Moonis Akbar; Mitra, Monjori; Kaur, Iqbal Rajinder; Dabas, Aashima; Choudhury, Jaydeep; Mukherjee, Mallar; Mishra, Devendra

    2017-09-02

    Varicella or chickenpox is a highly contagious disease with a high secondary attack rate. Almost 30% of Indian adolescents lack protective antibodies against varicella, emphasizing the need of routine varicella immunization. The Oka VZV is a well-established, safe and efficacious vaccine strain that is highly immunogenic and produces lifelong protective immunity. The present multicentric, open label, randomized, controlled Phase II/III study, compared the Bio Pox™ (indigenous investigational vaccine) with a licensed vaccine, Varivax™ ([a])([a]) Please note that this article refers to the product named VARIVAX as manufactured by Changchun Keygen Biological Products Ltd., China and marketed in India by VHB Life Sciences Limited, Mumbai, and not the product VARIVAX® owned by Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., Rahway, New Jersey, USA. Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. have asked us to make clear that the product manufactured by Changchun Keygen Biological Products Ltd. is unrelated to and is not sponsored, endorsed or otherwise authorised by Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. , for its safety and immunogenicity profile in 252 healthy subjects in the age group of 1-12 y (cohort I: 6-12 years, II:1-6 years) in 3 tertiary medical institutions. Antibodies were measured by VZV Glycoprotein Enzyme Linked Immunoassay (IgG ELISA) kit. Seroconversion percentage in children having pre-vaccination anti VZV IgG titer <10 mIU/mL (< 5 gp ELISA units/mL) were 80% for Bio Pox™ and 77% for Varivax™ (p = 0.692). The seroconversion rate in the group receiving Bio Pox™ was non-inferior to the group that received Varivax™. There were mild local reactions for both the vaccines; none of the patient had fever or required hospitalization or medication. The Bio Pox™ was found to be safe and immunogenic in children against VZV infection.

  5. Comparative evaluation of the lipid profile in the serum of patients with type II diabetes mellitus and healthy individuals with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Periodontal disease is an immuno-inflammatory disease that is initiated by the interaction between microbial plaque and the periodontal tissues. The data available on the association of periodontal diseases with the lipid profile are conflicting. Therefore, a need for a study in this area was felt. Aims: To evaluate the lipid profile in the serum of patients with chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with Type II diabetes mellitus (DM patients and to compare it with healthy controls, to see whether they can serve as potential markers for chronic periodontitis and also to assess whether periodontitis can have systemic effects. Settings and Design: This study is a cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted involving 300 participants in the age group of 30–60 years from October 2010 to May 2015. Five milliliters of venous blood was collected from each of the study participants, from the antecubital vein. Lipid profile was assessed using the ERBA commercially available kit. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software version 17. Multigroup comparison was carried out using ANOVA. The honest significant difference Tukey's test was used in conjunction with ANOVA to find means which are significantly different from each other. Results: When the lipid profile was estimated, total cholesterol (TC levels were seen to be significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the DM with periodontitis group. High-density lipoprotein (HDL levels were seen to be significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the control group. Mean serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL and very LDL (VLDL levels were seen to be significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the DM with periodontitis group. The triglyceride (TGL values were also significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the DM with periodontitis group. The HDL and LDL levels were seen to be nonsignificant between chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with

  6. Development of an expert system for the simulation model for casting metal substructure of a metal-ceramic crown design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, Ivan; Hadzistevic, Miodrag; Vukelic, Djordje; Potran, Michal; Brajlih, Tomaz

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the integrated CAD/CAE systems are favored solutions for the design of simulation models for casting metal substructures of metal-ceramic crowns. The worldwide authors have used different approaches to solve the problems using an expert system. Despite substantial research progress in the design of experts systems for the simulation model design and manufacturing have insufficiently considered the specifics of casting in dentistry, especially the need for further CAD, RE, CAE for the estimation of casting parameters and the control of the casting machine. The novel expert system performs the following: CAD modeling of the simulation model for casting, fast modeling of gate design, CAD eligibility and cast ability check of the model, estimation and running of the program code for the casting machine, as well as manufacturing time reduction of the metal substructure. The authors propose an integration method using common data model approach, blackboard architecture, rule-based reasoning and iterative redesign method. Arithmetic mean roughness values was determinated with constant Gauss low-pass filter (cut-off length of 2.5mm) according to ISO 4287 using Mahr MARSURF PS1. Dimensional deviation between the designed model and manufactured cast was determined using the coordinate measuring machine Zeiss Contura G2 and GOM Inspect software. The ES allows for obtaining the castings derived roughness grade number N7. The dimensional deviation between the simulation model of the metal substructure and the manufactured cast is 0.018mm. The arithmetic mean roughness values measured on the casting substructure are from 1.935µm to 2.778µm. The realized developed expert system with the integrated database is fully applicable for the observed hardware and software. Values of the arithmetic mean roughness and dimensional deviation indicate that casting substructures are surface quality, which is more than enough and useful for direct porcelain veneering. The

  7. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers for major renal outcomes in patients with diabetes: A 15-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hon-Yen; Peng, Chiao-Ling; Chen, Pei-Chun; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Chang, Chee-Jen; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Yu-Sen; Tu, Yu-Kang; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are considered to have similar renoprotective effects; so far there has been no consensus about their priorities. This study aimed to compare ACEIs and ARBs for major renal outcomes and survival in a 15-year cohort of adults with diabetes. This study utilized Taiwan's medical and pharmacy claims data in the Longitudinal Cohort of Diabetes Patients. The primary outcome was long-term dialysis, and secondary outcomes were hospitalization for acute kidney injury, hospitalization for hyperkalemia, all-cause death, cardiovascular death, and non-cardiovascular death. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for outcomes comparing ACEIs with ARBs. We conducted subgroup analyses and interaction tests among patients with different age and comorbid diseases. A total of 34,043 patients received ACEIs and 23,772 patients received ARBs. No differences were found for primary or secondary outcomes in the main analyses. ACEIs showed significantly lower hazard than ARBs for long-term dialysis among patients with cardiovascular disease (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.97, interaction P = 0.003) or chronic kidney disease (0.81, 0.71-0.93, interaction P = 0.001). Our analyses show similar effects of ACEIs and ARBs in patients with diabetes. However, ACEIs might provide additional renoprotective effects among patients who have cardiovascular disease or chronic kidney disease.

  8. Enhancement of dissolution rate of class II drugs (Hydrochlorothiazide); a comparative study of the two novel approaches; solid dispersion and liqui-solid techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amjad; Iqbal, Zafar; Shah, Yasar; Ahmad, Lateef; Ismail; Ullah, Zia; Ullah, Aman

    2015-01-01

    Liqui-solid technique and solid dispersion formation are two novel approaches for enhancement of dissolution rate of BCS class II drugs. Liqui-solid compact converts a liquid drug or drug solution into a free flowing powder with enhanced dissolution rate. In case of solid dispersion drug is molecularly dispersed in a hydrophilic polymer in solid state. In the present study, Liqui-solid and solid dispersion techniques were applied to enhance the dissolution of the Hydrochlorothiazide. Three formulations of Hydrochlorothiazide were prepared by liqui-solid technique using micro crystalline cellulose as carrier material and colloidal silicon dioxide as coating material. Water, poly ethylene glycol-400 and Tween-60 were used as solvent system. Solid dispersions of Hydrochlorothiazide were prepared by solvent fusion method using PEG-4000 as carrier polymer. Tablets were subjected to evaluation of various physical and chemical characteristics. Dissolution profiles of tablets prepared by the novel techniques were compared with marketed conventional tablets. Model independent techniques including similarity factor, dissimilarity factor and dissolution efficiency were applied for comparison of dissolution profiles. The results obtained indicated that liqui-solid compact formulations were more effective in enhancing the dissolution rate compared with solid dispersion technique. The liqui-solid compacts improved the dissolution rate up to 95% while the solid dispersion increased it to 88%. PMID:26702260

  9. Post cementation sensitivity evaluation of glass Ionomer, zinc phosphate and resin modified glass Ionomer luting cements under class II inlays: An in vivo comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to compare the patient-perceived post-cementation sensitivity of class II metal restorations preoperatively, immediately after cementation, one week after cementation and one month after cementation with (1 Glass Ionomer luting cement (2 Zinc Phosphate cement and (3 Resin-modified Glass Ionomer luting cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, irrespective of sex, in the age group of 15-50 years were selected and the teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 20 each. Twenty inlay cast restorations were cemented with three different luting cements. The criteria adapted to measure tooth sensitivity in the present study were objective examination for sensitivity.(1 Cold water test (2 Compressed air test and (3 Biting pressure test. Results: The patients with restorations cemented with Resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity when compared with Glass Ionomer and zinc phosphate cement at all different intervals of time evaluated by different tests. Conclusion: The patients with restorations cemented with resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity.

  10. Substructuring of multibody systems for numerical transfer path analysis in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acri, Antonio; Offner, Guenter; Nijman, Eugene; Rejlek, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Noise legislations and the increasing customer demands determine the Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) development of modern commercial vehicles. In order to meet the stringent legislative requirements for the vehicle noise emission, exact knowledge of all vehicle noise sources and their acoustic behavior is required. Transfer path analysis (TPA) is a fairly well established technique for estimating and ranking individual low-frequency noise or vibration contributions via the different transmission paths. Transmission paths from different sources to target points of interest and their contributions can be analyzed by applying TPA. This technique is applied on test measurements, which can only be available on prototypes, at the end of the designing process. In order to overcome the limits of TPA, a numerical transfer path analysis methodology based on the substructuring of a multibody system is proposed in this paper. Being based on numerical simulation, this methodology can be performed starting from the first steps of the designing process. The main target of the proposed methodology is to get information of noise sources contributions of a dynamic system considering the possibility to have multiple forces contemporary acting on the system. The contributions of these forces are investigated with particular focus on distribute or moving forces. In this paper, the mathematical basics of the proposed methodology and its advantages in comparison with TPA will be discussed. Then, a dynamic system is investigated with a combination of two methods. Being based on the dynamic substructuring (DS) of the investigated model, the methodology proposed requires the evaluation of the contact forces at interfaces, which are computed with a flexible multi-body dynamic (FMBD) simulation. Then, the structure-borne noise paths are computed with the wave based method (WBM). As an example application a 4-cylinder engine is investigated and the proposed methodology is applied on the

  11. The response to oestrogen deprivation of the cartilage collagen degradation marker, CTX-II, is unique compared with other markers of collagen turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tabassi, Nadine C B; Sondergaard, Lene V;

    2009-01-01

    The urinary level of the type II collagen degradation marker CTX-II is increased in postmenopausal women and in ovariectomised rats, suggesting that oestrogen deprivation induces cartilage breakdown. Here we investigate whether this response to oestrogen is also true for other type II collagen tu...... turnover markers known to be affected in osteoarthritis, and whether it relates to its presence in specific areas of cartilage tissue....

  12. Comparative effect of angiotensin II type I receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers on laboratory parameters in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Yayoi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both angiotensin II type I receptor blockers (ARBs and calcium channel blockers (CCBs are widely used antihypertensive drugs. Many clinical studies have demonstrated and compared the organ-protection effects and adverse events of these drugs. However, few large-scale studies have focused on the effect of these drugs as monotherapy on laboratory parameters. We evaluated and compared the effects of ARB and CCB monotherapy on clinical laboratory parameters in patients with concomitant hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods We used data from the Clinical Data Warehouse of Nihon University School of Medicine obtained between Nov 1, 2004 and July 31, 2011, to identify cohorts of new ARB users (n = 601 and propensity-score matched new CCB users (n = 601, with concomitant mild to moderate hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We used a multivariate-adjusted regression model to adjust for differences between ARB and CCB users, and compared laboratory parameters including serum levels of triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, non-fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, sodium, potassium, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and white blood cell (WBC, red blood cell (RBC and platelet (PLT counts up to 12 months after the start of ARB or CCB monotherapy. Results We found a significant reduction of serum TC, HbA1c, hemoglobin and hematocrit and RBC count and a significant increase of serum potassium in ARB users, and a reduction of serum TC and hemoglobin in CCB users, from the baseline period to the exposure period. The reductions of RBC count, hemoglobin and hematocrit in ARB users were significantly greater than those in CCB users. The increase of serum potassium in ARB users was significantly greater than that in CCB users. Conclusions Our study suggested that hematological adverse effects and

  13. Development and design of a semi-floater substructure for multi-megawatt wind turbines at 50+ m water depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NJOMO WANDJI, Wilfried; Natarajan, Anand; Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov

    2016-01-01

    A semi-floater concept as a substructure for multi-megawatt wind turbines is developed herein for installation at 50þ m water depths. The semi-floater concept is a hybrid between a fixed monopile type support structure and a floating spar buoy. The configuration of the substructure is composed of...... turbine components, and to exhibit low platform displacement at the mean sea level. Finally, the overall performance of the structure related to energy production is similar to that of a reference wind turbine situated on land......., HAWC2, coupled with dedicated in-house software packages for structural design analysis, and Abaqus. A reliability analysis and fatigue load calculations are made to ensure a desired life expectancy of the structure. The semi-floater concept is shown to maintain acceptable fatigue load levels for all...

  14. Distribution of distances between dislocations in different types of dislocation substructures in deformed Cu-Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trishkina, L., E-mail: trishkina.53@mail.ru; Zboykova, N.; Koneva, N., E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru; Kozlov, E. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya St., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, T. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya St., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 50 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the investigation was the determination of the statistic description of dislocation distribution in each dislocation substructures component forming after different deformation degrees in the Cu-Al alloys. The dislocation structures were investigated by the transmission diffraction electron microscopy method. In the work the statistic description of distance distribution between the dislocations, dislocation barriers and dislocation tangles in the deformed Cu-Al alloys with different concentration of Al and test temperature at the grain size of 100 µm was carried out. It was established that the above parameters influence the dislocation distribution in different types of the dislocation substructures (DSS): dislocation chaos, dislocation networks without disorientation, nondisoriented and disoriented cells, in the walls and inside the cells. The distributions of the distances between dislocations in the investigated alloys for each DSS type formed at certain deformation degrees and various test temperatures were plotted.

  15. Radial distribution and strong lensing statistics of satellite galaxies and substructure using high resolution LCDM hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Maccio, A V; Stadel, J; Diemand, J; Maccio', Andrea V.; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim; Diemand, Juerg

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the number density and radial distribution of substructures and satellite galaxies using cosmological simulations that follow the gas dynamics of a baryonic component, including shock heating, radiative cooling and star formation within the hierarchical concordance LCDM model. We find that the dissipation of the baryons greatly enhances the survival of subhaloes, expecially in the galaxy core, resulting in a radial distribution of satellite galaxies that closely follows the overall mass distribution. Hydrodynamical simulations are necessary to resolve the adiabatic contraction and dense cores of galaxies, resulting in a total number of satellites a factor of two larger than found in pure dark matter simulation. Convergence tests show that the cored distribution found by previous authors was due to physical overmerging of dark matter only structures. We proceed to use a ray-shooting technique in order to study the impact of these additional substructures on the number of violations of the cusp caust...

  16. Towards the understanding of jet substructures and cross sections in heavy ion collisions using soft collinear effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chien, Yang-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The jet quenching phenomenon in heavy ion collisions provides a strong evidence of the modification of parton shower in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Jet substructure observables can probe various aspects of the jet formation mechanism. They contain useful information about the QGP and allow us to study the medium properties in great details. Here we present theoretical calculations of jet shapes and cross sections in proton-proton and lead-lead collisions at the LHC using soft-collinear effective theory, with Glauber gluon interactions in the medium. We find that resumming large logarithms in the jet substructure calculation is necessary for precise theoretical predictions. The resummation is performed using renormalization group evolution between characteristic jet scales. We also find that the medium induces power corrections to jet shapes. In the end we present the comparison between our calculations with the recent measurements at the LHC with very good agreement. Our calculations help initiate precise j...

  17. A Substructure Combination Strategy To Create Potent and Selective Transthyretin Kinetic Stabilizers That Prevent Amyloidogenesis and Cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sungwook; Reixach, Natlia; Connelly, Stephen; Johnson, Steven M.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W. (Scripps)

    2010-08-13

    Transthyretin aggregation-associated proteotoxicity appears to cause several human amyloid diseases. Rate-limiting tetramer dissociation and monomer misfolding of transthyretin (TTR) occur before its aggregation into cross-{beta}-sheet amyloid fibrils. Small molecule binding to and preferential stabilization of the tetrameric state of TTR over the dissociative transition state raises the kinetic barrier for dissociation, imposing kinetic stabilization on TTR and preventing aggregation. This is an effective strategy to halt neurodegeneration associated with polyneuropathy, according to recent placebo-controlled clinical trial results. In three recent papers, we systematically ranked possibilities for the three substructures composing a typical TTR kinetic stabilizer, using fibril inhibition potency and plasma TTR binding selectivity data. Herein, we have successfully employed a substructure combination strategy to use these data to develop potent and selective TTR kinetic stabilizers that rescue cells from the cytotoxic effects of TTR amyloidogenesis. Of the 92 stilbene and dihydrostilbene analogues synthesized, nearly all potently inhibit TTR fibril formation. Seventeen of these exhibit a binding stoichiometry of >1.5 of a maximum of 2 to plasma TTR, while displaying minimal binding to the thyroid hormone receptor (<20%). Six analogues were definitively categorized as kinetic stabilizers by evaluating dissociation time-courses. High-resolution TTR-(kinetic stabilizer)2 crystal structures (1.31-1.70 {angstrom}) confirmed the anticipated binding orientation of the 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxyphenyl substructure and revealed a strong preference of the isosteric 3,5-dibromo-4-aminophenyl substructure to bind to the inner thyroxine binding pocket of TTR.

  18. Searching for dwarf spheroidal galaxies and other galactic dark matter substructures with the Fermi large area telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-08-01

    Over the past century, it has become clear that about a quarter of the known universe is composed of an invisible, massive component termed ''dark matter''. Some of the most popular theories of physics beyond the Standard Model suggest that dark matter may be a new fundamental particle that could self-annihilate to produce γ rays. Nearby over-densities in the dark matter halo of our Milky Way present some of the most promising targets for detecting the annihilation of dark matter. We used the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for γ rays produced by dark matter annihilation in Galactic dark matter substructures. We searched for γ-ray emission coincident with Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies, which trace the most massive Galactic dark matter substructures. We also sought to identify nearby dark matter substructures that lack all astrophysical tracers and would be detectable only through γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation. We found no conclusive evidence for γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and we set stringent and robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. While γ-ray searches for dark matter substructure are currently the most sensitive and robust probes of dark matter annihilation, they are just beginning to intersect the theoretically preferred region of dark matter parameter space. Thus, we consider future prospects for increasing the sensitivity of γ-ray searches through improvements to the LAT instrument performance and through upcoming wide- field optical surveys.

  19. Near-Field cosmology with RR Lyrae variable stars: A first view of substructure in the southern sky

    CERN Document Server

    Duffau, S; Navarrete, C; Catelan, M; Hajdu, G; Torrealba, G; Cortes, C; Belokurov, V; Koposov, S; Drake, A J

    2016-01-01

    We present an update of a spectroscopic follow-up survey at low-resolution of a large number of RR Lyrae halo overdensity candidates found in the southern sky. The substructure candidates were identified in the RR Lyrae catalog of Torrealba et al. (2015) using Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) data. Radial velocities and mean metallicities have been estimated for target stars in almost half of the original overdensities to assess their potential membership to coherent halo features.

  20. Association of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Clinical Features with European Population Genetic Substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaza, Manuel; Witte, Torsten; Papasteriades, Chryssa; Marchini, Maurizio; Migliaresi, Sergio; Kovacs, Attila; Ordi-Ros, Josep; Bijl, Marc; Santos, Maria Jose; Ruzickova, Sarka; Pullmann, Rudolf; Carreira, Patricia; Skopouli, Fotini N.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Suarez, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J.; Gomez-Reino, Juan J.; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a very varied spectrum of clinical manifestations that could be partly determined by genetic factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between prevalence of 11 clinical features and age of disease onset with European population genetic substructure. Data from 1413 patients of European ancestry recruited in nine countries was tested for association with genotypes of top ancestry informative markers. This analysis was done with logistic regression between phenotypes and genotypes or principal components extracted from them. We used a genetic additive model and adjusted for gender and disease duration. Three clinical features showed association with ancestry informative markers: autoantibody production defined as immunologic disorder (P = 6.8×10−4), oral ulcers (P = 6.9×10−4) and photosensitivity (P = 0.002). Immunologic disorder was associated with genotypes more common in Southern European ancestries, whereas the opposite trend was observed for photosensitivity. Oral ulcers were specifically more common in patients of Spanish and Portuguese self-reported ancestry. These results should be taken into account in future research and suggest new hypotheses and possible underlying mechanisms to be investigated. A first hypothesis linking photosensitivity with variation in skin pigmentation is suggested. PMID:22194982

  1. Measuring the power spectrum of dark matter substructure using strong gravitational lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Dalal, Neal; Holder, Gilbert; Kisner, Theodore; Kuhlen, Michael; Perreault Levasseur, Laurence

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, it has become possible to detect individual dark matter subhalos near images of strongly lensed extended background galaxies. Typically, only the most massive subhalos in the strong lensing region may be detected this way. In this work, we show that strong lenses may also be used to constrain the much more numerous population of lower mass subhalos that are too small to be detected individually. In particular, we show that the power spectrum of projected density fluctuations in galaxy halos can be measured using strong gravitational lensing. We develop the mathematical framework of power spectrum estimation, and test our method on mock observations. We use our results to determine the types of observations required to measure the substructure power spectrum with high significance. We predict that deep observations (~10 hours on a single target) with current facilities can measure this power spectrum at the 3σ level, with no apparent degeneracy with unknown clumpiness in the background source structure or fluctuations from detector noise. Upcoming ALMA measurements of strong lenses are capable of placing strong constraints on the abundance of dark matter subhalos and the underlying particle nature of dark matter.

  2. A transversal substructuring mode matching method applied to the acoustic analysis of dissipative mufflers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albelda, J.; Denia, F. D.; Torres, M. I.; Fuenmayor, F. J.

    2007-06-01

    To carry out the acoustic analysis of dissipative silencers with uniform cross-section, the application of the mode matching method at the geometrical discontinuities is an attractive option from a computational point of view. The consideration of this methodology assumes, in general, that the modes associated with the transversal geometry of each element with uniform cross-section are known for the excitation frequencies considered in the analysis. The calculation of the transversal modes is not, however, a simple task when the acoustic system involves perforated elements and absorbent materials. The current work presents a modal approach to calculate the transversal modes and the corresponding axial wavenumbers for dissipative mufflers of uniform (but arbitrary) cross-section. The proposed technique is based on the division of the transversal section into subdomains and the subsequent use of a substructuring procedure with two sets of modes to improve the convergence. The former set of modes fulfils the condition of zero pressure at the common boundary between transversal subdomains while the latter satisfies the condition of zero derivative in the direction normal to the boundary. The approach leads to a versatile methodology with a moderate computational effort that can be applied to mufflers commonly found in real applications. To validate the procedure presented in this work, comparisons are provided with finite element predictions and results available in the literature, showing a good agreement. In addition, the procedure is applied to an example of practical interest.

  3. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XIX. Tomography of Milky Way Substructures in the NGVS Footprint

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhorst, Deborah; McConnachie, Alan; Navarro, Julio F; Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Peng, Eric W; Gwyn, Stephen D J; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2016-01-01

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a deep $u^*giz$ survey targeting the Virgo cluster of galaxies at 16.5~Mpc. This survey provides high-quality photometry over an $\\sim$ 100 deg$^2$ region straddling the constellations of Virgo and Coma Berenices. This sightline through the Milky Way is noteworthy in that it intersects two of the most prominent substructures in the Galactic halo: the Virgo Over-Density (VOD) and Sagittarius stellar stream (close to its bifurcation point). In this paper, we use deep $u^*gi$ imaging from the NGVS to perform tomography of the VOD and Sagittarius stream using main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars as a halo tracer population. The VOD, whose centroid is known to lie at somewhat lower declinations ($\\alpha \\sim 190^\\circ$, $\\delta \\sim -5^\\circ$) than is covered by the NGVS, is nevertheless clearly detected in the NGVS footprint at distances between $\\sim$ 8 and 25~kpc. By contrast, the Sagittarius stream is found to slice directly across the NGVS field at distances be...

  4. Jet Substructure Classification in High-Energy Physics with Deep Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Pierre; Eng, Clara; Sadowski, Peter; Whiteson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    At the extreme energies of the Large Hadron Collider, massive particles can be produced at such high velocities that their hadronic decays are collimated and the resulting jets overlap. Deducing whether the substructure of an observed jet is due to a low-mass single particle or due to multiple decay objects of a massive particle is an important problem in the analysis of collider data. Traditional approaches have relied on expert features designed to detect energy deposition patterns in the calorimeter, but the complexity of the data make this task an excellent candidate for the application of machine learning tools. The data collected by the detector can be treated as a two-dimensional image, lending itself to the natural application of image classification techniques. In this work, we apply deep neural networks with a mixture of locally-connected and fully-connected nodes. Our experiments demonstrate that without the aid of expert features, such networks match or modestly outperform the current state-of-the...

  5. Detecting Mass Substructure in Galaxy Clusters: An Aperture Mass Statistic for Gravitational Flexion

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Adrienne; Wilkins, Stephen M

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational flexion has recently been introduced as a technique by which one can map out and study substructure in clusters of galaxies. Previous analyses involving flexion have measured the individual galaxy-galaxy flexion signal, or used either parametric techniques or a KSB-type inversion to reconstruct the mass distribution in Abell 1689. In this paper, we present an aperture mass statistic for flexion, and apply it to the lensed images of background galaxies obtained by ray-tracing simulations through a simple analytic mass distribution and through a galaxy cluster from the Millennium simulation. We show that this method is effective at detecting and accurately tracing structure within clusters of galaxies on sub-arcminute scales with high signal-to-noise even using a moderate background source number density and image resolution. In addition, the method provides much more information about both the overall shape and the small-scale structure of a cluster of galaxies than can be achieved through a weak...

  6. Analysis of shape memory alloy sensory particles for damage detection via substructure and continuum damage modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Brent R.; Benzerga, A. Amine; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to monitor and predict the structural health of an aircraft is of growing importance to the aerospace industry. Currently, structural inspections and maintenance are based upon experiences with similar aircraft operating in similar conditions. While effective, these methods are time-intensive and unnecessary if the aircraft is not in danger of structural failure. It is imagined that future aircraft will utilize non-destructive evaluation methods, allowing for the near real-time monitoring of structural health. A particularly interesting method involves utilizing the unique transformation response of shape memory alloy (SMA) particles embedded in an aircraft structure. By detecting changes in the mechanical and/or electromagnetic responses of embedded particles, operators could detect the formation or propagation of fatigue cracks in the vicinity of these particles. This work focuses on a finite element model of SMA particles embedded in an aircraft wing using a substructure modeling approach in which degrees of freedom are retained only at specified points of connection to other parts or the application of boundary conditions, greatly reducing computational cost. Previous work evaluated isolated particle response to a static crack to numerically demonstrate and validate this damage detection method. This paper presents the implementation of a damage model to account for crack propagation and examine for the first time the effect of particle configuration and/or relative placement with respect to the ability to detect damage.

  7. Ion beam modifications of defect sub-structure of calcite cleavages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Venkateshwar Rao; M Ramakrishna Murthy

    2008-04-01

    Experimental investigations on the defect sub-structure and surface modifications, brought about by He+ ion-bombardment of calcite cleavages (100), have been carried out. Optical and scanning electron microscopic investigations revealed drastic modifications on the surface morphology, local symmetry and defect concentration. Additional structural defects on ion-bombardment of calcite surfaces also have been observed. Changes in shape and form of chemical etch pits are found to be a function of ion-beam energy, as studied by optical microscopy. Radiation damage in calcite has been attributed mainly due to desorption of CO$^{-2}_{3}$ ions from the calcite surfaces, on irradiation. Measurements of surface conductivity on irradiated calcite surfaces have been made employing a four-probe technique. Enhancement of surface conductivity has been considered to be due to an increase in concentration of CO$^{-2}_{3}$ ions formed, on ion irradiation and subsequent thermal stimulation. Planar plastic anisotropy has been studied on irradiated calcite cleavages by measurement of microhardness.

  8. The Extraordinary Amount of Substructure in the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauzac, M.; Eckert, D.; Schwinn, J.; Harvey, D.; Baugh, C. M.; Robertson, A.; Bose, S.; Massey, R.; Owers, M.; Ebeling, H.; Shan, H. Y.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; Atek, H.; Clément, B.; Egami, E.; Israel, H.; Knowles, K.; Limousin, M.; Natarajan, P.; Rexroth, M.; Taylor, P.; Tchernin, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yields no objects with as many massive substructures as observed in Abell 2744, confirming that Abell 2744 is an extreme system. We stress that these properties still do not constitute a challenge to ΛCDM, as caveats apply to both the simulation and the observations: for instance, the projected mass measurements from gravitational lensing and the limited resolution of the sub-haloes finders. We discuss implications of Abell 2744 for the plausibility of different dark-matter candidates and, finally, measure a new upper limit on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter of σDM < 1.28 cm2g-1(68% CL), in good agreement with previous results from Harvey et al. (2015).

  9. Chemical Abundances of Planetary Nebulae in the Substructures of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Xuan; Guerrero, Martin A; Liu, Xiaowei; Yuan, Haibo; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    We present deep spectroscopy of planetary nebulae (PNe) that are associated with the substructures of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The spectra were obtained with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the 10.4 m GTC. Seven targets were selected for the observations, three in the Northern Spur and four associated with the Giant Stream. The most distant target in our sample, with a rectified galactocentric distance >100 kpc, was the first PN discovered in the outer streams of M31. The [O III] 4363 auroral line was well detected in the spectra of all targets, enabling electron temperature determination. Ionic abundances are derived based on the [O III] temperatures, and elemental abundances of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon are estimated. The relatively low N/O and He/H ratios as well as abundance ratios of alpha-elements indicate that our target PNe might belong to populations as old as ~2 Gyr. Our PN sample, including the current seven and the previous three observed by Fang et al., have rather homogeneo...

  10. Multicolor Photometry of the Galaxy Cluster A98: Substructures and Star Formation Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L; Zhou, X; Jiang, Z -J; Yang, Y -B; Ma, J; Wu, J -H; Wu, Z -Y

    2009-01-01

    An optical photometric observation with the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) multicolor system is carried out for A98 (z=0.104), a galaxy cluster with two large enhancements in X-ray surface brightness. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) covering 15 intermediate bands are obtained for all sources detected down to V ~ 20 mag in a field of $58' \\times 58'$. After the star-galaxy separation by the color-color diagrams, a photometric redshift technique is applied to the galaxy sample for further membership determination. The color-magnitude relation is taken as a further restriction of the early-type cluster galaxies. As a result, a list of 198 faint member galaxies is achieved. Based on newly generated sample of member galaxies, the dynamical substructures, A98N, A98S, and A98W, are investigated in detail. A separate galaxy group, A98X, is also found to the south of main concentration of A98, which is gravitationally unbound to A98. For 74 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies, the environme...

  11. Detection of lensing substructure using ALMA observations of the dusty galaxy SDP.81

    CERN Document Server

    Hezaveh, Yashar D; Marrone, Daniel P; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren; Wen, Di; Blandford, Roger D; Carlstrom, John E; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Holder, Gilbert P; Kemball, Athol; Marshall, Philip J; Murray, Norman; Levasseur, Laurence Perreault; Vieira, Joaquin D; Wechsler, Risa H

    2016-01-01

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations, we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a $M=10^{8.96\\pm 0.12} M_{\\odot}$ subhalo near one of the images, with a significance of $6.9\\sigma$ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter subhalos down to $M\\sim 2\\times 10^7 M_{\\odot}$, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies...

  12. Evolution of the substructure of a novel 12% Cr steel under creep conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Surya Deo, E-mail: surya.yadav@tugraz.at [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Kalácska, Szilvia, E-mail: kalacska@metal.elte.hu [Department of Materials Physics, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest (Hungary); Dománková, Mária, E-mail: maria.domankova@stuba.sk [Institute of Materials Science of MTF STU, Trnava (Slovakia); Yubero, David Canelo, E-mail: david.caneloyubero@tugraz.at [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Resel, Roland, E-mail: roland.resel@tugraz.at [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Groma, István, E-mail: groma@metal.elte.hu [Department of Materials Physics, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest (Hungary); Beal, Coline, E-mail: coline.beal@tugraz.at [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Sonderegger, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.sonderegger@tugraz.at [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Sommitsch, Christof, E-mail: christof.sommitsch@tugraz.at [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Poletti, Cecilia, E-mail: cecilia.poletti@tugraz.at [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    In this work we study the microstruture evolution of a newly developed 12% Cr martensitic/ferritic steel in as-received condition and after creep at 650 °C under 130 MPa and 80 MPa. The microstructure is described as consisting of mobile dislocations, dipole dislocations, boundary dislocations, precipitates, lath boundaries, block boundaries, packet boundaries and prior austenitic grain boundaries. The material is characterized employing light optical microscopy (LOM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). TEM is used to characterize the dislocations (mobile + dipole) inside the subgrains and XRD measurements are used to the characterize mobile dislocations. Based on the subgrain boundary misorientations obtained from EBSD measurements, the boundary dislocation density is estimated. The total dislocation density is estimated for the as-received and crept conditions adding the mobile, boundary and dipole dislocation densities. Additionally, the subgrain size is estimated from the EBSD measurements. In this publication we propose the use of three characterization techniques TEM, XRD and EBSD as necessary to characterize all type of dislocations and quantify the total dislocation densty in martensitic/ferritic steels. - Highlights: • Creep properties of a novel 12% Cr steel alloyed with Ta • Experimental characterization of different types of dislocations: mobile, dipole and boundary • Characterization and interpretation of the substructure evolution using unique combination of TEM, XRD and EBSD.

  13. On the cross-section of Dark Matter using substructure infall into galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, David; Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas D; Taylor, Andy; Pike, Simon R; Kay, Scott T; Lau, Erwin T; Nagai, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    We develop a statistical method to measure the interaction cross-section of Dark Matter, exploiting the continuous minor merger events in which small substructures fall into galaxy clusters. We find that by taking the ration of the distances between the galaxies and Dark Matter, and galaxies and gas in accreting sub-halos, we are able to calibrate and measure the Dark Matter self-interaction cross-section, remove any inherent line-of-sight projections. In order to interpret this ratio as a cross-section of Dark Matter we derive an analytical description of sub-halo infall which encompasses; the force of the main cluster potential, the drag on a gas sub-halo, a model for Dark Matter self-interactions and the resulting sub-halo drag, the force on the gas and galaxies due to the Dark Matter sub-halo potential, and finally the buoyancy on the gas and Dark Matter. We create mock observations from cosmological simulations of structure formation and find that collisionless Dark Matter becomes physically separated fr...

  14. Spectroscopic observations of evolving flare ribbon substructure suggesting origin in current sheet waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean R.; Longcope, Dana; Qiu, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    A flare ribbon is the chromospheric image of reconnection at a coronal current sheet. The dynamics and structure of the ribbon can thus reveal properties of the current sheet, including motion of the reconnecting flare loops. We present imaging and spectroscopic observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the evolution of a flare ribbon at high spatial resolution and time cadence. These reveal small-scale substructure in the ribbon, which manifest as oscillations in both position and Doppler velocities. We consider various alternative explanations for these oscillations, including modulation of chromospheric evaporation flows. Among these we find the best support for some form of elliptical wave localized to the coronal current sheet, such as a tearing mode or Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.IRIS is a NASA Small Explorer mission developed and operated by Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. This work is supported by contract 8100002702 from Lockheed Martin to Montana State University, a Montana Space Grant Consortium fellowship, and by NASA through HSR.

  15. Differential association with cellular substructures of pseudorabies virus DNA during early and late phases of replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Porat, T.; Veach, R.A.; Blankenship, M.L.; Kaplan, A.S.

    1984-12-01

    Pseudorabies virus DNA synthesis can be divided into two phases, early and late, which can be distinguished from each other on the basis of the structures of the replicating DNA. The two types of replicating virus DNA can also be distinguished from each other on the basis of the cellular substructures with which each is associated. Analysis by electron microscopic autoradiography showed that during the first round of replication, nascent virus DNA was found in the vicinity of the nuclear membrane; during later rounds of replication the nascent virus DNA was located centrally within the nucleus. The degree of association of virus DNA synthesized at early and late phases with the nuclear matrix fractions also differed; a larger proportion of late than of early nascent virus DNA was associated with this fraction. While nascent cellular DNA only was associated in significant amounts with the nuclear matrix fraction, a large part (up to 40%) of all the virus DNA remained associated with this fraction. However, no retention of specific virus proteins in this fraction was observed. Except for two virus proteins, which were preferentially extracted from the nuclear matrix, approximately 20% of all virus proteins remained in the nuclear matrix fraction. The large proportion of virus DNA associated with the nuclear fraction indicated that virus DNA may be intimately associated with some proteins.

  16. Ringed Substructure and a Gap at 1 AU in the Nearest Protoplanetary Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Sean M; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Birnstiel, Tilman; Carpenter, John M; Perez, Laura M; Bai, Xue-Ning; Oberg, Karin I; Hughes, A Meredith; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present long-baseline Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the 870 micron continuum emission from the nearest gas-rich protoplanetary disk, around TW Hya, that trace millimeter-sized particles down to spatial scales as small as 1 AU (20 mas). These data reveal a series of concentric ring-shaped substructures in the form of bright zones and narrow dark annuli (1-6 AU) with modest contrasts (5-30%). We associate these features with concentrations of solids that have had their inward radial drift slowed or stopped, presumably at local gas pressure maxima. No significant non-axisymmetric structures are detected. Some of the observed features occur near temperatures that may be associated with the condensation fronts of major volatile species, but the relatively small brightness contrasts may also be a consequence of magnetized disk evolution (the so-called zonal flows). Other features, particularly a narrow dark annulus located only 1 AU from the star, could indicate interactions...

  17. Strong lensing signatures of luminous structure and substructure in early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Keeton, Charles R; Nierenberg, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    The arrival times, positions, and fluxes of multiple images in strong lens systems can be used to infer the presence of dark subhalos in the deflector, and thus test predictions of cold dark matter models. However, gravitational lensing does not distinguish between perturbations to a smooth gravitational potential arising from baryonic and non-baryonic mass. In this work, we quantify the extent to which the stellar mass distribution of a deflector can reproduce flux ratio and astrometric anomalies typically associated with the presence of a dark matter subhalo. Using Hubble Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies, we simulate strong lens systems with real distributions of stellar mass as they would be observed at redshift $z_d=0.5$. We add a dark matter halo and external shear to account for the smooth dark matter field, omitting dark substructure, and use a Monte Carlo procedure to characterize the distributions of image positions, time delays, and flux ratios for a compact background source of diameter 5 ...

  18. Jet substructure classification in high-energy physics with deep neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Pierre; Bauer, Kevin; Eng, Clara; Sadowski, Peter; Whiteson, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    At the extreme energies of the Large Hadron Collider, massive particles can be produced at such high velocities that their hadronic decays are collimated and the resulting jets overlap. Deducing whether the substructure of an observed jet is due to a low-mass single particle or due to multiple decay objects of a massive particle is an important problem in the analysis of collider data. Traditional approaches have relied on expert features designed to detect energy deposition patterns in the calorimeter, but the complexity of the data make this task an excellent candidate for the application of machine learning tools. The data collected by the detector can be treated as a two-dimensional image, lending itself to the natural application of image classification techniques. In this work, we apply deep neural networks with a mixture of locally connected and fully connected nodes. Our experiments demonstrate that without the aid of expert features, such networks match or modestly outperform the current state-of-the-art approach for discriminating between jets from single hadronic particles and overlapping jets from pairs of collimated hadronic particles, and that such performance gains persist in the presence of pileup interactions.

  19. The Study of Substructures of Addiction Phenomena in High School Students Using Problem Finding Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi Meymandi, Manzumeh; Safizadeh, Hossein; Divsalar, Kouros; Rastegariyanzadeh, Ramin; Heravi, Gioia; Mahmoodi, Majid; Kheradmand, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background Addiction is one of the complicated problems in Iranian young population. The social and cultural dimensions of this social disease are less considered. So considering socio-cultural and environmental resources, this study investigated the substructures of addiction according to the viewpoints of high-school students of Kerman, Iran in 2007-2008. Methods This qualitative study accomplished in ten high schools through a one-day problem finding workshop and continued until data saturation. The resulted terms and phrases were analyzed by content analysis. To assure about the validity and reliability, the outputs reviewed by workshops participants, and classification and codification of the data were executed separately by two experts. Findings A total of 212 students, 45.3% girls and 54.7% boys, participated in the study. The students introduced the followings as the addiction substantial fundaments: lack of knowledge, positive attitude and interpretation of addiction as a value, family or friends' habit, economy status, psycho-personality problems and availability. Rules infirmity or non-implementation of the current rules enforcement, geographical status and addiction as a conspiracy were also observed in students’ statements. Conclusion The positive attitudes and historical roots of addiction along with the process of changing the values caused the growth of drug addiction in young population which could neutralize the security measures, legislations policy and even the knowledge. Therefore, intensification of personal protective factors and culturalization addressed for improving inner layers of values are recommended. PMID:24494110

  20. The importance of the cosmic web and halo substructure for power spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Francesco; Bacon, David J; Crittenden, Robert; Percival, Will J

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study the relevance of the cosmic web and substructures on the matter and lensing power spectra measured from halo mock catalogues extracted from the N-body simulations. Since N-body simulations are computationally expensive, it is common to use faster methods that approximate the dark matter field as a set of halos. In this approximation, we replace mass concentrations in N-body simulations by a spherically symmetric Navarro-Frenk-White halo density profile. We also consider the full mass field as the sum of two distinct fields: dark matter halos ($M>9\\times 10^{12}~M_{\\odot}$/h) and particles not included into halos. Mock halos reproduce well the matter power spectrum, but underestimate the lensing power spectrum on large and small scales. For sources at $z_{\\rm s}=1$ the lensing power spectrum is underestimated by up to 40% at $\\ell\\approx 10^4$ with respect to the simulated halos. The large scale effect can be alleviated by combining the mock catalogue with the dark matter distribution out...

  1. The LHC Search for The CP-odd Higgs by The Jet Substructure Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ning; Liu, Yandong; Liu, Zuowei

    2014-01-01

    The LHC searches for the CP-odd Higgs boson is studied (with masses from 300 GeV to 1 TeV) in the context of the general two-Higgs-doublet model. With the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson at the LHC, we highlight one promising discovery channel of the hZ. This channel can become significant after the global signal fitting to the 125 GeV Higgs boson in the general two-Higgs-doublet model. It is particularly important in the scenario where two CP-even Higgs bosons in the two-Higgs-doublet model have the common mass of 125 GeV. Since the final states involve a Standard-Model-like Higgs boson, we apply the jet substructure analysis of the fat Higgs jet in order to eliminate the Standard Model background sufficiently. After performing the kinematic cuts, we present the LHC search sensitivities for the CP-odd Higgs boson with mass up to 1 TeV via this channel.

  2. On the sound insulation of acoustic metasurface using a sub-structuring approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Lu, Zhenbo; Cheng, Li; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-08-01

    The feasibility of using an acoustic metasurface (AMS) with acoustic stop-band property to realize sound insulation with ventilation function is investigated. An efficient numerical approach is proposed to evaluate its sound insulation performance. The AMS is excited by a reverberant sound source and the standardized sound reduction index (SRI) is numerically investigated. To facilitate the modeling, the coupling between the AMS and the adjacent acoustic fields is formulated using a sub-structuring approach. A modal based formulation is applied to both the source and receiving room, enabling an efficient calculation in the frequency range from 125 Hz to 2000 Hz. The sound pressures and the velocities at the interface are matched by using a transfer function relation based on ;patches;. For illustration purposes, numerical examples are investigated using the proposed approach. The unit cell constituting the AMS is constructed in the shape of a thin acoustic chamber with tailored inner structures, whose stop-band property is numerically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated. The AMS is shown to provide effective sound insulation of over 30 dB in the stop-band frequencies from 600 to 1600 Hz. It is also shown that the proposed approach has the potential to be applied to a broad range of AMS studies and optimization problems.

  3. Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-07-01

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  4. Comparative in vitro activity of carbapenems against major Gram-negative pathogens: results of Asia-Pacific surveillance from the COMPACT II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Chongthaleong, Anan; Tan, Thean Yen; Lagamayo, Evelina; Roberts, Sally; Garcia, Jemelyn; Davies, Todd

    2012-04-01

    Resistance rates amongst Gram-negative pathogens are increasing in the Asia-Pacific region. The Comparative Activity of Carbapenem Testing (COMPACT) II study surveyed the carbapenem susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of doripenem, imipenem and meropenem against 1260 major Gram-negative pathogens isolated from hospitalised patients at 20 centres in five Asia-Pacific countries (New Zealand, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam) during 2010. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=625), Enterobacteriaceae (n=500), and other Gram-negative pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii (n=135) were collected from patients with bloodstream infection (32.2%), nosocomial pneumonia including ventilator-associated pneumonia (58.1%), and complicated intra-abdominal infection (9.7%), with 36.7% being isolated from patients in an Intensive Care Unit. As high as 29.8% of P. aeruginosa and 73.0% of A. baumannii isolates were not susceptible to at least a carbapenem, whereas the majority of Enterobacteriaceae (97.2%) were susceptible to all carbapenems. Respective MIC(50)/MIC(90) values (MICs for 50% and 90% of the organisms, respectively) of doripenem, imipenem and meropenem were: 0.38/8, 1.5/32 and 0.38/16 mg/L for P. aeruginosa; 0.023/0.094, 0.25/0.5 and 0.032/0.094 mg/L for Enterobacteriaceae; and 32/64, 32/128 and 32/64 mg/L for A. baumannii. Doripenem and meropenem had comparable activity against P. aeruginosa, both being more active than imipenem. All carbapenems were highly potent against Enterobacteriaceae, although imipenem demonstrated higher MIC values than doripenem and meropenem. The three carbapenems showed less activity against A. baumannii. The high prevalence of carbapenem resistance amongst important nosocomial pathogens (P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii) warrants rigorous infection control measures and appropriate antimicrobial use in the Asia-Pacific region.

  5. Comparing the Performance of Hybrid Capture II and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for the Identification of Cervical Dysplasia in the Screening and Diagnostic Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Hung N; Adler-Storthz, Karen; Dillon, Laura M; Follen, Michele; Scheurer, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Both PCR and Hybrid Capture II (HCII) have been used for identifying cervical dysplasia; however, comparisons on the performance between these two tests show inconsistent results. We evaluated the performance of HCII and PCR MY09/11 in both screening and diagnostic populations in sub-sample of 1,675 non-pregnant women from a cohort in three clinical centers in the United States and Canada. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and concordance between the two tests were calculated. Specificity of HCII in detecting low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) was higher in the screening group (88.7%; 95% CI: 86.2%-90.8%) compared to the diagnostic group (46.3%; 95% CI: 42.1%-50.6%); however, specificity of PCR was low in both the screening (32.8%; 95% CI: 29.6%-36.2%) and diagnostic (14.4%; 95% CI: 11.6%-17.6%) groups. There was comparable sensitivity by both tests in both groups to detect high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL); however, HCII was more specific (89.1%; 95% CI: 86.8%-91.0%; 66.2%; 95% CI: 62.0%-70.1%) than PCR (33.3%; 95% CI: 30.2%-36.5%; 17.9%; 95% CI: 14.8%-21.6%) in the screening and diagnostic groups, respectively. Overall agreement for HPV positivity was approximately 50% between HCII and PCR MY09/11; with more positive results coming from the PCR MY09/11. In the current study, PCR MY09/11 was more sensitive but less specific than HCII in detecting LSIL, and HCII was more sensitive and specific in detecting HSIL than PCR in both screening and diagnostic groups.

  6. Estudo Comparativo dos Resultados Maternos e Perinatais entre Pacientes com Diabetes Pré-gestacional Tipo I e Tipo II Comparative Study of Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes among Patients with Pregestational Type I and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheline Monte de Carvalho

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: avaliar a evolução da gestação, controle metabólico e resultados perinatais de pacientes diabéticas pré-gestacionais e fazer um estudo comparativo entre os resultados de pacientes com diabetes insulino-dependente e não-insulino-dependente. Métodos: análise retrospectiva de prontuários de 57 pacientes com diagnóstico de diabetes pré-gestacional que iniciaram pré-natal no Serviço de Medicina Materno-Fetal da Maternidade-Escola Assis Chateaubriand da Universidade Federal do Ceará, no período de janeiro 1995 a dezembro de 1998. As 57 grávidas incluídas no estudo foram divididas em dois grupos: grupo I, composto de 28 pacientes portadoras de diabetes insulino-dependente (tipo I, e grupo II, com 29 gestantes com diabetes não-insulino-dependente (tipo II controladas com dieta ou com hipoglicemiante oral antes da gestação. Resultados: não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os dois grupos em relação à necessidade de internamento para controle glicêmico (39,2% x 27,5% e complicações maternas, tais como: hipertensão arterial crônica (14,2% x 27,5%, doença hipertensiva específica da gravidez (14,2% x 17,2%, amniorrexe prematura (3,5% x 10,3%, infecção do trato urinário (10,7% x 6,8% e trabalho de parto prematuro (3,5% x 6,8%. Foi observado, porém, maior número de episódios de hipoglicemia materna entre as pacientes insulino-dependentes (35,7% x 3,4%. Os resultados perinatais foram semelhantes. Observamos elevados índices de malformações e morbimortalidade perinatal. Conclusão: não houve diferença na incidência de intercorrências clínicas e obstétricas entre as pacientes insulino-dependentes e não-insulino-dependentes, excluindo-se hipoglicemia materna.Purpose: to evaluate the evolution of gestation, metabolic control and perinatal outcome of pregestational diabetic patients and to perform a comparative study of the results of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes (type I and

  7. Updates on the treatment of essential hypertension: a summary of AHRQ's comparative effectiveness review of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and direct renin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Benjamin; Greene, Laurence; Balfe, Lisa M

    2011-10-01

    In 2007, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) published a comparative effectiveness review (CER) on the benefits and risks of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for treating essential hypertension in adults. The main findings indicated that the 2 classes of antihypertensive medications caused similar reductions in blood pressure, although higher rates of adverse events, especially cough, were reported by patients treated with ACEIs. In addition, the 2007 review indicated no treatment related differences in lipid levels, glycemic control, or progression of kidney disease among the agents. Since 2007, 39 relevant studies have been published that compare outcomes for adults treated with ACEIs versus ARBs or a drug in one of these 2 classes versus a direct renin inhibitor (DRI). To systematically analyze findings from the new research, AHRQ commissioned and, in June 2011, published an updated comparative effectiveness review on the benefits and risks of agents that target the renin-angiotensin- aldosterone system (RAAS), specifically ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs. To (a) familiarize health care professionals with the methods and findings from AHRQ's 2011 comparative effectiveness review on ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs for adults with essential hypertension; (b) provide commentary and encourage consideration of the clinical and managed care applications of the review findings; and (c) identify limitations to the existing research on the benefits and risks of ACEIs, ARBs, and DRIs. Consistent with the findings from AHRQ's 2007 report, the 2011 update indicated no overall differences in blood pressure control, mortality rates, and major cardiovascular events in patients treated with ACEIs versus ARBs. With a low strength of evidence, 2 studies reported a small significantly greater blood pressure reduction for patients treated with the DRI aliskiren versus the ACEI ramipril. Studies evaluating the DRI aliskiren

  8. Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers in Terms of Major Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Elderly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chao, Pei-Wen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lee, Yi-Jung; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chu, Hsi; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renin and aldosterone activity levels are low in elderly patients, raising concerns about the benefits and risks of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) use. However, data from direct comparisons of the effects of ACEIs on ARBs in the elderly population remain inconclusive. In this nationwide study, all patients aged ≥ 70 years were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database for the period 2000 to 2009 and were followed up until the end of 2010. The ARB cohort (12,347 patients who continuously used ARBs for ≥ 90 days) was matched to ACEI cohort using high-dimensional propensity score (hdPS). Intention-to-treat (ITT) and as-treated (AT) analyses were conducted. In the ITT analysis, after considering death as a competing risk, the ACEI cohort had similar risks of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio [HR] 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–1.06), ischemic stroke (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.90–1.07), and heart failure (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.83–1.04) compared with the ARB cohort. No difference in adverse effects, such as acute kidney injury (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89–1.09) and hyperkalemia (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.87–1.20), was observed between cohorts. AT analysis produced similar results to those of ITT analysis. We were unable to demonstrate a survival difference between cohorts (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88–1.21) after considering drug discontinuation as a competing risk in AT analysis. Our study supports the notion that ACEI and ARB users have similar risks of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), even in elderly populations. PMID:26512568

  9. Lactase persistence-related genetic variant: population substructure and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, George Davey; Lawlor, Debbie A; Timpson, Nic J; Baban, Jamil; Kiessling, Matt; Day, Ian N M; Ebrahim, Shah

    2009-03-01

    Lactase persistence is an autosomal-dominant trait that is common in European-derived populations. A basic tendency for lactase persistence to increase from the southeast to the northwest across European populations has been noted, but such trends within countries have not been extensively studied. We genotyped the C/T(-13910) variant (rs4988235) that constitutes the putatively causal allele for lactase persistence (T allele representing persistence) in a general population sample of 3344 women aged 60-79 years from 23 towns across Britain. We found an overall frequency of 0.253 for the C (lactase non-persistence) allele, but with considerable gradients of decreasing frequency from the south to the north and from the east to the west of Britain for this allele. Daily sunlight was positively related to C (non-persistence) allele prevalence. However, sunlight exposure and latitude are strongly correlated, and it was not possible to identify which is the primary factor statistically underlying the distribution of lactase persistence. The C/T(-13910) variant (rs4988235) was not related to drinking milk or bone health (although drinking milk itself was protective of bone health), and was essentially unrelated to a wide range of other lifestyle, health and demographic characteristics. One exception was general health being rated as being poor or fair, for which there was an odds ratio of 1.38 (1.04, 1.84) for women homozygous for the C allele; on adjustment for latitude and longitude of place of birth, this attenuated to 1.19 (0.87, 1.64). The lactase persistence variant could contribute to the examination of data for the existence of, and then statistical control for, population substructure in genetic association studies.

  10. Strong lensing signatures of luminous structure and substructure in early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Daniel; Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso; Keeton, Charles R.; Nierenberg, Anna M.

    2017-01-01

    The arrival times, positions, and fluxes of multiple images in strong lens systems can be used to infer the presence of dark subhalos in the deflector, and thus test predictions of cold dark matter models. However, gravitational lensing does not distinguish between perturbations to a smooth gravitational potential arising from baryonic and non-baryonic mass. In this work, we quantify the extent to which the stellar mass distribution of a deflector can reproduce flux ratio and astrometric anomalies typically associated with the presence of a dark matter subhalo. Using Hubble Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies, we simulate strong lens systems with real distributions of stellar mass as they would be observed at redshift zd = 0.5. We add a dark matter halo and external shear to account for the smooth dark matter field, omitting dark substructure, and use a Monte Carlo procedure to characterize the distributions of image positions, time delays, and flux ratios for a compact background source of diameter 5 pc. By convolving high-resolution images of real galaxies with a Gaussian PSF, we simulate the most detailed smooth potential one could construct given high quality data, and find scatter in flux ratios of ≈10%, which we interpret as a typical deviation from a smooth potential caused by large and small scale structure in the lensing galaxy. We demonstrate that the flux ratio anomalies arising from galaxy-scale baryonic structure can be minimized by selecting the most massive and round deflectors, and by simultaneously modeling flux ratio and astrometric data.

  11. ProteMiner-SSM: a web server for efficient analysis of similar protein tertiary substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Darby Tien-Hau; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chung, Wen-Chin; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of protein–ligand interactions is a fundamental issue in drug design. As the detailed and accurate analysis of protein–ligand interactions involves calculation of binding free energy based on thermodynamics and even quantum mechanics, which is highly expensive in terms of computing time, conformational and structural analysis of proteins and ligands has been widely employed as a screening process in computer-aided drug design. In this paper, a web server called ProteMiner-SSM designed for efficient analysis of similar protein tertiary substructures is presented. In one experiment reported in this paper, the web server has been exploited to obtain some clues about a biochemical hypothesis. The main distinction in the software design of the web server is the filtering process incorporated to expedite the analysis. The filtering process extracts the residues located in the caves of the protein tertiary structure for analysis and operates with O(nlogn) time complexity, where n is the number of residues in the protein. In comparison, the α-hull algorithm, which is a widely used algorithm in computer graphics for identifying those instances that are on the contour of a three-dimensional object, features O(n2) time complexity. Experimental results show that the filtering process presented in this paper is able to speed up the analysis by a factor ranging from 3.15 to 9.37 times. The ProteMiner-SSM web server can be found at http://proteminer.csie.ntu.edu.tw/. There is a mirror site at http://p4.sbl.bc.sinica.edu.tw/proteminer/. PMID:15215355

  12. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenwirth, C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Drexler, S.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); Girst, S.; Reindl, J. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Walsh, D.W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Friedl, A.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); and others

    2015-04-01

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future.

  13. Weak lensing study of 16 DAFT/FADA clusters: Substructures and filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Nicolas; Clowe, Douglas; Durret, Florence; Adami, Christophe; Acebrón, Ana; Hernandez-García, Lorena; Márquez, Isabel; Guennou, Loic; Sarron, Florian; Ulmer, Mel

    2016-05-01

    While our current cosmological model places galaxy clusters at the nodes of a filament network (the cosmic web), we still struggle to detect these filaments at high redshifts. We perform a weak lensing study for a sample of 16 massive, medium-high redshift (0.4 detection with noise resampling techniques. Taking advantage of the large field of view of our data, we study cluster environment, adding information from galaxy density maps at the cluster redshift and from X-ray images when available. We find that clusters show a large variety of weak lensing maps at large scales and that they may all be embedded in filamentary structures at megaparsec scale. We classify these clusters in three categories according to the smoothness of their weak lensing contours and to the amount of substructures: relaxed (~7%), past mergers (~21.5%), and recent or present mergers (~71.5%). The fraction of clusters undergoing merging events observationally supports the hierarchical scenario of cluster growth, and implies that massive clusters are strongly evolving at the studied redshifts. Finally, we report the detection of unusually elongated structures in CLJ0152, MACSJ0454, MACSJ0717, A851, BMW1226, MACSJ1621, and MS1621. This study is based on observations obtained with MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/IRFU, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. The study is also based on archive data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. This research made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive provided by the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC) and data obtained from the XMM-Newton Data Archive provided by the XMM-Newton Science Archive (XSA).

  14. Probing deformation substructure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and dislocation dynamics modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hofmann, Felix; Song, Xu; Eve, Sophie; Collins, Steve P

    2010-09-01

    Materials characterization at the nano-scale is motivated by the desire to resolve the structural aspects and deformation behavior at length scales relevant to those mechanisms that define the novel and unusual properties of nano-structured materials. A range of novel techniques has recently become accessible with the help of synchrotron X-ray beams that can be focused down to spot sizes of less than a few microns on the sample. The unique combination of tunability (energy selection), parallelism and brightness of synchrotron X-ray beams allows their use for high resolution diffraction (determination of crystal structure and transformations, analysis of dislocation sub-structures, orientation and texture analysis, strain mapping); small angle X-ray scattering (analysis of nano-scale voids and defects; orientation analysis) and imaging (radiography and tomography). After a brief review of the state-of-the-art capabilities for monochromatic and white beam synchrotron diffraction, we consider the usefulness of these techniques for the task of bridging the gap between experiment and modeling. Namely, we discuss how the experiments can be configured to provide